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Sample records for wave effect enabling

  1. Wave Manipulation in Metamaterials: A LEGO® Bricks Enabled Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    In this work, we show how simple, reconfigurable arrangements of LEGO® bricks can be turned into the building blocks of an experimental platform for the investigation of wave phenomena in metamaterial architectures. The approach involves the assembly of reconfigurable specimens consisting of patterns of bricks on a baseplate and the use of a 3D laser vibrometer to reconstruct global and local wave features. The ability to seamlessly transition between different topologies makes this an effective approach for rapid experimental verification and proof of concept in the arena of mechanical metamaterials engineering. The intuitive nature of the brick-and-baseplate assembly paradigm can also be leveraged to implement families of intuitive lab demonstrations with significant didactic and scientific outreach potential. The versatility of the platform is tested through a series of experiments that illustrate a variety of wave manipulation effects, such as waveguiding and seismic isolation, both in periodic and disordered topologies. We acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation (Grant CMMI-1266089).

  2. Regulatory effects of terahertz waves

    OpenAIRE

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk; Alexey N. Ivanov

    2013-01-01

    There are modern data about biological effects of terahertz (THz) waves in this article. Items of interaction of THz waves with bio objects of different organization level. A complex of the data indicates that the realization of a THz wave effect in biosystems is possible at molecular, cellular, tissular, organ and system levels of regulation. There are data about changes in nervous and humoral regulation of an organism and metabolic effects of THz waves.

  3. Review on Millimeter Wave Antennas- Potential Candidate for 5G Enabled Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Matin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The millimeter wave (mmWave band is considered as the potential candidate for high speed communication services in 5G networks due to its huge bandwidth. Moreover, mmWave frequencies lead to miniaturization of RF front end including antennas. In this article, we provide an overview of recent research achievements of millimeter-wave antenna design along with the design considerations for compact antennas and antennas in package/on chip, mostly in the 60 GHz band is described along with their inherent benefits and challenges. A comparative analysis of various designs is also presented. The antennas with wide bandwidth, high-gain, compact size and low profile with easiness of integration in-package or on-chip with other components are required for 5G enabled applications.

  4. Modulation of orthogonal body waves enables high maneuverability in sidewinding locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, Henry C; Gong, Chaohui; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Serrano, Miguel M; Vela, Patricio A; Choset, Howie; Mendelson, Joseph R; Hu, David L; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-05-12

    Many organisms move using traveling waves of body undulation, and most work has focused on single-plane undulations in fluids. Less attention has been paid to multiplane undulations, which are particularly important in terrestrial environments where vertical undulations can regulate substrate contact. A seemingly complex mode of snake locomotion, sidewinding, can be described by the superposition of two waves: horizontal and vertical body waves with a phase difference of ± 90°. We demonstrate that the high maneuverability displayed by sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) emerges from the animal's ability to independently modulate these waves. Sidewinder rattlesnakes used two distinct turning methods, which we term differential turning (26° change in orientation per wave cycle) and reversal turning (89°). Observations of the snakes suggested that during differential turning the animals imposed an amplitude modulation in the horizontal wave whereas in reversal turning they shifted the phase of the vertical wave by 180°. We tested these mechanisms using a multimodule snake robot as a physical model, successfully generating differential and reversal turning with performance comparable to that of the organisms. Further manipulations of the two-wave system revealed a third turning mode, frequency turning, not observed in biological snakes, which produced large (127°) in-place turns. The two-wave system thus functions as a template (a targeted motor pattern) that enables complex behaviors in a high-degree-of-freedom system to emerge from relatively simple modulations to a basic pattern. Our study reveals the utility of templates in understanding the control of biological movement as well as in developing control schemes for limbless robots.

  5. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  6. Module integration and amplifier design optimization for optically enabled passive millimeter-wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Andrew A.; Martin, Richard D.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Shi, Shouyuan; Zhang, Yifei; Yao, Peng; Shreve, Kevin P.; Dillon, Thomas E.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Harrity, Charles E.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2016-05-01

    This paper will discuss the development of a millimeter-wave (mm-wave) receiver module used in a sparse array passive imaging system. Using liquid crystal polymer (LCP) technology and low power InP low noise amplifiers (LNA), enables the integration of the digital circuitry along with the RF components onto a single substrate significantly improves the size, weight, power, and cost (SWaP-C) of the mm-wave receiver module compared to previous iterations of the module. Also comparing with previous generation modules, the operating frequency has been pushed from 77 GHz to 95 GHz in order to improve the resolution of the captured image from the sparse array imaging system.

  7. Enabling practical surface acoustic wave nebulizer drug delivery via amplitude modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksa, Anushi; Qi, Aisha; Yeo, Leslie Y; Coppel, Ross; Friend, James R

    2014-06-07

    A practical, commercially viable microfluidic device relies upon the miniaturization and integration of all its components--including pumps, circuitry, and power supply--onto a chip-based platform. Surface acoustic waves (SAW) have become popular in microfluidic manipulation, in solving the problems of microfluidic manipulation, but practical applications employing SAW still require more power than available via a battery. Introducing amplitude modulation at 0.5-40 kHz in SAW nebulization, which requires the highest energy input levels of all known SAW microfluidic processes, halves the power required to 1.5 W even while including the power in the sidebands, suitable for small lithium ion batteries, and maintains the nebulization rate, size, and size distributions vital to drug inhalation therapeutics. This simple yet effective means to enable an integrated SAW microfluidics device for nebulization exploits the relatively slow hydrodynamics and is furthermore shown to deliver shear-sensitive biomolecules--plasmid DNA and antibodies as exemplars of future pulmonary gene and vaccination therapies--undamaged in the nebulized mist. Altogether, the approach demonstrates a means to offer truly micro-scale microfluidics devices in a handheld, battery powered SAW nebulization device.

  8. Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Node Enabled by a Duck-Shaped Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Water Wave Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam

    2016-12-08

    This paper presents a fully enclosed duck-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for effectively scavenging energy from random and low-frequency water waves. The design of the TENG incorporates the freestanding rolling mode and the pitch motion of a duck-shaped structure generated by incident waves. By investigating the material and structural features, a unit of the TENG device is successfully designed. Furthermore, a hybrid system is constructed using three units of the TENG device. The hybrid system achieves an instantaneous peak current of 65.5 µA with an instantaneous output power density of up to 1.366 W m−2. Following the design, a fluid–solid interaction analysis is carried out on one duck-shaped TENG to understand the dynamic behavior, mechanical efficiency, and stability of the device under various water wave conditions. In addition, the hybrid system is experimentally tested to enable a commercial wireless temperature sensor node. In summary, the unique duck-shaped TENG shows a simple, cost-effective, environmentally friendly, light-weight, and highly stable system. The newly designed TENG is promising for building a network of generators to harvest existing blue energy in oceans, lakes, and rivers.

  9. Detection of Short-Waved Spin Waves in Individual Microscopic Spin-Wave Waveguides Using the Inverse Spin Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brächer, T; Fabre, M; Meyer, T; Fischer, T; Auffret, S; Boulle, O; Ebels, U; Pirro, P; Gaudin, G

    2017-12-13

    The miniaturization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices becomes increasingly difficult due to fundamental limitations and the increase of leakage currents. Large research efforts are devoted to find alternative concepts that allow for a larger data-density and lower power consumption than conventional semiconductor approaches. Spin waves have been identified as a potential technology that can complement and outperform CMOS in complex logic applications, profiting from the fact that these waves enable wave computing on the nanoscale. The practical application of spin waves, however, requires the demonstration of scalable, CMOS compatible spin-wave detection schemes in material systems compatible with standard spintronics as well as semiconductor circuitry. Here, we report on the wave-vector independent detection of short-waved spin waves with wavelengths down to 150 nm by the inverse spin Hall effect in spin-wave waveguides made from ultrathin Ta/Co 8 Fe 72 B 20 /MgO. These findings open up the path for miniaturized scalable interconnects between spin waves and CMOS and the use of ultrathin films made from standard spintronic materials in magnonics.

  10. Multi-sample immunoassay inside optical fiber capillary enabled by evanescent wave detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel evanescent wave-based (EW microfluidic capillary fiber-optic biosensor (MCFOB has been developed using capillaries as a transducer embedded in a multichannel device to enhance the collection efficiency of the fluorescence signal. The capillary serves dual roles as a waveguide and a container, enabling more straightforward, consistent, and compact biosensor packaging compared to conventional optical fiber biosensors and microfluidic systems. In order to detect multiple samples in one device, the biosensor incorporates a polydimethysiloxane (PDMS multi-channel device, which also serves as cladding for the biosensor. In addition, this biosensor only consumes 10 μl of a sample and does not require hydrofluoric acid etching in the fabrication process. The orientation for signal collection is optimized by comparing the lateral and normal signal directions for detected glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. C-reactive protein (CRP is used to validate the MCFOB, and the limit of detection (LOD for CRP in the MCFOB is 1.94 ng/ml (74 pM. Moreover, the real-time measurement is demonstrated to verify that the evanescent wave is the only exciting light source in the MCFOB, which gives the potential for real-time measurement applications.

  11. Manipulating Effective Gravity and Trapping Shallow Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareei, Ahmad; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-11-01

    A perfect manipulation of water waves in shallow water using transformation media methods usually requires changes in both water depth and gravitational acceleration as medium properties; however gravitational acceleration is always a physical constant. Reduced models and conformal transformations are used to keep the gravitational acceleration as a constant at the cost of performance and restriction of use. Here we present a novel method of changing effective gravitational acceleration using a visco-elastic bottom topography. This method of manipulating effective gravitational acceleration, beside changes in bottom topography, opens new applications toward controlling surface waves and enables perfect manipulation of water waves in a broad range of frequencies. Using the visco-elastic bottom topography, we present a GRIN-lens based wave-guide that traps water waves in a region along the axis of the lens. The presented method of manipulating effective gravitational acceleration can as well be applied to perfectly focus and rotate the waves for energy harvesting applications.

  12. A Guided Wave Sensor Enabling Simultaneous Wavenumber-Frequency Analysis for Both Lamb and Shear-Horizontal Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baiyang; Cho, Hwanjeong; Lissenden, Cliff J

    2017-03-01

    Guided waves in plate-like structures have been widely investigated for structural health monitoring. Lamb waves and shear horizontal (SH) waves, two commonly used types of waves in plates, provide different benefits for the detection of various types of defects and material degradation. However, there are few sensors that can detect both Lamb and SH waves and also resolve their modal content, namely the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. A sensor that can detect both waves is desirable to take full advantage of both types of waves in order to improve sensitivity to different discontinuity geometries. We demonstrate that polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film provides the basis for a multi-element array sensor that detects both Lamb and SH waves and also measures their modal content, i.e., the wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  13. Short wave breaking effects on low frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.; Roelvink, J.A.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; McCall, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of short wave breaking on low frequency waves is investigated using two breaker formulations implemented in a time-dependent numerical model (XBeach): (1) an advective-deterministic approach (ADA) and (2) the probabilistic breaker formulation of Roelvink (1993). Previous research has

  14. W-Band Millimeter-Wave Vector Signal Generation Based on Precoding-Assisted Random Photonic Frequency Tripling Scheme Enabled by Phase Modulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xinying; Xu, Yuming; Xiao, Jiangnan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    We propose W-band photonic millimeter-wave (mm-wave) vector signal generation employing a precoding-assisted random frequency tripling scheme enabled by a single phase modulator cascaded with a wavelength selective switch (WSS...

  15. Time Travel: The Role of Temporality in Enabling Semantic Waves in Secondary School Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matruglio, Erika; Maton, Karl; Martin, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the theoretical understandings from Legitimation Code Theory (Maton, 2013) and Systemic Functional Linguistics (Martin, 2013) underpinning the research discussed in this special issue, this paper focuses on classroom pedagogy to illustrate an important strategy for making semantic waves in History teaching, namely "temporal shifting". We…

  16. Acoustic wave coupled magnetoelectric effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.S. [Institute of information Engineering, Suqian College, Suqian 223800 (China); Magnetoelectronic Laboratory, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, N., E-mail: zhangning@njnu.edu.cn [Magnetoelectronic Laboratory, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. Longitudinal and transversal ME effects of larger than 44 and 6 (V cm{sup −1} Oe{sup −1}) were obtained with the waveguide-coupled ME device, respectively. Several resonant points were observed in the range of frequency lower than 47 kHz. Analysis showed that the standing waves in the waveguide were responsible for those resonances. The frequency and size dependence of the ME effects were investigated. A resonant condition about the geometrical size of the waveguide was obtained. Theory and experiments showed the resonant frequencies were closely influenced by the diameter and length of the waveguide. A series of double-peak curves of longitudinal magnetoelectric response were obtained, and their significance was discussed initially. - Highlights: • Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. • The frequency and size dependence of the ME effects were investigated. • A resonant condition about the geometrical size of the waveguide was obtained. • A series of double-peak curves of longitudinal magnetoelectric response were obtained, and their significance was discussed initially.

  17. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Ibere; Mohapatra, Sonali [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration. (orig.)

  18. Enabling a new degree of wave control with metamaterials: a personal perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alù, Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2017-08-01

    Metamaterials represent an exciting area of research, which has rapidly evolved in the past two decades from basic research to applied technology, and it now encompasses a broad range of scientific communities, with continuous and exciting scientific progress. Our personal journey in the field of artificial materials and metamaterials spans over many years, and has brought us through an exciting adventure in the theoretical understanding of wave interactions with materials, with several implications for new devices and components for radio-wave, infrared, optical and acoustic technology. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of some highlights of our contribution to this area of research, looking forward to several exciting opportunities for further scientific and technical progress in this area of science and technology.

  19. Manipulating waves by distilling frequencies: a tunable shunt-enabled rainbow trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, Davide; Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose and test a strategy for tunable, broadband wave attenuation in electromechanical waveguides with shunted piezoelectric inclusions. Our strategy is built upon the vast pre-existing literature on vibration attenuation and bandgap generation in structures featuring periodic arrays of piezo patches, but distinguishes itself for several key features. First, we demystify the idea that periodicity is a requirement for wave attenuation and bandgap formation. We further embrace the idea of ‘organized disorder’ by tuning the circuits as to resonate at distinct neighboring frequencies. In doing so, we create a tunable ‘rainbow trap’ (Tsakmakidis et al 2007 Nature 450 397-401) capable of attenuating waves with broadband characteristics, by distilling (sequentially) seven frequencies from a traveling wavepacket. Finally, we devote considerable attention to the implications in terms of packet distortion of the spectral manipulation introduced by shunting. This work is also meant to serve as a didactic tool for those approaching the field of shunted piezoelectrics, and attempts to provide a different perspective, with abundant details, on how to successfully design an experimental setup involving resistive-inductive shunts.

  20. Enabling technologies for millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber systems in next generation heterogeneous mobile access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Wang, Jing; Xu, Mu; Cheng, Lin; Lu, Feng; Shen, Shuyi; Yan, Yan; Cho, Hyunwoo; Guidotti, Daniel; Chang, Gee-kung

    2017-01-01

    Fifth-generation (5G) wireless access network promises to support higher access data rate with more than 1,000 times capacity with respect to current long-term evolution (LTE) systems. New radio-access-technologies (RATs) based on higher carrier frequencies to millimeter-wave (MMW) radio-over-fiber, and carrier-aggregation (CA) using multi-band resources are intensively studied to support the high data rate access and effectively use of frequency resources in heterogeneous mobile network (Het-Net). In this paper, we investigate several enabling technologies for MMW RoF systems in 5G Het-Net. Efficient mobile fronthaul (MFH) solutions for 5G centralized radio access network (C-RAN) and beyond are proposed, analyzed and experimentally demonstrated based on the analog scheme. Digital predistortion based on memory polynomial for analog MFH linearization are presented with improved EVM performances and receiver sensitivity. We also propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel inter-/intra- RAT CA scheme for 5G Het- Net. The real-time standard 4G-LTE signal is carrier-aggregated with three broadband 60GHz MMW signals based on proposed optical-domain band-mapping method. RATs based on new waveforms have also been studied here to achieve higher spectral-efficiency (SE) in asynchronous environments. Full-duplex asynchronous quasi-gapless carrier aggregation scheme for MMW ROF inter-/intra-RAT based on the FBMC is also presented with 4G-LTE signals. Compared with OFDM-based signals with large guard-bands, FBMC achieves higher spectral-efficiency with better EVM performance at less received power and smaller guard-bands.

  1. Study of MHD Effects on Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Ji, H.; Pace, D.; Rappaport, H.

    2001-10-01

    The liquid metal experiment (LMX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has been constructed to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on the propagation of surface waves in liquid metals in an imposed horizontal magnetic field. The physics of liquid metal is of interest generally as a regime of small magnetic Reynolds number MHD and more specifically contributes basic knowledge to the applications of liquid lithium walls in a fusion reactor. Surface waves are driven by a wave driver controlled by a PC-based Labview system. A non-invasive diagnostic measures surface fluctuations at multiple locations accurately by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface and onto a screen recorded by an ICCD camera. The real part of the dispersion relation has been measured precisely and agrees well with a linear theory, revealing the role of surface oxidation. Experiments have also confirmed that a transverse magnetic field does not affect wave propagation, and have qualitatively observed MHD damping (a non-zero imaginary component of the dispersion relation) of waves propagating in a parallel magnetic field. Planned upgrades to LMX will enable quantitative measurement of this MHD damping rate as well as experiments on two-dimensional waves and nonlinear waves. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed.

  2. On the effects of wave steepness on higher order Stokes waves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of wave steepness on higher order finite amplitude Stokes waves is investigated analytically and numerically. It is shown that the phase speed increases as the wave steepness increases thereby initiating the wave instabilities. As the order increases, the phase speed also increases .However, the impact of wave ...

  3. The VERCE Science Gateway: Enabling User Friendly HPC Seismic Wave Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarotti, E.; Spinuso, A.; Matser, J.; Leong, S. H.; Magnoni, F.; Krause, A.; Garcia, C. R.; Muraleedharan, V.; Krischer, L.; Anthes, C.

    2014-12-01

    The EU-funded project VERCE (Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community in Europe) aims to deploy technologies which satisfy the HPC and data-intensive requirements of modern seismology.As a result of VERCE official collaboration with the EU project SCI-BUS, access to computational resources, like local clusters and international infrastructures (EGI and PRACE), is made homogeneous and integrated within a dedicated science gateway based on the gUSE framework. In this presentation we give a detailed overview on the progress achieved with the developments of the VERCE Science Gateway, according to a use-case driven implementation strategy. More specifically, we show how the computational technologies and data services have been integrated within a tool for Seismic Forward Modelling, whose objective is to offer the possibility to performsimulations of seismic waves as a service to the seismological community.We will introduce the interactive components of the OGC map based web interface and how it supports the user with setting up the simulation. We will go through the selection of input data, which are either fetched from federated seismological web services, adopting community standards, or provided by the users themselves by accessing their own document data store. The HPC scientific codes can be selected from a number of waveform simulators, currently available to the seismological community as batch tools or with limited configuration capabilities in their interactive online versions.The results will be staged out via a secure GridFTP transfer to a VERCE data layer managed by iRODS. The provenance information of the simulation will be automatically cataloged by the data layer via NoSQL techonologies.Finally, we will show the example of how the visualisation output of the gateway could be enhanced by the connection with immersive projection technology at the Virtual Reality and Visualisation Centre of Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ).

  4. The VERCE Science Gateway: enabling user friendly seismic waves simulations across European HPC infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Krause, Amy; Ramos Garcia, Clàudia; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Klampanos, Iraklis A.; Frobert, Laurent; Krischer, Lion; Trani, Luca; David, Mario; Leong, Siew Hoon; Muraleedharan, Visakh

    2014-05-01

    The EU-funded project VERCE (Virtual Earthquake and seismology Research Community in Europe) aims to deploy technologies which satisfy the HPC and data-intensive requirements of modern seismology. As a result of VERCE's official collaboration with the EU project SCI-BUS, access to computational resources, like local clusters and international infrastructures (EGI and PRACE), is made homogeneous and integrated within a dedicated science gateway based on the gUSE framework. In this presentation we give a detailed overview on the progress achieved with the developments of the VERCE Science Gateway, according to a use-case driven implementation strategy. More specifically, we show how the computational technologies and data services have been integrated within a tool for Seismic Forward Modelling, whose objective is to offer the possibility to perform simulations of seismic waves as a service to the seismological community. We will introduce the interactive components of the OGC map based web interface and how it supports the user with setting up the simulation. We will go through the selection of input data, which are either fetched from federated seismological web services, adopting community standards, or provided by the users themselves by accessing their own document data store. The HPC scientific codes can be selected from a number of waveform simulators, currently available to the seismological community as batch tools or with limited configuration capabilities in their interactive online versions. The results will be staged out from the HPC via a secure GridFTP transfer to a VERCE data layer managed by iRODS. The provenance information of the simulation will be automatically cataloged by the data layer via NoSQL techonologies. We will try to demonstrate how data access, validation and visualisation can be supported by a general purpose provenance framework which, besides common provenance concepts imported from the OPM and the W3C-PROV initiatives, also offers

  5. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors - the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals - and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, “firewalls” and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  6. Dynamical 3-Space Gravitational Waves: Reverberation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gravity theory missed a key dynamical process that became ap parent only when ex- pressed in terms of a velocity field, instead of the Newtonian gravitational acceleration field. This dynamical process involves an additional self-i nteraction of the dynam- ical 3-space, and experimental data reveals that its streng th is set by the fine struc- ture constant, implying a fundamental link between gravity and quantum theory. The dynamical 3-space has been directly detected in numerous li ght-speed anisotropy ex- periments. Quantum matter has been shown to exhibit an accel eration caused by the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the 3-space flow, givi ng the first derivation of gravity from a deeper theory, as a quantum wave refraction effect. EM radiation is also refracted in a similar manner. The anisotropy experiments have all shown 3-space wave / turbulence effects, with the latest revealing the fractal structure of 3-s pace. Here we report the prediction of a new effect, namely a reverberation effect, when the gravi- tational waves propagate in the 3-space inflow of a large mass . This effect arises from the non-linear dynamics of 3-space. These reverberations c ould offer an explanation for the Shnoll effect, in which cosmological factors influence stochastic pro cesses, such as radioactive decay rates.

  7. Selective excitation of tropical atmospheric waves in wave-CISK: The effect of vertical wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghua; Geller, Marvin A.

    1994-01-01

    The growth of waves and the generation of potential energy in wave-CISK require unstable waves to tilt with height oppositely to their direction of propagation. This makes the structures and instability properties of these waves very sensitive to the presence of vertical shear in the basic flow. Equatorial Kelvin and Rossby-gravity waves have opposite phase tilt with height to what they have in the stratosphere, and their growth is selectively favored by basic flows with westward vertical shear and eastward vertical shear, respectively. Similar calculations are also made for gravity waves and Rossby waves. It is shown that eastward vertical shear of the basic flow promotes CISK for westward propagating Rossby-gravity, Rossby, and gravity waves and suppresses CISK for eastward propagating Kelvin and gravity waves, while westward shear of the basic flow has the reverse effects.

  8. Measurements of Wave Power in Wave Energy Converter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berins, J.; Berins, J.; Kalnacs, A.

    2017-08-01

    The article is devoted to the technical solution of alternative budget measuring equipment of the water surface gravity wave oscillation and the theoretical justification of the calculated oscillation power. This solution combines technologies such as lasers, WEB-camera image digital processing, interpolation of defined function at irregular intervals, volatility of discrete Fourier transformation for calculating the spectrum.

  9. Measurements of Wave Power in Wave Energy Converter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berins J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the technical solution of alternative budget measuring equipment of the water surface gravity wave oscillation and the theoretical justification of the calculated oscillation power. This solution combines technologies such as lasers, WEB-camera image digital processing, interpolation of defined function at irregular intervals, volatility of discrete Fourier transformation for calculating the spectrum.

  10. Effects of wafer-level packaging on millimetre-wave antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Abutarboush, Hattan

    2011-11-01

    A cost-effective antenna package suitable for mass production mm-wave applications is investigated. Different packaging material that can be possibly used in mm-wave antennas are presented and compared. Moreover, this study investigates different methods of packaging millimetre-wave (60 GHz) MEMS antennas. The paper first introduces the custom needs for optimum operation of the MEMS antenna and then examines the current available enabling technologies for packaging. The sensitivity of the antenna\\'s reflection coefficient, gain and radiation efficiency to the packaging environment is investigated through EM simulations. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. Proteomic profiling in schizophrenia: Enabling stratification for more effective treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Guest (Paul); D. Martins-de-Souza (Daniel); E. Schwarz (Emanuel); H. Rahmoune (Hassan); M. Alsaif (Murtada); J.J. Tomasik (Jakub); D. Turck (Dominique); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSchizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder characterized by an array of clinical manifestations. Although the best known manifestations include serious effects on mood and behavior, patients can also display co-morbidities, including immune system or metabolic abnormalities.

  12. The CNN Effect: Stretegic Enabler or Operational Risk?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belknap, Margaret

    2001-01-01

    .... Satellite technology and the proliferation of 2417 news networks have created and increased the so-called 'CNN effect' on strategic level decision-making and how warfighters direct their commands...

  13. The blast wave mitigation effects of a magnetogasdynamic decelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, Roy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lundgren, Ronald G [APPLIED RESEARCH ASSOCIATES; Tucker, Don H [UNIV OF UTAH

    2009-01-01

    This work computes shock wave jump functions for viscous blast waves propagating in a magnetogasdynamic decelerator. The decelerator is assumed to be a one-dimensional channel with sides that are perfect conductors. An electric field applied on the walls of the channel produces a magnetogasdynamic pump, which decelerates the flow field induced by a blast wave. The blast wave jump functions computed here are compared to magnetogasdynamic results for steady supersonic channel flow to quantify potential blast mitigation effects. Theoretical shock wave jump functions are also presented for inviscid blast waves propagating in a one-dimensional channel with an electromagnetic field.

  14. Enabling Effective Problem-oriented Research for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kueffer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental problems caused by human activities are increasing; biodiversity is disappearing at an unprecedented rate, soils are being irreversibly damaged, freshwater is increasingly in short supply, and the climate is changing. To reverse or even to reduce these trends will require a radical transformation in the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Just how this can be achieved within, at most, a few decades is unknown, but it is clear that academia must play a crucial role. Many believe, however, that academic institutions need to become more effective in helping societies move toward sustainability. We first synthesize current thinking about this crisis of research effectiveness. We argue that those involved in producing knowledge to solve societal problems face three particular challenges: the complexity of real-world sustainability problems, maintaining impartiality when expert knowledge is used in decision making, and ensuring the salience of the scientific knowledge for decision makers. We discuss three strategies to meet these challenges: conducting research in interdisciplinary teams, forming research partnerships with actors and experts from outside academia, and framing research questions with the aim of solving specific problems (problem orientation. However, we argue that implementing these strategies within academia will require both cultural and institutional change. We then use concepts from transition management to suggest how academic institutions can make the necessary changes. At the level of system optimization, we call for: quality criteria, career incentives, and funding schemes that reward not only disciplinary excellence but also achievements in inter-/transdisciplinary work; professional services and training through specialized centers that facilitate problem-oriented research and reciprocal knowledge exchange with society; and the integration of sustainability and inter

  15. Effect of electromagnetic waves on human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowiak, Artur; Mazurek, Paweł A; Wdowiak, Anita; Bojar, Iwona

    2017-03-31

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitting from the natural environment, as well as from the use of industrial and everyday appliances, constantly influence the human body. The effect of this type of energy on living tissues may exert various effects on their functioning, although the mechanisms conditioning this phenomenon have not been fully explained. It may be expected that the interactions between electromagnetic radiation and the living organism would depend on the amount and parameters of the transmitted energy and type of tissue exposed. Electromagnetic waves exert an influence on human reproduction by affecting the male and female reproductive systems, the developing embryo, and subsequently, the foetus. Knowledge concerning this problem is still being expanded; however, all the conditionings of human reproduction still remain unknown. The study presents the current state of knowledge concerning the problem, based on the latest scientific reports.

  16. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  17. Heat Waves in the United States: Mortality Risk during Heat Waves and Effect Modification by Heat Wave Characteristics in 43 U.S. Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Devastating health effects from recent heat waves, and projected increases in frequency, duration, and severity of heat waves from climate change, highlight the importance of understanding health consequences of heat waves. Objectives We analyzed mortality risk for heat waves in 43 U.S. cities (1987–2005) and investigated how effects relate to heat waves’ intensity, duration, or timing in season. Methods Heat waves were defined as ≥ 2 days with temperature ≥ 95th percentile for the community for 1 May through 30 September. Heat waves were characterized by their intensity, duration, and timing in season. Within each community, we estimated mortality risk during each heat wave compared with non-heat wave days, controlling for potential confounders. We combined individual heat wave effect estimates using Bayesian hierarchical modeling to generate overall effects at the community, regional, and national levels. We estimated how heat wave mortality effects were modified by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, timing in season). Results Nationally, mortality increased 3.74% [95% posterior interval (PI), 2.29–5.22%] during heat waves compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality risk increased 2.49% for every 1°F increase in heat wave intensity and 0.38% for every 1-day increase in heat wave duration. Mortality increased 5.04% (95% PI, 3.06–7.06%) during the first heat wave of the summer versus 2.65% (95% PI, 1.14–4.18%) during later heat waves, compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality impacts and effect modification by heat wave characteristics were more pronounced in the Northeast and Midwest compared with the South. Conclusions We found higher mortality risk from heat waves that were more intense or longer, or those occurring earlier in summer. These findings have implications for decision makers and researchers estimating health effects from climate change. PMID:21084239

  18. Enabling inter- and intra-chip optical wireless interconnect by the aid of hybrid plasmonic leaky-wave optical antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Vahid; Yousefi, Leila; Mohammad-Taheri, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to provide optical link in Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). The proposed method uses two hybrid plasmonic leaky-wave optical antennas, operating at the standard optical telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm, to provide inter-chip interconnect between two layers in a photonic chip and also intra-chip interconnect between two different photonic ICs. Linearly tapered couplers are designed to couple the optical signal from the silicon waveguide to the hybrid plasmonic antennas. The performance of the proposed optical link is verified using numerical full wave simulation. The proposed structure is planar, and can be fabricated using standard CMOS technology which makes it the superior candidate for realization of future multi-layered Photonic Integrated Circuits.

  19. Wave energy converter effects on wave propagation: A sensitivity study in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Magalen, J.; Ruehl, K.; Chartrand, C.

    2014-12-01

    The development of renewable offshore energy in the United States is growing rapidly and wave energy is one of the largest resources currently being evaluated. The deployment of wave energy converter (WEC) arrays required to harness this resource could feasibly number in the hundreds of individual devices. The WEC arrays have the potential to alter nearshore wave propagation and circulation patterns and ecosystem processes. As the industry progresses from pilot- to commercial-scale it is important to understand and quantify the effects of WECs on the natural nearshore processes that support a local, healthy ecosystem. To help accelerate the realization of commercial-scale wave power, predictive modeling tools have been developed and utilized to evaluate the likelihood of environmental impact. At present, direct measurements of the effects of different types of WEC arrays on nearshore wave propagation are not available; therefore wave model simulations provide the groundwork for investigations of the sensitivity of model results to prescribed WEC characteristics over a range of anticipated wave conditions. The present study incorporates a modified version of an industry standard wave modeling tool, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), to simulate wave propagation through a hypothetical WEC array deployment site on the California coast. The modified SWAN, referred to as SNL-SWAN, incorporates device-specific WEC power take-off characteristics to more accurately evaluate a WEC device's effects on wave propagation. The primary objectives were to investigate the effects of a range of WEC devices and device and array characteristics (e.g., device spacing, number of WECs in an array) on nearshore wave propagation using SNL-SWAN model simulations. Results showed that significant wave height was most sensitive to variations in WEC device type and size and the number of WEC devices in an array. Locations in the lee centerline of the arrays in each modeled scenario showed the

  20. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    for improvement seems to have been a much reduced value of the wave-induced oscillatory boundary layer flow, in the vicinity of the pressure inlet, as compared to the mainstream oscillatory flow. The sensor's performance wa better for the case of waves riding...

  1. Wave propagation in structured materials as a platform for effective parameters retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A. A.

    utilization of the Bloch-mode analysis5. The idea is to perform the Bloch mode expansion6 of the field inside the metamaterial slab when it is illuminated with a plane wave incident from vacuum. Then we determine the effective refractive index from the propagation constant of the dominating (fundamental......) Bloch mode. The Bloch and wave impedances are determined by definition as the proportionality coefficient between electric and magnetic fields of the fundamental Bloch mode volume or surface averaged over the unit cell1. The ratio of the surface averaged fields provides the value of the Bloch impedance...... and, respectively, enables the retrieval of wave EPs. The volume averaging provides the wave impedance, which is needed for the retrieval of the materials parameters. The main advantage of our method is its simple numerical realization. The first part of the method involves the extraction...

  2. Dynamic wave field synthesis: enabling the generation of field distributions with a large space-bandwidth product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Edwin N; Heine, Julian; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2015-11-02

    We present a novel approach for the design and fabrication of multiplexed computer generated volume holograms (CGVH) which allow for a dynamic synthesis of arbitrary wave field distributions. To achieve this goal, we developed a hybrid system that consists of a CGVH as a static element and an electronically addressed spatial light modulator as the dynamic element. We thereby derived a new model for describing the scattering process within the inhomogeneous dielectric material of the hologram. This model is based on the linearization of the scattering process within the Rytov approximation and incorporates physical constraints that account for voxel based laser-lithography using micro-fabrication of the holograms in a nonlinear optical material. In this article we demonstrate that this system basically facilitates a high angular Bragg selectivity on the order of 1°. Additionally, it allows for a qualitatively low cross-talk dynamic synthesis of predefined wave fields with a much larger space-bandwidth product (SBWP ≥ 8.7 × 10(6)) as compared to the current state of the art in computer generated holography.

  3. Blast effects physical properties of shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book compiles a variety of experimental data on blast waves. The book begins with an introductory chapter and proceeds to the topic of blast wave phenomenology, with a discussion Rankine-Hugoniot equations and the Friedlander equation, used to describe the pressure-time history of a blast wave. Additional topics include arrival time measurement, the initiation of detonation by exploding wires, a discussion of TNT equivalency, and small scale experiments. Gaseous and high explosive detonations are covered as well. The topics and experiments covered were chosen based on the comparison of used scale sizes, from small to large. Each characteristic parameter of blast waves is analyzed and expressed versus scaled distance in terms of energy and mass. Finally, the appendix compiles a number of polynomial laws that will prove indispensable for engineers and researchers.

  4. Wave propagation in metamaterials and effective parameters retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A.

    2011-01-01

    as handsome for implementation. We set a goal to develop a method which is unambiguous but at the same time simple and straightforward. We assume that this can be done by observing the wave propagation inside a metamaterial slab thick enough to avoid transient effects. First, we formulated a retrieval method...... with a plane wave incident from vacuum. Then we determine the effective refractive index from the propagation constant of the dominating (fundamental) Bloch mode. The Bloch and wave impedances are determined by definition as the proportionality coefficient between the electric and magnetic fields...... complex wave effective parameters. Extending the method further we developed the approach to determine both wave and material effective parameters through the Bloch-mode analysis [3]. The idea is to perform the Bloch mode expansion [4] of the field inside the metamaterial slab when it is illuminated...

  5. Numerical Simulation of Wake Effects in the Lee of a Farm of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beels, C.; Troch, P.; De Visch, K.

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of wave energy to the renewable energy supply is rising. To extract a considerable amount of wave power,Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are arranged in several rows or in a ‘farm'. The wake behind each individual WEC in the farm affects the power absorption of its neighbouring WECs....... In this paper wake effects in the lee of a single Wave Dragon WEC and multiple Wave Dragon WECs are studied in a time-dependent mild-slope equation model. The Wave Dragon WEC is a floating offshore converter of the overtopping type. The water volume of overtopped waves is first captured in a basin above mean...

  6. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and L-value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the ...

  7. Climate Change Effects on Heat Waves and Future Heat Wave-Associated IHD Mortality in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of future climate change on the occurrence of heat waves and its implications for heat wave-related mortality due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD in Germany is studied. Simulations of 19 regional climate models with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° forced by the moderate climate change scenario A1B are analyzed. Three model time periods of 30 years are evaluated, representing present climate (1971–2000, near future climate (2021–2050, and remote future climate (2069–2098. Heat waves are defined as periods of at least three consecutive days with daily mean air temperature above the 97.5th percentile of the all-season temperature distribution. Based on the model simulations, future heat waves in Germany will be significantly more frequent, longer lasting and more intense. By the end of the 21st century, the number of heat waves will be tripled compared to present climate. Additionally, the average duration of heat waves will increase by 25%, accompanied by an increase of the average temperature during heat waves by about 1 K. Regional analyses show that stronger than average climate change effects are observed particularly in the southern regions of Germany. Furthermore, we investigated climate change impacts on IHD mortality in Germany applying temperature projections from 19 regional climate models to heat wave mortality relationships identified in a previous study. Future IHD excess deaths were calculated both in the absence and presence of some acclimatization (i.e., that people are able to physiologically acclimatize to enhanced temperature levels in the future time periods by 0% and 50%, respectively. In addition to changes in heat wave frequency, we incorporated also changes in heat wave intensity and duration into the future mortality evaluations. The results indicate that by the end of the 21st century the annual number of IHD excess deaths in Germany attributable to heat waves is expected to rise by factor 2

  8. The effects of core-reflected waves on finite fault inversions with teleseismic body wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yunyi; Ni, Sidao; Wei, Shengji; Almeida, Rafael; Zhang, Han

    2017-11-01

    Teleseismic body waves are essential for imaging rupture processes of large earthquakes. Earthquake source parameters are usually characterized by waveform analyses such as finite fault inversions using only turning (direct) P and SH waves without considering the reflected phases from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). However, core-reflected waves such as ScS usually have amplitudes comparable to direct S waves due to the total reflection from the CMB and might interfere with the S waves used for inversion, especially at large epicentral distances for long duration earthquakes. In order to understand how core-reflected waves affect teleseismic body wave inversion results, we develop a procedure named Multitel3 to compute Green's functions that contain turning waves (direct P, pP, sP, direct S, sS and reverberations in the crust) and core-reflected waves (PcP, pPcP, sPcP, ScS, sScS and associated reflected phases from the CMB). This ray-based method can efficiently generate synthetic seismograms for turning and core-reflected waves independently, with the flexibility to take into account the 3-D Earth structure effect on the timing between these phases. The performance of this approach is assessed through a series of numerical inversion tests on synthetic waveforms of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and the 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal earthquake. We also compare this improved method with the turning-wave only inversions and explore the stability of the new procedure when there are uncertainties in a priori information (such as fault geometry and epicentre location) or arrival time of core-reflected phases. Finally, a finite fault inversion of the 2005 Mw8.7 Nias-Simeulue earthquake is carried out using the improved Green's functions. Using enhanced Green's functions yields better inversion results as expected. While the finite source inversion with conventional P and SH waves is able to recover large-scale characteristics of the earthquake source, by adding PcP and ScS phases

  9. Effects of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiations at Different Wave Lengths on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    biotechsocietynigeria.org. Short Communication. Effects of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiations at Different Wave Lengths on the Microbial Load ... stained blue while the living cells reduced the stain and remained colourless. The viability of the yeast ...

  10. Effects of ship-induced waves on aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Friederike; Lorenz, Stefan; Stoll, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Most larger water bodies worldwide are used for navigation, and the intensity of commercial and recreational navigation is expected to further increase. Navigation profoundly affects aquatic ecosystems. To facilitate navigation, rivers are trained and developed, and the direct effects of navigation include chemical and biological impacts (e.g., inputs of toxic substances and dispersal of non-native species, respectively). Furthermore, propagating ships create hydrodynamic alterations, often simply summarized as waves. Although ship-induced waves are recognized as influential stressors, knowledge on their effects is poorly synthesized. We present here a review on the effects of ship-induced waves on the structure, function and services of aquatic ecosystems based on more than 200 peer reviewed publications and technical reports. Ship-induced waves act at multiple organizational levels and different spatial and temporal scales. All the abiotic and biotic components of aquatic ecosystems are affected, from the sediment and nutrient budget to the planktonic, benthic and fish communities. We highlight how the effects of ship-induced waves cascade through ecosystems and how different effects interact and feed back into the ecosystem finally leading to altered ecosystem services and human health effects. Based on this synthesis of wave effects, we discuss strategies for mitigation. This may help to develop scientifically based and target-oriented management plans for navigational waters that optimize abiotic and biotic integrity and their ecosystem services and uses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Iterative Addition of Kinetic Effects to Cold Plasma RF Wave Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Berry, Lee; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The hot nature of fusion plasmas requires a wave vector dependent conductivity tensor for accurate calculation of wave heating and current drive. Traditional methods for calculating the linear, kinetic full-wave plasma response rely on a spectral method such that the wave vector dependent conductivity fits naturally within the numerical method. These methods have seen much success for application to the well-confined core plasma of tokamaks. However, quantitative prediction of high power RF antenna designs for fusion applications has meant a requirement of resolving the geometric details of the antenna and other plasma facing surfaces for which the Fourier spectral method is ill-suited. An approach to enabling the addition of kinetic effects to the more versatile finite-difference and finite-element cold-plasma full-wave solvers was presented by where an operator-split iterative method was outlined. Here we expand on this approach, examine convergence and present a simplified kinetic current estimator for rapidly updating the right-hand side of the wave equation with kinetic corrections. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  12. Ionospheric effects of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves: Dispersion relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Michael; Ostrovsky, Lev A.; Bedard, Alfred J.

    2017-06-01

    There is extensive evidence for ionospheric effects associated with earthquake-related atmospheric disturbances. Although the existence of earthquake precursors is controversial, one suggested method of detecting possible earthquake precursors and tsunamis is by observing possible ionospheric effects of atmospheric waves generated by such events. To study magneto-acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere, we have derived a general dispersion relation including the effects of the Earth's magnetic field. This dispersion relation can be used in a general atmospheric ray tracing program to calculate the propagation of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves from the ground to the ionosphere. The presence of the Earth's magnetic field in the ionosphere can radically change the dispersion properties of the wave. The general dispersion relation obtained here reduces to the known dispersion relations for magnetoacoustic waves and acoustic-gravity waves in the corresponding particular cases. The work described here is the first step in achieving a generalized ray tracing program permitting propagation studies of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves.

  13. ICT enabled classroom effectiveness scale development and validation: A case of multi-campus university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Tikoria

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The research work aims at developing a valid and reliable scale for ICT (Information and communication technology enabled classroom effectiveness from student’s perspective in a multi-campus university setting. A standard methodology for scale development is used for developing and validating the scale which comprises of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample population was the students from a premier multi-campus university. The results revealed ICT enabled classroom effectiveness as a multi-dimensional construct comprising of four factors namely class design and infrastructure; scheduling and coordination; technical support staff; and resource availability. Although a plethora of literature is available in the domain of e-learning, none of them have considered the aspects of ICT enabled classroom effectiveness specifically in an Indian multi-campus university. The limitation of the study lies in terms of sample size and generalizability. Emphasizing the identified factors will give a cutting edge advantage for the universities by enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of ICT enabled classroom teaching.

  14. ECT: its brain enabling effects. A review of electroconvulsive therapy-induced structural brain plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouckaert, F.; Sienaert, P.; Obbels, J.; Dols, A.; Vandenbulcke, M.; Stek, M.L.; Bolwig, T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the past 2 decades, new evidence for brain plasticity has caused a shift in both preclinical and clinical ECT research from falsifying the "brain damage hypothesis" toward exploring ECT's enabling brain (neuro)plasticity effects. METHODS: By reviewing the available animal and human

  15. Using Email to Enable E[superscript 3] (Effective, Efficient, and Engaging) Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, ChanMin

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that technology that supports both noncognitive and cognitive aspects can make learning more effective, efficient, and engaging (e[superscript 3]-learning). The technology of interest in this article is email. The investigation focuses on characteristics of email that are likely to enable e[superscript 3]-learning. In addition,…

  16. Piezoelectric parametric effects on wave vibration and contact mechanics of traveling wave ultrasonic motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Shiyu; Xiu, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Elastic wave quality determines the operating performance of traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUM). The time-variant circumferential force from the shrink of piezoelectric ceramic is one of the factors that distort the elastic wave. The distorted waveshape deviates from the ideal standard sinusoidal fashion and affects the contact mechanics and driving performance. An analytical dynamic model of ring ultrasonic motor is developed. Based on this model, the piezoelectric parametric effects on the wave distortion and contact mechanics are examined. Multi-scale method is employed to obtain unstable regions and distorted wave response. The unstable region is verified by Floquét theory. Since the waveshape affects the contact mechanism, a contact model involving the distorted waveshape and normal stiffness of the contact layer is established. The contact model is solved by numerical calculation. The results verify that the deformation of the contact layer deviates from sinusoidal waveshape and the pressure distribution is changed, which influences the output characteristics directly. The surface speed within the contact region is averaged such that the rotor speed decreases for lower torque and increases for larger torque. The effects from different parametric strengths, excitation frequencies and pre-pressures on pressure distribution and torque-speed relation are compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Theory of Josephson effect in d-wave superconductor/diffusive ferromagnet/d-wave superconductor junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2007-01-01

    We study Josephson effect in d-wave superconductor/diffusive ferromagnet/d-wave superconductor junctions, changing the exchange field and the angles between the normal to the interfaces and the crystal axes of d-wave superconductors. We find a 0–π transition at a certain value of the exchange field.

  18. Effect of a relative phase of waves constituting the initial perturbation and the wave interference on the dynamics of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Arun; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2017-07-01

    While it is a common wisdom that initial conditions influence the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), the research in this area is focused primarily on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation. The information has hitherto largely ignored the influences on RMI dynamics of the relative phase of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves. In this work we systematically study the influence of the relative phase and the interference of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation on a strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface separating ideal fluids with contrast densities. We apply group theory analysis and smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulations. For verification and validation of the simulations, qualitative and quantitative comparisons are performed with rigorous zeroth-order, linear, and nonlinear theories as well as with gas dynamics experiments achieving good agreement. For a sample case of a two-wave (two-mode) initial perturbation we select the first-wave amplitude enabling the maximum initial growth rate of the RMI and we vary the second-wave amplitude from 1% to 100% of the first-wave amplitude. We also vary the relative phase of the first and second waves and consider the in-phase, the antiphase and the random-phase cases. We find that the relative phase and the interference of waves are important factors of RMI dynamics influencing qualitatively and quantitatively the symmetry, morphology, and growth rate of the Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface, as well as the order and disorder in strong-shock-driven RMI.

  19. Update on the Effects of Sound Wave on Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Emran Khan Chowdhury

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is considered the sum of cell proliferation and subsequent elongation of the cells. The continuous proliferation and elongation of plant cells are vital to the production of new organs, which have a significant impact on overall plant growth. Accordingly, the relationship between environmental stimuli, such as temperature, light, wind, and sound waves to plant growth is of great interest in studies of plant development. Sound waves can have negative or positive effects on plant growth. In this review paper we have summarized the relationship between sound waves and plant growth response. Sound waves with specific frequencies and intensities can have positive effects on various plant biological indices including seed germination, root elongation, plant height, callus growth, cell cycling, signaling transduction systems, enzymatic and hormonal activities, and gene expression.

  20. Effect of extra dimensions on gravitational waves from cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  1. Cellular and molecular effects of electromagnetic radiation and sonic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Froes Meyer; Oscar Ariel Ronzio; Adenilson de Souza da Fonseca; Sebastiao David Santos-Filho; Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (in the form of pulsed magnetic fields, radiofrequency and intense pulsed light) and mechanical agents (such as sonic waves) have been used in physical therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low-intensity magnetic fields, sonic and radiofrequency waves, and intense pulsed light on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and on the electrophoretic mobility of plasmid DNA. Exponentially growing E. coli AB1157 cultures and plasmid DNA samples were...

  2. Investigation of Magnetostatic Surface Waves for Anisotropic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    inves- tigate the effect of launching magnetostatic surface waves at different angles on a yttrium-iron- garnet (YIG) single crystal film. Many...Freeman were able to excite the surface wave mode on a thin, single crystal , yttrium-iron- garnet (YIG) slab where the magneto- static surface...films of YIG. The technique used to fabricate these single crystal films is liquid phase epitaxy ( LPE ). A "melt" is prepared with the proper compo

  3. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  4. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  5. Key Enablers of Effective Implementation of TQM in Royal Jet Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moza Tahnoon Al Nahyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management (TQM is a unified management approach that concentrates on the consecutive improvement of processes, products, and methods to surpass client expectations. This paper aims to highlight the advantages of implementing TQM in the airline industry by examining the key enablers of TQM. This study was based on a research model including six factors that were found to have a profound influence in implementing TQM. The data needed for the study was collected with the aid of questionnaires and secondary sources. The study discovered that procedures, policies, and a culture of knowledge transfer were the most significant enablers of successful TQM initiatives in Royal Jet Airways. In order to effectively implement TQM, the study suggests that management should offer appropriate recognition and rewards to employees. This will motivate them to adopt and practice TQM initiatives. Apart from that, management should also arrange seminars or workshops to accustom the employees to the basic procedures and objectives of effective TQM.

  6. Generation of 1.024-Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated twin vector waves through polarization-insensitive optical parametric amplification enabling transmission over 4000-km dispersion-managed TWRS fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiang; Hu, Hao; Chandrasekhar, S.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the first Tb/s Nyquist-WDM phase-conjugated twin waves, consisting of eight 128-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signals and their idlers, by a broadband polarization-insensitive fiber optical parametric amplifier, enabling more than doubled reach in dispersion-managed transmission...

  7. Effective Orthorhombic Anisotropic Models for Wave field Extrapolation

    KAUST Repository

    Ibanez Jacome, Wilson

    2013-05-01

    Wavefield extrapolation in orthorhombic anisotropic media incorporates complicated but realistic models, to reproduce wave propagation phenomena in the Earth\\'s subsurface. Compared with the representations used for simpler symmetries, such as transversely isotropic or isotropic, orthorhombic models require an extended and more elaborated formulation that also involves more expensive computational processes. The acoustic assumption yields more efficient description of the orthorhombic wave equation that also provides a simplified representation for the orthorhombic dispersion relation. However, such representation is hampered by the sixth-order nature of the acoustic wave equation, as it also encompasses the contribution of shear waves. To reduce the computational cost of wavefield extrapolation in such media, I generate effective isotropic inhomogeneous models that are capable of reproducing the first-arrival kinematic aspects of the orthorhombic wavefield. First, in order to compute traveltimes in vertical orthorhombic media, I develop a stable, efficient and accurate algorithm based on the fast marching method. The derived orthorhombic acoustic dispersion relation, unlike the isotropic or transversely isotropic one, is represented by a sixth order polynomial equation that includes the fastest solution corresponding to outgoing P-waves in acoustic media. The effective velocity models are then computed by evaluating the traveltime gradients of the orthorhombic traveltime solution, which is done by explicitly solving the isotropic eikonal equation for the corresponding inhomogeneous isotropic velocity field. The inverted effective velocity fields are source dependent and produce equivalent first-arrival kinematic descriptions of wave propagation in orthorhombic media. I extrapolate wavefields in these isotropic effective velocity models using the more efficient isotropic operator, and the results compare well, especially kinematically, with those obtained from the

  8. The effect of extracoporeal schock waves on intestinal anastomosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shobha

    Background and Objectives: To investigate the effect of extracorporeal shock waves on the healing of intestinal anastomosis. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of ten each comprising of Group I. (only laparotomy), Group II (right colon segment resection and end to end ...

  9. On the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone induced waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, S.; Suzuki, T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the effectiveness of mangroves in attenuating cyclone- induced waves was done using the SWAN 40.81 numerical model. Hydraulic parameters during extreme events and local mangrove vegetation parameters were estimated for the Kanika Sands mangrove island near the upcoming Dhamra Port in

  10. Wave Chaos and HPM Effects on Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    Final Report: 5/01/10 – 4/30/13 Wave Chaos and HPM Effects on Electronic Systems FA95501010106 By Thomas M. Antonsen Jr., Edward Ott, John Rodgers...Hamiltonian system has been claimed to be fully chaotic, namely, the anisotropic Kepler problem with zero angular momentum. 3 particularly easy to go

  11. Electromagnetic wave propagation in rain and polarization effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    OKAMURA, Sogo; OGUCHI, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes our study on microwave and millimeter-wave propagation in rain with special emphasis on the effects of polarization. Starting from a recount of our past findings, we will discuss developments with these and how they are connected with subsequent research. PMID:20551593

  12. Effects of ultrasonic waves on eggshell strength and hatchability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two trials were conducted to investigate the effects of exposing layer-type breeder eggs before incubation to ultrasonic waves (ULT). Eggs were subjected to ULT of 117 volts at 40 kHz for up to 15 minutes. Eggshell breaking force (EBF), hatchability and chick hatching weight (CHW) of Balady breeder eggs (Trial 1), and egg ...

  13. Microscopic model of quantum butterfly effect: Out-of-time-order correlators and traveling combustion waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiner, Igor L.; Faoro, Lara; Ioffe, Lev B.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the Keldysh technique to enable the computation of out-of-time order correlators such as . We show that the behavior of these correlators is described by equations that display initially an exponential instability which is followed by a linear propagation of the decoherence between two initially identically copies of the quantum many body systems with interactions. At large times the decoherence propagation (quantum butterfly effect) is described by a diffusion equation with non-linear dissipation known in the theory of combustion waves. The solution of this equation is a propagating non-linear wave moving with constant velocity despite the diffusive character of the underlying dynamics. Our general conclusions are illustrated by the detailed computations for the specific models describing the electrons interacting with bosonic degrees of freedom (phonons, two-level-systems etc.) or with each other.

  14. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion. Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  15. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Lee, Jung-Lyul

    2012-12-01

    An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion.Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  16. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  17. Effects of low-dose extracorporeal shock waves on microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Walaa; Goertz, Ole; Lauer, Henrik; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Hauser, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    The extended wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and following septicemia. The aim of this study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burn injury with and without extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA). A novel shockwave system was developed based on a commercially available device for orthopedics (Dornier Aries®) that was equipped with a newly developed applicator. This system is based on the electromagnetic shock wave emitter (EMSE) technology and was introduced to accomplish a localized treatment for wound healing. The system includes a novel field of focus for new applications, with high precision and ease of use. In the animal study, full-thickness burns were inflicted on to the ears of hairless mice (n=51). Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7. Values were obtained immediately after burn, as well as at days 1, 3, 7, and 12 post burn. All shockwave treated groups showed an accelerated angiogenesis with a less non-perfused area and an improved blood flow after burn injury compared to the placebo control group. After three treatments, the shock waves increased the number of rolling leukocytes significantly compared to the non-treated animals. Shock waves seem to have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burn injury. However, further investigations are necessary to detect positive influence of shock waves on microcirculation after burn injuries.

  18. Effect of drift waves on plasma blob dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Justin R; Umansky, Maxim V; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I

    2012-05-25

    Most of the work to date on plasma blobs found in the edge region of magnetic confinement devices is limited to 2D theory and simulations which ignore the variation of blob parameters along the magnetic field line. However, if the 2D convective rate of blobs is on the order of the growth rate of unstable drift waves, then drift wave turbulence can drastically alter the dynamics of blobs from that predicted by 2D theory. The density gradients in the drift plane that characterize the blob are mostly depleted during the nonlinear stage of drift waves resulting in a much more diffuse blob with a greatly reduced radial velocity. Sheath connected plasma blobs driven by effective gravity forces are considered in this Letter and it is found that the effects of resistive drift waves occur at earlier stages in the 2D motion for smaller blobs and in systems with a smaller effective gravity force. These conclusions are supported numerically by a direct comparison of 2D and 3D seeded blob simulations.

  19. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important......-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute...

  20. Effects of beach morphology and waves on onshore larval transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Larvae of intertidal species grow offshore, and migrate back to the shore when they are ready to settle on their adult substrates. In order to reach the habitat, they must cross the surf zone, which is characterized as a semi-permeable barrier. This is accomplished through physical forcing (i.e., waves and current) as well as their own behavior. Two possible scenarios of onshore larval transport are proposed: Negatively buoyant larvae stay in the bottom boundary layer because of turbulence-dependent sinking behavior, and are carried toward the shore by streaming of the bottom boundary layer; positively buoyant larvae move to the shore during onshore wind events, and sink to the bottom once they encounter high turbulence (i.e., surf zone edge), where they are carried by the bottom current toward the shore (Fujimura et al. 2014). Our biophysical Lagrangian particle tracking model helps to explain how beach morphology and wave conditions affect larval distribution patterns and abundance. Model results and field observations show that larval abundance in the surf zone is higher at mildly sloped, rip-channeled beaches than at steep pocket beaches. Beach attributes are broken up to examine which and how beach configuration factors affect larval abundance. Modeling with alongshore uniform beaches with variable slopes reveal that larval populations in the surf zone are negatively correlated with beach steepness. Alongshore variability enhances onshore larval transport because of increased cross-shore water exchange by rip currents. Wave groups produce transient rip currents and enhance cross-shore exchange. Effects of other wave components, such as wave height and breaking wave rollers are also considered.

  1. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentan Dong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI: 6%, 31% in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39% in an older group (ages ≥65 years, and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44% in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages <65 years. Our findings suggest that heat wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  2. Networking between community health programs: a case study outlining the effectiveness, barriers and enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grills, Nathan J; Robinson, Priscilla; Phillip, Maneesh

    2012-07-19

    In India, since the 1990s, there has been a burgeoning of NGOs involved in providing primary health care. This has resulted in a complex NGO-Government interface which is difficult for lone NGOs to navigate. The Uttarakhand Cluster, India, links such small community health programs together to build NGO capacity, increase visibility and better link to the government schemes and the formal healthcare system. This research, undertaken between 1998 and 2011, aims to examine barriers and facilitators to such linking, or clustering, and the effectiveness of this clustering approach. Interviews, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document the process and explore the enablers, the barriers and the effectiveness of networks improving community health. The analysis revealed that when activating, framing, mobilising and synthesizing the Uttarakhand Cluster, key brokers and network players were important in bridging between organisations. The ties (or relationships) that held the cluster together included homophily around common faith, common friendships and geographical location and common mission. Self interest whereby members sought funds, visibility, credibility, increased capacity and access to trainings was also a commonly identified motivating factor for networking. Barriers to network synthesizing included lack of funding, poor communication, limited time and lack of human resources. Risk aversion and mistrust remained significant barriers to overcome for such a network. In conclusion, specific enabling factors allowed the clustering approach to be effective at increasing access to resources, creating collaborative opportunities and increasing visibility, credibility and confidence of the cluster members. These findings add to knowledge regarding social network formation and collaboration, and such knowledge will assist in the conceptualisation, formation and success of potential health networks in India and other developing world countries.

  3. Networking between community health programs: a case study outlining the effectiveness, barriers and enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Nathan J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In India, since the 1990s, there has been a burgeoning of NGOs involved in providing primary health care. This has resulted in a complex NGO-Government interface which is difficult for lone NGOs to navigate. The Uttarakhand Cluster, India, links such small community health programs together to build NGO capacity, increase visibility and better link to the government schemes and the formal healthcare system. This research, undertaken between 1998 and 2011, aims to examine barriers and facilitators to such linking, or clustering, and the effectiveness of this clustering approach. Methods Interviews, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document the process and explore the enablers, the barriers and the effectiveness of networks improving community health. Results The analysis revealed that when activating, framing, mobilising and synthesizing the Uttarakhand Cluster, key brokers and network players were important in bridging between organisations. The ties (or relationships that held the cluster together included homophily around common faith, common friendships and geographical location and common mission. Self interest whereby members sought funds, visibility, credibility, increased capacity and access to trainings was also a commonly identified motivating factor for networking. Barriers to network synthesizing included lack of funding, poor communication, limited time and lack of human resources. Risk aversion and mistrust remained significant barriers to overcome for such a network. Conclusions In conclusion, specific enabling factors allowed the clustering approach to be effective at increasing access to resources, creating collaborative opportunities and increasing visibility, credibility and confidence of the cluster members. These findings add to knowledge regarding social network formation and collaboration, and such knowledge will assist in the conceptualisation, formation and success of

  4. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate

  5. ECT: its brain enabling effects: a review of electroconvulsive therapy-induced structural brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouckaert, Filip; Sienaert, Pascal; Obbels, Jasmien; Dols, Annemieke; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Stek, Max; Bolwig, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Since the past 2 decades, new evidence for brain plasticity has caused a shift in both preclinical and clinical ECT research from falsifying the "brain damage hypothesis" toward exploring ECT's enabling brain (neuro)plasticity effects. By reviewing the available animal and human literature, we examined the theory that seizure-induced structural changes are crucial for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. Both animal and human studies suggest electroconvulsive stimulation/electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-related neuroplasticity (neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, or gliogenesis). It remains unclear whether structural changes might explain the therapeutic efficacy and/or be related to the (transient) learning and memory impairment after ECT. Methods to assess in vivo brain plasticity of patients treated with ECT will be of particular importance for future longitudinal studies to give support to the currently available correlational data.

  6. Effect of Knowledge Management on Organizational Performance: Enabling Thought Leadership and Social Capital through Technology Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub, Michel S.

    The present paper studies the relationship between social networks enabled by technological advances in social software, and overall business performance. With the booming popularity of online communication and the rise of knowledge communities, businesses are faced with a challenge as well as an opportunity - should they monitor the use of social software or encourage it and learn from it? We introduce the concept of user-autonomy and user-fun, which go beyond the traditional user-friendly requirement of existing information technologies. We identified 120 entities out of a sample of 164 from Mediterranean countries and the Gulf region, to focus on the effect of social exchange information systems in thought leadership.

  7. The genotoxic effect of radiofrequency waves on mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Burak; Aktug, Huseyin; Altug, Huseyin; Yildiz, Teoman; Guducu, Candan; Irgi, Melis; Koksal, Mehtap Gulcihan Cinar; Ozkinay, Ferda; Gunduz, Cumhur; Cogulu, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the health effects of radiofrequency (RF) waves have been raised because of the gradual increase in usage of cell phones, and there are scientific questions and debates about the safety of those instruments in daily life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic effects of RF waves in an experimental brain cell culture model. Brain cell cultures of the mice were exposed to 10.715 GHz with specific absorbtion rate (SAR) 0.725 W/kG signals for 6 h in 3 days at 25°C to check for the changes in the micronucleus (MNi) assay and in the expression of 11 proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes. It was found that MNi rate increased 11-fold and STAT3 expression decreased 7-fold in the cell cultures which were exposed to RF. Cell phones which spread RF may damage DNA and change gene expression in brain cells.

  8. Effects of Ultraviolet (UV) Radiations at Different Wave Lengths on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Abstract. The effects of UV-radiation on the bacterial load and yeast viability of palm wine were investigated. In the studies 500ml of fresh palm wine sample each with initial yeast viability of 100% and bacterial load of 8.0 x 1015 Cfu/ml was exposed to UV-radiation at various wave lengths and time of 0 to 7hrs.

  9. Correcting transmission losses in short-wave infrared spatially offset Raman spectroscopy measurements to enable reduced fluorescence through-barrier detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R J; Lee, L; Shand, N C

    2017-09-25

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is a proven technique for sub-surface detection. SORS is able to separate Raman signals from a container and its contents, thereby demonstrating application to through-barrier detection for defence and security. Whilst SORS has been demonstrated to reduce fluorescence from the barrier (or surface), fluorescence from the sample (or sub-surface) can still be problematic for some materials when using Raman excitation wavelengths typical in commercially available instrumentation (e.g. 785 nm). Previous work has demonstrated that short-wave infrared (SWIR) excited SORS (e.g. 1064 nm) can reduce fluorescence from the sample and barrier, thereby providing the potential to detect a wider range of materials through a wider range of barriers. In this paper we highlight an additional challenge for detection through some plastic container materials (e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) and other opaque plastics) that absorb and scatter both incident and Raman scattered photons in the SWIR band, leading to distortion of the resultant SORS spectrum. The existence of this effect and its impact is explored, along with a potential solution to overcome this challenge that uses multi-wavelength Raman excitation to avoid the detrimental HDPE absorption region.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of enablers on HIV testing, initiation and retention in antiretroviral treatment and AIDS related mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Safarnejad

    Full Text Available An enabling environment is believed to have significant and critical effects on HIV and AIDS program implementation and desired outcomes. This paper estimates the paths, directionality, and direct and indirect associations between critical enablers with antiretroviral treatment (ART coverage and to AIDS-related mortality.Frameworks that consider the role of enablers in HIV and AIDS programs were systematically reviewed to develop a conceptual model of interaction. Measurements for constructs of the model were pooled from the latest publicly available data. A hypothetical model, including latent/unobserved factors and interaction of enablers, program activities and outcomes, was analyzed cross-sectionally with structural equation modeling. Coefficients of the model were used to estimate the indirect associations of enablers to treatment coverage and the subsequent associated impact on AIDS related mortality.The model's fit was adequate (RMSEA = 0·084, 90% CI [0·062, 0·104] and the indirect effects of enablers on outcomes were measured. Enablers having significant associations with increased ART coverage were social/financial protection, governance, anti-discrimination, gender equality, domestic AIDS spending, testing service delivery, and logistics.Critical enablers are significantly correlated to outcomes like ART coverage and AIDS related mortality. Even while this model does not allow inference on causality, it provides directionality and magnitude of the significant associations.

  11. Direct and indirect effects of enablers on HIV testing, initiation and retention in antiretroviral treatment and AIDS related mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Ali; Izazola-Licea, Jose-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    An enabling environment is believed to have significant and critical effects on HIV and AIDS program implementation and desired outcomes. This paper estimates the paths, directionality, and direct and indirect associations between critical enablers with antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and to AIDS-related mortality. Frameworks that consider the role of enablers in HIV and AIDS programs were systematically reviewed to develop a conceptual model of interaction. Measurements for constructs of the model were pooled from the latest publicly available data. A hypothetical model, including latent/unobserved factors and interaction of enablers, program activities and outcomes, was analyzed cross-sectionally with structural equation modeling. Coefficients of the model were used to estimate the indirect associations of enablers to treatment coverage and the subsequent associated impact on AIDS related mortality. The model's fit was adequate (RMSEA = 0·084, 90% CI [0·062, 0·104]) and the indirect effects of enablers on outcomes were measured. Enablers having significant associations with increased ART coverage were social/financial protection, governance, anti-discrimination, gender equality, domestic AIDS spending, testing service delivery, and logistics. Critical enablers are significantly correlated to outcomes like ART coverage and AIDS related mortality. Even while this model does not allow inference on causality, it provides directionality and magnitude of the significant associations.

  12. Remote effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on cutaneous microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Tobias; Sorg, Heiko; Forstmeier, Vinzent; Knobloch, Karsten; Liodaki, Eirini; Stang, Felix; Mailänder, Peter; Krämer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) has proven its clinical benefits in different fields of medicine. Tissue regeneration and healing is improved after shock wave treatment. Even in the case of burn wounds angiogenesis and re-epithelialization is accelerated, but ESWT in extensive burn wounds is impracticable. High energy ESWT influences cutaneous microcirculation at body regions remote from application site. Eighteen Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received either high energy ESWT (Group A: total 1000 impulses, 10 J) or placebo shock wave treatment (Group B: 0 impulses, 0 J), applied to the dorsal lower leg of the hind limb. Ten minutes later microcirculatory effects were assessed at the contralateral lower leg of the hind limb (remote body region) by combined Laser-Doppler-Imaging and Photospectrometry. In Group A cutaneous capillary blood velocity was significantly increased by 152.8% vs. placebo ESWT at the remote body location (p = 0.01). Postcapillary venous filling pressure remained statistically unchanged (p > 0.05), while cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation increased by 12.7% in Group A (p = 0.220). High energy ESWT affects cutaneous hemodynamics in body regions remote from application site in a standard rat model. The results of this preliminary study indicate that ESWT might be beneficial even in disseminated and extensive burn wounds by remote shock wave effects and should therefore be subject to further scientific evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, Dustin K; Rao, Brianna M; McLain, Jean E; Watts, George S; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections.

  14. Nonparametric Online Learning Control for Soft Continuum Robot: An Enabling Technique for Effective Endoscopic Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kit-Hang; Fu, Denny K C; Leong, Martin C W; Chow, Marco; Fu, Hing-Choi; Althoefer, Kaspar; Sze, Kam Yim; Yeung, Chung-Kwong; Kwok, Ka-Wai

    2017-12-01

    Bioinspired robotic structures comprising soft actuation units have attracted increasing research interest. Taking advantage of its inherent compliance, soft robots can assure safe interaction with external environments, provided that precise and effective manipulation could be achieved. Endoscopy is a typical application. However, previous model-based control approaches often require simplified geometric assumptions on the soft manipulator, but which could be very inaccurate in the presence of unmodeled external interaction forces. In this study, we propose a generic control framework based on nonparametric and online, as well as local, training to learn the inverse model directly, without prior knowledge of the robot's structural parameters. Detailed experimental evaluation was conducted on a soft robot prototype with control redundancy, performing trajectory tracking in dynamically constrained environments. Advanced element formulation of finite element analysis is employed to initialize the control policy, hence eliminating the need for random exploration in the robot's workspace. The proposed control framework enabled a soft fluid-driven continuum robot to follow a 3D trajectory precisely, even under dynamic external disturbance. Such enhanced control accuracy and adaptability would facilitate effective endoscopic navigation in complex and changing environments.

  15. Biological effects of spark-generated shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Edwin L.

    1992-08-01

    Shock waves, whether generated by sparks or laser bursts, are capable of producing a wide range of biological effects. Thresholds for hemorrhage of kidney and lung, the killing of fruit fly larvae, developmental defects in embryos and changes in function of excitable tissues such as the heart fall in the range from 1 to 10 MPa. In endoscopic applications, the bubble that is created has the potential to act directly upon the surrounding tissues producing effects by mechanisms that are qualitatively different than the shock fields themselves.

  16. Large-scale structure and gravitational waves. III. Tidal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2014-04-01

    The leading locally observable effect of a long-wavelength metric perturbation corresponds to a tidal field. We derive the tidal field induced by scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations, and use second-order perturbation theory to calculate the effect on the locally measured small-scale density fluctuations. For subhorizon scalar perturbations, we recover the standard perturbation theory result (F2 kernel). For tensor modes of wavenumber kL, we find that effects persist for kLτ ≫1, i.e. even long after the gravitational wave has entered the horizon and redshifted away ("fossil effect"). We then use these results, combined with the "ruler perturbations" of F. Schmidt and D. Jeong [Phys. Rev. D 86, 083527 (2012)], to predict the observed distortion of the small-scale matter correlation function induced by a long-wavelength tensor mode. We also estimate the observed signal in the B mode of the cosmic shear from a gravitational wave background, including both tidal (intrinsic alignment) and projection (lensing) effects. The nonvanishing tidal effect in the kLτ≫1 limit significantly increases the intrinsic alignment contribution to shear B modes, especially at low redshifts z≲2.

  17. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 2. Comparison with skewness, asymmetry, and other effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    contributions believed to play a prominent role in cross-shore boundary layer and sediment transport processes: (1) converging-diverging effects from bed slope, (2) wave skewness, (3) wave asymmetry, and (4) waves combined with superposed negative currents (intended to loosely represent, for example, return...... from beach slope may make a significant onshore bed load contribution. Generally, however, the results suggest wave skewness (in addition to conventional steady streaming) as the most important onshore contribution outside the surf zone. Streaming induced within the wave boundary layer is also...... investigated for each component, and skewness and asymmetry are demonstrated to promote largely negative streaming velocities, consistent with earlier work. For hydraulically smooth cases, however, a thin region of positive streaming is revealed in the viscous sublayer which is effectively absent...

  18. The effect of heat waves on dairy cow mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, A; Felici, A; Esposito, S; Bernabucci, U; Bertocchi, L; Maresca, C; Nardone, A; Lacetera, N

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the mortality of dairy cows during heat waves. Mortality data (46,610 cases) referred to dairy cows older than 24mo that died on a farm from all causes from May 1 to September 30 during a 6-yr period (2002-2007). Weather data were obtained from 12 weather stations located in different areas of Italy. Heat waves were defined for each weather station as a period of at least 3 consecutive days, from May 1 to September 30 (2002-2007), when the daily maximum temperature exceeded the 90th percentile of the reference distribution (1971-2000). Summer days were classified as days in heat wave (HW) or not in heat wave (nHW). Days in HW were numbered to evaluate the relationship between mortality and length of the wave. Finally, the first 3 nHW days after the end of a heat wave were also considered to account for potential prolonged effects. The mortality risk was evaluated using a case-crossover design. A conditional logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for mortality recorded in HW compared with that recorded in nHW days pooled and stratified by duration of exposure, age of cows, and month of occurrence. Dairy cows mortality was greater during HW compared with nHW days. Furthermore, compared with nHW days, the risk of mortality continued to be higher during the 3 d after the end of HW. Mortality increased with the length of the HW. Considering deaths stratified by age, cows up to 28mo were not affected by HW, whereas all the other age categories of older cows (29-60, 61-96, and >96mo) showed a greater mortality when exposed to HW. The risk of death during HW was higher in early summer months. In particular, the highest risk of mortality was observed during June HW. Present results strongly support the implementation of adaptation strategies which may limit heat stress-related impairment of animal welfare and economic losses in dairy cow farm during HW. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science

  19. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407 (United States)

    2017-02-12

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained. - Highlights: • High frequency electrostatic wave propagation is investigated in a dense semi-bounded quantum plasma. • The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. • The quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. • The frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave. • The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  20. Enhancing Wave Energy Competitiveness through Co-Located Wind and Wave Energy Farms. A Review on the Shadow Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharay Astariz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy is one of the most promising alternatives to fossil fuels due to the enormous available resource; however, its development may be slowed as it is often regarded as uneconomical. The largest cost reductions are expected to be obtained through economies of scale and technological progress. In this sense, the incorporation of wave energy systems into offshore wind energy farms is an opportunity to foster the development of wave energy. The synergies between both renewables can be realised through these co-located energy farms and, thus, some challenges of offshore wind energy can be met. Among them, this paper focuses on the longer non-operational periods of offshore wind turbines—relative to their onshore counterparts—typically caused by delays in maintenance due to the harsh marine conditions. Co-located wave energy converters would act as a barrier extracting energy from the waves and resulting in a shielding effect over the wind farm. On this basis, the aim of this paper is to analyse wave energy economics in a holistic way, as well as the synergies between wave and offshore wind energy, focusing on the shadow effect and the associated increase in the accessibility to the wind turbines.

  1. Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stéfanon, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamical effects of vegetation on the 2003 summer heat waves Marc Stéfanon(1), Philippe Drobinski(1), Fabio D'Andrea(1), Nathalie de Noblet(2) (1) IPSL/LMD, France; (2) IPSL/LSCE, France The land surface model (LSM) in regional climate models (RCMs) plays a key role in energy and water exchanges between land and atmosphere. The vegetation can affect these exchanges through physical, biophysical and bio-geophysical mechanisms. It participates to evapo-transpiration process which determines the partitioning of net radiation between sensible and latent heat flux, through water evaporation from soil throughout the entire root system. For seasonal timescale leaf cover change induced leaf-area index (LAI) and albedo changes, impacting the Earth's radiative balance. In addition, atmospheric chemistry and carbon concentration has a direct effect on plant stomatal structure, the main exchange interface with the atmosphere. Therefore the surface energy balance is intimately linked to the carbon cycle and vegetation conditions and an accurate representation of the Earth's surface is required to improve the performance of RCMs. It is even more crucial for extreme events as heat waves and droughts which display highly nonlinear behaviour. If triggering of heat waves is determined by the large scale, local coupled processes over land can amplify or inhibit heat trough several feedback mechanism. One set of two simulation has been conducted with WRF, using different LSMs. They aim to study drought and vegetation effect on the dynamical and hydrological processes controlling the occurrence and life cycle of heat waves In the MORCE plateform, the dynamical global vegetation model (DGVM) ORCHIDEE is implemented in the atmospheric module WRF. ORCHIDEE is based on three different modules. The first module, called SECHIBA, describes the fast processes such as exchanges of energy and water between the atmosphere and the biosphere, and the soil water budget. The phenology and carbon

  2. Numerical study of ocean wave effect on offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lian; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Wind power at sea has become increasingly important in renewable energy study. For energy harvesting, winds over oceans have many advantages over winds on land, for example, larger and open surface area, faster wind speed, and more wind resource close to high population regions. On the other hand, the presence of ocean waves introduces complexities to wind turbines. There is a critical need to study the dynamical interactions among marine atmospheric boundary layer, ocean wave field, and floating turbines. In this research, we study offshore wind farm by performing large-eddy simulations for winds coupled with potential-flow-theory based simulations for broadband irregular waves, with the wind turbines represented by an actuator disk model. Our results show that windseas at different development stages result in different sea-surface roughness and have an appreciable effect on wind profile and the energy extraction rate of the turbines. If swells are present, swell-to-wind momentum and energy transfer further changes the wind field to introduce oscillations in as well as modify the mean of the wind power. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1341062. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-AGS-1045189 and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  3. Off-shell effects in s-wave pion absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachenberg, F.; Pirnerdouble-dagger, H.J.

    1978-06-01

    The effect of s-wave pion absorption on the pion-nucleus optical potential is calculated. We assume absorption by two uncorrelated nucleons with off-shell pion rescattering. For the pion-nucleon interaction we develop a field theoretic model which can be used on- and off-mass shell. A fully relativistic calculation of the pion polarization operator then gives U/sup opt/ =-4..pi..B/sub orho//sup 2/(2..mu..)/sup -1/, with B/sub 0/= (0.094+i0.036) ..mu../sup -4/, as contribution from s-wave absorption to the optical potential. The imaginary part agrees well with the experimentally determined value, while pion dispersion (real part of B/sub o/) does not explain the observed repulsion of the s-wave pion nucleus interaction. We deomonstrate the relevance of oo-shell dynamics in pion-nucleus scattering. The ratio R/sub s/ of ..pi../sup -/-absorption rates by neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs is much smaller than predicted by on-shell models. For equal numbers of neutrons and protons we get R/sub s/approx. =3.0.We also apply the formalism to s-wave pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions and obtain qualitative agreement with the data. In particular the longstanding puzzle of the small imaginary pion deuteron scattering length compared to Im B/sub 0/ is explained. Our claculation gives Im a/sub pid/=3.7 x 10/sup -3/..mu../sup -1/.

  4. Effects of whistler mode hiss waves in March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Santolík, O.; Reeves, G. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Denton, M. H.; Loridan, V.; Thaller, S. A.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.

    2017-07-01

    We present simulations of the loss of radiation belt electrons by resonant pitch angle diffusion caused by whistler mode hiss waves for March 2013. Pitch angle diffusion coefficients are computed from the wave properties and the ambient plasma data obtained by the Van Allen Probes with a resolution of 8 h and 0.1 L shell. Loss rates follow a complex dynamic structure, imposed by the wave and plasma properties. Hiss effects can be strong, with minimum lifetimes (of 1 day) moving from energies of 100 keV at L 5 up to 2 MeV at L 2 and stop abruptly, similarly to the observed energy-dependent inner belt edge. Periods when the plasmasphere extends beyond L 5 favor long-lasting hiss losses from the outer belt. Such loss rates are embedded in a reduced Fokker-Planck code and validated against Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer observations of the belts at all energy. Results are complemented with a sensitivity study involving different radial diffusion and lifetime models. Validation is carried out globally at all L shells and energies. The good agreement between simulations and observations demonstrates that hiss waves drive the slot formation during quiet times. Combined with transport, they sculpt the energy structure of the outer belt into an "S shape." Low energy electrons (<0.3 MeV) are less subject to hiss scattering below L = 4. In contrast, 0.3-1.5 MeV electrons evolve in an environment that depopulates them as they migrate from L 5 to L 2.5. Ultrarelativistic electrons are not affected by hiss losses until L 2-3.

  5. The MOF+Technique: A Significant Synergic Effect Enables High Performance Chromate Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming Biao; Xiong, Yang Yang; Wu, Hui Qiong; Feng, Xue Feng; Li, Jian Qiang; Luo, Feng

    2017-12-18

    A significant synergic effect between a metal-organic framework (MOF) and Fe 2 SO 4 , the so-called MOF + technique, is exploited for the first time to remove toxic chromate from aqueous solutions. The results show that relative to the pristine MOF samples (no detectable chromate removal), the MOF + method enables super performance, giving a 796 Cr mg g -1 adsorption capacity. The value is almost eight-fold higher than the best value of established MOF adsorbents, and the highest value of all reported porous adsorbents for such use. The adsorption mechanism, unlike the anion-exchange process that dominates chromate removal in all other MOF adsorbents, as unveiled by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), is due to the surface formation of Fe 0.75 Cr 0.25 (OH) 3 nanospheres on the MOF samples. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. 2D and 3D graphical representation of the propagation of electromagnetic waves at the interface with a material with general effective complex permittivity and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Ramos, J. G.; Friedman, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    We developed a web-based instructional and research tool that demonstrates the behavior of electromagnetic waves as they propagate through a homogenous medium and through an interface where the second medium can be characterized by an effective complex permittivity and permeability. Either p- or s-polarization wave components can be chosen and the graphical interface includes 2D wave and 3D component representations. The program enables the study of continuity of electromagnetic components, critical angle, Brewster angle, absorption and amplification, behavior of light in sub-unity and negative-index materials, Poynting vector and phase velocity behavior, and positive and negative Goos- Hänchen shifts.

  7. Parameterizing the Effects of Finite Crested Wave Breaking in Wave-Averaged Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Suanda, S. H.; Feddersen, F.

    2016-02-01

    Finite crested breaking waves generate a rotational body force that creates two-dimensional turbulent eddies with strong rotational velocities, capable of tracer exchange (sediment, pathogens, contaminants) between the surfzone and the inner shelf. This eddy generation mechanism is strongly tied to the wave directional spread. Wave-resolving Boussinesq models like funwaveC include finite crest length breaking and accurately simulate surfzone eddy generation. However, this surfzone eddy generation mechanism is not included in existing wave-averaged models (e.g., Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport Modeling System, COAWST), leading to an incomplete representation of exchange between the surf zone and the inner shelf. In this study 250 funwaveC simulations with random, directionally spread waves spanning a range of beach slopes and wave conditions are used to simulate surfzone eddies. With these simulations, the stream function associated with breaking wave eddy forcing is isolated and quantified in the form of intensity, cross- and alongshore widths and propagation rates, followed by parameterization as a function of wave parameters and the beach slope. Parameterized stream function is implemented into COAWST as a stochastic surf zone eddy module which is used to study vorticity evolution from the surfzone to the inner-shelf, interaction between stratified water column and surfzone eddies, and overall provides a more complete representation of surfzone eddy induced cross-shore exchange. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PULSED SHORT WAVE TREATMENT. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogaru Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are short electromagnetic waves emitted as intermittent trains with a fixed duration, separated by free intervals of variable duration. The biological effects of pulsed short waves could be explained according to most of the authors by an activation of cellular enzymatic reactions, a stimulation of energy metabolism, a stimulation of liver function, of adrenal gland function and of the reticulocyte system, changes in cell permeability, by an increase of peripheral blood flow through the enhancement of local vascularization. This research aimed to investigate the biological effects of exposure to pulsed short waves at different doses on the adrenal glands of experimental animals, by structural and ultrastructural studies. The study included 35 animals assigned to 4 groups. Group I included 10 experimental animals exposed to radiation at a dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, group II, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, group III, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 6/600 impulses/sec, for 10 min/day, and the control group consisted of 5 unexposed animals. Structural and ultrastructural changes of adrenal glands induced by the dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, compared to the unexposed control group and the dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, include an intensification of protein synthesis processes, an enhancement of energy metabolism in providing the energy required for an increased production of hormones, an intensification of collagen fiber synthesis processes in the capsule, necessary for healing. It was demonstrated that this dose induced an intensification of hormone synthesis and secretion, a stimulation of adrenal function. At the dose of 6/600 cycles/sec, a slight diminution of hormone synthesis and secretion activity was found, which was not below the limits existing in the unexposed control group, but was comparable to group II. This dose is probably too strong for experimental animals, inducing them a state of stress. The

  9. Chemical and engineering approaches to enable organic field-effect transistors for electronic skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Bettinger, Christopher J; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-03-20

    Skin is the body's largest organ and is responsible for the transduction of a vast amount of information. This conformable material simultaneously collects signals from external stimuli that translate into information such as pressure, pain, and temperature. The development of an electronic material, inspired by the complexity of this organ is a tremendous, unrealized engineering challenge. However, the advent of carbon-based electronics may offer a potential solution to this long-standing problem. In this Account, we describe the use of an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) architecture to transduce mechanical and chemical stimuli into electrical signals. In developing this mimic of human skin, we thought of the sensory elements of the OFET as analogous to the various layers and constituents of skin. In this fashion, each layer of the OFET can be optimized to carry out a specific recognition function. The separation of multimodal sensing among the components of the OFET may be considered a "divide and conquer" approach, where the electronic skin (e-skin) can take advantage of the optimized chemistry and materials properties of each layer. This design of a novel microstructured gate dielectric has led to unprecedented sensitivity for tactile pressure events. Typically, pressure-sensitive components within electronic configurations have suffered from a lack of sensitivity or long mechanical relaxation times often associated with elastomeric materials. Within our method, these components are directly compatible with OFETs and have achieved the highest reported sensitivity to date. Moreover, the tactile sensors operate on a time scale comparable with human skin, making them ideal candidates for integration as synthetic skin devices. The methodology is compatible with large-scale fabrication and employs simple, commercially available elastomers. The design of materials within the semiconductor layer has led to the incorporation of selectivity and sensitivity within

  10. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two

  11. Surface wave propagation effects on buried segmented pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with surface wave propagation (WP effects on buried segmented pipelines. Both simplified analytical model and finite element (FE model are developed for estimating the axial joint pullout movement of jointed concrete cylinder pipelines (JCCPs of which the joints have a brittle tensile failure mode under the surface WP effects. The models account for the effects of peak ground velocity (PGV, WP velocity, predominant period of seismic excitation, shear transfer between soil and pipelines, axial stiffness of pipelines, joint characteristics, and cracking strain of concrete mortar. FE simulation of the JCCP interaction with surface waves recorded during the 1985 Michoacan earthquake results in joint pullout movement, which is consistent with the field observations. The models are expanded to estimate the joint axial pullout movement of cast iron (CI pipelines of which the joints have a ductile tensile failure mode. Simplified analytical equation and FE model are developed for estimating the joint pullout movement of CI pipelines. The joint pullout movement of the CI pipelines is mainly affected by the variability of the joint tensile capacity and accumulates at local weak joints in the pipeline.

  12. Goos-Hänchen effect and bending of spin wave beams in thin magnetic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruszecki, P., E-mail: pawel.gruszecki@amu.edu.pl; Krawczyk, M., E-mail: krawczyk@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 85, Poznań 61-614 (Poland); Romero-Vivas, J. [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N. [Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Ulyanovsk State University, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., 432000 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Lyubchanskii, I. L. [Donetsk Physical and Technical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2014-12-15

    For magnon spintronic applications, the detailed knowledge of spin wave (SW) beam dispersion, transmission (reflection) of SWs passing through (reflected from) interfaces, or borders or the scattering of SWs by inhomogeneities is crucial. These wave properties are decisive factors on the usefulness of a particular device. Here, we demonstrate, using micromagnetic simulations supported by an analytical model, that the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift exists for SW reflecting from thin film edge and that with the effect becomes observable. We show that this effect will exist for a broad range of frequencies in the dipole-exchange range, with the magnetization degree of pinning at the film edge as the crucial parameter, whatever its nature. Moreover, we have also found that the GH effect can be accompanied or even dominating by a bending of the SW beam due to the inhomogeneity of the internal magnetic field. This inhomogeneity, created by demagnetizing field taking place at the film edge, causes gradual change of SWs refractive index. The refraction of the SW beams by the non-uniformity of the magnetic field enables the exploration of graded index magnonics and metamaterial properties for the transmission and processing of information at nanoscale.

  13. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  14. Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness: A National Informatics-Enabled Registry for Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdany, Jinoos; Bansback, Nick; Clowse, Megan; Collier, Deborah; Law, Karen; Liao, Katherine P; Michaud, Kaleb; Morgan, Esi M; Oates, James C; Orozco, Catalina; Reimold, Andreas; Simard, Julia F; Myslinski, Rachel; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2016-12-01

    The Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness (RISE) is a national electronic health record (EHR)-enabled registry. RISE passively collects data from EHRs of participating practices, provides advanced quality measurement and data analytic capacities, and fulfills national quality reporting requirements. Here we report the registry's architecture and initial data, and we demonstrate how RISE is being used to improve the quality of care. RISE is a certified Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Qualified Clinical Data Registry, allowing collection of data without individual patient informed consent. We analyzed data between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015 to characterize initial practices and patients captured in RISE. We also analyzed medication use among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and performance on several quality measures. Across 55 sites, 312 clinicians contributed data to RISE; 72% were in group practice, 21% in solo practice, and 7% were part of a larger health system. Sites contributed data on 239,302 individuals. Among the subset with RA, 34.4% of patients were taking a biologic or targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) at their last encounter, and 66.7% were receiving a nonbiologic DMARD. Examples of quality measures include that 55.2% had a disease activity score recorded, 53.6% a functional status score, and 91.0% were taking a DMARD in the last year. RISE provides critical infrastructure for improving the quality of care in rheumatology and is a unique data source to generate new knowledge. Data validation and mapping are ongoing and RISE is available to the research and clinical communities to advance rheumatology. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. GeoSpark SQL: An Effective Framework Enabling Spatial Queries on Spark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the era of big data, Internet-based geospatial information services such as various LBS apps are deployed everywhere, followed by an increasing number of queries against the massive spatial data. As a result, the traditional relational spatial database (e.g., PostgreSQL with PostGIS and Oracle Spatial cannot adapt well to the needs of large-scale spatial query processing. Spark is an emerging outstanding distributed computing framework in the Hadoop ecosystem. This paper aims to address the increasingly large-scale spatial query-processing requirement in the era of big data, and proposes an effective framework GeoSpark SQL, which enables spatial queries on Spark. On the one hand, GeoSpark SQL provides a convenient SQL interface; on the other hand, GeoSpark SQL achieves both efficient storage management and high-performance parallel computing through integrating Hive and Spark. In this study, the following key issues are discussed and addressed: (1 storage management methods under the GeoSpark SQL framework, (2 the spatial operator implementation approach in the Spark environment, and (3 spatial query optimization methods under Spark. Experimental evaluation is also performed and the results show that GeoSpark SQL is able to achieve real-time query processing. It should be noted that Spark is not a panacea. It is observed that the traditional spatial database PostGIS/PostgreSQL performs better than GeoSpark SQL in some query scenarios, especially for the spatial queries with high selectivity, such as the point query and the window query. In general, GeoSpark SQL performs better when dealing with compute-intensive spatial queries such as the kNN query and the spatial join query.

  16. The electric field standing wave effect in infrared transflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G.; Popp, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    We show that an electric field standing wave effect is responsible for the oscillations and the non-linear dependence of the absorbance on the layer thickness in thin layers on a reflective surface. This effect is connected to the occurrence of interference inside these layers. Consequently, the absorptance undergoes a maximum electric field intensity enhancement at spectral positions close to those where corresponding non-absorbing layers on a metal show minima in the reflectance. The effect leads to changes of peak maxima ratios with layer thickness and shows the same periodicity as oscillations in the peak positions. These peculiarities are fully based on and described by Maxwell's equations but cannot be understood and described if the strongly simplifying model centered on reflectance absorbance is employed.

  17. Effectiveness and Impact of Technology-Enabled Project-Based Learning with the Use of Process Prompts in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Chan, Lim-Ha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness and impacts of process prompts on students' learning and computer self-efficacy within the technology-enabled project-based learning (PBL) context in an undergraduate educational technology course. If the aim is to prepare prospective teachers to effectively, efficiently, and engagingly use technologies in…

  18. The Effect of Weak Collisions on the Plasma Wave Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carrie; Germaschewski, Kai; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2008-11-01

    It has been shown recently that weak collisions, which are a singular perturbation on the collisionless Vlasov equation, have a profound effect on the underlying spectrum for linear plasma waves by eliminating the Case-Van Kampen continuous spectrum and replacing it with a complete class of discrete eigenmodes [C.S. Ng, A. Bhattacharjee, F. Skiff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1974 (1999); 92, 065002 (2004).]. This discovery has important consequences for the regime of validity of C. H. Su and C. Oberman's classical theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 20, 427 (1968)] on the collisional decay of plasma wave echoes. Using a fully nonlinear one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system solver including the Lenard-Bernstein collision operator, we have studied the effects of collisions on the echoes. We have identified the Su-Oberman regime on intermediate time scales. The long-time asymptotics of the system and its relation to the complete set of discrete eigenmodes found by Ng, Bhattacharjee and Skiff will be discussed.

  19. Cellular and molecular effects of electromagnetic radiation and sonic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Froes Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic radiation (in the form of pulsed magnetic fields, radiofrequency and intense pulsed light and mechanical agents (such as sonic waves have been used in physical therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low-intensity magnetic fields, sonic and radiofrequency waves, and intense pulsed light on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and on the electrophoretic mobility of plasmid DNA. Exponentially growing E. coli AB1157 cultures and plasmid DNA samples were exposed to these physical agents and 0.9% NaCl (negative control and SnCl2 (positive control solutions. Aliquots of the cultures were diluted and spread onto a solidified rich medium. The colony-forming units were counted after overnight incubation and the survival fraction was calculated. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed to visualise and quantify the plasmid topological forms. The results suggest that these agents do not alter the survival of E. coli cells or plasmid DNA electrophoresis mobility. Moreover, they do not protect against the lesive action of SnCl2. These physical agents therefore had no cytotoxic or genotoxic effects under the conditions studied.

  20. The nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity wave packets: dispersion and polarization relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Zhang

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the results of the numerical simulations of nonlinear propagation of three Gaussian gravity-wave packets in isothermal atmosphere individually, the nonlinear effects on the characteristics of gravity waves are studied quantitatively. The analyses show that during the nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packets the mean flows are accelerated and the vertical wavelengths show clear reduction due to nonlinearity. On the other hand, though nonlinear effects exist, the time variations of the frequencies of gravity wave packets are close to those derived from the dispersion relation and the amplitude and phase relations of wave-associated disturbance components are consistent with the predictions of the polarization relation of gravity waves. This indicates that the dispersion and polarization relations based on the linear gravity wave theory can be applied extensively in the nonlinear region.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  1. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF HIGH-FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this report the author discusses the influence of high-frequency electromagnetic waves on living matter, especially in the field of microwaves. He...of electromagnetic waves . Symptoms of damage are listed and methods of protection discussed.

  2. The effect of extra dimensions on gravity wave bursts from cosmic string cusps

    CERN Document Server

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-01-01

    We explore the kinematical effect of having extra dimensions on the gravity wave emission from cosmic strings. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, and reduce the probability of their formation. We recompute the gravity wave burst, taking into account these two factors, and find a potentially significant damping on the gravity waves of the strings.

  3. The effect of non-linear wave in front of vertical wall using bi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of waves in front of a vertical wall are examined, using the new theoretical approach of a bi-parametric distribution, proposed by Ejinkonye [1] to investigate the effect of nonlinearity for the mechanics of the sea waves. The most probable value of the wave steepness is assumed to be = 0.055. From the subsequent calculation ...

  4. Effects of gravitational waves on the polarization of pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2015-01-01

    The polarization of electromagnetic waves in the presence of a gravitational wave is analyzed. The rotation of the polarization angle and the Stokes parameters are deduced. A possible application to the detection of stochastic background of gravitational waves is proposed as a complement to the pulsar timing method.

  5. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This depicts increase of amplitude of induced sur- face waves with decrease of edge-slope. Further, as the S-wave velocity is decreasing the spatial rate of decrease of maximum strain is increasing due to the increased dispersion of Love waves and lower value of quality factors in the soils. 4.3 Snapshots. In order to explain ...

  6. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Implementation of eHealth Enabled Integrated Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Penterman, L; van Montfort, Augustinus P.W.P.; Smits, Jacco Gerardus Wilhelmus Leonardus; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: ‘E-health enabled integrated care’ (eHEIC) has high potential to improve quality of care, widen access and increase efficiency. Experts and scholars increasingly report about difficulties of sustainable eHEIC implementation. These reports indicate in particular ‘human factors’ often

  7. Hanbury Brown–Twiss Effect with Wave Packets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Qureshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hanbury Brown–Twiss (HBT effect, at the quantum level, is essentially an interference of one particle with another, as opposed to interference of a particle with itself. Conventional treatments of identical particles encounter difficulties while dealing with entanglement. A recently introduced label-free approach to indistinguishable particles is described, and is used to analyze the HBT effect. Quantum wave-packets have been used to provide a better understanding of the quantum interpretation of the HBT effect. The effect is demonstrated for two independent particles governed by Bose–Einstein or Fermi–Dirac statistics. The HBT effect is also analyzed for pairs of entangled particles. Surprisingly, entanglement has almost no effect on the interference seen in the HBT effect. In the light of the results, an old quantum optics experiment is reanalyzed, and it is argued that the interference seen in that experiment is not a consequence of non-local correlations between the photons, as is commonly believed. Quanta 2017; 6: 61–69.

  8. Fatigue and extreme wave loads on bottom fixed offshore wind turbines. Effects from fully nonlinear wave forcing on the structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe

    2013-01-01

    will transfer energy to higher frequencies which can be close to the wind turbines eigenfrequency. In the present thesis the response of an offshore wind turbine placed on a monopile foundation is investigated when exposed to linear and fully nonlinear irregular waves. The focus of the investigations...... effects of the wave nonlinearity. In first part of the thesis, the linear and nonlinear wave realizations are compared and the static wave forcing based on the two wave theories analysed. This analysis is followed by dynamic calculations where the effects of wave nonlinearity on the structural dynamics...... response due to the forces based on the potential-flow solver and Morison’s equation. Finally a small study of the effect of including wave directionality in the dynamic analysis is performed. All the analyses in this thesis contribute to the understanding of how important the wave nonlinearity...

  9. Applicability of coda wave interferometry technique for measurement of acoustoelastic effect of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Woo [Dept. of Safety Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we examined the applicability of coda wave interferometry (CWI) technique, which was developed to characterize seismic waves, to detect and evaluate change in the velocity of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to acoustoelastic effect. Ultrasonic wave measurements and compressive loading tests were conducted on a concrete specimen. The measured wave signals were processed with CWI to detect and evaluate the relative velocity change with respect to the stress state of the specimen. A phase change due to the acoustoelastic effect of concrete was clearly detected in the late-arriving coda wave. This shows that the relative velocity change of ultrasonic waves in concrete due to the acoustoelastic effect can be evaluated successfully and precisely using CWI.

  10. Modeling Mitigation Effects of Watershield on Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this analysis is to investigate mitigation effects of watershield on air blast waves. To examine the water mitigation concept, features of the free-field detonation process are studied from a series of one-dimensional simulations using a multimaterial Eulerian finite element technique. Five different shock Hugoniots for water are compared, and the most accurate data are suggested. To verify the numerical procedure, results are compared with available experimental data for UNDEX problem and analytical predictions for air shocks. For the case of contact watershield, the magnitude of peak pressure generally decreases and the shock arrival time increases with increasing thickness of watershield. The total pressure impulse is reduced significantly at near field. Non-contact watershield was also examined, and was found to provide a better design criterion based on the further decay of peak pressure.

  11. Lifshitz effects on holographic p-wave superfluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Bo Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the probe limit, we numerically build a holographic p-wave superfluid model in the four-dimensional Lifshitz black hole coupled to a Maxwell-complex vector field. We observe the rich phase structure and find that the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z contributes evidently to the effective mass of the matter field and dimension of the gravitational background. Concretely, we obtain that the Cave of Winds appeared only in the five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS spacetime, and the increasing z hinders not only the condensate but also the appearance of the first-order phase transition. Furthermore, our results agree with the Ginzburg–Landau results near the critical temperature. In addition, the previous AdS superfluid model is generalized to the Lifshitz spacetime.

  12. Hertz and the Discovery of Radio Waves and the Photoelectric Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the discoveries by Hertz historically, such as photoelectric effect, radio waves, their impact on modern physics and some applications. Presents several diagrams and two chronological tables. (YP)

  13. Radioastronomical observations of the effect of Lunar tidal wave in the upper atmosphere of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobitniak, Liubov; Ryabov, Mikhail

    Since 1987 on the radio-telescope “URAN-4” monitoring of the fluxes of powerful galactic and extra-galactic radio sources at decameter waves have been held. On the basis of the monitoring data scans of radio sources were researched. The following effects were detected: strong fluctuations, chart compression and disintegrated recording source. All these effects can be caused by the passing of the tidal wave in the ionosphere, which acts like a "plasma" lens and distorts the wave front. There have been found effects of forward and reverse tidal wave. The angular interval of tidal effects are 60 degrees according to all researched space sources.

  14. Shallow water effects on wave energy converters with hydraulic power take-off system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashank Sinha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water depth on the power absorption by a single heaving point absorber wave energy converter, attached to a hydraulic power take-off system, is simulated and analysed. The wave energy flux for changing water depths is presented and the study is carried out at a location in the north-west Portuguese coast, favourable for wave power generation. This analysis is based on a procedure to modify the wave spectrum as the water depth reduces, namely, the TMA spectrum (Transformation spectrum. The present study deals with the effect of water depth on the spectral shape and significant wave heights. The reactive control strategy, which includes an external damping coefficient and a negative spring term, is used to maximize power absorption by the wave energy converter. The presented work can be used for making decisions regarding the best water depth for the installation of point absorber wave energy converters in the Portuguese nearshore.

  15. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  16. Wave Influenced Wind and the Effect on Offshore Wind Turbine Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kalvig, Siri; Manger, Eirik; Bjørn H. Hjertager; Jakobsen, Jasna B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the effect of wave influenced wind on offshore wind turbines is studied numerically. The wave is seen as a dynamical roughness that influences the wind flow and hence the wind turbine performance. An actuator line representation of the NREL's 5 MW offshore baseline wind turbine is placed in a simulation domain with a moving mesh that resolves the ocean waves. These wave influenced wind turbine simulations, WIWiTS, show that the wave will influence the wind field at the turbine r...

  17. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  18. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levedahl, William Kirk

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  19. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  20. Effects of Offshore Wind Turbines on Ocean Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Nicholas; Churchfield, Matthew; Hamlington, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wakes from horizontal axis wind turbines create large downstream velocity deficits, thus reducing the available energy for downstream turbines while simultaneously increasing turbulent loading. Along with this deficit, however, comes a local increase in the velocity around the turbine rotor, resulting in increased surface wind speeds. For offshore turbines, these increased speeds can result in changes to the properties of wind-induced waves at the ocean surface. In this study, the characteristics and implications of such waves are explored by coupling a wave simulation code to the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The wave simulator and SOWFA are bi-directionally coupled using the surface wind field produced by an offshore wind farm to drive an ocean wave field, which is used to calculate a wave-dependent surface roughness that is fed back into SOWFA. The details of this combined framework are outlined. The potential for using the wave field created at offshore wind farms as an additional energy resource through the installation of on-site wave converters is discussed. Potential negative impacts of the turbine-induced wave field are also discussed, including increased oscillation of floating turbines.

  1. Effect of centrifugation on water recycling and algal growth to enable algae biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igou, Thomas; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Penalver-Argueso, Patricia; Fu, Hao; Doi, Shusuke; Narode, Asmita; Cheruvu, Sarasija; Zhang, Qian; Hassan, Fariha; Woodruff, Frazier; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-12-01

    The latest research shows that algal biofuels, at the production levels mandated in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, will place significant demands on water and compete with agriculture meant for food production. Thus, there is a great need to recycle water while producing algal biofuels. This study shows that when using a synthetic medium, soluble algal products, bacteria, and other inhibitors can be removed by centrifugation and enable water recycling. Average water recovery reached 84% and water could be recycled at least 10 times without reducing algal growth.

  2. Contagion effect of enabling or coercive use of costing model within the managerial couple in lean organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Israelsen, Poul

    In the lean strategy is enabling formalization behaviour expected at the lower levels of management to be successful. We study the contagion effect between the superior, middle manager, of the lower level manager. This effect is proposed to be a dominant contingency variable for the use of costing...... models at the lower levels of management. Thus the use of costing models at the middle manager level is an important key to be successful with the lean package....

  3. X-ray plane-wave diffraction effects in a crystal with third-order nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balyan, M. K., E-mail: mbalyan@ysu.am [Yerevan State University, Faculty of Physics (Armenia)

    2016-12-15

    The two-wave dynamical diffraction in the Laue geometry has been theoretically considered for a plane X-ray wave in a crystal with a third-order nonlinear response to the external field. An analytical solution to the problem stated is found for certain diffraction conditions. A nonlinear pendulum effect is analyzed. The nonlinear extinction length is found to depend on the incident-wave intensity. A pendulum effect of a new type is revealed: the intensities of the transmitted and diffracted waves periodically depend on the incidentwave intensity at a fixed crystal thickness. The rocking curves and Borrmann nonlinear effect are numerically calculated.

  4. Quantum dust magnetosonic waves with spin and exchange correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroof, R.; Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    Dust magnetosonic waves are studied in degenerate dusty plasmas with spin and exchange correlation effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, spin magnetization energy, and exchange correlation, a generalized dispersion relation is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The exchange-correlation potentials are used, based on the adiabatic local-density approximation, and can be described as a function of the electron density. For three different values of angle, the dispersion relation is reduced to three different modes under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effects of quantum corrections in the presence of dust concentration significantly modify the dispersive properties of these modes. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets) and in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, etc.)

  5. Unfocused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Induce Anabolic Effects in Rat Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.P. van der Jagt (Olav); T.M. Piscaer (Tom); W. Schaden (Wolfgang); J. Li; N. Kops (Nicole); H. Jahr (Holger); J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. de Jong (Marion); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock waves are known to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells toward osteoprogenitors and induce the expression of osteogenic-related growth hormones. The aim of this study was to investigate if and how extracorporeal shock waves

  6. The effect of statistical wind corrections on global wave forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Tom H.; Greenslade, Diana J. M.; Simmonds, Ian

    2013-10-01

    The skill of modern wave models is such that the quality of their forecasts is, to a large degree, determined by errors in the forcing wind field. This work explores the extent to which large-scale systematic biases in modelled waves from a third generation wave model can be attributed to the forcing winds. Three different sets of winds with known global bias characteristics are used to force the WAVEWATCH III model. These winds are based on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's ACCESS model output, with different statistical corrections applied. Wave forecasts are verified using satellite altimeter data. It is found that a negative bias in modelled Significant Wave Height (Hs) has its origins primarily in the forcing, however, the reduction of systematic wind biases does not result in universal improvement in modelled Hs. A positive bias is present in the Southern Hemisphere due primarily to an overestimation of high Hs values in the Southern Ocean storm tracks. A positive bias is also present in the east Pacific and East Indian Ocean. This is due both to the over-prediction of waves in the Southern Ocean and lack of swell attenuation in the wave model source terms used. Smaller scale features are apparent, such as a positive bias off the Cape of Good Hope, and a negative bias off Cape Horn. In some situations, internal wave model error has been compensated for by error in the forcing winds.

  7. Numerical modelling of wind effects on breaking waves in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua

    2017-10-01

    Wind effects on periodic breaking waves in the surf zone have been investigated in this study using a two-phase flow model. The model solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k - 𝜖 turbulence model simultaneously for the flows both in the air and water. Both spilling and plunging breakers over a 1:35 sloping beach have been studied under the influence of wind, with a focus during wave breaking. Detailed information of the distribution of wave amplitudes and mean water level, wave-height-to-water-depth ratio, the water surface profiles, velocity, vorticity, and turbulence fields have been presented and discussed. The inclusion of wind alters the air flow structure above water waves, increases the generation of vorticity, and affects the wave shoaling, breaking, overturning, and splash-up processes. Wind increases the water particle velocities and causes water waves to break earlier and seaward, which agrees with the previous experiment.

  8. Effect of horizontal wave barriers on ground vibration propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, L; Laulagnet, B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a method to mitigate ground surface vibration through a flexural plate coupled to the ground and acting as a horizontal wave barrier. Using the thin plate hypothesis, two flexural plates are coupled to the ground, the first plate being the excited plate and the second plate the horizontal wave barrier. For instance, the first plate may represent a slab track and be excited by the tramway wheels. A solution to the problem can be found using a spatial two-dimensional Fourier transform of the elastodynamics equation for the ground and a modal decomposition for the flexural plate vibration. The authors show that vibration is substantially mitigated by the horizontal wave barrier and depends on its thickness and width. When the top surface wavelength becomes smaller than twice the plate width, the horizontal wave barrier acts as a wave barrier in the frequency range of interest, i.e., from 20 Hz.

  9. Fluctuation mechanisms in superconductors nanowire single-photon counters, enabled by effective top-down manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolf, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Holger Bartolf discusses state-of-the-art detection concepts based on superconducting nanotechnology as well as sophisticated analytical formulæ that model dissipative fluctuation-phenomena in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. Such knowledge is desirable for the development of advanced devices which are designed to possess an intrinsic robustness against vortex-fluctuations and it provides the perspective for honorable fundamental science in condensed matter physics. Especially the nanowire detector allows for ultra-low noise detection of signals with single-photon sensitivity and GHz repetition rates. Such devices have a huge potential for future technological impact and might enable unique applications (e.g. high rate interplanetary deep-space data links from Mars to Earth). Contents Superconducting Single-Photon Detectors Nanotechnological Manufacturing; Scale: 10 Nanometer Berezinskii-Kosterlitz Thouless (BKT) Transition, Edge-Barrier, Phase Slips Target Groups Researchers and students of...

  10. Spin wave generation by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Labanowski, Dominic; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2017-07-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) on piezoelectric substrates can excite spin wave resonance (SWR) in magnetostrictive films through magnetoelastic coupling. This acoustically driven SWR enables the excitation of a single spin wave mode with an in-plane wave vector k matched to the magnetoelastic wave vector. A 2D frequency domain finite element model is presented that fully couples elastodynamics, micromagnetics, and piezoelectricity with interface spin pumping effects taken into account. It is used to simulate SAW driven SWR on a ferromagnetic and piezoelectric heterostructure device with an interdigital transducer configuration. These results, for the first time, present the spatial distribution of magnetization components that, together with elastic wave, exponentially decays along the propagation direction due to magnetic damping. The results also show that the system transmission rate S21(dB) can be tuned by both an external bias field and the SAW wavevector. Acoustic spin pumping at magnetic film/normal metal interface leads to damping enhancement in magnetic films that decreases the energy absorption rate from elastic energy. This weakened interaction between the magnetic energy and elastic energy leads to a lower evanescence rate of the SAW that results in a longer distance propagation. With strong magnetoelastic coupling, the SAW driven spin wave is able to propagate up to 1200 μm. The results give a quantitative indication of the acoustic spin pumping contribution to linewidth broadening.

  11. Pulsed short-wave diathermy effects on human fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan; Lewis, Martyn; Mills, Pauline; Kielty, Cay

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the influence of pulsed short-wave diathermy (PSWD) on fibroblast and chondrocyte cell proliferation rates and to establish the influences of different dosages applied. Four single-blind trials. Laboratory, in vitro study. Human adult dermal fibroblast and chondrocyte cells were plated at known concentrations and incubated for 5 days. Exposure to PSWD, twice daily, on days 2, 3, and 4. After crystal violet staining (day 5), optical density (cell number) was determined spectrophotometrically. PSWD, given at mean power of 48W for 10 minutes, increased fibroblast proliferation compared with control groups (P<.001). There was a relationship between cell proliferation and the amount of energy given (P<0.001). The optimal mean power for proliferation was estimated to be 13.8W. While keeping mean power constant at 6W, altering pulse duration and pulse repetition rate dosage parameters did not have a significant effect on proliferation (P=.519). Chondrocyte proliferation also increased with PSWD exposure of 6W at 10 minutes duration (P=.015). In addition, treatment time was significantly associated with chondrocyte proliferation (P<.001). PSWD is associated with increased rates of fibroblast and chondrocyte proliferation in vitro, which is dose dependent. These results contribute to an understanding of the physiologic mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of PSWD. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  12. Geodetic refraction effects of electromagnetic wave propagation through the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    With very few exceptions, geodetic measurements use electro­ magnetic radiation in order to measure directions, distances, time delays, and Doppler frequency shifts, to name the main ter­ restrial and space observables. Depending on the wavelength of the radiation and the purpose of the measurements, the follow­ ing parameters of the electromagnetic wave are measured: ampli­ tude, phase, angle-of-arrival, polarisation and frequency. Ac­ curate corrections have to be applied to the measurements in order to take into account the effects of the intervening medium between transmitter and receiver. The known solutions use at­ mospheric models, special observation programs, remote sensing techniques and instrumental methods. It has been shown that the effects of the earth's atmospheric envelope present a fundamental limitation to the accuracy and precision of geodetic measurements. This applies equally to ter­ restrial and space applications. Instrumental accuracies are al­ ready below the atmospherically i...

  13. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Functions in Senile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter.

  14. Correlation of Microseisms Properties with Global Ocean Wave Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, M. L.; Davis, P. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Graham, N.; Estrin, D.

    2009-12-01

    We are exploring the correlation of daily microseism travel times, amplitude, and azimuth along the linear MASE seismic array with global wave height and global sources of microseisms. The MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE) was a 100 station 500km linear broadband seismic array deployed for 2 years across Mexico. The time series of daily travel times between pairs of stations, determined from noise correlation, fluctuates by up to two seconds, and are correlated with one another across independent pairs of nearly aligned stations. It is well known that the fluctuations are due to the changing location of microseisms sources over time. The sources must be in the far-field because the travel time fluctuations are common mode across the array. We have successfully modeled the fluctuations between stations by describing the phase change introduced by the biased energy from the off receiver-line sources. We have begun searching for an external model to correlate our results to and potentially track the bias sources over time. Our search has focused on the global wave height, wave-wave interaction intensity (Ψ), microseism source intensity (Ψ_c), and other wave parameters obtained by running the Wavewatch III wave modeling framework. Our most successful correlation has been between the observed microseism azimuth with the predicted microseism azimuth derived from the global wave height. Further, the predicted azimuth provides a solution to the micoseism travel time fluctuations found from the noise correlation which are biased by asymmetrically arriving energy.

  15. Effect of hydraulic and structural parameters on the wave run-up over the berm breakwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Milanian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to investigate the effect of berm breakwater on wave run-up. A total of 200 numerical analysis tests have been carried out in this paper to investigate the effect of berm width, wave height, and wave period on the wave run-up, using an integrating technique of Computer-Aided Design (CAD and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Direct application of Navier Stokes equations within the berm width has been used to provide a more reliable approach for studying the wave run-up over berm breakwaters. A well tested Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS code with the Volume of Fluid (VOF scheme was adopted for numerical computations. The computational results were compared with theoretical data to validate the model outputs. Numerical results showed that the simulation method can provide accurate estimations for wave run-up over berm breakwaters. It was found that the wave run-up may be decreased by increasing the berm width up to about 36 percent. Furthermore, the wave run-up may increase by increasing the wave height and wave period up to about 53 and 36 percent, respectively. These results may convince the engineers to use this model for design of berm breakwater in actual scale by calculating the Reynolds numbers.

  16. Short Wave Multipolar Antenna for Propagation by NVIS Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Igor; Martins, Maria João; Baptista, António; Gonçalves, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this papper is to design, build and test an antenna resonant at the frequencies of 4, 5, 6, and 7 MHz, in the high frequency band (HF). With this antenna we want to explore and use NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Sky wave), which consists in using the ionosphere as a reflector layer of sky waves, that reach the ionosphere with angles near vertical incidence. When reflected, these waves achieve distances from dozens to hundreds of kilometers for the established communication. F...

  17. The effect of educational intervention on girl's behavior regarding nutrition: Applying the beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, and enabling factors

    OpenAIRE

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Hazavei, Mohammad Mehdi; Entezari, Mohammad Hassan; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an educational program based on the Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors (BASNEF) Model on the nutritional behavior among second-grade, middle school, female students in Isfahan city. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on 72 students. The samples were randomly divided in two groups (36 in the intervention group and 36 in the control group). The data collection tools...

  18. Activating Peripheral Innate Immunity Enables Safe and Effective Oncolytic Virotherapy in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukxmi Balathasan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The oncolytic mutant vesicular stomatitis virus VSVΔ51 achieves robust efficacy in multiple extracranial tumor models. Yet for malignancies of the brain, direct intratumoral infusion of VSVΔ51 causes lethal virus-induced neuropathology. Here, we have developed a novel therapeutic regime that uses peripheral immunization with a single sub-lethal dose of VSVΔ51 to establish an acute anti-viral state that enables the safe intracranial (IC infusion of an otherwise lethal dose of VSVΔ51 within just 6 hr. Although type I interferons alone appeared insufficient to explain this protective phenotype, serum isolated at early time points from primed animals conferred protection against an IC dose of virus. Adaptive immune populations had minimal contributions. Finally, the therapeutic utility of this novel strategy was demonstrated by peripherally priming and intracranially treating mice bearing aggressive CT2A syngeneic astrocytomas with VSVΔ51. Approximately 25% of animals achieved complete regression of established tumors, with no signs of virus-induced neurological impairment. This approach may harness an early warning system in the brain that has evolved to protect the host against otherwise lethal neurotropic viral infections. We have exploited this protective mechanism to safely and efficaciously treat brain tumors with an otherwise neurotoxic virus, potentially widening the available treatment options for oncolytic virotherapy in the brain.

  19. Activating Peripheral Innate Immunity Enables Safe and Effective Oncolytic Virotherapy in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balathasan, Lukxmi; Tang, Vera A; Yadollahi, Beta; Brun, Jan; Labelle, Melanie; Lefebvre, Charles; Swift, Stephanie L; Stojdl, David F

    2017-12-15

    The oncolytic mutant vesicular stomatitis virus VSVΔ51 achieves robust efficacy in multiple extracranial tumor models. Yet for malignancies of the brain, direct intratumoral infusion of VSVΔ51 causes lethal virus-induced neuropathology. Here, we have developed a novel therapeutic regime that uses peripheral immunization with a single sub-lethal dose of VSVΔ51 to establish an acute anti-viral state that enables the safe intracranial (IC) infusion of an otherwise lethal dose of VSVΔ51 within just 6 hr. Although type I interferons alone appeared insufficient to explain this protective phenotype, serum isolated at early time points from primed animals conferred protection against an IC dose of virus. Adaptive immune populations had minimal contributions. Finally, the therapeutic utility of this novel strategy was demonstrated by peripherally priming and intracranially treating mice bearing aggressive CT2A syngeneic astrocytomas with VSVΔ51. Approximately 25% of animals achieved complete regression of established tumors, with no signs of virus-induced neurological impairment. This approach may harness an early warning system in the brain that has evolved to protect the host against otherwise lethal neurotropic viral infections. We have exploited this protective mechanism to safely and efficaciously treat brain tumors with an otherwise neurotoxic virus, potentially widening the available treatment options for oncolytic virotherapy in the brain.

  20. Capturing Safety Requirements to Enable Effective Task Allocation Between Humans and Automaton in Increasingly Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Natasha A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a current drive towards enabling the deployment of increasingly autonomous systems in the National Airspace System (NAS). However, shifting the traditional roles and responsibilities between humans and automation for safety critical tasks must be managed carefully, otherwise the current emergent safety properties of the NAS may be disrupted. In this paper, a verification activity to assess the emergent safety properties of a clearly defined, safety critical, operational scenario that possesses tasks that can be fluidly allocated between human and automated agents is conducted. Task allocation role sets were proposed for a human-automation team performing a contingency maneuver in a reduced crew context. A safety critical contingency procedure (engine out on takeoff) was modeled in the Soar cognitive architecture, then translated into the Hybrid Input Output formalism. Verification activities were then performed to determine whether or not the safety properties held over the increasingly autonomous system. The verification activities lead to the development of several key insights regarding the implicit assumptions on agent capability. It subsequently illustrated the usefulness of task annotations associated with specialized requirements (e.g., communication, timing etc.), and demonstrated the feasibility of this approach.

  1. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  2. Effect of CABG on P-wave Dispersion and the Relationship between AF and P-wave Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Khosropanah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common complication after CABG. It is associated with doubling ofmortality rate and increased incidence of CHF, MI, renal insufficiency, and stroke which prolongs hospital stayand is associated with increased rate of re-hospitalization.In this study we examined the effect of CABG on atrial electrophysiology as reflected by P-wave dispersion.Patients and Methods: A total of 197 consecutive patients undergoing elective CABG due to CAD were monitoredfor 4 days in hospital and their daily ECGs were obtained. .Differences in P-wave dispersions were comparedbetween the patients who developed AF and those maintaining sinus rhythms.Results: Post-operative AF occurred in 18.2% of patients, who showed statistically significant increase of Pwave duration, in lead aVL of pre-op ECG (79.4±25.0 vs 70.1±22.4; P = 0.032. In addition, P wave dispersionwas significantly increased on first and third days of post-op period (77.2±22.0 vs 67.5±22.2; P=0.018 and(69.4±22.7 vs 61.1±20.3; P= 0.035 respectively, in those developing AF rhythm compared to patients remainingin sinus rhythm .Conclusion: Our result indicates that P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for development of AF in patients undergoingCABG.

  3. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal's method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth's ionosphere.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of wind waves: multifractal phase/time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mellen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the bispectral coherence method, phase/time analysis of analytic signals is another promising avenue for the investigation of phase effects in wind waves. Frequency spectra of phase fluctuations obtained from both sea and laboratory experiments follow an F-β power law over several decades, suggesting that a fractal description is appropriate. However, many similar natural phenomena have been shown to be multifractal. Universal multifractals are quantified by two additional parameters: the Lévy index 0 α 2 for the type of multifractal and the co-dimension 0 C1 1 for intermittence. The three parameters are a full statistical measure the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis of laboratory flume data is reported here and the results indicate that the phase fluctuations are 'hard multifractal' (α > 1. The actual estimate is close to the limiting value α = 2,  which is consistent with Kolmogorov's lognormal model for turbulent fluctuations. Implications for radar and sonar backscattering from the sea surface are briefly considered.

  5. Propagation effect of gravitational wave on detector response

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Zhao, Zhi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    The response of a detector to gravitational wave is a function of frequency. When the time a photon moving around in the Fabry-Perot cavities is the same order of the period of a gravitational wave, the phase-difference due to the gravitational wave should be an integral along the path. We present a formula description for detector response to gravitational wave with varied frequencies. The LIGO data for GW150914 and GW 151226 are reexamined in this framework. For GW150924, the traveling time of a photon in the LIGO detector is just a bit larger than a half period of the highest frequency of gravitational wave and the similar result is obtained with LIGO and Virgo collaborations. However, we are not always so luck. In the case of GW151226, the time of a photon traveling in the detector is larger than the period of the highest frequency of gravitational wave and the announced signal cannot match well the template with the initial black hole masses 14.2M$_\\odot$ and 7.5M$_\\odot$.

  6. Effect of wave frequency and directional spread on shoreline runup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guza, R. T.; Feddersen, Falk

    2012-06-01

    Wave breaking across the surf zone elevates the mean water level at the shoreline (setup), and drives fluctuations about the mean (runup). Runup often is divided into sea-swell (0.04-0.3 Hz) and lower frequency infragravity (0.00-0.04 Hz) components. With energetic incident waves, runup is dominated by infragravity frequencies, and total water levels (combined setup and runup) can exceed 3 m, significantly contributing to coastal flooding and erosion. Setup and runup observations on sandy beaches are scattered about empirical parameterizations based on near-shoreline beach slope and deep water wave height and wavelength. Accurate parameterizations are needed to determine flooding and erosion risk to coastal ecosystems and communities. Here, numerical simulations with the Boussinesq wave model funwaveC are shown to statistically reproduce typical empirical setup and runup parameterizations. Furthermore, the model infragravity runup Rs(ig) strongly depends on the incident wave directional and frequency spread (about the mean direction and peak frequency). Realistic directional spread variations change Rs(ig) equivalent to a factor of two variation in incident wave height. The modeled Rs(ig) is shown to vary systematically with a new, non-dimensional spreading parameter that involves peak frequency, frequency spread, and directional spread. This suggests a new parameterization for Rs(ig) potentially useful to predict coastal flooding and erosion.

  7. Numerical study of the synergy effects of electron cyclotron wave and two lower-hybrid waves in the current drive process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youlei; Xiang, Nong; Hu, Ye Min

    2017-08-01

    In recent experiments on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, the electron cyclotron wave and the two lower-hybrid waves at different frequencies, i.e., 4.6 GHz and 2.45 GHz, are applied simultaneously to sustain and control the plasma current. To investigate the synergy effects of the three waves, the Fokker-Planck equation with the quasi-linear diffusions induced by the three waves is solved numerically with the CQL3D code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992)]. It is found that there might be strong synergy effects between the three waves. The electrons in the low velocity region in the velocity space can be accelerated perpendicularly by the electron cyclotron wave, and their parallel velocities can be increased due to scattering and fall into the resonance regions of the lower-hybrid waves. Therefore, such processes may bring more electrons to resonate with the lower-hybrid waves and enhance the current drive of the lower-hybrid waves. The synergy effects strongly depend on the distance between the resonance regions in the velocity space of the three waves.

  8. Effect of fracture compliance on wave propagation within a fluid-filled fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Korneev, Valeri A

    2014-06-01

    Open and partially closed fractures can trap seismic waves. Waves propagating primarily within fluid in a fracture are sometimes called Krauklis waves, which are strongly dispersive at low frequencies. The behavior of Krauklis waves has previously been examined for an open, fluid-filled channel (fracture), but the impact of finite fracture compliance resulting from contacting asperities and porous fillings in the fracture (e.g., debris, proppants) has not been fully investigated. In this paper, a dispersion equation is derived for Krauklis wave propagation in a fracture with finite fracture compliance, using a modified linear-slip-interface model (seismic displacement-discontinuity model). The resulting equation is formally identical to the dispersion equation for the symmetric fracture interface wave, another type of guided wave along a fracture. The low-frequency solutions of the newly derived dispersion equations are in good agreement with the exact solutions available for an open fracture. The primary effect of finite fracture compliance on Krauklis wave propagation is to increase wave velocity and attenuation at low frequencies. These effects can be used to monitor changes in the mechanical properties of a fracture.

  9. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  10. Challenging bullwhip effect dynamics with electronically enabled-supply chain management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Patmond Mbhele

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The bullwhip effect shows the dynamics of accumulating order rate that exceeds the tentatively stable actual demand rate. This paper aimed to assess the relative role of e-SCM systems as consumer demand orders cascading upstream supply chain network. The study’s population, consisting of the managers (senior and functional levels including supervisory level (non-managerial from retail sales, logistics, warehousing, marketing, manufacturing and IT hubs organisations, comprised of 460 respondents. In order to achieve the paper’s objective, the researcher developed and distributed a survey questionnaire and collected and analysed the data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. The empirical results from the study reveal that business-to-business information technology (B2BIT diffusion frequencies have an effect on supply chain performance and e-SCM implementation promotes connectivity among supply chain partners to entrench commitment of the exchanged demand order information to mitigate the bullwhip effect

  11. Effect of fluid viscosity on wave propagation in a cylindrical bore in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Wave propagation in a cylindrical bore filled with viscous liquid and situated in a micropolar elastic medium of infinite extent is studied. Frequency equation for surface wave propagation near the surface of the cylindrical bore is obtained and the effect of viscosity and micropolarity on dispersion curves is observed.

  12. Wave attenuation by submerged vegetation: combining the effect of organism traits and tidal current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, M.; Bouma, T.J.; Amos, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate wave height prediction along the shore plays an important role in coastal protection and management. To account for the effect of submerged vegetation in wave-attenuation models, it is important to understand how the interaction between vegetation characteristics and hydrodynamic forcing

  13. Effects of crack-dilatancy on Rayleigh waves in fluid-saturated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, aspect (thickness to radius) ratio of (circular) cracks may not have much effect on the velocity of Rayleigh waves. The opening of surface pores may be an important reason for a faster propagation of Rayleigh waves in any realistic elastic medium. Finally, the dilatancy due to the growth of cracks up to their ...

  14. 3-D Effects Force Reduction of Short-Crested Non-Breaking Waves on Caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of wave short-crestedness on the horizontal wave force on a caisson is twofold. The one is the force reduction due to the reduction of point pressure on the caisson, named point-pressure reduction. The other is the force reduction due to the fact that the peak pressures do not occur si...

  15. Collaborative Activities Enabled by GroupScribbles (GS): An Exploratory Study of Learning Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Ng, Foo-Keong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory cycle of a design-based research project and examines the learning effectiveness of collaborative activities that are supported by the GroupScribbles (GS) software technology in two Singapore primary science classrooms. The students had ten weeks of GS-based lessons in science, which were…

  16. Local-field effects and nanostructuring for controlling optical properties and enabling novel optical phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgaleva, Ksenia

    My Ph. D. thesis is devoted to the investigation of the methods of controlling and improving the linear and nonlinear optical properties of materials. Within my studies, two approaches are considered: nanostructuring and invoking local-field effects. These broad topics involve various projects that I have undertaken during my Ph. D. research. The first project is on composite laser gain media. It involves both nanostructuring and using local-field effects to control the basic laser parameters, such as the radiative lifetime, small-signal gain and absorption, and the saturation intensity. While being involved in this project, I have performed both theoretical and experimental studies of laser characteristics of composite materials. In particular, I have developed simple theoretical models for calculating the effective linear susceptibilities of layered and Maxwell Garnett composite materials with a gain resonance in one of their components. The analysis of the results given by the models suggests that local-field effects provide considerable freedom in controlling the optical properties of composite laser gain media. I have also experimentally measured the radiative lifetime of Nd:YAG nanopowder suspended in different liquids to extract information regarding local-field effects. The second project is devoted to the investigation of a not-well-known phenomenon that local-field effects can induce, which is microscopic cascading in nonlinear optics. This project involves the theoretical prediction of local-field-induced microscopic cascading effect in the fifth-order nonlinear response and its first experimental observation. This effect has been mostly overlooked or underestimated, but could prove useful in quantum optics. I have shown that, under certain conditions, the microscopic cascaded contribution can be a dominant effect in high-order nonlinearities. The third project is about characterization of laser performance of a new dye, oligofluorene, embedded into

  17. Effect of random surface inhomogeneities on spectral properties of dielectric-disk microresonators: theory and modeling at millimeter wave range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapolskii, E M; Eremenko, Z E; Tarasov, Yu V

    2009-04-01

    The influence of random axially homogeneous surface roughness on spectral properties of dielectric resonators of circular disk form is studied both theoretically and experimentally. To solve the equations governing the dynamics of electromagnetic fields, the method of eigenmode separation is applied previously developed with reference to inhomogeneous systems subject to arbitrary external static potential. We prove theoretically that it is the gradient mechanism of wave-surface scattering that is highly responsible for nondissipative loss in the resonator. The influence of side-boundary inhomogeneities on the resonator spectrum is shown to be described in terms of effective renormalization of mode wave numbers jointly with azimuth indices in the characteristic equation. To study experimentally the effect of inhomogeneities on the resonator spectrum, the method of modeling in the millimeter wave range is applied. As a model object, we use a dielectric disk resonator (DDR) fitted with external inhomogeneities randomly arranged at its side boundary. Experimental results show good agreement with theoretical predictions as regards the predominance of the gradient scattering mechanism. It is shown theoretically and confirmed in the experiment that TM oscillations in the DDR are less affected by surface inhomogeneities than TE oscillations with the same azimuth indices. The DDR model chosen for our study as well as characteristic equations obtained thereupon enable one to calculate both the eigenfrequencies and the Q factors of resonance spectral lines to fairly good accuracy. The results of calculations agree well with obtained experimental data.

  18. Limiting the effects of earthquakes on gravitational-wave interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael; Harms, Jan; Biscans, Sebastien; Buchanan, Christopher; Coughlin, Eric; Donovan, Fred; Fee, Jeremy; Gabbard, Hunter; Guy, Michelle; Mukund, Nikhil; Perry, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are susceptible to high-magnitude teleseismic events, which can interrupt their operation in science mode and significantly reduce the duty cycle. It can take several hours for a detector to stabilize enough to return to its nominal state for scientific observations. The down time can be reduced if advance warning of impending shaking is received and the impact is suppressed in the isolation system with the goal of maintaining stable operation even at the expense of increased instrumental noise. Here we describe an early warning system for modern gravitational-wave observatories. The system relies on near real-time earthquake alerts provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Hypocenter and magnitude information is generally available in 5 to 20 minutes of a significant earthquake depending on its magnitude and location. The al...

  19. Wave propagation phenomena in metamaterials for retrieving of effective parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Ha, S.

    2011-01-01

    into account propagation of eigen-waves in multilayered structures (thicknesses 10-100 unit cells). Thus, the question of pa-rameters convergence is naturally resolved in our approach. The method has been tested on complex three-dimensional structures like a split-cube-in-carcass and with circular polarized...... waves on chiral MMs [1, 2]. Elaborating our approach the new method has been established, where the unit-cell volume and face field averaging procedures define wave and input (Bloch) impedances correspond-ingly. The first part of the method involves the extraction of the dominating (fundamental) Bloch...... between constitutive elements, multipoles resonances, multimode or photonic crystal (diffraction type) regimes. There are also technical limitations of the retrieval methods connected with very strong losses, branching ambiguity, convergence to bulk parameters, etc. Moreover, most of the simple methods...

  20. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    OpenAIRE

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; Jean E. McLain; Watts, George S; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic ...

  1. Nanoscale triboelectric-effect-enabled energy conversion for sustainably powering portable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-12-12

    Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based on triboelectric effect has been proven to be simple, cost-effective, and robust. However, its output is still insufficient for sustainably driving electronic devices/systems. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed arch-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) by utilizing the contact electrification between a polymer thin film and a metal thin foil. The working mechanism of the TENG was studied by finite element simulation. The output voltage, current density, and energy volume density reached 230 V, 15.5 μA/cm(2), and 128 mW/cm(3), respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated. The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a lithium ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a commercial cell phone, which is the first demonstration of the nanogenerator for driving personal mobile electronics, opening the chapter of impacting general people's life by nanogenerators.

  2. Toward responsible development and effective risk management of nano-enabled products in the U.S. construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Gavin H.; Lippy, Bruce E., E-mail: blippy@cpwr.com; Cooper, Michael R. [CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training (United States); Marsick, Daniel [Marsick Consulting, LLC (United States); Burrelli, Leonard G.; Griffin, Kelsey N. [Environmental Profiles, Inc. (United States); Segrave, Alan M. [Bureau Veritas North America, Inc. (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The global construction sector is experiencing major improvements to building materials used in large quantities through commercial applications of nanotechnology. Nano-enabled construction products hold great promise for energy efficiency and resource conservation, but risk assessments lag as new products emerge. This paper presents results from an inventory, survey, and exposure assessment conducted by the authors and explores these findings in the broader context of evolving research trends and responsible development of nanotechnology. An inventory of 458 reportedly nano-enabled construction products provided insight into product availability, potential exposures, and deficiencies in risk communication that are barriers to adoption of proactive safety measures. Seasoned construction trainers surveyed were largely unaware of the availability of nano-enabled construction products. Exposure assessment demonstrated the effectiveness of ventilation to reduce exposures during mechanical abrasion of photocatalytic tiles containing titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). Dissociated particles of TiO{sub 2} just above the nanoscale (138 nm) were detected in the debris collected during cutting of the tiles, but measurements were below recommended exposure limits for TiO{sub 2}. Exposure assessments remain scarce, and toxicological understanding primarily pertains to unincorporated nanomaterials; less is known about the occupational risks of nano-enabled construction products across their life cycle. Further research is needed to characterize and quantify exposure to debris released from nanocomposite materials for realistic risk assessment, and to ascertain how nanocomposite matrices, fillers, and degradation forces interact to affect release dynamics. Improving risk communication strategies and implementing safe work practices will cultivate responsible development of nanotechnology in construction, as will multidisciplinary research efforts.

  3. Periodicity effects of axial waves in elastic compound rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R. B.; Sorokin, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Floquet analysis is applied to the Bernoulli-Euler model for axial waves in a periodic rod. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the stop band borders are given and the topology of the stop band pattern is explained. Eigenfrequencies of the symmetric unit cell are determined by the Phase-closure Prin......Floquet analysis is applied to the Bernoulli-Euler model for axial waves in a periodic rod. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the stop band borders are given and the topology of the stop band pattern is explained. Eigenfrequencies of the symmetric unit cell are determined by the Phase...

  4. The effect of small-wave modulation on the electromagnetic bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto; Kim, Yunjin; Martin, Jan M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of small ocean waves by large waves on the physical mechanism of the EM bias is examined by conducting a numerical scattering experiment which does not assume the applicability of geometric optics. The modulation effect of the large waves on the small waves is modeled using the principle of conservation of wave action and includes the modulation of gravity-capillary waves. The frequency dependence and magnitude of the EM bias is examined for a simplified ocean spectral model as a function of wind speed. These calculations make it possible to assess the validity of previous assumptions made in the theory of the EM bias, with respect to both scattering and hydrodynamic effects. It is found that the geometric optics approximation is inadequate for predictions of the EM bias at typical radar altimeter frequencies, while the improved scattering calculations provide a frequency dependence of the EM bias which is in qualitative agreement with observation. For typical wind speeds, the EM bias contribution due to small-wave modulation is of the same order as that due to modulation by the nonlinearities of the large-scale waves.

  5. Effective work plan for conditioning of Saskatchewan pipeline data to enabled industry standard mapping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Geomatics Data Management Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Operators in the oil and gas industry need to access pipeline information to support their business. Several Industry Standard mapping systems are in use today, including AccuMap, geoscout and internal GIS software. This presentation discussed the issue of data accuracy and presented methods, sources and processes to condition and improve data. It emphasized the value of a custom database that integrates field data for effective information management. Accurate data leads to better decision making through consistent information and preservation of knowledge. The process is sustainable and companies become more proactive in regulatory compliance, operations, maintenance and production accounting. tabs., figs.

  6. Effect of focusing conditions on laser-induced shock waves at titanium-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Arpita; Khare, Alika

    2011-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of laser-induced shock waves at a titanium-water interface was analyzed using a beam deflection setup. The focusing conditions of the source laser were varied, and its effect onto the dynamics of shock waves was elucidated. For a tightly focused condition, the speed of the shock wave was ~6.4 Km/s, whereas for a defocused condition the velocities reduced to laser is focused a few millimeters above the target, i.e., within the water, the emission of dual shock waves was observed toward the rear side of the focal volume. These shock waves originate from the titanium-water interface as well as from the pure water breakdown region, respectively. The shock wave pressure is estimated from the shock wave velocity using the Newton's second law across a shock wave discontinuity. The shock wave pressure for a tightly focused condition was 18 GPa, whereas under a defocused condition the pressure experienced was ≤1 GPa in the proximity of target.

  7. Developing a mobile application to better inform patients and enable effective consultation in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbazoglu, Erokan; Salman, Yucel Batu; Yildirim, Mustafa Eren; Merdenyan, Burak; Ince, Ibrahim Furkan

    2016-01-01

    The field of dentistry lacks satisfactory tools to help visualize planned procedures and their potential results to patients. Dentists struggle to provide an effective image in their patient's mind of the end results of the planned treatment only through verbal explanations. Thus, verbal explanations alone often cannot adequately help the patients make a treatment decision. Inadequate attempts are frequently made by dentists to sketch the procedure for the patient in an effort to depict the treatment. These attempts however require an artistic ability not all dentists have. Real case photographs are sometimes of help in explaining and illustrating treatments. However, particularly in implant cases, real case photographs are often ineffective and inadequate. The purpose of this study is to develop a mobile application with an effective user interface design to support the dentist-patient interaction by providing the patient with illustrative descriptions of the procedures and the end result. Sketching, paper prototyping, and wire framing were carried out with the actual user's participation. Hard and soft dental tissues were modeled using three dimensional (3D) modeling programs and real cases. The application enhances the presentation to the patients of potential implants and implant supported prosthetic treatments with rich 3D illustrative content. The application was evaluated in terms of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness through an online survey. The application helps improve the information sharing behavior of dentists to enhance the patients' right to make informed decisions. The paper clearly demonstrates the relevance of interactive communication technologies for dentist-patient communication.

  8. The effects of latent heat release on the waves with Ekman pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of the effects of the latent heat release on the waves with both upper and lower boundary frictional effects is investigated. The influence of the vertical shear of the basic wind in these models will be investigated. These investigations will shed some light on the method of solution to the problem of including the effect of Ekman pumping on the moist baroclinic waves in the model of Tang and Fichtl.

  9. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  10. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  11. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and quasiparticle-tunneling blockade effect in s-wave/d-wave hybrid junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawabata, S.; Kawabata, S.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Ariando, A.; Verwijs, C.J.M.; Verwijs, C.J.M.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Kirtley, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) and the influence of nodal quasiparticles and zero energy bound states (ZESs) on MQT in s-wave/d-wave hybrid Josephson junctions. In contrast to d-wave/d-wave junctions, the low-energy quasiparticle dissipation resulting from

  12. 1 billion tons of nanostructure - segregation engineering enables confined transformation effects at lattice defects in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, D.; Ponge, D.; Wang, M.-M.; Herbig, M.; Belde, M.; Springer, H.

    2017-07-01

    The microstructure of complex steels can be manipulated by utilising the interaction between the local mechanical distortions associated with lattice defects, such as dislocations and grain boundaries, and solute components that segregate to them. Phenomenologically these phenomena can be interpreted in terms of the classical Gibbs adsorption isotherm, which states that the total system energy can be reduced by removing solute atoms from the bulk and segregating them at lattice defects. Here we show how this principle can be utilised through appropriate heat treatments not only to enrich lattice defects by solute atoms, but also to further change these decorated regions into confined ordered structural states or even to trigger localized decomposition and phase transformations. This principle, which is based on the interplay between the structure and mechanics of lattice defects on the one hand and the chemistry of the alloy’s solute components on the other hand, is referred to as segregation engineering. In this concept solute decoration to specific microstructural traps, viz. lattice defects, is not taken as an undesired effect, but instead seen as a tool for manipulating specific lattice defect structures, compositions and properties that lead to beneficial material behavior. Owing to the fairly well established underlying thermodynamic and kinetic principles, such local decoration and transformation effects can be tuned to proceed in a self-organised manner by adjusting (i) the heat treatment temperatures for matching the desired trapping, transformation or reversion regimes, and (ii) the corresponding timescales for sufficient solute diffusion to the targeted defects. Here we show how this segregation engineering principle can be applied to design self-organized nano- and microstructures in complex steels for improving their mechanical properties.

  13. Numerical study of the collar wave characteristics and the effects of grooves in acoustic logging while drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufeng; Guan, Wei; Hu, Hengshan; Xu, Minqiang

    2017-05-01

    Large-amplitude collar wave covering formation signals is still a tough problem in acoustic logging-while-drilling (LWD) measurements. In this study, we investigate the propagation and energy radiation characteristics of the monopole collar wave and the effects of grooves on reducing the interference to formation waves by finite-difference calculations. We found that the collar wave radiates significant energy into the formation by comparing the waveforms between a collar within an infinite fluid, and the acoustic LWD in different formations with either an intact or a truncated collar. The collar wave recorded on the outer surface of the collar consists of the outward-radiated energy direct from the collar (direct collar wave) and that reflected back from the borehole wall (reflected collar wave). All these indicate that the significant effects of the borehole-formation structure on collar wave were underestimated in previous studies. From the simulations of acoustic LWD with a grooved collar, we found that grooves broaden the frequency region of low collar-wave excitation and attenuate most of the energy of the interference waves by multireflections. However, grooves extend the duration of the collar wave and convert part of the collar-wave energy originally kept in the collar into long-duration Stoneley wave. Interior grooves are preferable to exterior ones because both the low-frequency and the high-frequency parts of the collar wave can be reduced and the converted inner Stoneley wave is relatively difficult to be recorded on the outer surface of the collar. Deeper grooves weaken the collar wave more greatly, but they result in larger converted Stoneley wave especially for the exterior ones. The interference waves, not only the direct collar wave but also the reflected collar wave and the converted Stoneley waves, should be overall considered for tool design.

  14. The effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain activity waves in conscious and aneasthetized rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komaki AR

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain's waves are produced by spontaneous activity of neurons. These waves are changed by neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS. Concentration of these neurotransmitters can be changed by various drugs and total power of brain waves also increase or decrease by these drugs. In this research effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain waves was investigated. Male wistar rats (weight 190-230 were aneasthetized with thiopental and two holes were made into the frontal and occipital area and two Ag/AgCl electrodes were fixed into these holes. One week after recovery, two electrodes were connected to the physiograph and the results were analyzed before and after intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of drugs by PC computer. Our results showed that intraperitoneal administration (5 mg/kg of diazepam reduced the depth of anesthesia. Conversely, intracerebroventricular injection of sulpiride increased the depth of anesthesia which was manifested by an increase in relative power of delta waves and reduction of relative power of alpha waves. This drug had a biphasic effect on EEG, at high doses in increased the depth of aneasthesia and total sleep. Wehteas depth of anesthesia was decreased at low dose. Simutanuos administration of sulpiride and quinpirole produced an effect on EEG similar to diazepam. As a result, biphasic effect of D2 agonist and antagonist drugs on brain waves are due to nonspecific action of these drugs on these receptors and this effect may be produced by other mechanisms

  15. Ambient temperature and added heat wave effects on hospitalizations in California from 1999 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbakov, Toki; Malig, Brian; Guirguis, Kristen; Gershunov, Alexander; Basu, Rupa

    2018-01-01

    Investigators have examined how heat waves or incremental changes in temperature affect health outcomes, but few have examined both simultaneously. We utilized distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM) to explore temperature associations and evaluate possible added heat wave effects on hospitalizations in 16 climate zones throughout California from May through October 1999-2009. We define heat waves as a period when daily mean temperatures were above the zone- and month-specific 95th percentile for at least two consecutive days. DLNMs were used to estimate climate zone-specific non-linear temperature and heat wave effects, which were then combined using random effects meta-analysis to produce an overall estimate for each. With higher temperatures, admissions for acute renal failure, appendicitis, dehydration, ischemic stroke, mental health, non-infectious enteritis, and primary diabetes were significantly increased, with added effects from heat waves observed for acute renal failure and dehydration. Higher temperatures also predicted statistically significant decreases in hypertension admissions, respiratory admissions, and respiratory diseases with secondary diagnoses of diabetes, though heat waves independently predicted an added increase in risk for both respiratory types. Our findings provide evidence that both heat wave and temperature exposures can exert effects independently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Bose–Einstein condensate; optical lattices; inhomogeneous nonlinearity. Abstract. Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and ...

  17. Solitary Wave Effects North of Strait of Messina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    solitary waves in the Gulf of Gioia, north of the Strait of Messina. Bollettino di Oceanologia Teorica ed Applicata VI (1), 3-14. Hopkins, T.S., Salusti...1985. Instituto di Fisica G. Marconi, Universita di Roma La Sapienza in collaborazione con IFA-CNR, Preprint No. 433, 15 Gennaio. Lamb, K., 1994

  18. The Parametric Instability of Alfven Waves: Effects of Temperature Anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tenerani, A.; Velli, M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 851, č. 2 (2017), 99/1-99/9 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * plasmas * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  19. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of torsional surface waves in an initially stressedanisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space. We assumethe quadratic inhomogeneity in rigidity and density in the lower half-space and irregularity is taken inthe form of ...

  20. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space. We assume the quadratic inhomogeneity in rigidity and density in the lower half-space and irregularity is taken in the form ...

  1. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Kil Park

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls (γν = 1. Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  2. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sang Kil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls ( 1 γv = 1. Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  3. The effect of nanoparticle uptake on cellular behavior: disrupting or enabling functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miserocchi G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Alice Panariti, Giuseppe Miserocchi, Ilaria RivoltaDepartment of Experimental Medicine, University of Milano Bicocca, Monza, ItalyAbstract: Nanoparticles (NPs are materials with overall dimensions in the nanoscale range. They have unique physicochemical properties, and have emerged as important players in current research in modern medicine. In the last few decades, several types of NPs and microparticles have been synthesized and proposed for use as contrast agents for diagnostics and imaging and for drug delivery; for example, in cancer therapy. Yet specific targeting that will improve their delivery still represents an unsolved challenge. The mechanism by which NPs enter the cell has important implications not only for their fate but also for their impact on biological systems. Several papers in the literature discuss the potential risks related to NP exposure, and more recently the concept that even sublethal doses of NPs may elicit a cell response has been proposed. In this review, we intend to present an overall view of cell mechanisms that may be perturbed by cell–NP interaction. Published data, in fact, emphasize that NPs should no longer be viewed only as simple carriers for biomedical applications, but that they can also play an active role in mediating biological effects.Keywords: nanoparticles, uptake, intracellular trafficking, bio compatibility

  4. Five task clusters that enable efficient and effective digitization of biological collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gil; Paul, Deborah; Riccardi, Gregory; Mast, Austin R

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and illustrates five major clusters of related tasks (herein referred to as task clusters) that are common to efficient and effective practices in the digitization of biological specimen data and media. Examples of these clusters come from the observation of diverse digitization processes. The staff of iDigBio (The U.S. National Science Foundation's National Resource for Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections) visited active biological and paleontological collections digitization programs for the purpose of documenting and assessing current digitization practices and tools. These observations identified five task clusters that comprise the digitization process leading up to data publication: (1) pre-digitization curation and staging, (2) specimen image capture, (3) specimen image processing, (4) electronic data capture, and (5) georeferencing locality descriptions. While not all institutions are completing each of these task clusters for each specimen, these clusters describe a composite picture of digitization of biological and paleontological specimens across the programs that were observed. We describe these clusters, three workflow patterns that dominate the implemention of these clusters, and offer a set of workflow recommendations for digitization programs.

  5. The four-flipper swimming method of plesiosaurs enabled efficient and effective locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscutt, Luke E; Dyke, Gareth; Weymouth, Gabriel D; Naish, Darren; Palmer, Colin; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-08-30

    The extinct ocean-going plesiosaurs were unique within vertebrates because they used two flipper pairs identical in morphology for propulsion. Although fossils of these Mesozoic marine reptiles have been known for more than two centuries, the function and dynamics of their tandem-flipper propulsion system has always been unclear and controversial. We address this question quantitatively for the first time in this study, reporting a series of precisely controlled water tank experiments that use reconstructed plesiosaur flippers scaled from well-preserved fossils. Our aim was to determine which limb movements would have resulted in the most efficient and effective propulsion. We show that plesiosaur hind flippers generated up to 60% more thrust and 40% higher efficiency when operating in harmony with their forward counterparts, when compared with operating alone, and the spacing and relative motion between the flippers was critical in governing these increases. The results of our analyses show that this phenomenon was probably present across the whole range of plesiosaur flipper motion and resolves the centuries-old debate about the propulsion style of these marine reptiles, as well as indicating why they retained two pairs of flippers for more than 100 million years. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Effective isolation of primo vessels in lymph using sound- and ultrasonic-wave stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do-Young; Lee, Hye-Rie; Rho, Min-Suk; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2014-12-01

    The effects of stimulation with sound and ultrasonic waves of a specific bandwidth on the microdissection of primo vessels in lymphatic vessels of rabbit were investigated. The primo vessels stained with alcian-blue dye injected in the lymph nodes were definitely visualized and more easily isolated by sound-wave vibration and ultrasonic stimulation applied to rabbits at various frequencies and intensities. With sound wave at 7 Hz and ultrasonic waves at 2 MHz, the probability of detecting the primo vessels was improved to 90%; however, without wave stimulation the probability of discovering primo vessels was about 50% only. Sound and ultrasonic waves at specific frequency bands should be effective for microdissection of the primo vessels in the abdominal lymph of rabbit. We suggest that oscillation of the primo vessels by sound and ultrasonic waves may be useful to visualize specific primo structure, and wave vibration can be a very supportive process for observation and isolation of the primo vessels of rabbits. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. In vivo effects of focused shock waves on tumor tissue visualized by fluorescence staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Petr; Zeman, Jan; Horak, Vratislav; Hoffer, Petr; Pouckova, Pavla; Holubova, Monika; Hosseini, S Hamid R; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sunka, Pavel; Benes, Jiri

    2015-06-01

    Shock waves can cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells and tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, understanding the mechanisms of shock wave interaction with tissues is limited. We have studied in vivo effects of focused shock waves induced in the syngeneic sarcoma tumor model using the TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical detection of caspase-3 and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Shock waves were produced by a multichannel pulsed-electrohydraulic discharge generator with a cylindrical ceramic-coated electrode. In tumors treated with shock waves, a large area of damaged tissue was detected which was clearly differentiated from intact tissue. Localization and a cone-shaped region of tissue damage visualized by TUNEL reaction apparently correlated with the conical shape and direction of shock wave propagation determined by high-speed shadowgraphy. A strong TUNEL reaction of nuclei and nucleus fragments in tissue exposed to shock waves suggested apoptosis in this destroyed tumor area. However, specificity of the TUNEL technique to apoptotic cells is ambiguous and other apoptotic markers (caspase-3) that we used in our study did not confirmed this observation. Thus, the generated fragments of nuclei gave rise to a false TUNEL reaction not associated with apoptosis. Mechanical stress from high overpressure shock wave was likely the dominant pathway of tumor damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Cyber-Based Data-Enabled Virtual Organization for Wind Load Effects on Civil Infrastructures: VORTEX-Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Kareem

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite many advances in the area of wind effects on structures in recent decades, research has been traditionally conducted within limited resources scattered geographically. With the trend toward increasingly complex designs of civil infrastructure combined with the escalating potential for losses by extreme wind events, a new culture of research needs to be established based on innovative and collaborative solutions for better management of the impact of extreme wind events. To address this change, this paper presents a new paradigm of a multiscale cyber-based laboratory framework for the analysis/design, modeling, and simulation of wind load effects based on an ongoing collaborative cyberinfrastructure-based platform, Virtual Organization for Reducing the Toll of EXtreme Winds (VORTEX-Winds, https://vortex-winds.org, and discusses its current status since its inception in 2007 and ongoing developments. This collaborative framework as it evolves would enable a paradigm shift by offering advanced cyber-enabled modules (e-modules for accelerating advances in research and education to achieve improved understanding and better modeling of wind effects on structures. Accordingly, it will enhance wind community’s analysis and design capabilities to address next-generation challenges posed by wind. Through empowering those without computational or experimental resources, the e-modules will encompass a large set of subject areas and topics categorized as Database-enabled design, Full-scale/Field site data repository, Statistical/Stochastic toolboxes, Tele-experimentation, Uncertainty modeling, Damage assessment, and Computational platforms. This prototype will allow access to the individual e-module, while it is envisaged that next level of development in VORTEX-Winds will have the capability for an automated and integrated analysis/design through a nexus of e-modules. A highlight of the e-modules currently completed or in development is presented

  9. Assessment of current effect on waves in a semi-enclosed basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.; Bergamasco, A.

    2012-04-01

    The wave-current interaction process in the semi-enclosed Adriatic Sea is studied using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system, which is used to exchange data fields between the ocean model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System) and the wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore). The 2-way data transfer between circulation and wave models is synchronous with ROMS providing current fields, free surface elevation, and bathymetry to SWAN. In particular, the 3-D current profiles are averaged using a formulation that integrates the near-surface velocity over a depth controlled by the spectral mean wave number. This coupling procedure is carried out up to coastal areas by means of an offline grid nesting. The parent grid covers the whole Adriatic Sea and has a horizontal resolution of 2.0 km, whereas the child grid resolution increases to 0.5 km but it is limited to the northern Adriatic Sea (Gulf of Venice), where the current effect on waves is investigated. The most frequent winds blowing on the Adriatic Sea are the so-called Bora and Sirocco which cause high waves in the Adriatic Sea, although Bora waves are generally fetch-limited. In fact, Bora winds blow orthogonal to the main basin axis (approximately aligned with the NW-SE direction), while Sirocco has large spatial scale being a southeasterly wind. For the numerical simulations, the meteorological forcings are provided by the operational meteorological model COSMO-I7, which is the Italian version of the COSMO Model, a mesoscale model developed in the framework of the COSMO Consortium. During the analysis period, the simulated wind, current and wave are compared with observations at the ISMAR oceanographic tower located off the Venice littoral. Wave heights and sea surface winds are also compared with satellite-derived data. To account for the variability of sea states during a storm, the expected maximum individual wave height in a sea storm with a given history is also

  10. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Orsenigo

    Full Text Available Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy. The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and

  11. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsenigo, Simone; Abeli, Thomas; Rossi, Graziano; Bonasoni, Paolo; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gandini, Maurizia; Mondoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy). The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and timing of emergence

  12. Effects of Autumn and Spring Heat Waves on Seed Germination of High Mountain Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsenigo, Simone; Abeli, Thomas; Rossi, Graziano; Bonasoni, Paolo; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Gandini, Maurizia; Mondoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Alpine plants are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate change and related extreme episodes, such as heat waves. Despite growing interest in the impact of heat waves on alpine plants, knowledge about their effects on regeneration is still fragmentary. Recruitment from seeds will be crucial for the successful migration and survival of these species and will play a key role in their future adaptation to climate change. In this study, we assessed the impacts of heat waves on the seed germination of 53 high mountain plants from the Northern Apennines (Italy). The seeds were exposed to laboratory simulations of three seasonal temperature treatments, derived from real data recorded at a meteorological station near the species growing site, which included two heat wave episodes that occurred both in spring 2003 and in autumn 2011. Moreover, to consider the effect of increasing drought conditions related to heat waves, seed germination was also investigated under four different water potentials. In the absence of heat waves, seed germination mainly occurred in spring, after seeds had experienced autumn and winter seasons. However, heat waves resulted in a significant increase of spring germination in c. 30% of the species and elicited autumn germination in 50%. When heat waves were coupled with drought, seed germination decreased in all species, but did not stop completely. Our results suggest that in the future, heat waves will affect the germination phenology of alpine plants, especially conditionally dormant and strictly cold-adapted chorotypes, by shifting the emergence time from spring to autumn and by increasing the proportion of emerged seedlings. The detrimental effects of heat waves on recruitment success is less likely to be due to the inhibition of seed germination per se, but rather due to seedling survival in seasons, and temperature and water conditions that they are not used to experiencing. Changes in the proportion and timing of emergence

  13. Strain-rate dependence of the effective viscosity under steady-wave shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.

    1981-05-15

    Relationships among Hugoniot pressure, effective viscosity, and strain rate under conditions of steady-wave shock compression are predicted based on the assumption of invariance of a shock property equal to the product of the energy dissipated in shock compression and the rise time of the steady wave. Effective viscosity is found to decrease as happrox.e/sup -1/2/, while strain rate increases as eapprox.p/sup 4//sub h/ with Hugoniot pressure. These results are consistent with steady-wave profile measurements on aluminum.

  14. Sound waves induce Volkov-like states, band structure and collimation effect in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Leyva, M; Naumis, Gerardo G

    2016-01-20

    We find exact states of graphene quasiparticles under a time-dependent deformation (sound wave), whose propagation velocity is smaller than the Fermi velocity. To solve the corresponding effective Dirac equation, we adapt the Volkov-like solutions for relativistic fermions in a medium under a plane electromagnetic wave. The corresponding electron-deformation quasiparticle spectrum is determined by the solutions of a Mathieu equation resulting in band tongues warped in the surface of the Dirac cones. This leads to a collimation effect of electron conduction due to strain waves.

  15. Effect of Accent Familiarity on Language Processing via Alpha and Beta Brain Wave Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachel Elizabeth Capps; Erick Van Buren; Brian Kluge; Sara Thompson; David F Nichols

    2016-01-01

    .... The current study was designed to test the effects of familiarity of geographically diverse accents on the amplitudes of relaxed, i.e., alpha (~10 Hz), and alert, i.e., beta (~20 Hz), brain waves...

  16. Spin wave amplification using the spin Hall effect in permalloy/platinum bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladii, O.; Henry, Y.; Bailleul, M. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Collet, M.; Garcia-Hernandez, K.; Cheng, C.; Bortolotti, P.; Cros, V.; Anane, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Xavier, S. [Thales Research and Technology, 1 Av. A. Fresnel, Campus de l' Ecole Polytechnique, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Kim, J.-V. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-05-16

    We investigate the effect of an electrical current on the attenuation length of a 900 nm wavelength spin-wave in a permalloy/Pt bilayer using propagating spin-wave spectroscopy. The modification of the spin-wave relaxation rate is linear in current density, reaching up to 14% for a current density of 2.3 × 10{sup 11} A/m{sup 2} in Pt. This change is attributed to the spin transfer torque induced by the spin Hall effect and corresponds to an effective spin Hall angle of 0.13, which is among the highest values reported so far. The spin Hall effect thus appears as an efficient way of amplifying/attenuating propagating spin waves.

  17. Effect of transient wave forcing on the behavior of arsenic in a sandy nearshore aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimbekova, S.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Waves cause large quantities of coastal water to recirculate across the groundwater-coastal water interface in addition to inducing complex groundwater flows in the nearshore aquifer. Due to the distinct chemical composition of recirculating coastal water compared with discharging terrestrial groundwater, wave-induced recirculations and flows can alter geochemical gradients in the nearshore aquifer which may subsequently affect the mobilization and transport of reactive pollutants (e.g., arsenic). The impact of seasonal geochemical and hydrological variability on the occurrence and mobility of arsenic near the groundwater-surface water interface has been shown previously in riverine settings, however, the impact of high frequency geochemical variations (e.g., varying wave conditions) on arsenic mobility in groundwater-surface water environments is unclear. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of intensified wave conditions on the behavior of arsenic in a nearshore aquifer to determine the factors regulating its mobility and transport to receiving coastal waters. Field investigations were conducted at a permeable beach on the Great Lakes during a period of intensified wave conditions (wave event). High spatial resolution pore water sampling captured the geochemical conditions in the nearshore aquifer prior to the wave event, immediately after the wave event and over a recovery period of 3 weeks following the wave event. Shifts in pH and redox potential (ORP) gradients in response to varying wave conditions caused shifts in the iron and arsenic distributions in the aquifer. Sediment analysis was combined with the pore water distributions to assess the release of sediment-bound arsenic in response to the varying wave conditions. Insight into the effect of transient forcing on arsenic mobility and transport in groundwater-surface water environments is important for evaluating the potential risks associated with this toxic metalloid. The findings of this

  18. Quantum electrostatic surface waves in a hybrid plasma waveguide: Effect of nano-sized slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mahmodi Moghadam, M.

    2017-10-01

    The propagation properties of surface plasmon (SP) waves are studied in a hybrid plasma waveguide (consisting of plasma-gap-dielectric layers) with quantum effects including the Fermi-pressure, the Bohm potential and the exchange-correlation interaction. By using a quantum hydrodynamic model and Maxwell's equations, the dispersion relation of SP waves is derived, which describes the quantum corrected features of the dispersion properties of such surface waves. Previous results in this context are recovered. It is found that the exchange-correlation interactions and the presence of the second dielectric layer drastically modify the behaviors of the surface plasmon waves. The implications of our finding are discussed in some particular cases of interest. Our finding is applicable for understanding the surface wave behaviors in nano-scale systems.

  19. Effects of Medium Characteristics on Laser RCS of Airplane with E-Wave Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam El-Ocla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plane wave incidence should be postulated to have an authentic target detection. Practically, the plane wave is incapable usually of keeping its power in the far field especially when propagating through an inhomogeneous medium. Consequently, we assume an incident beam wave with a finite width around the target. In this work, we calculate numerically a laser radar cross section (LRCS of conducting targets having smooth cross sections with inflection points such as airplane in random media. Effects of fluctuations intensity of random media on the LRCS performance are studied in this paper. E-wave polarization (E-wave incidence is considered while the mean target size is approximately twice the wavelength.

  20. [Therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shock wave combined with orthopaedic insole on plantar fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenguang; Sun, Shaodan; Li, Xuhong

    2014-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shock wave combined with orthopaedic insole on plantar fasciitis. A total of 153 plantar with plantar fasciitis were randomly divided into a combined group (n=51), an extracorporeal shock wave group (n=53) and an orthopaedic group (n=49). The combined group received treatment of both extracorporeal shock wave and orthopaedic insole while the extracorporeal shock wave or the orthopaedic group only received the treatment of extracorporeal shock wave or orthopaedic insole. The therapeutic parameters such as visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, continued walking time and thickness of the plantar fascia were monitored before and aft er the treatment for 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months, respectively. The VAS scores in the 3 groups were all reduced after the treatment compared with the corresponding scores before the therapy (Pplantar fascia was improved after the treatment (Pplantar fasciitis. It is recommended to spread in clinic.

  1. Effect of small ionospheric irregularities on radio wave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. C.; Fejer, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The ionospheric absorption of a radio wave caused by small-scale irregularities with a gaussian autocorrelation function is calculated for various values of the linear scale height, the radio frequency, the scale size of the irregularities, and the mean-square fractional electron density fluctuations. The absorption is due to scattering of the radio wave into plasma oscillations by the irregularities. It is concluded that the absorption due to such irregularities with a mean-square fractional electron density deviation greater than about 0.000001 exceeds the normal collisional height-integrated absorption. Absorption of this type could play a significant part in heating experiments or in an ionosphere containing naturally occurring irregularities.

  2. Dynamical 3-Space: Gravitational Wave Detection and the Shnoll Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothall D. P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shnoll has investigated the non-Poisson scatter of rate measurements in various phenomena such as biological and chemical reactions, radioactive decay, photodiode current leakage and germanium semiconductor noise, and attributed the scatter to cosmophysical factors. While Shnoll didn’t pinpoint the nature of the cosmophysical factors the Process Physics model of reality leads to a description of space, which is dynamic and fractal and exhibits reverberation eects, and which oers an explanation for the scattering anomaly. The work presented here shows a new way of generating the eects Shnoll discovered, through studying the phase dierence of RF EM waves travelling through a dual coaxial cable Gravitational Wave Detector experiment.

  3. Effects of PCB thickness on adjustable fountain wave soldering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ltd., 32 Ang Mo Kio Industrial Park 2, Singapore, Singapore e-mail: .... In the electronics assembly industry, wave soldering has numerous functions, such as component ..... 4.0. Vertical filling (%). 0. 20. 40. 60. 80. 100. Adjustable 0o. Conventional 6o y = -10.8x2 + 16.9x + 93.9. R² = 1 y = -1x2 - 30x + 123.3. R² = 1. Figure 18.

  4. Effect of Intense Sound Waves on a Stationary Gas Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, H; Ehret, L

    1950-01-01

    Intense sound waves with a resonant frequency of 5000 cycles per second were imposed on a stationary propane-air flame issuing from a nozzle. In addition to a slight increase of the flame velocity, a fundamental change both in the shape of the burning zone and in the flow pattern could be observed. An attempt is made to explain the origin of the variations in the flame configuration on the basis of transition at the nozzle from jet flow to potential flow.

  5. Limiting the effects of earthquakes on gravitational-wave interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Earle, Paul; Harms, Jan; Biscans, Sebastien; Buchanan, Christopher; Coughlin, Eric; Donovan, Fred; Fee, Jeremy; Gabbard, Hunter; Guy, Michelle; Mukund, Nikhil; Perry, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are susceptible to ground shaking from high-magnitude teleseismic events, which can interrupt their operation in science mode and significantly reduce their duty cycle. It can take several hours for a detector to stabilize enough to return to its nominal state for scientific observations. The down time can be reduced if advance warning of impending shaking is received and the impact is suppressed in the isolation system with the goal of maintaining stable operation even at the expense of increased instrumental noise. Here, we describe an early warning system for modern gravitational-wave observatories. The system relies on near real-time earthquake alerts provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Preliminary low latency hypocenter and magnitude information is generally available in 5 to 20 min of a significant earthquake depending on its magnitude and location. The alerts are used to estimate arrival times and ground velocities at the gravitational-wave detectors. In general, 90% of the predictions for ground-motion amplitude are within a factor of 5 of measured values. The error in both arrival time and ground-motion prediction introduced by using preliminary, rather than final, hypocenter and magnitude information is minimal. By using a machine learning algorithm, we develop a prediction model that calculates the probability that a given earthquake will prevent a detector from taking data. Our initial results indicate that by using detector control configuration changes, we could prevent interruption of operation from 40 to 100 earthquake events in a 6-month time-period.

  6. Limiting the effects of earthquakes on gravitational-wave interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Earle, Paul; Harms, Jan; Biscans, Sebastien; Buchanan, Christopher; Coughlin, Eric; Donovan, Fred; Fee, Jeremy; Gabbard, Hunter; Guy, Michelle; Mukund, Nikhil; Perry, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are susceptible to ground shaking from high-magnitude teleseismic events, which can interrupt their operation in science mode and significantly reduce their duty cycle. It can take several hours for a detector to stabilize enough to return to its nominal state for scientific observations. The down time can be reduced if advance warning of impending shaking is received and the impact is suppressed in the isolation system with the goal of maintaining stable operation even at the expense of increased instrumental noise. Here, we describe an early warning system for modern gravitational-wave observatories. The system relies on near real-time earthquake alerts provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Preliminary low latency hypocenter and magnitude information is generally available in 5 to 20 min of a significant earthquake depending on its magnitude and location. The alerts are used to estimate arrival times and ground velocities at the gravitational-wave detectors. In general, 90% of the predictions for ground-motion amplitude are within a factor of 5 of measured values. The error in both arrival time and ground-motion prediction introduced by using preliminary, rather than final, hypocenter and magnitude information is minimal. By using a machine learning algorithm, we develop a prediction model that calculates the probability that a given earthquake will prevent a detector from taking data. Our initial results indicate that by using detector control configuration changes, we could prevent interruption of operation from 40 to 100 earthquake events in a 6-month time-period.

  7. Effect of Local Thermal Equilibrium Misbalance on Long-wavelength Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Kumar, S.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2017-11-01

    Evolution of slow magnetoacoustic waves guided by a cylindrical magnetic flux tube that represents a coronal loop or plume, is modeled accounting for the effects of finite gas pressure, weak nonlinearity, dissipation by thermal conduction and viscosity, and the misbalance between the cooling by optically thin radiation and unspecified heating of the plasma. An evolutionary equation of the Burgers–Malthus type is derived. It is shown that the cooling/heating misbalance, determined by the derivatives of the combined radiative cooling and heating function, with respect to the density, temperature, and magnetic field at the thermal equilibrium affect the wave rather strongly. This effect may either cause additional damping, or counteract it, or lead to the gradual amplification of the wave. In the latter case, the coronal plasma acts as an active medium for the slow magnetoacoustic waves. The effect of the cooling/heating misbalance could be important for coronal slow waves, and could be responsible for certain discrepancies between theoretical results and observations, in particular, the increased or decreased damping lengths and times, detection of the waves at certain heights only, and excitation of compressive oscillations. The results obtained open up a possibility for the diagnostics of the coronal heating function by slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  8. Effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sungho; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-02-01

    Waves propagating in anisotropic media are subject to skewing effects due to the media having directional wave speed dependence, which is characterized by slowness curves. Likewise, the generation of second harmonics is sensitive to micro-scale damage that is generally not detectable from linear features of ultrasonic waves. Here, the effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in a transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate are numerically studied. The strain energy density function for a nonlinear transversely isotropic material is formulated in terms of the Green-Lagrange strain invariants. The guided wave mode pairs for cumulative second harmonic generation in the plate are selected in accordance with the internal resonance criteria - i.e., phase matching and non-zero power flux. Moreover, the skew angle dispersion curves for the mode pairs are obtained from the semi-analytical finite element method using the derivative of the slowness curve. The skew angles of the primary and secondary wave modes are calculated and wave propagation simulations are carried out using COMSOL. Numerical simulations revealed that the effect of skew angle mismatch can be significant for second harmonic generation in anisotropic media. The importance of skew angle matching on cumulative second harmonic generation is emphasized and the accompanying issue of the selection of internally resonant mode pairs for both a unidirectional transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate is demonstrated.

  9. Effect of Sound Waves on Decarburization Rate of Fe-C Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey V.; Sano, Masamichi

    2018-02-01

    Sound waves have the ability to propagate through a gas phase and, thus, to supply the acoustic energy from a sound generator to materials being processed. This offers an attractive tool, for example, for controlling the rates of interfacial reactions in steelmaking processes. This study investigates the kinetics of decarburization in molten Fe-C alloys, the surface of which was exposed to sound waves and Ar-O2 gas blown onto the melt surface. The main emphasis is placed on clarifying effects of sound frequency, sound pressure, and gas flow rate. A series of water model experiments and numerical simulations are also performed to explain the results of high-temperature experiments and to elucidate the mechanism of sound wave application. This is explained by two phenomena that occur simultaneously: (1) turbulization of Ar-O2 gas flow by sound wave above the melt surface and (2) motion and agitation of the melt surface when exposed to sound wave. It is found that sound waves can both accelerate and inhibit the decarburization rate depending on the Ar-O2 gas flow rate and the presence of oxide film on the melt surface. The effect of sound waves is clearly observed only at higher sound pressures on resonance frequencies, which are defined by geometrical features of the experimental setup. The resonance phenomenon makes it difficult to separate the effect of sound frequency from that of sound pressure under the present experimental conditions.

  10. Effect of Sound Waves on Decarburization Rate of Fe-C Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey V.; Sano, Masamichi

    2017-11-01

    Sound waves have the ability to propagate through a gas phase and, thus, to supply the acoustic energy from a sound generator to materials being processed. This offers an attractive tool, for example, for controlling the rates of interfacial reactions in steelmaking processes. This study investigates the kinetics of decarburization in molten Fe-C alloys, the surface of which was exposed to sound waves and Ar-O2 gas blown onto the melt surface. The main emphasis is placed on clarifying effects of sound frequency, sound pressure, and gas flow rate. A series of water model experiments and numerical simulations are also performed to explain the results of high-temperature experiments and to elucidate the mechanism of sound wave application. This is explained by two phenomena that occur simultaneously: (1) turbulization of Ar-O2 gas flow by sound wave above the melt surface and (2) motion and agitation of the melt surface when exposed to sound wave. It is found that sound waves can both accelerate and inhibit the decarburization rate depending on the Ar-O2 gas flow rate and the presence of oxide film on the melt surface. The effect of sound waves is clearly observed only at higher sound pressures on resonance frequencies, which are defined by geometrical features of the experimental setup. The resonance phenomenon makes it difficult to separate the effect of sound frequency from that of sound pressure under the present experimental conditions.

  11. The AMERE project: Enabling real-time detection of radiation effects in individual cells in deep space

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Meesen, Geert; Szpirer, Cedric; Scohy, Sophie; Cherukuri, Chaitanya; Evrard, Olivier; Hutsebaut, Xavier; Beghuin, Didier

    2012-12-01

    A major concern for long-term deep space missions is the detrimental impact of cosmic radiation on human health. Especially the presence of high-energy particles of high atomic mass (HZE) represents a serious threat. To contribute to a fundamental understanding of space radiation effects and to help improving risk assessment for humans on the Moon, the ESA Lunar Lander mission model payload includes a package dedicated to cell-based radiobiology experiments in the form of an Autonomous Microscope for Examination of Radiation Effects (AMERE). The purpose of this setup is to enable real-time visualization of DNA damage repair in living cells after traversal of HZE particles on the Moon. To assess the feasibility of this challenging experiment, we have analysed the biological and technological demands. In this article, we discuss the experimental concept, the biological considerations and describe the implications for system design.

  12. The Effect of a Twisted Magnetic Field on the Nature of Kink MHD Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, K.; Khalvandi, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    We consider a pressureless plasma in a thin magnetic-flux tube with a twisted magnetic field. We study the effect of twisted magnetic field on the nature of propagating kink waves. To do this, the restoring forces of oscillations in the linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) were obtained. In the presence of a twisted magnetic field, the ratio of the magnetic-tension force to the gradient of the magnetic pressure increases for the mode with negative azimuthal wave number, but it decreases for the mode with positive azimuthal wave number. For the kink mode with positive azimuthal mode number, the ratio of the forces is more affected by the twisted magnetic field in dense loops. For the kink mode with negative azimuthal mode number, the perturbed magnetic pressure is negligible under some conditions. The magnetic twist increases (diminishes) the damping of the kink waves with positive (negative) azimuthal mode number due to resonant absorption. Our conclusion is that introducing a twisted magnetic field breaks the symmetry between the nature of the kink waves with positive and negative azimuthal wave number, and the wave can be a purely Alfvénic wave in the entire loop.

  13. Effect of Oblique Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves on Relativistic Electron Scattering: CRRES Based Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the effect of oblique EMIC waves on relativistic electron scattering in the outer radiation belt using simultaneous observations of plasma and wave parameters from CRRES. The main findings can be s ummarized as follows: 1. In 1comparison with field-aligned waves, int ermediate and highly oblique distributions decrease the range of pitc h-angles subject to diffusion, and reduce the local scattering rate b y an order of magnitude at pitch-angles where the principle absolute value of n = 1 resonances operate. Oblique waves allow the absolute va lue of n > 1 resonances to operate, extending the range of local pitc h-angle diffusion down to the loss cone, and increasing the diffusion at lower pitch angles by orders of magnitude; 2. The local diffusion coefficients derived from CRRES data are qualitatively similar to the local results obtained for prescribed plasma/wave parameters. Conseq uently, it is likely that the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients, if estimated from concurrent data, will exhibit the dependencies similar to those we found for model calculations; 3. In comparison with f ield-aligned waves, intermediate and highly oblique waves decrease th e bounce-averaged scattering rate near the edge of the equatorial lo ss cone by orders of magnitude if the electron energy does not excee d a threshold (approximately equal to 2 - 5 MeV) depending on specified plasma and/or wave parameters; 4. For greater electron energies_ ob lique waves operating the absolute value of n > 1 resonances are more effective and provide the same bounce_averaged diffusion rate near the loss cone as fiel_aligned waves do.

  14. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130-140%. In the paper a procedure for calculating the efficiency and optimizing the geometry of wave reflectors are described, this by use of a 3D boundary element method. The calculations are verified ...

  15. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of educational intervention on girl's behavior regarding nutrition: Applying the beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, and enabling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Hazavei, Mohammad Mehdi; Entezari, Mohammad Hassan; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an educational program based on the Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors (BASNEF) Model on the nutritional behavior among second-grade, middle school, female students in Isfahan city. This quasi-experimental study was performed on 72 students. The samples were randomly divided in two groups (36 in the intervention group and 36 in the control group). The data collection tools were validated and had reliable questionnaires. For the intervention group, a 75-minute educational session was held thrice. The control group had no education. The BASNEF model constructs guided the development of the questionnaires and content of the educational sessions. The independent t-test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data. A two-tailed P value lower than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. According to the results, the mean scores of knowledge and model variables (Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors) had a significant difference in the two groups after intervention (P educational intervention, 36.1% of the students had unfavorable nutritional behavior. In the control group, 88.9% of the students had unfavorable nutritional behavior, before and one month after intervention. The present study showed that nutrition education intervention based on the BASNEF model could promote the nutritional behavior in girl students.

  17. Effects of wave-current interaction on storm surge in the Taiwan Strait: Insights from Typhoon Morakot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolong; Pan, Weiran; Zheng, Xiangjing; Zhou, Shenjie; Tao, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The effects of wave-current interaction on storm surge are investigated by a two-dimensional wave-current coupling model through simulations of Typhoon Morakot in the Taiwan Strait. The results show that wind wave and slope of sea floor govern wave setup modulations within the nearshore surf zone. Wave setup during Morakot can contribute up to 24% of the total storm surge with a maximum value of 0.28 m. The large wave setup commonly coincides with enhanced radiation stress gradient, which is itself associated with transfer of wave momentum flux. Water levels are to leading order in modulating significant wave height inside the estuary. High water levels due to tidal change and storm surge stabilize the wind wave and decay wave breaking. Outside of the estuary, waves are mainly affected by the current-induced modification of wind energy input to the wave generation. By comparing the observed significant wave height and water level with the results from uncoupled and coupled simulations, the latter shows a better agreement with the observations. It suggests that wave-current interaction plays an important role in determining the extreme storm surge and wave height in the study area and should not be neglected in a typhoon forecast.

  18. Effects of obliquely opposing and following currents on wave propagation in a new 3D wave-current basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, Mike; Schlurmann, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION & MOTIVATION The design of structures in coastal and offshore areas and their maintenance are key components of coastal protection. Usually, assessments of processes and loads on coastal structures are derived from experiments with flow and wave parameters in separate physical models. However, Peregrin (1976) already points out that processes in natural shallow coastal waters flow and sea state processes do not occur separately, but influence each other nonlinearly. Kemp & Simons (1982) perform 2D laboratory tests and study the interactions between a turbulent flow and following waves. They highlight the significance of wave-induced changes in the current properties, especially in the mean flow profiles, and draw attention to turbulent fluctuations and bottom shear stresses. Kemp & Simons (1983) also study these processes and features with opposing waves. Studies on the wave-current interaction in three-dimensional space for a certain wave height, wave period and water depth were conducted by MacIver et al. (2006). The research focus is set on the investigation of long-crested waves on obliquely opposing and following currents in the new 3D wave-current basin. METHODOLOGY In a first step the flow analysis without waves is carried out and includes measurements of flow profiles in the sweet spot of the basin at predefined measurement positions. Five measuring points in the water column have been delineated in different water depths in order to obtain vertical flow profiles. For the characterization of the undisturbed flow properties in the basin, an uniformly distributed flow was generated in the wave basin. In the second step wave analysis without current, the unidirectional wave propagation and wave height were investigated for long-crested waves in intermediate wave conditions. In the sweet spot of the wave basin waves with three different wave directions, three wave periods and uniform wave steepness were examined. For evaluation, we applied a common

  19. Ion temperature effects on magnetotail Alfvén wave propagation and electron energization: ION TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON ALFVÉN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiano, P. A. [Princeton Center for Heliophysics, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA; Johnson, J. R. [Princeton Center for Heliophysics, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA; Chaston, C. C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley California USA; School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney New South Wales Australia

    2015-07-01

    A new 2-D self-consistent hybrid gyrofluid-kinetic electron model in dipolar coordinates is presented and used to simulate dispersive-scale Alfvén wave pulse propagation from the equator to the ionosphere along an L = 10 magnetic field line. The model is an extension of the hybrid MHD-kinetic electron model that incorporates ion Larmor radius corrections via the kinetic fluid model of Cheng and Johnson (1999). It is found that consideration of a realistic ion to electron temperature ratio decreases the propagation time of the wave from the plasma sheet to the ionosphere by several seconds relative to a ρi=0 case (which also implies shorter timing for a substorm onset signal) and leads to significant dispersion of wave energy perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Additionally, ion temperature effects reduce the parallel current and electron energization all along the field line for the same magnitude perpendicular electric field perturbation.

  20. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state-dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water-level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state-dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water-level and current predictions.

  1. Using forecast and observed weather data to assess performance of forecast products in identifying heat waves and estimating heat wave effects on mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yeh-Hsin; Schwartz, Joel D; Rood, Richard B; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-09-01

    Heat wave and health warning systems are activated based on forecasts of health-threatening hot weather. We estimated heat-mortality associations based on forecast and observed weather data in Detroit, Michigan, and compared the accuracy of forecast products for predicting heat waves. We derived and compared apparent temperature (AT) and heat wave days (with heat waves defined as ≥ 2 days of daily mean AT ≥ 95th percentile of warm-season average) from weather observations and six different forecast products. We used Poisson regression with and without adjustment for ozone and/or PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) to estimate and compare associations of daily all-cause mortality with observed and predicted AT and heat wave days. The 1-day-ahead forecast of a local operational product, Revised Digital Forecast, had about half the number of false positives compared with all other forecasts. On average, controlling for heat waves, days with observed AT = 25.3°C were associated with 3.5% higher mortality (95% CI: -1.6, 8.8%) than days with AT = 8.5°C. Observed heat wave days were associated with 6.2% higher mortality (95% CI: -0.4, 13.2%) than non-heat wave days. The accuracy of predictions varied, but associations between mortality and forecast heat generally tended to overestimate heat effects, whereas associations with forecast heat waves tended to underestimate heat wave effects, relative to associations based on observed weather metrics. Our findings suggest that incorporating knowledge of local conditions may improve the accuracy of predictions used to activate heat wave and health warning systems.

  2. Effects of fracture contact areas on seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) between fractures and the embedding matrix is considered to be a predominant seismic attenuation mechanism in fractured rocks. That is, due to the strong compressibility contrast between fractures and embedding matrix, seismic waves induce strong fluid pressure gradients, followed by local fluid flow between such regions, which in turn produces significant energy dissipation. Natural fractures can be conceptualized as two surfaces in partial contact, containing very soft and highly permeable material in the inner region. It is known that the characteristics of the fracture contact areas control the mechanical properties of the rock sample, since as the contact area increases, the fracture becomes stiffer. Correspondingly, the detailed characteristics of the contact area of fractures are expected to play a major role in WIFF-related attenuation. To study this topic, we consider a simple model consisting of a horizontal fracture located at the center of a porous rock sample and represented by a number of rectangular cracks of constant height separated by contact areas. The cracks are modelled as highly compliant, porous, and permeable heterogeneities, which are hydraulically connected to the background material. We include a number of rectangular regions of background material separating the cracks, which represent the presence of contact areas of the fracture. In order to estimate the WIFF effects, we apply numerical oscillatory relaxation tests based on the quasi-static poro-elastic equations. The equivalent undrained, complex plane-wave modulus, which allows to estimate seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion for the vertical direction of propagation, is expressed in terms of the imposed displacement and the resulting average vertical stress at the top boundary. In order to explore the effects of the presence of fracture contact areas on WIFF effects, we perform an exhaustive sensitivity analysis considering different

  3. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    wave slope was retrieved from the DNS results. Similar to the physical experiment the wave growth rate weakly decreased with the wave steepness. The results of physical and numerical experiments were compared with the calculations within the theoretical model of a turbulent boundary layer based on the system of Reynolds equations with the first-order closing hypothesis. Within the model the wind-wave interaction is considered within the quasi-linear approximation and the mean airflow over waves within the model is treated as a non-separated. The calculations within the model represents well profiles of the mean wind velocity, turbulent stress, amplitude and phase of the main harmonics of the wave-induced velocity components and also wave-induced pressure fluctuations and wind wave growth rate obtained both in the physical experiment and DNS. Applicability of the non-separating quasi-linear theory for description of average fields in the airflow over steep and even breaking waves, when the effect of separation is manifested in the instantaneous flow images, can possibly be explained qualitatively by the strongly non-stationary character of the separation process with the typical time being much less than the wave period, and by the small scale of flow heterogeneity in the area of separation. In such a situation small-scale vortices produced within the separation bubble affect the mean flow and wind-induced disturbances as eddy viscosity. Then, the flow turbulence affects the averaged fields as a very viscous fluid, where the effective Reynolds number for the average fields determined by the eddy viscosity was small even for steep waves. It follows from this assumption that strongly nonlinear effects, such as flow separations should not be expected in the flow averaged over turbulent fluctuations, and the main harmonics of the wave-induced disturbances of the averaged flow, which determine the energy flux to surface waves, can be described in the weakly

  4. Impurity Induced Polar Kerr Effect in A Chiral p-wave Superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Goryo, Jun

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the polar Kerr effect (PKE) in a chiral p-wave (p_x+i p_y-wave) superconductor. It is found that the off-diagonal component of a current-current correlation function is induced by impurity scattering in the chiral p-wave condensate, and a nonzero Hall conductivity is obtained using the Kubo formula. We estimate the Kerr rotation angle by using this impurity-induced Hall conductivity and compare it with experimental results [Jing Xia et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 167002 (2006)].

  5. Numerical Study of the Effects of Wave-Induced Forcing on Dynamics in Ocean Mixed Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Zengan Deng; Lian Xie; Ting Yu; Suixiang Shi; Jiye Jin; Kejian Wu

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments using hybrid coordinate ocean model (HYCOM) are designed to quantify the effects of wind wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF) on mixed layer (ML) dynamics in a global context. CSF calculated by the wave parameters simulated by using the WaveWatch III (WW3) model is introduced as a new driving force for HYCOM. The results show that noticeable influence on ocean circulation in ML can be caused by CSF. Over most of the global oceans the direction of Stokes transport i...

  6. Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler

    2010-09-01

    We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron wave functions that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The wave functions are expanded in a series of analytical functions (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these wave functions can be obtained from the authors.

  7. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  8. The Creation of Scientific Effects Heinrich Hertz and Electric Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Buchwald, Jed Z

    1994-01-01

    This book is an attempt to reconstitute the tacit knowledge—the shared, unwritten assumptions, values, and understandings—that shapes the work of science. Jed Z. Buchwald uses as his focus the social and intellectual world of nineteenth-century German physics. Drawing on the lab notes, published papers, and unpublished manuscripts of Heinrich Hertz, Buchwald recreates Hertz's 1887 invention of a device that produced electromagnetic waves in wires. The invention itself was serendipitous and the device was quickly transformed, but Hertz's early experiments led to major innovations in electrodyna

  9. Annular flow in rod-bundle: Effect of spacer on disturbance waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Son H.; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2016-08-01

    A high-speed camera technique is used to study the effect of spacers on the disturbance waves present in annular two-phase flow within a rod-bundle geometry. Images obtained using a backlight configuration to visualize the spacer-wave interactions at the micro-scale resolution (in time and space) are discussed. This paper also presents additional images obtained using a reflected light configuration which provides new observations of the disturbance waves. These images show the separation effect caused by the spacer on the liquid film in which the size of generated liquid droplets can be controlled by the gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the data confirm that the spacer breaks the circumferential coherent structures of the waves.

  10. On the Effects of Geometry Control on the Performance of Overtopping Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victor, Lander; Troch, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    Overtopping wave energy converters (OWECs) are designed to extract energy from ocean waves based on wave overtopping into a reservoir, which is emptied into the ocean through a set of low-head turbines, and typically feature a low crest freeboard and a smooth impermeable steep slope. In the process...... of optimizing the performance of OWECs, the question arises whether adapting the slope geometry to the variable wave characteristics at the deployment site (i.e., geometry control) can increase the overall hydraulic efficiency and overall hydraulic power compared to a fixed slope geometry. The effect of five...... different geometry control scenarios on the overall hydraulic efficiency and overall hydraulic power of OWECs has been simulated for three possible deployment sites using empirical prediction formulae. The results show that the effect of an adaptive slope angle is relatively small. On the other hand...

  11. Experiments with Point Absorber Type Wave Energy Converters in a Large-Scale Wave Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratigaki, Vasiliki; Troch, Peter; Stallard, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WECs) extract energy from ocean waves and have the potential to produce a significant contribution of electricity from renewable sources. However, large "WEC farms" or "WEC arrays" are expected to have "WEC array effects", expressed as the impact of the WECs on the wave...... of geometric layout configurations and wave conditions. WEC response, wave induced forces on the WECs and wave field modifications have been measured. Each WEC consists of a buoy with diameter of 0.315 m. Power take-off is modeled by realizing friction based energy dissipation through damping of the WECs...... array effects and for validation and extension of numerical models. This model validation will enable optimization of the geometrical layout of WEC arrays for real applications and reduction of the cost of energy from wave energy systems....

  12. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  13. Modelling the effects of gravity waves in the GEM-Mars GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, L.; Daerden, F.; Viscardy, S.

    2017-09-01

    Parameterizations for orographic and non-orographic gravity waves are included in the GEM-Mars general circulation model (GCM) for low-resolution simulations. The impacts of these parameterizations on the temperature and winds in the upper atmosphere are examined and sensitivity studies are discussed. Initial tests indicate that the largest effects of the gravity wave parameterizations on temperature occur during the solstice periods in the upper atmosphere of the winter polar regions, improving the agreement with observations.

  14. Simulation of blast wave propagation from source to long distance with topography and atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Dinh, Maxime; Gainville, Olaf; Lardjane, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    We present new results for the blast wave propagation from strong shock regime to the weak shock limit. For this purpose, we analyse the blast wave propagation using both Direct Numerical Simulation and an acoustic asymptotic model. This approach allows a full numerical study of a realistic pyrotechnic site taking into account for the main physical effects. We also compare simulation results with first measurements. This study is a part of the french ANR-Prolonge project (ANR-12-ASTR-0026).

  15. Sound waves induce Volkov-like states, band structure and collimation effect in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva-Leyva, M.; Naumis, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    We find exact states of graphene quasiparticles under a time-dependent deformation (sound wave), whose propagation velocity is smaller than the Fermi velocity. To solve the corresponding effective Dirac equation, we adapt the Volkov-like solutions for relativistic fermions in a medium under a plane electromagnetic wave. The corresponding electron-deformation quasiparticle spectrum is determined by the solutions of a Mathieu equation resulting in band tongues warped in the surface of the Dirac...

  16. Effectiveness of radio waves application in modern general dental procedures: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Arslan; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Pikos, Michael A; Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to review indexed literature and provide an update on the effectiveness of high-frequency radio waves (HRW) application in modern general dentistry procedures. Indexed databases were searched to identify articles that assessed the efficacy of radio waves in dental procedures. Radiosurgery is a refined form of electrosurgery that uses waves of electrons at a radiofrequency ranging between 2 and 4 MHz. Radio waves have also been reported to cause much less thermal damage to peripheral tissues compared with electrosurgery or carbon dioxide laser-assisted surgery. Formation of reparative dentin in direct pulp capping procedures is also significantly higher when HRW are used to achieve hemostasis in teeth with minimally exposed dental pulps compared with traditional techniques for achieving hemostasis. A few case reports have reported that radiosurgery is useful for procedures such as gingivectomy and gingivoplasty, stage-two surgery for implant exposure, operculectomy, oral biopsy, and frenectomy. Radiosurgery is a relatively modern therapeutic methodology for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia; however, its long-term efficacy is unclear. Radio waves can also be used for periodontal procedures, such as gingivectomies, coronal flap advancement, harvesting palatal grafts for periodontal soft tissue grafting, and crown lengthening. Although there are a limited number of studies in indexed literature regarding the efficacy of radio waves in modern dentistry, the available evidence shows that use of radio waves is a modernization in clinical dentistry that might be a contemporary substitute for traditional clinical dental procedures.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  18. Development of Extended Ray-tracing method including diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Kota; Kubo, Shin; Dodin, Ilya; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tsujimura, Toru

    2017-10-01

    Geometrical Optics Ray-tracing is a reasonable numerical analytic approach for describing the Electron Cyclotron resonance Wave (ECW) in slowly varying spatially inhomogeneous plasma. It is well known that the result with this conventional method is adequate in most cases. However, in the case of Helical fusion plasma which has complicated magnetic structure, strong magnetic shear with a large scale length of density can cause a mode coupling of waves outside the last closed flux surface, and complicated absorption structure requires a strong focused wave for ECH. Since conventional Ray Equations to describe ECW do not have any terms to describe the diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects, we can not describe accurately a mode coupling of waves, strong focus waves, behavior of waves in inhomogeneous absorption region and so on. For fundamental solution of these problems, we consider the extension of the Ray-tracing method. Specific process is planned as follows. First, calculate the reference ray by conventional method, and define the local ray-base coordinate system along the reference ray. Then, calculate the evolution of the distributions of amplitude and phase on ray-base coordinate step by step. The progress of our extended method will be presented.

  19. CFD Study of Liquid Sodium inside a Wavy Tube for Laminar Convectors: Effect of Reynolds Number, Wave Pitch, and Wave Amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Murtuza Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic tubes have been widely used as primary heat transfer elements in laminar convectors for domestic and aerospace heating purpose. This paper uses CFD tool to investigate the heat output and pressure drop of liquid sodium flowing inside a circular tube having a wavy profile throughout its length. The wavy tube can be utilized in laminar liquid metal convectors as basic heat transfer element. The effect of Reynolds number (500≤Re≤2000 wave pitch (25 mm≤λ≤100 mm and wave amplitude (2 mm≤a≤6 mm on the heat output and pressure drop has been numerically studied. Based on the CFD results important controlling parameters have been identified and it is concluded that the heat output from the wavy tube is affected by the wave pitch and the wave amplitude while the pressure drop is mostly affected by the Reynolds number and wave amplitude.

  20. The Effects of Hydrogen Band EMIC Waves on Ring Current H+ Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhai, Hao; Gao, Zhuxiu

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogen band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have received much attention recently because they are found to frequently span larger spatial areas than the other band EMIC waves. Using test particle simulations, we study the nonlinear effects of hydrogen band EMIC waves on ring current H+ ions. A dimensionless parameter R is used to characterize the competition between wave-induced and adiabatic motions. The results indicate that there are three regimes of wave-particle interactions for typical 35 keV H+ ions at L = 5: diffusive (quasi-linear) behavior when αeq ≤ 35° (R ≥ 2.45), the nonlinear phase trapping when 35° < αeq < 50° (0.75 < R < 2.45), and both the nonlinear phase bunching and phase trapping when αeq ≥ 50° (R ≤ 0.75). The phase trapping can transport H+ ions toward large pitch angle, while the phase bunching has the opposite effect. The phase-trapped H+ ions can be significantly accelerated (from 35 keV to over 500 keV) in about 4 min and thus contribute to the formation of high energy components of ring current ions. The results suggest that the effect of hydrogen band EMIC waves is not ignorable in the nonlinear acceleration and resonance scattering of ring current H+ ions.

  1. The characteristic of heat wave effects on coronary heart disease mortality in Beijing, China: a time series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxing Tian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence for the impacts of heat waves on coronary heart disease (CHD mortality in Beijing, capital city of China. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find a best heat wave definition for CHD mortality; and explore the characteristic of heat wave effects on CHD in Beijing, China. METHODS: We obtained daily data on weather and CHD mortality in Beijing for years 2000-2011. A quasi-Poisson regression model was used to assess the short-term impact of heat waves on CHD mortality in hot season (May-September, while controlling for relative humidity, day of the week, long-term trend and season. We compared 18 heat wave definitions by combining heat wave thresholds (87.5(th, 90.0(th, 92.5(th, 95(th, 97.5(th, and 99(th percentile of daily mean temperature with different duration days (≥ 2 to ≥ 4 days, using Akaike information criterion for quasi-Poisson. We examined whether heat wave effects on CHD mortality were modified by heat wave duration and timing. RESULTS: Heat wave definition using 97.5(th percentile of daily mean temperature (30.5 °C and duration ≥ 2 days produced the best model fit. Based on this heat wave definition, we found that men and elderly were sensitive to the first heat waves of the season, while women and young were sensitive to the second heat waves. In general, the longer duration of heat waves increased the risks of CHD mortality more than shorter duration for elderly. The first two days of heat waves had the highest impact on CHD mortality. Women and elderly were at higher risks than men and young when exposed to heat waves, but the effect differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Heat waves had significant impact on CHD mortality. This finding may have implications for policy making towards protecting human health from heat waves.

  2. The effect of heat waves on ambulance attendances in Brisbane, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lyle R; Connell, Des; Tong, Shilu

    2013-10-01

    Introduction Heat waves have significant impacts on mortality and morbidity. However, little is known regarding effects on pre-admission health outcomes such as ambulance attendances, particularly in subtropical regions. Problem This study investigated both main temperature effects and the added effects of heat waves on ambulance attendances in Brisbane, a subtropical city in Australia. Daily data relating to 783,935 ambulance attendances, along with data on meteorological variables and air pollutants, were collected for the period 2000-2007. Ambient temperature (main) effects were assessed using a distributed lag nonlinear approach that accounted for delayed effects of temperature, while added heat wave effects were incorporated separately using a local heat wave definition. Effect estimates were obtained for total, cardiovascular and respiratory attendances, and different age groups. Main effects of temperature were found for total attendances, which increased by 50.6% (95% CI, 32.3%-71.4%) for a 9.5°C increase above a reference temperature of 29°C. An added heat wave effect on total attendances was observed (18.8%; 95% CI, 6.5%-32.5%). Significant effects were found for both respiratory and cardiovascular attendances, particularly for those aged 65 and above. Ambulance attendances can be significantly impacted by sustained periods of high temperatures, and are a valid source of early detection of the effects of extreme temperatures on the population. The planning of ambulance services may need to be adapted as a consequence of increasing numbers of heat waves in the future. Ambulance attendance data also should be utilized in the development of heat warning systems and climate change adaptation strategies.

  3. Effect of High-Frequency Sea Waves on Wave Period Retrieval from Radar Altimeter and Buoy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wave periods estimated from satellite altimetry data behave differently from those calculated from buoy data, especially in low-wind conditions. In this paper, the geometric mean wave period T a is calculated from buoy data, rather than the commonly used zero-crossing wave period T z . The geometric mean wave period uses the fourth moment of the wave frequency spectrum and is related to the mean-square slope of the sea surface measured using altimeters. The values of T a obtained from buoys and altimeters agree well (root mean square difference: 0.2 s only when the contribution of high-frequency sea waves is estimated by a wavenumber spectral model to complement the buoy data, because a buoy cannot obtain data from waves having wavelengths that are shorter than the characteristic dimension of the buoy.

  4. Influence of instantaneous wave effects on contaminant transport in beach aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. E.; Malott, S. S.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Waves cause large quantities of water to recirculate across the sediment-water interface and set up complex groundwater flows and geochemical conditions in beach aquifers. The interacting water exchange, flow and geochemical processes control the fate of various contaminants in nearshore environments including nutrients, organic contaminants (e.g., non-aqueous phase liquids [NAPLs]) and fecal bacteria. This study explores the effect of waves on the transport of dissolved, particulate and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants in beach aquifers. In particular, it evaluates the influence of high frequency pressure gradients induced by individual waves compared with lower frequency pressure gradients set up by the phase-averaged effect of waves (i.e. wave set up). While the effect of waves and other forcing on the fate of dissolved constituents in beach aquifers is well explored, there is limited understanding of the transport of colloidal (i.e. bacteria) and NAPL contaminants. Field data of instantaneous phase-resolved and phase-averaged pressure gradients over a period of intensified wave conditions at a freshwater beach were collected. Although the pressure gradients induced by individual waves cause large quantities of coastal water to infiltrate across the sediment-water interface, the residence time for coastal-derived dissolved constituents (i.e., dissolved organic matter) in shallow sediments is likely not sufficient for reaction to take place. As a result the longer recirculation flow paths and residence times caused by wave set up are expected to be more important for the transformation of dissolved constituents in beach aquifers. The high frequency water exchange however may be important for the fate of particulates (e.g., particulate organic matter) or fecal bacteria as they can be retained in sediment by attachment or straining. Finally, multiphase flow numerical simulations reveal the differential transport of NAPL contaminants in beach aquifers

  5. Junctionless Diode Enabled by Self-Bias Effect of Ion Gel in Single-Layer MoS2 Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Atif; Rathi, Servin; Park, Jinwoo; Lim, Dongsuk; Lee, Yoontae; Yun, Sun Jin; Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2017-08-16

    The self-biasing effects of ion gel from source and drain electrodes on electrical characteristics of single layer and few layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistor (FET) have been studied. The self-biasing effect of ion gel is tested for two different configurations, covered and open, where ion gel is in contact with either one or both, source and drain electrodes, respectively. In open configuration, the linear output characteristics of the pristine device becomes nonlinear and on-off ratio drops by 3 orders of magnitude due to the increase in "off" current for both single and few layer MoS2 FETs. However, the covered configuration results in a highly asymmetric output characteristics with a rectification of around 103 and an ideality factor of 1.9. This diode like behavior has been attributed to the reduction of Schottky barrier width by the electric field of self-biased ion gel, which enables an efficient injection of electrons by tunneling at metal-MoS2 interface. Finally, finite element method based simulations are carried out and the simulated results matches well in principle with the experimental analysis. These self-biased diodes can perform a crucial role in the development of high-frequency optoelectronic and valleytronic devices.

  6. Mechanisms of realization of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence physiological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, there is generalized material of many experimental researches in interaction of THz-waves molecular emission and absorption spectrum (MEAS of nitrogen oxide occurrence with bioobjects. Thrombocytes and experimental animals were used as bioobjects. The experiments let indicate changes caused by THz-waves: at the cellular, tissular, system, organismic levels. There are all data of changes in physiological mechanisms of reglations at all levels: autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and nervous. There is a complex overview of experimental material firstly performed in the article. There had been shown that the effect of THz-waves of the given occurrence is realized by the changed activity of nitroxidergic system. It had been proved that THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence can stimulate nitrogen oxide producing in organs and tissues in condition of its low concentration. Possible mechanisms of antiaggregative effect of the given waves had been described. There had been shown the possibility of regulating of vascular tone and system hemodynamics with the help of the studying these frequencies. The represented data of lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic components of organism system under the influence of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence in stress conditions. Besides, there were shown changes of stress-regulating system activity and in concentration of important mediators - catecholamines and glucocorticosteroids. These data let characterize mechanism of realization of THz-waves basic effects. The research had shown the possibility of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence usage as a method of natural physiological noninvasive regulation of significant organism functions.

  7. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L.; Miller, Richard S.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies.

  8. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L; Miller, Richard S

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermomagnetic effect on the propagation of Rayleigh waves in an isotropic homogeneous elastic half-space under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Ghatuary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave propagation in an isotropic homogeneous initially stressed thermoelastic half-space under the effect of magnetic field has been studied using Green–Lindsay (GL theory of generalized thermoelasticity. The frequency equation has been obtained for Rayleigh waves. The Rayleigh wave velocity is computed numerically for different values of initial stress parameter, magnetic pressure number, thermoelastic coupling parameter, and wave number for aluminium material, and the results obtained are compared graphically.

  10. Extracting Supersymmetry-Breaking Effects from Wave-Function Renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    1998-01-01

    We show that in theories in which supersymmetry breaking is communicated by renormalizable perturbative interactions, it is possible to extract the soft terms for the observable fields from wave-function renormalization. Therefore all the information about soft terms can be obtained from anomalous dimensions and beta functions, with no need to further compute any Feynman diagram. This method greatly simplifies calculations which are rather involved if performed in terms of component fields. For illustrative purposes we reproduce known results of theories with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. We then use our method to obtain new results of phenomenological importance. We calculate the next-to-leading correction to the Higgs mass parameters, the two-loop soft terms induced by messenger-matter superpotential couplings, and the soft terms generated by messengers belonging to vector supermultiplets.

  11. Numerical Study of the Effects of Wave-Induced Forcing on Dynamics in Ocean Mixed Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical experiments using hybrid coordinate ocean model (HYCOM are designed to quantify the effects of wind wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing (CSF on mixed layer (ML dynamics in a global context. CSF calculated by the wave parameters simulated by using the WaveWatch III (WW3 model is introduced as a new driving force for HYCOM. The results show that noticeable influence on ocean circulation in ML can be caused by CSF. Over most of the global oceans the direction of Stokes transport is different from that of the change in current transport caused by CSF. This is not unusual because CSF is normal to Stokes drift. However, the CSF-caused change in current transport and the wave-induced Stokes transport have the same magnitude. The seasonal variabilities of mixed layer temperature (MLT and mixed layer depth (MLD caused by CSF are analyzed, and the possible relationship between them is also given.

  12. Effect of viscosity on wave propagation in anisotropic thermoelastic medium with three-phase-lag model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajneesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to study the wave propagation in anisotropic viscoelastic medium in the context of the theory threephase- lag model of thermoelasticity. It is found that there exist two quasi-longitudinal waves (qP1, qP2 and two transverse waves (qS1, qS2. The governing equations for homogeneous transversely isotropic thermoviscoelastic are reduced as a special case from the considered model. Different characteristics of waves like phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, specific loss and penetration depth are computed from the obtained results. Viscous effect is shown graphically on different resulting quantities for two-phase-lag model and three-phase-lag model of thermoelasticity. Some particular cases of interest are also deduced from the present investigation.

  13. The Effect of Dust Particles on Ion Acoustic Solitary Waves in a Dusty Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Rim Choi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have examined the effect of dust charge density on nonlinear ion acoustic solitary wave which propagates obliquely with respect to the external magnetic field in a dusty plasma. For the dusty charge density below a critical value, the Sagdeev potential Ψ(n has a singular point in the region n<1, where n is the ion number density divided by its equilibrium number density. If there exists a dust charge density over the critical value, the Sagdeev potential becomes a finite function in the region n<1, which means that there may exist the rarefactive ion acoustic solitary wave. By expanding the Sagdeev potential in the small amplitude limit up to δ n4 near n=1, we find the solution of ion acoustic solitary wave. Therefore we suggest that the dust charge density plays an important role in generating the rarefactive solitary wave.

  14. Effect of shock wave reapplication on urinary n-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in canine kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A.Q.R. Fortes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Renal tubular damage can be assessed with the aid of urinary dosing of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG and it is possible to demonstrate a significant correlation between shock wave and damage to renal parenchyma. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of shock wave reapplication over urinary NAG in canine kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors submitted 10 crossbred dogs to 2 applications of 2000 shock waves in a 24-hour interval in order to assess urinary NAG values after 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. RESULTS: Twelve hours following the first shockwave application there was an increase in NAG of 6.47 ± 5.44 u/g creatinine (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Shock wave reapplication with a 24-hour interval did not cause any increase in urinary NAG.

  15. Nonlinear PTO Effect on Performance of Vertical Axisymmetric Wave Energy Converter Using Semi-Analytical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ming

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The wave energy, as a clean and non-pollution renewable energy sources, has become a hot research topic at home and abroad and is likely to become a new industry in the future. In this article, to effectively extract and maximize the energy from ocean waves, a vertical axisymmetric wave energy converter (WEC was presented according to investigating of the advantages and disadvantages of the current WEC. The linear and quadratic equations in frequency-domain for the reactive controlled single-point converter property under regular waves condition are proposed for an efficient power take-off (PTO. A method of damping coefficients, theoretical added mass and exciting force are calculated with the analytical method which is in use of the series expansion of eigen functions. The loads of optimal reactive and resistive, the amplitudes of corresponding oscillation, and the width ratios of energy capture are determined approximately and discussed in numerical results.

  16. Effects of Damping Plate and Taut Line System on Mooring Stability of Small Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wave energy can be used for electricity supply to ocean data acquisition buoys. A heaving buoy wave energy converter is designed and the damping plate and taut line system are used to provide the mooring stability for better operating conditions. The potential flow assumption is employed for wave generation and fluid structure interactions, which are processed by the commercial software AQWA. Effects of damping plate diameter and taut line linking style with clump and seabed weights on reduction of displacements in 6 degrees of freedom are numerically studied under different operating wave conditions. Tensile forces on taut lines of optimized mooring system are tested to satisfy the national code for wire rope utilization.

  17. A Hamiltonian Model of Dissipative Wave-particle Interactions and the Negative-mass Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Zhmoginov

    2011-02-07

    The effect of radiation friction is included in the Hamiltonian treatment of wave-particle interactions with autoresonant phase-locking, yielding a generalized canonical approach to the problem of dissipative dynamics near a nonlinear resonance. As an example, the negativemass eff ect exhibited by a charged particle in a pump wave and a static magnetic field is studied in the presence of the friction force due to cyclotron radiation. Particles with negative parallel masses m! are shown to transfer their kinetic energy to the pump wave, thus amplifying it. Counterintuitively, such particles also undergo stable dynamics, decreasing their transverse energy monotonically due to cyclotron cooling, whereas some of those with positive m! undergo cyclotron heating instead, extracting energy from the pump wave.

  18. Effect of target-fixture geometry on shock-wave compacted copper powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooyeol; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Jae Ik; Park, Lee Ju; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-01-01

    In shock compaction with a single gas gun system, a target fixture is used to safely recover a powder compact processed by shock-wave dynamic impact. However, no standard fixture geometry exists, and its effect on the processed compact is not well studied. In this study, two types of fixture are used for the dynamic compaction of hydrogen-reduced copper powders, and the mechanical properties and microstructures are investigated using the Vickers microhardness test and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. With the assistance of finite element method simulations, we analyze several shock parameters that are experimentally hard to control. The results of the simulations indicate that the target geometry clearly affects the characteristics of incident and reflected shock waves. The hardness distribution and the microstructure of the compacts also show their dependence on the geometry. With the results of the simulations and the experiment, it is concluded that the target geometry affects the shock wave propagation and wave interaction in the specimen.

  19. Effects of isosorbide mononitrate and AII inhibition on pulse wave reflection in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Gordon S; Barin, Edward S; Gilfillan, Kerry L

    2003-02-01

    The aortic pulse wave contour in isolated systolic hypertension often shows a prominent reflection peak, which combines with the incident wave arising from cardiac ejection so as to widen pulse pressure. We investigated the effects of an extended-release nitrate preparation and of 2 angiotensin II (AII) inhibitors (an AII receptor antagonist and an ACE inhibitor) on the aortic pulse wave contour and systemic blood pressure in hypertensive subjects with high augmentation index caused by exaggerated pulse wave reflection. Two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover studies were carried out in a total of 16 elderly patients with systolic hypertension resistant to conventional antihypertensive therapy. In 1 study, pharmacodynamic responses to single doses of placebo, isosorbide mononitrate, eprosartan, and captopril were determined; in the other, single-dose isosorbide mononitrate and placebo were compared in subjects treated with AII inhibitors at baseline. Blood pressure was measured by sphygmomanometry and pulse wave components by applanation tonometry at the radial artery. All 3 agents were shown to decrease brachial systolic blood pressure, aortic systolic blood pressure, and aortic pulse pressure. Qualitative effects on the aortic pulse wave contour differed: augmentation index was not significantly altered by either captopril or eprosartan but was decreased (PAII inhibition.

  20. Solitary waves in a degenerate relativistic plasma with ionic pressure anisotropy and electron trapping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, M.; Ali, S.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2017-05-01

    The dynamics of obliquely propagating ion-acoustic (IA) waves in the presence of ionic pressure anisotropy and electron trapping effects is studied in a dense magnetoplasma, containing degenerate relativistic trapped electrons and dynamical (classical) ions. By using the plane wave solution, a modified linear dispersion relation for IA waves is derived and analyzed with different limiting cases and various plasma parameters both analytically and numerically. For nonlinear analysis, a reductive perturbation technique is employed to obtain a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation involving the weakly nonlinear IA excitations. It is shown that the electron thermal correction and ionic pressure anisotropy strongly modify the wave amplitudes and width attributed to weakly nonlinear IA waves. The stability criterion for stable/unstable solitary pulses is also discussed with variations of angle (β) and temperature ratio (σ). A reduction and domain splitting of unstable excitations into sub-domains with stable and unstable potential pulses are pointed out for electron temperature ratio in the range of 0.01 understanding the nonlinear dynamics and propagation characteristics of waves in superdense plasmas, in the environments of white dwarfs and neutron stars, where the electron thermal and ionic pressure anisotropy effects cannot be ignored.

  1. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    KAUST Repository

    Webber, Matthew A

    2013-03-12

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd and SISSA Medialab srl.

  2. Effect of disorder on bulk sound wave speed: a multiscale spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Disorder of size (polydispersity) and mass of discrete elements or particles in randomly structured media (e.g., granular matter such as soil) has numerous effects on the materials' sound propagation characteristics. The influence of disorder on energy and momentum transport, the sound wave speed and its low-pass frequency-filtering characteristics is the subject of this study. The goal is understanding the connection between the particle-microscale disorder and dynamics and the system-macroscale wave propagation, which can be applied to nondestructive testing, seismic exploration of buried objects (oil, mineral, etc.) or to study the internal structure of the Earth. To isolate the longitudinal P-wave mode from shear and rotational modes, a one-dimensional system of equally sized elements or particles is used to study the effect of mass disorder alone via (direct and/or ensemble averaged) real time signals, signals in Fourier space, energy and dispersion curves. Increase in mass disorder (where disorder has been defined such that it is independent of the shape of the probability distribution of masses) decreases the sound wave speed along a granular chain. Energies associated with the eigenmodes can be used to obtain better quality dispersion relations for disordered chains; these dispersion relations confirm the decrease in pass frequency and wave speed with increasing disorder acting opposite to the wave acceleration close to the source.

  3. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew A.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave.

  4. Surface wave effects on long range IR imaging in the marine surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, M. J.; Kunz, G. J.; van Eijk, A. M. J.

    2005-08-01

    The quality of long range infrared (IR) imaging depends on the effects of atmospheric refraction and other pathintegrated effects (e.g., transmission losses, scintillation and blurring), which are strongly related to the prevailing meteorological conditions. EOSTAR is a PC based computer program to quantify these strong nonlinear effects in the marine atmospheric surface layer and to present a spectrally resolved target image influenced by atmospheric effects using ray tracing techniques for the individual camera pixels. Presently, the propagation is predicted with bulk atmospheric models and the sea surface is idealized by steady regular periodic Stokes' waves. Dynamical wind-waves interactions are not taken into account in this approach, although they may strongly modify the refractive index in the near-surface layer. Nonetheless, the inclusion of the sea surface in the ray tracer module already has a great impact on the near-surface grazing rays and thus influences the images especially in situations of super refraction and mirage. This work aims at improving the description of the sea surface in EOSTAR taking into account the non-uniformity of spatially resolved wind-generated waves and swell. A new surface module is developed to model surface wind-waves and swell in EOSTAR on the basis of meteorological observations and spectral wave modeling. Effects due to these new surfaces will be analyzed and presented.

  5. Full-Wave Analysis of Traveling-Wave Field-Effect Transistors Using Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Narahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear transmission lines, which define transmission lines periodically loaded with nonlinear devices such as varactors, diodes, and transistors, are modeled in the framework of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. Originally, some root-finding routine is needed to evaluate the contributions of nonlinear device currents appropriately to the temporally advanced electrical fields. Arbitrary nonlinear transmission lines contain large amount of nonlinear devices; therefore, it costs too much time to complete calculations. To reduce the calculation time, we recently developed a simple model of diodes to eliminate root-finding routines in an FDTD solver. Approximating the diode current-voltage relation by a piecewise-linear function, an extended Ampere's law is solved in a closed form for the time-advanced electrical fields. In this paper, we newly develop an FDTD model of field-effect transistors (FETs, together with several numerical examples that demonstrate pulse-shortening phenomena in a traveling-wave FET.

  6. Effect of environment on the propagation of electromagnetic waves in GRC 408E digital radiorelay devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojkan M. Radonjić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality transmission of digital signals from a transmitting radio-relay device to a receiving one depends on the impact of environmental effects on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. In this paper some of the most important effects are explained and modeled, especially those characteristic for the frequency range within which the GRC 408E operates. The modeling resulted in the conclusions about the quality of transmission of digital signals in the GRC 408E radio-relay equipment. Propagation of electromagnetic waves A radio-relay link is achieved by direct electromagnetic waves, provided there is a line of sight between the transmitting and receiving antenna of a radio-relay device. Electromagnetic waves on the road are exposed to various environmental influences causing phenomena such as bending, reflection, refraction, absorption and multiple propagation. Due to these environmental effects, the quality of information transmission is not satisfactory and a radio-relay link is not reliable. The approach to the analysis of the quality of links in digital radiorelay devices is different from the one in analog radio-relay devices. Therefore, the quality is seen through errors in the received bit ( BER , the propagation conditions are taken into account, a reservation for the fading is determined by other means, etc.. Phenomena which accompany the propagation of electromagnetic waves in digital radio-relay links The propagation of direct EM waves is followed by the following phenomena: - attenuation due to propagation, - diffraction (changing table, - refraction (refraction, - reflection (refusing, - absorption (absorption and - multiple wave propagation. Each of these has a negative effect on the quality of the received signal at the receiving antenna of the radio-relay device. Attenuation due to propagation of electromagnetic waves The main parameter for evaluating the quality of radio-relay links is the level of the field at the reception

  7. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of international sustainable development law principles in enabling effective renewable energy policy – a South African perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barnard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is universally accepted that renewable energy is an important contributing factor towards the promotion of sustainable development. The implementation of renewable energy needs to be regulated in an effective manner which in turn necessitates the formulation of law and policy geared towards sustainable development. Recent policy developments in South Africa propose to facilitate the promotion of sustainable development through the implementation of renewable energy, among others. In terms of existing energy policy in South-Africa, the interconnectivity of renewable energy and sustainable development is evident. Most notably, the White Paper on Renewable Energy of 2003 promotes increased access to affordable renewable energy in order to contribute to sustainable development. Moreover, the 2008 first review of the National Energy Efficiency Strategy of the Republic of South-Africa of 2005 states that in order for the country’s renewable energy policy to be considered sustainable, it needs to facilitate development in the social, economic and environmental spheres. Notwithstanding, attaining the goal of sustainable development depends on whether all its effecting principles are catered for in the policy developments. Accordingly, in order to ascertain whether South-African law and policy can successfully facilitate/enable sustainable development via the implementation of renewable energy, a specific methodology is proposed. In terms of the New Delhi Declaration of 2002 there are 7 principles of international law effecting sustainable development. These principles will be used as criteria in a principled assessment of South-African renewable energy law and policy in order to establish whether the goal of promoting sustainable development would be effected through the national policy developments.

  10. Transition, coexistence, and interaction of vector localized waves arising from higher-order effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chong [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Zhan-Ying, E-mail: zyyang@nwu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Zhao, Li-Chen, E-mail: zhaolichen3@163.com [School of Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Yang, Wen-Li [Institute of Modern Physics, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2015-11-15

    We study vector localized waves on continuous wave background with higher-order effects in a two-mode optical fiber. The striking properties of transition, coexistence, and interaction of these localized waves arising from higher-order effects are revealed in combination with corresponding modulation instability (MI) characteristics. It shows that these vector localized wave properties have no analogues in the case without higher-order effects. Specifically, compared to the scalar case, an intriguing transition between bright–dark rogue waves and w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons, which occurs as a result of the attenuation of MI growth rate to vanishing in the zero-frequency perturbation region, is exhibited with the relative background frequency. In particular, our results show that the w-shaped–anti-w-shaped solitons can coexist with breathers, coinciding with the MI analysis where the coexistence condition is a mixture of a modulation stability and MI region. It is interesting that their interaction is inelastic and describes a fusion process. In addition, we demonstrate an annihilation phenomenon for the interaction of two w-shaped solitons which is identified essentially as an inelastic collision in this system. -- Highlights: •Vector rogue wave properties induced by higher-order effects are studied. •A transition between vector rogue waves and solitons is obtained. •The link between the transition and modulation instability (MI) is demonstrated. •The coexistence of vector solitons and breathers coincides with the MI features. •An annihilation phenomenon for the vector two w-shaped solitons is presented.

  11. The effect of a gravitational wave at the contact of conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. B.; Ignatev, Iu. G.

    1983-06-01

    The electrical effects induced by a gravitational wave in a plasma with a nonzero initial self-consistent nonhomogeneous electric field are treated. The results are found to differ fundamentally from those presented by Ignat'ev and Balakin (1981) and Ignat'ev (1981). These latter studies described the effects in an initially isotropic plasma. The principal difference consists in the nonlocal character of the effect of a gravitational wave on the media in question, resulting in particular in oscillations of the screening radius, distortions of the configuration of the self-consistent electric field, and the appearance of an electric current. The possibility of the existence of a quite measurable current (10 to the -14 A) induced by a gravitational wave at the contact of two conductors is demonstrated.

  12. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  13. India heat wave attribution considering effects of anthropogenic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2017-04-01

    Extreme weather event attribution, now a well-established field within the Detection and Attribution community, slowly incorporates all regions of the globe. Here we present heat wave results for India in 2015, using pre-conditioned (SST driven) large ensemble RCM simulations provided by weather@home. Apart from the presentation of a thoroughly validated set of hydrometeorological model variables for the South Asian region, the novelty in this study is that we include a GHG-only ensemble in our analysis. Rather than relying on actual and counterfactual data for 2015 to investigate the event-specific dynamic contribution, we make also use of an ensemble where the SST forcing corresponds to a world in which anthropogenic aerosols have been removed (AA). Since AAs have far-reaching implications for the Asian monsoon system (e.g. Bollasina et al. 2011; Li et al 2016), the changing risk of certain extreme weather events occurring due to a variable load of AAs can potentially be attributed for the first time. Since we are now in the possession a fully consistent 30 year climatology (200 ensemble member per year) for actual, counterfactual and GHG only conditions as well, we can try and answer the question whether circulation changes or trends due to anthropogenic climate change are detectable already. In addition, we demonstrate how these results can be used in our fast track attribution framework, including evidence for the robustness of the analogue method utilised to determine event-specific dynamic contributions.

  14. Effects of acoustic waves on stick-slip in granular media and implications for earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.A.; Savage, H.; Knuth, M.; Gomberg, J.; Marone, Chris

    2008-01-01

    It remains unknown how the small strains induced by seismic waves can trigger earthquakes at large distances, in some cases thousands of kilometres from the triggering earthquake, with failure often occurring long after the waves have passed. Earthquake nucleation is usually observed to take place at depths of 10-20 km, and so static overburden should be large enough to inhibit triggering by seismic-wave stress perturbations. To understand the physics of dynamic triggering better, as well as the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we have conducted laboratory studies of stick-slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibration. Glass beads were used to simulate granular fault zone material, sheared under constant normal stress, and subject to transient or continuous perturbation by acoustic waves. Here we show that small-magnitude failure events, corresponding to triggered aftershocks, occur when applied sound-wave amplitudes exceed several microstrain. These events are frequently delayed or occur as part of a cascade of small events. Vibrations also cause large slip events to be disrupted in time relative to those without wave perturbation. The effects are observed for many large-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Dynamic stressing of tectonic faults may play a similar role in determining the complexity of earthquake recurrence. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Effects of acoustic waves on stick-slip in granular media and implications for earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul A; Savage, Heather; Knuth, Matt; Gomberg, Joan; Marone, Chris

    2008-01-03

    It remains unknown how the small strains induced by seismic waves can trigger earthquakes at large distances, in some cases thousands of kilometres from the triggering earthquake, with failure often occurring long after the waves have passed. Earthquake nucleation is usually observed to take place at depths of 10-20 km, and so static overburden should be large enough to inhibit triggering by seismic-wave stress perturbations. To understand the physics of dynamic triggering better, as well as the influence of dynamic stressing on earthquake recurrence, we have conducted laboratory studies of stick-slip in granular media with and without applied acoustic vibration. Glass beads were used to simulate granular fault zone material, sheared under constant normal stress, and subject to transient or continuous perturbation by acoustic waves. Here we show that small-magnitude failure events, corresponding to triggered aftershocks, occur when applied sound-wave amplitudes exceed several microstrain. These events are frequently delayed or occur as part of a cascade of small events. Vibrations also cause large slip events to be disrupted in time relative to those without wave perturbation. The effects are observed for many large-event cycles after vibrations cease, indicating a strain memory in the granular material. Dynamic stressing of tectonic faults may play a similar role in determining the complexity of earthquake recurrence.

  16. Effects of improving current characteristics of spark discharge on underwater shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Higa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have been developing a food-processing device that uses underwater shock waves generated by spark discharges at an underwater spark gap. Underwater shock waves can be used in food processing for softening, fracturing and sterilization. These technologies are attracting attention because the food is not heated during processing, so it does not change flavour. In this study, we develop a rice-powder manufacturing system using the fracturing effect provided by underwater shock waves. Because rice grains are very hard, the process must be applied repeatedly using a momentary high pressure to fracture the grains. The fast repeated generation of shock waves should provide high pressures from low energies. Therefore, we aim to achieve higher pressures from low energies expended by the underwater gap discharge. We increase the pulse compression rate by decreasing the circuit impedance of the device and increasing the charging voltage. Using optical observations and a pressure sensor, we measure the high pressure developed by the underwater shock wave and the rise time of the discharge current. We find that we can decrease the rise time of the discharge current by 17% while maintaining the peak current, and simultaneously increase the high pressure of the underwater shock wave by 135%.

  17. Effect of magnetic quantization on ion acoustic waves ultra-relativistic dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Asif; Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.; Siddique, M.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we have studied the influence of magnetic quantization of orbital motion of the electrons on the profile of linear and nonlinear ion-acoustic waves, which are propagating in the ultra-relativistic dense magneto quantum plasmas. We have employed both Thomas Fermi and Quantum Magneto Hydrodynamic models (along with the Poisson equation) of quantum plasmas. To investigate the large amplitude nonlinear structure of the acoustic wave, Sagdeev-Pseudo-Potential approach has been adopted. The numerical analysis of the linear dispersion relation and the nonlinear acoustic waves has been presented by drawing their graphs that highlight the effects of plasma parameters on these waves in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. It has been noticed that only supersonic ion acoustic solitary waves can be excited in the above mentioned quantum plasma even when the value of the critical Mach number is less than unity. Both width and depth of Sagdeev potential reduces on increasing the magnetic quantization parameter η. Whereas the amplitude of the ion acoustic soliton reduces on increasing η, its width appears to be directly proportional to η. The present work would be helpful to understand the excitation of nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in the dense astrophysical environments such as magnetars and in intense-laser plasma interactions.

  18. Different Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Torpor on EEG Slow-Wave Characteristics in Djungarian Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovskiy, V V; Palchykova, S; Achermann, P; Tobler, I; Deboer, T

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown previously in Djungarian hamsters that the initial electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (power in the 0.5-4.0 Hz band; SWA) in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep following an episode of daily torpor is consistently enhanced, similar to the SWA increase after sleep deprivation (SD). However, it is unknown whether the network mechanisms underlying the SWA increase after torpor and SD are similar. EEG slow waves recorded in the neocortex during sleep reflect synchronized transitions between periods of activity and silence among large neuronal populations. We therefore set out to investigate characteristics of individual cortical EEG slow waves recorded during NREM sleep after 4 h SD and during sleep after emergence from an episode of daily torpor in adult male Djungarian hamsters. We found that during the first hour after both SD and torpor, the SWA increase was associated with an increase in slow-wave incidence and amplitude. However, the slopes of single slow waves during NREM sleep were steeper in the first hour after SD but not after torpor, and, in contrast to sleep after SD, the magnitude of change in slopes after torpor was unrelated to the changes in SWA. Furthermore, slow-wave slopes decreased progressively within the first 2 h after SD, while a progressive increase in slow-wave slopes was apparent during the first 2 h after torpor. The data suggest that prolonged waking and torpor have different effects on cortical network activity underlying slow-wave characteristics, while resulting in a similar homeostatic sleep response of SWA. We suggest that sleep plays an important role in network homeostasis after both waking and torpor, consistent with a recovery function for both states. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator....

  20. Inlet effects on roll-wave development in shallow turbulent open-channel flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campomaggiore Francesca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the effect of the flow profile induced by an inlet condition on the roll-wave evolution in turbulent clear-water flows. The study employs theoretical and numerical analyses. Firstly, the influence of the inlet condition on the spatial evolution of a single perturbation in a hypercritical flow is examined through the expansion near a wavefront analysis. The results show that an accelerated unperturbed profile reduces the disturbance spatial growth. A decelerated profile causes an increase. The effect of the flow profile on the spatial evolution of roll-wave trains is then numerically investigated solving the Saint Venant equations with a second-order Runge-Kutta Total Variation Diminishing (TVD Finite Volume scheme. The numerical simulations comply with the analytical results for the initial and transition phases of the roll-wave development. The unperturbed profile influences even the roll-waves statistical characteristics in the final stage, with a more evident effect in case of accelerated profiles. The influence of the flow profile should be therefore accounted for in the formulation of predictive criteria for roll-waves appearance based on the estimation of the disturbance spatial growth rate.

  1. Synergetic effects between chaotic and self-consistent effects observed for wave particle interaction in a TWT upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doveil, Fabrice; Guyomarc'h, Didier; Caetano da Sousa, Meirielen; Elskens, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Beside industrial uses, Traveling Wave Tubes (TWT) are useful to mimic and study plasma-like wave-particle interaction. We upgraded a TWT, whose slow wave structure is a 4 m long helix (diameter 3.4 cm, pitch 1 mm) of Be-Cu wire in a vacuum glass tube. At one end, a cathode injects electrons, radially confined by a constant axial magnetic field. Movable probes, capacitively coupled to the helix, launch and monitor waves with an arbitrary waveform at a few tens of MHz. At the other end of the helix, a trochoidal analyzer allows to reconstruct the beam electron distribution function after its self-consistent interaction with the waves. The new device's observed dispersion relation agrees very well with a sheath model. The measured probe-helix coupling coefficients are used to reconstruct the spatial evolution of a launched wave as it interacts with the beam. For low beam intensity, chaotic effects are observed on the beam. For larger beam intensity, growth and saturation of a launched wave is observed.

  2. On the Effect of Green Water on Deck on the Wave Bending Moment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Xia, Jinzhu

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate whether green water on deck in severe sea states have a notable effect on the maximum wave bending moments. The analysis is carried out for an S175 container ship for which results from model experiments are available. The static water head...... and a momentum term, using an effective relative motion calibrated with the model tests, model the green water load. The resulting loads are of the same magnitude as the slamming loads. The results show only a marginal influence of the green water load on the maximum wave bending moment, although the time signal...

  3. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and $MnO_2$ dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of $\\partial\\omega/\\partial k < 0$ are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  4. The effect of wave-induced turbulence on intertidal mudflats: Impact of boat traffic and wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verney, R.; Deloffre, J.; Brun-Cottan, J.-C.; Lafite, R.

    2007-03-01

    Semi-diurnal and fortnightly surveys were carried out to quantify the effects of wind- and navigation-induced high-energy events on bed sediments above intertidal mudflats. The mudflats are located in the upper fluvial part (Oissel mudflat) and at the mouth (Vasière Nord mudflat) of the macrotidal Seine estuary. Instantaneous flow velocities and mudflat bed elevation were measured at a high frequency and high resolution with an acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) and an ALTUS altimeter, respectively. Suspended particulate matter concentrations were estimated by calibrating the ADV acoustic backscattered intensity with bed sediments collected at the study sites. Turbulent bed shear stress values were estimated by the turbulent kinetic energy method, using velocity variances filtered from the wave contribution. Wave shear stress and maximum wave-current shear stress values were calculated with the wave-current interaction (WCI) model, which is based on the bed roughness length, wave orbital velocities and the wave period ( TS). In the fluvial part of the estuary, boat passages occurred unevenly during the surveys and were characterized by long waves ( TS>50 s) induced by the drawdown effect and by short boat-waves ( TSBoat waves generated large bottom shear stress values of 0.5 N m -2 for 2-5 min periods and, in burst of several seconds, larger bottom shear stress values up to 1 N m -2. At the mouth of the estuary, west south-west wind events generated short waves ( TShydrodynamic forcing parameters above the two mudflats. Bed elevation and SPM concentration time series showed that these high energy events induced erosion processes of up to several centimetres. Critical erosion shear stress ( τce) values were determined from the SPM concentration and bed elevation measurements. Rough τce values were found above 0.2 N m -2 for the Oissel mudflat and about 1 N m -2 for the Vasière Nord mudflat. These results demonstrate the advantages of combining the measurement of

  5. Cost-effectiveness of a vocational enablement protocol for employees with hearing impairment; design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gussenhoven Arjenne HM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hearing impairment at the workplace, and the resulting psychosocial problems are a major health problem with substantial costs for employees, companies, and society. Therefore, it is important to develop interventions to support hearing impaired employees. The objective of this article is to describe the design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the (cost- effectiveness of a Vocational Enablement Protocol (VEP compared with usual care. Methods/Design Participants will be selected with the 'Hearing and Distress Screener'. The study population will consist of 160 hearing impaired employees. The VEP intervention group will be compared with usual care. The VEP integrated care programme consists of a multidisciplinary assessment of auditory function, work demands, and personal characteristics. The goal of the intervention is to facilitate participation in work. The primary outcome measure of the study is 'need for recovery after work'. Secondary outcome measures are coping with hearing impairment, distress, self-efficacy, psychosocial workload, job control, general health status, sick leave, work productivity, and health care use. Outcome measures will be assessed by questionnaires at baseline, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after baseline. The economic evaluation will be performed from both a societal and a company perspective. A process evaluation will also be performed. Discussion Interventions addressing occupational difficulties of hearing impaired employees are rare but highly needed. If the VEP integrated care programme proves to be (cost- effective, the intervention can have an impact on the well-being of hearing impaired employees, and thereby, on the costs for the company as well for the society. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2782

  6. Elastic wave induced by friction as a signature of human skin ageing and gender effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaghloul, M; Morizot, F; Zahouani, H

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative approach based on a rotary tribometer coupled with laser velocimetry for measuring the elastic wave propagation on the skin. The method is based on a dynamic contact with the control of the normal force (Fn ), the contact length and speed. During the test a quantification of the friction force is produced. The elastic wave generated by friction is measured at the surface of the skin 35 mm from the source of friction exciter. In order to quantify the spectral range and the energy property of the wave generated, we have used laser velocimetry whose spot laser diameter is 120 μm, which samples the elastic wave propagation at a frequency which may reach 100 kHz. In this configuration, the speaker is the friction exciter and the listener the laser velocimetry. In order to perform non-invasive friction tests, the normal stress has been set to 0.3 N and the rotary velocity to 3 revolutions per second, which involves a sliding velocity of 63 mm/s. This newly developed innovative tribometer has been used for the analysis of the elastic wave propagation induced by friction on human skin during chronological ageing and gender effect. Measurements in vivo have been made on 60 healthy men and women volunteers, aged from 25 to 70. The results concerning the energy of the elastic wave signature induced by friction show a clear difference between the younger and older groups in the range of a low band of frequencies (0-200 Hz). The gender effect was marked by a 20% decrease in the energy of elastic wave propagation in the female group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Propagation of ULF waves through the ionosphere: Inductive effect for oblique magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Sciffer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Solutions for ultra-low frequency (ULF wave fields in the frequency range 1–100mHz that interact with the Earth's ionosphere in the presence of oblique background magnetic fields are described. Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic wave fields in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere are derived within the context of an inductive ionosphere. The inductive shielding effect (ISE arises from the generation of an "inductive" rotational current by the induced part of the divergent electric field in the ionosphere which reduces the wave amplitude detected on the ground. The inductive response of the ionosphere is described by Faraday's law and the ISE depends on the horizontal scale size of the ULF disturbance, its frequency and the ionosphere conductivities. The ISE for ULF waves in a vertical background magnetic field is limited in application to high latitudes. In this paper we examine the ISE within the context of oblique background magnetic fields, extending studies of an inductive ionosphere and the associated shielding of ULF waves to lower latitudes. It is found that the dip angle of the background magnetic field has a significant effect on signals detected at the ground. For incident shear Alfvén mode waves and oblique background magnetic fields, the horizontal component of the field-aligned current contributes to the signal detected at the ground. At low latitudes, the ISE is larger at smaller conductivity values compared with high latitudes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; electric fields and currents; wave propagation

  8. Propagation of ULF waves through the ionosphere: Inductive effect for oblique magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Sciffer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Solutions for ultra-low frequency (ULF wave fields in the frequency range 1–100mHz that interact with the Earth's ionosphere in the presence of oblique background magnetic fields are described. Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic wave fields in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere are derived within the context of an inductive ionosphere. The inductive shielding effect (ISE arises from the generation of an "inductive" rotational current by the induced part of the divergent electric field in the ionosphere which reduces the wave amplitude detected on the ground. The inductive response of the ionosphere is described by Faraday's law and the ISE depends on the horizontal scale size of the ULF disturbance, its frequency and the ionosphere conductivities. The ISE for ULF waves in a vertical background magnetic field is limited in application to high latitudes. In this paper we examine the ISE within the context of oblique background magnetic fields, extending studies of an inductive ionosphere and the associated shielding of ULF waves to lower latitudes. It is found that the dip angle of the background magnetic field has a significant effect on signals detected at the ground. For incident shear Alfvén mode waves and oblique background magnetic fields, the horizontal component of the field-aligned current contributes to the signal detected at the ground. At low latitudes, the ISE is larger at smaller conductivity values compared with high latitudes. Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; electric fields and currents; wave propagation

  9. Excitation of flare-induced waves in coronal loops and the effects of radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    2018-01-01

    EUV imaging observations from several space missions (SOHO/EIT, TRACE, and SDO/AIA) have revealed a presence of propagating intensity disturbances in solar coronal loops. These disturbances are typically interpreted as slow magnetoacoustic waves. However, recent spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS of active region loops revealed that the propagating intensity disturbances are associated with intermittent plasma upflows (or jets) at the footpoints which are presumably generated by magnetic reconnection. For this reason, whether these disturbances are waves or periodic flows is still being studied. This study is aimed at understanding the physical properties of observed disturbances by investigating the excitation of waves by hot plasma injections from below and the evolution of flows and wave propagation along the loop. We expand our previous studies based on isothermal 3D MHD models of an active region to a more realistic model that includes full energy equation accounting for the effects of radiative losses. Computations are initialized with an equilibrium state of a model active region using potential (dipole) magnetic field, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from the polytropic equation of state. We model an impulsive injection of hot plasma into the steady plasma outflow along the loops of different temperatures, warm (∼1 MK) and hot (∼6 MK). The simulations show that hot jets launched at the coronal base excite slow magnetoacoustic waves that propagate to high altitudes along the loops, while the injected hot flows decelerate rapidly with heights. Our results support that propagating disturbances observed in EUV are mainly the wave features. We also find that the effect of radiative cooling on the damping of slow-mode waves in 1-6 MK coronal loops is small, in agreement with the previous conclusion based on 1D MHD models.

  10. Two-Dimensional Linear and Nonlinear Talbot Effects from Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Petrović, Milan S; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    We introduce two-dimensional (2D) linear and nonlinear Talbot effects (LTE and NLTE). They are produced by 2D diffraction patterns and can be visualized as 3D stacks of Talbot carpets. The NLTE originates from 2D rogue waves and forms in a bulk 3D nonlinear medium. The recurrence of an input rogue wave (with a $\\pi$ phase shift) can only be observed at the (half) Talbot length. Different from NLTE, the LTE displays the usual fractional Talbot images as well. We also find that the smaller the period of incident rogue waves, the shorter the Talbot length. Increasing the beam intensity increases the Talbot length, but above a threshold this leads to a catastrophic self-focusing phenomenon which destroys the nonlinear effect.

  11. Luneburg modified lens for surface water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Helene; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Phillipe; Martin, Paul; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that when the waves pass across an elevated bathymetry, refraction often results in amplification of waves behind it. In this sense, focusing of liquid surface waves can be used to enhance the harvest efficiency of ocean power. An ocean wave focusing lens concentrates waves on a certain focal point by transforming straight crest lens of incident waves into circular ones just like an optical lens. These devices have attracted ocean engineers and are promising because they enable the effective utilization of wave energy, the remaining challenge being to increase the harvest efficiency of the lens. In this work, in order to improve well known focusing of surface liquid waves by lens, the propagation of liquid surface waves through a Luneburg modified lens is investigated. The traditional Luneburg lens is a rotationally symmetric lens with a spatially varying refractive-index profile that focuses an incident plane wave on the rim of the lens. The modified Luneburg lens allows to choose the position of the focal point, which can lie inside or outside the lens. This new degree of freedom leads to enhanced focusing and tunable focusing. The focusing of linear surface waves through this lens is investigated and is shown to be more efficient than classical profile lenses.

  12. The effect of superluminal phase velocity on electron acceleration in a powerful electromagnetic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Arefiev, A. V.; Khudik, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect that electromagnetic dispersion has on the motion of an electron in a relativistically strong plane wave. We obtain an analytic solution for the electron momentum and check this solution against direct numerical integration of the equations of motion. The solution shows that even a relatively small difference between the phase velocity of the wave, vp, and the speed of light, c, can significantly alter the electron dynamics if the normalized wave amplitude a0 exceeds √{2 c /(vp-c ) } . At this amplitude, the maximum longitudinal electron momentum scales only linearly with a0, as opposed to a02 . We also show that at this amplitude the impact of an accelerating longitudinal electric field and electron pre-acceleration is negated by the superluminous phase velocity of the wave. This has implications for the potential of Direct Laser Acceleration of electrons. We point out that electromagnetic dispersion can arise from both propagation in a plasma and from propagating the laser in what is effectively a wave-guiding structure, and that this latter source of dispersion is likely to be more significant.

  13. Effect of gas on shear wave velocity of sandy soils densified with explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Vega-Posada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Shear wave velocity tests (Vs are commonly used to estimate the increase in resistance of explosive densified soils. In some historical cases, Vs tests performed after the soil improvement process do not show a significant increase in soil resistance, even though the soil surface sits more than 0.50 m. It is believed that this response is due to the presence of gas on the soil mass. Method: This paper presents the results of monotonic triaxial tests performed on samples of dense gaseous sandy soils to evaluate the effect of occluded gas on the response to the shear wave velocity in densified sands with explosives. For sand sampling, it was collected from a loose sand deposit located in South Carolina, USA. These samples were densified in-situ with explosives, and consolidated to the in-situ effective stress conditions, which are considered representative in the conditions of effort at the moment of the densification with explosives. Results: Triaxial tests were performed under global non-drained conditions. The results of these tests show that gas causes the shear wave velocity values obtained for the gaseous sands to approximate the shear wave velocity values obtained in the saturated samples tested under drained conditions. In addition, behavior tends to be more pronounced as the soil is denser. Conclusions: These response may offer some insights as to why the shear wave velocity does not increase significantly in densified soils with explosives, even though the density increases considerably.

  14. Effect of a transverse plasma jet on a shock wave induced by a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu WANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted experiments in a wind tunnel with Mach number 2 to explore the evolution of a transverse plasma jet and its modification effect on a shock wave induced by a ramp with an angle of 24°. The transverse plasma jet was created by arc discharge in a small cylindrical cavity with a 2 mm diameter orifice. Three group tests with different actuator arrangements in the spanwise or streamwise direction upstream from the ramp were respectively studied to compare their disturbances to the shock wave. As shown by a time-resolved schlieren system, an unsteady motion of the shock wave by actuation was found: the shock wave was significantly modified by the plasma jet with an upstream motion and a reduced angle. Compared to spanwise actuation, a more intensive impact was obtained with two or three streamwise actuators working together. From shock wave structures, the control effect of the plasma jet on the shock motion based on a thermal effect, a potential cause of shock modification, was discussed. Furthermore, we performed a numerical simulation by using the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES method to simulate the evolution of the transverse plasma jet plume produced by two streamwise actuators. The results show that flow structures are similar to those identified in schlieren images. Two streamwise vortices were recognized, which indicates that the higher jet plume is the result of the overlap of two streamwise jets. Keywords: Flow control, Improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method, Plasma synthetic jet, Shock wave/boundary layer interaction, Time resolved schlieren system

  15. Acoustic wave propagation and stochastic effects in metamaterial absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We show how stochastic variations of the effective parameters of anisotropic structured metamaterials can lead to increased absorption of sound. For this, we derive an analytical model based on the Bourret approximation and illustrate the immediate connection between material disorder and attenua......We show how stochastic variations of the effective parameters of anisotropic structured metamaterials can lead to increased absorption of sound. For this, we derive an analytical model based on the Bourret approximation and illustrate the immediate connection between material disorder...

  16. Interpretation of VLF phase data. [analysis of effects of various parameters on electromagnetic wave transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, F.; Hargrave, J.; Crouchley, J.

    1972-01-01

    The specific applications of very low frequency phase tracking are described. The requirements for correct interpretation of very low frequency phase data are defined. The effects of the lower ionosphere and the ground along the path of signal propagation are analyzed. The following subjects are discussed: (1) interpretation equipment, (2) representation of very low frequency waves, (3) diurnal effects and mode interference phenomena, (4) antipodal interference, and (5) overall effects resulting from solar flares, galactic X-rays, and geomagnetic parameters.

  17. Thermal effect on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper deals with the effect of temperature on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space. It has been assumed that the liquid layer is under the action of gravity, while the solid half-space is under the influence of initial compressive hydrostatic stress. When the temperature of the half-space is ...

  18. A probabilistic approach to investigate the effect of wave chorology on process-based morphological modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dastgheib, A.; Rajabalinejad, M.R.; Ranasinghe, R.; Roelvink, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the sensitivity of morphological process-based models to the chronology of input wave conditions. In this research the effect of an emerged offshore breakwater on the morphology of the beach is investigated. A 30 day long morphological simulation with real time history of the

  19. Effect of face fracturing on shear wave coda quality factor estimated from acoustic emission events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgarume, T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependency of the quality factor derived from S wave coda (Q(subc)) on frequency is analysed in order to understand the effect of fracturing ahead of a mining stope. Micro seismic events recorded using acoustic emission sensors in a mining...

  20. Lunar cycle may have an effect on Shock Wave Lithotripsy related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: We tried to investigate the effects of lunar phase on Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) related pain. In addition, correlation of various clinical parameters with the pain perception during SWL procedure, were also investigated. Methods: A total of 378 patients who underwent first SWL sessions for renal or ureteral ...

  1. Effect of disorder on bulk sound wave speed : A multiscale spectral analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Disorder of size (polydispersity) and mass of discrete elements or particles in randomly structured media (e.g., granular matter such as soil) has numerous effects on the materials' sound propagation characteristics. The influence of disorder on energy and momentum transport, the sound wave speed

  2. Combined effects of heat waves and droughts on avian communities across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Brian D. Wardlow; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Increasing surface temperatures and climatic variability associated with global climate change are expected to produce more frequent and intense heat waves and droughts in many parts of the world. Our goal was to elucidate the fundamental, but poorly understood, effects of these extreme weather events on avian communities across the conterminous United States....

  3. The effect of non-linear wave in front of vertical wall using bi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the subsequent calculation carried out, it was found that on deep water the parameter 2 tends to zero and 1 tends to , which is twice as much as the value of for the progressive waves on deep water. Moreover, for a fixed kd, this theory suggests that the non-linear effects increase while approaching the bottom, which is ...

  4. Thermal effect on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. This paper deals with the effect of temperature on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space. It has been assumed that the liquid layer is under the action of gravity, while the solid half-space is under the influence of initial compressive hydrostatic stress. When the temperature of the.

  5. Biological effects of THz electromagnetic waves on frequencies of active cell metabolites at a molecular level

    OpenAIRE

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk; Alexander A. Tsymbal

    2013-01-01

    A reaction of biomolecules had been studied, including an effect of albumin molecules on THz electromagnetic waves on frequencies of active cell metabolites (nitrogen oxide 150.176-150.664 GHz and atmospheric oxygen 129.0 GHz). Change of conformational molecule state had been displayed.

  6. Wave propagation method as an accurate technique for effective refractive index retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    An effective parameters retrieval method based on the wave propagation simulation is proposed and compared with the standard S-parameter procedure. The method is free from possible mistakes originated by the multiple branching of solutions in the S-parameter procedure and shows high accuracy. The...

  7. Collisional effect on lower hybrid waves instability in a dusty plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of particle collisions on lower hybrid modes in a dusty plasma is studied. The dispersion relation derived from fluid theory is numerically solved for plasma parameters relevant to determine the modification in wave propagation due to collisions. This study is relevant to the earth's lower atmosphere, in particular, the ...

  8. Simulation analysis of effects of single fragment size on air-blast wave and fragment propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Hongwei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper involves the propagation and attenuation of the velocity and energy of air-blast waves and high-velocity fragments while taking their combined effects into account.[Methods] With ANSYS/LS-DYNA software, a simulation model of a columnar TNT air blast is built with prefabricated fragments affixed to its end. When the total quality of fragments is constant, the effects of a single fragment's size on the propagation of the air-blast wave and fragments are studied by changing the size of the single fragment.[Results] The results show that fragments greatly reduce the intensity and velocity of a shockwave, and block the air-blast waves behind them. When the total quality of the fragments remains constant, the effects of single fragment size on blast shockwave propagation characteristics show little difference. The smaller the single fragment, the more kinetic energy the fragments will have and the faster that energy will dissipate.[Conclusions] As a result, more attention should be paid to the combined effects of air-blast waves and high-velocity fragments. Such research can provide reference points for the deeper study of blast loads and their interaction.

  9. Ground state energy and wave function of an off-centre donor in spherical core/shell nanostructures: Dielectric mismatch and impurity position effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d’Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B.P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida 24000 (Morocco); Laboratoire d’Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B.P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); Zouitine, Asmae [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B.P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat (Morocco); Assaid, El Mahdi, E-mail: eassaid@yahoo.fr [Equipe d’Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B.P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida 24000 (Morocco); Laboratoire d’Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B.P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); Feddi, El Mustapha [Département de Physique, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Enseignement Technique, Université Mohammed V Souissi, B.P. 6207 Rabat-Instituts, Rabat (Morocco); and others

    2014-09-15

    Ground state energy and wave function of a hydrogen-like off-centre donor impurity, confined anywhere in a ZnS/CdSe spherical core/shell nanostructure are determined in the framework of the envelope function approximation. Conduction band-edge alignment between core and shell of nanostructure is described by a finite height barrier. Dielectric constant mismatch at the surface where core and shell materials meet is taken into account. Electron effective mass mismatch at the inner surface between core and shell is considered. A trial wave function where coulomb attraction between electron and off-centre ionized donor is used to calculate ground state energy via the Ritz variational principle. The numerical approach developed enables access to the dependence of binding energy, coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to core radius, shell radius and impurity position inside ZnS/CdSe core/shell nanostructure.

  10. Diffusion in plasma: The Hall effect, compositional waves, and chemical spots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urpin, V., E-mail: Vadim.urpin@uv.es [Ioffe Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Diffusion caused by a combined influence of the electric current and Hall effect is considered, and it is argued that such diffusion can form inhomogeneities of a chemical composition in plasma. The considered mechanism can be responsible for the formation of element spots in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. This current-driven diffusion can be accompanied by propagation of a particular type of waves in which the impurity number density oscillates alone. These compositional waves exist if the magnetic pressure in plasma is much greater than the gas pressure.

  11. The Dose-Related Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Ja-Young; Choi, Cheol-Min; Lee, June-Kyung; Kee, Hoi-Sung; Jung, Kwang-Ik; Yoon, Seo-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dose-related effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for knee osteoarthritis. Methods Seventy-five subjects were recruited, 60 of which met the inclusion criteria. The patients were randomly classified into two groups: group L, which was a low-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; energy flux density [EFD], 0.040 mJ/mm2) and group M, which was a medium-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; EFD, 0.093 mJ/mm2). For each group, 1,000 shock waves w...

  12. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  13. A Comparison Study of a Generic Coupling Methodology for Modeling Wake Effects of Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verbrugghe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wave Energy Converters (WECs need to be deployed in large numbers in an array layout in order to have a significant power production. Each WEC has an impact on the incoming wave field, by diffracting, reflecting and radiating waves. Simulating the wave transformations within and around a WEC array is complex; it is difficult, or in some cases impossible, to simulate both these near-field and far-field wake effects using a single numerical model, in a time- and cost-efficient way in terms of computational time and effort. Within this research, a generic coupling methodology is developed to model both near-field and far-field wake effects caused by floating (e.g., WECs, platforms or fixed offshore structures. The methodology is based on the coupling of a wave-structure interaction solver (Nemoh and a wave propagation model. In this paper, this methodology is applied to two wave propagation models (OceanWave3D and MILDwave, which are compared to each other in a wide spectrum of tests. Additionally, the Nemoh-OceanWave3D model is validated by comparing it to experimental wave basin data. The methodology proves to be a reliable instrument to model wake effects of WEC arrays; results demonstrate a high degree of agreement between the numerical simulations with relative errors lower than 5 % and to a lesser extent for the experimental data, where errors range from 4 % to 17 % .

  14. Gluon fragmentation into a vector charmonium J/psi considering the effect of meson wave function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Moosavi nejad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the production or decay processes of heavy quarkonia (the bound state of heavy quark-antiquark is a powerful tool to test our understanding of strong interaction dynamics and QCD theory. Fragmentation is the dominant production mechanism for heavy quarkonia with large transverse momentum. The fragmentation refers to the production process of a parton with high transverse momentum which subsequently decays into a heavy quarkonia. In all previous manuscript where the fragmentation functions of heavy mesons or baryons are calculated, authors have used the approximation of a Dirac delta function for the meson wave function. In the present paper by working in a perturbative QCD framework and by considering the effect of meson wave functions we calculate the fragmentation function of a gluon into a spin-triplet S-wave charmonium J/psi.  To consider the real aspect of meson bound state we apply a mesonic wave function which is different of Dirac delta function and is a nonrelativistic limit of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Finally, we present our numerical results and show that how the proposed wave function improves the previous results.

  15. Troitskaya-Bolshakova effect as a manifestation of the solar wind wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A. S.; Polyushkina, T. N.; Guglielmi, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The impact of changes in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the amplitude of geomagnetic Pc3 pulsations (the Troitskaya-Bolshakova effect) is demonstrated using observations of several pulsation events. We show that the source of changes in the IMF cone angle is sometimes Alfvén waves propagating in the solar wind. For the analysis, measurements of geomagnetic pulsations at the mid-latitude Uzur magneto-telluric observatory and on three spacecraft outside the bow shock wave were used. The results show that the influence is exerted only by waves with a period of more than 40-60 min in a coordinate system fixed relative to the Earth. The Alfvén turbulence of a higher frequency is incoherent; the oscillations are of a chaotic nature, not coordinated in amplitude and phase either between satellites or with variations in the amplitude of Pc3. In some cases, the modulation of the pulsation amplitude is associated with the passage of the IMF sector boundary. An evaluation of the direction of propagation of Alfvén waves showed that they predominantly propagate from the Sun, but the normal of the wave fronts can deviate from the Sun-Earth line. This is quite consistent with earlier published results. The statistics of the basic properties of the oscillatory structures in the interplanetary medium, which we observed during the observation period, are given.

  16. Compensating effect of ultrasonic waves on retarding action of nanoparticles in drops liquid-liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saien, Javad; Daneshamoz, Sana

    2018-03-01

    The influence of ultrasonic waves on liquid-liquid extraction of circulating drops and in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles was investigated. Experiments were conducted in a column equipped with an ultrasound transducer. The frequency and intensity of received waves, measured by the hydrophone standard method, were 35.40 kHz and 0.37 mW/cm 2 , respectively. The recommended chemical system of cumene-isobutyric acid-water was used in which mass transfer resistance lies in the aqueous phase. Nanoparticles, within concentration range of (0.0003-0.0030) wt%, were added to the aqueous continuous phase. The presence of nanoparticles and ultrasonic waves provided no sensible change in drop size (within 2.49-4.17 mm) and measured terminal velocities were close to Grace model. However, presence of nanoparticles, caused mass transfer to decrease. This undesired effect was significantly diminished by using ultrasonic waves so that mass transfer coefficient increased from (73.0-178.2) to (130.2-240.2) µm/s, providing a 55.6% average enhancement. It is presumably due to disturbing the accumulated nanoparticles around the drops. The current innovative study highlights the fact that using ultrasonic waves is an interesting way to improve liquid-liquid extraction in the presence and absence of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Position control of desiccation cracks by memory effect and Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yousuke; Takeshi, Ooshida; Nakahara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation of desiccation cracks on a layer of a calcium carbonate paste is studied experimentally. This paste is known to exhibit a memory effect, which means that a short-time application of horizontal vibration to the fresh paste predetermines the direction of the cracks that are formed after the paste is dried. While the position of the cracks (as opposed to their direction) is still stochastic in the case of horizontal vibration, the present work reports that their positioning is also controllable, at least to some extent, by applying vertical vibration to the paste and imprinting the pattern of Faraday waves, thus breaking the translational symmetry of the system. The experiments show that the cracks tend to appear in the node zones of the Faraday waves: in the case of stripe-patterned Faraday waves, the cracks are formed twice more frequently in the node zones than in the anti-node zones, presumably due to the localized horizontal motion. As a result of this preference of the cracks to the node zones, the memory of the square lattice pattern of Faraday waves makes the cracks run in the oblique direction differing by 45 degrees from the intuitive lattice direction of the Faraday waves.

  18. Analysis of the effect of a rectangular cavity resonator on acoustic wave transmission in a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R.; Evans, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    The transmission of acoustic waves along a two-dimensional waveguide which is coupled through an opening in its wall to a rectangular cavity resonator is considered. The resonator acts as a classical band-stop filter, significantly reducing acoustic transmission across a range of frequencies. Assuming wave frequencies below the first waveguide cut-off, the solution for the reflected and transmitted wave amplitudes is formulated exactly within the framework of inviscid linear acoustics. The main aim of the paper is to develop an approximation in closed form for reflected and transmitted amplitudes when the gap in the thin wall separating the waveguide and the cavity resonator is assumed to be small. This approximation is shown to accurately capture the effect of all cavities resonances, not just the fundamental Helmholtz resonance. It is envisaged this formula (and more generally the mathematical approach adopted) could be used in the development of acoustic metamaterial devices containing resonator arrays.

  19. Microplasticity effect in low-velocity zone induced by seismic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    Microplasticity effects in loam caused by seismic wave of frequency about 1000 Hz are detected in the borehole-to-borehole measurements. Microplasticity manifestations on seismic record are presented as the ladder-like stepwise changes in amplitude course. The step (plateau) on seismic trace is time delay, its duration depends on the strain-amplitude value. Time delay changes the frequency characteristic of stress pulse, nonlinearly transforms wave front, and shifts the amplitude maximum along time axis. The microplastic process occurs owing to the anomalous realignment of the internal stresses on the microstructural defects in the area of small deformations. This is the useful contribution to wave propagation physics. The received results can also be used in solving the applied problems in material science, seismic prospecting, diagnostics, etc.

  20. Sound waves effectively assist tobramycin in elimination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; Harb, A; Kolacny, D; Martins, P; Smyth, H D C

    2014-12-01

    Microbial biofilms are highly refractory to antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of low-frequency vibration therapy (20-20 kHz) on antibiotic-mediated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm eradication. In screening studies, low-frequency vibrations were applied on model biofilm compositions to identify conditions in which surface standing waves were observed. Alginate surface tension and viscosity were also measured. The effect of vibration on P. aeruginosa biofilms was studied using a standard biofilm assay. Subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC) of tobramycin (5 μg/ml) were added to biofilms 3 h prior, during, and immediately after vibration and quantitatively assessed by (2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay (XTT) and, qualitatively, by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The standing waves occurred at frequencies sound waves together with antibiotics are a promising approach in eliminating pathogenic biofilms.

  1. Influence of quantum Hall effect on wave refraction in ferrite-semiconductor superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2008-12-01

    Peculiarities of wave refraction are investigated in periodic structures consisting of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and GaAs-AlGaAs-type semiconductor bilayers. It is shown that in quantum Hall effect conditions, the refractive indices and consequently the refraction angles of the propagating waves are quantized.Two different geometries of the refracting plane are considered: (I) parallel and (II) perpendicular to the quantizing magnetic field. It is shown that in the first case, negative refraction through the lateral surface of the structure is possible. A frequency region is found where the refraction is negative for all angles of incidence and regardless of the sign of permittivity tensor components. Analytical expressions for both phase and group refractive indices are obtained.In the second case, one of the propagating waves (in the birefringent regime) is backward. Despite this, and unlike in the case of non-quantizing magnetic fields, negative refraction is impossible.

  2. Research on the Lift-off Effect of Receiving Longitudinal Mode Guided Waves in Pipes Based on the Villari Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiang; Sun, Yong; Zhou, Jinhai

    2016-09-20

    The magnetostrictive guided wave technology as a non-contact measurement can generate and receive guided waves with a large lift-off distance up to tens of millimeters. However, the lift-off distance of the receiving coil would affect the coupling efficiency from the elastic energy to the electromagnetic energy. In the existing magnetomechanical models, the change of the magnetic field in the air gap was ignored since the permeability of the rod is much greater than that of air. The lift-off distance of the receiving coil will not affect the receiving signals based on these models. However, the experimental phenomenon is in contradiction with these models. To solve the contradiction, the lift-off effect of receiving the longitudinal mode guided waves in pipes is investigated based on the Villari effect. A finite element model of receiving longitudinal guided waves in pipes is obtained based on the Villari effect, which takes into account the magnetic field in the pipe wall and the air zone at the same time. The relation between the amplitude of the induced signals and the radius (lift-off distance) of the receiving coil is obtained, which is verified by experiment. The coupling efficiency of the receiver is a monotonic decline with the lift-off distance increasing. The decay rate of the low frequency wave is slower than the high frequency wave. Additionally, the results show that the rate of change of the magnetic flux in the air zone and in the pipe wall is the same order of magnitude, but opposite. However, the experimental results show that the error of the model in the large lift-off distance is obvious due to the diffusion of the magnetic field in the air, especially for the high frequency guided waves.

  3. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the three most important aspects of seismic microzonation namely prediction of fundamental frequency (F0) of soil deposit, aggravation factor (aggravation factor is simply the extra spectral amplification due to complex 2D site effects over the 1D response of the soil column) and the spatial variability of ...

  4. Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, Jenna; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves J. Charland * **, J. Touboul **, V. Rey ** jenna.charland@univ-tln.fr * Direction Générale de l'Armement, CNRS Délégation Normandie ** Université de Toulon, 83957 La Garde, France Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) Aix Marseille Université, 13288 Marseille, France CNRS/INSU, IRD, MIO, UM 110 In the nearshore area, both wave propagation and currents are influenced by the bathymetry. For a better understanding of wave - current interactions in the presence of a 3D bathymetry, a large scale experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin FIRST, Toulon, France. The 3D bathymetry consisted of two symmetric underwater mounds on both sides in the mean wave direction. The water depth at the top the mounds was hm=1,5m, the slopes of the mounds were of about 1:3, the water depth was h=3 m elsewhere. For opposite current conditions (U of order 0.30m/s), a huge focusing of the wave up to twice its incident amplitude was observed in the central part of the basin for T=1.4s. Since deep water conditions are verified, the wave amplification is ascribed to the current field. The mean velocity fields at a water depth hC=0.25m was measured by the use of an electromagnetic current meter. The results have been published in Rey et al [4]. The elliptic form of the "mild slope" equation including a uniform current on the water column (Chen et al [1]) was then used for the calculations. The calculated wave amplification of factor 1.2 is significantly smaller than observed experimentally (factor 2). So, the purpose of this study is to understand the physical processes which explain this gap. As demonstrated by Kharif & Pelinovsky [2], geometrical focusing of waves is able to modify significantly the local wave amplitude. We consider this process here. Since vertical velocity profiles measured at some locations have shown significant

  5. Synergy effects during current drive by two lower-hybrid waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youlei; Xiang, Nong; Hu, Ye Min

    2017-03-01

    In recent lower-hybrid current drive experiments on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, two lower-hybrid waves are launched simultaneously from different locations with different phase velocities to drive the plasma current. To understand the synergy effects of the two LH waves, the analytical expression for the electron velocity distribution is obtained based on Fuchs' model [Fuchs et al., Phys. Fluids 28(12), 3619-3628 (1985)], which is in good agreement with that obtained by solving the quasi-linear equation numerically via the CQL3D code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992)]. The synergy factor is also obtained analytically. It is found that the existence of two resonant regions may bring more resonant electrons interacting with each wave and the perpendicular dynamics can further enhance the synergy effect by increasing the effective electron temperature, which in turn increases the number of electrons in the resonance with each wave.

  6. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  7. Effect of wave action on near-well zone cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen’kovskii, V. I.; Korsakova, N. K.

    2017-10-01

    Drilling filtrate invasion into the producing formation and native water accumulating of the near-well zone in well operation reduce the well productivity. As a result of that, depending on characteristic capillary pressure scale and differential pressure drawdown, oil production rate may become lower than expected one. In this paper, it is considered the hysteresis effects of capillary pressure after reversion of displacement. As applied to laboratory experiment conditions, the solution of problem of oil flow in formation model with a pressure drop on the model sides harmonically varied with time is presented. It was estimated a range of fluid vibration effective action on the near-well zone cleaning from capillary locking water. The plant simulating extraction of oil from formation using widely practised sucker-rod pump has been created. Formation model is presented as a slot filled with broken glass between two plates. In the process, natural oil and sodium chloride solution were used as working fluids. The experiments qualitatively confirm a positive effect of jack pumps on the near-well zone cleaning.

  8. Pleiotropic effects associated with an allele enabling the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum to use Barbarea vulgaris as a host plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuker, C.J.; Jong, de P.W.; Victoir, K.; Vrieling, K.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Danish region of Kværkeby, a mutation in an, as yet, unknown single autosomal gene has resulted in a dominant resistance (R-) allele in the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae). It enables the beetle to overcome the defences of Barbarea vulgaris ssp.

  9. Residual stress effects of a fatigue crack on guided lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M.; Pant, S.; Yanishevsky, M.; Backman, D.

    2017-11-01

    Structural health monitoring has focused on the use of computational models to capture the effect of crack-like discontinuities on the behaviour of acoustic-ultrasonic signals. However, few models have taken into account the effect of geometric complexity in combination with residual stresses generated during the fatigue crack growth (FCG) process. In this study, a finite element analysis model of a C-channel type aeronautical structure is evaluated under a pitch-catch scenario. Three different finite element model configurations were considered in order to understand the effects that residual stresses of a fatigue crack emanating from a through-hole have on the guided Lamb wave propagation behaviour. The results demonstrate that numerical modelling is able to capture the change in amplitude and the effect of a phase shift on the guided Lamb wave behaviour due to the presence of the discontinuity and the stress field generated during the FCG process.

  10. Electron pitch-angle diffusion: resonant scattering by waves vs. nonadiabatic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Artemyev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the electron pitch-angle diffusion coefficients in the night-side inner magnetosphere around the geostationary orbit (L ~ 7 due to magnetic field deformation. We compare the effects of resonant wave–particle scattering by lower band chorus waves and the adiabaticity violation of electron motion due to the strong curvature of field lines in the vicinity of the equator. For a realistic magnetic field configuration, the nonadiabatic effects are more important than the wave–particle interactions for high energy (> 1 MeV electrons. For smaller energy, the scattering by waves is more effective than nonadiabatic one. Moreover, the role of nonadiabatic effects increases with particle energy. Therefore, to model electron scattering and transport in the night-side inner magnetosphere, it is important to take into account the peculiarities of high-energy electron dynamics.

  11. Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect with electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, T; Tervo, J; Setälä, T; Friberg, A T

    2011-08-01

    The classic Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiment is analyzed in the space-frequency domain by taking into account the vectorial nature of the radiation. We show that as in scalar theory, the degree of electromagnetic coherence fully characterizes the fluctuations of the photoelectron currents when a random vector field with Gaussian statistics is incident onto the detectors. Interpretation of this result in terms of the modulations of optical intensity and polarization state in two-beam interference is discussed. We demonstrate that the degree of cross-polarization may generally diverge. We also evaluate the effects of the state of polarization on the correlations of intensity fluctuations in various circumstances.

  12. Compressibility and shock wave interaction effects on free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimy, M.; Erwin, D. E.; Elliott, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two compressible free shear layers with convective Mach numbers of .51 and .86 were studied as baseline configurations to investigate the effects of compressibility on the turbulence characteristics. These shear layers were then disturbed by the placement of an obstruction in the shear layer in an attempt to enhance the shear layer growth rate. These models produced a curved shock in the supersonic side of the shear layer. The results indicate a significant reduction in turbulence levels with increased compressibility. However, there are not any significant changes due to the bow shock interaction with the shear layer.

  13. [Hazardous health effects of microwaves and radio waves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, A I; Skotte, J

    1994-03-14

    About 4000 Danish employees may be significantly exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF) or microwaves (MW) during work in the health sector or industrially. Exposure measurements and classifications are difficult, therefore, epidemiological as well as experimental research in the field is complicated. High exposure induces elevation of body temperature or local heating ("hot spots"). Some biological effects from RF/MW exposure seem to be mediated by heating, others are considered to be athermic. Epidemiological studies do not indicate that RF/MW should be carcinogenic, and experimental studies have not shown the radiation to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. Epidemiological studies among physiotherapists have indicated that RF may have reproductive effects. In one study, an association between ischaemic heart disease and exposure to RF is observed. The cataractogenic property of MW is supposed to be mediated by elevation in lens temperature following relatively high exposure. However, in the light of the problems in exposure classification, the epidemiological research may not be conclusive, and attempts should be made to improve the methods. In addition, Danish experience points out a number of methods of exposure reduction in the working environment.

  14. Wave propagation retrieval method for metamaterials: Unambiguous restoration of effective parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this brief report we propose a direct method of effective-parameters restoration that is based on the wave propagation phenomenon. It is easy in implementation, has no unambiguity in retrieving effective properties and is applicable to thick metamaterial (MTM) slabs. The method is validated...... on the case studies of fishnet, split cube in carcass, and Jerusalem cross MTMs. The constraints of the method are designated....

  15. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Gregory; Mohammad Mehrmohammadi; Max Denis; Mahdi Bayat; Stan, Daniela L.; Mostafa Fatemi; Azra Alizad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE). Methods SuperSonic Imagine (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammogra...

  16. On the effects of geometry on guided electromagnetic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Robin W.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of moving (Cartan coframes is used to analyze the influence of geometry on the behavior of electromagnetic fields in confining guides and the effect of such fields on their ultra-relativistic sources. Such issues are of relevance to a number of topical problems in accelerator science where the need to control the motion of high current-density micro-meter size bunches of relativistic radiating charge remains a technical and theoretical challenge. By dimensionally reducing the exterior equations for the sources and fields on spacetime using symmetries exhibited by the confining guides one achieves a unifying view that offers natural perturbative approaches for dealing with smooth non-uniform and curved guides. The issue of the back-reaction of radiation fields on the sources is approached in terms of a simple charged relativistic fluid model. .

  17. Thermal and viscous effects on sound waves: revised classical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony M J; Brenner, Howard

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the recently developed, bi-velocity model of fluid mechanics based on the principles of linear irreversible thermodynamics (LIT) is applied to sound propagation in gases taking account of first-order thermal and viscous dissipation effects. The results are compared and contrasted with the classical Navier-Stokes-Fourier results of Pierce for this same situation cited in his textbook. Comparisons are also made with the recent analyses of Dadzie and Reese, whose molecularly based sound propagation calculations furnish results virtually identical with the purely macroscopic LIT-based bi-velocity results below, as well as being well-supported by experimental data. Illustrative dissipative sound propagation examples involving application of the bi-velocity model to several elementary situations are also provided, showing the disjoint entropy mode and the additional, evanescent viscous mode.

  18. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, SeokJoo; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kwansub

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a conservative physical therapy group (n=10) and an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (n=10). Both groups received general conservative physical therapy, and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy was additionally treated with ext...

  19. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  20. Determining the Effects of EMIC Waves on Precipitating MeV Electrons during Strom Main Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretic studies have suggested that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can cause significant precipitation of ~MeV electrons, supposedly accounting for the fast dropouts of outer-belt electrons during storm main phases. Usually the resonance between left-hand polarized EMIC with electrons with moderate energy is unlikely due to their opposite polarizations, while resonance with highly relativistic electrons do occur and cause electrons to precipitate into the atmosphere through pitch-angle scattering. Several previous studies on observations find a close relation between the two phenomena, e.g., Cliverd et al. [2007], Sandanger et al. [2007], and Miyoshi et al. [2008], while others find otherwise, e.g., Meredith et al. [2011]; recently, more observational evidence supporting the connection has been reported (e.g., Li et al. [2014] and Blum et al. [2015]). However, whether and under what favoring conditions EMIC waves cause rapid dropouts of relativistic electrons during storm main phases remain unresolved questions. Here, using latest wave and electron data from multiple missions including Van Allen Probes, BARREL, and NOAA POES, we systemically examine the relation between EMIC waves and MeV electron precipitation. We first construct two independent event lists for intensified EMIC waves and enhancements of MeV electron precipitation, respectively. Then we cross check the two lists to identify if any significant correlation exists in between, and further characterize the wave effectiveness in terms of L-shell, MLT, resonance energy, as well as the background plasma conditions. Results from this study will advance our knowledge about the loss mechanism of outer-belt electrons, thus laying down another stepping stone towards high-fidelity physics-based models for radiation belts.

  1. EFFECT OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPYVERSUS CORTICOSTEROID INJECTION IN MANAGEMENT OFKNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Elerian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: knee Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Shockwaves have been used as an alternative treatment for musculoskeletal disorders; intra-articular injection of steroid is a common treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of Shock wave therapy versus Corticosteroid intra articular injection in case of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients were diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis; they were included in the study. Their ages were 43:65 years with mean age 50 ± 3.5 years. Patients were divided randomly into three equal groups, group (A received shock wave therapy, group (B received two intra-articular injections of corticosteroid at 1-month intervals and group (C received sham shock wave. The outcome measurements were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC values, knee ROM, and pain severity using the visual analogue scale (VAS were recorded. The patients were evaluated for these parameters before allocated in their groups then after 1, 2, and 6months later. Results: compared to sham group there were significant improvement of VAS and ROM of shock wave group and corticosteroid injection group than sham (placebo group (p<0.000, (p<0.006, and 0.02 respectively. Furthermore there was significant improve of shock wave group than corticosteroid injection group where p was <0.000 for VAS, ROM and (WOMAC. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that shock wave therapy may provide effective modality for relieving pain, increase Range of motion and improve function in knee osteoarthritis patient than intra articular corticosteroid injection.

  2. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  3. The effect of curvature on detonation waves in Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Gary J.

    2001-04-01

    The effect of curvature on detonation speed and structure for detonation waves in C-O is investigated. Weakly curved detonation fronts have a sonic point inside the reaction zone. In such waves the detonation speed depends on the detailed internal structure and not on simple jump conditions. Hence, in order to obtain the correct propagation speed and products of burning, the reaction length-scales must be resolved in any numerical simulation involving curved detonations in C-O. For each value of the initial density there is a corresponding extinction curvature above which quasi-steady detonations cannot propagate. For densities less than 2×107gcm-3, where the self-sustaining planar waves are Chapman-Jouguet, and for realistic values of the curvature, the sonic point moves from the end of silicon burning to the end of oxygen burning. Hence the effective detonation length, i.e. the length-scale of the burning between the shock and the sonic point which can affect the front, is several orders of magnitudes less than the planar waves predict. However, silicon burning, which occurs downstream of the sonic point, is increased in length by a few orders of magnitude owing to lower detonation speeds and temperatures. Therefore more intermediate-mass elements will be produced by incomplete burning if curvature is taken into account. Recent advances in detonation theory and modelling are also discussed in the context of Type Ia supernovae.

  4. Effects of chronic exposure to electromagnetic waves on the auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Tümkaya, Levent; Terzi, Suat; Kalkan, Yıldıray; Erdivanlı, Özlem Çelebi; Dursun, Engin

    2015-08-01

    The results support that chronic electromagnetic field exposure may cause damage by leading to neuronal degeneration of the auditory system. Numerous researches have been done about the risks of exposure to the electromagnetic fields that occur during the use of these devices, especially the effects on hearing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the electromagnetic waves emitted by the mobile phones through the electrophysiological and histological methods. Twelve adult Wistar albino rats were included in the study. The rats were divided into two groups of six rats. The study group was exposed to the electromagnetic waves over a period of 30 days. The control group was not given any exposure to the electromagnetic fields. After the completion of the electromagnetic wave application, the auditory brainstem responses of both groups were recorded under anesthesia. The degeneration of cochlear nuclei was graded by two different histologists, both of whom were blinded to group information. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis showed neuronal degeneration signs, such as increased vacuolization in the cochlear nucleus, pyknotic cell appearance, and edema in the group exposed to the electromagnetic fields compared to the control group. The average latency of wave in the ABR was similar in both groups (p > 0.05).

  5. Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2015-01-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

  6. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Domino, L; Patinet, Sylvain; Eddi, A

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying sub-wavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  7. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, L; Tarpin, M; Patinet, S; Eddi, A

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying subwavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  8. The effect of dissipative inhomogeneous medium on the statistics of the wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1993-01-01

    One of the main theoretical points in the theory of wave propagation in random medium is the derivation of closed form equations to describe the statistics of the propagating waves. In particular, in one dimensional problems, the closed form representation of the multiple scattering effects is important since it contributes in understanding such problems like wave localization, backscattering enhancement, and intensity fluctuations. In this the propagation of plane waves in a layer of one-dimensional dissipative random medium is considered. The medium is modeled by a complex permittivity whose real part is a constant representing the absorption. The one dimensional problem is mathematically equivalent to the analysis of a transmission line with randomly perturbed distributed parameters and a single mode lossy waveguide and the results can be used to study the propagation of radio waves through atmosphere and the remote sensing of geophysical media. It is assumed the scattering medium consists of an ensemble of one-dimensional point scatterers randomly positioned in a layer of thickness L with diffuse boundaries. A Poisson impulse process with density lambda is used to model the position of scatterers in the medium. By employing the Markov properties of this process an exact closed form equation of Kolmogorov-Feller type was obtained for the probability density of the reflection coefficient. This equation was solved by combining two limiting cases: (1) when the density of scatterers is small; and (2) when the medium is weakly dissipative. A two variable perturbation method for small lambda was used to obtain solutions valid for thick layers. These solutions are then asymptotically evaluated for small dissipation. To show the effect of dissipation, the mean and fluctuations of the reflected power are obtained. The results were compared with a lossy homogeneous medium and with a lossless inhomogeneous medium and the regions where the effect of absorption is not

  9. Leaf-shape effects in electromagnetic wave scattering from vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Fung, Adrian K.

    1989-01-01

    A vegetation medium is modeled as a half-space of randomly distributed and oriented leaves of arbitrary shape. In accordance with the first-order radiative transfer theory, the backscattering coefficient for such a half-space is expressed in terms of the scattering amplitudes. For disc- or needle-shaped leaves, the generalized Rayleigh-Gans approximation is used to calculate the scattering amplitudes. This approach is valid for leaf dimensions up to the size of the incident wavelength. To examine the leaf-shape effect, elliptic discs are used to model deciduous leaves, and needles are used to model coniferous leaves. The differences between the scattering characteristics of leaves of different shapes are illustrated numerically for various orientations, frequencies, and incidence angles. It is found that the scattering characteristics of elliptic disc-shaped leaves are sensitive to the three angles of orientation and disc ellipticity. In general, both like and cross polarizations may be needed to differentiate the difference in scattering due to the shapes of the leaves.

  10. Matter effects on LIGO/Virgo searches for gravitational waves from merging neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Torrey; Harry, Ian; Read, Jocelyn; Flynn, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Gravitational waves from merging neutron stars are expected to be observed in the next five years. We explore the potential impact of matter effects on gravitational waves from merging double neutron-star binaries. If neutron star binaries exist with chirp masses less than roughly one solar mass and typical neutron-star radii are larger than roughly 14 km, or if neutron-star radii are larger than 15-16 km for the chirp masses of galactic neutron-star binaries, then matter will have a significant impact on the effectiveness of a point-particle-based search at Advanced LIGO design sensitivity (roughly 5% additional loss of signals). In a configuration typical of LIGO’s first observing run, extreme matter effects lead to up to 10% potential loss in the most extreme cases.

  11. Simulations of Wind Field Effect on Two-Stream Waves in the Equatorial Electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lon Fern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wind field effect on the phase veloc i ties of 3- to 10-me ter Farley-Buneman two-stream waves in the equato rial E region ion o sphere at al titudes in the range of 95 - 110 km is stud ied by nu mer i cal simu la tion. The behav ior of this two-stream wave in the uni form wind field Un in a plane per pen dic u lar to the Earth’s mag netic field is simu lated with a two-di men sional two-fluid code in which elec tron in er tia is ne glected while ion in er tia is re tained. It is con firmed that, the thresh old con di tion for the ap pear ance of two-stream waves is VD C U th » + s + n (1 / cos Y0 q ; and the phase ve loc ity of the two-stream wave at the thresh old con di tion is Vp » Cs + Un cos q, where q is the ele va tion an gle of the wave prop a ga tion in a limited range and Y0 = ninnen / WiWe. The first formula in di cates that the wind field paral lel (anti-par al lel to the elec tron drift ve loc ity will raise (lower the thresh old drift ve loc ity by the amount of the wind speed. This means that par al lel wind is a sta ble fac tor, while anti-paral lel wind is an un sta ble fac tor of two-stream waves. This may ex plain why high speed (larger than acous tic speed two-stream waves were rarely ob served, since larger thresh old drift veloc ity de mands larger po larization elec tric field. The result of the simu la tions at the sat u ra tion stage show that when VD was only slightly larger than VD th , the hor i zon tal phase ve loc ity of the two-stream wave would grad u ally down-shift to the thresh old phase ve loc ity Cs + Un. The physical implications of which are discussed

  12. Effects of a disturbed zone of low-amplitude disjunctive dislocations on parameters of Love channel waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, V.N.; Osipov-Ivanovskii, S.P.; Vatolin, E.S. (Moskovskii Gornyi Institut (USSR))

    1990-08-01

    Analyzes effects of low-amplitude disjunctive dislocations on Love channel waves travelling through a coal seam. A model of the parameters of Love channel waves travelling through a system of coal seam layers with discrete changing elastic properties is used. Changes of transverse wave velocity in this zone are described by an analytical approximation formula based on the results of experiments carried out in the Eastern Donbass. Analyses show that the dislocation zones cause a decrease in wave amplitude for the first channel harmonic by about 20% while seismic pulse energy decreases by 30%. 3 refs.

  13. Effects from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of an offshore wind turbine and its monopile foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    The effect from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of the foundation and tower of an offshore wind turbine is investigated through aeroelastic calculations. Five representative sea states with increasing significant wave height are considered in a water depth of 40 m....... The waves are both linear and fully nonlinear irregular 2D waves. The wind turbine is the NREL 5-MW reference wind turbine. Fatigue analysis is performed in relation to analysis of the sectional forces in the tower and monopile. Impulsive excitation of the sectional force at the bottom of the tower is seen...... when the waves are large and nonlinear and most notably for small wind speeds. In case of strong velocities and turbulent wind, the excitation is damped out. In the monopile no excitation of the force is seen, but even for turbulent strong wind the wave affects the forces in the pile significantly...

  14. Interplay of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in cuprates with impurity effect and d-wave pairing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohapatra, Rasmita, E-mail: rmrmmohapatra@gmail.com [P.G. Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore, Odisha 756019 (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Physics Enclave, Plot no-664/4825, Lane-4A, Shree Vihar, Patia, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751024 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We considered here the interplay of antiferromagnetism (AFM) and Superconductivity (SC) with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of impurity effect. • The tunneling conductance explains the multiple peaks and dip-hump structure. • It is observed that AFM coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature. • The low temperature specific heat anomaly due to impurity atoms. - Abstract: We present here a model Hamiltonian to study the interplay between staggered magnetic field and the superconductivity with d-wave pairing symmetry in presence of hybridization between impurity f-electrons of rare-earth ions and 3d-electrons of copper ions. The staggered field and superconducting (SC) gaps are calculated by Green’s function technique and solved self-consistently. The coupling constants are compared using s-wave and d-wave pairings. The strength of hybridization suppresses the magnitude of the gaps; while antiferromagnetic coupling enhances the superconducting transition temperature, but suppresses the Neel temperature. The density of states (DOS) representing tunneling conductance shows complex character with impurity level lying at the Fermi level. The electronic specific heat explains prototype heavy fermion behavior in cuprate systems at low temperatures.

  15. Wave-turbulence interaction-induced vertical mixing and its effects in ocean and climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fangli; Yuan, Yeli; Deng, Jia; Dai, Dejun; Song, Zhenya

    2016-04-13

    Heated from above, the oceans are stably stratified. Therefore, the performance of general ocean circulation models and climate studies through coupled atmosphere-ocean models depends critically on vertical mixing of energy and momentum in the water column. Many of the traditional general circulation models are based on total kinetic energy (TKE), in which the roles of waves are averaged out. Although theoretical calculations suggest that waves could greatly enhance coexisting turbulence, no field measurements on turbulence have ever validated this mechanism directly. To address this problem, a specially designed field experiment has been conducted. The experimental results indicate that the wave-turbulence interaction-induced enhancement of the background turbulence is indeed the predominant mechanism for turbulence generation and enhancement. Based on this understanding, we propose a new parametrization for vertical mixing as an additive part to the traditional TKE approach. This new result reconfirmed the past theoretical model that had been tested and validated in numerical model experiments and field observations. It firmly establishes the critical role of wave-turbulence interaction effects in both general ocean circulation models and atmosphere-ocean coupled models, which could greatly improve the understanding of the sea surface temperature and water column properties distributions, and hence model-based climate forecasting capability. © 2016 The Authors.

  16. Effect of parallel transport currents on the d-wave Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashedi, Gholamreza [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jerib Avenue, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rashedi@phys.ui.ac.ir

    2009-02-18

    In this paper, the non-local mixing of coherent current states in d-wave superconducting banks is investigated. The superconducting banks are connected via a ballistic point contact. The banks have mis-orientation and phase difference. Furthermore, they are subjected to a tangential transport current along the ab plane of d-wave crystals and parallel to the interface between the superconductors. The effects of mis-orientation and external transport current on the current-phase relations and current distributions are the subjects of this paper. It is observed that, at values of phase difference close to 0, {pi} and 2{pi}, the current distribution may have a vortex-like form in the vicinity of the point contact. The current distribution of the above-mentioned junction between d-wave superconductors is totally different from the junction between s-wave superconductors. The interesting result which this study shows is that spontaneous and Josephson currents are observed for the case of {phi} = 0.

  17. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti-Galdino, M K; Silva, J A da; Mendes, L C; Santos, N A da; Simas, M L B

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd) as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1) no alcohol intake (control group) and 2) alcohol ingestion (experimental group). The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  18. Acute effect of alcohol intake on sine-wave Cartesian and polar contrast sensitivity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Cavalcanti-Galdino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess contrast sensitivity for angular frequency stimuli as well as for sine-wave gratings in adults under the effect of acute ingestion of alcohol. We measured the contrast sensitivity function (CSF for gratings of 0.25, 1.25, 2.5, 4, 10, and 20 cycles per degree of visual angle (cpd as well as for angular frequency stimuli of 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 cycles/360°. Twenty adults free of ocular diseases, with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, and no history of alcoholism were enrolled in two experimental groups: 1 no alcohol intake (control group and 2 alcohol ingestion (experimental group. The average concentration of alcohol in the experimental group was set to about 0.08%. We used a paradigm involving a forced-choice method. Maximum sensitivity to contrast for sine-wave gratings in the two groups occurred at 4 cpd sine-wave gratings and at 24 and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Significant changes in contrast sensitivity were observed after alcohol intake compared with the control condition at spatial frequency of 4 cpd and 1, 24, and 48 cycles/360° for angular frequency stimuli. Alcohol intake seems to affect the processing of sine-wave gratings at maximum sensitivity and at the low and high frequency ends for angular frequency stimuli, both under photopic luminance conditions.

  19. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  20. Effects of the local resonance on the wave propagation in periodic frame structures: generalized Newtonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Céline; Boutin, Claude; Hans, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the wave propagation in infinite two-dimensional structures made up of the periodic repetition of frames. Such materials are highly anisotropic and, because of lack of bracing, can present a large contrast between the shear and compression deformabilities. Moreover, when the thickness to length ratio of the frame elements is small, these elements can resonate in bending at low frequencies when compressional waves propagate in the structure. The frame size being small compared to the wavelength of the compressional waves, the homogenization method of periodic discrete media is extended to situations with local resonance, and it is applied to identify the macroscopic behavior at the leading order. In particular, the local resonance in bending leads to an effective mass different from the real mass and to the generalization of the Newtonian mechanics at the macroscopic scale. Consequently, compressional waves become dispersive and frequency bandgaps occur. The physical origin of these phenomena at the microscopic scale is also presented. Finally, a method is proposed for the design of such materials.

  1. Preliminary study on the effect of stiffness on lamb wave propagation in bovine corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yin, Yin; Guo, Yan-Rong; Diao, Xian-Fen; Chen, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of human cornea could provide valuable information for various clinical applications. Particularly, it will be helpful to achieve a patient-specific biomechanical optimization in LASIK refractive surgery, early detection of corneal ecstatic disease or improved accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement. However, there are few techniques that are capable of accurately assessing the corneal elasticity in situ in a nondestructive fashion. In order to develop a quantitative method for assessing both elasticity and viscosity of the cornea, we use ultrasound radiation force to excite Lamb waves in cornea, and a pulse echo transducer to track the tissue vibration. The fresh postmortem bovine eyes were treated via collagen cross-linking to make the cornea stiff. The effect of stiffness was studied by comparing the propagation of Lamb waves in normal and treated corneas. It was found that the waveform of generated Lamb waves changed significantly due to the increase in higher modes in treated corneas. This result indicated that the generated waveform was a complex of multiple harmonics and the varied stiffness will affect the energy distribution over different components. Therefore, it is important for assessing the viscoelastic properties of the cornea to know the components of Lamb wave and calculate the phase velocity appropriately.

  2. Effect of seismic waves on the hydro-mechanical properties of fractured rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lak, Meysam; Baghbanan, Alireza; Hashemolhoseini, Hamid

    2017-07-01

    The transmission of seismic waves in a particular region may influence the hydraulic properties of a rock mass, including permeability, which is one of the most important. To determine the effect of a seismic wave on the hydraulic behavior of a fractured rock mass, systematic numerical modeling was conducted. A number of discrete fracture network (DFN) models with a size of 20 m × 20 m were used as geometrical bases, and a discrete element method (DEM) was employed as a numerical simulation tool. Three different boundary conditions without (Type I) and with static (Type II) and dynamic (Type III) loading were performed on the models, and then their permeability was calculated. The results showed that permeability in Type III models was respectively 62.7% and 44.2% higher than in Type I and Type II models. This study indicates that seismic waves can affect deep earth, and, according to the results, seismic waves increase the permeability and change the flow rate patterns in a fractured rock mass.

  3. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  4. Strong negative effects of simulated heat waves in a tropical butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Klaus; Klockmann, Michael; Reim, Elisabeth

    2014-08-15

    Climate change poses a significant challenge to all natural systems on Earth. Especially increases in extreme weather events such as heat waves have the potential to strongly affect biodiversity, though their effects are poorly understood because of a lack of empirical data. Therefore, we here explore the sensitivity of a tropical ectotherm, which are in general believed to have a low warming tolerance, to experimentally simulated climate change using ecologically realistic diurnal temperature cycles. Increasing the mean temperature permanently by 3°C had mostly minor effects on developmental traits in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Simulated heat waves (strongly elevated temperatures for some time though retaining the same overall temperature mean), in contrast, caused strong negative effects by prolonging development time (by up to 10%) and reducing body mass (-21%), especially when combined with reduced relative humidity. Detrimental effects were carried over into the adult stage, diminishing subsequent performance. Most strikingly, higher temperatures suppressed adult immune function (haemocytes: -54%, lysozyme activity: -32%), which may potentially change the way species interact with antagonists. Heat waves thus reduced fitness parameters by 10-25% for development time and body mass and by up to 54% for immune parameters even in this plastic and widespread butterfly, exemplifying the potentially dramatic impact of extreme weather events on biodiversity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Effect of Electromagnetic Wave on Bone Healing in Fixed and Unfixed Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onger, Mehmet Emin; Göçer, Hasan; Çirakli, Alper; Büyükceran, Ismail; Kiliç, Mesut; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2016-09-01

    Mobile phones have come into daily life and are now one of the most frequently used devices for communication. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible effect of electromagnetic wave (EMW) with and without fixation material on bone healing.Forty male rats were exposed to fracture on tibia bone and were randomly divided into 4 groups as E(+)K(+), E(+)K(-), E(-)K(+), and E(-)K(-) where E(+) means EMW exposure and K(+) means Kirschner wire fixation. At the end of study tibia samples were taken from all the groups for the quantitative evaluation of regeneration.Significant difference was found between Group E(+)K(+) and E(-)K(+) in terms of both new bone and capillary volume.Electromagnetic wave may be harmful for bone healing with fixation whereas it has no same effect on bone regeneration without fixation.

  6. The involvement of cutaneous receptors in the biological effects of electromagnetic millimeter waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Emil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of peripheral nerve terminations in the mechanisms of action of electromagnetic millimeter waves (mmW was assessed. It is currently thought that mmW could be used in noninvasive complementary therapy because of their analgesic effect. However, the mechanisms of their antinociceptive effect and non-ionizing radiation are the subjects of controversy. The mechanisms of interaction of mmW and the cutaneous tissue have not been elucidated. We observed mast cell degranulation at the place of mmW action, a decrease of chronaxie and Turck reflex time, an increase in the number of afferent impulses after sciatic nerve at stimulation, as well as an increase electrocardiogram R-R interval of isolated frog heart after application of mmW. Based on these investigations, we propose that electromagnetic waves of millimeter length modify, through indirect mechanisms, the excitability and reactivity of peripheral nerve terminations.

  7. MMS Super-Conjunction Studies of Chorus Wave Properties and Their Effects on Energetic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D.; Blake, J. B.; Kletzing, C.; Zhao, H.; Leonard, T. W.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Wilder, F. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Schiller, Q.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I.

    2016-12-01

    During the first full sweep of NASA's MMS mission through the Earth's magnetotail, referred to as Phase 1x, the active state of the geomagnetic environment allowed many opportunities for new insights into inner magnetospheric dynamics. Of particular interest is the local generation of whistler-mode chorus waves and their subsequent effect on energetic electrons. In this study, we take advantage of conjunctions between MMS and the rest of the Heliospheric System Observatory satellites, including one super-conjunction event on 01 May 2016, when both Van Allen Probes and MMS were all within 1 Re of each other at the same time. Using multipoint measurements, we examine the properties and effects of chorus in fine detail. This concentration of observation points in the chorus generation region unveils new understanding of the wave-particle interactions that accelerate electrons and form the Earth's radiation belts.

  8. Transient overexpression of DNA adenine methylase enables efficient and mobile genome engineering with reduced off-target effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennen, Rebecca; Nilsson Wallin, Annika; Pedersen, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination of single-stranded oligonucleotides is a highly efficient process for introducing precise mutations into the genome of E. coli and other organisms when mismatch repair (MMR) is disabled. This can result in the rapid accumulation of off-target mutations that can mask desir...... reconstruct mutations found in evolved salt-tolerant strains, enabling the identification of causative mutations and isolation of strains with up to 75% increases in growth rate and greatly reduced lag times in 0.6 M NaCl....

  9. Effects of bilastine on T-wave morphology and the QTc interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Struijk, Johannes J.; Kanters, Jørgen K.

    2012-01-01

    The International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH) E14 guideline for thorough QT studies requires assessing the propensity of new non-antiarrhythmic drugs to affect cardiac repolarization. The present study investigates whether a composite ECG measure of T-wave morphology (Morphology Combination...... Score [MCS]) can be used together with the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) in a fully ICH E14-compliant thorough QT study to exclude clinically relevant repolarization effects of bilastine, a novel antihistamine....

  10. Effects of Mechanical Pumping on the Arterial Pulse Wave Velocity: Peripheral Artery and Micro-Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL PUMPING ON THE ARTERIAL PULSE WAVE VELOCITY : PERIPHERAL ARTERY AND MICRO -VESSELS Shu-Mei Wu*†, Yio-Wha Shau**, Bor-Shyh...was contributed from the results of BA-RA, the PWV for the micro -vessels (BA-finger) on the contrary was increased. Keywords- Mechanical Pumping ...arterial conduit (brachial artery-radial artery; BA-RA) and the micro -vessels (RA-ring finger) to mechanical pumping was evaluated. II

  11. Slow wave and REM sleep deprivation effects on explicit and implicit memory during sleep.

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Sarah; Solomons, Luke C.; Steier, Joerg Sebastian; Kabra, Neeraj; Burnside, Anna; Pengo, Martino F; Moxham, John; Goldstein, Laura Hilary; Kopelman, M D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been debated whether different stages in the human sleep cycle preferentially mediate the consolidation of explicit and implicit memories, or whether all of the stages in succession are necessary for optimal consolidation. Here we investigated whether the selective deprivation of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over an entire night would have a specific effect on consolidation in explicit and implicit memory tasks. Method: Participants completed a set...

  12. Gravity wave effects on the occurrence and brightness of Polar Mesospheric Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Amal

    This dissertation is concerned with characterizing the effects of Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) on Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) occurrence and brightness. In this study, PMC images from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) experiment, which is one of the three instruments on board the NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft is used. AIM was launched into a 600 km sun-synchronous orbit on April 25, 2007. CIPS is a four camera, ultraviolet imager designed to measure PMC morphology and particle properties. CIPS images have shown distinct wave patterns and structures in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), around the summertime mesopause region, which are qualitatively similar to structures seen in Noctilucent Clouds (NLC) from ground-based photographs. The structures in PMC are generally considered to be manifestations of upward propagating AGWs. Variability of AGW effects on PMC reported at several lidar sites has led to the notion of longitudinal differences in this relationship. This study compares the longitudinal variability in the CIPS observed wave occurrence frequency with CIPS measured PMC occurrence frequency and albedo along with mesospheric temperatures measured by the SABER instrument on board the TIMED spacecraft. In this dissertation, AGW structures were first identified in PMCs. An automated wave detection technique was developed for this purpose. The global longitudinal variability in AGW occurrences was determined and correlated with the observed longitudinal variability in PMC occurrences and longitudinal variations in temperature structures from the SABER instrument. From these studies it is apparent that the longitudinal variability in PMC wave structures is anti-correlated with the PMC occurrence variability, while deviations in SABER temperatures from mean temperatures at 83 km is correlated with GW occurrences. Hence GW occurrence variability appears to be a driving mechanism for the variability in PMC occurrences. In the

  13. Surface effect on band structure of flexural wave propagating in magneto-elastic phononic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunzu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical model is established to study the size-dependent performance of flexural wave propagation in magneto-elastic phononic crystal (PC) nanobeam with surface effect based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Considering the magneto-mechanical coupling constitutive relation of magnetostrictive material, the influence of surface effect on band structure is calculated by the plane wave expansion method for PC nanobeam subjected to pre-stress and magnetic field loadings. Through the example of an epoxy/Terfenol-D PC nanobeam, it can be observed that the characteristics of flexural wave band structures are size-dependent, and remarkably affected by surface effect when the dimension of the PC beam reduces to the nanoscale. The edges and width of the band gap with surface effect are higher than those without surface effect, especially for high frequency region. And surface effect gradually reduces with the increasing of bulk layer-to-surface layer thickness ratio until the band gap descends to a constant for the conventional one in the absence of surface effect. The effects of surface elasticity and piezomagneticity on band gap are more prominent than the residual surface stress. In addition, a distinctly nonlinear variation of band gap appears under the combined effects of pre-stress and magnetic field. Moreover, with the varying of filling fraction, multi-peaks of the width of the band gap are obtained and discussed. These results could be helpful for the intelligent regulation of magneto-elastic PC nanobeam and the design of nanobeam-based devices.

  14. Effects of Single Dose Energy Drink on QT and P-Wave Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Arinc

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Aim of this study is to evaluate the cardiac electrophysiological effects of energy drink (Red Bull on QT and P duration and dispersion on surface electrocardiogram. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers older than 17 years of age were included the study. Subjects with a cardiac rhythm except sinus rhythm, history of atrial or ventricular arrhythmia, family history of premature sudden cardiac death, palpitations, T-wave abnormalities, QTc interval greater than 440 milliseconds, or those P-waves and QT intervals unavailable in at least eight ECG leads were excluded. Subjects having insomnia, lactose intolerance, caffeine allergy, recurrent headaches, depression, any psychiatric condition, and history of alcohol or drug abuse, pregnant or lactating women were also excluded from participation. 12 lead ECG was obtained before and after consumption of 250 cc enegry drink. QT and P-wave dispersion was calculated. RESULTS: No significant difference have occurred in heart rate (79 ± 14 vs.81 ±13, p=0.68, systolic pressure (114 ± 14 vs.118 ± 16,p=0.38, diastolic blood pressure (74 ± 12 vs.76 ± 14, p=0.64, QT dispersion (58 ± 12 vs. 57 ± 22, p= 0.785 and P-wave dispersion (37 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 13, p= 0.755 between before and 2 hours after consumption of energy drink. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Consumption of single dose energy drink doesn't affect QT dispersion and P-wave dispersion, heart rate and blood pressure in healthy adults.

  15. Effects of waves and currents on the siltation problem of Damietta harbour, Nile Delta coast, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABO BAKER.I. ABO ZED

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the effect of prevailing dynamic factors on the sedimentation process in Damietta Harbour along the Nile delta coast of Egypt. The monitoring program spanned the period between 1978 and 1999 and included measurements of waves, currents and bathymetric profiles. The evaluation was based on determination of erosion and accretion rates, current regime, sediment transport, wave characteristics and wave refraction. Results revealed that the predominant wave direction from N-NW sector (86 % throughout the year is responsible for generation of a longshore eastward current. Less frequent waves from the N-NE sector generate an opposing longshore westward current. The refraction pattern for the prevailing wave direction indicates that the harbour and its navigation channel are located within a divergence of wave orthogonal and in an accretion sediment sink area. The annual net rate of littoral drift on the western side of the harbour is about 1.43 * 105 m3 (accretion, while the annual net rate of littoral drift on the eastern side is about 2.54 * 105 m3 (erosion. Currents fluctuate tremendously in speed and direction, especially during the winter months. Hence, sediment transport takes place in offshore, eastward, and onshore directions. Progressive vector diagrams show that the largest near bottom offshore, onshore and easterly net drift occurs during summer, spring and winter respectively. The onshore sediment transport generated during spring and summer plays an important role in the redistribution of eroded sediments during the winter. The overall study of dynamic factors indicated that the harbour site is characterized by eastern, western, offshore and onshore sediment movements. Therefore, the north-south orientation of the navigation channel, with its depth greater than the surrounding area, interrupts sediment drift from different directions and reduces the current speed. Consequently, the sediments sink within the navigation

  16. Spectral modulation effect in teleseismic P-waves from DPRK nuclear tests recorded at different azimuths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Yefim; Kim, So Gu; Hofstetter, Abraham

    2014-05-01

    Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed at ISN stations for the Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating a source and not site-effect. Similar spectral minima with about the same frequency were observed in teleseismic P-waves of all three North Korea explosions (including the 2006 test) recorded at network stations and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NORESS, ARCESS), Australia (Alice Springs, Warramunga) and Canada (Yellowknife), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of the 2013 test at Warramunga array showed harmonic spectral modulation with several minima, evidencing a clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korea tests was estimated as ~2 km (different from the value ~1 km reported by USGS for the third test). This unusual depth estimation needs an additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  17. Experimental research of shock wave processes influence on machineless gas flow energy separation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Y. A.; Zditovets, A. G.; Leontiev, A. I.; Popovich, S. S.; Strongin, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental results for artificially initiated shock wave influence on machineless gas flow energy separation effect are presented. The working principle of the technique is based on interaction of supersonic and subsonic flows through the heat-conducting wall. In result at output there are two flows with different temperature – heated supersonic air flow and cooled subsonic one. Shock waves were initiated by conic ribs placed along the supersonic channel. During the research varied parameters included uni-flow and counter-flow air moving direction in subsonic and supersonic channels, subsonic flow rate divided by supersonic one (from 0 to 0.9), stagnation flow temperature (298, 313 and 343K) and initial Mach number (1.9, 2.5). The research was carried out with the use of infrared thermal imaging, thermocouples, total and static pressure probes, National Instruments automation equipment. Energy separation effect is increasing with the growth of Mach number and stagnation flow temperature. Rib placement in supersonic channel causes rise of static pressure and wall temperature and results in decreasing of energy separation effect at output of the device by less than 12%. Operability of the device with shock wave generation is remained.

  18. [Effectiveness of health education about heat wave hazard prevention in the elderly: a mixed effect model analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W J; Lin, Q X; Lin, H L; Liu, T; Zeng, W L; Xiao, J P; Li, X; Luo, Y

    2016-09-10

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of health education about prevention of heat wave hazard in the elderly. Methods: A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted during the summer of 2015 among a sample of residents aged ≥60 years in Panyu district, Guangzhou. Eight intervention measures for heat wave hazard prevention were taken in intervention group for 3 months (from August to October) and in control group no intervention measures were taken. The comparison of intervention effects was conducted between the intervention group and control group with mixed effect model after the collection of related information with same questionnaire. Results: After adjusting of family per capita income, family air-condition availability, alcohol use, disease history and time, the average score of risk awareness in the intervention group increased by 1.62, while it was 0.51 in the control group, the difference was significant (t=2.76, P=0.006). A significant effect was observed in the intervention group on the reduction of hospitalizations due to chronic diseases. The hospitalization rate due to chronic diseases in resent 3 months in the intervention group decreased from 32.39% (46/142) before intervention to 28.87% (41/142) after intervention; while in the control group, it increased from 26.28% (41/156) before intervention to 36.53% (57/156) after intervention. There was no significant difference between the two groups in awareness of knowledge on heat wave hazard prevention and the score of adaptation to heat wave. Conclusion: Health education programs could improve the risk awareness on heat waves, and reduce the hospitalizations due to chronic diseases in the elderly.

  19. Diffraction model of peristrophic multiplexing with spherical reference wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Takahata, Yosuke; Horiuchi, Shuma; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2015-02-01

    Multiplexing recording is a primary contributor to determining the recording density in holographic data storage. Therefore, many different kinds of recording methods have been proposed. Among them, the method that utilizes spherical waves as reference waves is characterized by the ability to enable multiplexing recording only by moving (shifting or rotating) the recording medium. In our research, we propose a theoretical diffraction model of peristrophic multiplexing with a spherical reference wave and evaluate the diffraction efficiency; this multiplexing recording method has incorporated spherical reference waves in rotation of the media. Additionally, we verify the effectiveness of the model by comparing it with experimental results.

  20. A Note on the Effect of Wind Waves on Vertical Mixing in Franks Tract, Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L. Jones

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional numerical model that simulates the effects of whitecapping waves was used to investigate the importance of whitecapping waves to vertical mixing at a 3-meter-deep site in Franks Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta over an 11-day period. Locally-generated waves of mean period approximately 2 s were generated under strong wind conditions; significant wave heights ranged from 0 to 0.3 m. A surface turbulent kinetic energy flux was used to model whitecapping waves during periods when wind speeds > 5 m s-1 (62% of observations. The surface was modeled as a wind stress log-layer for the remaining 38% of the observations. The model results demonstrated that under moderate wind conditions (5–8 m s-1 at 10 m above water level, and hence moderate wave heights, whitecapping waves provided the dominant source of turbulent kinetic energy to only the top 10% of the water column. Under stronger wind (> 8 m s-1, and hence larger wave conditions, whitecapping waves provided the dominant source of turbulent kinetic energy over a larger portion of the water column; however, this region extended to the bottom half of the water column for only 7% of the observation period. The model results indicated that phytoplankton concentrations close to the bed were unlikely to be affected by the whitecapping of waves, and that the formation of concentration boundary layers due to benthic grazing was unlikely to be disrupted by whitecapping waves. Furthermore, vertical mixing of suspended sediment was unlikely to be affected by whitecapping waves under the conditions experienced during the 11-day experiment. Instead, the bed stress provided by tidal currents was the dominant source of turbulent kinetic energy over the bottom half of the water column for the majority of the 11-day period.

  1. Effects of internal waves on sound propagation in the shallow waters of the continental shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Ming Yi

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Sound waves propagating through the oceans are refracted by internal waves. In the shallow waters of the continental shelves, an additional downward refraction of sound waves due to internal waves can cause them to interact more often with the seabed, resulting in additional energy from the sound waves being dissipated into the seabed. This study investigates how internal waves affect sound propagation on the continental shelves. It fi...

  2. 3D effects in the dynamics of oceanic rogue waves: A numerical study

    OpenAIRE

    Ruban, V. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent results of numerical simulations of fully nonlinear evolutionary equations for long-crested deep-water waves are discussed, where formation of extreme waves was observed. Several examples demonstrate that three-dimensionality of the fluid motion has an essential influence on the process of rogue wave formation. In particular, in the presence of elongate wave groups, the most tall extreme waves occur when in an initial state the wave fronts were oriented obliquely to the direction of th...

  3. Modulatory Effect of Association of Brain Stimulation by Light and Binaural Beats in Specific Brain Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomeni, Mauricio Rocha; Furtado da Silva, Vernon; Velasques, Bruna Brandão; Feijó, Olavo Guimarães; Bittencourt, Juliana Marques; Ribeiro de Souza E Silva, Alair Pedro

    2017-01-01

    One of the positive effects of brain stimulation is interhemispheric modulation as shown in some scientific studies. This study examined if a type of noninvasive stimulation using binaural beats with led-lights and sound would show different modulatory effects upon Alfa and SMR brain waves of elderlies and children with some disease types. The sample included 75 individuals of both genders, being, randomly, divided in 6 groups. Groups were named elderly without dementia diagnosis (EWD), n=15, 76±8 years, elderly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (EDP), n=15, 72±7 years, elderly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (EDA), n=15, 81±6 years. The other groups were named children with Autism (CA), n=10, 11±4 years, children with Intellectual Impairment (CII), n=10, 12 ±5 years and children with normal cognitive development (CND), n=10, 11±4 years. Instruments were the Mini Mental State Examination Test (MMSE), EEG-Neurocomputer instrument for brain waves registration, brain stimulator, Digit Span Test and a Protocol for working memory training. Data collection followed a pre and post-conjugated stimulation version. The results of the inferential statistics showed that the stimulation protocol had different effects on Alpha and SMR brain waves of the patients. Also, indicated gains in memory functions, for both, children and elderlies as related to gains in brain waves modulation. The results may receive and provide support to a range of studies examining brain modulation and synaptic plasticity. Also, it was emphasized in the results discussion that there was the possibility of the technique serving as an accessory instrument to alternative brain therapies.

  4. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkens, Bart, E-mail: blipkens@wne.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Western New England University, Springfield, Massachusetts, 01119 (United States); Ilinskii, Yurii A., E-mail: ilinskii@gmail.com; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A., E-mail: zheniazabolotskaya@gmail.com [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713–8029 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  5. Estimating site effects for seismic hazard assessment in Portugal using shear wave and geotechnical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela Pinto, C.; Carvalho, J.; Vilanova, S.; Borges, J.

    2012-04-01

    The estimation of seismic ground motion requires a simultaneous understanding of the effects of earthquake sources, propagation effects in the earth and local geological site conditions. In this work we address the latter issue in Portugal mainland. The SCENE project has the main goal to improve the seismic hazard assessment in Portugal by taking into account the site effects. To achieve this purpose, the project was divided into two main goals: 1) to estimate the shear-wave profiles at the seismic stations in order to correct the recorded ground motions for site effects and 2)to produce a regional soil classification based on shear-wave velocity averaged on the upper 30m (VS30) that will be used to include first order site effects in seismic hazard maps. This parameter was calculated using seismic refraction and reflection data, interpreted with the aid of nearby wells. The refraction interpretation was carried out using the generalized reciprocal and first break tomographic methods. Using reflection seismic software, the velocities measured from the reflection hyperbolae occasionally observed in the shot gathers were used to obtain an average velocity until the respective reflector and complement the refraction data. The soil classification is based on the eurocode 8, which uses only shear wave velocities, but the classification presented here includes also standard penetration test (SPT) data. The seismic acquisition was carried out next to the accelerometer and broadband stations located in the regions center and south of Portugal. To produce a soil classification, 30 P-wave and 30 S-wave profiles were acquired and data collected under the scope of other projects was also used. The classification takes into consideration not only the geological units on which the seismic profiles were acquired but lithological information and has been generalized to each unit using 1: 200.000 scale geological cartography. This classification for southern Portugal is presented

  6. Damping of Mechanical Waves with Styrene/Butadiene Rubber Filled with Polystyrene Particle: Effects of Particles Size and Wave Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghgo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing polymeric materials for damping mechanical waves is of great importance in various fields of applications such as military camouflage, prevention of structural vibrational energy transfer, and noise attenuation. This ability originates from segmental dynamics of chain-like polymer molecules. Damping properties of styrene-butadiene rubbercontaining 10 wt% of monosize polystyrene particles with different diameters (from 80 nm to 500 μm was investigated in the frequency range of vibration, sound, and ultrasound via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, normalsound adsorption test, and ultrasound attenuation coefficient measurement. The obtained results indicated that for different systems, containing different sizes of polystyrene particles, the area under the damping curve does not show significant change comparing to the neat SBR in the frequency range studied. However, addition of polystyrene particles, specifically nanosized particles, resulted in emergence of a secondary glass transition temperature which could be attributed to the modified dynamics of a layer of matrix molecules near the surface of PS particles. In the range of sound frequency, 0.5 to 6.3 kHz, the maximum damping was observed for the system containing polystyrene nanoparticles. However the single damping curve of neat SBR was separated into two or even three distinct curves owing to the presence of the particles. The maximum damping in the ultrasound frequency range was found for the system containing 0.5 mm polystyrene particles. This is attributed to different contributions from matrix chains dynamics and the reflection of mechanical waves from particles-matrix interface at different frequency ranges. On other words, the increase in the glass transition temperature of the elastomeric matrix phase with increasing the mechanical wave frequency causes a reduction in the contribution from matrix chains dynamics while the contribution due to diffraction from dispersed

  7. On the effect of topography on surface wave propagation in the ambient noise frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of analyzing empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-period surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 s). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to significantly affect recovered velocity variations in the ambient noise frequency range.

  8. Kink Waves in Non-isothermal Stratified Solar Waveguides: Effect of the External Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2017-10-01

    We study the effect of an external magnetic field on the properties of kink waves, propagating along a thin non-isothermal stratified and diverging magnetic flux tube. A wave equation, governing the propagation of kink waves under the adopted model is derived. It is shown that the vertical gradient of temperature introduces a spatially local cut-off frequency ω c . The vertical distribution of the cut-off frequency is calculated for the reference VAL-C model of the solar atmosphere and for different values of a ratio of external to internal magnetic fields. The results show that the cut-off frequency is negative below the temperature minimum due to the negative temperature gradient. In the chromosphere the cut-off frequency at a given height is smaller for a stronger external magnetic field. For the appropriate range of a ratio B e /B i ≈ 0-0.8, the cutoff lies in the range ω c ≈ 0.003-0.010 s-1 (periods 600 , ω 2/ω 1 < 2. This reduction grows for a larger ratio of temperature at the loop top to the temperature at the footpoints. Moreover, the effect of reduction is most pronounced for the steeper temperature profiles.

  9. Degradation of methyl orange through synergistic effect of zirconia nanotubes and ultrasonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianling; Wang, Xixin; Zhang, Libin; Hou, Xiaorui; Li, Ying; Tang, Chengchun

    2011-04-15

    Zirconia nanotubes with a length of 25 μm, inner diameter of 80 nm, and wall thickness of 35 nm were prepared by anodization method in mixture of formamide and glycerol (volume ratio = 1:1) containing 1 wt% NH(4)F and 1 wt% H(2)O. Experiments showed that zirconia nanotubes and ultrasonic wave had synergistic degradation effect for methyl orange and the efficiency of ultrasonic wave increased by more than 7 times. The decolorization percentage was influenced by pH value of the solution. Methyl orange was easy to be degraded in acidic solution. The decolorization percentage of methyl orange reached 97.6% when degraded for 8h in 20mg/L methyl orange solution with optimal pH value 2. The reason of synergistic degradation effect for methyl orange might be that adsorption of methyl orange onto zirconia nanotubes resulted in the easy degradation of the methyl orange through ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of a shock wave with an array of particles and effect of particles on the shock wave weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, P. V.; Ilyina, T. E.; Volkov, K. N.; Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    Two-phase systems that involve gas-particle or gas-droplet flows are widely used in aerospace and power engineering. The problems of weakening and suppression of detonation during saturation of a gas or liquid flow with the array of solid particles are considered. The tasks, associated with the formation of particles arrays, dust lifting behind a travelling shock wave, ignition of particles in high-speed and high-temperature gas flows are adjoined to safety of space flight. The mathematical models of shock wave interaction with the array of solid particles are discussed, and numerical methods are briefly described. The numerical simulations of interaction between sub- and supersonic flows and an array of particles being in motionless state at the initial time are performed. Calculations are carried out taking into account the influence that the particles cause on the flow of carrier gas. The results obtained show that inert particles significantly weaken the shock waves up to their suppression, which can be used to enhance the explosion safety of spacecrafts.

  11. Effects of magnetized plasma on the propagation properties of obliquely incident THz waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxian Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the propagation of obliquely incident terahertz (THz wave in a non-uniform magnetized plasma slab is investigated. The electron density and the collision frequency across the plasma are assumed to have a Gaussian profile. To deal with the non-uniform profile, the plasma slab is divided into a series of subslabs. For more accuracy, twice reflection between the interfaces of each subslab is considered, and the corresponding transmitted and reflected power are derived. Effects of collision frequency, magnetic field amplitude and incident angle on THz wave propagation characteristics are investigated. Specifically, the refraction angles in each subslab are presented. These simulation results are meaningful for the hypersonic flight communication.

  12. Effects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on stone forming risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, S; Yaman, O; Sarica, K; Göğüş, O; Yaman, L S; Süzer, O

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported in some definite studies that ESWL causes transient deterioration in renal haemodynamics and function. Again certain parameters in blood and urine have been used in order to assess this functional deterioration and different results are reported. In our present study we aimed to describe the adverse effects of shock waves on the excretion of urinary metabolites such as electrolytes, oxalate and citrate. Evaluation of our results in 30 patients revealed that although exposure to shock waves during ESWL for symptomatic renal calculi causes a slight increase in the urinary level of metabolites, all of these changes remained in normal range and no statistically significant changes in the urinary level of the aforementioned parameters could be demonstrated.

  13. Effects of an elastic membrane on tube waves in permeable formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Johnson, D.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the modified properties were calculated for tube wave propagation in a fluid-filled borehole penetrating a permeable rock due to the presence of a mudcake which forms on the borehole wall. The mudcake was characterized by an impermeable elastic layer. The mudcake partial sealing mechanism was simulated using a finite membrane stiffness. Consequently, it was shown that the mudcake can reduce, but not eliminate, the permeability effects on the tube wave slowness and attenuation. Moreover, this paper discusses a variety of values for the relevant parameters especially the mudcake thickness and membrane stiffness. The important combinations of mudcake parameters were clarified by using an analytic expression for the low-frequency limit.

  14. Effects of Rotation and Gravity Field on Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Thermoelastic Media under Four Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation is done to investigate the gravitational and rotational parameters effects on surface waves in fibre-reinforced thermoelastic media. The theory of generalized surface waves has been firstly developed and then it has been employed to investigate particular cases of waves, namely, Stoneley waves, Rayleigh waves, and Love waves. The analytical expressions for surface waves velocity and attenuation coefficient are obtained in the physical domain by using the harmonic vibrations and four thermoelastic theories. The wave velocity equations have been obtained in different cases. The numerical results are given for equation of coupled thermoelastic theory (C-T, Lord-Shulman theory (L-S, Green-Lindsay theory (G-L, and the linearized (G-N theory of type II. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of gravity, rotation, and parameters for fibre-reinforced of the material media. The results obtained are displayed by graphs to clear the phenomena physical meaning. The results indicate that the effect of gravity, rotation, relaxation times, and parameters of fibre-reinforced of the material medium is very pronounced.

  15. Assessment of quasi-linear effect of RF power spectrum for enabling lower hybrid current drive in reactor plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Roberto; Cardinali, Alessandro; Castaldo, Carmine; Amicucci, Luca; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Galli, Alessandro; Napoli, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi; Santini, Franco; Schettini, Giuseppe; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The main research on the energy from thermonuclear fusion uses deuterium plasmas magnetically trapped in toroidal devices. To suppress the turbulent eddies that impair thermal insulation and pressure tight of the plasma, current drive (CD) is necessary, but tools envisaged so far are unable accomplishing this task while efficiently and flexibly matching the natural current profiles self-generated at large radii of the plasma column [1-5]. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [6] can satisfy this important need of a reactor [1], but the LHCD system has been unexpectedly mothballed on JET. The problematic extrapolation of the LHCD tool at reactor graded high values of, respectively, density and temperatures of plasma has been now solved. The high density problem is solved by the FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) method [7], and solution of the high temperature one is presented here. Model results based on quasi-linear (QL) theory evidence the capability, w.r.t linear theory, of suitable operating parameters of reducing the wave damping in hot reactor plasmas. Namely, using higher RF power densities [8], or a narrower antenna power spectrum in refractive index [9,10], the obstacle for LHCD represented by too high temperature of reactor plasmas should be overcome. The former method cannot be used for routinely, safe antenna operations, Thus, only the latter key is really exploitable in a reactor. The proposed solutions are ultimately necessary for viability of an economic reactor.

  16. The Effect of Surface Topography on the Nonlinear Dynamics of Rossby Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, S. I.; Desjardins, O.; Pitsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    Boussinesq convection in rotating systems attracts a sustained attention of the fluid dynamics community, because it has intricate non-linear dynamics (Cross & Hohenberg 1993) and plays an important role in geophysical and astrophysical applications, such as the motion of the liquid outer core of Earth, the Red Spot in Jupiter, the giant cells in the Sun etc. (Alridge et al. 1990). A fundamental distinction between the real geo- and astrophysical problems and the idealized laboratory studies is that natural systems are inhomogeneous (Alridge et al. 1990). Heterogeneities modulate the flow and influence significantly the dynamics of convective patterns (Alridge et al. 1990; Hide 1971). The effect of modulations on pattern formation and transition to turbulence in Boussinesq convection is far from being completely understood (Cross & Hohenberg 1993; Aranson & Kramer 2002). It is generally accepted that in the liquid outer core of the Earth the transport of the angular momentum and internal heat occurs via thermal Rossby waves (Zhang et al. 2001; Kuang & Bloxham 1999). These waves been visualized in laboratory experiments in rotating liquid-filled spheres and concentric spherical shells (Zhang et al. 2001; Kuang & Bloxham 1999). The basic dynamical features of Rossby waves have been reproduced in a cylindrical annulus, a system much simpler than the spherical ones (Busse & Or 1986; Or & Busse 1987). For convection in a cylindrical annulus, the fluid motion is two-dimensional, and gravity is replaced by a centrifugal force, (Busse & Or 1986; Or & Busse 1987). Hide (1971) has suggested that the momentum and heat transport in the core might be influenced significantly by so-called bumps, which are heterogeneities on the mantle-core boundary. To model the effect of surface topography on the transport of momentum and energy in the liquid outer core of the Earth, Bell & Soward (1996), Herrmann & Busse (1998) and Westerburg & Busse (2001) have studied the nonlinear dynamics

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is effective in treating chronic plantar fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiale; Gao, Fuqiang; Wang, Yanhua; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Baoguo; Li, Zirong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common reason for heel pain. The efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) as an ideal alternative to conservative treatments and surgery is controversial, and almost all previous articles compared general ESWT with placebo without indicating the kind of shock wave. We undertook a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of general ESWT, focused shock wave (FSW), and radial shock wave (RSW) with placebo, to assess their effectiveness in chronic PF. Methods: The PubMed, Medline, EmBase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases were searched for studies comparing FSW or RSW therapy with placebo in chronic PF. Clinical outcomes included the odds ratios (ORs) of pain relief, pain reduction, and complications. Relevant data were analyzed using RevMan v5.3. Results: Nine studies involving 935 patients were included. ESWT had higher improvement rates than the placebo group (OR 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97–3.39, P < .00001). ESWT had markedly lower standardized mean difference than placebo, with heterogeneity observed (standardized mean difference 1.01, 95% CI −0.01 to 2.03, P = .05, I2 = 96%, P < .00001). FSW and RSW therapies had greater therapeutic success in pain relief than the placebo group (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.49–3.16, P < .0001; OR 4.63, 95% CI 1.30–16.46, P = .02), but significant heterogeneity was observed in RSW therapy versus placebo (I2 = 81%, P = .005). Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggested that FSW therapy can relieve pain in chronic PF as an ideal alternative option; meanwhile, no firm conclusions of general ESWT and RSW effectiveness can be drawn. Due to variations in the included studies, additional trials are needed to validate these conclusions. PMID:28403111

  18. The Effect of the Leeuwin Current on Offshore Surface Gravity Waves in Southwest Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandres, Moritz; Wijeratne, E. M. S.; Cosoli, Simone; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of regional wave regimes is critical for coastal zone planning, protection, and management. In this study, the influence of the offshore current regime on surface gravity waves on the southwest Western Australian (SWWA) continental shelf was examined. This was achieved by coupling the three dimensional, free surface, terrain-following hydrodynamic Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) and the third generation wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-WaveSediment Transport (COAWST) model. Different representative states of the Leeuwin Current (LC), a strong pole-ward flowing boundary current with a persistent eddy field along the SWWA shelf edge were simulated and used to investigate their influence on different large wave events. The coupled wave-current simulations were compared to wave only simulations, which represented scenarios in the absence of a background current field. Results showed that the LC and the eddy field significantly impact SWWA waves. Significant wave heights increased (decreased) when currents were opposing (aligning with) the incoming wave directions. During a fully developed LC system significant wave heights were altered by up to ±25% and wave directions by up to ±20°. The change in wave direction indicates that the LC may modify nearshore wave dynamics and consequently alter sediment patterns. Operational regional wave forecasts and hindcasts may give flawed predictions if wave-current interaction is not properly accounted for.

  19. The effect of induced heat waves on Pinus taeda and Quercus rubra seedlings in ambient and elevated CO2 atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameye, Maarten; Wertin, Timothy M; Bauweraerts, Ingvar; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    Here, we investigated the effect of different heat-wave intensities applied at two atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) on seedlings of two tree species, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and northern red oak (Quercus rubra). Seedlings were assigned to treatment combinations of two levels of [CO2] (380 or 700 μmol mol(-1)) and four levels of air temperature (ambient, ambient +3°C, or 7-d heat waves consisting of a biweekly +6°C heat wave, or a monthly +12°C heat wave). Treatments were maintained throughout the growing season, thus receiving equal heat sums. We measured gas exchange and fluorescence parameters before, during and after a mid-summer heat wave. The +12°C heat wave, significantly reduced net photosynthesis (Anet) in both species and [CO2] treatments but this effect was diminished in elevated [CO2]. The decrease in Anet was accompanied by a decrease in Fv'/Fm' in P. taeda and ΦPSII in Q. rubra. Our findings suggest that, if soil moisture is adequate, trees will experience negative effects in photosynthetic performance only with the occurrence of extreme heat waves. As elevated [CO2] diminished these negative effects, the future climate may not be as detrimental to plant communities as previously assumed. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130......-140%. In the paper a procedure for calculating the efficiency and optimizing the geometry of wave reflectors are described, this by use of a 3D boundary element method. The calculations are verified by laboratory experiments and a very good agreement is found. The paper gives estimates of possible power benifit...... for different geometries of the wave reflectors and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC's can evaluate whether a specific WEC possible could benefit from wave reflectors....

  1. Effect of light assisted collisions on matter wave coherence in superradiant Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo; Griesmaier, Axel Rudolf; Steenstrup, Mads Peter Hornbak

    2012-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the effects of light assisted collisions on the coherence between momentum states in Bose-Einstein condensates. The onset of superradiant Rayleigh scattering serves as a sensitive monitor for matter-wave coherence. A subtle interplay of binary and collective effects...... leads to a profound asymmetry between the two sides of the atomic resonance and provides far bigger coherence loss rates for a condensate bathed in blue detuned light than previously estimated. We present a simplified quantitative model containing the essential physics to explain our experimental data...

  2. Asymptotics of QCD traveling waves with fluctuations and running coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuf, Guillaume

    2008-09-01

    Extending the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation independently to running coupling or to fluctuation effects due to pomeron loops is known to lead in both cases to qualitative changes of the traveling-wave asymptotic solutions. In this paper we study the extension of the forward BK equation, including both running coupling and fluctuations effects, extending the method developed for the fixed coupling case [E. Brunet, B. Derrida, A.H. Mueller, S. Munier, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 056126, cond-mat/0512021]. We derive the exact asymptotic behavior in rapidity of the probabilistic distribution of the saturation scale.

  3. Effect of magnetic impurity scattering in a d-wave superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, C H

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of magnetic impurity scattering in a d-wave superconductor by taking into account the magnetic moment and the anisotropy of the impurity potential. We compute the transition temperate, the superfluid density, the residual resistivity, and the residual density of states as a function of the impurity concentration by solving the t-matrix equation of impurity scattering. In the Ginzburg-Landau region, we derive the general expression for the various physical quantities to discuss the effect of arbitrary phase shifts of the impurity potential. We also compare the results with the experiments for Zn and Ni substitutions in the high temperature superconductors.

  4. Parity violation effects in the Josephson junction of a p-wave superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Nikolay A., E-mail: belov@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Harman, Zoltán

    2016-10-23

    The phenomenon of the parity violation due to weak interaction may be studied with superconducting systems. Previous research considered the case of conventional superconductors. We here theoretically investigate the parity violation effect in an unconventional p-wave ferromagnetic superconductor, and find that its magnitude can be increased by three orders of magnitude, as compared to results of earlier studies. For potential experimental observations, the superconductor UGe{sub 2} is suggested, together with the description of a possible experimental scheme allowing one to effectively measure and control the phenomenon. Furthermore, we put forward a setup for a further significant enhancement of the signature of parity violation in the system considered.

  5. Diffusion in coastal and harbour zones, effects of Waves,Wind and Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, M.; Redondo, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    between different sites is not direct and a good understanding of the dominant mixing processes is needed. There is an increase of diffusivity with wave height but only for large Wave Reynolds numbers. Other important factors are wind speed and tidal currents. The horizontal diffusivity shows a marked anisotropy as a function of wave height and distance from the coast. The measurements were performed under a variety of weather conditions conditional sampling has been used to identify the different influences of the environmental agents on the actual effective horizontal diffusion[4]. [1] Bahia E. (1998) "Un estudio numerico experimental de la dispersion de contaminantes en aguas costeras, PhD Tesis UPC, Barcelona. [2] Bezerra M.O., (2000) "Diffusion de contaminantes en la costa. , PhD Tesis Uni. De Barcelona, Barcelona. [3] Diez M. (1998) "Estudio de la Hidrodinamica de la zona de rompientes mediante el analisis digital de imagenes. Master Thesis, UPC, Barcelona. [4] Artale V., Boffetta G., Celani A., Cencini M. and Vulpiani A., 1997, "Dispersion of passive tracers in closed basins: Beyond the diffusion coefficient", Physics of Fluids, vol 9, pp 3162-1997

  6. Comment on “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan, E-mail: unghosh1@rediffmail.com; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Recently Gun Li et al. discussed “Effects of damping solitary wave in a viscosity bounded plasma” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022118 (2014)]. The paper contains some serious errors which have been pointed out in this Comment.

  7. Quantum effects on propagation of bulk and surface waves in a thin quantum plasma film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-19

    The propagation of bulk and surface plasma waves in a thin quantum plasma film is investigated, taking into account the quantum effects. The generalized bulk and surface plasma dispersion relation due to quantum effects is derived, using the quantum hydrodynamic dielectric function and applying appropriate additional boundary conditions. The quantum mechanical and film geometric effects on the bulk and surface modes are discussed. It is found that quantum effects become important for a thin film of small thickness. - Highlights: • New bulk and surface plasma dispersion relations due to quantum effects are derived, in a thin quantum plasma film. • It is found that quantum effects become important for a thin quantum film of small thickness.

  8. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects

  9. Dust ion acoustic waves in four component magnetized dusty plasma with effect of slow rotation and superthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2017-12-01

    Dust ion acoustic waves are investigated in four component magneto-rotating dusty plasma comprising opposite polarity dust grains, ions, and nonthermal electrons using the concept of one fluid and two fluid models. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived using the reductive perturbation technique to study the nonlinear solitary wave structures. The numerical results show that the superthermality of electrons affects both amplitude and width of the solitary waves while the rotational frequency has a small impression on the width. It is shown that the solitary wave changes its potential from positive to negative at a critical value of the superthermal parameter. It is also observed that the inertial role of dust grains flourishes the effect of rotational frequency and also changes the critical value of the superthermal parameter where the positive/negative potential solitary waves exist.

  10. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Ke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb on custom capture arrays, and enriched over 99% of the targets in all libraries. The percentage of aligned reads was highly consistent (24.4-29.1% across all specimens, including in multiplexing up to 20 barcoded individuals on a single array. Base coverage among specimens and within targets in each species library was uniform, and the performance of targets among independent exon captures was highly reproducible. There was no decrease in coverage among chipmunk species, which showed up to 1.5% sequence divergence in coding regions. We did observe a decline in capture performance of a subset of targets designed from a much more divergent ground squirrel genome (30 My, however, over 90% of the targets were also recovered. Final assemblies yielded over ten thousand orthologous loci (~3.6 Mb with thousands of fixed and polymorphic SNPs among species identified. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of a transcriptome-enabled, multiplexed, exon capture method to create thousands of informative markers for population genomic and phylogenetic studies in non-model species across the tree of life.

  11. Long-term effects of invasive treatment in patients with a post-thrombolytic Q-wave myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Madsen, Jan K; Grande, Peer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a deferred invasive treatment strategy on long-term outcome in patients with a post-thrombolytic Q-wave myocardial infarction and inducible myocardial ischemia.......The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a deferred invasive treatment strategy on long-term outcome in patients with a post-thrombolytic Q-wave myocardial infarction and inducible myocardial ischemia....

  12. A Wave Interpretation of the Compton Effect As a Further Demonstration of the Postulates of de Broglie

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Ching-Chuan

    2005-01-01

    The Compton effect is commonly cited as a demonstration of the particle feature of light, while the wave nature of matter has been proposed by de Broglie and demonstrated by Davisson and Germer with the Bragg diffraction of electron beams. In this investigation, we present an entirely different interpretation of the Compton effect based on the postulates of de Broglie and on an interaction between electromagnetic and matter waves. The speeds of interacting electrons in the Compton scattering ...

  13. Gravitational Wave Detection with Atom Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-23

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. The terrestrial experiment can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment probes the same frequency spectrum as LISA with better strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The effect of the gravitational waves on the propagating laser field produces the main effect in this configuration and enables a large enhancement in the gravitational wave signal while significantly suppressing many backgrounds. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations and acceleration noise, and reduces spacecraft control requirements.

  14. Solitary wave evolution in a magnetized inhomogeneous plasma under the effect of ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2011-10-01

    A modified form of Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation appropriate to nonlinear ion acoustic solitary waves in an inhomogeneous plasma is derived in the presence of an external magnetic field and constant ionization in the plasma. This equation differs from usual version of the KdV equation because of the inclusion of two terms arising due to ionization and density gradient present in the plasma. In this plasma, only the compressive solitary waves are found to propagate corresponding to the fast and slow modes. The amplitude of the solitary wave increases with an enhancement in the ionization for the fast mode as well as for the slow mode. The effect of magnetic field is to enhance the width of the solitary structure. The amplitude is found to increase (decrease) with an enhancement in charge number of the ions for the fast (slow) mode. The tailing structure becomes more (less) prominent with the rise in ion drift velocity for the case of fast (slow) mode.

  15. A novel traveling wave piezoelectric actuated tracked mobile robot utilizing friction effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Shu, Chengyou; Jin, Jiamei; Zhang, Jianhui

    2017-03-01

    A novel traveling wave piezoelectric-actuated tracked mobile robot with potential application to robotic rovers was proposed and investigated in this study. The proposed tracked mobile robot is composed of a parallelogram-frame-structure piezoelectric transducer with four rings and a metal track. Utilizing the converse piezoelectric and friction effects, traveling waves were propagated in the rings and then the metal track was actuated by the piezoelectric transducer. Compared with traditional tracked mechanisms, the proposed tracked mobile robot has a simpler and more compact structure without lubricant, which eliminates the problem of lubricant volatilization and deflation, thus, it could be operated in the vacuum environment. Dynamic characteristics were simulated and measured to reveal the mechanism of actuating track of the piezoelectric transducer. Experimental investigations of the traveling wave piezoelectric-actuated tracked mobile robot were then carried out, and the results indicated that the robot prototype with a pair of exciting voltages of 460 Vpp is able to achieve a maximum velocity of 57 mm s-1 moving on the foam plate and possesses the obstacle crossing capability with a maximum height of 27 mm. The proposed tracked mobile robot exhibits potential to be the driving system of robotic rovers.

  16. Effective model for a supercurrent in a pair-density wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wârdh, Jonatan; Granath, Mats

    2017-12-01

    We extend the standard effective model of d -wave superconductivity of a single band tight-binding Hamiltonian with a nearest-neighbor attraction to include finite range periodically modulated pair hopping. The pair hopping is characterized by a fixed wave number Q =Q x ̂ breaking lattice rotational symmetry. Within self-consistent BCS theory we study the general variational state consisting of two incommensurate singlet pair amplitudes ΔQ1and ΔQ 2 and find two types of ground states; one of the Larkin-Ovchnnikov (LO) or pair-density wave (PDW) type with ΔQ1=ΔQ2 and Q1=-Q2≈Q , and one of the Fulde-Ferrell (FF) type with ΔQ 2=0 and Q1≈±Q . An anomalous term in the static current operator arising from the pair hopping ensures that Bloch's theorem on ground state current is enforced also for the time-reversal and parity breaking FF state, despite no spin-population imbalance. We also consider a supercurrent by exploring the space of pair momenta Q1 and Q2 and identify characteristics of a state with multiple finite momentum order parameters. This includes the possibility of phase separation of current densities and spontaneous mirror-symmetry breaking manifested in the directional dependence of the depairing current.

  17. WAVE EQUATION DATUMING TO CORRECT TOPOGRAPHY EFFECT ON FOOTHILL SEISMIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes Vides Luis Alfredo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The current seismic processing applies Static Corrections to overcome the effects associated to rough topography, based in the assumption that velocity in near surface is lower than in the substratum, which force going up rays travel near to vertical. However, when the velocity contrast between these layers is not large enough, the trajectory of the up going rays deviate from vertical raveling the reflectors erroneously. A better alternative to correct this is to continue the wave field to a datum, because it does not assume vertical ray trajectory and solves the acoustic wave equation to extrapolate sources and receivers. The Kirchhoff approach was tested in synthetic shots continuing their wave field to a datum and finally it was applied instead of Static Corrections in real data acquired in foothill zones. First shot and receiver gathers were downward continued to the base of weathering layer and later upward continued to a final flat datum. Comparing the obtained results we observed that continuation approach provides a noticeable enhancement of reflectors in seismic records, displaying a better continuity of the reflectors and an increment in frequency content.

  18. Wave propagation in magneto-electro-elastic multilayered plates with nonlocal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangyi; Guo, Junhong; Pan, Ernian

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, analytical solutions for propagation of time-harmonic waves in three-dimensional, transversely isotropic, magnetoelectroelastic and multilayered plates with nonlocal effect are derived. We first convert the time-harmonic wave problem into a linear eigenvalue system, from which we obtain the general solutions of the extended displacements and stresses. The solutions are then employed to derive the propagator matrix which connects the field variables at the upper and lower interfaces of each layer. Making use of the continuity conditions of the physical quantities across the interface, the global propagator relation is assembled by propagating the solutions in each layer from the bottom to the top of the layered plate. From the global propagator matrix, the dispersion equation is obtained by imposing the traction-free boundary conditions on both the top and bottom surfaces of the layered plate. Dispersion curves and mode shapes in layered plates made of piezoelectric BaTiO3 and magnetostrictive CoFe2O4 materials are presented to show the influence of the nonlocal parameter, stacking sequence, as well as the orientation of incident wave on the time-harmonic field response.

  19. The Effects of Cell Phone Waves (900 MHz-GSM Band) on Sperm Parameters and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Masoud; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Khavanin, Ali; Khazaei, Mozafar

    2013-04-01

    There is tremendous concern regarding the possible adverse effects of cell phone microwaves. Contradictory results, however, have been reported for the effects of these waves on the body. In the present study, the effect of cell phone microwaves on sperm parameters and total antioxidant capacity was investigated with regard to the duration of exposure and the frequency of these waves. This experimental study was performed on 28 adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g). The animals were randomly assigned to four groups (n=7): i. control; ii. two-week exposure to cell phone-simulated waves; iii. three-week exposure to cell phonesimulated waves; and iv. two-week exposure to cell phone antenna waves. In all groups, sperm analysis was performed based on standard methods and we determined the mean sperm total antioxidant capacity according to the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test using SPSS version 16 software. The results indicated that sperm viability, motility, and total antioxidant capacity in all exposure groups decreased significantly compared to the control group (pcell phone waves can decrease sperm viability and motility in rats. These waves can also decrease sperm total antioxidant capacity in rats and result in oxidative stress.

  20. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glick, A; Kang, M; Lin, H; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Ben-Josef, E; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. An in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie Grant

  1. Effect Of Electromagnetic Waves Emitted From Mobile Phone On Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potential In Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone (MP) is commonly used communication tool. Electromagnetic waves (EMWs) emitted from MP may have potential health hazards. So, it was planned to study the effect of electromagnetic waves (EMWs) emitted from the mobile phone on brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) in male subjects in the age group of 20-40 years. BAEPs were recorded using standard method of 10-20 system of electrode placement and sound click stimuli of specified intensity, duration and frequency.Right ear was exposed to EMW emitted from MP for about 10 min. On comparison of before and after exposure to MP in right ear (found to be dominating ear), there was significant increase in latency of II, III (p wave, amplitude of I-Ia wave (p wave (P waves of BAEP in left ear before vs after MP. On comparison of right (having exposure routinely as found to be dominating ear) and left ears (not exposed to MP), before exposure to MP, IPL of IIl-V wave and amplitude of V-Va is more (wave (< 0.001) in left ear. After exposure to MP, the amplitude of V-Va was (p < 0.05) more in right ear compared to left ear. In conclusion, EMWs emitted from MP affects the auditory potential.

  2. Application of Local Time Dependent Ion Composition to Observations, Modeling, and Effects of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Angelopoulos, V.; Chen, L.; Thorne, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous global magnetospheric studies on electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have revealed the typical wave properties observed throughout the Earth's magnetosphere. The observed trends in the wave properties at various geocentric distances and local time sectors, although in general agreement, elude satisfactory explanation without further details on the ambient plasma properties, the low-energy (few to ~100 eV) ions in particular. Recent studies also described techniques to deduce the presence and properties of low-energy ions and the application of such a technique to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) data has revealed the typical low-energy ion compositional properties throughout the Earth's magnetosphere. Motivated by the recent work on EMIC waves and low-energy ion composition, we analyze typical wave cases observed at each local time sector by the THEMIS satellites and apply the composition techniques or the statistical low-energy ion composition data to constrain the low-energy components in modeling of each wave case in the context of linear hot plasma theory. We find that the observed waves are modeled well with hot plasma theory and both are fully consistent with the composition of the ambient plasma. Our results suggest that combined ion composition and wave measurements are critical for further assessment of the effects of the waves on energetic particles. In the cases we report on here, we find the waves could resonantly interact with electrons at energies in excess of 2 MeV and therefore do not have an effect on the dominant trapped electron population.

  3. Is Tamsulosin Effective after Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Pediatric Renal Stones? A Randomized, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahat, Ahmed; Elderwy, Ahmad; Safwat, Ahmed S; Abdelkawi, Islam F; Reda, Ahmed; Abdelsalam, Yasser; Sayed, Mohamed; Hammouda, Hisham

    2016-04-01

    We assessed the effect of tamsulosin as an adjunctive therapy after shock wave lithotripsy for pediatric single renal pelvic stones. A total of 120 children with a unilateral single renal pelvic stone were included in a prospective randomized, controlled study. All children were randomized to 2 equal groups. Group 1 received tamsulosin (0.01 mg/kg once daily) as adjunctive therapy after shock wave lithotripsy in addition to paracetamol while group 2 received paracetamol only. Stone clearance was defined as no renal stone fragments or fragments less than 3 mm and no pelvicalyceal system dilatation. Our study included 69 boys and 51 girls with a median age of 3.5 years and a median stone size of 1.2 cm. There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 in stone or patient criteria. Of the children 99 (82.5%) achieved stone clearance after the first session, including 50 in group 1 and 49 in group 2. All children in each group were cleared of stones after the second session. The overall complication rate was 14.2%. There was no statistically significant difference between single session stone clearance rates (p = 0.81) and complications rates (p = 0.432) in either group. On multivariate analysis using logistic regression smaller stone size (p = 0.016) and radiopaque stones (p = 0.019) were the only predictors of stone clearance at a single shock wave lithotripsy session. Tamsulosin therapy did not affect stone clearance (p = 0.649). Tamsulosin does not seem to improve renal stone clearance. Smaller and radiopaque renal stones have more chance of clearance after shock wave lithotripsy for pediatric single renal pelvic stones. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of strong elastic contrasts on the propagation of seismic wave in hard-rock environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, R.; Zheng, L.; Liu, Q.; Milkereit, B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the propagation of seismic waves in a presence of strong elastic contrasts, such as topography, tunnels and ore-bodies is still a challenge. Safety in mining is a major concern and seismic monitoring is the main tool here. For engineering purposes, amplitudes (peak particle velocity/acceleration) and travel times of seismic events (mostly blasts or microseismic events) are critical parameters that have to be determined at various locations in a mine. These parameters are useful in preparing risk maps or to better understand the process of spatial and temporal stress distributions in a mine. Simple constant velocity models used for monitoring studies in mining, cannot explain the observed complexities in scattered seismic waves. In hard-rock environments modeling of elastic seismic wavefield require detailed 3D petrophysical, infrastructure and topographical data to simulate the propagation of seismic wave with a frequencies up to few kilohertz. With the development of efficient numerical techniques, and parallel computation facilities, a solution for such a problem is achievable. In this study, the effects of strong elastic contrasts such as ore-bodies, rough topography and tunnels will be illustrated using 3D modeling method. The main tools here are finite difference code (SOFI3D)[1] that has been benchmarked for engineering studies, and spectral element code (SPECFEM) [2], which was, developed for global seismology problems. The modeling results show locally enhanced peak particle velocity due to presence of strong elastic contrast and topography in models. [1] Bohlen, T. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modeling. Computers & Geosciences 28 (2002) 887-899 [2] Komatitsch, D., and J. Tromp, Introduction to the spectral-element method for 3-D seismic wave propagation, Geophys. J. Int., 139, 806-822, 1999.

  5. The effect of diabetes mellitus on the P-wave dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Altunkeser, Bulent B; Kayrak, Mehmet; Duzenli, M Akif; Vatankulu, M Akif; Soylu, Ahmet; Ulgen, Mehmet S

    2007-06-01

    P-wave dispersion (PD), a measure of heterogeneity of atrial refractoriness, is defined as the difference between the minimum (P min) and maximum P-wave (P max) durations on standard 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG). Increase in PD shows the intra-atrial and inter-atrial non-uniform conduction. In the present study the evaluation of the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) on PD in patients without coronary artery disease and hypertension was carried out. Seventy-six diabetic patients who had no coronary artery disease or hypertension (group 1; mean age 48+/-9) and 40 healthy volunteer individuals (group 2; mean age 46+/-13) were enrolled in the study. After obtaining 12-lead surface ECG of all cases, P max and P min P-wave durations were measured and the differences between them were taken as PD (PD=P max-P min). Left atrium diameter, left ventricular end systolic and end diastolic diameters were measured and left ventricular ejection fraction was determined by echocardiography. Pulse wave mitral flow velocities were measured from the apical 4-chamber view. Mitral early diastolic velocity (E), late diastolic velocity (A), E/A, E deceleration time and isovolumetric relaxation time were determined. In comparison of the 2 groups there was no statistically significant difference among age, sex, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, resting heart rate and body mass index of the cases. Although PD and P max were significantly higher in diabetic patients, there was no difference between P min values (33+/-12 vs 28+/-10, p=0.02; 99+/-12 vs 93+/-10, p=0.011; 66+/-9 vs 65+/-10, p=NS; respectively). DM might increase PD even without ischemia, hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  6. Patient perspectives on barriers and enablers to the use and effectiveness of de-escalation techniques for the management of violence and aggression in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Owen; Baker, John; Bee, Penny; Grundy, Andrew; Scott, Anne; Butler, Debbie; Cree, Lindsey; Lovell, Karina

    2017-10-30

    Investigate patient perspectives on barriers and enablers to the use and effectiveness of de-escalation techniques for aggression in mental health settings. De-escalation techniques are the recommended first-line intervention for the management of aggression in mental health settings internationally, yet use of higher risk restrictive practices persists. This indicates de-escalation techniques are not used at optimum frequency and/or there are important factors limiting their use and effect. Descriptive qualitative research using semi-structured interviews and Framework Analysis. Inpatient interviews (N = 26) exploring staff, patient and environmental factors influencing the use and effectiveness of staff de-escalation were conducted mid-2014. Three service user researchers led analysis. Data were synthesized in three deductive themes relating to staff, patient and environmental influences on the use and effectiveness of de-escalation techniques. The dominant view was that restrictive practices, rather than de-escalation techniques, are used in response to escalating patient behaviour. Under-use of de-escalation techniques was attributed to: lack of staff reflection on culture and practice and a need to retain control/dominance over patients. Ward rules, patient factors and a lack of staff respect for patients diluted their effectiveness. Participants identified a systematic process of de-escalation, rule subversion, reduced social distance and staff authenticity as enablers of effective de-escalation. This study investigated patient perspectives on staff, patient and environmental influences on the use and effectiveness of de-escalation techniques. Our framework of barriers and enablers provides indicators of organizational/behaviour change targets for interventions seeking to reduce violence and restrictive practices through enhanced de-escalation techniques. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in a magnetized quantum electron-positron plasma with effects of exchange-correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahmansouri, M., E-mail: mshmansouri@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156-8 8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Misra, A. P., E-mail: apmisra@visva-bharati.ac.in, E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-07-15

    The dispersion properties of elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in a magnetized electron-positron-pair (EP-pair) plasma are studied with the effects of particle dispersion associated with the Bohm potential, the Fermi degenerate pressure, and the exchange-correlation force. Two possible modes of the extraordinary or X wave, modified by these quantum effects, are identified and their propagation characteristics are investigated numerically. It is shown that the upper-hybrid frequency and the cutoff and resonance frequencies are no longer constants but are dispersive due to these quantum effects. It is found that the particle dispersion and the exchange-correlation force can have different dominating roles on each other depending on whether the X waves are of short or long wavelengths (in comparison with the Fermi Debye length). The present investigation should be useful for understanding the collective behaviors of EP plasma oscillations and the propagation of extraordinary waves in magnetized dense EP-pair plasmas.

  8. Elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in a magnetized quantum electron-positron plasma with effects of exchange-correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmansouri, M

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of elliptically polarized electromagnetic (EM) waves in a magnetized electron-positron-pair (EP-pair) plasma are studied with the effects of particle dispersion associated with the Bohm potential, the Fermi degenerate pressure, and the exchange-correlation force. Two possible modes of the extraordinary or X wave, modified by these quantum effects, are identified and their propagation characteristics are investigated numerically. It is shown that the upper-hybrid frequency, and the cutoff and resonance frequencies are no longer constants but are dispersive due to these quantum effects. It is found that the particle dispersion and the exchange-correlation force can have different dominating roles on each other depending on whether the X waves are of short or long wavelengths (in comparison with the Fermi Debye length). The present investigation should be useful for understanding the collective behaviors of EP plasma oscillations and the propagation of extraordinary waves in magnetized ...

  9. Impulsively Generated Wave Trains in Coronal Structures. I. Effects of Transverse Structuring on Sausage Waves in Pressureless Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2017-02-01

    The behavior of the axial group speeds of trapped sausage modes plays an important role in determining impulsively generated wave trains, which have often been invoked to account for quasi-periodic signals with quasi-periods of the order of seconds in a considerable number of coronal structures. We conduct a comprehensive eigenmode analysis, both analytically and numerically, on the dispersive properties of sausage modes in pressureless tubes with three families of continuous radial density profiles. We find a rich variety of the dependence on the axial wavenumber k of the axial group speed {v}{gr}. Depending on the density contrast and profile steepness as well as on the detailed profile description, the {v}{gr}{--}k curves either possess or do not possess cutoff wavenumbers, and they can behave in either a monotonical or non-monotonical manner. With time-dependent simulations, we further show that this rich variety of the group speed characteristics heavily influences the temporal evolution and Morlet spectra of impulsively generated wave trains. In particular, the Morlet spectra can look substantially different from the “crazy tadpoles” found for the much-studied discontinuous density profiles. We conclude that it is necessary to re-examine available high-cadence data to look for the rich set of temporal and spectral features that can be employed to discriminate between the unknown forms of the density distributions transverse to coronal structures.

  10. Experimental Research of Machineless Energy Separation Effect Influenced by Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Popovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research results of machineless energy separation effect with transversal ribs in supersonic channel. The energy separation effect assumes a physical division of the inlet flow into two or more flows, each having different stagnation temperature. Among well-known energy separation effects noted there are Ranque-Hilsch vortex tubes, Hartmann-Sprenger resonance tubes, pulsating tubes and some others.A working principle of device under study is based on thermal interaction between subsonic and supersonic gas flows through a heat-conducting division wall. This energy separation method was proposed by academician Leontiev and was patented in 1998. A number of references for PhD theses, articles, and conference proceedings devoted to the research of “Leontiev tube” have been mentioned in the paper. Efficiency factors for energy separation device performability have been analyzed in detail. The main attention was focused on the phenomenon of shock waves generation in supersonic channel of Leontiev tube.Experiment was carried out in the air prototype of energy separation device with supersonic flow Mach numbers 1.9 and 2.5, stagnation temperatures 40°С and 70°С, and for uni-flow and counter-flow air moving direction in subsonic and supersonic channels. Shock waves have been generated by means of circular ribs in supersonic channel of energy separation device. The research was carried out by means of infrared thermal imaging, thermocouples, total and static pressure probes, and modern National Insturments automation equipment. The work shows that shock waves have no negative influence on energy separation effect. A conclusion is made that unexpected shock wave generation in supersonic channel will not cause operability loss. It was gained that counter-flow regime is more efficient than uni-flow. Energy separation effect also appears to be higher with the rise of Mach number and flow initial stagnation temperature

  11. Collisional effects in weakly collisional plasmas: nonlinear electrostatic waves and recurrence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Pezzi, O.; Valentini, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of collisions in plasmas is a very fascinating and huge topic in plasma physics. The 'natural' operator that describes the Coulombian interactions between charged particles is the Landau (LAN) integral operator. The LAN operator is a nonlinear, integro-differential and Fokker-Planck type operator which satisfies the H theorem for the entropy growth. Due to its nonlinear nature and multi-dimensionality, any approach to the solution of the Landau integral is almost prohibitive. Therefore collisions are usually modeled by simplified collisional operators. Here collisional effects are modeled by i) the one-dimensional Lenard-Bernstein (LB) operator and ii) the three-dimensional Dougherty (DG) operator. In the first case i), by focusing on a 1D-1V phase space, we study recurrence effects in a weakly collisional plasma, being collisions modeled by the LB operator. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. Despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not in general a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations. Moreover, recursive phenomena affect both the linear exponential growth and the nonlinear saturation of a linear instability by producing a fake growth in the electric field, thus showing that, although the filamentation is usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, it can occur also in nonlinear phenomena. On the other hand ii), the effects of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of nonlinear electrostatic waves are shown by means of Eulerian simulations in a 1D-3V (one dimension in physical space, three dimensions in velocity space) phase space. The nonlinear regime of the symmetric

  12. [The effect of high-frequency current and ultrasonic wave on selected indicators of body weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełczewska, Magdalena; Szymczyk, Jerzy; Leszczyńsk, Ryszard; Błaszczyk, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Effective change the appearance of the body through available both invasive and non-invasive methods such as treatment has been documented in numerous clinical trials. Liposuction and lipoplasty are currently the most widely used methods of reducing fat deposits. Technological advances made has become increasingly popular use of invasive procedures using energy fields and high-frequency ultrasonic wave. It is now one of the most effective and safe methods of treatment, based on the principle of mechanical and thermal stimulation of the physiological processes leading to the reduction of locally accumulated fat. The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of selected parameters of body weight in patients undergoing fat reduction BTL Exilis device. IThe study included a 50-group of women who are patients of the Specialist Outpatient Clinic Al-Med in Kolobrzeg. Taken twice the measurement of body weight, waist circumference and thickness measurement of skinfolds before the first treatment, and after a series of treatments. Treatment consisted of 4 sessions while maintaining the 10-day interval between treatments. In the study a statistically significant reduction in the studied parameters such as actual body weight, waist circumference, fat mass and thickness of the skinfolds were showed. The effect of treatment with the energy field of highfrequency ultrasonic wave in a reduction in the size of fat body mass and improving the contour shape. Willingness to continue participation examined in this type of surgery proves positive reception of therapy and its effectiveness. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  13. Laser-induced pressure-wave and barocaloric effect during flash diffusivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Porter, W. D.; Dinwiddie, R. B.

    2017-07-01

    We report the laser-induced pressure-wave and the barocaloric effect captured by an infrared detector during thermal diffusivity measurements. Very fast (<1 ms) and negative transients during laser flash measurements were captured using the infrared detector on thin, high thermal conductivity samples. The standard thermal diffusivity analysis only focuses on the longer time scale thermal transient measured from the back-surface due to heat conduction. Previously, these negative transients or spikes were filtered out and ignored as noise or anomaly from the instrument. This study confirmed that the initial negative signal was indeed a temperature drop induced by the laser pulse. The laser pulse induced instantaneous volume expansion and the associated cooling in the specimen can be explained by the barocaloric effect. The initial cooling (<100 μs) is also known as the thermoelastic effect in which a negative temperature change is generated when the material is elastically deformed by volume expansion. A subsequent temperature oscillation in the sample was observed and only lasted about 1 ms. The pressure-wave induced thermal signal was systematically studied and analyzed. The underlying physics of photon-mechanical-thermal energy conversions and the potential of using this signal to study barocaloric effects in solids are discussed.

  14. Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressure and wave reflection readings: effects of posture and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yves; Abdolhosseini, Parirash; Brown, Freddy; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Williams, Michelle A; Stoner, Lee

    2015-08-01

    Oscillometric pulse wave analysis devices have recently emerged, presenting suitable options for investigating central hemodynamic properties in clinical practice. This study sought to examine whether the between-day reliability of central SBP (cSBP) and systemic arterial wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx) readings exceed the criterion for acceptable reliability or are affected by posture (supine and seated) and fasting state. Twenty healthy adults (50% female, 27.9 years, 24.2 kg/m) were tested on six different mornings: 3 days fasted and 3 days nonfasted. On each occasion, participants were tested in supine and seated postures. Oscillometric pressure waveforms were recorded on left upper arm. For cSBP, there was nonsignificant main effect for fasting state (P = 0.819) but there was a main effect for posture (P = 0.002). Conversely, for AIx, there was nonsignificant main effect for posture (P = 0.537) but there was a large main effect for fasting state (P = oscillometric assessments of central hemodynamic variables exceed the criterion for acceptable reliability and are most reliable when participants are evaluated while supine and fasted.

  15. Potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ziaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to present the available updated knowledge regarding the potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise (LFN from an open window in a moving car where the negative effects of LFN induced by heating components and/or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning are assessed. Furthermore, the assessment of noise in chosen enclosed spaces, such as rooms, offices, and classrooms, or other LFN sources and their effect on the human being were investigated. These types of noise are responsible for disturbance during relaxation, sleep, mental work, education, and concentration, which may reflect negatively on the comfort and health of the population and on the mental state of people such as scientific staff and students. The assessment points out the most exposed areas, and analyzes the conditions of standing wave generation in these rooms caused by outdoor and/or indoor sources. Measurements were made for three different enclosed spaces (office, flat, and passenger car and sources (traffic specific noise at intersections, noise induced by pipe vibration, and aerodynamic noise and their operating conditions. For the detection of LFN, the A-weighted sound pressure level and vibration were measured and a fast Fourier transform analysis was used. The LFN sources are specified and the direct effects on the human are reported. Finally, this paper suggests the possibilities for the assessment of LFN and some possible measures that can be taken to prevent or reduce them.

  16. Wave-energy distribution and hurricane effects on Margarita Reef, southwestern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Fernández, A.; Hernández-Ávila, M. L.; Roberts, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Wave measurements at Margarita Reef in southwestern Puerto Rico show that wave height decreases as waves travel across the forereef and into the backreef. Wave spectra reveal the presence of two wave trains impinging on the reef during the study: trade-wind waves and locally generated seas. Significant wave height calculated from the spectra show an average reduction of 19.5% from 20- to 10-m isobaths and 26% from 20- to 5-m isobaths. The significant wave height decreases an average of 82% for waves traveling across the reef crest and into the backreef. Wave-energy reduction is 35% from 20- to 10-m isobaths and 45% from 20- to 5-m isobaths. Energy loss across the reef crest is 97% which translates into the formation of strong across-the-reef currents capable of moving coarse sediment. Refraction diagrams of waves impinging on the reef from the SE provide a display of wave energy distribution around the reef. The transmission coefficients calculated for trade-wind waves and locally generated seas have means of 18% and 39%, respectively. A wave height model with negligible energy dissipation, produces wave height estimates that are, in general, within the ±15% error bands. Results of wave-energy changes from this study were applied to waves representative of hurricane conditions at the reef. Aerial photographs of the reef before and after the passage of hurricanes were compared to assess the reef changes. Changes observed in the photographs are interpreted as products of sediment transport by hurricane-generated waves. The patterns of change agree with the refraction diagrams suggesting that waves were the main agents of change at margarita Reef during severe storms.

  17. Sparse and Dispersion-Based Matching Pursuit for Minimizing the Dispersion Effect Occurring when Using Guided Wave for Pipe Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Rostami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic guided wave is an effective tool for structural health monitoring of structures for detecting defects. In practice, guided wave signals are dispersive and contain multiple modes and noise. In the presence of overlapped wave-packets/modes and noise together with dispersion, extracting meaningful information from these signals is a challenging task. Handling such challenge requires an advanced signal processing tool. The aim of this study is to develop an effective and robust signal processing tool to deal with the complexity of guided wave signals for non-destructive testing (NDT purpose. To achieve this goal, Sparse Representation with Dispersion Based Matching Pursuit (SDMP is proposed. Addressing the three abovementioned facts that complicate signal interpretation, SDMP separates overlapped modes and demonstrates good performance against noise with maximum sparsity. With the dispersion taken into account, an overc-omplete and redundant dictionary of basic atoms based on a narrowband excitation signal is designed. As Finite Element Method (FEM was used to predict the form of wave packets propagating along structures, these atoms have the maximum resemblance with real guided wave signals. SDMP operates in two stages. In the first stage, similar to Matching Pursuit (MP, the approximation improves by adding, a single atom to the solution set at each iteration. However, atom selection criterion of SDMP utilizes the time localization of guided wave reflections that makes a portion of overlapped wave-packets to be composed mainly of a single echo. In the second stage of the algorithm, the selected atoms that have frequency inconsistency with the excitation signal are discarded. This increases the sparsity of the final representation. Meanwhile, leading to accurate approximation, as discarded atoms are not representing guided wave reflections, it simplifies extracting physical meanings for defect detection purpose. To verify the

  18. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias-Neto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i the counting of transducing units and (ii the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU, with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6 ligand sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall

  19. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  20. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  1. Wave Effect Neutron Radiographic Imaging Origins in WCNR and Prospects for Low Cost Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. P.; Rogers, J. D.

    The origins of wave effect neutron test methods for advanced neutron radiography as published in World Conference on Neutron Radiography (WCNR) series has been reviewed. They include Neutron Holography demonstrated at the Dido reactor, Harwell, UK; Neutron Refraction and Small Angle Scattering demonstrated at the IR-8 reactor, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; and Neutron Interferometry demonstrated at the ILL reactor, Grenoble, France. Each case presents encouraging evidence that the advanced techniques currently practiced at the most advanced shared-user facilities could be built upon at some lower cost, single-user facilities if the lessons of the original low cost experiments are studied.

  2. The focusing effect of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals with gradually varying lattice constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bakhshi Garmi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the focusing effect of electromagnetic wave in the two-dimensional graded photonic crystal consisting of Silicon rods in the air background with gradually varying lattice constant. The results showed that graded photonic crystal can focus wide beams on a narrow area at frequencies near the lower edge of the band gap, where equal frequency contours are not concave. For calculation of photonic band structure and equal frequency contours, we have used plane wave expansion method and revised plane wave expansion method, respectively. The calculation of the electric and magnetic fields was performed by finite difference time domain method.

  3. Collision effects on propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in a sub-wavelength plasma slab of partially ionized dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, LI; Zhibin, WANG; Qiuyue, NIE; Xiaogang, WANG; Fanrong, KONG; Zhenyu, WANG

    2018-01-01

    Intensive collisions between electrons and neutral particles in partially ionized plasmas generated in atmospheric/sub-atmospheric pressure environments can sufficiently affect the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves, particularly in the sub-wavelength regime. To investigate the collisional effect in such plasmas, we introduce a simplified plasma slab model with a thickness on the order of the wavelength of the incident electromagnetic wave. The scattering matrix method (SMM) is applied to solve the wave equation in the plasma slab with significant nonuniformity. Results show that the collisions between the electrons and the neutral particles, as well as the incident angle and the plasma thickness, can disturb the transmission and reduce reflection significantly.

  4. Effects of reverse waves on the hydrodynamic pressure acting on a dual porous horizontal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kweon Hyuck-Min

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The seaward reverse wave, occurring on the submerged dual porous horizontal plate, can contribute to the reduction of the transmitted wave as it reflects the propagating wave. However, the collision between the propa¬gating and seaward reverse waves increases the water level and acts as a weight on the horizontal plate. This study investigated the characteristics of the wave pressure created by the seaward reverse wave through the analysis of expe¬rimental data. The analysis confirmed the following results: 1 the time series of the wave pressure showed reverse phase phenomena due to the collision, and the wave pressures acted simultaneously on both upper and lower surfaces of the horizontal plate; 2 the horizontal plate became repeatedly compressed and tensile before and after the occur¬rence of the seaward reverse wave; and 3 the seaward reverse wave created the total wave pressure to the maximum towards the direction of gravity, primarily on the upper plate. It was also confirmed that the wave distributions showed a similar trend to the wave steepness. Such outcome of the analysis will provide basic information to the structural analysis of the horizontal plate as a wave dissipater of the steel-type breakwater (STB.

  5. Effects of reverse waves on the hydrodynamic pressure acting on a dual porous horizontal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The seaward reverse wave, occurring on the submerged dual porous horizontal plate, can contribute to the reduction of the transmitted wave as it reflects the propagating wave. However, the collision between the propagating and seaward reverse waves increases the water level and acts as a weight on the horizontal plate. This study investigated the characteristics of the wave pressure created by the seaward reverse wave through the analysis of experimental data. The analysis confirmed the following results: 1 the time series of the wave pressure showed reverse phase phenomena due to the collision, and the wave pressures acted simultaneously on both upper and lower surfaces of the horizontal plate; 2 the horizontal plate became repeatedly compressed and tensile before and after the occurrence of the seaward reverse wave; and 3 the seaward reverse wave created the total wave pressure to the maximum towards the direction of gravity, primarily on the upper plate. It was also confirmed that the wave distributions showed a similar trend to the wave steepness. Such outcome of the analysis will provide basic information to the structural analysis of the horizontal plate as a wave dissipater of the steel-type breakwater (STB.

  6. Landau damping effects on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty negative-ion plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Barman, A

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear theory of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) with Landau damping is studied in an unmagnetized dusty negative-ion plasma in the extreme conditions when the free electrons are absent. The cold massive charged dusts are described by fluid equations, whereas the two-species of ions (positive and negative) are described by the kinetic Vlasov equations. A Korteweg de-Vries (KdV) equation with Landau damping, governing the dynamics of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive DAWs, is derived following Ott and Sudan [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 12}, 2388 (1969)]. It is shown that for some typical laboratory and space plasmas, the Landau damping (and the nonlinear) effects are more pronounced than the finite Debye length (dispersive) effects for which the KdV soliton theory is not applicable to DAWs in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of the linear phase velocity, solitary wave amplitudes (in presence and absence of the Landau damping) as well as the Landau damping rate are studied with the effects of the positive io...

  7. The effect of aerosols on long wave radiation and global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Savijärvi, H.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of aerosols on long wave (LW) radiation was studied based on narrowband LW calculations in a reference mid-latitude summer atmosphere with and without aerosols. Aerosols were added to the narrowband LW scheme based on their typical schematic observed spectral and vertical behaviour over European land areas. This was found to agree also with the spectral aerosol data from the Lan Zhou University Semi-Arid Climate Observatory and Laboratory measurement stations in the north-western China. A volcanic stratospheric aerosol load was found to induce local LW warming and a stronger column “greenhouse effect” than a doubled CO2 concentration. A heavy near-surface aerosol load was found to increase the downwelling LW radiation to the surface and to reduce the outgoing LW radiation, acting very much like a thin low cloud in increasing the LW greenhouse effect of the atmosphere. The short wave reflection of white aerosol has, however, stronger impact in general, but the aerosol LW greenhouse effect is non-negligible under heavy aerosol loads.

  8. Effects of yoga on brain waves and structural activation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Radhika; Tailor, Anisha; Bhatt, Tanvi

    2015-05-01

    Previous research has shown the vast mental and physical health benefits associated with yoga. Yoga practice can be divided into subcategories that include posture-holding exercise (asana), breathing (pranayama, Kriya), and meditation (Sahaj) practice. Studies measuring mental health outcomes have shown decreases in anxiety, and increases in cognitive performance after yoga interventions. Similar studies have also shown cognitive advantages amongst yoga practitioners versus non-practitioners. The mental health and cognitive benefits of yoga are evident, but the physiological and structural changes in the brain that lead to this remain a topic that lacks consensus. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine and review existing literature on the effects of yoga on brain waves and structural changes and activation. After a narrowed search through a set of specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 15 articles were used in this review. It was concluded that breathing, meditation, and posture-based yoga increased overall brain wave activity. Increases in graygray matter along with increases in amygdala and frontal cortex activation were evident after a yoga intervention. Yoga practice may be an effective adjunctive treatment for a clinical and healthy aging population. Further research can examine the effects of specific branches of yoga on a designated clinical population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Untangling the Effect of Head Acceleration on Brain Responses to Blast Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haojie; Unnikrishnan, Ginu; Rakesh, Vineet; Reifman, Jaques

    2015-12-01

    Multiple injury-causing mechanisms, such as wave propagation, skull flexure, cavitation, and head acceleration, have been proposed to explain blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). An accurate, quantitative description of the individual contribution of each of these mechanisms may be necessary to develop preventive strategies against bTBI. However, to date, despite numerous experimental and computational studies of bTBI, this question remains elusive. In this study, using a two-dimensional (2D) rat head model, we quantified the contribution of head acceleration to the biomechanical response of brain tissues when exposed to blast waves in a shock tube. We compared brain pressure at the coup, middle, and contre-coup regions between a 2D rat head model capable of simulating all mechanisms (i.e., the all-effects model) and an acceleration-only model. From our simulations, we determined that head acceleration contributed 36-45% of the maximum brain pressure at the coup region, had a negligible effect on the pressure at the middle region, and was responsible for the low pressure at the contre-coup region. Our findings also demonstrate that the current practice of measuring rat brain pressures close to the center of the brain would record only two-thirds of the maximum pressure observed at the coup region. Therefore, to accurately capture the effects of acceleration in experiments, we recommend placing a pressure sensor near the coup region, especially when investigating the acceleration mechanism using different experimental setups.

  10. Multipath Effects in Millimetre-Wave Wireless Communication using Orbital Angular Momentum Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Li, Long; Xie, Guodong; Bao, Changjing; Liao, Peicheng; Huang, Hao; Ren, Yongxiong; Ahmed, Nisar; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Zhe; Ashrafi, Nima; Ashrafi, Solyman; Talwar, Shilpa; Sajuyigbe, Soji; Tur, Moshe; Molisch, Andreas F; Willner, Alan E

    2016-09-23

    Electromagnetic waves carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been used for mode division multiplexing in free-space communication systems to increase both the capacity and the spectral efficiency. In the case of conventional wireless communication links using non-OAM beams, multipath effects caused by beam spreading and reflection from the surrounding objects affect the system performance. This paper presents the results of analysis, simulations, and measurements of multipath effects in a millimetre-wave communication link using OAM multiplexing at 28 GHz. Multipath-induced intra- and inter-channel crosstalk, which are caused by specular reflection from a plane parallel to the propagation path, are analysed and measured. Both the simulation and the experimental results show that an OAM channel with a high OAM number ℓ tends to suffer from both strong intra-channel crosstalk and strong inter-channel crosstalk with other OAM channels. Results of the analysis show that this observation can be explained on the basis of both the properties of OAM beam divergence and the filtering effect at the receiver, which is associated with the spiral wavefront of OAM beams.

  11. Low-cycle fatigue behavior of 316 stainless steel at FBR temperature. Effects of strain rate and strain wave form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, Isamu; Kitagawa, Masaki; Ohtomo, Akira (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1983-07-01

    The effects of strain rate and strain wave form on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of 316 stainless steel at FBR temperature were studied in order to clarify the controlling factor of fatigue strength and fracture mechanism. The following major results are obtained. (1) Under symmetrical and asymmetrical straining (slow-fast and fast-slow wave) with the strain rate between 10/sup 0/%/sec to 10/sup -3/%/sec, the fatigue life decreases with a decrease of strain rate in tension going period. The fatigue life is affected only by the strain rate in tension going period, and is not affected by the strain rate in compression going period. Slow-fast wave is most damaging, but the effect of saw-tooth wave is not significant. (2) The dependence of fatigue life on the strain rate in tension going period may not be due to the creep effect but due to the dynamic strain aging effect proper to FBR temperature (500/sup 0/C to 600/sup 0/C) (3) The fracture mode changes from transgranular cracking to intergranular cracking with a decrease of strain rate in tension going period. Slow-fast wave enhances the intergranular cracking, whereas fast-slow wave enhances the transgranular cracking. (4) Thermal aging increases the fatigue life under symmetrical and asymmetrical straining, and the life reduction with the strain rate reduction in tension going period is not so significant for the thermally aged condition.

  12. Numerical modeling of the load effect on PZT-induced guided wave for load compensation of damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hu; Zhang, Aijia; Wang, Yishou; Qing, Xinlin P.

    2017-04-01

    Guided wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has been given considerable attention and widely studied for large-scale aircraft structures. Nevertheless, it is difficult to apply SHM systems on board or online, for which one of the most serious reasons is the environmental influence. Load is one fact that affects not only the host structure, in which guided wave propagates, but also the PZT, by which guided wave is transmitted and received. In this paper, numerical analysis using finite element method is used to study the load effect on guided wave acquired by PZT. The static loads with different grades are considered to analyze its effect on guided wave signals that PZT transmits and receives. Based on the variation trend of guided waves versus load, a load compensation method is developed to eliminate effects of load in the process of damage detection. The probabilistic reconstruction algorithm based on the signal variation of transmitter-receiver path is employed to identify the damage. Numerical tests is conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the given method.

  13. Effect of hot anisotropic He+ ions on the growth and damping of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.-Y.; Noh, S.-J.; Choi, C.-R.; Lee, J. J.; Hwang, J. A.

    2017-05-01

    Physics of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is complicated by inclusion of heavy ions. In particular, He+ ions in the magnetosphere have long been considered to play important roles. Motivated by recent observations, we examine the effect of the inclusion of hot anisotropic He+ ions in addition to the usual hot anisotropic protons. We solve the kinetic dispersion relation for this examination and find the following results. First, inclusion of hot anisotropic He+ ions leads to the growth of EMIC waves at frequencies below the He+ gyrofrequency (He band) and a reduction of the EMIC wave growth rates (or damping of the waves) at frequencies between the proton and He+ gyrofrequencies (H band). Second, this effect is more dramatic for higher temperatures of He+ that would play a role in damping EMIC waves for both frequency bands and especially for cases without a He+ temperature anisotropy. Lastly, the effect is more prominent for cold plasma dominant conditions such as the region inside the plasmasphere or plume than for hot proton dominant conditions such as the region outside the plasmasphere. We propose that this last effect can at least partially explain the satellite observations indicating the preferred (though not exclusive) occurrence of He band waves inside the plasmasphere for the times when hot anisotropic He+ ions are supplied from the plasma sheet and ring current.

  14. Effects of bee venom acupuncture on heart rate variability, pulse wave, and cerebral blood flow for types of Sasang Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-min

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objectives: To evaluate effects of bee venom acupuncture on cardiovascular system and differences according to each constitution. 2. Methods: Heart rate variability, pulse wave and the velocity of cerebral blood flow were measured before bee venom acupuncture(BVA, right after and after 30 minuets, had been applied to 20 subjects. 3. Results: 1. BVA did not have effects on measurement variables of heart rate variability. 2. BVA had effects on pulse wave, showing total time, radial augmentation index up and height of percussion wave, time to percussion wave, sum of pulse pressure down. 3. BVA did not have effects on the cerebral blood flow velocity when considering not Sasang Constitution 4. Considering Sasang Constitution, BVA demonstrates different responses in time to preincisura wave, mean blood flow velocity, peak systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity. 4.Conclusion: From those results, the following conclusions are obtained. Cause BVA alters pulse wave and makes differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity according to Sasang Constitution. Various methods of BVA treatment are needed considering Sasang Constitution.

  15. Interactions Between Hydropeaking and Thermopeaking Waves and Their Effect on the Benthic Community in Flume Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, M.; Carolli, M.; Maiolini, B.; Siviglia, A.; Zolezzi, G.

    2013-12-01

    M. C. Bruno1*, M. Carolli2, B. Maiolini1, A. Siviglia2, Zolezzi, G.2 1 Fondazione Edmund Mach, Research and Innovation Centre. S. Michele all'Adige, I-38010, Italy 2 Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, I-38100, Trento, Italy * cristina.bruno@fmach.it In Alpine regions, hydroelectricity generation is a key power source and its ability to quickly respond to short-term changes in energy demand makes it an ideal source to meet the needs of the deregulated energy market. This economic need is reflected in the temporal patterns of dam operations with consequences for the water bodies that receive downstream releases in the form of ';hydropeaking', typically consisting of sharp water releases in river reaches below dams. The unsteadiness related to this highly intermittent phenomenon has cascading effects on both biotic and abiotic river resources. Regulation by dams may also significantly affect the thermal regime of riversespecially in mountain areas, where releases from high-elevation reservoirs are often characterized by a markedly different temperature from that of the receiving body, thus causing also sharp water temperature variations, named ';thermopeaking'. While interacting with external forcing, the hydrodynamic and thermal waves propagate downstream with different celerities and a first phase of mutual overlap is followed by a second phase in which the two waves proceed separately. The asynchronous propagation of the two waves produces two distinct but consecutive impacts on the benthic community. Because it is difficult to disentangle the multiple effects of hydropeaking and thermopeaking on benthic macroinvertebrates in experiments conducted in natural conditions, we conducted our studies in an experimental structure of five steel channels directly fed by an alpine stream, the Fersina, a tributary to the Adige River of northern Italy. We simulated two sets of cold and warm thermopeaking waves, and measured the

  16. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hong-Xing [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Yong-Dong, E-mail: LYDbeijing@163.com [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Xiong, Tao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Guan, Yong [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2016-09-07

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained. - Highlights: • SH-wave is investigated in a multiferroic plate with coupled interfacial imperfections. • SH-wave is affected by both interfacial imperfections and their inter-couplings. • Physical mechanisms of the effects are explained via energy transformations.

  17. Effect of initial stress on Love waves in a piezoelectric structure carrying a functionally graded material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Hirose, Sohichi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of Love waves in a piezoelectric half-space of polarized ceramics carrying a functionally graded material (FGM) layer is analytically investigated in this paper from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity. The analytical solutions are obtained for the dispersion relations of Love wave propagating in this kind of structure with initial stress for both electrical open case and electrical short case, respectively. One numerical example is given to graphically illustrate the effect of initial stress on dispersive curve, phase velocity and electromechanical coupling factor of the Love wave propagation. The results reported here are meaningful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  18. The effects of the Asselin time filter on numerical solutions to the linearized shallow-water wave equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R. E.; Johnson, D. R.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In the present investigation, a one-dimensional linearized analysis is used to determine the effect of Asselin's (1972) time filter on both the computational stability and phase error of numerical solutions for the shallow water wave equations, in cases with diffusion but without rotation. An attempt has been made to establish the approximate optimal values of the filtering parameter nu for each of the 'lagged', Dufort-Frankel, and Crank-Nicholson diffusion schemes, suppressing the computational wave mode without materially altering the physical wave mode. It is determined that in the presence of diffusion, the optimum filter length depends on whether waves are undergoing significant propagation. When moderate propagation is present, with or without diffusion, the Asselin filter has little effect on the spatial phase lag of the physical mode for the leapfrog advection scheme of the three diffusion schemes considered.

  19. Analysis of Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction Effects on the response of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures using a One-Direction Three-ComponentWave Propagation Model

    CERN Document Server

    d'Avila, Maria Paola Santisi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a model of one-directional propagation of three-component seismic waves in a nonlinear multilayered soil profile is coupled with a multi-story multi-span frame model to consider, in a simple way, the soil-structure interaction modelled in a finite element scheme. Modeling the three-component wave propagation enables the effects of a soil multiaxial stress state to be taken into account. These reduce soil strength and increase nonlinear effects, compared with the axial stress state. The simultaneous propagation of three components allows the prediction of the incident direction of seismic loading at the ground surface and the analysis of the behavior of a frame structure shaken by a three-component earthquake. A parametric study is carried out to characterize the changes in the ground motion due to dynamic features of the structure, for different incident wavefield properties and soil nonlinear effects. A seismic response depending on parameters such as the frequency content of soil and structur...

  20. Effect of mangrove forest structures on wave attenuation in coastal Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Quang Bao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses wave attenuation in coastal mangrove forests in Vietnam. Data from 32 mangrove plots of six species located in 2 coastal regions are used for this study. In each plot, mangrove forest structures and wave height at different cross-shore distances are measured. Wave height closely relates to cross-shore distances. 92 exponential regression equations are highly significant with R2 > 0.95 and P val. < 0.001. Wave height reduction depends on initial wave height, cross-shore distances, and mangrove forest structures. This relationship is used to define minimum mangrove band width for coastal protection from waves in Vietnam.

  1. Testing effective quantum gravity with gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunes, N [Institute for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6300 (United States); Sopuerta, C F, E-mail: nyunes@princeton.ed [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Campus UAB, Torre C5 parells, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Testing deviation of GR is one of the main goals of the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. For the first time, we consistently compute the generation of gravitational waves from extreme-mass ratio inspirals (stellar compact objects into supermassive black holes) in a well-motivated alternative theory of gravity, that to date remains weakly constrained by double binary pulsar observations. The theory we concentrate on is Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, a 4-D, effective theory that is motivated both from string theory and loop-quantum gravity, and which enhances the Einstein-Hilbert action through the addition of a dynamical scalar field and the parity-violating Pontryagin density. We show that although point particles continue to follow geodesics in the modified theory, the background about which they inspiral is a modification to the Kerr metric, which imprints a CS correction on the gravitational waves emitted. CS modified gravitational waves are sufficiently different from the General Relativistic expectation that they lead to significant dephasing after 3 weeks of evolution, but such dephasing will probably not prevent detection of these signals, but instead lead to a systematic error in the determination of parameters. We end with a study of radiation-reaction in the modified theory and show that, to leading-order, energy-momentum emission is not CS modified, except possibly for the subdominant effect of scalar-field emission. The inclusion of radiation-reaction will allow for tests of CS modified gravity with space-borne detectors that might be two orders of magnitude larger than current binary pulsar bounds.

  2. Dynamical effects of small-scale gravity waves of lower atmospheric origin on the equinoctial thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.; Aylward, A. D.; Ridley, A. J.; Harris, M. J.; Moldwin, M.; Hartogh, P.

    2011-12-01

    Small-scale internal gravity waves (GWs) propagating directly from the lower to upper atmosphere play a significant dynamical role for the general circulation of the thermosphere at solstice (Yigit et al., 2009). Using the extended spectral nonlinear gravity wave parameterization of Yigit et al. (2008) implemented into a 3-D coupled general circulation model, this work investigates the effects of a broad spectrum of small-scale GWs of lower atmospheric origin on the equinoctial thermosphere for the first time. GWs propagate to F region altitudes in both hemispheres, producing appreciable drag on the mean zonal wind. A modification of the two-cell equinoctial mean circulation by GWs is simulated. The mean zonal GW drag is comparable to the ion drag up to the middle thermosphere. While the mean dynamical effects of GWs is the deceleration of the mean flow, the instantaneous GW body force can have both signs. In the Southern Hemisphere high-latitude, GWs produce very large torque, the mechanism of which is investigated in detail. GW anisotropy plays a crucial role in offsetting and modulating wave filtering, introducing increased favorable propagation conditions for westerly harmonics in the high-latitudes. This leads to a very large localized eastward GW drag reaching a maximum in the upper thermosphere as a consequence of enhanced molecular viscosity, thermal conduction, and ion drag. Overall, this study highlights that in studies of the thermosphere at equinox, GWs should be taken into account. 1. Yigit, E., A. D. Aylward, A.S. Medvedev (2008), J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. 2. Yigit, E., A. S. Medvedev, A. D. Aylward, P. Hartogh, and M. J. Harris (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, D07101, doi:10.1029/2008JD011132.

  3. Control of propagation characteristics of spin wave pulses via elastic and thermal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Arista, Ivan [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O., E-mail: oleg.kolokoltsev@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Acevedo, A.; Qureshi, N. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Ordóñez-Romero, César L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CU, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico)

    2017-05-01

    A study of the magnetoelastic (ME) and thermal effects governing the phase (φ) and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides is presented. The ME effects were studied in a flexural configuration, under punctual mechanical force (F). Thermally induced ME and demagnetization phenomena were controlled by optically injected thermal power P{sub th}. It was determined that in an unclamped Ga:YIG waveguide, the force F that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the P{sub th} at which Δφ=π decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. For nano-volume waveguides the ME control energy (E{sub me}) can be of order of aJ, and the thermal control energy (ΔE{sub th}) can be as small as 50 fJ. The response time of these effects lies in the ns time scale. Both the mechanical and the thermo-magnetic forces provide an effective control of MSSW pulse amplitude, in addition to its phase shift. The thermo-magnetic effect allows one to realize variable delays of a MSSW pulse. - Highlights: • The Magneto-elastic (ME) and optically induced thermal effects governing the phase and amplitude of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) pulses propagating in Ga:YIG/GGG and permalloy magnonic waveguides are presented. • A mechanical force that causes phase shift Δφ=π for spin waves in the waveguides decreases by a quadratic law in the range from 1 mN to nN, and the optical power that induces the phase shift Δφ=π, decreases linearly from mW to μW as the waveguide volume decreases from mm{sup 3} to nm{sup 3}. • The response time of these effects can lie in the ns time scale.

  4. Investigation of competitive and thermal-wave effects in photoelectric H{sub 2} sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelis, A.; Wagner, R.E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Detailed experimental comparisons of the two competing signal generation modes in photopyroelectric gas sensors, i.e. the purely chemical and the purely thermal-wave mode, were performed. The purpose was to selectively isolate one or the other detection mode, through total or partial annulment of the effect of the other, using several instrumentation techniques. Competing effects on hydrogen gas concentration and flow-rate, signal optimization with respect to one or the other mode, and new progress on the mechanistic aspects of the sensor signal generation were also discussed. Effectiveness of the photopyroelectric hydrogen sensor was demonstrated. The sensor was more sensitive to optical changes of Pd than sensors which measure the reflectance of a Pd film. It was suggested that judicious choice of the excitation wavelength and the Pd-film thickness would result in detection limits of about 0.1% in air. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Far-field high resolution effects and manipulating of electromagnetic waves based on transformation optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, XueBin; Zang, XiaoFei; Li, Zhou; Shi, Cheng; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing

    2015-05-01

    Based on the transformation optics (TO) and the effective medium theory (EMT), a new illusion media with homogeneous and isotropic materials is proposed to realize the far-field high resolution effects. When two point sources with the separation distance of λ0 / 4 are covered with the illusion media (λ0 is the free-space wavelength), the corresponding far-field pattern is equivalent to the case of two point sources with the separation distance larger than λ0 / 2 in free space, leading to the far-field high resolution effects (in free space, the separation distance of λ0 / 4 is less than half-wavelength, and thus the two point sources cannot be distinguished from each other). Furthermore, such illusion media can be applied to design tunable high-directivity antenna and an angle-dependent floating carpet cloak. Full wave simulations are carried out to verify the performance of our device.

  6. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the stars' rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We present new (3+1) dimensional numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) mergers that take into account the NS spins. We consider different spin configurations, aligned or antialigned to the orbital angular momentum, for equal and unequal mass BNS and for two equations of state. All the simulations employ quasiequilibrium circular initial data in the constant rotational velocity approach, i.e. they are consistent with Einstein equations and in hydrodynamical equilibrium. We study the NS rotation effect on the energetics, the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated to dynamical mass ejecta. For dimensionless spin magnitudes of $\\chi\\sim0.1$ we find that spin-orbit interactions and also spin-induced-quadrupole deformations affect the late-inspiral-merger dynamics. The latter is, however, dominated by finite-size effects. Spin (tidal) effects contribute to GW phase differences up to 5 (20) radians accumulated during the last eight orbits to...

  7. Developing the practice context to enable more effective pain management with older people: an action research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormack Brendan G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper, which draws upon an Emancipatory Action Research (EAR approach, unearths how the complexities of context influence the realities of nursing practice. While the intention of the project was to identify and change factors in the practice context that inhibit effective person-centred pain management practices with older people (65 years or older, reflective critical engagement with the findings identified that enhancing pain management practices with older people was dependent on cultural change in the unit as a whole. Methods An EAR approach was utilised. The project was undertaken in a surgical unit that conducted complex abdominal surgery. Eighty-five percent (n = 48 of nursing staff participated in the two-year project (05/NIR02/107. Data were obtained through the use of facilitated critical reflection with nursing staff. Results Three key themes (psychological safety, leadership, oppression and four subthemes (power, horizontal violence, distorted perceptions, autonomy were found to influence the way in which effective nursing practice was realised. Within the theme of 'context,' effective leadership and the creation of a psychologically safe environment were key elements in the enhancement of all aspects of nursing practice. Conclusions Whilst other research has identified the importance of 'practice context' and models and frameworks are emerging to address this issue, the theme of 'psychological safety' has been given little attention in the knowledge translation/implementation literature. Within the principles of EAR, facilitated reflective sessions were found to create 'psychologically safe spaces' that supported practitioners to develop effective person-centred nursing practices in complex clinical environments.

  8. Additive effects due to biochar and endophyte application enable soybean to enhance nutrient uptake and modulate nutritional parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Asaf, Sajjad; Hamayun, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Lee, In-Jung

    We studied the effects of hardwood-derived biochar (BC) and the phytohormone-producing endophyte Galactomyces geotrichum WLL1 in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) with respect to basic, macro- and micronutrient uptakes and assimilations, and their subsequent effects on the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity. The assimilation of basic nutrients such as nitrogen was up-regulated, leaving carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen unaffected in BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean plants. In comparison, the uptakes of macro- and micronutrients fluctuated in the individual or co-application of BC and G. geotrichum in soybean plant organs and rhizospheric substrate. Moreover, the same attribute was recorded for the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and DPPH-scavenging activity. Collectively, these results showed that BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean yielded better results than did the plants treated with individual applications. It was concluded that BC is an additional nutriment source and that the G. geotrichum acts as a plant biostimulating source and the effects of both are additive towards plant growth promotion. Strategies involving the incorporation of BC and endophytic symbiosis may help achieve eco-friendly agricultural production, thus reducing the excessive use of chemical agents.

  9. Additive effects due to biochar and endophyte application enable soybean to enhance nutrient uptake and modulate nutritional parameters* #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Asaf, Sajjad; Hamayun, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad Aaqil; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of hardwood-derived biochar (BC) and the phytohormone-producing endophyte Galactomyces geotrichum WLL1 in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) with respect to basic, macro-and micronutrient uptakes and assimilations, and their subsequent effects on the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity. The assimilation of basic nutrients such as nitrogen was up-regulated, leaving carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen unaffected in BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean plants. In comparison, the uptakes of macro-and micronutrients fluctuated in the individual or co-application of BC and G. geotrichum in soybean plant organs and rhizospheric substrate. Moreover, the same attribute was recorded for the regulation of functional amino acids, isoflavones, fatty acid composition, total sugar contents, total phenolic contents, and DPPH-scavenging activity. Collectively, these results showed that BC+G. geotrichum-treated soybean yielded better results than did the plants treated with individual applications. It was concluded that BC is an additional nutriment source and that the G. geotrichum acts as a plant biostimulating source and the effects of both are additive towards plant growth promotion. Strategies involving the incorporation of BC and endophytic symbiosis may help achieve eco-friendly agricultural production, thus reducing the excessive use of chemical agents. PMID:28124840

  10. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, SeokJoo; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kwansub

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a conservative physical therapy group (n=10) and an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (n=10). Both groups received general conservative physical therapy, and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy was additionally treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy after receiving conservative physical therapy. Both groups were treated three times a week over a four-week period. The visual analogue scale was used to evaluate pain in the knee joints of the subjects, and the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to evaluate the function of the subjects. [Results] The comparison of the visual analogue scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores within each group before and after the treatment showed statistically significant declines in scores in both the conservative physical therapy group and extracorporeal shock wave therapy group. A group comparison after the treatment showed statistically significant differences in these scores in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group and the conservative physical therapy group. [Conclusion] extracorporeal shock wave therapy may be a useful nonsurgical intervention for reducing the pain of patients with degenerative knee arthritis and improving these patients’ function. PMID:28356649

  11. Effect of curvature and thickness on elastic wave velocity in cornea-like structures by FEM and OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Twa, Michael D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Wave models, which have been utilized in the past to reconstruct corneal biomechanical properties based on the propagation of an elastic wave, were often developed assuming a thin-plate geometry. However, the curvature and thickness of the cornea are not considered when utilizing these models. In this work, optical coherence elastography (OCE) experiments were conducted on tissue-mimicking agar phantoms and contact lenses along with finite element (FE) modeling of four kinds of cornea-like structures to understand the effects of curvature and thickness on the group velocity of an elastic wave. As the radius of curvature increased from 19.1 to 47.7 mm, the group velocity of the elastic wave obtained by both FE and OCE from a spherical shell section model decreased from ~2.8 m/s to ~2.2 m/s. When the thickness of the agar phantom increased from 1.9 mm to 5.6 mm, the elastic wave velocity increased from ~3.0 m/s to ~4.1 m/s. Both the FE and OCE results show that the group velocity of the elastic wave decreased with radius of curvature but increased with thickness. Therefore, the curvature and thickness must be considered when developing accurate wave models for quantifying biomechanical properties of the cornea.

  12. Study of dispersive and nonlinear effects of coastal wave dynamics with a fully nonlinear potential flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michel; Yates, Marissa L.; Raoult, Cécile

    2017-04-01

    Efficient and accurate numerical models simulating wave propagation are required for a variety of engineering projects including the evaluation of coastal risks, the design of protective coastal structures, and the estimation of the potential for marine renewable energy devices. Nonlinear and dispersive effects are particularly significant in the coastal zone where waves interact with the bottom, the shoreline, and coastal structures. The main challenge in developing a numerical models is finding a compromise between computational efficiency and the required accuracy of the simulated wave field. Here, a potential approach is selected and the (fully nonlinear) water wave problem is formulated using the Euler-Zakharov equations (Zakharov, 1968) describing the temporal evolution of the free surface elevation and velocity potential. The proposed model (Yates and Benoit, 2015) uses a spectral approach in the vertical (i.e. the vertical variation of the potential is approximated by a linear combination of the first NT+1 Chebyshev polynomials, following the work of Tian and Sato (2008)). The Zakharov equations are integrated in time using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme with a constant time step. At each sub-timestep, the Laplace Boundary Value Problem (BVP) is solved to estimate the free surface vertical velocity using the spectral approach, with typical values of NT between 5 to 8 for practical applications. The 1DH version of the code is validated with comparisons to the experimental data set of Becq-Girard et al. (1999), which studied the propagation of irregular waves over a beach profile with a submerged bar. The nonlinear and dispersive capacities of the model are verified with the correct representation of wave-wave interactions, in particular the transfer of energy between different harmonic components during wave propagation (analysis of the transformation of the variance spectrum along the channel). Evolution of wave skewness, asymmetry and kurtosis along the

  13. EFFECT OF LASER RADIATION WITH 662 NM WAVE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Bredikhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study: to define the effect of various doses of laser radiation with 662 nm wave on the growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro.Materials and methods. Samples of mycobacterial suspension of M. tuberculosis H37Rv were processed by monopositional light radiation (λ = 662 nm in six dosing regimens varying in power and duration of the exposure to the light. All samples of mycobacterial suspension of M. tuberculosis were inoculated on the solid nutritional media of Lowenstein-Jensen in triplets for each dose of the exposure to light. Cultures were incubated under 37°С for 90 days with weekly inspection of samples.Results. Continuous irradiation by diffused laser with 662 nm wave provides the most expressed bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects against M. tuberculosis H37Rv under the density of the energy dose of 234.5 and 703.5 of J/sq.cm. Such a dose was obtained through 5 and 15-minute exposure respectively. 

  14. Application of the Time-Dependent Mild-Slope Equations for the Simulation of Wake Effects in the Lee of a Farm of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beels, Charlotte; Troch, Peter; Visch, Kenneth De

    2010-01-01

    Time-dependent mild-slope equations have been extensively used to compute wave transformations near coastal and offshore structures for more than 20 years. Recently the wave absorption characteristics of a Wave Energy Converter (abbreviated as WEC) of the overtopping type have been implemented...... in a time-dependent mild-slope equation model by using numerical sponge layers. In this paper the developed WEC implementation is applied to a single Wave Dragon WEC and multiple Wave Dragon WECs. The Wave Dragon WEC is a floating offshore converter of the overtopping type. Two wave reflectors focus...... the incident wave power towards a ramp. The focussed waves run up the ramp and overtop in a water reservoir above mean sea level. The obtained potential energy is converted into electricity when the stored water drains back to the sea through hydro turbines. The wave reflectors and the main body (ramp...

  15. Organising to Enable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual paper is to reveal how organising can enable innovation across organisational layers and organisational units. This approach calls for a cross-disciplinary literature review. The aim is to provide an integrated understanding of innovation in an organisational approach....... The findings reveal a continous organising process between individual/ team creativity and organisational structures/control to enable innovation at firm level. Organising provides a dynamic approach and contains the integrated reconstruction of creativity, structures and boundaries for enhanced balance...... of explorative and exploitative learning in uncertain environments. Shedding light on the cross-disciplinary theories to organise innovation provides a contribution at the firm level to enable innovation....

  16. Effective modeling and reverse-time migration for novel pure acoustic wave in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shigang; Liu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    The conventional pseudo-acoustic wave equations (PWEs) in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic (OA) media usually have coupled P- and SV-wave modes. These coupled equations may introduce strong SV-wave artifacts and numerical instabilities in P-wave simulation results and reverse-time migration (RTM) profiles. However, pure acoustic wave equations (PAWEs) completely decouple the P-wave component from the full elastic wavefield and naturally solve all the aforementioned problems. In this article, we present a novel PAWE in arbitrary OA media and compare it with the conventional coupled PWEs. Through decomposing the solution of the corresponding eigenvalue equation for the original PWE into an ellipsoidal differential operator (EDO) and an ellipsoidal scalar operator (ESO), the new PAWE in time-space domain is constructed by applying the combination of these two solvable operators and can effectively describe P-wave features in arbitrary OA media. Furthermore, we adopt the optimal finite-difference method (FDM) to solve the newly derived PAWE. In addition, the three-dimensional (3D) hybrid absorbing boundary condition (HABC) with some reasonable modifications is developed for reducing artificial edge reflections in anisotropic media. To improve computational efficiency in 3D case, we adopt graphic processing unit (GPU) with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) instead of traditional central processing unit (CPU) architecture. Several numerical experiments for arbitrary OA models confirm that the proposed schemes can produce pure, stable and accurate P-wave modeling results and RTM images with higher computational efficiency. Moreover, the 3D numerical simulations can provide us with a comprehensive and real description of wave propagation.

  17. Design and Implementation of Scientific Software Components to Enable Multiscale Modeling: The Effective Fragment Potential (QM/EFP) Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenko, Alexander [Ames Laboratory; Windus, Theresa L. [Ames Laboratory; Sosonkina, Masha [Ames Laboratory; Gordon, Mark S. [Ames Laboratory

    2012-10-19

    The design and development of scientific software components to provide an interface to the effective fragment potential (EFP) methods are reported. Multiscale modeling of physical and chemical phenomena demands the merging of software packages developed by research groups in significantly different fields. Componentization offers an efficient way to realize new high performance scientific methods by combining the best models available in different software packages without a need for package readaptation after the initial componentization is complete. The EFP method is an efficient electronic structure theory based model potential that is suitable for predictive modeling of intermolecular interactions in large molecular systems, such as liquids, proteins, atmospheric aerosols, and nanoparticles, with an accuracy that is comparable to that of correlated ab initio methods. The developed components make the EFP functionality accessible for any scientific component-aware software package. The performance of the component is demonstrated on a protein interaction model, and its accuracy is compared with results obtained with coupled cluster methods.

  18. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-harmonic electron bunching in the field of a signal wave and the use of this effect in cyclotron masers with frequency multiplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bandurkin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of organizing electron-wave interaction at the multiplied frequency of the signal wave is proposed. This type of electron-wave interaction provides multiplied-frequency electron bunching, which leads to formation of an intense harmonic of the electron current at a selected multiplied frequency of the signal wave. This effect is attractive for the use in klystron-type cyclotron masers with frequency multiplication as a way to increase the output frequency and improve the selectivity.

  20. Effect of waves in the redistribution of sediments along the Konkan coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajamanickam, G.V.; Vethamony, P.; Gujar, A.R.

    From the wave refraction diagrams it is delineated that the Jaigad Head and Warori Bluff are the zones of wave energy convergence and the Narvan and Ambwah bays the areas of wave energy divergence. The presence of two distinct mineral phases noticed...