WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave detector explorer

  1. The Gravitational Wave Detector EXPLORER

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE5 EXPLORER is a cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational wave (GW) detector. It is in operation at CERN since 1984 and it has been the first cryogenic GW antenna to perform continuous observations (since 1990).\\\\ \\\\EXPLORER is actually part of the international network of resonant-mass detectors which includes ALLEGRO at the Louisiana State University, AURIGA at the INFN Legnaro Laboratories, NAUTILUS at the INFN Frascati Laboratories and NIOBE at the University of Western Australia. The EXPLORER sensitivity, at present of the same order of the other antennas, is 10$^{-20}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$ over a bandwidth of 20 Hz and 6 10$^{-22}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$ with a bandwidth of about 0.5 Hz, corresponding to a sensitivity to short GW bursts of \\textit{h} = 6 10$^{-19}$.\\\\ \\\\This sensitivity should allow the detection of the burst sources in our Galaxy and in the Local Group. No evidence of GW signals has been reported up to now.\\\\ \\\\The principle of operation is based on the assumption that any vibrational mode of a resonant bo...

  2. Quantum biological gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopvillem, U.Kh.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of producing biological detectors of gravitational waves is considered. High sensitivity of biological systems to outer effects can be ensured by existence of molecule subgroups in Dicke states. Existence of clusters in Dicke state-giant electric dipoles (GED) is supposed in the Froehlich theory. Comparison of biological and physical detectors shows that GED systems have unique properties for detection of gravitational waves if the reception range is narrow

  3. Advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Saulson, Peter R

    2019-01-01

    Gravitational waves are one of the most exciting and promising emerging areas of physics and astrophysics today. The detection of gravitational waves will rank among the most significant physics discoveries of the 21st century.Advanced Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors brings together many of the world's top experts to deliver an authoritative and in-depth treatment on current and future detectors. Volume I is devoted to the essentials of gravitational-wave detectors, presenting the physical principles behind large-scale precision interferometry, the physics of the underlying noise sources that limit interferometer sensitivity, and an explanation of the key enabling technologies that are used in the detectors. Volume II provides an in-depth look at the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo interferometers that have just finished construction, as well as examining future interferometric detector concepts. This two-volume set will provide students and researchers the comprehensive background needed to und...

  4. Fundamentals of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Saulson, Peter R

    2017-01-01

    LIGO's recent discovery of gravitational waves was headline news around the world. Many people will want to understand more about what a gravitational wave is, how LIGO works, and how LIGO functions as a detector of gravitational waves.This book aims to communicate the basic logic of interferometric gravitational wave detectors to students who are new to the field. It assumes that the reader has a basic knowledge of physics, but no special familiarity with gravitational waves, with general relativity, or with the special techniques of experimental physics. All of the necessary ideas are developed in the book.The first edition was published in 1994. Since the book is aimed at explaining the physical ideas behind the design of LIGO, it stands the test of time. For the second edition, an Epilogue has been added; it brings the treatment of technical details up to date, and provides references that would allow a student to become proficient with today's designs.

  5. Interferometric detectors of gravitational waves on Earth: the next generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, G [INFN Firenze - Via G.Sansone 1, 50019 - Sesto F., Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: losurdo@fi.infn.it

    2008-05-15

    First generation long-baseline interferometric detectors of gravitational waves are now taking data. A first detection might be possible with these instruments, but more sensitive detectors will be needed to start the field of gravitational wave astronomy. Second generation interferometers will improve the sensitivity by a factor ten, allowing to explore a universe volume 1000 times larger. The technology is almost ready and the construction will start at the beginning of the next decade. The community of the physicists involved in the field has also started to make plans for third generation detectors, for which a long term technology development program will be required. The plans for the upgrades of the existing detectors and the scenario for the evolution of the field will be reviewed in this paper.

  6. Forward modeling of space-borne gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbo, Louis J.; Cornish, Neil J.; Poujade, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    Planning is underway for several space-borne gravitational wave observatories to be built in the next 10 to 20 years. Realistic and efficient forward modeling will play a key role in the design and operation of these observatories. Space-borne interferometric gravitational wave detectors operate very differently from their ground-based counterparts. Complex orbital motion, virtual interferometry, and finite size effects complicate the description of space-based systems, while nonlinear control systems complicate the description of ground-based systems. Here we explore the forward modeling of space-based gravitational wave detectors and introduce an adiabatic approximation to the detector response that significantly extends the range of the standard low frequency approximation. The adiabatic approximation will aid in the development of data analysis techniques, and improve the modeling of astrophysical parameter extraction

  7. Stabilized lasers for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willke, B; Danzmann, K; Kwee, P; Seifert, F; Frede, M; Kracht, D; Puncken, O; Schulz, B; Veltkamp, C; Wagner, S; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; King, P; Savage, R L Jr

    2008-01-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with more than 100 W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. To achieve the demanding stability levels required, low noise techniques and adequate control actuators have to be part of the high power laser design. In addition feedback control and passive noise filtering is used to reduce the fluctuations in the so-called prestabilized laser system (PSL). In this paper, we discuss the design of a 200 W PSL which is under development for the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector and will present the first results. The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described

  8. Cosmological constant and advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Turner, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors could measure the frequency sweep of a binary inspiral (characterized by its chirp mass) to high accuracy. The observed chirp mass is the intrinsic chirp mass of the binary source multiplied by (1+z), where z is the redshift of the source. Assuming a nonzero cosmological constant, we compute the expected redshift distribution of observed events for an advanced LIGO detector. We find that the redshift distribution has a robust and sizable dependence on the cosmological constant; the data from advanced LIGO detectors could provide an independent measurement of the cosmological constant. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. The Schenberg gravitational wave detector: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, O.D.; Barroso, J.J; Bessada, D.F.A.; Carvalho, N.C; Castro, P.J.; Montana, C.E. Cedeno; Costa, C.F. da Silva; Araujo, J.C.N de; Evangelista, E.F.D.; Furtado, S.R; Miranda, O.D.; Moraes, P.H.R.S.; Pereira, Eduardo S.; Silveira, P.R.; Stellati, C.; Weber, J.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The quest for gravitational wave detection has been one of the toughest technological challenges ever faced by experimental physicists and engineers. Despite all difficulties, after four decades of research, the community involved in this area is continuously growing. One of the main reasons for this is because the first gravitational wave detection and the regular observation of gravitational waves are among the most important scientific goals for the beginning of this millennium. They will test one of the foundations of physics, Einstein's theory of general relativity, and will open a new window for the observation of the universe, which certainly will cause a revolution in our knowledge of physics and astrophysics. In this talk we present the status report of the Brazilian Schenberg gravitational wave detector, which started commissioning runs in September 2006 under the full support of FAPESP. We have been upgrading the detector since 2008, installing a dilution refrigerator, a new complete set of transducers, and a new suspension and vibration isolation system for the cabling and microstrip antennas, in order to restart operation with a higher sensitivity. We also have been studying an innovative approach, which could transform Schenberg into a broadband gravitational wave detector by the use of an ultra-high sensitivity non-resonant nanogap transducer, constructed by the application of recent achievements of nanotechnology. A spherical antenna, such as Schenberg or Mini-Grail, could add to this quality the advantage of wave position and polarity determination. (author)

  10. Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors: Challenges

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-14

    Sep 14, 2015 ... With arm-length of 4000 m,. δL. L. <10. −22. →δL < 3χ10. −19 m ... When these waves reach earth, what can they do to free masses? ... Even if we have a 4 km long interferometer, we need to detect 10—19 m and the best of ...

  11. Comparison of advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, Gregory M.; Houser, Janet L.; Strain, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    We compare two advanced designs for gravitational-wave antennas in terms of their ability to detect two possible gravitational wave sources. Spherical, resonant mass antennas and interferometers incorporating resonant sideband extraction (RSE) were modeled using experimentally measurable parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio of each detector for a binary neutron star system and a rapidly rotating stellar core were calculated. For a range of plausible parameters we found that the advanced LIGO interferometer incorporating RSE gave higher signal-to-noise ratios than a spherical detector resonant at the same frequency for both sources. Spheres were found to be sensitive to these sources at distances beyond our galaxy. Interferometers were sensitive to these sources at far enough distances that several events per year would be expected

  12. Parametric instabilities in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, S; Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Ju, L

    2010-01-01

    As the LIGO interferometric gravitational wave detectors have finished gathering a large observational data set, an intense effort is underway to upgrade these observatories to improve their sensitivity by a factor of ∼10. High circulating power in the arm cavities is required, which leads to the possibility of parametric instability due to three-mode opto-acoustic resonant interactions between the carrier, transverse optical modes and acoustic modes. Here, we present detailed numerical analysis of parametric instability in a configuration that is similar to Advanced LIGO. After examining parametric instability for a single three-mode interaction in detail, we examine instability for the best and worst cases, as determined by the resonance condition of transverse modes in the power and signal recycling cavities. We find that, in the best case, the dual recycling detector is substantially less susceptible to instability than a single cavity, but its susceptibility is dependent on the signal recycling cavity design, and on tuning for narrow band operation. In all cases considered, the interferometer will experience parametric instability at full power operation, but the gain varies from 3 to 1000, and the number of unstable modes varies between 7 and 30 per test mass. The analysis focuses on understanding the detector complexity in relation to opto-acoustic interactions, on providing insights that can enable predictions of the detector response to transient disturbances, and of variations in thermal compensation conditions.

  13. Data quality studies of enhanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIver, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Data quality assessment plays an essential role in the quest to detect gravitational wave signals in data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Interferometer data contain a high rate of noise transients from the environment, the detector hardware and the detector control systems. These transients severely limit the statistical significance of gravitational wave candidates of short duration and/or poorly modeled waveforms. This paper describes the data quality studies that have been performed in recent LIGO and Virgo observing runs to mitigate the impact of transient detector artifacts on the gravitational wave searches. (paper)

  14. Asymmetric rotator as a detector of monochromatic gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliner, Eh.B.; Mitrofanov, I.G.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction between a rotating asymmetric (principal moments of inertia are different) body with a gravitational wave is considered. A resonance rotational detector of monocrhomatic gravitational waves is proposed in which the turning due to the incident wave and the rotation which ensures resonance between the detector and wave correspond to different degrees of freedom. This significantly facilitates the creation of such detectors. The interference due to the gradient of the gravitational acceleration of the Earth and to rotation of the detector as a whole is estimated

  15. Source localization with an advanced gravitational wave detector network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We derive an expression for the accuracy with which sources can be localized using a network of gravitational wave detectors. The result is obtained via triangulation, using timing accuracies at each detector and is applicable to a network with any number of detectors. We use this result to investigate the ability of advanced gravitational wave detector networks to accurately localize signals from compact binary coalescences. We demonstrate that additional detectors can significantly improve localization results and illustrate our findings with networks comprised of the advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and LCGT. In addition, we evaluate the benefits of relocating one of the advanced LIGO detectors to Australia.

  16. Electron detector with a traVelling wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, A.S.; Kazakov, V.M.; Kozlov, O.V.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles of operation of a travelling-wave detector designed to measure the shapes of nanosecond electron pulses are discussed. Propagation of electrons through the input window into the detector results in spreading of TEM waves to both sides. The energy of the wave propagating towards resistor R is absorbed by the latter, while the wave propagating in the opposite direction hits a register. Thus good matching of all the detector elements results in the absence of reflection and standing waves which provides extremely high time resolution and minimum distortion of the electron pulse shape. The detector constitutes a piece of a cylindrical coaxial line whose impedance is equal to the impedance of a transmission line. On one side the detector is loaded onto resistor R equal to the wave resistance of the detector. On the other side the detector is loaded onto the transmission line which connects the detector with a wide-range register. The design and calculation of a detector having a time resolution of about 0.1 ns are presented. The results of testing the coaxial detector When measuring electron pulses with a duration of 60 ns and frequency of 1818 MHz have shown that the developed detector (external diameter being 63 mm, internal diameter 18 mm, length 400 mm) provides the 0.2 ns time resolution

  17. Gravitational-wave detector realized by a superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishidoshiro, K.; Ando, M.; Takamori, A.; Okada, K.; Tsubono, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a new gravitational-wave detector based on superconducting magnetic levitation and results of its prototype test. Our detector is composed of the suspended test mass that is rotated by gravitational waves. Gravitational wave signals are readout by monitoring its angular motion. Superconducting magnetic levitation is used for the suspension of the test mass, since it has many advantages, such as zero mechanical loss and resonant frequency around its suspension axis in an ideal situation. For the study of actual performance of such gravitational-wave detector, a prototype detector has been developed. Using the prototype detector, the actual loss factor and resonant frequency are measured as 1.2 x 10 -8 Nms/rad and 5 mHz respectively. A detector noise is also evaluated. The current noise level is determined by the magnetic coupling with external magnetic field and mechanical coupling between translation and angular motion. The prototype detector has already one of the lowest noise levels for gravitational waves at 0.1 Hz among current gravitational-wave detectors. We have succeeded at the demonstration of the advantages of our torsion gravitational-wave detector.

  18. The string soundscape at gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Garcia, Isabel; Krippendorf, Sven; March-Russell, John

    2018-04-01

    We argue that gravitational wave signals due to collisions of ultra-relativistic bubble walls may be common in string theory. This occurs due to a process of post-inflationary vacuum decay via quantum tunnelling. Though we study a specific string construction involving warped throats, we argue that our conclusions are more general. Many such transitions could have occurred in the post-inflationary Universe, as a large number of throats with exponentially different mass scales can be present in the string landscape, leading to several signals of widely different frequencies - a soundscape connected to the landscape of vacua. Detectors such as aLIGO/VIRGO, LISA, and pulsar timing observations with SKA and EPTA have the sensitivity to detect such signals. A distribution of primordial black holes is also a likely consequence, though reliable estimates of masses and their abundance require dedicated numerical simulations, as do the fine details of the gravitational wave spectrum due to the unusual nature of the transition.

  19. Thermal noise reduction for present and future gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amico, P.; Bosi, L.; Gammaitoni, L.; Losurdo, G.; Marchesoni, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Punturo, M. E-mail: michele.punturo@pg.infn.it; Stanga, R.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Vetrano, F.; Vocca, H

    2004-02-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension is and will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave detectors currently under construction. The technical solutions, adopted in the Virgo detector, optimize the current suspension scheme, but new materials and new designs are needed to further reduce the suspension thermal noise. Silicon fibers are promising candidates both for room temperature advanced detectors and for future cryogenic interferometric detectors.

  20. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atom Interferometry (AI) Technology for Gravity Wave Measurements demonstrates new matter wave Interferometric sensor technology for precise detection and...

  1. Response of resonant gravitational wave detectors to damped sinusoid signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, A; Celsi, C; Pallottino, G V; D'Antonio, S; Astone, P

    2007-01-01

    Till date, the search for burst signals with resonant gravitational wave (GW) detectors has been done using the δ-function approximation for the signal, which was reasonable due to the very small bandwidth of these detectors. However, now with increased bandwidth (of the order of 10 or more Hz) and with the possibility of comparing results with interferometric GW detectors (broad-band), it is very important to exploit the resonant detectors' capability to detect also signals with specific wave shapes. As a first step, we present a study of the response of resonant GW detectors to damped sinusoids with given frequency and decay time and report on the development of a filter matched to these signals. This study is a preliminary step towards the comprehension of the detector response and of the filtering for signals such as the excitation of stellar quasi-normal modes

  2. Laser amplitude stabilization for advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, B W; Strain, K A; Killow, C J

    2005-01-01

    We present results of experiments into the stabilization of the amplitude of Nd:YAG lasers for use in advanced gravitational wave detectors. By feeding back directly to the pump-diode driving current we achieved shot-noise-limited stabilization at frequencies up to several kHz with some residual noise at lower frequencies (sub ∼100 Hz). The method used is applicable to higher powered laser systems planned for advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

  3. THz detectors using surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We describe a proposal for THz detectors based on the excitation of surface waves, in layered superconductors, at frequencies lower than the Josephson plasma frequency ω J . These waves propagate along the vacuum-superconductor interface and are attenuated in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). The surface Josephson plasma waves are also important for the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood's anomalies, used for gratings) and produce a huge enhancement of the wave absorption, which can be used for the detection of THz waves

  4. Localization of gravitational wave sources with networks of advanced detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pankow, C.; Vedovato, G.; Drago, M.; Prodi, G.; Mazzolo, G.; Salemi, F.; Re, V.; Yakushin, I.

    2011-01-01

    Coincident observations with gravitational wave (GW) detectors and other astronomical instruments are among the main objectives of the experiments with the network of LIGO, Virgo, and GEO detectors. They will become a necessary part of the future GW astronomy as the next generation of advanced detectors comes online. The success of such joint observations directly depends on the source localization capabilities of the GW detectors. In this paper we present studies of the sky localization of transient GW sources with the future advanced detector networks and describe their fundamental properties. By reconstructing sky coordinates of ad hoc signals injected into simulated detector noise, we study the accuracy of the source localization and its dependence on the strength of injected signals, waveforms, and network configurations.

  5. Physics of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Caltech-MIT joint LIGO project is operating three long-baseline interferometers (one of 2 km and two of 4 km) in order to unambiguously measure the infinitesimal displacements of isolated test masses which convey the signature of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. An interferometric gravitational wave ...

  6. Physics of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Caltech-MIT joint LIGO project is operating three long-baseline inter- ... gravitational waves for LIGO are: (i) binary coalescing neutron star systems, (ii) ..... The fundamental mode of this basis is a purely Gaussian function which means.

  7. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willke, B; Danzmann, K; Fallnich, C; Frede, M; Heurs, M; King, P; Kracht, D; Kwee, P; Savage, R; Seifert, F; Wilhelm, R

    2006-01-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requirements and new results (RIN ≤ 4x10 -9 /√Hz) will be presented

  8. Advanced Virgo: a second-generation interferometric gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acernese, F.; Bulten, H.J.; Rabeling, D.S.; van den Brand, J.F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the Virgo interferometric detector of gravitational waves, with the aim of increasing the number of observable galaxies (and thus the detection rate) by three orders of magnitude. The project is now in an advanced construction phase and the assembly and

  9. Diffractive Optics for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkowski, A; Burmeister, O; Clausnitzer, T; Kley, E-B; Tuennermann, A; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2006-01-01

    All-reflective interferometry based on nano-structured diffraction gratings offers new possibilities for gravitational wave detection. We investigate an all-reflective Fabry-Perot interferometer concept in 2nd order Littrow mount. The input-output relations for such a resonator are derived treating the grating coupler by means of a scattering matrix formalism. A low loss dielectric reflection grating has been designed and manufactured to test the properties of such a grating cavity

  10. WAVE-E: The WAter Vapour European-Explorer Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-LLuva, David; Deiml, Michael; Pavesi, Sara

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, stratosphere-troposphere coupling processes in the Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) have been increasingly recognized to severely impact surface climate and high-impact weather phenomena. Weakened stratospheric circumpolar jets have been linked to worldwide extreme temperature and high-precipitation events, while anomalously strong stratospheric jets can lead to an increase in surface winds and tropical cyclone intensity. Moreover, stratospheric water vapor has been identified as an important forcing for global decadal surface climate change. In the past years, operational weather forecast and climate models have adapted a high vertical resolution in the UTLS region in order to capture the dynamical processes occurring in this highly stratified region. However, there is an evident lack of available measurements in the UTLS region to consistently support these models and further improve process understanding. Consequently, both the IPCC fifth assessment report and the ESA-GEWEX report 'Earth Observation and Water Cycle Science Priorities' have identified an urgent need for long-term observations and improved process understanding in the UTLS region. To close this gap, the authors propose the 'WAter Vapour European - Explorer' (WAVE-E) space mission, whose primary goal is to monitor water vapor in the UTLS at 1 km vertical, 25 km horizontal and sub-daily temporal resolution. WAVE-E consists of three quasi-identical small ( 500 kg) satellites (WAVE-E 1-3) in a constellation of Sun-Synchronous Low Earth Orbits, each carrying a limb sounding and cross-track scanning mid-infrared passive spectrometer (824 cm-1 to 829 cm-1). The core of the instruments builds a monolithic, field-widened type of Michelson interferometer without any moving parts, rendering it rigid and fault tolerant. Synergistic use of WAVE-E and MetOp-NG operational satellites is identified, such that a data fusion algorithm could provide water vapour profiles from the

  11. Advanced Virgo: a second-generation interferometric gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acernese, F; Barone, F; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Aisa, D; Allemandou, N; Allocca, A; Amarni, J; Baronick, J-P; Barsuglia, M; Astone, P; Basti, F; Balestri, G; Ballardin, G; Bavigadda, V; Basti, A; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is the project to upgrade the Virgo interferometric detector of gravitational waves, with the aim of increasing the number of observable galaxies (and thus the detection rate) by three orders of magnitude. The project is now in an advanced construction phase and the assembly and integration will be completed by the end of 2015. Advanced Virgo will be part of a network, alongside the two Advanced LIGO detectors in the US and GEO HF in Germany, with the goal of contributing to the early detection of gravitational waves and to opening a new window of observation on the universe. In this paper we describe the main features of the Advanced Virgo detector and outline the status of the construction. (paper)

  12. Advanced LIGO: the next generation of gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, Gregory M

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are next generation instruments which will replace the existing initial LIGO detectors. They are currently being constructed and installed. Advanced LIGO strain sensitivity is designed to be about a factor 10 better than initial LIGO over a broad band and usable to 10 Hz, in contrast to 40 Hz for initial LIGO. This is expected to allow for detections and significant astrophysics in most categories of gravitational waves. To achieve this sensitivity, all hardware subsystems are being replaced with improvements. Designs and expected performance are presented for the seismic isolation, suspensions, optics and laser subsystems. Possible enhancements to Advanced LIGO, either to resolve problems that may arise and/or to allow for improved performance, are now being researched. Some of these enhancements are discussed along with some potential technology being considered for detectors beyond Advanced LIGO.

  13. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  14. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Barriga, P.; Blair, D.; Coward, D.; Davidson, J.; Dumas, J.; Howell, E.; Ju, L.; Wen, L.; Zhao, C.; McClelland, D.; Scott, S.; Slagmolen, B.; Inta, R.; Munch, J.; Ottaway, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  15. Development of mirror coatings for gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, J.

    2018-05-01

    Gravitational waves are detected by measuring length changes between mirrors in the arms of kilometre-long Michelson interferometers. Brownian thermal noise arising from thermal vibrations of the mirrors can limit the sensitivity to distance changes between the mirrors, and, therefore, the ability to measure gravitational-wave signals. Thermal noise arising from the highly reflective mirror coatings will limit the sensitivity both of current detectors (when they reach design performance) and of planned future detectors. Therefore, the development of coatings with low thermal noise, which at the same time meet strict optical requirements, is of great importance. This article gives an overview of the current status of coatings and of the different approaches for coating improvement. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  16. Explore the Lifetime Frontiers with MATHUSLA Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ce; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) include particles that are neutral, weakly coupled, and long-lived that can decay to final states containing several hadronic jets. Long-lived particles (LLPs) can be detected as displaced decays from the interaction point, or missing energy if they escape. ATLAS and CMS have performed searches at the LHC and significant exclusion limits have been set in recent years. However, the current searches performed at colliders have limitations. An LLP does not interact with the detector and it is only visible once it decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ~ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis ($c\\tau \\sim 10^7-10^8 m$). Therefore, ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs) produced at the LHC will escape the main detector with extremely high probability. MATHUSLA (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles) is a surface ...

  17. New detectors to explore the lifetime frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, John Paul; Curtin, David; Lubatti, H. J.

    2017-04-01

    Long-lived particles (LLPs) are a common feature in many beyond the Standard Model theories, including supersymmetry, and are generically produced in exotic Higgs decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ∼ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cτ ≲107-108 m. We propose the MATHUSLA surface detector concept (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles), which can be implemented with existing technology and in time for the high luminosity LHC upgrade to find such ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs), whether produced in exotic Higgs decays or more general production modes. We also advocate a dedicated LLP detector at a future 100 TeV collider, where a modestly sized underground design can discover ULLPs with lifetimes at the BBN limit produced in sub-percent level exotic Higgs decays.

  18. The EXPLORER gravitational wave antenna: recent improvements and performances

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Castellano, M G; Cavallari, G; Coccia, E; Cosmelli, C; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Federici, G; Minenkov, Y; Modestino, G; Modena, I; Moleti, A; Pizzella, G; Pallottino, G V; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Visco, M

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2000 the EXPLORER gravity wave (GW) detector has been operated continuously after a stop devoted to improve the apparatus. The antenna has been equipped with a new read-out. The use of a new transducer, characterized by a very small gap, and a dc-SQUID with a high coupling, led to a better sensitivity and a larger bandwidth. The EXPLORER sensitivity in terms of spectral noise amplitude, at present (June 2001), is 10 sup - sup 2 sup 0 Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 over a bandwidth of 35 Hz and 3 x 10 sup - sup 2 sup 1 Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 with a bandwidth of about 6 Hz, corresponding to a sensitivity to short conventional GW bursts of h = 4 x 10 sup - sup 1 sup 9. The performance is stable and the apparatus is taking data with a duty cycle in excess of 80%.

  19. The EXPLORER gravitational wave antenna: recent improvements and performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P; Bassan, M; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Castellano, M G; Cavallari, G; Coccia, E; Cosmelli, C; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Federici, G; Minenkov, Y; Modestino, G; Modena, I; Moleti, A; Pizzella, G; Pallottino, G V; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Visco, M

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2000 the EXPLORER gravity wave (GW) detector has been operated continuously after a stop devoted to improve the apparatus. The antenna has been equipped with a new read-out. The use of a new transducer, characterized by a very small gap, and a dc-SQUID with a high coupling, led to a better sensitivity and a larger bandwidth. The EXPLORER sensitivity in terms of spectral noise amplitude, at present (June 2001), is 10 -20 Hz -1/2 over a bandwidth of 35 Hz and 3 x 10 -21 Hz -1/2 with a bandwidth of about 6 Hz, corresponding to a sensitivity to short conventional GW bursts of h = 4 x 10 -19 . The performance is stable and the apparatus is taking data with a duty cycle in excess of 80%

  20. Resonant surface acoustic wave chemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Robert W.; Brocato, Terisse; Stotts, Larry G.

    2017-08-08

    Apparatus for chemical detection includes a pair of interdigitated transducers (IDTs) formed on a piezoelectric substrate. The apparatus includes a layer of adsorptive material deposited on a surface of the piezoelectric substrate between the IDTs, where each IDT is conformed, and is dimensioned in relation to an operating frequency and an acoustic velocity of the piezoelectric substrate, so as to function as a single-phase uni-directional transducer (SPUDT) at the operating frequency. Additionally, the apparatus includes the pair of IDTs is spaced apart along a propagation axis and mutually aligned relative to said propagation axis so as to define an acoustic cavity that is resonant to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the operating frequency, where a distance between each IDT of the pair of IDTs ranges from 100 wavelength of the operating frequency to 400 wavelength of the operating frequency.

  1. Constraint likelihood analysis for a network of gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mohanty, S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a coherent method for detection and reconstruction of gravitational wave signals with a network of interferometric detectors. The method is derived by using the likelihood ratio functional for unknown signal waveforms. In the likelihood analysis, the global maximum of the likelihood ratio over the space of waveforms is used as the detection statistic. We identify a problem with this approach. In the case of an aligned pair of detectors, the detection statistic depends on the cross correlation between the detectors as expected, but this dependence disappears even for infinitesimally small misalignments. We solve the problem by applying constraints on the likelihood functional and obtain a new class of statistics. The resulting method can be applied to data from a network consisting of any number of detectors with arbitrary detector orientations. The method allows us reconstruction of the source coordinates and the waveforms of two polarization components of a gravitational wave. We study the performance of the method with numerical simulations and find the reconstruction of the source coordinates to be more accurate than in the standard likelihood method

  2. Utilization Of Carbon Nanotubes In Electromagnetic Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hanis Zakariah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct detection of hydrocarbon by an active source using electromagnetic (EM energy termed seabed logging (SBL has shown very promising results. However, currently available electromagnetic wave technology has a number of challenges include sensitivity and frequency matching. This paper presents development of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs as electromagnetic wave detector due to outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes. They are currently one of the desired materials for advanced technologies. Two types of detectors were developed in this work, carbon nanotube-based (D1 and without nanotube-based (D2 detectors. Various configuration and arrangement for each type of detector were investigated to determine the one with the highest detection measurement and stability of frequency stability of detection system. It was found that 20 turn-coils coil placed at its centre gives the maximum detection of induction voltage, 39.61 mV. However, the 20 turn- coils with CNTs which gives 36.50 mV is the preferred EM detectors due to the stability in frequency of the detection system.

  3. Development of a Ferrite-Based Electromagnetic Wave Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hanish Zakariah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct detection of hydrocarbon by an active source using electromagnetic (EM wave termed Sea Bed Logging (SBL has shown very promising results. However, currently available electromagnetic wave technology has a number of challenges including sensitivity and lapsed time. Our initial response to this issue is to develop a ferrite-based EM wave detector for Sea Bed Logging (SBL. Ferrite bar and copper rings in various diameters were used as detector 1 (D1. For Detector 2 (D2, toroid added with copper wires in different lengths at the centre of it were used. The first experiment is to determine the inductance and resistance for both detectors by using LCR meter. We obtained the highest inductance value of 0.02530 mH at the ferrite bar when it was paired with a 15 cm diameter copper ring and 0.00526 mH for D2 using a 100 cm copper wire placed at the centre of the toroid. The highest resistivity for D1 was measured at ferrite bar paired with a 15 cm diameter  copper ring and 1.099 Ω when using 20 cm length of copper wire. The second interest deals with voltage peak-to-peak (Vp-p value for both detectors by using oscilloscope. The highest voltage value at the ferrite bar of D1 was 25.30 mV. While at D2, the highest voltage measured was 27.70 mV when using a 100 cm copper wire. The third premise is the comparison of sensitivity and lapsed time for both detectors. It was found that D1 was 61% more sensitive than D2 but had higher lapsed time than D2.

  4. Dark Matter searches using gravitational wave bar detectors: quark nuggets and newtorites

    CERN Document Server

    Bassan, M; D'Antonio, S.; Fafone, V.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Modena, I.; Pallottino, G.V.; Pizzella, G.; Rocchi, A.; Ronga, F.; Visco, M.

    2016-01-01

    Many experiments have searched for supersymmetric WIMP dark matter, with null results. This may suggest to look for more exotic possibilities, for example compact ultra-dense quark nuggets, widely discussed in literature with several different names. Nuclearites are an example of candidate compact objects with atomic size cross section. After a short discussion on nuclearites, the result of a nuclearite search with the gravitational wave bar detectors Nautilus and Explorer is reported. The geometrical acceptance of the bar detectors is 19.5 $\\rm m^2$ sr, that is smaller than that of other detectors used for similar searches. However, the detection mechanism is completely different and is more straightforward than in other detectors. The experimental limits we obtain are of interest because, for nuclearites of mass less than $10^{-5}$ g, we find a flux smaller than that one predicted considering nuclearites as dark matter candidates. Particles with gravitational only interactions (newtorites) are another examp...

  5. Transducers for the Brazilian gravitational wave detector 'Mario Schenberg'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajuca, Carlos; Ribeiro, Kilder L; Andrade, Luiz A; Jr, Walter F Velloso; Melo, Jose L; Aguiar, Odylio D; Magalhaes, Nadja S

    2002-01-01

    'Mario Schenberg' is a spherical resonant-mass gravitational wave (GW) detector that will be part of a GW detection array of three detectors. The other two will be built in Italy and the Netherlands. Their resonant frequencies will be around 3.2 kHz with a bandwidth of about 200 Hz. This range of frequencies is new in a field where the typical frequencies lie below 1 kHz, making the transducer development much more complex. In this paper, the design of the mechanical part of the transducer will be shown, as well as the attachment method to the sphere and the expected sensitivity

  6. Development of Mirror Coatings for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Reid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The first detections of gravitational waves, GW150914 and GW151226, were associated with the coalescence of stellar mass black holes, heralding the opening of an entirely new way to observe the Universe. Many decades of development were invested to achieve the sensitivities required to observe gravitational waves, with peak strains associated with GW150914 at the level of 10−21. Gravitational wave detectors currently operate as modified Michelson interferometers, where thermal noise associated with the highly reflective mirror coatings sets a critical limit to the sensitivity of current and future instruments. This article presents an overview of the mirror coating development relevant to gravitational wave detection and the prospective for future developments in the field.

  7. Newtonian noise cancellation in tensor gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Harms, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial gravity noise produced by ambient seismic and infrasound fields poses one of the main sensitivity limitations in low-frequency ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. This noise needs to be suppressed by 3-5 orders of magnitude in the frequency band 10 mHz to 1 Hz, which is extremely challenging. We present a new approach that greatly facilitates cancellation of gravity noise in full-tensor GW detectors. It makes explicit use of the direction of propagation of a GW, and can therefore either be implemented in directional searches for GWs or in observations of known sources. We show that suppression of the Newtonian-noise foreground is greatly facilitated using the extra strain channels in full-tensor GW detectors. Only a modest number of auxiliary, high-sensitivity environmental sensors is required to achieve noise suppression by a few orders of magnitude. (paper)

  8. The next science run of the gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P; Bassan, M; Bonifazi, P; Coccia, E; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Giordano, G; Marini, A; Minenkov, Y; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Pallottino, G V; Pizzella, G; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Terenzi, R; Visco, M

    2002-01-01

    The ultra-cryogenic gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS is gathering data in Frascati (Rome), in its second science run since June 1998. The measured strain sensitivity at the two resonances is 4 x 10 sup - sup 2 sup 2 Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 over a bandwidth of 1 Hz and better than 3 x 10 sup - sup 2 sup 0 Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 over a band of about 25 Hz, with a duty cycle of about 80%, mainly limited by cryogenic operations. At the beginning of 2002, the detector will be upgraded with a new Al bar, transducer and SQUID, and will be tuned to the 935 Hz frequency of the recently discovered pulsar in SN 1987A. The future sensitivity of the detector is presented and discussed.

  9. Status of the Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, F.; Adams, T.; Agatsuma, K.; Aiello, L.; Allocca, A.; Amato, A.; Antier, S.; Arnaud, N.; Ascenzi, S.; Astone, P.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Basti, A.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Bloemen, S.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Boschi, V.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Branchesi, M.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirone, A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Conti, L.; Cortese, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; Degallaix, J.; de Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; De Rosa, R.; di Fiore, L.; di Giovanni, M.; di Girolamo, T.; di Lieto, A.; di Pace, S.; di Palma, I.; di Renzo, F.; Dolique, V.; Ducrot, M.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frey, V.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giazotto, A.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Granata, M.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Harms, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Huet, D.; Intini, G.; Isac, J.-M.; Jacqmin, T.; Jaranowski, P.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Kéfélian, F.; Khan, I.; Koley, S.; Kowalska, I.; Królak, A.; Kutynia, A.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Lumaca, D.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Masserot, A.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Meidam, J.; Merzougui, M.; Metzdorff, R.; Mezzani, F.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Montani, M.; Mours, B.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Nichols, D.; Nissanke, S.; Nocera, F.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pedurand, R.; Perreca, A.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Razzano, M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Ricci, F.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Rosińska, D.; Ruggi, P.; Salconi, L.; Sassolas, B.; Schmidt, P.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sieniawska, M.; Singhal, A.; Sorrentino, F.; Stratta, G.; Swinkels, B. L.; Tacca, M.; Tiwari, S.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vardaro, M.; Vasúth, M.; Vedovato, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Walet, R.; Wang, G.; Was, M.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2017-10-01

    Advanced Virgo is the French-Italian second generation laser gravitational wave detector, successor of the Initial Virgo. This new interferometer keeps only the infrastructure of its predecessor and aims to be ten times more sensitive, with its first science run planned for 2017. This article gives an overview of the Advanced Virgo design and the technical choices behind it. Finally, the up-to-date progresses and the planned upgrade for the following years are detailed.

  10. Signs of cosmic rays in gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Denis Borgarelli

    2010-01-01

    One of the phenomena predicted by Einstein in the derivation of general relativity is the existence of small perturbations of the metric that he named gravitational waves. As they travel through space oscillates the space-time according to its polarization. This is the only major prediction of general relativity not yet proven completely. The small signal generated by the passage of a gravitational wave compared to the noise in the system of detection makes their direct detection one challenge of modern science. In this paper we study the noise generated by cosmic rays in the gravitational antenna Mario Schenberg, located in the city of Sao Paulo. Single muons and hadrons flux measurements held in the northern hemisphere were used to calculate the expected flux of these particles in the city of Sao Paulo. The calculation of the energy deposited in the detector of gravitational waves from cosmic rays was performed by Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4. The transport of muons and protons, with several energy and some different angles of incidence, across the building and the resonant sphere was simulated. We developed a thermo-acoustic model, called multi-point, suitable for calculating the energy deposited in the normal modes from the energy deposited on the sphere by elementary particles. With these results we calculate the expected rate of cosmic ray signals in the main detection mode of gravitational waves, nl = 12, of the Mario Schenberg detector, for temperatures T noise between 10 -5 and 10 -7 K. The results showed for the designed for 4.2 K sensitivity of the Mario Schenberg detector that the rate of signals due to cosmic rays is very small, being around 5 events per day. However, when it will reach the quantum limit will be needed a more detailed analysis of the antenna signal output, since the expected number of cosmic ray noise increases considerably, reaching about 250 signals per day. (author)

  11. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  12. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  13. Space gravitational wave detector DECIGO/pre-DECIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musha, Mitsuru

    2017-09-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) is ripples in gravitational fields caused by the motion of mass such as inspiral and merger of blackhole binaries or explosion of super novae, which was predicted by A.Einstein in his general theory of relativity. In Japan, besides the ground-base GW detector, KAGRA, the space gravitational wave detector, DECIGO, is also promoted for detecting GW at lower frequency range. DECIGO (DECi-heltz Gravitational-wave Observatory) consists of 3 satellites, forming a 1000-km triangle-shaped Fabry-Perot laser interferometer whose designed strain sensitivity is ?l/l planned a milestone mission for DECIGO named Pre-DECIGO, which has almost the same configuration as DECIGO with shorter arm length of 100 km. Pre-DECIGO is aimed for detecting GW from merger of blackhole binaries with less sensitivity as DECIGO, and also for feasibility test of key technologies for realizing DECIGO. Pre-DECIGO is now under designing and developing for launching in late 2020s, with the financial support of JAXA and JSPS. In our presentation, we will review DECIGO project, and show the design and current status of Pre-DECIGO.

  14. Reflective coating optimization for interferometric detectors of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Maria

    2015-05-04

    Brownian fluctuations in the highly reflective test-mass coatings are the dominant noise source, in a frequency band from a few tens to a few hundreds Hz, for Earth-bound detectors of Gravitational Waves. Minimizing such noise is mandatory to increase the visibility distance of these instruments, and eventually reach their quantum-limited sensitivity. Several strategies exist to achieve this goal. Layer thickness and material properties optimization have been proposed and effectively implemented, and are reviewed in this paper, together with other, so far less well developed, options. The former is the simplest option, yielding a sensible noise reduction with limited technological challenges; the latter is more technologically demanding, but is needed for future (cryogenic) detectors.

  15. Prospects for determination of thermal history after inflation with future gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Nakayama, Kazunori; Saito, Shun

    2011-01-01

    Thermal history of the Universe between inflation and big-bang nucleosynthesis has not yet been revealed observationally. It will be probed by the detection of primordial gravitational waves generated during inflation, which contain information on the reheating temperature as well as the equation of state of the Universe after inflation. Based on the Fisher information formalism, we examine how accurately the tensor-to-scalar ratio and reheating temperature after inflation can be simultaneously determined with space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and the Big-Bang Observer. We show that the reheating temperature is best determined if it is around 10 7 GeV for tensor-to-scalar ratio of around 0.1, and explore the detectable parameter space. We also find that equation of state of the early Universe can be also determined accurately enough to distinguish different equation-of-state parameters if the inflationary gravitational waves are successfully detected. Thus, future gravitational wave detectors provide a unique and promising opportunity to reveal the thermal history of the Universe around 10 7 GeV.

  16. First VESF School on Advanced Detectors for Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Advanced Interferometers and the Search for Gravitational Waves

    2014-01-01

    The search for gravitational radiation with optical interferometers is gaining momentum worldwide. Beside the VIRGO and GEO gravitational wave observatories in Europe and the two LIGOs in the United States, which have operated successfully during the past decade, further observatories are being completed (KAGRA in Japan) or planned (ILIGO in India). The sensitivity of the current observatories, although spectacular, has not allowed direct discovery of gravitational waves. The advanced detectors (Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo), at present in the development phase, will improve sensitivity by a factor of 10, probing the universe up to 200 Mpc for signal from inspiraling binary compact stars. This book covers all experimental aspects of the search for gravitational radiation with optical interferometers. Every facet of the technological development underlying the evolution of advanced interferometers is thoroughly described, from configuration to optics and coatings, and from thermal compensation to suspensio...

  17. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  18. OBSERVATIONAL SELECTION EFFECTS WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik [LIGO, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world; though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  19. OBSERVATIONAL SELECTION EFFECTS WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E.; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world; though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  20. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzella, G.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer

  1. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzella, G. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Physics Dept.; Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Frascati, RM (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer.

  2. Possibility of gravitational wave detector production on the base of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational wave detector based on the light diffraction is proposed. Under the gravitation wave incidence on an elastic rod standing acoustic oscillations are excited in it, which are then used as a diffraction grating for the light scattering. A detailed mathematical analysis of this detector is given. 1 ref

  3. Unequal arm space-borne gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Shane L.; Hellings, Ronald W.; Hiscock, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Unlike ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors, large space-based systems will not be rigid structures. When the end stations of the laser interferometer are freely flying spacecraft, the armlengths will change due to variations in the spacecraft positions along their orbital trajectories, so the precise equality of the arms that is required in a laboratory interferometer to cancel laser phase noise is not possible. However, using a method discovered by Tinto and Armstrong, a signal can be constructed in which laser phase noise exactly cancels out, even in an unequal arm interferometer. We examine the case where the ratio of the armlengths is a variable parameter, and compute the averaged gravitational wave transfer function as a function of that parameter. Example sensitivity curve calculations are presented for the expected design parameters of the proposed LISA interferometer, comparing it to a similar instrument with one arm shortened by a factor of 100, showing how the ratio of the armlengths will affect the overall sensitivity of the instrument

  4. Quadrupole mass detector in the field of weak plane gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, L.B.

    1978-01-01

    Studied is the behaviour of the system which consists of two test particles connected by a string (quadrupole mass detector) and placed in the field of weak plane monochromatic gravitational waves. It is shown that at cross orientation of the detector the gravitational wave effecting such a system excites oscillations in it with the frequency equal to that of the gravitational wave source. The role of the driving force is played by the periodical change with the time of the equilibrium position. The gravitational wave does not influence the detector at its longitudinal orientation

  5. Towards a gravitational wave observatory designer: sensitivity limits of spaceborne detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barke, S; Wang, Y; Delgado, J J Esteban; Tröbs, M; Heinzel, G; Danzmann, K

    2015-01-01

    The most promising concept for low frequency (millihertz to hertz) gravitational wave observatories are laser interferometric detectors in space. It is usually assumed that the noise floor for such a detector is dominated by optical shot noise in the signal readout. For this to be true, a careful balance of mission parameters is crucial to keep all other parasitic disturbances below shot noise. We developed a web application that uses over 30 input parameters and considers many important technical noise sources and noise suppression techniques to derive a realistic position noise budget. It optimizes free parameters automatically and generates a detailed report on all individual noise contributions. Thus one can easily explore the entire parameter space and design a realistic gravitational wave observatory. In this document we describe the different parameters, present all underlying calculations, and compare the final observatory’s sensitivity with astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. We use as an example parameters currently assumed to be likely applied to a space mission proposed to be launched in 2034 by the European Space Agency. The web application itself is publicly available on the Internet at http://spacegravity.org/designer. Future versions of the web application will incorporate the frequency dependence of different noise sources and include a more detailed model of the observatory’s residual acceleration noise. (paper)

  6. Towards a gravitational wave observatory designer: sensitivity limits of spaceborne detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barke, S.; Wang, Y.; Esteban Delgado, J. J.; Tröbs, M.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    The most promising concept for low frequency (millihertz to hertz) gravitational wave observatories are laser interferometric detectors in space. It is usually assumed that the noise floor for such a detector is dominated by optical shot noise in the signal readout. For this to be true, a careful balance of mission parameters is crucial to keep all other parasitic disturbances below shot noise. We developed a web application that uses over 30 input parameters and considers many important technical noise sources and noise suppression techniques to derive a realistic position noise budget. It optimizes free parameters automatically and generates a detailed report on all individual noise contributions. Thus one can easily explore the entire parameter space and design a realistic gravitational wave observatory. In this document we describe the different parameters, present all underlying calculations, and compare the final observatory’s sensitivity with astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. We use as an example parameters currently assumed to be likely applied to a space mission proposed to be launched in 2034 by the European Space Agency. The web application itself is publicly available on the Internet at http://spacegravity.org/designer. Future versions of the web application will incorporate the frequency dependence of different noise sources and include a more detailed model of the observatory’s residual acceleration noise.

  7. Gravitational Waves from Known Pulsars: Results from the Initial Detector Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aasi, J.; et al., [Unknown; Hessels, J.W.T.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and

  8. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atom Interferometry (AI) Technology for Gravity Wave Measurements demonstrates new matter wave Interferometric sensor technology for precise detection and...

  9. Astronomical observations with a network of detectors of gravitational waves: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhurandhar, S.V.; Tinto, Massimo

    1988-01-01

    Two different representations for the antenna pattern of Earth-based gravitational wave detectors (laser interferometers and bars) observing arbitrarily polarized waves are investigated in the long wavelength limit. We show that the response of a gravitational wave detector can be written either as a contraction between two symmetric trace-free (STF) tensors, one associated with the wave and the other with the detector, or as a linear combination of generalized spherical functions. We then apply this formalism to solve the simplest form of the 'inverse problem' for bursts: determining the direction of an incoming wave, the orientation of its polarization ellipse and the wave's two independent amplitudes, using only the response amplitudes of five wide-band detectors located in the same place. We give a simple linear expression for the components of the STF tensor that characterize the wave as a function of the detector responses. We then show how to solve for the wave's direction, polarization and amplitude from its STF tensor. (author)

  10. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The 'Mesa' beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle α and beam width D. Varying α allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat (α=0) to the nearly concentric (α=π) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D→∞ hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an α=π Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67 cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the α=0.91π hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite mirror effects. This allows us to increase the D

  11. LRO LUNAR EXPLORATION NEUTRON DETECTOR 2 EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Raw, uncalibrated housekeeping and scientific data collected from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  12. GW170814: A Three-Detector Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Caldeorn; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Duran, P. Cerda; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. -P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrion, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dalya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; De Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Marsh, P.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morisaki, S.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R. J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tpai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forn, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Taya, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, M.; Van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; Van der Schaaf, L.; Van Heijningen, J. V.; Van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicer, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A. B.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    On August 14, 2017 at 10∶30:43 UTC, the Advanced Virgo detector and the two Advanced LIGO detectors coherently observed a transient gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar mass black holes, with a false-alarm rate of ≲1 in 27 000 years. The signal was observed with a

  13. An Open-Source Standard T-Wave Alternans Detector for Benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, A; Nemati, S; Clifford, Gd

    2008-09-14

    We describe an open source algorithm suite for T-Wave Alternans (TWA) detection and quantification. The software consists of Matlab implementations of the widely used Spectral Method and Modified Moving Average with libraries to read both WFDB and ASCII data under windows and Linux. The software suite can run in both batch mode and with a provided graphical user interface to aid waveform exploration. Our software suite was calibrated using an open source TWA model, described in a partner paper [1] by Clifford and Sameni. For the PhysioNet/CinC Challenge 2008 we obtained a score of 0.881 for the Spectral Method and 0.400 for the MMA method. However, our objective was not to provide the best TWA detector, but rather a basis for detailed discussion of algorithms.

  14. Gravitational wave detector on the basis of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method for detection of gravitational waves by means of light diffraction at the first maximum on oscillations in optically transparent matter under effect of gravitational waves is considered. Intensity of light flux scattering on oscillations of elastic rod is calculated. A possibility of using the diffraction method for detection of gravitational waves is disclosed

  15. Searching for Stochastic Gravitational Waves Using Data from the Two Co-Located LIGO Hanford Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among other things, on the separation between the two detectors: the smaller the separation, the better the sensitivity. Hence, a co-located detector pair is more sensitive to a gravitational-wave background than a nonco- located detector pair. However, co-located detectors are also expected to suffer from correlated noise from instrumental and environmental effects that could contaminate the measurement of the background. Hence, methods to identify and mitigate the effects of correlated noise are necessary to achieve the potential increase in sensitivity of co-located detectors. Here we report on the first SGWB analysis using the two LIGO Hanford detectors and address the complications arising from correlated environmental noise. We apply correlated noise identification and mitigation techniques to data taken by the two LIGO Hanford detectors, H1 and H2, during LIGO's fifth science run. At low frequencies, 40-460Hz, we are unable to sufficiently mitigate the correlated noise to a level where we may confidently measure or bound the stochastic gravitational-wave signal. However, at high frequencies, 460 - 1000Hz, these techniques are sufficient to set a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the gravitational-wave energy density of Omega(f) < 7.7 × 10(exp -4)(f/900Hz)(sup 3), which improves on the previous upper limit by a factor of approx. 180. In doing so, we demonstrate techniques that will be useful for future searches using advanced detectors, where correlated noise (e.g., from global magnetic fields) may affect even widely separated detectors.

  16. Observation results by the TAMA300 detector on gravitational wave bursts from stellar-core collapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki; Aso, Youichi; Iida, Yukiyoshi; Nishi, Yuhiko; Otsuka, Shigemi; Seki, Hidetsugu; Soida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Shinsuke; Tochikubo, Kuniharu; Tsubono, Kimio; Yoda, Tatsuo; Arai, Koji; Beyersdorf, Peter; Kawamura, Seiji; Sato, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Fujimoto, Masa-Katsu

    2005-01-01

    We present data-analysis schemes and results of observations with the TAMA300 gravitational wave detector, targeting burst signals from stellar-core collapse events. In analyses for burst gravitational waves, the detection and fake-reduction schemes are different from well-investigated ones for a chirp wave analysis, because precise waveform templates are not available. We used an excess -power filter for the extraction of gravitational wave candidates, and developed two methods for the reduction of fake events caused by nonstationary noises of the detector. These analysis schemes were applied to real data from the TAMA300 interferometric gravitational wave detector. As a result, fake events were reduced by a factor of about 1000 in the best cases. In addition, in order to interpret the event candidates from an astronomical viewpoint, we performed a Monte-Carlo simulation with an assumed Galactic event distribution model and with burst waveforms obtained from numerical simulations of stellar-core collapses. We set an upper limit of 5.0x10 3 events/sec on the burst gravitational wave event rate in our Galaxy with a confidence level of 90%. This work shows prospects on the search for burst gravitational waves, by establishing an analysis scheme for the observation data from an interferometric gravitational wave detector

  17. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  18. Astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves in the advanced detector era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    With the advanced gravitational wave detectors coming on line in the next 5 years, we expect to make the first detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources, and study the properties of the waves themselves as tests of general relativity. In addition, these gravitational waves will be powerful tools for the study of their astrophysical sources and source populations. They carry information that is quite complementary to what can be learned from electromagnetic or neutrino observations, probing the central gravitational engines that power the electromagnetic emissions at the outer layers of the source. Preparations are being made to enable near-simultaneous observations of both gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations of transient sources, using low-latency search pipelines and rapid sky localization. We will review the many opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy and astrophysics with gravitational waves enabled by the advanced detectors, and the preparations that are being made to quickly and fully exploit them. (paper)

  19. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10 -5 - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  20. Search for gravitational wave bursts by the network of resonant detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P; Busby, D; Bassan, M; Blair, D G; Bonaldi, M; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Cerdonio, M; Coccia, E; Conti, L; Cosmelli, C; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Falferi, P; Fortini, P; Frasca, S; Hamilton, W O; Heng, I S; Ivanov, E N; Johnson, W W; Locke, C R; Marini, A; Mauceli, E; McHugh, M P; Mezzena, R; Minenkov, Y; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Ortolan, A; Pallottino, G V; Pizzella, G; Prodi, G A; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Rocco, E; Ronga, F; Salemi, F; Santostasi, G; Taffarello, L; Terenzi, R; Tobar, M E; Vedovato, G; Vinante, A; Visco, M; Vitale, S; Zendri, J P

    2002-01-01

    The groups operating cryogenic bar detectors of gravitational waves are performing a coordinated search for short signals within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC). We review the most relevant aspects of the data analysis, based on a time-coincidence search among triggers from different detectors, and the properties of the data exchanged by each detector under a recently-upgraded agreement. The IGEC is currently analysing the observations from 1997 to 2000, when up to four detectors were operating simultaneously. 10% and 50% of this time period were covered by simultaneous observations, respectively, of at least three or at least two detectors. Typical signal search thresholds were in the range 2-6 10 sup - sup 2 sup 1 /Hz. The coincidences found are within the estimated background, hence improved upper limits on incoming GW (gravitational wave) bursts have been set.

  1. On the background estimation by time slides in a network of gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Michal; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Leroy, Nicolas; Robinet, Florent; Vavoulidis, Miltiadis

    2010-01-01

    Time shifting the outputs of gravitational wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way to estimate the background in a search for short-duration signals. However, this procedure is limited as increasing indefinitely the number of time shifts does not provide better estimates. We show that the false alarm rate estimation error saturates with the number of time shifts. In particular, for detectors with very different trigger rates, this error saturates at a large value. Explicit computations are done for two detectors, and for three detectors where the detection statistic relies on the logical 'OR' of the coincidences of the three couples in the network.

  2. On the background estimation by time slides in a network of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Michal; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Leroy, Nicolas; Robinet, Florent; Vavoulidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mwas@lal.in2p3.f [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2010-01-07

    Time shifting the outputs of gravitational wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way to estimate the background in a search for short-duration signals. However, this procedure is limited as increasing indefinitely the number of time shifts does not provide better estimates. We show that the false alarm rate estimation error saturates with the number of time shifts. In particular, for detectors with very different trigger rates, this error saturates at a large value. Explicit computations are done for two detectors, and for three detectors where the detection statistic relies on the logical 'OR' of the coincidences of the three couples in the network.

  3. Gravitational wave detectors: New eyes for physics and astronomy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sitivity, they have better sensitivity than previous detectors and work in some ... the TAMA project team, but there are plans underway to combine results, showing ..... from its estimation of the expectations from measured noise in six minute inter ...

  4. The methodology of the search for a correlated signal from a supernova explosion using the data of gravitational wave detectors and neutrino observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, M. B.

    2017-11-01

    The proposed methodology developed in cooperation of the LIGO, VIRGO, Borexino, LVD, and IceCube collaborations is based on a joint analysis of data from neutrino and gravitational wave detectors which record corresponding radiations, almost undistorted by the interstellar medium and propagating with similar speeds. This approach allows to increase the reliability of observations, detect the so-called Silent supernovae and explore the properties and generation mechanisms of gravitational waves.

  5. Line-robust statistics for continuous gravitational waves: safety in the case of unequal detector sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The multi-detector F-statistic is close to optimal for detecting continuous gravitational waves (CWs) in Gaussian noise. However, it is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts, for example quasi-monochromatic disturbances (‘lines’), which resemble a CW signal more than Gaussian noise. In a recent paper (Keitel et al 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89 064023), a Bayesian model selection approach was used to derive line-robust detection statistics for CW signals, generalizing both the F-statistic and the F-statistic consistency veto technique and yielding improved performance in line-affected data. Here we investigate a generalization of the assumptions made in that paper: if a CW analysis uses data from two or more detectors with very different sensitivities, the line-robust statistics could be less effective. We investigate the boundaries within which they are still safe to use, in comparison with the F-statistic. Tests using synthetic draws show that the optimally-tuned version of the original line-robust statistic remains safe in most cases of practical interest. We also explore a simple idea on further improving the detection power and safety of these statistics, which we, however, find to be of limited practical use. (paper)

  6. Localization of binary neutron star mergers with second and third generation gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Cameron; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2018-05-01

    The observation of gravitational wave signals from binary black hole and binary neutron star mergers has established the field of gravitational wave astronomy. It is expected that future networks of gravitational wave detectors will possess great potential in probing various aspects of astronomy. An important consideration for successive improvement of current detectors or establishment on new sites is knowledge of the minimum number of detectors required to perform precision astronomy. We attempt to answer this question by assessing the ability of future detector networks to detect and localize binary neutron stars mergers on the sky. Good localization ability is crucial for many of the scientific goals of gravitational wave astronomy, such as electromagnetic follow-up, measuring the properties of compact binaries throughout cosmic history, and cosmology. We find that although two detectors at improved sensitivity are sufficient to get a substantial increase in the number of observed signals, at least three detectors of comparable sensitivity are required to localize majority of the signals, typically to within around 10 deg2 —adequate for follow-up with most wide field of view optical telescopes.

  7. Scalable Background-Limited Polarization-Sensitive Detectors for mm-wave Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostem, Karwan; Ali, Aamir; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe A.; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin L.; Essinger-Hileman, Tom; Marriage, Tobias A.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report on the status and development of polarization-sensitive detectors for millimeter-wave applications. The detectors are fabricated on single-crystal silicon, which functions as a low-loss dielectric substrate for the microwave circuitry as well as the supporting membrane for the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The orthomode transducer (OMT) is realized as a symmetric structure and on-chip filters are employed to define the detection bandwidth. A hybridized integrated enclosure reduces the high-frequency THz mode set that can couple to the TES bolometers. An implementation of the detector architecture at Q-band achieves 90% efficiency in each polarization. The design is scalable in both frequency coverage, 30-300 GHz, and in number of detectors with uniform characteristics. Hence, the detectors are desirable for ground-based or space-borne instruments that require large arrays of efficient background-limited cryogenic detectors.

  8. Scientific detectors for astronomy 2005 Explorers of the Photon Odyssey

    CERN Document Server

    Beletic, Jenna E; Amico, Paola

    2006-01-01

    Every three years, the leading experts in detectors for astronomy gather together to exchange information and form professional relationships. This series of meetings is entitled Scientific Detectors for Astronomy. The meeting has been held six times, with the last four publishing hardcover proceedings. Nearly all leading astronomical observatories and manufacturers attend this meeting, with participants from every continent of the world. The 2005 meeting in Taormina, Italy was attended by 127 professionals who develop and use the highest quality detectors for wavelengths from x-ray to sub-mm, with emphasis on optical and infrared detectors. The meeting consisted of overview talks, technical presentations, poster sessions and roundtable discussions. In addition, a strong cultural programme exposed the participants to the host region while fostering the enhancement of professional relationships. These proceedings capture the technical content and the spirit of the 2005 workshop. The 87 papers cover a wide rang...

  9. Methods to filter out spurious disturbances in continuous-wave searches from gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Semicoherent all-sky searches over year-long observation times for continuous gravitational wave signals produce various thousands of potential periodic source candidates. Efficient methods able to discard false candidate events are crucial in order to put all the efforts into a computationally intensive follow-up analysis for the remaining most promising candidates (Shaltev et al 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89 124030). In this paper we present a set of techniques able to fulfill such requirements, identifying and eliminating false candidate events, reducing thus the bulk of candidate sets that need to be further investigated. Some of these techniques were also used to streamline the candidate sets returned by the Einstein@Home hierarchical searches presented in (Aasi J et al (The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration) 2013 Phys. Rev. D 87 042001). These powerful methods and the benefits originating from their application to both simulated and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run are illustrated and discussed. (paper)

  10. Linear projection of technical noise for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J R; Ajith, P; Grote, H; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Lueck, H; Strain, K A; Willke, B; Hough, J; Danzmann, K

    2006-01-01

    An international network of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors is now in operation, and has entered a period of intense commissioning focused on bringing the instruments to their theoretical sensitivity limits. To expedite this process, noise analysis techniques have been developed by the groups associated with each instrument. We present methods of noise analysis that were developed and utilized for the commissioning of the GEO 600 detector. The focal point of this paper is a technique called noise projection that is used to determine the levels of contribution of various noise sources to the detector output. Example applications of this method to control loops typical of those employed in an interferometric GW detector are presented. Possible extensions of noise projections, including technical noise subtraction and gravitational-wave vetoes are also discussed

  11. A Gravitational Wave Detector Based on an Atom Interferometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational waves are tiny perturbations in the curvature of space-time that arise from accelerating masses – according to Einstein's general theory of relativity....

  12. Thermal noise from optical coatings in gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory M; Armandula, Helena; Black, Eric; Crooks, D R M; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Hough, Jim; Murray, Peter; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Sneddon, Peter; Fejer, Martin M; Route, Roger; Penn, Steven D

    2006-03-01

    Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity. These waves are created by massive objects, like neutron stars or black holes, oscillating at speeds appreciable to the speed of light. The detectable effect on the Earth of these waves is extremely small, however, creating strains of the order of 10(-21). There are a number of basic physics experiments around the world designed to detect these waves by using interferometers with very long arms, up to 4 km in length. The next-generation interferometers are currently being designed, and the thermal noise in the mirrors will set the sensitivity over much of the usable bandwidth. Thermal noise arising from mechanical loss in the optical coatings put on the mirrors will be a significant source of noise. Achieving higher sensitivity through lower mechanical loss coatings, while preserving the crucial optical and thermal properties, is an area of active research right now.

  13. Negative optical inertia for enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, Farid; Danilishin, Stefan; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Miao Haixing; Zhao Chunnong; Chen Yanbei

    2011-01-01

    We consider enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors by using double optical spring. When the power, detuning and bandwidth of the two carriers are chosen appropriately, the effect of the double optical spring can be described as a 'negative inertia', which cancels the positive inertia of the test masses and thus increases their response to gravitational waves. This allows us to surpass the free-mass standard quantum limit (SQL) over a broad frequency band, through signal amplification, rather than noise cancellation, which has been the case for all broadband SQL-beating schemes so far considered for gravitational-wave detectors. The merit of such signal amplification schemes lies in the fact that they are less susceptible to optical losses than noise-cancellation schemes. We show that it is feasible to demonstrate such an effect with the Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility, and it can eventually be implemented in future advanced GW detectors.

  14. Monocrystalline fibres for low thermal noise suspension in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amico, P; Bosi, L; Gammaitoni, L; Losurdo, G; Marchesoni, F; Mazzoni, M; Parisi, D; Punturo, M; Stanga, R; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Travasso, F; Vetrano, F; Vocca, H

    2004-01-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of future interferometric gravitational wave detectors. We propose a new type of materials to realize low thermal noise suspension in such detectors. Monocrystalline suspension fibres are good candidates both for cryogenic and for ambient temperature interferometers. Material characteristics and a production facility are described in this paper

  15. Performance and calibration of wave length shifting fibers for K2K SciBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Taichi

    2004-01-01

    The wave length shifting (WLS) fibers (Kuraray Y11 (200) MS) are used for light collection from scintillators in the SciBar detector. The performance of WLS fibers was measured before installation. Because the number of WLS fibers is about 15,000, it is necessary to make a system to measure attenuation length of WLS fibers efficiently. I will report the pre-calibration method for measurement and the performance of the WLS fibers in SciBar detector. (author)

  16. Double pass locking and spatial mode locking for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cusack, B J; Slagmolen, B; Vine, G D; Gray, M B; McClelland, D E

    2002-01-01

    We present novel techniques for overcoming problems relating to the use of high-power lasers in mode cleaner cavities for second generation laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Rearranging the optical components into a double pass locking regime can help to protect locking detectors from damage. Modulator thermal lensing can be avoided by using a modulation-free technique such as tilt locking, or its recently developed cousin, flip locking.

  17. Monocrystalline fibres for low thermal noise suspension in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amico, P [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Bosi, L [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Gammaitoni, L [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Losurdo, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Marchesoni, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Mazzoni, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Parisi, D [NEST-Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Punturo, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Stanga, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Toncelli, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Tonelli, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Travasso, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Vetrano, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Vocca, H [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)

    2004-03-07

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of future interferometric gravitational wave detectors. We propose a new type of materials to realize low thermal noise suspension in such detectors. Monocrystalline suspension fibres are good candidates both for cryogenic and for ambient temperature interferometers. Material characteristics and a production facility are described in this paper.

  18. Exploring AdS waves via nonminimal coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy; Hassaiene, Mokhtar

    2006-01-01

    We consider nonminimally coupled scalar fields to explore the Siklos spacetimes in three dimensions. Their interpretation as exact gravitational waves propagating on AdS space restrict the source to behave as a pure radiation field. We show that the related pure radiation constraints single out a unique self-interaction potential depending on one coupling constant. For a vanishing coupling constant, this potential reduces to a mass term with a mass fixed in terms of the nonminimal-coupling parameter. This mass dependence allows the existence of several free cases including massless and tachyonic sources. There even exists a particular value of the nonminimal-coupling parameter for which the corresponding mass exactly compensates the contribution generated by the negative scalar curvature, producing a genuinely massless field in this curved background. The self-interacting case is studied in detail for the conformal coupling. The resulting gravitational wave is formed by the superposition of the free and the self-interaction contributions, except for a critical value of the coupling constant where a nonperturbative effect relating the strong and weak regimes of the source appears. We establish a correspondence between the scalar source supporting an AdS wave and a pp wave by showing that their respective pure radiation constraints are conformally related, while their involved backgrounds are not. Finally, we consider the AdS waves for topologically massive gravity and its limit to conformal gravity

  19. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, E; Riles, K

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors. (paper)

  20. The path to the enhanced and advanced LIGO gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J R

    2009-01-01

    We report on the status of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the plans and progress toward Enhanced and Advanced LIGO. The initial LIGO detectors have finished a two-year long data run during which a full year of triple-coincidence data was collected at design sensitivity. Much of this run was also coincident with the data runs of interferometers in Europe, GEO600 and Virgo. The joint analysis of data from this international network of detectors is ongoing. No gravitational wave signals have been detected in analyses completed to date. Currently two of the LIGO detectors are being upgraded to increase their sensitivity in a program called Enhanced LIGO. The Enhanced LIGO detectors will start another roughly one-year long data run with increased sensitivity in 2009. In parallel, construction of Advanced LIGO, a major upgrade to LIGO, has begun. Installation and commissioning of Advanced LIGO hardware at the LIGO sites will commence at the end of the Enhanced LIGO data run in 2011. When fully commissioned, the Advanced LIGO detectors will be ten times as sensitive as the initial LIGO detectors. Advanced LIGO is expected to make several gravitational-wave detections per year.

  1. GW170814: A three-detector observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole coalescence

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Biscans, S; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.

    2017-01-01

    On August 14, 2017 at 10:30:43 UTC, the Advanced Virgo detector and the two Advanced LIGO detectors coherently observed a transient gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar mass black holes, with a false-alarm-rate of ≾ 1 in 27000 years. The signal was observed with a three-detector network matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 18. The inferred masses of the initial black holes are 30.5^(+5.7)_(-3.0)M⊙ and 25.3^(+2.8)_(-4.2)M⊙ (at the 90% credible level). The lum...

  2. A report on the status of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewitson, M; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C

    2003-01-01

    GEO 600 is an interferometric gravitational wave detector with 600 m arms, which will employ a novel, dual-recycled optical scheme allowing its optical response to be tuned over a range of frequencies (from ∼100 Hz to a few kHz). Additional advanced technologies, such as multiple pendulum suspensions with monolithic bottom stages, make the anticipated sensitivity of GEO 600 comparable to initial detectors with kilometre arm lengths. This paper discusses briefly the design of GEO, reports on the status of the detector up to the end of 2002 with particular focus on participation in coincident engineering and science runs with LIGO detectors. The plans leading to a fully optimized detector and participation in future coincident science runs are briefly outlined

  3. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a χ 2 minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky

  4. Gravitational-wave confusion background from cosmological compact binaries: Implications for future terrestrial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regimbau, T.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave (GW) detector improves our ability to measure the characteristics of detected sources. It also increases the number of weak signals that contribute to the data. Because GW detectors have nearly all-sky sensitivity, they can be subject to a confusion limit: Many sources which cannot be distinguished may be measured simultaneously, defining a stochastic noise floor to the sensitivity. For GW detectors operating at present and for their planned upgrades, the projected event rate is sufficiently low that we are far from the confusion-limited regime. However, some detectors currently under discussion may have large enough reach to binary inspiral that they enter the confusion-limited regime. In this paper, we examine the binary inspiral confusion limit for terrestrial detectors. We consider a broad range of inspiral rates in the literature, several planned advanced gravitational-wave detectors, and the highly advanced 'Einstein telescope' design. Though most advanced detectors will not be impacted by this limit, the Einstein telescope with a very low-frequency 'seismic wall' may be subject to confusion noise. At a minimum, careful data analysis will be require to separate signals which will appear confused. This result should be borne in mind when designing highly advanced future instruments.

  5. Capacitive acoustic wave detector and method of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A capacitor having two substantially parallel conductive faces is acoustically coupled to a conductive sample end such that the sample face is one end of the capacitor. A non-contacting dielectric may serve as a spacer between the two conductive plates. The formed capacitor is connected to an LC oscillator circuit such as a Hartley oscillator circuit producing an output frequency which is a function of the capacitor spacing. This capacitance oscillates as the sample end coating is oscillated by an acoustic wave generated in the sample by a transmitting transducer. The electrical output can serve as an absolute indicator of acoustic wave displacement.

  6. Localization accuracy of compact binary coalescences detected by the third-generation gravitational-wave detectors and implication for cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Wen, Linqing

    2018-03-01

    We use the Fisher information matrix to investigate the angular resolution and luminosity distance uncertainty for coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs) and neutron star-black hole binaries (NSBHs) detected by the third-generation (3G) gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Our study focuses on an individual 3G detector and a network of up to four 3G detectors at different locations including the United States, Europe, China, and Australia for the proposed Einstein Telescope (ET) and Cosmic Explorer (CE) detectors. In particular, we examine the effect of the Earth's rotation, as GW signals from BNS and low-mass NSBH systems could be hours long for 3G detectors. In this case, an individual detector can be effectively treated as a detector network with long baselines formed by the trajectory of the detector as it rotates with the Earth. Therefore, a single detector or two-detector networks could also be used to localize the GW sources effectively. We find that a time-dependent antenna beam-pattern function can help better localize BNS and NSBH sources, especially edge-on ones. The medium angular resolution for one ET-D detector is around 150 deg2 for BNSs at a redshift of z =0.1 , which improves rapidly with a decreasing low-frequency cutoff flow in sensitivity. The medium angular resolution for a network of two CE detectors in the United States and Europe, respectively, is around 20 deg2 at z =0.2 for the simulated BNS and NSBH samples. While for a network of two ET-D detectors, the similar angular resolution can be achieved at a much higher redshift of z =0.5 . The angular resolution of a network of three detectors is mainly determined by the baselines between detectors regardless of the CE or ET detector type. The medium angular resolution of BNS for a network of three detectors of the ET-D or CE type in the United States, Europe, and Australia is around 10 deg2 at z =2 . We discuss the implications of our results for multimessenger astronomy and, in particular, for

  7. Constraints on cosmic strings from the LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors between 2005 and 2010, with over 625 days of live time. We find no evidence of GW signals from cosmic strings. From this result, we derive new constraints o...

  8. Full-waveform inversion of surface waves in exploration geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, D.; Gao, F.; Williamson, P.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a data fitting approach to estimate high-resolution properties of the Earth from seismic data by minimizing the misfit between observed and calculated seismograms. In land seismics, the source on the ground generates high-amplitude surface waves, which generally represent most of the energy recorded by ground sensors. Although surface waves are widely used in global seismology and engineering studies, they are typically treated as noise within the seismic exploration community since they mask deeper reflections from the intervals of exploration interest. This is mainly due to the fact that surface waves decay exponentially with depth and for a typical frequency range (≈[5-50] Hz) sample only the very shallow part of the subsurface, but also because they are much more sensitive to S-wave than P-wave velocities. In this study, we invert surface waves in the hope of using them as additional information for updating the near surface. In a heterogeneous medium, the main challenge of surface wave inversion is associated with their dispersive character, which makes it difficult to define a starting model for conventional FWI which can avoid cycle-skipping. The standard approach to dealing with this is by inverting the dispersion curves in the Fourier (f-k) domain to generate locally 1-D models, typically for the shear wavespeeds only. However this requires that the near-surface zone be more or less horizontally invariant over a sufficient distance for the spatial Fourier transform to be applicable. In regions with significant topography, such as foothills, this is not the case, so we revert to the time-space domain, but aim to minimize the differences of envelopes in the early stages of the inversion to resolve the cycle-skipping issue. Once the model is good enough, we revert to the classic waveform-difference inversion. We first present a few synthetic examples. We show that classical FWI might be trapped in a local minimum even for

  9. Long-wave Infrared Detectors for the Planetary Infrared Spectrometers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Understanding the role of primitive bodies as building blocks for planets and life are key targets for space exploration. Chemical and mineralogical...

  10. A gravitational wave detector operating beyond the quantum shot-noise limit: Squeezed light in application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Roman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews our recent progress on the generation of squeezed light [1], and also the recent squeezed-light enhancement of the gravitational wave detector GEO 600 [2]. GEO 600 is currently the only GW observatory operated by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in its search for gravitational waves. With the help of squeezed states of light it now operates with its best ever sensitivity, which not only proves the qualification of squeezed light as a key technology for future gravitational wave astronomy but also the usefulness of quantum entanglement.

  11. GW170814: A Three-Detector Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Afrough, M; Agarwal, B; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Amato, A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Angelova, S V; Antier, S; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atallah, D V; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; AultONeal, K; Austin, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Bae, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Banagiri, S; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barkett, K; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Barthelmy, S D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bawaj, M; Bayley, J C; Bazzan, M; Bécsy, B; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Bero, J J; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bode, N; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonilla, E; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bossie, K; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Canepa, M; Canizares, P; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Carney, M F; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerdá-Durán, P; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chase, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterjee, D; Chatziioannou, K; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chia, H; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, A K W; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Ciolfi, R; Cirelli, C E; Cirone, A; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Clearwater, P; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Cohen, D; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L R; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corban, P; Corbitt, T R; Cordero-Carrión, I; Corley, K R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Dálya, G; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; De, S; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Demos, N; Denker, T; Dent, T; De Pietri, R; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; De Rossi, C; DeSalvo, R; de Varona, O; Devenson, J; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Renzo, F; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; Dovale Álvarez, M; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Dreissigacker, C; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dupej, P; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Eisenstein, R A; Essick, R C; Estevez, D; Etienne, Z B; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fee, C; Fehrmann, H; Feicht, J; Fejer, M M; Fernandez-Galiana, A; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finstad, D; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fishbach, M; Fisher, R P; Fitz-Axen, M; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Font, J A; Forsyth, P W F; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Gaonkar, S G; Garcia-Quiros, C; Garufi, F; Gateley, B; Gaudio, S; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, D; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glover, L; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gomes, S; Goncharov, B; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Gretarsson, E M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Gruning, P; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Halim, O; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hamilton, E Z; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hannuksela, O A; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hinderer, T; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Horst, C; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Inta, R; Intini, G; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Junker, J; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kamai, B; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katolik, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kawabe, K; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kemball, A J; Kennedy, R; Kent, C; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J C; Kim, K; Kim, W; Kim, W S; Kim, Y-M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kinley-Hanlon, M; Kirchhoff, R; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Knowles, T D; Koch, P; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Krämer, C; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwang, S; Lackey, B D; Lai, K H; Landry, M; Lang, R N; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lanza, R K; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, H W; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Linker, S D; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Lo, R K L; Lockerbie, N A; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lumaca, D; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macas, R; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña Hernandez, I; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magaña Zertuche, L; Magee, R M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markakis, C; Markosyan, A S; Markowitz, A; Maros, E; Marquina, A; Marsh, P; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Mason, K; Massera, E; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matas, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McCuller, L; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McNeill, L; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Mejuto-Villa, E; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Milovich-Goff, M C; Minazzoli, O; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moffa, D; Moggi, A; Mogushi, K; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morisaki, S; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, A; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muñiz, E A; Muratore, M; Murray, P G; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Neilson, J; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Nevin, L; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Ng, K K Y; Nguyen, T T; Nichols, D; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; North, C; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; O'Dea, G D; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Okada, M A; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, R J; O'Reilly, B; Ormiston, R; Ortega, L F; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ossokine, S; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Page, M A; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B; Pang, P T H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Parida, A; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patil, M; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pirello, M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Porter, E K; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Pratten, G; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rajbhandari, B; Rakhmanov, M; Ramirez, K E; Ramos-Buades, A; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ren, W; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Ricker, P M; Rieger, S; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romel, C L; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Ross, M P; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Rutins, G; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sanchez, L E; Sanchis-Gual, N; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheel, M; Scheuer, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulte, B W; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seidel, E; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shah, A A; Shahriar, M S; Shaner, M B; Shao, L; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Somala, S; Son, E J; Sonnenberg, J A; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staats, K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Stops, D J; Strain, K A; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Strunk, A; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Suresh, J; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Tait, S C; Talbot, C; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Taracchini, A; Tasson, J D; Taylor, J A; Taylor, R; Tewari, S V; Theeg, T; Thies, F; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres-Forné, A; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tsang, K W; Tse, M; Tso, R; Tsukada, L; Tsuna, D; Tuyenbayev, D; Ueno, K; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walet, R; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J Z; Wang, W H; Wang, Y F; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessel, E K; Weßels, P; Westerweck, J; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Wilken, D; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Wofford, J; Wong, K W K; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wysocki, D M; Xiao, S; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, L; Yap, M J; Yazback, M; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zelenova, T; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y-H; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zimmerman, A B; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2017-10-06

    On August 14, 2017 at 10∶30:43 UTC, the Advanced Virgo detector and the two Advanced LIGO detectors coherently observed a transient gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar mass black holes, with a false-alarm rate of ≲1 in 27 000 years. The signal was observed with a three-detector network matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 18. The inferred masses of the initial black holes are 30.5_{-3.0}^{+5.7}M_{⊙} and 25.3_{-4.2}^{+2.8}M_{⊙} (at the 90% credible level). The luminosity distance of the source is 540_{-210}^{+130}  Mpc, corresponding to a redshift of z=0.11_{-0.04}^{+0.03}. A network of three detectors improves the sky localization of the source, reducing the area of the 90% credible region from 1160   deg^{2} using only the two LIGO detectors to 60  deg^{2} using all three detectors. For the first time, we can test the nature of gravitational-wave polarizations from the antenna response of the LIGO-Virgo network, thus enabling a new class of phenomenological tests of gravity.

  12. Superconducting Hot-Electron Submillimeter-Wave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting hot-electron bolometer has been built and tested as a prototype of high-sensitivity, rapid-response detectors of submillimeter-wavelength radiation. There are diverse potential applications for such detectors, a few examples being submillimeter spectroscopy for scientific research; detection of leaking gases; detection of explosive, chemical, and biological weapons; and medical imaging. This detector is a superconducting-transition- edge device. Like other such devices, it includes a superconducting bridge that has a low heat capacity and is maintained at a critical temperature (T(sub c)) at the lower end of its superconducting-transition temperature range. Incident photons cause transient increases in electron temperature through the superconducting-transition range, thereby yielding measurable increases in electrical resistance. In this case, T(sub c) = 6 K, which is approximately the upper limit of the operating-temperature range of silicon-based bolometers heretofore used routinely in many laboratories. However, whereas the response speed of a typical silicon- based laboratory bolometer is characterized by a frequency of the order of a kilohertz, the response speed of the present device is much higher characterized by a frequency of the order of 100 MHz. For this or any bolometer, a useful figure of merit that one seeks to minimize is (NEP)(tau exp 1/2), where NEP denotes the noise-equivalent power (NEP) and the response time. This figure of merit depends primarily on the heat capacity and, for a given heat capacity, is approximately invariant. As a consequence of this approximate invariance, in designing a device having a given heat capacity to be more sensitive (to have lower NEP), one must accept longer response time (slower response) or, conversely, in designing it to respond faster, one must accept lower sensitivity. Hence, further, in order to increase both the speed of response and the sensitivity, one must make the device very small in

  13. Influence of Cell Phone Waves on the Performance of HPGe Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.A.; Hassan, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Hand phone mobile waves search systems, constructed with high resolution germanium (HPGe) detectors, are currently being installed at locations worldwide. This reflects a general desire for improved performance and a reduction in the time to make a good decision in interdiction cases. An integrated gamma-ray spectrometer, incorporating a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector, digital signal processing electronics, MCA, and communications has been developed to meet the detection and environmental needs of these systems. The HPGe detectors are designed to have good low- and medium-energy detection efficiency and excellent spectral peak resolution in order to eliminate peak overlaps and thereby remove problems by common industrial and medical radionuclides found in all types of hand phone mobile. Systems using detectors with inferior resolution, regardless of efficiency, are unable to separate the radiation signals from NORM and illicit nuclides. The absolute full-energy peak efficiency of the detector and background count-rate in the peak energy region determine the signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements presented show the impact of shielding and masking on the performance of the hand phone mobile. The results illustrate applicability of the design to a variety of monitoring situations for the detection of illicit material. In the present work we studied the effects of different types of hand phone waves on the performance of 70% HPGe X and Gamma-ray detector. The detected interference has an energy range 30-100 keV. A correction battues was estimated as a function of time verses cell phone type.The measurement quality of the measurer gamma-spectra can be corrected at low X-ray region. The effect of these waves was also studied on the performance of the main detector amplifier. The results were obtained for Etesalat, Vodafone and Mobinile stations. The introduced method can be simulated for other devices having the same interference effect.

  14. Prospects for direct detection of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Chiba, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential impact of detecting the inflationary gravitational wave background by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors, such as DECIGO and BBO. The signal-to-noise ratio of each experiment is calculated for chaotic/natural/hybrid inflation models by using the precise predictions of the gravitational wave spectrum based on numerical calculations. We investigate the dependence of each inflation model on the reheating temperature which influences the amplitude and shape of the spectrum, and find that the gravitational waves could be detected for chaotic/natural inflation models with high reheating temperature. From the detection of the gravitational waves, a lower bound on the reheating temperature could be obtained. The implications of this lower bound on the reheating temperature for particle physics are also discussed.

  15. Systematic survey for monitor signals to reduce fake burst events in a gravitational-wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishidoshiro, Koji; Ando, Masaki; Tsubono, Kimio

    2006-01-01

    We present methods and results to reduce fake burst events induced by nonstationary noises. To reduce these fake events, we systematically surveyed monitor signals recorded with a main (or gravitational-wave) signal of a gravitational-wave detector so as to watch the detector. Our survey was to check whether or not there was a coincidence between the main and monitor signals when we found a burst event from the main signal. If there was a coincidence, we rejected this event as a fake event induced by nonstationary noises, regarding the main signal as being dominated by nonstationary noises. As a result, we succeeded to reject about 90% of the burst events of which the SNR values were larger than 10 as fake events, with an accidental probability of about 5% to reject burst-gravitational-wave candidates

  16. The Science benefits and preliminary design of the southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, D G; Barriga, P; Coward, D; Dumas, J-C; Fan, Y; Gras, S; Howell, E; Ju, L; Miao, H [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Brooks, A F; Hosken, D J; Munch, J; Veitch, P J [Department of Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 Australia (Australia); Charlton, P [School of Computing and Mathematics, Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678 (Australia); Galloway, D [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia); Hughes, S [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J [Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Melatos, A [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville Vic 3010 Australia (Australia)], E-mail: dgb@physics.uwa.edu.au (and others)

    2008-07-15

    The proposed southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO increases the projected average baseline of the global array of ground based gravitational wave detectors by a factor {approx}4. This allows the world array to be substantially improved. The orientation of AIGO allows much better resolution of both wave polarisations. This enables better distance estimates for inspiral events, allowing unambiguous optical identification of host galaxies for about 25% of neutron star binary inspiral events. This can allow Hubble Law estimation without optical identification of an outburst, and can also allow deep exposure imaging with electromagnetic telescopes to search for weak afterglows. This allows independent estimates of cosmological acceleration and dark energy as well as improved understanding of the physics of neutron star and black hole coalescences. This paper reviews and summarises the science benefits of AIGO and presents a preliminary conceptual design.

  17. The Science benefits and preliminary design of the southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D G; Barriga, P; Coward, D; Dumas, J-C; Fan, Y; Gras, S; Howell, E; Ju, L; Miao, H; Brooks, A F; Hosken, D J; Munch, J; Veitch, P J; Charlton, P; Galloway, D; Hughes, S; McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Melatos, A

    2008-01-01

    The proposed southern hemisphere gravitational wave detector AIGO increases the projected average baseline of the global array of ground based gravitational wave detectors by a factor ∼4. This allows the world array to be substantially improved. The orientation of AIGO allows much better resolution of both wave polarisations. This enables better distance estimates for inspiral events, allowing unambiguous optical identification of host galaxies for about 25% of neutron star binary inspiral events. This can allow Hubble Law estimation without optical identification of an outburst, and can also allow deep exposure imaging with electromagnetic telescopes to search for weak afterglows. This allows independent estimates of cosmological acceleration and dark energy as well as improved understanding of the physics of neutron star and black hole coalescences. This paper reviews and summarises the science benefits of AIGO and presents a preliminary conceptual design

  18. Parametric Instability in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Grass, S; Zhao, C; Degallaix, J; Blair, D G

    2006-01-01

    High frequency parametric instabilities in optical cavities are radiation pressure induced interactions between test mass mechanical modes and cavity optical modes. The parametric gain depends on the cavity power and the quality factor of the test mass internal modes (usually in ultrasonic frequency range), as well as the overlap integral for the mechanical and optical modes. In advanced laser interferometers which require high optical power and very low acoustic loss test masses, parametric instabilities could prevent interferometer operation if not suppressed. Here we review the problem of parametric instabilities in advanced detector configurations for different combinations of sapphire and fused silica test masses, and compare three methods for control or suppression of parametric instabilities-thermal tuning, surface damping and active feedback

  19. A noise model for the Brazilian gravitational wave detector 'Mario Schenberg'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajuca, Carlos; Ribeiro, Kilder L; Andrade, Luiz A; Aguiar, Odylio D; Magalhaes, Nadja S; Jr, Rubens de Melo Marinho

    2004-01-01

    'Mario Schenberg' is a spherical resonant-mass gravitational wave (GW) detector that will be part of a GW detection array of three detectors. The other two will be built in Italy and in The Netherlands. Their resonant frequencies will be around 3.2 kHz with a bandwidth of about 200 Hz. This range of frequencies is new in a field where the typical frequencies lay below 1 kHz, making the development of the mechanical system much more complex. In this work, a noise model of the detector is presented, where all main sources of noise were taken into account. The final goal is to calculate the expected sensitivity of the detector, analysing which parameters must be changed to improve this

  20. Towards a data and detector characterization robot for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, S D

    2002-01-01

    A change of non-astrophysical origin in the detector state or in the statistical nature of data while an interferometer is in lock reflects an abnormality. The change can manifest itself in many forms: transients, drifts in noise power spectral density, change in cross correlation between channels, etc. We advance the idea of an algorithm for detecting such change points whose design goal is reliable performance, i.e. a known false alarm rate, even when statistically unmodelled data such as those from the physical environmental monitors are included. Reliability is important since following up on such change points could be fairly labour intensive. Such an algorithm need not be simply a collection of isolated independent monitors running in parallel. We present the first design steps towards building this detector characterization robot along with some preliminary results and outline some possibilities for the future.

  1. Inherent Limitations in Mid-Wave and Long-Wave-IR Upconversion Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Tseng, Yu-Pei; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Inherent limitations in terms of optical losses, selection of nonlinear crystal(s), detection efficiency and pumping conditions in mid-wave (3-5 µm) and long-wave (8-12 µm) infrared frequency upconversion modules are investigated in this paper.......Inherent limitations in terms of optical losses, selection of nonlinear crystal(s), detection efficiency and pumping conditions in mid-wave (3-5 µm) and long-wave (8-12 µm) infrared frequency upconversion modules are investigated in this paper....

  2. A ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensor for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a system of four novel shadow detectors having, collectively, a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms) / √Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. The detectors were designed to monitor the vibrations of the 600 mm long, 400 μm diameter, silica suspension fibres of the mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors, at the resonances of the so-called Violin Modes (VM). The VM detection system described here had a target sensitivity of 100 pm (rms)/ √Hz at 500 Hz, together with, ultimately, a required detection span of ±0.1 mm about the mean position of each fibre—in order to compensate for potential slow drift over time of fibre position, due to mechanical relaxation. The full sensor system, comprising emitters (sources of illumination) and shadow detectors, therefore met these specifications. Using these sensors, VM resonances having amplitudes of 1.2 nm (rms) were detected in the suspension fibres of an Advanced LIGO dummy test-mass. The VM bandwidth of the sensor, determined by its transimpedance amplifier, was 226 Hz-8.93 kHz at the -3 dB points. This paper focuses mainly on the detector side of the shadow sensors. The emitters are described in an accompanying paper.

  3. Distributed state machine supervision for long-baseline gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, Jameson Graef

    2016-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two identical yet independent, widely separated, long-baseline gravitational-wave detectors. Each Advanced LIGO detector consists of complex optical-mechanical systems isolated from the ground by multiple layers of active seismic isolation, all controlled by hundreds of fast, digital, feedback control systems. This article describes a novel state machine-based automation platform developed to handle the automation and supervisory control challenges of these detectors. The platform, called Guardian, consists of distributed, independent, state machine automaton nodes organized hierarchically for full detector control. User code is written in standard Python and the platform is designed to facilitate the fast-paced development process associated with commissioning the complicated Advanced LIGO instruments. While developed specifically for the Advanced LIGO detectors, Guardian is a generic state machine automation platform that is useful for experimental control at all levels, from simple table-top setups to large-scale multi-million dollar facilities.

  4. Distributed state machine supervision for long-baseline gravitational-wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, Jameson Graef, E-mail: jameson.rollins@ligo.org [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) consists of two identical yet independent, widely separated, long-baseline gravitational-wave detectors. Each Advanced LIGO detector consists of complex optical-mechanical systems isolated from the ground by multiple layers of active seismic isolation, all controlled by hundreds of fast, digital, feedback control systems. This article describes a novel state machine-based automation platform developed to handle the automation and supervisory control challenges of these detectors. The platform, called Guardian, consists of distributed, independent, state machine automaton nodes organized hierarchically for full detector control. User code is written in standard Python and the platform is designed to facilitate the fast-paced development process associated with commissioning the complicated Advanced LIGO instruments. While developed specifically for the Advanced LIGO detectors, Guardian is a generic state machine automation platform that is useful for experimental control at all levels, from simple table-top setups to large-scale multi-million dollar facilities.

  5. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-02

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  6. P wave detector with PP rhythm tracking: evaluation in different arrhythmia contexts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portet, François

    2008-01-01

    Automatic detection of atrial activity (P waves) in an electrocardiogram (ECG) is a crucial task to diagnose the presence of arrhythmias. The P wave is difficult to detect and most of the approaches in the literature have been evaluated on normal sinus rhythms and rarely considered arrhythmia contexts other than atrial flutter and fibrillation. A novel knowledge-based P wave detector algorithm is presented. It is self-adaptive to the patient and able to deal with certain arrhythmias by tracking the PP rhythm. The detector has been tested on 12 records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database containing several ventricular and supra-ventricular arrhythmias. On the overall records, the detector demonstrates Se = 96.60% and Pr = 95.46%; for the normal sinus rhythm, it reaches Se = 97.76% and Pr = 96.80% and, in the case of Mobitz type II, it demonstrates Se = 72.79% and Pr = 99.51%. It also shows good performance for trigeminy and bigeminy, and outperforms some more sophisticated techniques. Although the results emphasize the difficulty of P wave detection in difficult arrhythmias (supra and ventricular tachycardias), it shows that domain knowledge can efficiently support signal processing techniques

  7. Astigmatism compensation in mode-cleaner cavities for the next generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, Pablo J. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)]. E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.au; Zhao Chunnong [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Blair, David G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2005-06-06

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use triangular ring cavities to filter spatial and frequency instabilities from the input laser beam. The next generation of interferometric detectors will use high laser power and greatly increased circulating power inside the cavities. The increased power inside the cavities increases thermal effects in their mirrors. The triangular configuration of conventional mode-cleaners creates an intrinsic astigmatism that can be corrected by using the thermal effects to advantage. In this Letter we show that an astigmatism free output beam can be created if the design parameters are correctly chosen.

  8. Astigmatism compensation in mode-cleaner cavities for the next generation of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, Pablo J.; Zhao Chunnong; Blair, David G.

    2005-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use triangular ring cavities to filter spatial and frequency instabilities from the input laser beam. The next generation of interferometric detectors will use high laser power and greatly increased circulating power inside the cavities. The increased power inside the cavities increases thermal effects in their mirrors. The triangular configuration of conventional mode-cleaners creates an intrinsic astigmatism that can be corrected by using the thermal effects to advantage. In this Letter we show that an astigmatism free output beam can be created if the design parameters are correctly chosen

  9. Comments on the 2001 run of the EXPLORER/NAUTILUS gravitational wave experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P; Babusci, D; Bassan, M; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Cavallari, G; Coccia, E; Cosmelli, C; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Frasca, S; Giordano, G; Marini, A; Minenkov, Y; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Pallottino, G V; Pizzella, G; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Visco, M

    2003-01-01

    The recently published analysis of the coincidences between the EXPLORER and NAUTILUS gravitational wave detectors in the year 2001 (Astone P et al 2002 Class. Quantum Grav. 19 5449) has drawn some criticism, reported at this workshop. We do not hold with these objections, even if we agree that no claim can be made with our data. The paper we published reports data of unprecedented quality and sets a new procedure for the coincidence search, which can be repeated by us and by other groups in order to search for the signature of possible signals. As for the reported coincidence excess, we remark that it is not destined to remain an intriguing observation for long: it will be confirmed or denied soon by interferometers and bars operating at their expected sensitivity

  10. Compact binary coalescences in the band of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As the ground-based gravitational-wave telescopes LIGO, Virgo and GEO 600 approach the era of first detections, we review the current knowledge of the coalescence rates and the mass and spin distributions of merging neutron-star and black-hole binaries. We emphasize the bi-directional connection between gravitational-wave astronomy and conventional astrophysics. Astrophysical input will make possible informed decisions about optimal detector configurations and search techniques. Meanwhile, rate upper limits, detected merger rates and the distribution of masses and spins measured by gravitational-wave searches will constrain astrophysical parameters through comparisons with astrophysical models. Future developments necessary to the success of gravitational-wave astronomy are discussed.

  11. Test the mergers of the primordial black holes by high frequency gravitational-wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Li-Li; Li, Jin [Chongqing University, Department of Physics, Chongqing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The black hole could have a primordial origin if its mass is less than 1M {sub CircleDot}. The mergers of these black hole binaries generate stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB). We investigate the SGWB in high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz. It can be detected by high frequency gravitational-wave detector. Energy density spectrum and amplitude of the SGWB are derived. The upper limit of the energy density spectrum is around 10{sup -7}. Also, the upper limit of the amplitude ranges from 10{sup -31.5} to 10{sup -29.5}. The fluctuation of spacetime origin from gravitational wave could give a fluctuation of the background electromagnetic field in a high frequency gravitational-wave detector. The signal photon flux generated by the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz is derived, which ranges from 1 to 10{sup 2} s{sup -1}. The comparison between the signal photon flux generated by relic gravitational waves (RGWs) and the SGWB is also discussed in this paper. It is shown that the signal photon flux generated by the RGW, which is predicted by the canonical single-field slow-roll inflation models, is sufficiently lower than the one generated by the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz. Our results indicate that the SGWB in the high frequency band 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} Hz is more likely to be detected by the high frequency gravitational-wave detector. (orig.)

  12. Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Coyne, D.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright gamma ray burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80--2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than ≅150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational-wave signal strength larger than a predetermined threshold. We report frequency-dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around ≅250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational-wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h RSS ≅6x10 -21 Hz -1/2 . Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and gamma ray bursts

  13. Control strategy to limit duty cycle impact of earthquakes on the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscans, S.; Warner, J.; Mittleman, R.; Buchanan, C.; Coughlin, M.; Evans, M.; Gabbard, H.; Harms, J.; Lantz, B.; Mukund, N.; Pele, A.; Pezerat, C.; Picart, P.; Radkins, H.; Shaffer, T.

    2018-03-01

    Advanced gravitational-wave detectors such as the laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatories (LIGO) require an unprecedented level of isolation from the ground. When in operation, they measure motion of less than 10‑19 m. Strong teleseismic events like earthquakes disrupt the proper functioning of the detectors, and result in a loss of data. An earthquake early-warning system, as well as a prediction model, have been developed to understand the impact of earthquakes on LIGO. This paper describes a control strategy to use this early-warning system to reduce the LIGO downtime by  ∼30%. It also presents a plan to implement this new earthquake configuration in the LIGO automation system.

  14. Effect of energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles on interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Okada, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Tsunesada, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the noise of interferometric gravitational wave detectors due to heat energy deposited by cosmic-ray particles. We derived a general formula that describes the response of a mirror against a cosmic-ray passage. We found that there are differences in the comic-ray responses (the dependence of temperature and cosmic-ray track position) in cases of interferometric and resonant gravitational wave detectors. The power spectral density of vibrations caused by low-energy secondary muons is 100 times smaller than the goal sensitivity of future second-generation interferometer projects, such as LCGT and Advanced LIGO. The arrival frequency of high-energy cosmic-ray muons that generate enough large showers inside mirrors of LCGT and Advanced LIGO is one per a millennium. We also discuss the probability of exotic-particle detection with interferometers.

  15. Exploring the Universe from a different angle

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, astrophysicists have explored the Universe thanks to electromagnetic waves. But one day it might be possible to observe it differently. That is what the hunters of gravitational waves hope, as they work on detectors such as EXPLORER at CERN.

  16. The gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS operating at T = 0.1 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P.; Bassan, M.; Bonifazi, P.

    1997-02-01

    They report on the ultralow-temperature resonant-mass gravitational-wave detector NAUTILUS operating at the Frascati INFN Laboratories. The present aim of this detector is to achieve a sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of gravitational radiation from sources located in our Galaxy and in the local group. Progress in transducer technology is likely to lead to sensitivities that will enable them to observe events from sources as far away as the Virgo cluster of galaxies. They describe the cryogenic apparatus, readout system cosmic-ray veto system, and give first results obtained during one year of continuous operation at T = 0.1 K. In particular the Brownian noise of the detector at T = 0.1 K was measured. The measured strain sensitivity was h-tilde ∼ 6 10 -22 Hz -1/2 at the frequencies of the two modes, 908 Hz and 924 Hz, with bandwidths of about 1 Hz

  17. Orthogonal ribbons for suspending test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.H.; Ju, L.; Blair, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    We show that a simple modification of proposed ribbon suspensions for laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors can substantially reduce the amplitude of violin modes at the expense of a small deterioration of suspension thermal noise. Using low loss fused silica, large amplitude peaks which cause dynamic range problems can be reduced by 21 dB. The total number of horizontal longitudinal direction violin modes below 5 kHz is reduced to less than half that expected with conventional ribbon suspensions

  18. Orthogonal ribbons for suspending test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.H. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)]. E-mail: bhl@physics.uwa.edu.au; Ju, L. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia); Blair, D.G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)

    2005-05-23

    We show that a simple modification of proposed ribbon suspensions for laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors can substantially reduce the amplitude of violin modes at the expense of a small deterioration of suspension thermal noise. Using low loss fused silica, large amplitude peaks which cause dynamic range problems can be reduced by 21 dB. The total number of horizontal longitudinal direction violin modes below 5 kHz is reduced to less than half that expected with conventional ribbon suspensions.

  19. Destruction of coherence in nondemolition monitoring: quantum 'watchdog effect' in gravity wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurek, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The author shows that nondemolition monitoring of a Weber bar may prevent changes of the number of phonons, and thus influence the sensitivity of quantum-counting gravity wave detectors. This effect is similar to the Watchdog Effect which is predicted to delay decays of the monitored, unstable quantum system. Relations between watchdog effect and Environment-Induced Superselection Rules as well as its connections to the fundamental questions of the quantum theory of measurement are briefly considered. (Auth.)

  20. Comparison of filters for detecting gravitational wave bursts in interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.; Pradier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Filters developed in order to detect short bursts of gravitational waves in interferometric detector outputs are compared according to three main points. Conventional receiver operating characteristics (ROC) are first built for all the considered filters and for three typical burst signals. Optimized ROC are shown for a simple pulse signal in order to estimate the best detection efficiency of the filters in the ideal case, while realistic ones obtained with filters working with several 'templates' show how detection efficiencies can be degraded in a practical implementation. Second, estimations of biases and statistical errors on the reconstruction of the time of arrival of pulse-like signals are then given for each filter. Such results are crucial for future coincidence studies between gravitational wave detectors but also with neutrino or optical detectors. As most of the filters require a pre-whitening of the detector noise, the sensitivity to a nonperfect noise whitening procedure is finally analyzed. For this purpose lines of various frequencies and amplitudes are added to a Gaussian white noise and the outputs of the filters are studied in order to monitor the excess of false alarms induced by the lines. The comparison of the performances of the different filters finally show that they are complementary rather than competitive

  1. Detector with internal gain for short-wave infrared ranging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2017-09-01

    Abstarct.Highly sensitive photon detectors are regarded as the key enabling elements in many applications. Due to the low photon energy at the short-wave infrared (SWIR), photon detection and imaging at this band are very challenging. As such, many efforts in photon detector research are directed toward improving the performance of the photon detectors operating in this wavelength range. To solve these problems, we have developed an electron-injection (EI) technique. The significance of this detection mechanism is that it can provide both high efficiency and high sensitivity at room temperature, a condition that is very difficult to achieve in conventional SWIR detectors. An EI detector offers an overall system-level sensitivity enhancement due to a feedback stabilized internal avalanche-free gain. Devices exhibit an excess noise of unity, operate in linear mode, require bias voltage of a few volts, and have a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. We review the material system, operating principle, and development of EI detectors. The shortcomings of the first-generation devices were addressed in the second-generation detectors. Measurement on second-generation devices showed a high-speed response of ˜6 ns rise time, low jitter of less than 20 ps, high amplification of more than 2000 (at optical power levels larger than a few nW), unity excess noise factor, and low leakage current (amplified dark current ˜10 nA at a bias voltage of -3 V and at room temperature. These characteristics make EI detectors a good candidate for high-resolution flash light detection and ranging (LiDAR) applications with millimeter scale depth resolution at longer ranges compared with conventional p-i-n diodes. Based on our experimentally measured device characteristics, we compare the performance of the EI detector with commercially available linear mode InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) as well as a p-i-n diode using a theoretical model. Flash LiDAR images obtained by our model show that the EI

  2. Ground-based gravitational wave interferometric detectors of the first and second generation: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losurdo, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The era of first-generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors is ending. No signals have been detected so far. However, remarkable results have been achieved: the design sensitivity has been approached (and in some cases even exceeded) together with the achievement of robustness and reliability; a world-wide network of detectors has been established; the data collected so far has allowed upper limits to be put on several types of sources; some second-generation technologies have been tested on these detectors. The scenario for the next few years is very exciting. The projects to upgrade LIGO and Virgo to second-generation interferometers, capable of increasing the detection rate by a factor of ∼1000, have been funded. The construction of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo has started. GEO600 has started the upgrade to GEO HF, introducing light squeezing for the first time on a large detector. LCGT has been partly funded and the construction of the vacuum system is underway. There is a possibility that the third Advanced LIGO interferometer will be constructed in India. So, a powerful worldwide network could be in operation by the end of the decade. In this paper, we review the results achieved so far and the perspectives for the advanced detectors. (paper)

  3. Quantum variational measurement and the optical lever intracavity topology of gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    The intracavity topologies of laser gravitational-wave detectors proposed several years ago are the promising way to obtain sensitivity of these devices significantly better than the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). In essence, the intracavity detector is a two-stage device where the end mirrors displacement created by the gravitational wave is transferred to the displacement of an additional local mirror by means of the optical rigidity. The local mirror positions have to be monitored by an additional local meter. It is evident that the local meter precision defines the sensitivity of the detector. To overcome the SQL, the quantum variational measurement can be used in the local meter. In this method a frequency-dependent correlation between the meter backaction noise and measurement noise is introduced, which allows us to eliminate the backaction noise component from the meter output signal. This correlation is created by means of an additional filter cavity. In this article the sensitivity limitations of this scheme imposed by the optical losses both in the local meter itself and in the filter cavity are estimated. It is shown that the main sensitivity limitation stems from the filter cavity losses. In order to overcome it, it is necessary to increase the filter cavity length. In a preliminary prototype experiment, an approximate 10 m long filter cavity can be used to obtain sensitivity approximately 2-3 times better than the SQL. For future Quantum Non-Demolition (QND) gravitational-wave detectors with sensitivity about 10 times better than the SQL, the filter cavity length should be within kilometer range

  4. Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters Using Kinetic Inductance Detectors for TolTEC and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Dober, B.; Gao, J.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Mauskopf, P.; McKenney, C. M.; Simon, S. M.; Ullom, J. N.; Vissers, M. R.; Wilson, G. W.

    2018-05-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) provide a compelling path forward to the large-format polarimeter, imaging, and spectrometer arrays needed for next-generation experiments in millimeter-wave cosmology and astronomy. We describe the development of feedhorn-coupled MKID detectors for the TolTEC millimeter-wave imaging polarimeter being constructed for the 50-m Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). Observations with TolTEC are planned to begin in early 2019. TolTEC will comprise ˜ 7000 polarization-sensitive MKIDs and will represent the first MKID arrays fabricated and deployed on monolithic 150 mm diameter silicon wafers—a critical step toward future large-scale experiments with over 10^5 detectors. TolTEC will operate in observational bands at 1.1, 1.4, and 2.0 mm and will use dichroic filters to define a physically independent focal plane for each passband, thus allowing the polarimeters to use simple, direct-absorption inductive structures that are impedance matched to incident radiation. This work is part of a larger program at NIST-Boulder to develop MKID-based detector technologies for use over a wide range of photon energies spanning millimeter-waves to X-rays. We present the detailed pixel layout and describe the methods, tools, and flexible design parameters that allow this solution to be optimized for use anywhere in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We also present measurements of prototype devices operating in the 1.1 mm band and compare the observed optical performance to that predicted from models and simulations.

  5. A ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensor for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a system of four novel shadow detectors having, collectively, a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms) / √Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. The detectors were designed to monitor the vibrations of the 600 mm long, 400 μm diameter, silica suspension fibres of the mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors, at the resonances of the so-called Violin Modes (VM). The VM detection system described here had a target sensitivity of 100 pm (rms)/ √Hz at 500 Hz, together with, ultimately, a required detection span of ±0.1 mm about the mean position of each fibre—in order to compensate for potential slow drift over time of fibre position, due to mechanical relaxation. The full sensor system, comprising emitters (sources of illumination) and shadow detectors, therefore met these specifications. Using these sensors, VM resonances having amplitudes of 1.2 nm (rms) were detected in the suspension fibres of an Advanced LIGO dummy test-mass. The VM bandwidth of the sensor, determined by its transimpedance amplifier, was 226 Hz–8.93 kHz at the −3 dB points. This paper focuses mainly on the detector side of the shadow sensors. The emitters are described in an accompanying paper. (paper)

  6. Design considerations for large detector arrays on submillimeter-wave telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Antony A.

    2000-07-01

    The emerging technology of large (approximately 10,000 pixel) submillimeter-wave bolometer arrays presents a novel optical design problem -- how can such arrays be fed by diffraction- limited telescope optics where the primary mirror is less than 100,000 wavelengths in diameter? Standard Cassegrain designs for radiotelescope optics exhibit focal surface curvature so large that detectors cannot be placed more than 25 beam diameters from the central ray. The problem is worse for Ritchey-Chretien designs, because these minimize coma while increasing field curvature. Classical aberrations, including coma, are usually dominated by diffraction in submillimeter- wave single dish telescopes. The telescope designer must consider (1) diffraction, (2) aberration, (3) curvature of field, (4) cross-polarization, (5) internal reflections, (6) the effect of blockages, (7) means of beam chopping on- and off-source, (8) gravitational and thermal deformations of the primary mirror, (9) the physical mounting of large detector packages, and (10) the effect of gravity and (11) vibration on those detectors. Simultaneous optimization of these considerations in the case of large detector arrays leads to telescopes that differ considerably from standard radiotelescope designs. Offset optics provide flexibility for mounting detectors, while eliminating blockage and internal reflections. Aberrations and cross-polarization can be the same as on-axis designs having the same diameter and focal length. Trade-offs include the complication of primary mirror homology and an increase in overall cost. A dramatic increase in usable field of view can be achieved using shaped optics. Solutions having one to six mirrors will be discussed, including possible six-mirror design for the proposed South Pole 10 m telescope.

  7. Image-based deep learning for classification of noise transients in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Cuoco, Elena

    2018-05-01

    The detection of gravitational waves has inaugurated the era of gravitational astronomy and opened new avenues for the multimessenger study of cosmic sources. Thanks to their sensitivity, the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo interferometers will probe a much larger volume of space and expand the capability of discovering new gravitational wave emitters. The characterization of these detectors is a primary task in order to recognize the main sources of noise and optimize the sensitivity of interferometers. Glitches are transient noise events that can impact the data quality of the interferometers and their classification is an important task for detector characterization. Deep learning techniques are a promising tool for the recognition and classification of glitches. We present a classification pipeline that exploits convolutional neural networks to classify glitches starting from their time-frequency evolution represented as images. We evaluated the classification accuracy on simulated glitches, showing that the proposed algorithm can automatically classify glitches on very fast timescales and with high accuracy, thus providing a promising tool for online detector characterization.

  8. Study on the performance of ZnO nanomaterial-based surface acoustic wave ultraviolet detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Wenbo; He, Yongning; Zhao, Xiaolong; Liu, Han; Kang, Xue; Wen, Changbao

    2013-01-01

    A ZnO nanomaterial-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) ultraviolet (UV) detector is highly desirable for UV radiation detection due to its high sensitivity. In this work, firstly the ZnO nanomaterial-based SAW UV detectors operating at three different frequencies (∼50, ∼100 and ∼200 MHz) were fabricated. Then, four ZnO nanomaterial sensing layers with different thicknesses were synthesized on the SAW UV detectors operating at ∼200 MHz. The morphology, crystallization and photoluminescence of ZnO nanomaterial sensing layers were characterized using the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectrometer, respectively. The SAW UV detectors based on different operating frequencies and ZnO nanomaterial sensing layer's thicknesses were exposed under UV illumination at a wavelength of 365 nm and their UV responses were measured. The experimental results indicate that the frequency shift of ZnO nanomaterial-based SAW UV detector can be significantly improved by increasing operating frequency or ZnO nanomaterial sensing layer's thickness. Furthermore, the detectors exhibit good selectivity of UV illumination, an ultrahigh UV sensitivity of about 9.6 ppm (µW cm −2 ) −1  and fast transient properties. The experimental results agree well with the acousto-electric effect theory. What deserves to be noted is that, under a UV intensity of 150 µW cm −2 , the frequency shift of the SAW UV detector operating at ∼50 MHz with a thin ZnO nanomaterial sensing layer was only ∼50 kHz while that of the SAW UV detector operating at ∼200 MHz with a thick ZnO nanomaterial sensing layer could reach ∼292 kHz. These results suggest the huge potential applications of ultra-sensitive ZnO nanomaterial-based SAW UV detectors for remote wireless UV and radiation monitoring. (paper)

  9. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D. A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10 -19 Hz -1/2 in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background

  10. Low-latency analysis pipeline for compact binary coalescences in the advanced gravitational wave detector era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T; Buskulic, D; Germain, V; Marion, F; Mours, B; Guidi, G M; Montani, M; Piergiovanni, F; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    The multi-band template analysis (MBTA) pipeline is a low-latency coincident analysis pipeline for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. MBTA runs with a low computational cost, and can identify candidate GW events online with a sub-minute latency. The low computational running cost of MBTA also makes it useful for data quality studies. Events detected by MBTA online can be used to alert astronomical partners for electromagnetic follow-up. We outline the current status of MBTA and give details of recent pipeline upgrades and validation tests that were performed in preparation for the first advanced detector observing period. The MBTA pipeline is ready for the outset of the advanced detector era and the exciting prospects it will bring. (paper)

  11. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  12. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  13. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O'Connor

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program

  14. Harsh-Environment Solid-State Gamma Detector for Down-hole Gas and Oil Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Sandvik; Stanislav Soloviev; Emad Andarawis; Ho-Young Cha; Jim Rose; Kevin Durocher; Robert Lyons; Bob Pieciuk; Jim Williams; David O' Connor

    2007-08-10

    The goal of this program was to develop a revolutionary solid-state gamma-ray detector suitable for use in down-hole gas and oil exploration. This advanced detector would employ wide-bandgap semiconductor technology to extend the gamma sensor's temperature capability up to 200 C as well as extended reliability, which significantly exceeds current designs based on photomultiplier tubes. In Phase II, project tasks were focused on optimization of the final APD design, growing and characterizing the full scintillator crystals of the selected composition, arranging the APD device packaging, developing the needed optical coupling between scintillator and APD, and characterizing the combined elements as a full detector system preparing for commercialization. What follows is a summary report from the second 18-month phase of this program.

  15. Control sideband generation for dual-recycled laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, B W; Miyakawa, O; Kawamura, S; Weinstein, A J; Ward, R; Vass, S; Strain, K A

    2006-01-01

    We present a discussion of the problems associated with generation of multiple control sidebands for length sensing and control of dual-recycled, cavity-enhanced Michelson interferometers and the motivation behind more complicated sideband generation methods. We focus on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer as a topological solution to the problem and present results from tests carried out at the Caltech 40 m prototype gravitational wave detector. The consequences for sensing and control for advanced interferometry are discussed, as are the implications for future interferometers such as Advanced LIGO

  16. Strategies for the control of parametric instability in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, L; Blair, D G; Zhao, C; Gras, S; Zhang, Z; Barriga, P; Miao, H; Fan, Y; Merrill, L

    2009-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have been predicted to occur in all advanced high optical power gravitational wave detectors. In this paper we review the problem of parametric instabilities, summarize the latest findings and assess various schemes proposed for their control. We show that non-resonant passive damping of test masses reduces parametric instability but has a noise penalty, and fails to suppress the Q-factor of many modes. Resonant passive damping is shown to have significant advantages but requires detailed modeling. An optical feedback mode suppression interferometer is proposed which is capable of suppressing all instabilities but requires experimental development.

  17. Strategies for the control of parametric instability in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, L; Blair, D G; Zhao, C; Gras, S; Zhang, Z; Barriga, P; Miao, H; Fan, Y; Merrill, L, E-mail: juli@physics.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2009-01-07

    Parametric instabilities have been predicted to occur in all advanced high optical power gravitational wave detectors. In this paper we review the problem of parametric instabilities, summarize the latest findings and assess various schemes proposed for their control. We show that non-resonant passive damping of test masses reduces parametric instability but has a noise penalty, and fails to suppress the Q-factor of many modes. Resonant passive damping is shown to have significant advantages but requires detailed modeling. An optical feedback mode suppression interferometer is proposed which is capable of suppressing all instabilities but requires experimental development.

  18. Space-based gravitational-wave detectors can determine the thermal history of the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Saito, Shun; Suwa, Yudai; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that space-based gravitational-wave detectors such as DECIGO and/or the Big Bang Observer will provide us with invaluable information on the cosmic thermal history after inflation, and they will be able to determine the reheat temperature T R provided that it lies in the range preferred by the cosmological gravitino problem, T R ∼10 5-9 GeV. Therefore it is strongly desired that they will be put into practice as soon as possible

  19. Optimizing the regimes of the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector for multiple source types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashov, I. S.; Simakov, D. A.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Danilishin, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    We developed algorithms which allow us to find regimes of the signal-recycled Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometer [for example, the Advanced Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO)], optimized concurrently for two (binary inspirals + bursts) and three (binary inspirals + bursts + millisecond pulsars) types of gravitational wave sources. We show that there exists a relatively large area in the interferometer parameters space where the detector sensitivity to the first two kinds of sources differs only by a few percent from the maximal ones for each kind of source. In particular, there exists a specific regime where this difference is ≅0.5% for both of them. Furthermore, we show that even more multipurpose regimes are also possible that provide significant sensitivity gain for millisecond pulsars with only minor sensitivity degradation for binary inspirals and bursts.

  20. Exploration of Wave Development during Yarn Transverse Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hudspeth

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Single yarns have been impacted in a transverse fashion so as to probe the characteristics of resulting wave development. Longitudinal wave speeds were tracked in efforts to directly measure the yarn tensile stiffness, resulting in a slight increase in the modulus of Kevlar® KM2 and Dyneema® SK76. Additionally, the load developed in AuTx® and Kevlar® KM2 yarns behind the longitudinal wave front has been recorded, providing additional verification for the Smith relations. Further effort to bolster the Smith equations has been successfully performed via tracking transverse wave speeds in AuTx® yarns over a range of impacting velocities. Additional emphasis has been placed at understanding the transverse wave development around the yarn critical velocity, demonstrating that there is a velocity zone where partial yarn failure is detected. Above the critical velocity, measurement of early time transverse wave speeds also agrees with the Smith solution, though the wave speed quickly reduces in value due to the drop in tensile stresses resulting from filament rupture. Finally, the Smith equations have been simplified and are compared to the Cunniff equation, which bear a striking resemblance. Due to such a resemblance, it is suggested that yarn critical velocity experiments can be performed on trial yarn material, and the effect of modifying yarn mechanical properties is discussed.

  1. Analysis of monochromatic signals by using data from the detector of Allegro gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fernanda Gomes de

    2010-01-01

    The present work is developed in the searching for monochromatic gravitational waves signals in ALLEGRO's data. We have two procedures for data analysis based on the periodogram of Welch, which a method for the detection of monochromatic signals in the middle of noise which basically makes power spectrum estimates using averaged modified periodograms. By using this method it was possible to obtain a power spectrum for the data which reinforce peaks due to monochromatic signals. The two procedures of analysis for the years 1997 and 1999, were focused on monitoring a peak that appears in the spectral density of ALLEGRO's detector, so called 'mystery mode' (near 887 Hz). We look for variations in the frequency of the mystery mode that agree with the variation of the Doppler effect. In the rst analysis we have used by the variation of daily and annual Doppler shift. For the second one, we have only searched annual Doppler shift. We have applied the periodogram of Welch in both tests in the raw data of the detector in the search for a real signal and we found some peaks that can be candidates of gravitational radiation only the second analysis. In order to test the method we used in both analysis a simulated gravitational wave signal modulated by the Doppler effect injected in the data. We detected in both methods the artificial signal of GW simulated. Therefore we have reason to conclude that both methods are efficient in the search for monochromatic signals. (author)

  2. Lower frequency companions for the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave interferometric detectors: an observational opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Recent x-ray and optical observations provide evidence for a population of intermediate mass black holes with masses of tens to thousands of solar masses. Dynamical braking in high stellar density regions may 'catalyze' the inspiral of heavy mass objects down to the million-year time scale. Black-hole binaries, with the masses implied by the observations, will plunge below 100 Hz. It may be technologically possible to build ground-based low frequency gravitational wave interferometric detectors optimized to detect these events and install them next to Advanced LIGO (AdL), within the existing LIGO facilities. This additional interferometer, operated coherently with AdL and Virgo, would greatly enhance the effectiveness of the existing interferometers by generating a wealth of triggers for potentially frequent but otherwise undetectable heavy mass inspirals. AdL would study, at higher frequency, the triggered, ultra-relativistic phases (merging and ringdown) of these inspirals. Comparisons are made between the expected detection performances of AdL in its proposed wide band tuning, as well as AdL in its best low frequency tuning, with a low frequency gravitational wave interferometric detector that is mechanically and optically optimized for operation at the lowest possible frequency. Finally, the synergies of tandem operation of AdL and the proposed low frequency interferometer have been considered

  3. Sagnac interferometer as a speed-meter-type, quantum-nondemolition gravitational-wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanbei

    2003-01-01

    According to quantum measurement theory, 'speed meters' - devices that measure the momentum, or speed, of free test masses - are immune to the standard quantum limit (SQL). It is shown that a Sagnac-interferometer gravitational-wave detector is a speed meter and therefore in principle it can beat the SQL by large amounts over a wide band of frequencies. It is shown, further, that, when one ignores optical losses, a signal-recycled Sag nac interferometer with Fabry-Perot arm cavities has precisely the same performance, for the same circulating light power, as the Michelson speed-meter interferometer recently invented and studied by Purdue and the author. The influence of optical losses is not studied, but it is plausible that they be fairly unimportant for the Sag nac interferometer, as for other speed meters. With squeezed vacuum (squeeze factor e -2R =0.1) injected into its dark port, the recycled Sag nac interferometer can beat the SQL by a factor √(10)≅3 over the frequency band 10 Hz c ∼820 kw as is to be used by the (quantum limited) second-generation Advanced LIGO interferometers--if other noise sources are made sufficiently small. It is concluded that the Sag nac optical configuration, with signal recycling and squeezed-vacuum injection, is an attractive candidate for third-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (LIGO-III and EURO)

  4. Sagnac interferometer as a speed-meter-type, quantum-nondemolition gravitational-wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbei

    2003-06-01

    According to quantum measurement theory, “speed meters”—devices that measure the momentum, or speed, of free test masses—are immune to the standard quantum limit (SQL). It is shown that a Sagnac-interferometer gravitational-wave detector is a speed meter and therefore in principle it can beat the SQL by large amounts over a wide band of frequencies. It is shown, further, that, when one ignores optical losses, a signal-recycled Sagnac interferometer with Fabry-Perot arm cavities has precisely the same performance, for the same circulating light power, as the Michelson speed-meter interferometer recently invented and studied by Purdue and the author. The influence of optical losses is not studied, but it is plausible that they be fairly unimportant for the Sagnac interferometer, as for other speed meters. With squeezed vacuum (squeeze factor e-2R=0.1) injected into its dark port, the recycled Sagnac interferometer can beat the SQL by a factor (10)≃3 over the frequency band 10 Hz≲f≲150 Hz using the same circulating power Ic˜820 kW as is to be used by the (quantum limited) second-generation Advanced LIGO interferometers—if other noise sources are made sufficiently small. It is concluded that the Sagnac optical configuration, with signal recycling and squeezed-vacuum injection, is an attractive candidate for third-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (LIGO-III and EURO).

  5. Constraining neutron-star tidal Love numbers with gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, Eanna E.; Hinderer, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Ground-based gravitational wave detectors may be able to constrain the nuclear equation of state using the early, low frequency portion of the signal of detected neutron star-neutron star inspirals. In this early adiabatic regime, the influence of a neutron star's internal structure on the phase of the waveform depends only on a single parameter λ of the star related to its tidal Love number, namely, the ratio of the induced quadrupole moment to the perturbing tidal gravitational field. We analyze the information obtainable from gravitational wave frequencies smaller than a cutoff frequency of 400 Hz, where corrections to the internal-structure signal are less than 10%. For an inspiral of two nonspinning 1.4M · neutron stars at a distance of 50 Megaparsecs, LIGO II detectors will be able to constrain λ to λ≤2.0x10 37 g cm 2 s 2 with 90% confidence. Fully relativistic stellar models show that the corresponding constraint on radius R for 1.4M · neutron stars would be R≤13.6 km (15.3 km) for a n=0.5 (n=1.0) polytrope with equation of state p∝ρ 1+1/n

  6. Classifier for gravitational-wave inspiral signals in nonideal single-detector data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, S. J.; Dent, T.; Dal Canton, T.

    2017-11-01

    We describe a multivariate classifier for candidate events in a templated search for gravitational-wave (GW) inspiral signals from neutron-star-black-hole (NS-BH) binaries, in data from ground-based detectors where sensitivity is limited by non-Gaussian noise transients. The standard signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and chi-squared test for inspiral searches use only properties of a single matched filter at the time of an event; instead, we propose a classifier using features derived from a bank of inspiral templates around the time of each event, and also from a search using approximate sine-Gaussian templates. The classifier thus extracts additional information from strain data to discriminate inspiral signals from noise transients. We evaluate a random forest classifier on a set of single-detector events obtained from realistic simulated advanced LIGO data, using simulated NS-BH signals added to the data. The new classifier detects a factor of 1.5-2 more signals at low false positive rates as compared to the standard "reweighted SNR" statistic, and does not require the chi-squared test to be computed. Conversely, if only the SNR and chi-squared values of single-detector events are available, random forest classification performs nearly identically to the reweighted SNR.

  7. How would GW150914 look with future gravitational wave detector networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, S. M.; Veitch, J.

    2017-09-01

    The first detected gravitational wave signal, GW150914 (Abbott et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 061102), was produced by the coalescence of a stellar-mass binary black hole. Along with the subsequent detection of GW151226, GW170104 and the candidate event LVT151012, this gives us evidence for a population of black hole binaries with component masses in the tens of solar masses (Abbott et al 2016 Phys. Rev. X 6 041015). As detector sensitivity improves, this type of source is expected to make a large contribution to the overall number of detections, but has received little attention compared to binary neutron star systems in studies of projected network performance. We simulate the observation of a system like GW150914 with different proposed network configurations, and study the precision of parameter estimates, particularly source location, orientation and masses. We find that the improvements to low frequency sensitivity that are expected with continued commissioning (Abbott et al 2016 Living Rev. Relativ. 19 1) will improve the precision of chirp mass estimates by an order of magnitude, whereas the improvements in sky location and orientation are driven by the expanded network configuration. This demonstrates that both sensitivity and number of detectors will be important factors in the scientific potential of second generation detector networks.

  8. Search algorithm for a gravitational wave signal in association with gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, S D; Marka, Sz; Rahkola, R; Mukherjee, S; Leonor, I; Frey, R; Cannizzo, J; Camp, J

    2004-01-01

    One of the brightest gamma ray bursts ever recorded, GRB030329, occurred during the second science run of the LIGO detectors. At that time, both interferometers at the Hanford, WA LIGO site were in lock and were acquiring data. The data collected from the two Hanford detectors were analysed for the presence of a gravitational wave signal associated with this GRB. This paper presents a detailed description of the search algorithm implemented in the current analysis

  9. Sensitivity Achieved by the LIGO and Virgo Gravitational Wave Detectors during LIGO's Sixth and Virgo's Second and Third Science Runs

    OpenAIRE

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for low-mass compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's sixth science run and Virgo's second and third science runs. We present strain noise power spectral densities (PSDs) which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors in these science runs. The data presented here and in the accompanying web-accessible data files are intended to be released to the public as a ...

  10. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Jade; Heng, Ik Siong; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Font, José A; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers. (paper)

  11. Exploration Technology Development including Surface Acoustic Wave RFID chips

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is focused on maturing future surface exploration technologies and instrumentation and working towards flight instrumentation and systems to support...

  12. Modelling the performance of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors with realistically imperfect optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Brett

    1998-12-01

    The LIGO project is part of a world-wide effort to detect the influx of Gravitational Waves upon the earth from astrophysical sources, via their interaction with laser beams in interferometric detectors that are designed for extraordinarily high sensitivity. Central to the successful performance of LIGO detectors is the quality of their optical components, and the efficient optimization of interferometer configuration parameters. To predict LIGO performance with optics possessing realistic imperfections, we have developed a numerical simulation program to compute the steady-state electric fields of a complete, coupled-cavity LIGO interferometer. The program can model a wide variety of deformations, including laser beam mismatch and/or misalignment, finite mirror size, mirror tilts, curvature distortions, mirror surface roughness, and substrate inhomogeneities. Important interferometer parameters are automatically optimized during program execution to achieve the best possible sensitivity for each new set of perturbed mirrors. This thesis includes investigations of two interferometer designs: the initial LIGO system, and an advanced LIGO configuration called Dual Recycling. For Initial-LIGO simulations, the program models carrier and sideband frequency beams to compute the explicit shot-noise-limited gravitational wave sensitivity of the interferometer. It is demonstrated that optics of exceptional quality (root-mean-square deformations of less than ~1 nm in the central mirror regions) are necessary to meet Initial-LIGO performance requirements, but that they can be feasibly met. It is also shown that improvements in mirror quality can substantially increase LIGO's sensitivity to selected astrophysical sources. For Dual Recycling, the program models gravitational- wave-induced sidebands over a range of frequencies to demonstrate that the tuned and narrow-banded signal responses predicted for this configuration can be achieved with imperfect optics. Dual Recycling

  13. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M.A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-01-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry–Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  14. Comparison of filters for gravitational wave burst detection by interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizouard, M-A; Arnaud, N; Barsuglia, M; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelbergh, S; Porter, E K; Pradier, T

    2003-01-01

    During the last few years, several filters have been developed for the detection of short gravitational waves. In this presentation we give the main results of a comparison of time domain filters using simulated noise data. This benchmark focused on three points: the filter efficiency versus the false alarm rate for different families of signals, the accuracy of the signal arrival time estimation and the robustness of the filters to a non-perfect whitening procedure of the detector noise. It has been shown that it is mandatory to use a battery of filters because their performance depends on the signal. Concerning the timing accuracy, one can expect a precision much smaller than 1 ms even for low signal-to-noise-ratio signals as long as the waveforms exhibit a well defined peak. Finally, we have determined the requirements on the data whitening procedure which are needed to be able to predict the false alarm rate

  15. Noise behavior of the Garching 30-meter prototype gravitational-wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, D.; Schilling, R.; Schnupp, L.; Winkler, W.; Maischberger, K.; Ruediger, A.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype gravitational-wave detector at Garching is described: in a laser-illuminated Michelson interferometer having arms 30 m in length, a folded optical path of 3 km is realized. The origin, action, and magnitude of possible noise sources are given. The agreement between the expected and measured noise is good. For a band of astrophysical interest, extending from 1 to 6 kHz, the quantum shot noise corresponding to a light power of P = 0.23 W is dominant. In terms of the dimensionless strain h the best sensitivity in a 1-kHz bandwidth is h = 3 x 10/sup -18/, comparable to the most sensitive Weber-bar-type antennas

  16. Quantum noise in laser-interferometer gravitational-wave detectors with a heterodyne readout scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Chen Yanbei; Mavalvala, Nergis

    2003-01-01

    We analyze and discuss the quantum noise in signal-recycled laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO, using a heterodyne readout scheme and taking into account the optomechanical dynamics. Contrary to homodyne detection, a heterodyne readout scheme can simultaneously measure more than one quadrature of the output field, providing an additional way of optimizing the interferometer sensitivity, but at the price of additional noise. Our analysis provides the framework needed to evaluate whether a homodyne or heterodyne readout scheme is more optimal for second generation interferometers from an astrophysical point of view. As a more theoretical outcome of our analysis, we show that as a consequence of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle the heterodyne scheme cannot convert conventional interferometers into (broadband) quantum non-demolition interferometers

  17. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M.A.; Brisson, V. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Casanueva, J., E-mail: casanuev@lal.in2p3.fr [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I. [ESPCI, CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Robinet, F. [LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Univ. Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France)

    2017-02-11

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry–Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  18. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M. A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry-Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  19. Comparison of filters for gravitational wave burst detection by interferometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizouard, M-A; Arnaud, N; Barsuglia, M; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelbergh, S; Porter, E K; Pradier, T [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, BP 34, Batiment 200, Campus d' Orsay, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2003-09-07

    During the last few years, several filters have been developed for the detection of short gravitational waves. In this presentation we give the main results of a comparison of time domain filters using simulated noise data. This benchmark focused on three points: the filter efficiency versus the false alarm rate for different families of signals, the accuracy of the signal arrival time estimation and the robustness of the filters to a non-perfect whitening procedure of the detector noise. It has been shown that it is mandatory to use a battery of filters because their performance depends on the signal. Concerning the timing accuracy, one can expect a precision much smaller than 1 ms even for low signal-to-noise-ratio signals as long as the waveforms exhibit a well defined peak. Finally, we have determined the requirements on the data whitening procedure which are needed to be able to predict the false alarm rate.

  20. Suspension-thermal noise in spring–antispring systems for future gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan; Mow-Lowry, Conor M.

    2018-01-01

    Spring–antispring systems have been investigated in the context of low-frequency seismic isolation in high-precision optical experiments. These systems provide the possibility to tune the fundamental resonance frequency to, in principle, arbitrarily low values, and at the same time maintain a compact design. It was argued though that thermal noise in spring–antispring systems would not be as small as one may naively expect from lowering the fundamental resonance frequency. In this paper, we present calculations of suspension-thermal noise for spring–antispring systems potentially relevant in future gravitational-wave detectors, i.e. the beam-balance tiltmeter, and the Roberts linkage. We find a concise expression of the suspension-thermal noise spectrum, which assumes a form very similar to the well-known expression for a simple pendulum. For systems such as the Roberts linkage foreseen as passive seismic isolation, we find that while they can provide strong seismic isolation due to a very low fundamental resonance frequency, their thermal noise is determined by the dimension of the system and is insensitive to fine-tunings of the geometry that can strongly influence the resonance frequency. By analogy, i.e. formal similarity of the equations of motion, this is true for all horizontal mechanical isolation systems with spring–antispring dynamics. This imposes strict requirements on mechanical spring–antispring systems for seismic isolation in potential future low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors as we discuss for the four main concepts, atom-interferometric, superconducting, torsion-bars, and conventional laser interferometer, and generally suggests that thermal noise needs to be evaluated carefully for high-precision experiments implementing spring–antispring dynamics.

  1. On Special Optical Modes and Thermal Issues in Advanced Gravitational Wave Interferometric Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinet Jean-Yves

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of present ground-based gravitational wave antennas is too low to detect many events per year. It has, therefore, been planned for years to build advanced detectors allowing actual astrophysical observations and investigations. In such advanced detectors, one major issue is to increase the laser power in order to reduce shot noise. However, this is useless if the thermal noise remains at the current level in the 100 Hz spectral region, where mirrors are the main contributors. Moreover, increasing the laser power gives rise to various spurious thermal effects in the same mirrors. The main goal of the present study is to discuss these issues versus the transverse structure of the readout beam, in order to allow comparison. A number of theoretical studies and experiments have been carried out, regarding thermal noise and thermal effects. We do not discuss experimental problems, but rather focus on some theoretical results in this context about arbitrary order Laguerre–Gauss beams, and other “exotic” beams.

  2. Wireless data transfer with mm-waves for future tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelikan, D.; Bingefors, N.; Brenner, R.; Gustafsson, L.; Dancila, D.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless data transfer has revolutionized the consumer market for the last decade generating many products equipped with transmitters and receivers for wireless data transfer. Wireless technology opens attractive possibilities for data transfer in future tracking detectors. The reduction of wires and connectors for data links is certainly beneficial both for the material budget and the reliability of the system. An advantage of wireless data transfer is the freedom of routing signals which today is particularly complicated when bringing the data the first 50 cm out of the tracker. With wireless links intelligence can be built into a tracker by introducing communication between tracking layers within a region of interest which would allow the construction of track primitives in real time. The wireless technology used in consumer products is however not suitable for tracker readouts. The low data transfer capacity of current 5 GHz transceivers and the relatively large feature sizes of the components is a disadvantage.Due to the requirement of high data rates in tracking detectors high bandwidth is required. The frequency band around 60 GHz turns out to be a very promising candidate for data transfer in a detector system. The high baseband frequency allows for data transfer in the order of several Gbit/s. Due to the small wavelength in the mm range only small structures are needed for the transmitting and receiving electronics. The 60 GHz frequency band is a strong candidate for future WLAN applications hence components are already starting to be available on the market.Patch antennas produced on flexible Printed Circuit Board substrate that can be used for wireless communication in future trackers are presented in this article. The antennas can be connected to transceivers for data transmission/reception or be connected by wave-guides to structures capable of bringing the 60 GHz signal behind boundaries. Results on simulation and fabrication of these antennas are

  3. Wireless data transfer with mm-waves for future tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikan, D.; Bingefors, N.; Brenner, R.; Dancila, D.; Gustafsson, L.

    2014-11-01

    Wireless data transfer has revolutionized the consumer market for the last decade generating many products equipped with transmitters and receivers for wireless data transfer. Wireless technology opens attractive possibilities for data transfer in future tracking detectors. The reduction of wires and connectors for data links is certainly beneficial both for the material budget and the reliability of the system. An advantage of wireless data transfer is the freedom of routing signals which today is particularly complicated when bringing the data the first 50 cm out of the tracker. With wireless links intelligence can be built into a tracker by introducing communication between tracking layers within a region of interest which would allow the construction of track primitives in real time. The wireless technology used in consumer products is however not suitable for tracker readouts. The low data transfer capacity of current 5 GHz transceivers and the relatively large feature sizes of the components is a disadvantage.Due to the requirement of high data rates in tracking detectors high bandwidth is required. The frequency band around 60 GHz turns out to be a very promising candidate for data transfer in a detector system. The high baseband frequency allows for data transfer in the order of several Gbit/s. Due to the small wavelength in the mm range only small structures are needed for the transmitting and receiving electronics. The 60 GHz frequency band is a strong candidate for future WLAN applications hence components are already starting to be available on the market.Patch antennas produced on flexible Printed Circuit Board substrate that can be used for wireless communication in future trackers are presented in this article. The antennas can be connected to transceivers for data transmission/reception or be connected by wave-guides to structures capable of bringing the 60 GHz signal behind boundaries. Results on simulation and fabrication of these antennas are

  4. Demonstration and comparison of tuned and detuned signal recycling in a large-scale gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hild, S; Grote, H; Hewtison, M; Lueck, H; Smith, J R; Strain, K A; Willke, B; Danzmann, K

    2007-01-01

    The British/German gravitational wave detector GEO 600 located near Hannover in Germany is the first large-scale gravitational-wave detector using the advanced technique of signal recycling. Currently the instrument operates in detuned signal recycling mode. Several problems arise due to the fact that the signal recycling cavity changes amplitude and phase of all light fields (carrier and sidebands) present at the dark-port. In addition, in the case of detuned signal recycling this leads to unbalanced sideband fields at the detector output. The large amplitude modulation caused by this asymmetry does not carry any gravitational wave information, but might be the cause of saturation and nonlinearities on the main photodiode. We developed and demonstrated a new control method to realize tuned signal recycling operation in a large-scale gravitational wave detector. A detailed comparison of tuned and detuned signal recycling operation is given. The response function of the system (optical gain) was measured and compared, as was the size of amplitude modulation on the main photodiode. Some important noise couplings were measured and partly found to be strongly reduced in the case of tuned signal recycling operation

  5. Low-noise mid-IR upconversion detector for improved IR-degenerate four-wave mixing gas sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Sahlberg, Anna-Lena

    2014-01-01

    -to-noise ratio. The two detectors are compared for the detection of a coherent degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) signal in the mid-infrared, and applied to measure trace-level acetylene in a gas flow at atmospheric pressure, probing its fundamental rovibrational transitions. In addition to lower noise...

  6. Geothermal exploration in the German Molasse Basin - Supplementary exploration using integrated 3-component data and shear wave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Lüschen, Ewald; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    To establish a dense area-wide network of geothermal facilities, the Stadtwerke München initiated the joint research project GRAME together with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (GeoParaMoL*). As a database for the project, a 3D seismic survey was acquired from November 1015 to March 2016 and covers 170 km2 of the southern part of Munich. 3D seismic exploration is a well-established method to explore geothermal reservoirs, and its value for reservoir characterization of the Malm has been proven by several projects. A particular challenge often is the determination of geophysical parameters for facies interpretation without any borehole information, which is needed for calibration. A new approach to facilitate a reliable interpretation is to include shear waves in the interpretation workflow, which helps to tie down the range of lithological and petrophysical parameters. Shear wave measurements were conducted during the regular 3D seismic survey in Munich. In a passive experiment, the survey was additionally recorded on 467 single, 3-component (3C), digital receivers that were deployed along one main line (15 km length) and two crosslines (4 km length). In this way another 3D P-wave as well as a 3D shear wave dataset were acquired. In the active shear wave experiment the SHOVER technique (Edelmann, 1981) was applied to directly excite shear waves using standard vertical vibrators. The 3C recordings of both datasets show, in addition to the P-wave reflections on the vertical component, clear shear-wave signals on the horizontal components. The structural image of the P-waves recorded on the vertical component of the 3C receivers displays clear reflectors within the Molasse Basin down to the Malm and correlates well with the structural image of the regular survey. Taking into account a travel time ratio of 1.6 the reflection patterns of horizontal and vertical components approximately coincide. This indicates that Molasse sediments and the Malm can also

  7. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, A.; Raffai, P.; Marka, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H.; Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Viboud, N.; Numata, K.; Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, ∼12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q∼2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q∼2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance (∼60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from ∼0.1to ∼50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation

  8. Detection in coincidence of gravitational wave bursts with a network of interferometric detectors: Geometric acceptance and timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Canitrot, Philippe; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Pradier, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    Detecting gravitational wave bursts (characterized by short durations and poorly modeled waveforms) requires coincidences between several interferometric detectors in order to reject nonstationary noise events. As the wave amplitude seen in a detector depends on its location with respect to the source direction and as the signal to noise ratio of these bursts is expected to be low, coincidences between antennas may not be very likely. This paper investigates this question from a statistical point of view by using a simple model of a network of detectors; it also estimates the timing precision of a detection in an interferometer, which is an important issue for the reconstruction of the source location based on time delays

  9. Characterisation of Low Frequency Gravitational Waves from Dual RF Coaxial-Cable Detector: Fractal Textured Dynamical 3-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have revealed that the Fresnel drag effect is not present in RF coaxial cables, contrary to a previous report. This enables a very sensitive, robust and compact detector, that is 1st order in v / c and using one clock, to detect the dynamical space passing the earth, revealing the sidereal rotation of the earth, together with significant wave / turbulence e ff ects. These are “gravitational waves”, and previously detected by Cahill 2006, using an Optical-Fibre – RF Coaxial Cable Detector, and Cahill 2009, using a preliminary version of the Dual RF Coaxial Cable Detector. The gravitational waves have a 1 / f spectrum, implying a fractal structure to the textured dynamical 3- space.

  10. Exploring the Birth and Evolution of the Universe: How Detectors Have Revolutionized Space Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    The past century has seen tremendous advances in the capability of instruments used for astronomical imaging and spectroscopy. Capabilities of instruments have expanded in many dimensions; the scale of telescopes has grown tremendously, the wavelengths used for astronomy have grown from visible light to the full electromagnetic spectrum, extending from gamma rays to low frequency radio waves. Additional advances have been enabled by the availability of space facilities, which eliminate the effects of the earths atmosphere and magnetosphere, and allow cooling of instruments to avoid instrumental thermal radiation. Even with all these advances, the increase in capability of detection systems has produced truly revolutionary improvements in capability. Today, I will describe the advances in astronomical detection from the photographic plates of the early 20th century to the giant high efficiency focal planes being developed for modern space and ground based astronomical instrument. I will review the demanding performance requirements set by space astronomy, and show how the detector community has risen to the challenge in producing high performance detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the James Webb Space Telescope, now under development.

  11. Coincident searches between high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves with ANTARES, VIRGO and LIGO detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhou, B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is the joint detection of gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos in a multi-messengers context. The neutrino and gravitational waves astronomies are still in the phase of development, but they are expected to play a fundamental role in the future. In fact, these messengers can travel big distances because of their weak interaction with matter (contrary to photons that at high energy are rapidly absorbed) without being affected by magnetic fields (contrary to charged cosmic rays). They can also escape dense media and provide information on the processes taking place in the heart of astrophysics sources. Particularly, GW+HEN multi-messenger astronomy may open a new observational window on the Universe. ANTARES collaboration has built a telescope of area 0.1 km 2 in the Mediterranean Sea for the detection of high energy neutrinos. This is the most sensitive telescope for the observed part of the sky. LIGO and VIRGO interferometers are ground-based detector for direct observation of gravitational waves, installed in Europe and the USA respectively. Instruments ANTARES, VIRGO and LIGO offer unrivaled sensitivity in the area of joint observation. The first chapter of this thesis introduces the theoretical motivations for GW+HEN search by developing different emission scenarios. The second and third chapters we give an overview of the experiments and review the data analysis tools. The fourth and fifth chapters of this work present the results of the analysis of the combined data from ANTARES, VIRGO and LIGO taken separately in 2007 and 2009-2010. (author)

  12. Making waves in seismic exploration software: Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    GMA International is in the business of developing and supplying geological, geophysical and petrophysical computer-aided exploration software products for use in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation world-wide. The company is headquartered in Calgary; it also has offices in Houston and London. It has over 5,500 installations and licensing arrangements with over 700 companies in 53 countries. This report details operating results during 1998, which included adding 77 new clients and the sale of over 300 new software licenses to new and existing clients. Consolidated balance sheets provide statements of earning (losses) and retained earnings, and changes in the company's financial position.

  13. Making waves in seismic exploration software: Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    GMA International is in the business of developing and supplying geological, geophysical and petrophysical computer-aided exploration software products for use in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation world-wide. The company is headquartered in Calgary; it also has offices in Houston and London. It has over 5,500 installations and licensing arrangements with over 700 companies in 53 countries. This report details operating results during 1998, which included adding 77 new clients and the sale of over 300 new software licenses to new and existing clients. Consolidated balance sheets provide statements of earning (losses) and retained earnings, and changes in the company`s financial position.

  14. Making waves in seismic exploration software: Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    GMA International is in the business of developing and supplying geological, geophysical and petrophysical computer-aided exploration software products for use in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation world-wide. The company is headquartered in Calgary; it also has offices in Houston and London. It has over 5,500 installations and licensing arrangements with over 700 companies in 53 countries. This report details operating results during 1998, which included adding 77 new clients and the sale of over 300 new software licenses to new and existing clients. Consolidated balance sheets provide statements of earning (losses) and retained earnings, and changes in the company's financial position

  15. Exploring stellar evolution with gravitational-wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorkin, Irina; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph

    2018-05-01

    Recent detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes opened new possibilities to study the evolution of massive stars and black hole formation. In particular, stellar evolution models may be constrained on the basis of the differences in the predicted distribution of black hole masses and redshifts. In this work we propose a framework that combines galaxy and stellar evolution models and use it to predict the detection rates of merging binary black holes for various stellar evolution models. We discuss the prospects of constraining the shape of the time delay distribution of merging binaries using just the observed distribution of chirp masses. Finally, we consider a generic model of primordial black hole formation and discuss the possibility of distinguishing it from stellar-origin black holes.

  16. Prospects for Detecting Gravitational Waves at 5 Hz with Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Martynov, Denis; Vitale, Salvatore; Evans, Matthew; Shoemaker, David; Barr, Bryan; Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Hough, James; Huttner, Sabina; Rowan, Sheila; Sorazu, Borja; Carbone, Ludovico; Freise, Andreas; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Dooley, Katherine L.; Fulda, Paul; Grote, Hartmut; Sigg, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    We propose an upgrade to Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), named LIGO-LF, that focuses on improving the sensitivity in the 5-30 Hz low-frequency band, and we explore the upgrade's astrophysical applications. We present a comprehensive study of the detector's technical noises and show that with technologies currently under development, such as interferometrically sensed seismometers and balanced-homodyne readout, LIGO-LF can reach the fundamental limits set by quantum and thermal noises down to 5 Hz. These technologies are also directly applicable to the future generation of detectors. We go on to consider this upgrade's implications for the astrophysical output of an aLIGO-like detector. A single LIGO-LF can detect mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) out to a redshift of z ≃6 and would be sensitive to intermediate-mass black holes up to 2000 M⊙. The detection rate of merging BHs will increase by a factor of 18 compared to aLIGO. Additionally, for a given source the chirp mass and total mass can be constrained 2 times better than aLIGO and the effective spin 3-5 times better than aLIGO. Furthermore, LIGO-LF enables the localization of coalescing binary neutron stars with an uncertainty solid angle 10 times smaller than that of aLIGO at 30 Hz and 4 times smaller when the entire signal is used. LIGO-LF also significantly enhances the probability of detecting other astrophysical phenomena including the tidal excitation of neutron star r modes and the gravitational memory effects.

  17. Prospects for Detecting Gravitational Waves at 5 Hz with Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Martynov, Denis; Vitale, Salvatore; Evans, Matthew; Shoemaker, David; Barr, Bryan; Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Hough, James; Huttner, Sabina; Rowan, Sheila; Sorazu, Borja; Carbone, Ludovico; Freise, Andreas; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Dooley, Katherine L; Fulda, Paul; Grote, Hartmut; Sigg, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    We propose an upgrade to Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), named LIGO-LF, that focuses on improving the sensitivity in the 5-30 Hz low-frequency band, and we explore the upgrade's astrophysical applications. We present a comprehensive study of the detector's technical noises and show that with technologies currently under development, such as interferometrically sensed seismometers and balanced-homodyne readout, LIGO-LF can reach the fundamental limits set by quantum and thermal noises down to 5 Hz. These technologies are also directly applicable to the future generation of detectors. We go on to consider this upgrade's implications for the astrophysical output of an aLIGO-like detector. A single LIGO-LF can detect mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) out to a redshift of z≃6 and would be sensitive to intermediate-mass black holes up to 2000  M_{⊙}. The detection rate of merging BHs will increase by a factor of 18 compared to aLIGO. Additionally, for a given source the chirp mass and total mass can be constrained 2 times better than aLIGO and the effective spin 3-5 times better than aLIGO. Furthermore, LIGO-LF enables the localization of coalescing binary neutron stars with an uncertainty solid angle 10 times smaller than that of aLIGO at 30 Hz and 4 times smaller when the entire signal is used. LIGO-LF also significantly enhances the probability of detecting other astrophysical phenomena including the tidal excitation of neutron star r modes and the gravitational memory effects.

  18. Time-delay interferometric ranging for space-borne gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Vallisneri, Michele; Armstrong, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Space-borne interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, sensitive in the low-frequency (mHz) band, will fly in the next decade. In these detectors, the spacecraft-to-spacecraft light-travel times will necessarily be unequal and time varying, and (because of aberration) will have different values on up- and down-links. In such unequal-armlength interferometers, laser-phase noise will be canceled by taking linear combinations of the laser-phase observables measured between pairs of spacecraft, appropriately time shifted by the light propagation times along the corresponding arms. This procedure, known as time-delay interferometry (TDI), requires an accurate knowledge of the light-time delays as functions of time. Here we propose a high-accuracy technique to estimate these time delays, and we study its use in the context of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. We refer to this ranging technique, which relies on the TDI combinations themselves, as time-delay interferometric ranging (TDIR). For every TDI combination, we show that, by minimizing the rms power in that combination (averaged over integration times ∼10 4 s) with respect to the time-delay parameters, we obtain estimates of the time delays accurate enough to cancel laser noise to a level well below the secondary noises. Thus TDIR allows the implementation of TDI without the use of dedicated interspacecraft ranging systems, with a potential simplification of the LISA design. In this paper we define the TDIR procedure formally, and we characterize its expected performance via simulations with the Synthetic LISA software package

  19. Advancements in Kinetic Inductance Detector, Spectrometer, and Amplifier Technologies for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, George

    The inductance of a conductor expresses its tendency to oppose a change in current flowing through it. For superconductors, in addition to the familiar magnetic inductance due to energy stored in the magnetic field generated by this current, kinetic inductance due to inertia of charge carriers is a significant and often dominant contribution to total inductance. Devices based on modifying the kinetic inductance of thin film superconductors have widespread application to millimeter-wave astronomy. Lithographically patterning such a film into a high quality factor resonator produces a high sensitivity photodetector known as a kinetic inductance detector (KID), which is sensitive to frequencies above the superconducting energy gap of the chosen material. Inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain and relatively simple to fabricate, KIDs pave the way to the large format focal plane array instruments necessary to conduct the next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB), star formation, and galaxy evolution studies. In addition, non-linear kinetic inductance can be exploited to develop traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifiers (TKIPs) based on superconducting delay lines to read out these instruments. I present my contributions to both large and small scale collaborative efforts to develop KID arrays, spectrometers integrated with KIDs, and TKIPs. I optimize a dual polarization TiN KID absorber for the next generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry, which is designed to investigate the role magnetic fields play in star formation. As part of an effort to demonstrate aluminum KIDs on sky for CMB polarimetry, I fabricate devices for three design variants. SuperSpec and WSpec are respectively the on-chip and waveguide implementations of a filter bank spectrometer concept designed for survey spectroscopy of high redshift galaxies. I provide a robust tool for characterizing the performance of all Super

  20. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  1. Coherent search of continuous gravitational wave signals: extension of the 5-vectors method to a network of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P; Colla, A; Frasca, S; Palomba, C; D'Antonio, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the extension to multiple datasets of a coherent method for the search of continuous gravitational wave signals, based on the computation of 5-vectors. In particular, we show how to coherently combine different datasets belonging to the same detector or to different detectors. In the latter case the coherent combination is the way to have the maximum increase in signal-to-noise ratio. If the datasets belong to the same detector the advantage comes mainly from the properties of a quantity called coherence which is helpful (in both cases, in fact) in rejecting false candidates. The method has been tested searching for simulated signals injected in Gaussian noise and the results of the simulations are discussed.

  2. Characterisation of Low Frequency Gravitational Waves from Dual RF Coaxial-Cable Detector: Fractal Textured Dynamical 3-Space

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that the Fresnel drag effect is not present in RF coaxial cables, contrary to a previous report. This enables a very sensitive, robust and compact detector, that is 1st order in v / c and using one clock, to detect the dynamical space passing the earth, revealing the sidereal rotation of the earth, together with significant wave / turbulence e ff ects. These are “gravitational waves”, and previously detected by Cahill ...

  3. Globally coherent short duration magnetic field transients and their effect on ground based gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalska-Leszczynska, Izabela; Bulik, Tomasz; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Robinet, Florent; Christensen, Nelson; Rohde, Maximilian; Coughlin, Michael; Gołkowski, Mark; Kubisz, Jerzy; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    It has been recognized that the magnetic fields from the Schumann resonances could affect the search for a stochastic gravitational-wave background by LIGO and Virgo. Presented here are the observations of short duration magnetic field transients that are coincident in the magnetometers at the LIGO and Virgo sites. Data from low-noise magnetometers in Poland and Colorado, USA, are also used and show short duration magnetic transients of global extent. We measure at least 2.3 coincident (between Poland and Colorado) magnetic transient events per day where one of the pulses exceeds 200 pT. Given the recently measured values of the magnetic coupling to differential arm motion for Advanced LIGO, there would be a few events per day that would appear simultaneously at the gravitational-wave detector sites and could move the test masses of order 10 −18 m. We confirm that in the advanced detector era short duration transient gravitational-wave searches must account for correlated magnetic field noise in the global detector network. (paper)

  4. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  5. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  6. Exploration of high harmonic fast wave heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; Le Blanc, B.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rosenberg, A.; Bonoli, P.; Mau, T.K.; Pinsker, R.I.; Raman, R.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.; Wilgen, J.

    2003-01-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, S. Neumeyer et al., in Proceedings of the 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 53] is such a device. An rf heating system has been installed on the NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge

  7. Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B.; Mau, T.K.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.I.; Raman, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Takase, Y.; Wilgen, J.

    2003-01-01

    High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge

  8. Exploring the three flavor effects with future superbeams using liquid argon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Prakash, Suprabh; Sankar, S. Uma

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurement of a moderately large value of θ 13 signifies an important breakthrough in establishing the standard three flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has provided an opportunity to explore the sub-dominant three flavor effects in present and future long-baseline experiments. In this paper, we perform a comparative study of the physics reach of two future superbeam facilities, LBNE and LBNO in their first phases of run, to resolve the issues of neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of θ 23 , and leptonic CP violation. We also find that the sensitivity of these future facilities can be improved significantly by adding the projected data from T2K and NOνA. Stand-alone LBNO setup with a 10 kt detector has a mass hierarchy discovery reach of more than 7σ, for the lowest allowed value of sin 2  θ 23 (true) = 0.34. This result is valid for any choice of true δ CP and hierarchy. LBNE10, in combination with T2K and NOνA, can achieve 3σ hierarchy discrimination for any choice of δ CP , sin 2  θ 23 , and hierarchy. The same combination can provide a 3σ octant resolution for sin 2  θ 23 (true) ≤ 0.44 or for sin 2  θ 23 (true) ≥ 0.58 for all values of δ CP (true). LBNO can give similar results with 10 kt detector mass. In their first phases, both LBNE10 and LBNO with 20 kt detector can establish leptonic CP violation for around 50% values of true δ CP at 2σ confidence level. In case of LBNE10, CP coverage at 3σ can be enhanced from 3% to 43% by combining T2K and NOνA data, assuming sin 2  θ 23 (true) = 0.5. For LBNO setup, CP violation discovery at 3σ is possible for 46% values of true δ CP if we add the data from T2K and NOνA

  9. Effect of eccentricity on searches for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries in ground-based detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Duncan A.; Zimmerman, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Inspiralling compact binaries are expected to circularize before their gravitational-wave signals reach the sensitive frequency band of ground-based detectors. Current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries using the LIGO and Virgo detectors therefore use circular templates to construct matched filters. Binary formation models have been proposed which suggest that some systems detectable by the LIGO-Virgo network may have non-negligible eccentricity. We investigate the ability of the restricted 3.5 post-Newtonian order TaylorF2 template bank, used by LIGO and Virgo to search for gravitational waves from compact binaries with masses M≤35M · , to detect binaries with nonzero eccentricity. We model the gravitational waves from eccentric binaries using the x-model post-Newtonian formalism proposed by Hinder et al.[I. Hinder, F. Hermann, P. Laguna, and D. Shoemaker, arXiv:0806.1037v1]. We find that small residual eccentricities (e 0 · · . For eccentricities e 0 > or approx. 0.1, the loss in matched filter signal-to-noise ratio due to eccentricity can be significant and so templates which include eccentric effects will be required to perform optimal searches for such systems.

  10. Coatings and surface treatments for enhanced performance suspensions for future gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birney, R.; Cumming, A. V.; Campsie, P.; Gibson, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hough, J.; Martin, I. W.; Reid, S.; Rowan, S.; Song, S.; Talbot, C.; Vine, D.; Wallace, G.

    2017-12-01

    Further improvements in the low frequency sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors are important for increasing the observable population of astrophysical sources, such as intermediate mass compact black hole binary systems. Improvements in the lower stage mirror and suspension systems will set challenging targets for the required thermal noise performance of the cantilever blade springs, which provide vertical softness and, thus, isolation to the mirror suspension stack. This is required due to the coupling between the vertical and horizontal axes due to the curvature of the Earth. This can be achieved through use of high mechanical Q materials, which are compatible with cryogenic cooling, such as crystalline silicon. However, such materials are brittle, posing further challenges for assembly/jointing and, more generally, for long-term robustness. Here, we report on experimental studies of the breaking strength of silicon at room temperature, via both tensile and 4-point flexural testing; and on the effects of various surface treatments and coatings on durability and strength. Single- and multi-layer DLC (diamond-like carbon) coatings, together with magnetron-sputtered silica and thermally-grown silica, are investigated, as are the effects of substrate preparation and argon plasma pre-treatment. Application of single- or multi-layer DLC coatings can significantly improve the failure stress of silicon flexures, in addition to improved robustness for handling (assessed through abrasion tests). Improvements of up to 80% in tensile strength, a twofold increase in flexural strength, in addition to a 6.4 times reduction in the vertical thermal noise contribution of the suspension stack at 10 Hz are reported (compared to current Advanced LIGO design). The use of silicon blade springs would also significantly reduce potential ‘crackling noise’ associated with the underlying discrete events associated with plastic deformation in loaded flexures.

  11. Feedforward correction of mirror misalignment fluctuations for the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J R; Grote, H; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Lueck, H; Parsons, M; Strain, K A; Willke, B

    2005-01-01

    The core instrument of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector is a Michelson interferometer with folded arms. The five main optics that form this interferometer are suspended in vacuum by triple pendulums with quasi-monolithic lower stages of fused silica. After installation of these pendulums in early 2003, a larger than expected coupling of longitudinal ground motion to tilt misalignment of the suspended optics was observed. Because of this, the uncontrolled misalignment of the optics during average conditions was several μrad Hz -1/2 in the frequency band around the pendulum resonance frequencies (0.5-4 Hz). In addition, it was found that longitudinal control signals applied to the intermediate pendulum stages also resulted in excessive mirror tilt. The resulting misalignment exceeded the level tolerable for stable operation of GEO 600. In order to reduce the level of mirror tilt, a bipartite feedforward system was implemented. One part feeds signals derived from seismic measurements to piezo-electric crystals in the stacks supporting the suspensions, reducing the longitudinal motion of the uppermost suspension points. The other applies tilt correction signals, derived from longitudinal control signals, to the intermediate level of the suspensions. The seismic feedforward correction reduces the root-mean-squared tilt misalignment of each main optic between 0.1 and 5 Hz by about 10 dB, typically. The intermediate-mass feedforward correction reduces the differential tilt misalignment of the Michelson interferometer by about 10 dB between 0.1 and 0.8 Hz, typically

  12. Development of a new scanning method for solid states track detector in the heavy nuclei explorer experiment (HNX-ECCO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, N.; Sekiguchi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Kitamura, T.; Tawara, H.; Doke, T.

    2001-01-01

    The HNX (Heavy Nuclear eXplorer) project has been tentatively accepted as one of the NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) Program. Purpose of this project is the measurement of abundances for heavy nuclei in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). This information will contribute to get a great knowledge for the origin of GCR. HNX has two large and high sensitive detectors, ENTICE (Energetic Trans-Ion Composition Experiment) and ECCO (Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer). ECCO experimental module consists the large BP-1 glass detectors (total area; 23 m 2 ), will collect the GCRs (∼2,000 events for Pt-group and ∼100 events for actinide) with its high charge resolution (<0.35 e) in space at least 3 years. We report the outline of HNX project and the new techniques for the measurement of large glass detectors. (author)

  13. Characterization of enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors and studies of numeric simulations for compact-binary coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekowsky, Larne

    Gravitational waves are a consequence of the general theory of relativity. Direct detection of such waves will provide a wealth of information about physics, astronomy, and cosmology. A worldwide effort is currently underway to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The global network of detectors includes the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which recently completed its sixth science run. A particularly promising source of gravitational waves is a binary system consisting of two neutron stars and/or black holes. As the objects orbit each other they emit gravitational radiation, lose energy, and spiral inwards. This produces a characteristic "chirp" signal for which we can search in the LIGO data. Currently this is done using matched-filter techniques, which correlate the detector data against analytic models of the emitted gravitational waves. Several choices must be made in constructing a search for signals from such binary coalescences. Any discrepancy between the signals and the models used will reduce the effectiveness of the matched filter. However, the analytic models are based on approximations which are not valid through the entire evolution of the binary. In recent years numerical relativity has had impressive success in simulating the final phases of the coalescence of binary black holes. While numerical relativity is too computationally expensive to use directly in the search, this progress has made it possible to perform realistic tests of the LIGO searches. The results of such tests can be used to improve the efficiency of searches. Conversely, noise in the LIGO and Virgo detectors can reduce the efficiency. This must be addressed by characterizing the quality of the data from the detectors, and removing from the analysis times that will be detrimental to the search. In this thesis we utilize recent results from numerical relativity to study both the degree to which analytic models match realistic waveforms

  14. Second-order spherical optoelectronic detector for 3D multi-particles wave emission and propagation in space time domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2017-09-01

    This paper concerns a feasibility study on a 2nd order spherical, or three-dimensional, angular momentum and linear momentum detector for photonic radiation applications. It has been developed in order to obtain a paraxial approximation of physical events observed under Coulomb gauge condition, which is essential to compute both the longitudinal and transverse rotational components of the observed 3-D vortex field, generally neglected by conventional detection systems under current usage. Since light and laser beams are neither full transversal or rotational phenomena, to measure directly and in the same time both the energy, mainly not-rotational, related to the relevant part of the linear momentum and the potential solenoidal energy (vortex), related to the angular momentum, 2nd order spherical, or 3-D, detector techniques are required. In addition, direct 2nd order measure techniques enable development of TEM + DEM [17] studies, therefore allowing for monochromatic complex wave detection with a paraxial accuracy in the relativistic time-space domain. Light and optic or Electromagnetic 2nd order 3-D AnM energy may usefully be used in tre-dimensional optical TEM, noTEM, DEM vortex or laser communications The paper illustrates an innovative quadratic order 3-D spherical model detector applied to directly measure a light source power spectrum and compares the performances of this innovative technique with those obtained with a traditional 1st order system. Results from a number of test experiments conducted in cooperation with INAF Observatories of ArcetriFlorence and Medicina-Bologna (Italy), and focused on telescopic observations of the inter-stellar electromagnetic radiations, are also summarized. The innovative quadratic-order spherical detector turns out to be optimal for optical and/or radio telescopes application, optical and optoelectronic sensors development and gravitational wave 2nd order detectors implementation. Although the proposed method is very

  15. Exploration of Pixelated detectors for double beta decay searches within the COBRA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenke, M., E-mail: schwenke@asp.tu-dresden.de [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Zuber, K.; Janutta, B. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, 01069 Dresden (Germany); He, Z.; Zeng, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Anton, G.; Michel, T.; Durst, J.; Lueck, F.; Gleixner, T. [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Goessling, C.; Schulz, O.; Koettig, T. [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Physik E IV, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Krawczynski, H.; Martin, J. [Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1105, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States); Stekl, I.; Cermak, P. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-09-11

    The aim of the COBRA experiment is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay events in Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) room temperature semiconductor detectors. The development of pixelated detectors provides the potential for clear event identification and thus major background reduction. The tracking option of a semiconductor is a unique approach in this field. For initial studies, several possible detector systems are considered with a special regard for low background applications: the large volume system Polaris with a pixelated CdZnTe sensor, Timepix detectors with Si and enriched CdTe sensor material and a CdZnTe pixel system developed at the Washington University in St. Louis, USA. For all detector systems first experimental background measurements taken at underground laboratories (Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in Italy, LNGS and the Niederniveau Messlabor Felsenkeller in Dresden, Germany) and additionally for the Timepix detectors simulation results are presented.

  16. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  17. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  18. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Jain, M. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Wicks, G.; Hossain, K. [Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); Golding, T. [Amethyst Research Ltd., Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Glasgow G20 0SP (United Kingdom); Amethyst Research, Inc., 123 Case Circle, Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 (United States); McEwan, K.; Howle, C. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  19. First joint Gravitational Waves search by the AURIGA-EXPLORER-NAUTILUS-Virgo collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Acernese, F; Amico, P; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Astone, P; Avino, S; Babusci, D; Baggio, L; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bassan, M; Bauer, T S; Bignotto, M; Bigotta, S; Birindelli, S; Bizouard, M A; Boccara, C; Bonaldi, M; Bondu, F; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Braccini, S; Brillet, A; Brisson, V; Buskulic, D; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Campagna, E; Camarda, M; Carbognani, F; Carelli, P; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cavallari, G; Cavanna, F; Cella, G; Cerdonio, M; Cesarini, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Clapson, A C; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Conti, L; Corda, C; Corsi, A; Cottone, F; Coulon, J P; Cuoco, E; D'Antonio, S; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; del Prete, M; De Rosa, R; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Virgilio, A; Drago, M; Dubath, F; Dujardin, B; Evans, M; Fafone, V; Falferi, P; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Foffa, S; Fortini, P; Fournier, J D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; GGemme; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Giordano, G; Giordano, L; Granata, V; Greverie, C; Grosjean, D; Guidi, G; Hamdani, S; Hebri, S; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Huet, D; Kreckelbergh, S; La Penna, P; Laval, M; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Liguori, N; Longo, S; López, B; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Mackowski, J M; Maggiore, M; Majorana, E; Marini, A; Man, C N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Menzinger, F; Mezzena, R; Minenkov, Y; Milano, L; Mion, A; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moins, C; Moleti, A; Moreau, J; Morgado, N; Mosca, S; Mours, B; Murtas, G P; Neri, I; Nocera, F; Ortolan, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palamara, O; Pallottino, G V; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Pardi, S; Parodi, R; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Piano Mortari, G; Piergiovanni, F; Pinard, L; Pizzella, G; Poggi, S; Poggiani, R; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; vander Putten, S; Quintieri, L; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Remillieux, A; Ricci, F; Ricciardi, I; Rocchi, A; Romano, R; Ronga, F; Ruggi, P; Russo, G; Salemi, F; Solimeno, S; Spallicci, A; Sturani, R; Taffarello, L; Tarallo, M; Terenzi, R; Tonelli, M; Toncelli, A; Torrioli, G; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Tremola, C; Vaccarone, R; Vajente, G; Vandoni, G; Vedovato, G; Van den Brand, J F J; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinante, A; Vinet, J Y; Visco, M; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Yvert, M; Zendri, J P

    2008-01-01

    We present results of the search for coincident burst excitations over a 24 hours long data set collected by AURIGA, EXPLORER, NAUTILUS and Virgo detectors during September 2005. The search of candidate triggers was performed independently on each of the data sets from single detectors. We looked for two-fold time coincidences between these candidates using an algorithm optimized for a given population of sources and we calculated the efficiency of detection through injections of templated signal waveforms into the streams of data. To this purpose we have considered the case of signals shaped as damped sinusoids coming from the galactic center direction. In this framework our method targets an optimal balance between high efficiency and low false alarm rate, aiming at setting confidence intervals as stringent as possible in terms of the rate of the selected source models.

  20. Exploring new frontiers in nuclear and particle physics with the STAR detector at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance collider detector scheduled to begin operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fall of 1999. In the sections which follow, details of the STAR detector and physics program, as well as the status of the RHIC construction project will be presented

  1. Radio-Wave Propagation in Salt Domes: Implications for a UHE Cosmic Neutrino Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, Alina-Mihaela; Saftoiu, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Salt deposits can be used as a natural dielectric medium for a UHE cosmic neutrino radio detector. Such a detector relies on the capability of reconstructing the initial characteristics of the cosmic neutrino from the measured radio electrical field produced at neutrino’s interaction in salt by the subsequent particle shower. A rigorous characterization of the propagation medium becomes compulsory. It is shown here that the amplitude of the electric field vector is attenuated by almost 90% after 100 m of propagation in a typical salt rock volume. The heterogeneities in salt also determine the minimal uncertainty (estimated at 19%) and the resolution of the detector

  2. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  3. Phase-dependent deterministic switching of magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise via compensation of demagnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Sourav, E-mail: sdutta38@gatech.edu; Naeemi, Azad [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A. [Components Research, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    The possibility of achieving phase-dependent deterministic switching of the magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise has been discussed. The proposed idea relies on the modification of the energy landscape by partially canceling the out-of-plane demagnetizing field and the resultant change in the intrinsic magnetization dynamics to drive the nanomagnet towards a preferential final magnetization state. The remarkable increase in the probability of successful switching can be accounted for by the shift in the location of the saddle point in the energy landscape and a resultant change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics of the magnetization from a highly precessional to a fairly damped one and an increased dependence on the initial magnetization values, a crucial requirement for phase-dependent spin wave detection.

  4. Measurements of the Young's modulus of hydroxide catalysis bonds, and the effect on thermal noise in ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Margot; van Veggel, Anna-Maria; Hough, James; Messenger, Chris; Hughes, David; Cunningham, William; Haughian, Karen; Rowan, Sheila

    2018-05-01

    With the outstanding results from the detection and observation of gravitational waves from coalescing black holes and neutron star inspirals, it is essential that pathways to further improve the sensitivities of the LIGO and VIRGO detectors are explored. There are a number of factors that potentially limit the sensitivities of the detectors. One such factor is thermal noise, a component of which results from the mechanical loss in the bond material between the silica fibre suspensions and the test mass mirrors. To calculate its magnitude, the Young's modulus of the bond material has to be known with reasonable accuracy. In this paper we present a new combination of ultrasonic technology and Bayesian analysis to measure the Young's modulus of hydroxide catalysis bonds between fused silica substrates. Using this novel technique, we measure the bond Young's modulus to be 18.5 ±2.32.0 GPa . We show that by applying this value to thermal noise models of bonded test masses with suitable attachment geometries, a reduction in suspension thermal noise consistent with an overall design sensitivity improvement allows a factor of 5 increase in event rate to be achieved.

  5. Large diameter lithium compensated silicon detectors for the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allbritton, G.L.; Andersen, H.; Barnes, A.

    1996-01-01

    Fabrication of the 100 mm diameter, 3 mm thick lithium-compensated silicon, Si(Li), detectors for the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) instrument on board the ACE satellite required development of new float-zone silicon growing techniques, new Si(Li) fabrication procedures, and new particle beam testing sequences. These developments are discussed and results are presented that illustrate the advances made in realizing these CRIS Si(Li) detectors, which, when operational in the CRIS detector telescopes, will usher in a new generation of cosmic-ray isotope spectrometers

  6. The advanced cosmic microwave explorer - A millimeter-wave telescope and stabilized platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhold, P. R.; Chingcuanco, A. O.; Gundersen, J. O.; Schuster, J. A.; Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Morris, D.; Villela, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed and flown a 1 m diameter Gregorian telescope system for measurements of anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). The telescope is incorporated in a balloon-borne stabilized platform with arcminute stabilization capability. To date, the system has flown four times and observed from the ground at the South Pole twice. The telescope has used both coherent and incoherent detectors. We describe the development of the telescope, pointing platform, and one of the receivers employed in making measurements of the CBR. Performance of the system during the first flight and operation on the ground at the South Pole are described, and the quality of the South Pole as a millimeter wave observing site is discussed.

  7. Search for gravitational waves associated with GRB 050915a using the Virgo detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acernese, F.; Bauer, T.; Russo, G.; van den Brand, J.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the expected association between gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves, we present results of an analysis aimed to search for a burst of gravitational waves in coincidence with gamma-ray burst 050915a. This was a long duration gamma-ray burst detected by Swift during September

  8. Constraining Nonperturbative Strong-Field Effects in Scalar-Tensor Gravity by Combining Pulsar Timing and Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing Shao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsar timing and laser-interferometer gravitational-wave (GW detectors are superb laboratories to study gravity theories in the strong-field regime. Here, we combine these tools to test the mono-scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Farèse (DEF, which predicts nonperturbative scalarization phenomena for neutron stars (NSs. First, applying Markov-chain Monte Carlo techniques, we use the absence of dipolar radiation in the pulsar-timing observations of five binary systems composed of a NS and a white dwarf, and eleven equations of state (EOSs for NSs, to derive the most stringent constraints on the two free parameters of the DEF scalar-tensor theory. Since the binary-pulsar bounds depend on the NS mass and the EOS, we find that current pulsar-timing observations leave scalarization windows, i.e., regions of parameter space where scalarization can still be prominent. Then, we investigate if these scalarization windows could be closed and if pulsar-timing constraints could be improved by laser-interferometer GW detectors, when spontaneous (or dynamical scalarization sets in during the early (or late stages of a binary NS (BNS evolution. For the early inspiral of a BNS carrying constant scalar charge, we employ a Fisher-matrix analysis to show that Advanced LIGO can improve pulsar-timing constraints for some EOSs, and next-generation detectors, such as the Cosmic Explorer and Einstein Telescope, will be able to improve those bounds for all eleven EOSs. Using the late inspiral of a BNS, we estimate that for some of the EOSs under consideration, the onset of dynamical scalarization can happen early enough to improve the constraints on the DEF parameters obtained by combining the five binary pulsars. Thus, in the near future, the complementarity of pulsar timing and direct observations of GWs on the ground will be extremely valuable in probing gravity theories in the strong-field regime.

  9. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  10. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, G; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Archibald, A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arzoumanian, Z [CRESST/USRA, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Backer, D [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Burgay, M [Universita di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, SP Monserrato-Sestu km 0.7, 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Ferdman, R D [Station de Radioastronomie de Nanay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Coles, W [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Cordes, J [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Demorest, P [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Finn, L [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Freire, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, J [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 403, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hotan, A, E-mail: george.hobbs@csiro.a [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Bentley, WA (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (approx 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to search for gravitational waves emitted from coalescing supermassive binary black-hole systems in the centres of merging galaxies and discuss the status of the project.

  11. Exploration of auditory P50 gating in schizophrenia by way of difference waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M

    2006-01-01

    potentials but here this method along with low frequency filtering is applied exploratory on auditory P50 gating data, previously analyzed in the standard format (reported in Am J Psychiatry 2003, 160:2236-8). The exploration was motivated by the observation during visual peak detection that the AEP waveform......Electroencephalographic measures of information processing encompass both mid-latency evoked potentials like the pre-attentive auditory P50 potential and a host of later more cognitive components like P300 and N400.Difference waves have mostly been employed in studies of later event related...

  12. Comment on "Hearing the signal of dark sectors with gravitational wave detectors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da; Lu, Bo-Qiang

    2018-03-01

    We revisit the calculation of the gravitational wave spectra generated in a classically scale-invariant S U (2 ) gauge sector with a scalar field in the adjoint representation, as discussed by J. Jaeckel, et al. The finite-temperature potential at 1-loop level can induce a strong first-order phase transition, during which gravitational waves can be generated. With the accurate numerical computation of the on-shell Euclidean actions of the nucleation bubbles, we find that the triangle approximation employed by J. Jaeckel et al. strongly distorts the actual potential near its maximum and thus greatly underestimates the action values. As a result, the gravitational wave spectra predicted by J. Jaeckel et al. deviate significantly from the exact ones in peak frequencies and shapes.

  13. A photon pressure calibrator for the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossavi, K.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Seifert, F.; Weiland, U.; Smith, J.R.; Lueck, H.; Grote, H.; Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    Interferometer mirror displacement induced by radiation pressure is used to demonstrate an alternative calibration method for the GEO 600 detector. The photon calibrator utilizes an amplitude modulated laser diode with up to 1.4 W output power at a wavelength of 1035 nm. The achieved accuracy of the strain amplitude calibration is dominated by the laser power calibration error, which is in the range of ±4% for the measurements presented in this Letter

  14. Status report and near future prospects for the gravitational wave detector AURIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zendri, J-P; Baggio, L; Bignotto, M; Bonaldi, M; Cerdonio, M; Conti, L; Rosa, M De; Falferi, P; Fortini, P L; Inguscio, M; Marin, A; Marin, F; Mezzena, R; Ortolan, A; Prodi, G A; Rocco, E; Salemi, F; Soranzo, G; Taffarello, L; Vedovato, G; Vinante, A; Vitale, S

    2002-01-01

    We describe the experimental efforts to set up the second AURIGA run. Thanks to the upgraded capacitive readout, fully characterized and optimized in a dedicated facility, we predict an improvement in the detector sensitivity and bandwidth by at least one order of magnitude. In the second run, AURIGA will also benefit from newly designed cryogenic mechanical suspensions and the upgraded data acquisition and data analysis

  15. The optimal approach of detecting stochastic gravitational wave from string cosmology using multiple detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xilong; Zhu Zonghong

    2008-01-01

    String cosmology models predict a relic background of gravitational wave produced during the dilaton-driven inflation. It's spectrum is most likely to be detected by ground gravitational wave laser interferometers (IFOs), like LIGO, Virgo, GEO, as the energy density grows rapidly with frequency. We show the certain ranges of the parameters that underlying string cosmology model using two approaches, associated with 5% false alarm and 95% detection rate. The result presents that the approach of combining multiple pairs of IFOs is better than the approach of directly combining the outputs of multiple IFOs for LIGOH, LIGOL, Virgo and GEO

  16. Host galaxy identification for binary black hole mergers with long baseline gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, E. J.; Chan, M. L.; Chu, Q.; Jones, D. H.; Heng, I. S.; Lee, H.-M.; Blair, D.; Degallaix, J.; Regimbau, T.; Miao, H.; Zhao, C.; Hendry, M.; Coward, D.; Messenger, C.; Ju, L.; Zhu, Z.-H.

    2018-03-01

    The detection of black hole binary coalescence events by Advanced LIGO allows the science benefits of future detectors to be evaluated. In this paper, we report the science benefits of one or two 8 km arm length detectors based on the doubling of key parameters in an Advanced LIGO-type detector, combined with realizable enhancements. It is shown that the total detection rate for sources similar to those already detected would increase to ˜ 103-105 per year. Within 0.4 Gpc, we find that around 10 of these events would be localizable to within ˜10-1 deg2. This is sufficient to make unique associations or to rule out a direct association with the brightest galaxies in optical surveys (at r-band magnitudes of 17 or above) or for deeper limits (down to r-band magnitudes of 20) yield statistically significant associations. The combination of angular resolution and event rate would benefit precision testing of formation models, cosmic evolution, and cosmological studies.

  17. Real-time Automatic Detectors of P and S Waves Using Singular Values Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzon, I.; Vernon, F.; Rosenberger, A.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We implement a new method for the automatic detection of the primary P and S phases using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis. The method is based on a real-time iteration algorithm of Rosenberger (2010) for the SVD of three component seismograms. Rosenberger's algorithm identifies the incidence angle by applying SVD and separates the waveforms into their P and S components. We have been using the same algorithm with the modification that we filter the waveforms prior to the SVD, and then apply SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio) detectors for picking the P and S arrivals, on the new filtered+SVD-separated channels. A recent deployment in San Jacinto Fault Zone area provides a very dense seismic network that allows us to test the detection algorithm in diverse setting, such as: events with different source mechanisms, stations with different site characteristics, and ray paths that diverge from the SVD approximation used in the algorithm, (e.g., rays propagating within the fault and recorded on linear arrays, crossing the fault). We have found that a Butterworth band-pass filter of 2-30Hz, with four poles at each of the corner frequencies, shows the best performance in a large variety of events and stations within the SJFZ. Using the SVD detectors we obtain a similar number of P and S picks, which is a rare thing to see in ordinary SNR detectors. Also for the actual real-time operation of the ANZA and SJFZ real-time seismic networks, the above filter (2-30Hz) shows a very impressive performance, tested on many events and several aftershock sequences in the region from the MW 5.2 of June 2005, through the MW 5.4 of July 2010, to MW 4.7 of March 2013. Here we show the results of testing the detectors on the most complex and intense aftershock sequence, the MW 5.2 of June 2005, in which in the very first hour there were ~4 events a minute. This aftershock sequence was thoroughly reviewed by several analysts, identifying 294 events in the first hour, located in a

  18. Constraints on Cosmic Strings from the LIGO-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aasi, J.; Agathos, M.; Beker, M.G.; Bertolini, A.; Blom, M.R.; Bulten, H.J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Jonker, R.; Li, T.G.F.; Meidam, J.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; van der Putten, S.; LIGO Sci, Collaboration; Virgo, Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings can give rise to a large variety of interesting astrophysical phenomena. Among them, powerful bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) produced by cusps are a promising observational signature. In this Letter we present a search for GWs from cosmic string cusps in data collected by the

  19. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, G.; Archibald, A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Cognard, I.; Coles, W.; Cordes, J.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R.D.; Finn, L.; Freire, P.; Gonzalez, M.; Hessels, J.; Hotan, A.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Kaspi, V.; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Lazio, J.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K.J.; Levin, Y.; Lommen, A.; Lorimer, D.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.; Ransom, S.; Reynolds, J.; Sanidas, S.; Sarkissian, J.; Sesana, A.; Shannon, R.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Theureau, G.; van Haasteren, R.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Yardley, D.R.B.; You, X.P.

    2010-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (similar to 10(-9)-10(-8) Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to

  20. Increasing sensitivity and angle-of-view of mid-wave infrared detectors by integration with dielectric microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Kenneth W., E-mail: kenneth.allen@gtri.gatech.edu; Astratov, Vasily N., E-mail: astratov@uncc.edu [Department of Physics and Optical Science, Center for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223-0001 (United States); Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States); Abolmaali, Farzaneh [Department of Physics and Optical Science, Center for Optoelectronics and Optical Communications, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223-0001 (United States); Duran, Joshua M.; Ariyawansa, Gamini; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Urbas, Augustine M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    We observed up to 100 times enhancement of sensitivity of mid-wave infrared photodetectors in the 2–5 μm range by using photonic jets produced by sapphire, polystyrene, and soda-lime glass microspheres with diameters in the 90–300 μm range. By finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling, we gain insight into the role of the microspheres refractive index, size, and alignment with respect to the detector mesa. A combination of enhanced sensitivity with angle-of-view (AOV) up to 20° is demonstrated for individual photodetectors. It is proposed that integration with microspheres can be scaled up for large focal plane arrays, which should provide maximal light collection efficiencies with wide AOVs, a combination of properties highly attractive for imaging applications.

  1. Groundwater exploration in a Quaternary sediment body by shear-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrung, M.; Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    The detailed investigation of a shallow aquifer structure is the prerequisite for choosing a proper well location for groundwater exploration drilling for human drinking water supply and subsequent managing of the aquifer system. In the case of shallow aquifers of some 10 m in depth, this task is still a challenge for high-resolution geophysical methods, especially in populated areas. In areas of paved surfaces, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics is advantageous compared to conventional P-wave seismic methods. The sediment body of the Alfbach valley within the Vulkaneifel region in Germany, partly covered by the village Gillenfeld, was estimated to have a maximum thickness of nearly 60 m. It lies on top of a complicated basement structure, constituted by an incorporated lava flow near the basement. For the positioning of new well locations, a combination of a SH-wave land streamer receiver system and a small, wheelbarrow-mounted SH-wave source was used for the seismic investigations. This equipment can be easily applied also in residential areas without notable trouble for the inhabitants. The results of the 2.5D profiling show a clear image of the sediment body down to the bedrock with high resolution. Along a 1 km seismic profile, the sediment thickness varies between 20 to more than 60 m in the centre of the valley. The reflection behaviour from the bedrock surface corroborates the hypothesis of a basement structure with distinct topography, including strong dipping events from the flanks of the valley and strong diffractions from subsurface discontinuities. The reflection seismic imaging leads to an estimation of the former shape of the valley and a reconstruction of the flow conditions at the beginning of the sedimentation process.

  2. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamilton, Allister B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  3. Improved optical properties and detectivity of an uncooled silicon carbide mid-wave infrared optical detector with increased dopant concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Geunsik; Kar, Aravinda; Manzur, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    An n-type 4H-SiC substrate is doped with gallium using a laser doping technique and its optical response is investigated at the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) wavelength 4.21 μm as a function of the dopant concentration. The dopant creates a p-type energy level of 0.3 eV, which is the energy of a photon corresponding to the MWIR wavelength 4.21 μm. Therefore, Ga-doped SiC can be used as an uncooled MWIR detector because an optical signal was obtained at this wavelength when the sample was at room temperature. The energy level of the Ga dopant in the substrate was confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the doped samples revealed an enhancement in the solid solubility of Ga in the substrate when doping is carried out by increasing the number of laser scans. A higher dopant concentration increases the number of holes in the dopant energy level, enabling photoexcitation of more electrons from the valence band by the incident MWIR photons. The detector performance improves as the dopant concentration increases from 1.15 × 10 19 to 6.25 × 10 20 cm −3 . The detectivity of the optical photodetector is found to be 1.07 × 10 10 cm Hz 1/2 W −1 for the case of doping with four laser passes. (paper)

  4. Investigation of ultra-high sensitivity Klystron cavity transducers for broadband resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, Guilherme Leite

    2008-01-01

    We show that, with a suitable choice of the parameters of the gravitational wave detector Mario Schoenberg, with technological accessible parameters (using state-of-art electronics), its sensitivity curve can be improved over the current project curve to become competitive with interferometric detectors in a frequency band of 1500 Hz, in the region from 1000 to 10000 Hz (these competitive bands are centered at the sphere's quadrupole modes). The sensitivity curve of an array of 100 identical spheres identical to the Schoenberg one is also analyzed, and is competitive against advanced LIGO in the entire band. A detailed study of the project's viability is conducted, with an emphasis on the project of the klystron resonant cavity, which will have a center post with a 1 nm gap, which represents a great technological challenge. This challenge is analyzed in terms of the cavity project as well as with a focus on the Casimir effect on the cavity. This could open an opportunity for precise measurements of this effect on a new distance scale compared to current measurements (in the μm scale). (author)

  5. On quantum limits for an indication system of the gravitational wave detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menskij, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The method of integration by paths is applied for estimation of quantum restrictions on sensitivity of Weber type gravitational detector. Indication systems tracing oscillations of the Weber resonator are considered. Way of describing evolution of the quantum system under continuous measurement is shown and the requirement of unitarity is generalized for this case. Two regimes of continuous measurement of a harmonic oscillator (tracing the coordinate and spectral mesurements) are calculated and estimations for sensitivity of a gravitational antenna of Weber type are obtained. A system of bound oscillators, i.e. the case when the indication system includes the oscillating circuit, the quantum properties of which cannot be neglected, is considered

  6. Evaluation of a gas chromatograph with a novel surface acoustic wave detector (SAW GC) for screening of volatile organic compounds in Hanford waste tank samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    A novel instrument, a gas chromatograph with a Surface Acoustic Wave Detector (SAW GC), was evaluated for the screening of organic compounds in Hanford tank headspace vapors. Calibration data were developed for the most common organic compounds, and the accuracy and precision were measured with a certified standard. The instrument was tested with headspace samples collected from seven Hanford waste tanks

  7. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Mullavey, Adam J.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities’ lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully...

  8. Enhancement of sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational wave detectors using fast-light-based white light cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet been observed directly. The initial LIGO apparatus has not yet observed GWs. The advanced LIGO (AdLIGO) will use a combination of improved techniques in order to increase the sensitivity. Along with power recycling and a higher power laser source, the AdLIGO will employ signal recycling (SR). While SR would increase sensitivity, it would also reduce the bandwidth significantly. Previously, we and others have investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the feasibility of using a fast-light-based white light cavity (WLC) to circumvent this constraint. However, in the previous work, it was not clear how one would incorporate the white light cavity effect. Here, we first develop a general model for Michelson-interferometer-based GW detectors that can be easily adapted to include the effects of incorporating a WLC into the design. We then describe a concrete design of a WLC constructed as a compound mirror, to replace the signal recycling mirror. This design is simple, robust, completely non-invasive, and can be added to the AdLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal sensitivity as well as the bandwidth are enhanced significantly over what is planned for the AdLIGO, covering the entire spectrum of interest for gravitational waves

  9. Present and Future of Gravitational Wave Experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    The status of the present detectors and of the main future projects will be reported. The recent results of a search for gravitational wave bursts, using the data collected by the ROG Collaboration cryogenic bar detectors EXPLORER (at CERN) and NAUTILUS (at LNF), will be discussed.

  10. Performance characterisation of a passive cavitation detector optimised for subharmonic periodic shock waves from acoustic cavitation in MHz and sub-MHz ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Song, Jae Hee; Prentice, Paul

    2018-05-01

    We describe the design, construction and characterisation of a broadband passive cavitation detector, with the specific aim of detecting low frequency components of periodic shock waves, with high sensitivity. A finite element model is used to guide selection of matching and backing layers for the shock wave passive cavitation detector (swPCD), and the performance is evaluated against a commercially available device. Validation of the model, and characterisation of the swPCD is achieved through experimental detection of laser-plasma bubble collapse shock waves. The final swPCD design is 20 dB more sensitive to the subharmonic component, from acoustic cavitation driven at 220 kHz, than the comparable commercial device. This work may be significant for monitoring cavitation in medical applications, where sensitive detection is critical, and higher frequencies are more readily absorbed by tissue. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. White noise analysis for the correlation-type elementary motion detectors with half-wave rectifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hideaki; Aonishi, Toru

    2018-06-01

    The motion detection mechanism of insects has been attracted attention of many researchers. Several motion-detection models have been proposed on the basis of insect visual system studies. Here, we examine two models, the Hassenstein-Reichardt (HR) model and the two-detector (2D) model. We analytically obtain the mean and variance of the stationary responses of the HR and the 2D models to white noise, and we derive the signal-to-fluctuation-noise ratio (SFNR) to evaluate encoding abilities of the two models. Especially when analyzing the 2D model, we calculate higher-order cumulants of a rectified Gaussian. The results show that the 2D model robustly works almost as well as the HR model in several sets of parameters estimated on the basis of experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detecting gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries with a network of detectors: Coherent versus coincident strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We compare two strategies of multidetector detection of compact binary inspiral signals, namely, the coincidence and the coherent. For simplicity we consider here two identical detectors having the same power spectral density of noise, that of initial LIGO, located in the same place and having the same orientation. We consider the cases of independent noise as well as that of correlated noise. The coincident strategy involves separately making two candidate event lists, one for each detector, and from these choosing those pairs of events from the two lists which lie within a suitable parameter window, which then are called coincidence detections. The coherent strategy on the other hand involves combining the data phase coherently, so as to obtain a single network statistic which is then compared with a single threshold. Here we attempt to shed light on the question as to which strategy is better. We compare the performances of the two methods by plotting the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for the two strategies. Several of the results are obtained analytically in order to gain insight. Further we perform numerical simulations in order to determine certain parameters in the analytic formulae and thus obtain the final complete results. We consider here several cases from the relatively simple to the astrophysically more relevant in order to establish our results. The bottom line is that the coherent strategy although more computationally expensive in general than the coincidence strategy, is superior to the coincidence strategy--considerably less false dismissal probability for the same false alarm probability in the viable false alarm regime

  13. First results of low frequency electromagnetic wave detector of TC-2/Double Star program

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cao, J. B.; Liu, Z. X.; Yang, J. Y.; Yian, C. X.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhang, X. H.; Wang, S. R.; Chen, S. W.; Bian, W.; Dong, W.; Zhang, Z. G.; Hua, F. L.; Zhou, L.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; de Laporte, B.; Parrot, M.; Alleyne, H.; Yearby, K.; Santolík, Ondřej; Mazelle, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2005), s. 2803-2811 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 650; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME811 Grant - others:NSFC(FR) 40390151; NSFC(FR) 40390153; ESA PECS(XE) 98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities, Instruments and techniques) * Space plasma physics (Instruments and techniques) Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2005

  14. Exploration of exposure conditions with a novel wireless detector for bedside digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Hilde; Nens, Joris; Delzenne, Louis; Marshall, Nicholas; Pauwels, Herman; De Wever, Walter; Oyen, Raymond

    2012-03-01

    We propose, apply and validate an optimization scheme for a new wireless CsI based DR detector in combination with a regular mobile X-ray system for bedside imaging applications. Three different grids were tested in this combination. Signal-difference-to-noise was investigated in two ways, using a 1mm Cu piece in combination with different thicknesses of PMMA and by means of the CDRAD phantom using 10 images per condition and an automated evaluation method. A Figure of Merit (FOM), namely SDNR2/Imparted Energy, was calculated for a large range of exposure conditions, without and with grid in place. Misalignment of the grids was evaluated via the same FOMs. This optimization study was validated with comparative X-ray acquisitions performed on dead bodies. An experienced radiologist scored the quality of several specific aspects for all these exposures. Signal difference to noise ratios measured with the Cu method correlated well with the threshold contrasts from the CDRAD analysis (R2 > 0.9). The analysis showed optimal FOM with detector air kerma rates as typically used in clinical practice. Lower tube voltages provide higher FOM than the higher values but their practical use depends on the limitations of X-ray tubes, linked to patient motion artefacts. The use of high resolution grids should be encouraged, as the FOM increases with 47% at 75kV. These scores from the Visual grading study confirmed the results obtained with the FOM. The switch to (wireless) DR technology for bedside imaging could benefit from devices to improve grid positioning or any scatter reduction technique.

  15. Thin walled Nb tubes for suspending test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.H. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)]. E-mail: bhl@physics.uwa.edu.au; Ju, L. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia); Blair, D.G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)

    2006-02-13

    In a previous Letter, we have shown that the use of orthogonal ribbons could provide a better mirror suspension technique in interferometric gravitational wave antennas. One of the key improvements presented by the orthogonal ribbon is the reduction in the number of violin string modes in the direction of the laser. We have considered more elaborate geometries in recent simulations and obtained a suspension that provides further reduction in the number of violin string modes in the direction of the laser, as well as in the direction orthogonal to the laser. This thin walled niobium tube suspension exhibits a reduction in the number of violin modes to 5 in each direction up to a frequency of 5 kHz. Furthermore, the violin mode thermal noise peaks can be reduced in amplitude by 30 dB.

  16. Thin walled Nb tubes for suspending test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.H.; Ju, L.; Blair, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous Letter, we have shown that the use of orthogonal ribbons could provide a better mirror suspension technique in interferometric gravitational wave antennas. One of the key improvements presented by the orthogonal ribbon is the reduction in the number of violin string modes in the direction of the laser. We have considered more elaborate geometries in recent simulations and obtained a suspension that provides further reduction in the number of violin string modes in the direction of the laser, as well as in the direction orthogonal to the laser. This thin walled niobium tube suspension exhibits a reduction in the number of violin modes to 5 in each direction up to a frequency of 5 kHz. Furthermore, the violin mode thermal noise peaks can be reduced in amplitude by 30 dB

  17. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrates for optimization of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Nawrodt, R [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Zimmer, A [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schnabel, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Vodel, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Future generations of gravitational wave interferometers are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of end mirrors and beam splitters that occurs in the optical substrates as well as in the dielectric coatings. A possible method for minimizing thermal noise is cooling to cryogenic temperatures, maximizing the mechanical quality factor Q, and maximizing the eigenfrequencies of the substrate. We present experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus that is suitable for the measurement of the temperature-dependent Q-factor of reflective, transmissive as well as nano-structured grating optics down to 5 K. In particular, the SQUID-based and the optical interferometric approaches to the measurement of the amplitude of vibrating test bodies are compared and the method of ring-down recording is described.

  18. A source of illumination for low-noise ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Strain, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    A low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow sensors having a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. These sensors were designed to detect ‘Violin-Mode’ resonances in the suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors. The source of illumination (emitter) described here used a single column of 8 × miniature near infrared LEDs (λ = 890 nm). These emitters cast the shadows of 400 μm diameter fused silica suspension fibres onto their complementary shadow-displacement detectors, located at a distance of 74 fibre diameters (29.6 mm) behind the axes of the fibres themselves. Violin-Mode vibrations of each fibre were sensed as differential ac photocurrents in the corresponding ‘split-photodiode’ detector. This paper describes the design, construction, noise analysis, and measures that were taken in the conception of the emitters, in order to produce high-contrast shadows at such distant detectors. In this way it proved possible to obtain, simultaneously, a very high transfer sensitivity to Violin-Mode vibration of the fibres, and a very low level of detection noise—close to the fundamental shot noise limit—whilst remaining within the constraints of this simple design of emitter. The shadow detector is described in an accompanying paper.

  19. MoonBEAM: A Beyond Earth-Orbit Gamma-Ray Burst Detector for Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A. M.; Jenke, P. A.; Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Burst Energetics All-sky Monitor (MoonBEAM) is a CubeSat concept of deploying gamma-ray detectors in cislunar space to improve localization precision for gamma-ray bursts by utilizing the light travel time difference between different orbits. We present here a gamma-ray SmallSat concept in Earth-Moon L3 halo orbit that is capable of rapid response and provide a timing baseline for localization improvement when partnered with an Earth-orbit instrument. Such an instrument would probe the extreme processes in cosmic collision of compact objects and facilitate multi-messenger time-domain astronomy to explore the end of stellar life cycles and black hole formations.

  20. Electronics for the IBM gravity wave detector. Concept, implementation, and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.L.; Garwin, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    The apparatus - antenna, transducer, signal processor, and calibrator - was designed to settle the question of the existence of gravity waves at 1.7kHz of the numbers and intensities claimed at the time (end-1971). The design criteria were: modest sensitivity, sensitivity independent of signal arrival time and state of excitation of the antenna, absolute calibration with pulsed mechanical excitation of the antenna, full simulation of the apparatus, hands-off computer analysis with every point published. It was recognized that a single bar would ultimately be limited by some Boltzmann distribution of noise at sub-thermal temperature, and that such an ideal antenna would be equivalent to an ideal coincidence pair of antennas, each of half the mass. Transducer, amplifier, signal processor, and programming were all done by the experimenters in order to reduce the cycle time for introducing improvements. Before the antenna and amplifier were ready, the processing algorithms were developed and tested with digitally-simulated antenna output, and many problems avoided. Any excess local noise proved to be sufficiently infrequent so that the single antenna could negate claims by Weber of the detection of gravitational radiation. The computer processing obviated the need for temperature control of the antenna or for tracking of the bar resonant frequency with the reference oscillator

  1. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a zero-detuning resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Sugamoto, Akio [Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Leonhardt, Volker; Sato, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Toshitaka; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Kawamura, Seiji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Osamu [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Somiya, Kentaro [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Morioka, Tomoko [University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishizawa, Atsushi [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: fumiko.kawazoe@aei.mpg.de

    2008-10-07

    Some next-generation gravitational-wave detectors, such as the American Advanced LIGO project and the Japanese LCGT project, plan to use power recycled resonant sideband extraction (RSE) interferometers for their interferometer's optical configuration. A power recycled zero-detuning (PRZD) RSE interferometer, which is the default design for LCGT, has five main length degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector. This task is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of optical configuration. A new control scheme for a PRZD RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer. The PRZD RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. It is the first experimental demonstration of a PRZD RSE interferometer with suspended test masses. The result serves as an important step for the operation of LCGT.

  2. Wideband and high-gain frequency stabilization of a 100-W injection-locked Nd:YAG laser for second-generation gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Noriaki; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Mio, Norikatsu

    2010-07-01

    Second-generation gravitational wave detectors require a highly stable laser with an output power greater than 100 W to attain their target sensitivity. We have developed a frequency stabilization system for a 100-W injection-locked Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. By placing an external wideband electro-optic modulator used as a fast-frequency actuator in the optical path of the slave output, we can circumvent a phase delay in the frequency control loop originating from the pole of an injection-locked slave cavity. Thus, we have developed an electro-optic modulator made of a MgO-doped stoichiometric LiNbO(3) crystal. Using this modulator, we achieve a frequency control bandwidth of 800 kHz and a control gain of 180 dB at 1 kHz. These values satisfy the requirement for a laser frequency control loop in second-generation gravitational wave detectors.

  3. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a zero-detuning resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Sugamoto, Akio; Leonhardt, Volker; Sato, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Toshitaka; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Somiya, Kentaro; Morioka, Tomoko; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Some next-generation gravitational-wave detectors, such as the American Advanced LIGO project and the Japanese LCGT project, plan to use power recycled resonant sideband extraction (RSE) interferometers for their interferometer's optical configuration. A power recycled zero-detuning (PRZD) RSE interferometer, which is the default design for LCGT, has five main length degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector. This task is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of optical configuration. A new control scheme for a PRZD RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer. The PRZD RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. It is the first experimental demonstration of a PRZD RSE interferometer with suspended test masses. The result serves as an important step for the operation of LCGT

  4. On the (In)Efficiency of the Cross-Correlation Statistic for Gravitational Wave Stochastic Background Signals with Non-Gaussian Noise and Heterogeneous Detector Sensitivities

    OpenAIRE

    Lionel, Martellini; Tania, Regimbau

    2015-01-01

    Under standard assumptions including stationary and serially uncorrelated Gaussian gravitational wave stochastic background signal and noise distributions, as well as homogenous detector sensitivities, the standard cross-correlation detection statistic is known to be optimal in the sense of minimizing the probability of a false dismissal at a fixed value of the probability of a false alarm. The focus of this paper is to analyze the comparative efficiency of this statistic, versus a simple alt...

  5. Small amplitude transverse waves on taut strings: exploring the significant effects of longitudinal motion on wave energy location and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, David R

    2013-01-01

    Introductory discussions of energy transport due to transverse waves on taut strings universally assume that the effects of longitudinal motion can be neglected, but this assumption is not even approximately valid unless the string is idealized to have a zero relaxed length, a requirement approximately met by the slinky spring. While making this additional idealization is probably the best approach to take when discussing waves on strings at the introductory level, for intermediate to advanced undergraduate classes in continuum mechanics and general wave phenomena where somewhat more realistic models of strings can be investigated, this paper makes the following contributions. First, various approaches to deriving the general energy continuity equation are critiqued and it is argued that the standard continuum mechanics approach to deriving such equations is the best because it leads to a conceptually clear, relatively simple derivation which provides a unique answer of greatest generality. In addition, a straightforward algorithm for calculating the transverse and longitudinal waves generated when a string is driven at one end is presented and used to investigate a cos 2 transverse pulse. This example illustrates much important physics regarding energy transport in strings and allows the ‘attack waves’ observed when strings in musical instruments are struck or plucked to be approximately modelled and analysed algebraically. Regarding the ongoing debate as to whether the potential energy density in a string can be uniquely defined, it is shown by coupling an external energy source to a string that a suggested alternative formula for potential energy density requires an unphysical potential energy to be ascribed to the source for overall energy to be conserved and so cannot be considered to be physically valid. (paper)

  6. Exploring the neutrinoless double beta decay in the inverted neutrino hierarchy with bolometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artusa, D.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Farach, H.A.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; De Biasi, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C.; Rampazzo, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Balata, M.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Casali, N.; Di Vacri, M.L.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Nisi, S.; Orlandi, D.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Zarra, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Banks, T.I. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M.; Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bersani, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carrettoni, M.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Fiorini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Sala, E.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cai, X.Z.; Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Li, Y.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Tian, W.D.; Wang, H.W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Datskov, V.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Orio, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dally, A.; Ejzak, L.; Wielgus, L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Freedman, S.J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Mei, Y.; Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Tenconi, M. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Heeger, K.M.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Hennings-Yeomans, R.; O' Donnell, T. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, H.Z.; Liu, X.; Trentalange, S.; Winslow, L.A.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kazkaz, K.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Kolomensky, Yu.G. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Nones, C. [CEA/Saclay, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ouellet, J.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Ventura, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Florence (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Wise, T. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature of neutrinos. In this paper we review the status and outlook for bolometric 0νββ decay searches. We summarize recent advances in background suppression demonstrated using bolometers with simultaneous readout of heat and light signals. We simulate several configurations of a future CUORE-like bolometer array which would utilize these improvements and present the sensitivity reach of a hypothetical next-generation bolometric 0νββ experiment. We demonstrate that a bolometric experiment with the isotope mass of about 1 ton is capable of reaching the sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass (vertical stroke m{sub ee} vertical stroke) of order 10-20 meV, thus completely exploring the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region. We highlight the main challenges and identify priorities for an R and D program addressing them. (orig.)

  7. Noise in gravitational-wave detectors and other classical-force measurements is not influenced by test-mass quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.; Gorodetsky, Mikhail L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.; Vyatchanin, Sergey P.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that photon shot noise and radiation-pressure back-action noise are the sole forms of quantum noise in interferometric gravitational wave detectors that operate near or below the standard quantum limit, if one filters the interferometer output appropriately. No additional noise arises from the test masses' initial quantum state or from reduction of the test-mass state due to measurement of the interferometer output or from the uncertainty principle associated with the test-mass state. Two features of interferometers are central to these conclusions: (i) The interferometer output [the photon number flux N(t) entering the final photodetector] commutes with itself at different times in the Heisenberg picture, [N(t),N(t ' )]=0 and thus can be regarded as classical. (ii) This number flux is linear to high accuracy in the test-mass initial position and momentum operators x o and p o , and those operators influence the measured photon flux N(t) in manners that can easily be removed by filtering. For example, in most interferometers x o and p o appear in N(t) only at the test masses' ∼1 Hz pendular swinging frequency and their influence is removed when the output data are high-pass filtered to get rid of noise below ∼10 Hz. The test-mass operators x o and p o contained in the unfiltered output N(t) make a nonzero contribution to the commutator [N(t),N(t ' )]. That contribution is precisely canceled by a nonzero commutation of the photon shot noise and radiation-pressure noise, which also are contained in N(t). This cancellation of commutators is responsible for the fact that it is possible to derive an interferometer's standard quantum limit from test-mass considerations, and independently from photon-noise considerations, and get identically the same result. These conclusions are all true for a far wider class of measurements than just gravitational-wave interferometers. To elucidate them, this paper presents a series of idealized thought experiments that

  8. Gravitational Wave Experiments - Proceedings of the First Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, E.; Pizzella, G.; Ronga, F.

    1995-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Notes on Edoardo Amaldi's Life and Activity * PART I. INVITED LECTURES * Sources and Telescopes * Sources of Gravitational Radiation for Detectors of the 21st Century * Neutrino Telescopes * γ-Ray Bursts * Space Detectors * LISA — Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for Gravitational Wave Measurements * Search for Massive Coalescing Binaries with the Spacecraft ULYSSES * Interferometers * The LIGO Project: Progress and Prospects * The VIRGO Experiment: Status of the Art * GEO 600 — A 600-m Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Antenna * 300-m Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detector (TAMA300) in Japan * Resonant Detectors * Search for Continuous Gravitational Wave from Pulsars with Resonant Detector * Operation of the ALLEGRO Detector at LSU * Preliminary Results of the New Run of Measurements with the Resonant Antenna EXPLORER * Operation of the Perth Cryogenic Resonant-Bar Gravitational Wave Detector * The NAUTILUS Experiment * Status of the AURIGA Gravitational Wave Antenna and Perspectives for the Gravitational Waves Search with Ultracryogenic Resonant Detectors * Ultralow Temperature Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors: Current Status of the Stanford Program * Electromechanical Transducers and Bandwidth of Resonant-Mass Gravitational-Wave Detectors * Fully Numerical Data Analysis for Resonant Gravitational Wave Detectors: Optimal Filter and Available Information * PART II. CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Sources and Telescopes * The Local Supernova Production * Periodic Gravitational Signals from Galactic Pulsars * On a Possibility of Scalar Gravitational Wave Detection from the Binary Pulsars PSR 1913+16 * Kazan Gravitational Wave Detector “Dulkyn”: General Concept and Prospects of Construction * Hierarchical Approach to the Theory of Detection of Periodic Gravitational Radiation * Application of Gravitational Antennae for Fundamental Geophysical Problems * On

  9. A source of illumination for low-noise ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V; Strain, K A

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow sensors having a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. These sensors were designed to detect ‘Violin-Mode’ resonances in the suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors. The source of illumination (emitter) described here used a single column of 8 × miniature near infrared LEDs (λ = 890 nm). These emitters cast the shadows of 400 μm diameter fused silica suspension fibres onto their complementary shadow-displacement detectors, located at a distance of 74 fibre diameters (29.6 mm) behind the axes of the fibres themselves. Violin-Mode vibrations of each fibre were sensed as differential ac photocurrents in the corresponding ‘split-photodiode’ detector. This paper describes the design, construction, noise analysis, and measures that were taken in the conception of the emitters, in order to produce high-contrast shadows at such distant detectors. In this way it proved possible to obtain, simultaneously, a very high transfer sensitivity to Violin-Mode vibration of the fibres, and a very low level of detection noise—close to the fundamental shot noise limit—whilst remaining within the constraints of this simple design of emitter. The shadow detector is described in an accompanying paper. (paper)

  10. Lignite and tin ores exploration in southern part of Thailand by using nuclear track-etch detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chittrakarn, T.; Boonnummar, R.; Pongsuwan, T.; Nuannin, P.; Kaew-On, C.

    1993-01-01

    Both lignite and tin mines in Southern of Thailand are associated with uranium ore. In lignite exploration, Bangpudum Lignite Mine at Krabi Province was chosen for this studied because we know the exact location and deposition of coal seam by using other geophysical technique and also confirm by borehole. The size 1x2 cm 2 of cellulose nitrate CN-85 films were used, each film was stuck at the inner bottom of a softdrink cup. Each cup was put up side down at the bottom of a borehole about 75 cm depth from the earth surface and laid about 10 m apart. All the cups were put in the hole along the line in order to cover about 280 metre in the cross sectional direction long of the known coal seam. After one month, all the film detectors were collected and etched with 6.25N NaOH at 60 o C about 25 minutes long in order to enlarge the latent alpha registration tracks. These alpha particles were emitted from radon gas (Rn-222) which was generated from uranium associated with lignite ore. The registration track density per area of each CN-85 film was studied by optical microscope at 400x magnifications. We found that the track densities of the films have high correlation with the depth of the known coal seam while high and low track densities will correspond to the shallow and deep coal seam respectively. Also, track density was significantly higher than background. A similar manner of experiment was designed for tin ore exploration at Ronpibul district, Nakorn Si Thammarat province. The result is in progress and will present at the conference. (Author)

  11. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  12. Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Haberman, D.P.; Hishmeh, G.A.; Ciszek, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal

  13. Fiscal 1996 verification survey of geothermal exploration technology. Development of the fracture type reservoir exploration method (development of the elastic wave use exploration method); 1996 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa. Danretsugata choryuso tansaho kaihatsu (danseiha riyo tansaho kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of exploring accurately fracture groups greatly restricting the fluid flow of geothermal reservoirs, technical development was made for applying the elastic wave exploration technology such as the high precision reflection method, VSP, elastic wave tomography to the geothermal exploration. The Okiri area, Kagoshima prefecture was selected as a demonstrative field of a typical type where the steep and predominant fracture rules the geothermal reservoir, and experiments were conducted using the high precision reflection method and VSP. Fracture models were made, and the analysis results were studied by a survey using the array CSMT/MT method and by a comparison with existing data. Reformation of the underground receiving system used for VSP and elastic tomography is made for improvement of its viability, and was applied to the VSP experiment. The treatment/analysis system of the core analyzer was improved, and cores of the demonstrative field were analyzed/measured. Further, the exploration results, core analysis results and existing data were synthetically analyzed, and fracture models of the demonstrative field were constructed. Also, effectiveness and viability of the elastic wave use exploration method were studied. 90 refs., 418 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Moonshine: Diurnally varying hydration through natural distillation on the Moon, detected by the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, T A; Chin, G; Sagdeev, R Z; Mitrofanov, I G; Boynton, W V; Evans, L G; Litvak, M L; McClanahan, T P; Sanin, A B; Starr, R D; Su, J J

    2015-07-15

    The Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), on the polar-orbiting Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft, has detected suppression in the Moon's naturally-occurring epithermal neutron leakage flux that is consistent with the presence of diurnally varying quantities of hydrogen in the regolith near the equator. Peak hydrogen concentration (neutron flux suppression) is on the dayside of the dawn terminator and diminishes through the dawn-to-noon sector. The minimum concentration of hydrogen is in the late afternoon and dusk sector. The chemical form of hydrogen is not determinable from these measurements, but other remote sensing methods and anticipated elemental availability suggest water molecules or hydroxyl ions. Signal-to-noise ratio at maximum contrast is 5.6 σ in each of two detector systems. Volatiles are deduced to collect in or on the cold nightside surface and distill out of the regolith after dawn as rotation exposes the surface to sunlight. Liberated volatiles migrate away from the warm subsolar region toward the nearby cold nightside surface beyond the terminator, resulting in maximum concentration at the dawn terminator. The peak concentration within the upper ~1 m of regolith is estimated to be 0.0125 ± 0.0022 weight-percent water-equivalent hydrogen (wt% WEH) at dawn, yielding an accumulation of 190 ± 30 ml recoverable water per square meter of regolith at each dawn. Volatile transport over the lunar surface in opposition to the Moon's rotation exposes molecules to solar ultraviolet radiation. The short lifetime against photolysis and permanent loss of hydrogen from the Moon requires a resupply rate that greatly exceeds anticipated delivery of hydrogen by solar wind implantation or by meteoroid impacts, suggesting that the surface inventory must be continually resupplied by release from a deep volatile inventory in the Moon. The natural distillation of water from the regolith by sunlight and its capture on the cold night surface may

  15. Novel Methods to Explore Building Energy Sensitivity to Climate and Heat Waves Using PNNL's BEND Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleyson, C. D.; Voisin, N.; Taylor, T.; Xie, Y.; Kraucunas, I.

    2017-12-01

    The DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been developing the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model to simulate energy usage in residential and commercial buildings responding to changes in weather, climate, population, and building technologies. At its core, BEND is a mechanism to aggregate EnergyPlus simulations of a large number of individual buildings with a diversity of characteristics over large spatial scales. We have completed a series of experiments to explore methods to calibrate the BEND model, measure its ability to capture interannual variability in energy demand due to weather using simulations of two distinct weather years, and understand the sensitivity to the number and location of weather stations used to force the model. The use of weather from "representative cities" reduces computational costs, but often fails to capture spatial heterogeneity that may be important for simulations aimed at understanding how building stocks respond to a changing climate (Fig. 1). We quantify the potential reduction in temperature and load biases from using an increasing number of weather stations across the western U.S., ranging from 8 to roughly 150. Using 8 stations results in an average absolute summertime temperature bias of 4.0°C. The mean absolute bias drops to 1.5°C using all available stations. Temperature biases of this magnitude translate to absolute summertime mean simulated load biases as high as 13.8%. Additionally, using only 8 representative weather stations can lead to a 20-40% bias of peak building loads under heat wave or cold snap conditions, a significant error for capacity expansion planners who may rely on these types of simulations. This analysis suggests that using 4 stations per climate zone may be sufficient for most purposes. Our novel approach, which requires no new EnergyPlus simulations, could be useful to other researchers designing or calibrating aggregate building model simulations - particularly those looking at

  16. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  17. Exploration of deep S-wave velocity structure using microtremor array technique to estimate long-period ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Higashi, Sadanori; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2007-01-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 9 sites in the Niigata plain to explore deep S-wave velocity structures for estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion. The 1D S-wave velocity profiles in the Niigata plain are characterized by 5 layers with S-wave velocities of 0.4, 0.8, 1.5, 2.1 and 3.0 km/s, respectively. The depth to the basement layer is deeper in the Niigata port area located at the Japan sea side of the Niigata plain. In this area, the basement depth is about 4.8 km around the Seirou town and about 4.1 km around the Niigata city, respectively. These features about the basement depth in the Niigata plain are consistent with the previous surveys. In order to verify the profiles derived from microtremor array exploration, we estimate the group velocities of Love wave for four propagation paths of long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake by multiple filter technique, which were compared with the theoretical ones calculated from the derived profiles. As a result, it was confirmed that the group velocities from the derived profiles were in good agreement with the ones from long-period earthquake ground motion records during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. Furthermore, we applied the estimation method of design basis earthquake input for seismically isolated nuclear power facilities by using normal mode solution to estimate long-period earthquake ground motion during Niigata-ken tyuetsu earthquake. As a result, it was demonstrated that the applicability of the above method for the estimation of long-period earthquake ground motion were improved by using the derived 1D S-wave velocity profile. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a tuned resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawazoe, F; Sugamoto, A [Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Sato, S; Leonhardt, V; Yamazaki, T; Fukushima, M; Kawamura, S [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Miyakawa, O [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Morioka, T [University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishizawa, A [Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: kawazoe@gravity.mtk.nao.ac.jp

    2008-07-15

    LCGT plans to use tuned RSE as the optical configuration for its interferometer. A tuned RSE interferometer has five degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector, although it is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of its optical configuration. A new control scheme for a tuned RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer to demonstrate successful control of the tuned RSE interferometer. The whole RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. Here the control scheme and the current status of the experiment are presented.

  19. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a tuned resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawazoe, F; Sugamoto, A; Sato, S; Leonhardt, V; Yamazaki, T; Fukushima, M; Kawamura, S; Miyakawa, O; Morioka, T; Nishizawa, A

    2008-01-01

    LCGT plans to use tuned RSE as the optical configuration for its interferometer. A tuned RSE interferometer has five degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector, although it is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of its optical configuration. A new control scheme for a tuned RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer to demonstrate successful control of the tuned RSE interferometer. The whole RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. Here the control scheme and the current status of the experiment are presented

  20. Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Background from Cosmic Strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, Xavier; Creighton, Jolien; Mandic, Vuk

    2007-01-01

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by a network of cosmic strings and assess their accessibility to current and planned gravitational wave detectors, as well as to big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), cosmic microwave background (CMB), and pulsar timing constraints. We find that current data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors, such as Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are sensitive to areas of parameter space of cosmic string models complementary to those accessible to pulsar, BBN, and CMB bounds. Future more sensitive LIGO runs and interferometers such as Advanced LIGO and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be able to explore substantial parts of the parameter space

  1. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  2. Small Explorer project: Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). Mission operations and data analysis plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    The Mission Operations and Data Analysis Plan is presented for the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) Project. It defines organizational responsibilities, discusses target selection and navigation, specifies instrument command and data requirements, defines data reduction and analysis hardware and software requirements, and discusses mission operations center staffing requirements.

  3. The effects of LIGO detector noise on a 15-dimensional Markov-chain Monte Carlo analysis of gravitational-wave signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, V; Mandel, I; Kalogera, V; Van der Sluys, M V; Roever, C; Christensen, N

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational-wave signals from inspirals of binary compact objects (black holes and neutron stars) are primary targets of the ongoing searches by ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) interferometers (LIGO, Virgo and GEO-600). We present parameter estimation results from our Markov-chain Monte Carlo code SPINspiral on signals from binaries with precessing spins. Two data sets are created by injecting simulated GW signals either into synthetic Gaussian noise or into LIGO detector data. We compute the 15-dimensional probability-density functions (PDFs) for both data sets, as well as for a data set containing LIGO data with a known, loud artefact ('glitch'). We show that the analysis of the signal in detector noise yields accuracies similar to those obtained using simulated Gaussian noise. We also find that while the Markov chains from the glitch do not converge, the PDFs would look consistent with a GW signal present in the data. While our parameter estimation results are encouraging, further investigations into how to differentiate an actual GW signal from noise are necessary.

  4. 125 GHz sine wave gating InGaAs/InP single-photon detector with a monolithically integrated readout circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Hao; Liu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Yin; Jin, Ge; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-12-01

    InGaAs/InP single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the key devices for applications requiring near-infrared single-photon detection. Gating mode is an effective approach to synchronous single-photon detection. Increasing gating frequency and reducing module size are important challenges for the design of such detector system. Here we present for the first time an InGaAs/InP SPD with 1.25 GHz sine wave gating using a monolithically integrated readout circuit (MIRC). The MIRC has a size of 15 mm * 15 mm and implements the miniaturization of avalanche extraction for high-frequency sine wave gating. In the MIRC, low-pass filters and a low-noise radio frequency amplifier are integrated based on the technique of low temperature co-fired ceramic, which can effectively reduce the parasitic capacitance and extract weak avalanche signals. We then characterize the InGaAs/InP SPD to verify the functionality and reliability of MIRC, and the SPD exhibits excellent performance with 27.5 % photon detection efficiency, 1.2 kcps dark count rate, and 9.1 % afterpulse probability at 223 K and 100 ns hold-off time. With this MIRC, one can further design miniaturized high-frequency SPD modules that are highly required for practical applications.

  5. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  6. The detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Barish, Barry C

    1996-01-01

    General Relativity predicts the emission of gravitanional waves whenever compact concentrations of energy change shape. This could occur in a variety of astrophysical phenomena. For example, the coalescence of binary systems such as a pair of neutron stars or black holes emit gravitanional waves that propagate through space at the speed of light, and in principle, can be directly detected on the earth's surface. This lecture series will review the possible sources of gravitanional waves and the various approaches toward detection, with special emphasis on long baseline interferometer detectors. The Laser Interferometer Gravitanional Wave Observatory (LIGO) is being constructed with a goal to detect these waves and then to use them as a new tool to explore and study the Universe. The sources of gravitanional waves and techniques for detection will be presented, as well as the status and prospects for the LIGO project.

  7. Fully integrated InGaAs/InP single-photon detector module with gigahertz sine wave gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xiaolei; Ma Jian; Jin Ge; Chen Zengbing; Zhang Jun; Pan Jianwei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu Jianhong; Wang Quan; Du Debing [Anhui Quantum Communication Technology Co., Ltd., Hefei, Anhui 230088 (China)

    2012-08-15

    InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) working in the regime of GHz clock rates are crucial components for the high-speed quantum key distribution (QKD). We have developed for the first time a compact, stable, and user-friendly tabletop InGaAs/InP single-photon detector system operating at a 1.25 GHz gate rate that fully integrates functions for controlling and optimizing SPAD performance. We characterize the key parameters of the detector system and test the long-term stability of the system for continuous operation of 75 h. The detector system can substantially enhance QKD performance and our present work paves the way for practical high-speed QKD applications.

  8. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm

  9. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  10. Computational exploration of wave propagation and heating from transcranial focused ultrasound for neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2016-10-01

    Objective. While ultrasound is largely established for use in diagnostic imaging, its application for neuromodulation is relatively new and crudely understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of tissue properties and geometry on the wave propagation and heating in the context of transcranial neuromodulation. Approach. A computational model of transcranial-focused ultrasound was constructed and validated against empirical data. The models were then incrementally extended to investigate a number of issues related to the use of ultrasound for neuromodulation, including the effect on wave propagation of variations in geometry of skull and gyral anatomy as well as the effect of multiple tissue and media layers, including scalp, skull, CSF, and gray/white matter. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was run to characterize the influence of acoustic properties of intracranial tissues. Finally, the heating associated with ultrasonic stimulation waveforms designed for neuromodulation was modeled. Main results. The wave propagation of a transcranially focused ultrasound beam is significantly influenced by the cranial domain. The half maximum acoustic beam intensity profiles are insensitive overall to small changes in material properties, though the inclusion of sulci in models results in greater peak intensity values compared to a model without sulci (1%-30% greater). Finally, heating using currently employed stimulation parameters in humans is highest in bone (0.16 °C) and is negligible in brain (4.27 × 10-3 °C) for a 0.5 s exposure. Significance. Ultrasound for noninvasive neuromodulation holds great promise and appeal for its non-invasiveness, high spatial resolution and deep focal lengths. Here we show gross brain anatomy and biological material properties to have limited effect on ultrasound wave propagation and to result in safe heating levels in the skull and brain.

  11. Silicon nitride films fabricated by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for coatings of the laser interferometer gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huang-Wei; Kuo, Ling-Chi; Huang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Meng-Yun; Juang, Yu-Hang; Lee, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Chieh; Wen, Ting Ting; Chao, Shiuh

    2018-01-01

    Silicon is a potential substrate material for the large-areal-size mirrors of the next-generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detector operated in cryogenics. Silicon nitride thin films uniformly deposited by a chemical vapor deposition method on large-size silicon wafers is a common practice in the silicon integrated circuit industry. We used plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to deposit silicon nitride films on silicon and studied the physical properties of the films that are pertinent to application of mirror coatings for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. We measured and analyzed the structure, optical properties, stress, Young's modulus, and mechanical loss of the films, at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Optical extinction coefficients of the films were in the 10-5 range at 1550-nm wavelength. Room-temperature mechanical loss of the films varied in the range from low 10-4 to low 10-5 within the frequency range of interest. The existence of a cryogenic mechanical loss peak depended on the composition of the films. We measured the bond concentrations of N - H , Si - H , Si - N , and Si - Si bonds in the films and analyzed the correlations between bond concentrations and cryogenic mechanical losses. We proposed three possible two-level systems associated with the N - H , Si - H , and Si - N bonds in the film. We inferred that the dominant source of the cryogenic mechanical loss for the silicon nitride films is the two-level system of exchanging position between a H+ and electron lone pair associated with the N - H bond. Under our deposition conditions, superior properties in terms of high refractive index with a large adjustable range, low optical absorption, and low mechanical loss were achieved for films with lower nitrogen content and lower N - H bond concentration. Possible pairing of the silicon nitride films with other materials in the quarter-wave stack is discussed.

  12. Watt-Level Continuous-Wave Emission from a Bi-Functional Quantum Cascade Laser/Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    cally authorized by the U.S. Government may violate any copyrights that exist in this work. Watt-level continuous- wave emission from a bi- functional ... wave bi- functional devices, opens the perspective of on-chip dual comb spectroscopy. Also for discrete sens- ing setups, one can switch to lasers...seas.harvard.edu Abstract Bi- functional active regions, capable of light generation and detection at the same wavelength, allow a straightforward realization of

  13. Marine renewables: Exploring the opportunity for combining wind and wave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Riefolo, Luigia; Lanfredi, Caterina; Vicinanza, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Resource diversity is considered the key to manage the intrinsic variability of renewable energy sources and to lower their system integration costs. The expected development of Marine Renewable Energy Installations is likely to result in further transformation of coastal sea areas, already heavily impacted. In this perspective, the combination of different renewables and their potential impact on the environment must be evaluated in the context of the existing pressures. In this study the opportunity of co-locating offshore wind turbines and wave energy converters and their environmental sustainability is evaluated through a quantitative Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) approach. [it

  14. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters - through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  15. Exploring the Potential for Increased Production from the Wave Energy Converter Lifesaver by Reactive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Molinas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fred Olsen is currently testing their latest wave energy converter (WEC, Lifesaver, outside of Falmouth Bay in England, preparing it for commercial operation at the Wavehub test site. Previous studies, mostly focusing on hydrodynamics and peak to average power reduction, have shown that this device has potential for increased power extraction using reactive control. This article extends those analyses, adding a detailed model of the all-electric power take-off (PTO system, consisting of a permanent magnet synchronous generator, inverter and DC-link. Time domain simulations are performed to evaluate the PTO capabilities of the modeled WEC. However, when tuned towards reactive control, the generator losses become large, giving a very low overall system efficiency. Optimal control with respect to electrical output power is found to occur with low added mass, and when compared to pure passive loading, a 1% increase in annual energy production is estimated. The main factor reducing the effect of reactive control is found to be the minimum load-force constraint of the device. These results suggest that the Lifesaver has limited potential for increased production by reactive control. This analysis is nevertheless valuable, as it demonstrates how a wave-to-wire model can be used for investigation of PTO potential, annual energy production estimations and evaluations of different control techniques for a given WEC device.

  16. Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlick, Skip [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Rhodes, Greg [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Ormat sited 2 full-size exploration wells based on 3D seismic interpretation of fractures, prior drilling results, and temperature anomaly. The wells indicated commercial temperatures (>300 F), but almost no permeability, despite one of the wells being drilled within 820 ft of an older exploration well with reported indications of permeability. Following completion of the second well in 2012, Ormat undertook a lengthy program to 1) evaluate the lack of observed permeability, 2) estimate the likelihood of finding permeability with additional drilling, and 3) estimate resource size based on an anticipated extent of permeability.

  17. Methods and Results of a Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties such as the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, assuming a fixed GW emission energy of 10(exp -2)Stellar Mass sq c, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events in the Advanced detector era.

  18. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise "Violin-Mode" shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ˜100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral "Violin-Mode" resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8 × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a "reverse Galilean" telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre's shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre's shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in anti-phase in the

  19. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise “Violin-Mode” shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral “Violin-Mode” resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a “reverse Galilean” telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre’s shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre’s shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in

  20. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise “Violin-Mode” shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral “Violin-Mode” resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a “reverse Galilean” telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre’s shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre’s shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in

  1. Inner core boundary topography explored with reflected and diffracted P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSilva, Susini; Cormier, Vernon F.; Zheng, Yingcai

    2018-03-01

    The existence of topography of the inner core boundary (ICB) can affect the amplitude, phase, and coda of body waves incident on the inner core. By applying pseudospectral and boundary element methods to synthesize compressional waves interacting with the ICB, these effects are predicted and compared with waveform observations in pre-critical, critical, post-critical, and diffraction ranges of the PKiKP wave reflected from the ICB. These data sample overlapping regions of the inner core beneath the circum-Pacific belt and the Eurasian, North American, and Australian continents, but exclude large areas beneath the Pacific and Indian Oceans and the poles. In the pre-critical range, PKiKP waveforms require an upper bound of 2 km at 1-20 km wavelength for any ICB topography. Higher topography sharply reduces PKiKP amplitude and produces time-extended coda not observed in PKiKP waveforms. The existence of topography of this scale smooths over minima and zeros in the pre-critical ICB reflection coefficient predicted from standard earth models. In the range surrounding critical incidence (108-130 °), this upper bound of topography does not strongly affect the amplitude and waveform behavior of PKIKP + PKiKP at 1.5 Hz, which is relatively insensitive to 10-20 km wavelength topography height approaching 5 km. These data, however, have a strong overlap in the regions of the ICB sampled by pre-critical PKiKP that require a 2 km upper bound to topography height. In the diffracted range (>152°), topography as high as 5 km attenuates the peak amplitudes of PKIKP and PKPCdiff by similar amounts, leaving the PKPCdiff/PKIKP amplitude ratio unchanged from that predicted by a smooth ICB. The observed decay of PKPCdiff into the inner core shadow and the PKIKP-PKPCdiff differential travel time are consistent with a flattening of the outer core P velocity gradient near the ICB and iron enrichment at the bottom of the outer core.

  2. Using the D-Wave 2X Quantum Computer to Explore the Formation of Global Terrorist Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosiano, John Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, Randy Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sims, Benjamin Hayden [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Social networks with signed edges (+/-) play an important role in an area of social network theory called structural balance. In these networks, edges represent relationships that are labeled as either friendly (+) or hostile (-). A signed social network is balanced only if all cycles of three or more nodes in the graph have an odd number of hostile edges. A fundamental property of a balanced network is that it can be cleanly divided into 2 factions, where all relationships within each faction are friendly, and all relationships between members of different factions are hostile. The more unbalanced a network is, the more edges will fail to adhere to this rule, making factions more ambiguous. Social theory suggests unbalanced networks should be unstable, a finding that has been supported by research on gangs, which shows that unbalanced relationships are associated with greater violence, possibly due to this increased ambiguity about factional allegiances (Nakamura et al). One way to estimate the imbalance in a network, if only edge relationships are known, is to assign nodes to factions that minimize the number of violations of the edge rule described above. This problem is known to be computationally NP-hard. However, Facchetti et al. have pointed out that it is equivalent to an Ising model with a Hamiltonian that effectively counts the number of edge rule violations. Therefore, finding the assignment of factions that minimizes energy of the equivalent Ising system yields an estimate of the imbalance in the network. Based on the Ising model equivalence of the signed-social network balance problem, we have used the D-Wave 2X quantum annealing computer to explore some aspects of signed social networks. Because connectivity in the D-Wave computer is limited to its particular native topology, arbitrary networks cannot be represented directly. Rather, they must be “embedded” using a technique in which multiple qubits are chained together with special weights to

  3. Searching for gravitational-wave signals emitted by eccentric compact binaries using a non-eccentric template bank: implications for ground-based detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cokelaer, T; Pathak, D, E-mail: Thomas.Cokelaer@astro.cf.ac.u, E-mail: Devanka.Pathak@astro.cf.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-21

    Most of the inspiralling compact binaries are expected to be circularized by the time their gravitational-wave signals enter the frequency band of ground-based detectors such as LIGO or VIRGO. However, it is not excluded that some of these binaries might still possess a significant eccentricity at a few tens of hertz. Despite this possibility, current search pipelines-based on matched filtering techniques-consider only non-eccentric templates. The effect of such an approximation on the loss of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) has been investigated by Martel and Poisson (1999 Phys. Rev. D 60 124008) in the context of initial LIGO detector. They ascertained that non-eccentric templates will be successful at detecting eccentric signals. We revisit their work by incorporating current and future ground-based detectors and precisely quantify the exact loss of SNR. In order to be more faithful to an actual search, we maximized the SNR over a template bank, whose minimal match is set to 95%. For initial LIGO detector, we claim that the initial eccentricity does not need to be taken into account in our searches for any system with total mass M element of [2-45]M{sub o-dot} if e{sub 0} approx< 0.05 because the loss of SNR (about 5%) is consistent with the discreteness of the template bank. Similarly, this statement is also true for systems with M element of [6-35]M{sub o-dot} and e{sub 0} approx< 0.10. However, by neglecting the eccentricity in our searches, significant loss of detection (larger than 10%) may arise as soon as e{sub 0} >= 0.05 for neutron-star binaries. We also provide exhaustive results for VIRGO, Advanced LIGO and Einstein Telescope detectors. It is worth noting that for Einstein Telescope, neutron star binaries with e{sub 0} >= 0.02 lead to a 10% loss of detection.

  4. Recent progress on the R and D program of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) proposed for the advanced gravitational wave detector, LIGO II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, A.; Cella, G.; Chenyang, W.; Salvo, R. de; Kovalik, J.; Marka, S.; Sannibale, V.; Takamori, A.; Tariq, H.; Viboud, N.

    2001-01-01

    High-performance Seismic Isolation Systems in gravitational wave interferometers are needed not only to increase the sensitivity of the detectors but also to guarantee long periods of stable operation. SAS is essentially a system which produces the required in-band seismic isolation by use of passive mechanical filters and actively reduces the out of band seismic noise using inertial damping. The passive isolation is achieved for all the 6 degrees of freedom, with an Inverted Pendulum and a chain of single wire pendula whose masses are the Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF). The active control is applied to reduce mainly the noise below 4 Hz and to damp the resonances of the chain acting from the inverted pendulum table. Here we present a brief overview of SAS and recent results achieved from the full scale SAS prototype

  5. Design of a high-magnification and low-aberration compact catadioptric telescope for the Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave interferometric detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buy, C; Barsuglia, M; Tacca, M; Genin, E; Gouaty, R

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Virgo is a major upgrade of the Virgo gravitational-wave detector, aiming to increase its sensitivity by an order of magnitude. Among the main modifications of the instrument, the size of the laser beam inside the central area has been roughly doubled. Consequently, the input/output optics systems have been re-designed. Due to the overall Advanced Virgo optical scheme, high-magnification and compact telescopes are needed. These telescopes also have to fulfill stringent requirements in terms of aberrations, separation of secondary beams and scattered light. In this paper we describe the design of the Advanced Virgo telescopes and their estimated performances in terms of tuning capability and optical properties. (paper)

  6. Whose banner are we waving? Exploring STEM partnerships for marginalized urban youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgeway, Monica L.; Yerrick, Randy K.

    2018-03-01

    This case study examines after school programming in citizen science from the perspective of Critical Race Theory. During the course of enacting community outreach projects this data was used to examine the positioning of experts, student, and teachers within the program. This study explores the role of race and ethnicity, and the ways in which marginalization can manifest itself with black urban youth and teachers. Implications for partner selection and training are addressed.

  7. Exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrenz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Oil and gas exploration is a unique kind of business. Businesses providing a vast and ever-changing panoply of products to markets are a focus of several disciplines' energetic study and analysis. The product inventory problem is robust, pertinent, and meaningful, and it merits the voluminous and protracted attention received from keen business practitioners. Prototypical business practitioners, be they trained by years of business hurly-burly, or sophisticated MBAs with arrays of mathematical algorithms and computers, are not normally prepared, however, to recognize the unique nature of exploration's inventories. Put together such a business practitioner with an explorationist and misunderstandings, hidden and open, are inevitable and predictably rife. The first purpose of this paper is to articulate the inherited inventory handling paradigms of business practitioners in relation to exploration's inventories. To do so, standard pedagogy in business administration is used and a case study of an exploration venture is presented. A second purpose is to show the burdens that the misunderstandings create. The result is not just business plans that go awry, but public policies that have effects opposite from those intended

  8. 1.25  GHz sine wave gating InGaAs/InP single-photon detector with a monolithically integrated readout circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Hao; Liu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Yin; Jin, Ge; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-12-15

    InGaAs/InP single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the key devices for applications requiring near-infrared single-photon detection. The gating mode is an effective approach to synchronous single-photon detection. Increasing gating frequency and reducing the module size are important challenges for the design of such a detector system. Here we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, an InGaAs/InP SPD with 1.25 GHz sine wave gating (SWG) using a monolithically integrated readout circuit (MIRC). The MIRC has a size of 15  mm×15  mm and implements the miniaturization of avalanche extraction for high-frequency SWG. In the MIRC, low-pass filters and a low-noise radio frequency amplifier are integrated based on the technique of low temperature co-fired ceramic, which can effectively reduce the parasitic capacitance and extract weak avalanche signals. We then characterize the InGaAs/InP SPD to verify the functionality and reliability of the MIRC, and the SPD exhibits excellent performance with 27.5% photon detection efficiency, a 1.2 kcps dark count rate, and 9.1% afterpulse probability at 223 K and 100 ns hold-off time. With this MIRC, one can further design miniaturized high-frequency SPD modules that are highly required for practical applications.

  9. Exploring short-GRB afterglow parameter space for observations in coincidence with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Resmi, L.; Misra, Kuntal; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Short duration Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) and their afterglows are among the most promising electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of Neutron Star (NS) mergers. The afterglow emission is broad-band, visible across the entire electromagnetic window from γ-ray to radio frequencies. The flux evolution in these frequencies is sensitive to the multidimensional afterglow physical parameter space. Observations of gravitational wave (GW) from BNS mergers in spatial and temporal coincidence with SGRB and associated afterglows can provide valuable constraints on afterglow physics. We run simulations of GW-detected BNS events and assuming that all of them are associated with a GRB jet which also produces an afterglow, investigate how detections or non-detections in X-ray, optical and radio frequencies can be influenced by the parameter space. We narrow down the regions of afterglow parameter space for a uniform top-hat jet model, which would result in different detection scenarios. We list inferences which can be drawn on the physics of GRB afterglows from multimessenger astronomy with coincident GW-EM observations.

  10. Gravitational-wave astronomy: delivering on the promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, B. F.

    2018-05-01

    Now that LIGO and Virgo have begun to detect gravitational-wave events with regularity, the field of gravitational-wave astronomy is beginning to realize its promise. Binary black holes and, very recently, binary neutron stars have been observed, and we are already learning much from them. The future, with improved sensitivity, more detectors and detectors like LISA in different frequency bands, has even more promise to open a completely hidden side of the Universe to our exploration. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  11. Gravitational-wave astronomy: delivering on the promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, B F

    2018-05-28

    Now that LIGO and Virgo have begun to detect gravitational-wave events with regularity, the field of gravitational-wave astronomy is beginning to realize its promise. Binary black holes and, very recently, binary neutron stars have been observed, and we are already learning much from them. The future, with improved sensitivity, more detectors and detectors like LISA in different frequency bands, has even more promise to open a completely hidden side of the Universe to our exploration.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  12. Exploring the performance of thin-film superconducting multilayers as kinetic inductance detectors for low-frequency detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songyuan; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.; Thomas, C. N.

    2018-01-01

    We have solved numerically the diffusive Usadel equations that describe the spatially varying superconducting proximity effect in Ti-Al thin-film bi- and trilayers with thickness values that are suitable for kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) to operate as photon detectors with detection thresholds in the frequency range of 50-90 GHz. Using Nam’s extension of the Mattis-Bardeen calculation of the superconductor complex conductivity, we show how to calculate the surface impedance for the spatially varying case, and hence the surface impedance quality factor. In addition, we calculate energy-and spatially-averaged quasiparticle lifetimes at temperatures well-below the transition temperature and compare to calculation in Al. Our results for the pair-breaking threshold demonstrate differences between bilayers and trilayers with the same total film thicknesses. We also predict high quality factors and long multilayer-averaged quasiparticle recombination times compared to thin-film Al. Our calculations give a route for designing KIDs to operate in this scientifically-important frequency regime.

  13. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsuglia, Matteo

    1999-01-01

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  14. High Precision Axial Coordinate Readout for an Axial 3-D PET Detector Module using a Wave Length Shifter Strip Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Joram, C; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Lustermann, W; Schinzel, D; Johnson, I; Renker, D; Albrecht, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel method to extract the axial coordinate from a matrix of long axially oriented crystals, which is based on wavelength shifting plastic strips. The method allows building compact 3-D axial gamma detector modules for PET scanners with excellent 3-dimensional spatial, timing and energy resolution while keeping the number of readout channels reasonably low. A voxel resolution of about 10 mm3 is expected. We assess the performance of the method in two independent ways, using classical PMTs and G-APDs to read out the LYSO (LSO) scintillation crystals and the wavelength shifting strips. We observe yields in excess of 35 photoelectrons from the strips for a 511 keV gamma and reconstruct the axial coordinate with a precision of about 2.5 mm (FWHM).

  15. Exploring changes in nursing students' attitudes towards the use of technology: A four-wave longitudinal panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Aljezawi, Ma'en; Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Habiballah, Laila; Akhu-Zaheya, Laila M

    2016-03-01

    It is essential for nursing students to be equipped with the necessary technology skills throughout and after their study period. Their acceptance of this technology depends largely on their attitudes towards technology. To explore the evolution in nursing students' attitudes towards technology, and to determine whether there was a change in participants' formal education in technology over their four years of study. A longitudinal panel study was conducted in a single school of nursing in Jordan. A total of 140 students were followed over their four years of undergraduate study. They completed the same tool (the Technology Attitude Scale) each year, to capture any changes in their attitudes towards technology across the years. In all four waves of data collection, students showed positive attitudes towards technology, with the highest attitude scores being in their final year (M=6.19, SD=0.72). As the students spent more time on their nursing education, they were found to have a more positive attitude. Thus, a strong positive relationship existed between this formal education in technology and attitudes: as the students' education in technology increased, their attitudes were more positive. A remarkable development in students' attitudes towards technology is reported in this study. The positive attitudes displayed by the students should be enhanced by providing technology-related subjects during their studies in nursing schools at a very early stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  17. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD) of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite: specifications and initial evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Imachi, Tomohiko; Yagitani, Satoshi; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsuda, Shoya; Shoji, Masafumi; Kurita, Satoshi; Hori, Tomoaki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Teramoto, Mariko; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Naoko; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Nomura, Reiko

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and initial evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), the key components for the electric field measurement of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase (ERG) satellite. WPT consists of two pairs of dipole antennas with 31-m tip-to-tip length. Each antenna element has a spherical probe (60 mm diameter) at each end of the wire (15 m length). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane of the spacecraft, which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun and enables to measure the electric field in the frequency range of DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost identical to the WPT of Plasma Wave Investigation aboard the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except for the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Al alloy, MMO: Ti alloy). EFD is a part of the EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA) receiver and measures the 2-ch electric field at a sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: ± 200 mV/m) and the 4-ch spacecraft potential at a sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: ± 100 V and ± 3 V/m), with the bias control capability of WPT. The electric field waveform provides (1) fundamental information about the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves in various magnetospheric statuses with the magnetic field measured by MGF and PWE-MSC. The spacecraft potential provides information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure combined with the electron density obtained from the upper hybrid resonance frequency provided by PWE-HFA. EFD has two data modes. The continuous (medium-mode) data are provided as (1) 2-ch waveforms at 64 Hz (in apoapsis mode, L > 4) or 256 Hz (in periapsis mode, L < 4), (2) 1-ch spectrum within 1-232 Hz with 1-s resolution, and (3) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 8 Hz. The burst (high-mode) data are intermittently obtained as (4) 2-ch waveforms at 512 Hz and (5) 4-ch spacecraft potential at 128 Hz and downloaded with the WFC

  18. Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD0 of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard ARASE: Specifications and Evaluation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Kasahara, Y.; Imachi, T.; Yagitani, S.; Kojima, H.; Kurita, S.; Shoji, M.; Hori, T.; Shinbori, A.; Teramoto, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, N.; Nishimura, Y.; Matsuoka, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kumamoto, A.; Nomura, R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes the specifications and the evaluation results of Wire Probe Antenna (WPT) and Electric Field Detector (EFD), which are the key parts of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) aboard the Arase satellite, in their initial operations and the beginning phase of the full observations. WPT consists of the two dipole antennas as electric field sensors with 32m tip-to-tip length, with a sphere probe (6 cm diameter) attached at each end of wires (length: 15-m). They are extended orthogonally in the spin plane which is roughly perpendicular to the Sun. It enables the PWE to measure the E-field from DC to 10 MHz. This system is almost compatible to the WPT of the Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) aboard BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter, except the material of the spherical probe (ERG: Aluminium alloy, MMO: Titanium-alloy). This paper shows the extended length evaluated by the Lorentz force (spacecraft velocity x B-field) and the antenna impedance as the basic information of the E-field measurement capability of the PWE E-field receivers, with the evaluation for the possible degradation of the probe surface coated by TiAlN as BepiColombo. EFD is the 2-channel low frequency electric receiver as a part of EWO (EFD/WFC/OFA), for the measurement of 2ch electric field in the spin-plane with the sampling rate of 512 Hz (dynamic range: +-200 mV/m, +-3 V/m) and the 4ch spacecraft potential with the sampling rate of 128 Hz (dynamic range: +-100 V), respectively, with the bias control capability fed to the WPT probes. The electric field in DC - 232Hz provides the capability to detect (1) the fundamental information of the plasma dynamics and accelerations and (2) the characteristics of MHD and ion waves with their Poynting vectors with the data measured by MGF and PWE/WFC-B connected to PWE/SCM. The spacecraft potential provides the electron density information with UHR frequency. This paper also introduces the data sets and their calibration status.

  19. Results of the IGEC-2 search for gravitational wave bursts during 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P; Baggio, L; Bassan, M; Bignotto, M; Bonaldi, M; Camarda, M; Carelli, P; Cavallari, G; Cerdonio, M; Chincarini, A; Coccia, Eugenio; Conti, L; D'Antonio, S; de Rossa, M; di Paolo Emilio, M; Drago, M; Dubath, F; Fafone, V; Falferi, P; Foffa, S; Fortini, P; Frasca, S; Gemme, G; Giordano, G; Giusfredi, G; Hamilton, W O; Hanson, J; Inguscio, M; Johnson, W W; Liguori, N; Longo, S; Maggiore, M; Marin, F; Mairni, A; McHuge, H P; Mezzena, R; Miller, P; Minenkov, Y; Mion, A; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Nettles, D; Ortolan, A; Pallottino, G V; Parodi, R; Piano Mortari, G; Poggi, S; Prodi, G A; Quintieri, L; Re, V; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Salemi, F; Soranzo, G; Sturani, R; Tafferello, L; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Vaccaronne, R; Vandoni, G; Vedovato, G; Vinante, A; Visco, M; Vitale, S; Weaver, J; Zendri, J P; Zhang, P

    2007-01-01

    The network of resonant bar detectors of gravitational waves resumed coordinated observations within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC-2). Four detectors are taking part in this collaboration: ALLEGRO, AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS. We present here the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts over 6 months during 2005, when IGEC-2 was the only gravitational wave observatory in operation. The network data analysis implemented is based on a time coincidence search among AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS, keeping the data from ALLEGRO for follow-up studies. With respect to the previous IGEC 1997-2000 observations, the amplitude sensitivity of the detectors to bursts improved by a factor about 3 and the sensitivity bandwidths are wider, so that the data analysis was tuned considering a larger class of detectable waveforms. Thanks to the higher duty cycles of the single detectors, we decided to focus the analysis on three-fold observation, so to ensure the identification of any singl...

  20. Cherenkov water detector NEVOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    A unique multipurpose Cherenkov water detector, the NEVOD facility, uses quasispherical measuring modules to explore all the basic components of cosmic rays on Earth's surface, including neutrinos. Currently, the experimental complex includes the Cherenkov water detector, a calibration telescope system, and a coordinate detector. This paper traces the basic development stages of NEVOD, examines research directions, presents the results obtained, including the search for the solution to the 'muon puzzle', and discusses possible future development prospects.

  1. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects.

  2. Exploring the mechanism of action of the sperm-triggered calcium-wave pacemaker in ascidian zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael; Levasseur, Mark; Wood, Chris; Whitaker, Michael; Jones, Keith T; McDougall, Alex

    2003-12-15

    In ascidians, as in mammals, sperm trigger repetitive Ca2+-waves that originate from cortical pacemakers situated in the vegetal hemisphere of the zygotes. In ascidians, a vegetal protrusion termed the contraction pole (CP) acts as the Ca2+-wave pacemaker, but the mechanism that underlies the generation of a Ca2+-wave pacemaker is not known. Here, we tested four hypotheses to determine which factors at the CP are involved in setting the pace of the ascidian Ca2+-wave pacemaker: (1) localized Ca2+ influx; (2) accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]; (3) accumulation of cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER); and (4) enrichment of the sperm activating factor. We developed a method of dynamically monitoring the location of the CP during fertilization using a plekstrin homology (PH) domain from phospholipase Cdelta1 coupled to green fluorescent protein (GFP) that binds PtdIns(4,5)P2. We found that eggs in Ca2+-free sea water displayed Ca2+ waves that originated from the CP, showing that enhanced CP Ca2+ influx does not determine the origin of the pacemaker. Also, disruption of the PH::GFP-labelled CP once it had formed did not dislodge the Ca2+-wave pacemaker from that site. Next, when we prevented the accumulation of cER at the CP, all of the Ca2+ waves came from the site of sperm-egg fusion and the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations was unaltered. These data show that local Ca2+ influx, the accumulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and cER at the CP are not required for Ca2+-wave pacemaker function and instead suggest that a factor associated with the sperm determines the site of the Ca2+-wave pacemaker. Finally, when we injected ascidian sperm extract into the centre of unfertilized ascidian eggs that had been treated with microfilament- and microtubule-disrupting drugs, all the Ca2+ waves still originated from near the plasma membrane, showing that the sperm factor does not require an intact cortex if it is enriched near the plasma membrane (PM). We

  3. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  4. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600

  5. Exploring the resonant vibration of thin plates: Reconstruction of Chladni patterns and determination of resonant wave numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P H; Wen, C P; Chiang, P Y; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2015-04-01

    The Chladni nodal line patterns and resonant frequencies for a thin plate excited by an electronically controlled mechanical oscillator are experimentally measured. Experimental results reveal that the resonant frequencies can be fairly obtained by means of probing the variation of the effective impedance of the exciter with and without the thin plate. The influence of the extra mass from the central exciter is confirmed to be insignificant in measuring the resonant frequencies of the present system. In the theoretical aspect, the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation is exploited to derive the response function as a function of the driving wave number for reconstructing experimental Chladni patterns. The resonant wave numbers are theoretically identified with the maximum coupling efficiency as well as the maximum entropy principle. Substituting the theoretical resonant wave numbers into the derived response function, all experimental Chladni patterns can be excellently reconstructed. More importantly, the dispersion relationship for the flexural wave of the vibrating plate can be determined with the experimental resonant frequencies and the theoretical resonant wave numbers. The determined dispersion relationship is confirmed to agree very well with the formula of the Kirchhoff-Love plate theory.

  6. Data analysis of gravitational-wave signals from spinning neutron stars. IV. An all-sky search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, Pia; Borkowski, Kazimierz M.; Jaranowski, Piotr; Krolak, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    We develop a set of data analysis tools for a realistic all-sky search for continuous gravitational-wave signals and we test our tools against simulated data. The aim of the paper is to prepare for an analysis of the real data from the EXPLORER bar detector; however, the methods that we present apply both to data from the resonant bar detectors that are currently in operation and the laser interferometric detectors that are in the final stages of construction and commissioning. With our techniques we shall be able to perform an all-sky coherent search of 2 days of data from the EXPLORER detector for a frequency bandwidth of 0.76 Hz in one month with 250 Mflops computing power. This search will detect all the continuous gravitational-wave signals with the dimensionless amplitude larger than 2.8x10 -23 with 99% confidence, assuming that the noise in the detector is Gaussian

  7. Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer: Status and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background in order to detect the characteristic signature of gravity waves created during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. PIPER combines cold /I.G K\\ optics, 5120 bolometric detectors, and rapid polarization modulation using VPM grids to achieve both high sensitivity and excellent control of systematic errors. I will discuss the current status and plans for the PIPER instrument.

  8. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  9. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  10. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  11. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  12. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashino, Katsuya, E-mail: hashino@jodo.sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kakizaki, Mitsuru, E-mail: kakizaki@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kanemura, Shinya, E-mail: kanemu@sci.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Ko, Pyungwon, E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Matsui, Toshinori, E-mail: matsui@kias.re.kr [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-10

    We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  13. Capability of simultaneous Rayleigh LiDAR and O2 airglow measurements in exploring the short period wave characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taori, Alok; Raghunath, Karnam; Jayaraman, Achuthan

    We use combination of simultaneous measurements made with Rayleigh lidar and O2 airglow monitoring to improve lidar investigation capability to cover a higher altitude range. We feed instantaneous O2 airglow temperatures instead the model values at the top altitude for subsequent integration method of temperature retrieval using Rayleigh lidar back scattered signals. Using this method, errors in the lidar temperature estimates converges at higher altitudes indicating better altitude coverage compared to regular methods where model temperatures are used instead of real-time measurements. This improvement enables the measurements of short period waves at upper mesospheric altitudes (~90 km). With two case studies, we show that above 60 km the few short period wave amplitude drastically increases while, some of the short period wave show either damping or saturation. We claim that by using such combined measurements, a significant and cost effective progress can be made in the understanding of short period wave processes which are important for the coupling across the different atmospheric regions.

  14. Using a Disciplinary Discourse Lens to Explore How Representations Afford Meaning Making in a Typical Wave Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enghag, Margareta; Forsman, Jonas; Linder, Cedric; MacKinnon, Allan; Moons, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a case study in a wave physics course at a Swedish university in order to investigate the relations between the representations used in the lessons and the experience of meaning making in interview-discussions. The grounding of these interview-discussions also included obtaining a rich description of the lesson environment in terms…

  15. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Hashino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  16. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  17. Exploring surface waves vortex interaction in deep water: a classical analog of the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vivanco, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple experiment to study the interaction of surface waves with a vertical vortex in the deep water regime. Similarly to what occurs in the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm problem for electron interacting with a magnetic potential, the effect of the vortex circulation is to introduce dislocations in the wavefront. These defects are explained taken into account the effects of advection on the propagating wavefront, due to the fluid motion. (Author)

  18. Making waves: visualizing fluid flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, Wout; Zwart, Valerie; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-01-01

    We explore the visualization of violent wave dynamics and erosion by waves and jets in laser-cut reliefs, laser engravings, and three-dimensional printing. For this purpose we built table-top experiments to cast breaking waves, and also explored the creation of extreme or rogue waves in larger wave

  19. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  20. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  1. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  2. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  3. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  4. Instrumentation for Kinetic-Inductance-Detector-Based Submillimeter Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ran

    A substantial amount of important scientific information is contained within astronomical data at the submillimeter and far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths, including information regarding dusty galaxies, galaxy clusters, and star-forming regions; however, these wavelengths are among the least-explored fields in astronomy because of the technological difficulties involved in such research. Over the past 20 years, considerable efforts have been devoted to developing submillimeter- and millimeter-wavelength astronomical instruments and telescopes. The number of detectors is an important property of such instruments and is the subject of the current study. Future telescopes will require as many as hundreds of thousands of detectors to meet the necessary requirements in terms of the field of view, scan speed, and resolution. A large pixel count is one benefit of the development of multiplexable detectors that use kinetic inductance detector (KID) technology. This dissertation presents the development of a KID-based instrument including a portion of the millimeter-wave bandpass filters and all aspects of the readout electronics, which together enabled one of the largest detector counts achieved to date in submillimeter-/millimeter-wavelength imaging arrays: a total of 2304 detectors. The work presented in this dissertation has been implemented in the MUltiwavelength Submillimeter Inductance Camera (MUSIC), a new instrument for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO).

  5. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  6. Systematic study of Si-based GeSn photodiodes with 2.6 µm detector cutoff for short-wave infrared detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thach; Du, Wei; Tran, Huong; Margetis, Joe; Tolle, John; Sun, Greg; Soref, Richard A; Naseem, Hameed A; Li, Baohua; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2016-03-07

    Normal-incidence Ge 1-x Sn x photodiode detectors with Sn compositions of 7 and 10% have been demonstrated. Such detectors were based on Ge/Ge 1-x Sn x /Ge double heterostructures grown directly on a Si substrate via a chemical vapor deposition system. A temperature-dependence study of these detectors was conducted using both electrical and optical characterizations from 300 to 77 K. Spectral response up to 2.6 µm was achieved for a 10% Sn device at room temperature. The peak responsivity and specific detectivity (D*) were measured to be 0.3 A/W and 4 × 10 9 cmHz 1/2 W -1 at 1.55 µm, respectively. The spectral D* of a 7% Sn device at 77 K was only one order-of-magnitude lower than that of an extended-InGaAs photodiode operating in the same wavelength range, indicating the promising future of GeSn-based photodetectors.

  7. Gravitation Waves seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort.

  8. The dawn of gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    On Sep 14 2015, gravitational waves were for the first time detected directly. This observation by the LIGO interferometric detectors marks the dawn of a new era in our observational study of the cosmos as a qualitatively new window to its exploration has been opened. This talk reviews some of the fundamental concepts of gravitational waves and the methodology employed for their observation. The first event, dubbed GW150914, and the properties of its source, as inferred from the observation, will be discussed. The talk concludes with a selected set of the most important topics where we expect gravitational-wave observations to deepen and either challenge or confirm our present understanding of the laws and the history of our universe.

  9. Detection of gravitational waves with resonant antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronga, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The status of the 4 operating cylindrical gravitational waves resonant antenna detectors is summarized. A short review is given of the experimental results and of the next generation projects. Resonant detectors are now sensitive to the strongest potential sources of gravitational waves in our galaxy and in the local group. Recently interferometric detectors have achieved very good perfomances, but resonant detectors are still competitive particularly for what concern the very good live-time

  10. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyaprakash B. S.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers, and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  11. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, Bernard F

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers), and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  12. Evaluation of non destructive testing to characterize the resistance of the prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level: permeability meter, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound, Schmidt sclerometer and metal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Chacon, Dannell

    2014-01-01

    Non destructive testing are determined to be correlated with resistance to compression and flexion of elements belonging to prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level. The characteristics of the non destructive testing are described, such as: measurer of permeability, Schmidt sclerometer, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound and metal detector. The columns and floor tiles are elaborated with 2 mixtures of different resistances at 28 days. The first more than 30 MPa and the second less than 25 MPa are sampled together with the control cylinders necessary to obtain the actual resistance according to ASTM C39. Last resistance testings to compression and Schmidt sclerometer are realized to control cylinders to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Non destructive testings (permeability meter Torrent, Schmidt sclerometer and determination of wave velocity by ultrasound) are performed in columns and floor tiles to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Last resistance testings to flexion is obtained by means of destructive tests of the columns and floor tiles sampled. The correlation of the data obtained is determined to derive values of compression resistance from non destructive testing [es

  13. Observational constraints on multimessenger sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Imre; Finley, Chad; Corsi, Alessandra; Márka, Szabolcs

    2011-12-16

    Many astronomical sources of intense bursts of photons are also predicted to be strong emitters of gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). Moreover some suspected classes, e.g., choked gamma-ray bursts, may only be identifiable via nonphoton messengers. Here we explore the reach of current and planned experiments to address this question. We derive constraints on the rate of GW and HEN bursts based on independent observations by the initial LIGO and Virgo GW detectors and the partially completed IceCube (40-string) HEN detector. We then estimate the reach of joint GW+HEN searches using advanced GW detectors and the completed km(3) IceCube detector to probe the joint parameter space. We show that searches undertaken by advanced detectors will be capable of detecting, constraining, or excluding, several existing models with 1 yr of observation. © 2011 American Physical Society

  14. Exploring the electron density localization in single MoS2 monolayers by means of a localize-electrons detector and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosslen Aray

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the electron density localization in a MoS2 monolayer under 0 % to 11% tensile strain has been systematically studied by means of a localized electron detector function and the Quantum Theory of atoms in molecules. At 10% tensile strain, this monolayer become metallic. It was found that for less than 6.5% of applied stress, the same atomic structure of the equilibrium geometry (0% strain is maintained; while over 6.5% strain induces a transformation to a structure where the sulfur atoms placed on the top and bottom layer form S2 groups. The localized electron detector function shows the presence of zones of highly electron delocalization extending throughout the Mo central layer. For less than 10% tensile strain, these zones comprise the BCPs and the remainder CPs in separates regions of the space; while for the structures beyond 10% strain, all the critical points are involved in a region of highly delocalized electrons that extends throughout the material. This dissimilar electron localization pattern is like to that previously reported for semiconductors such as Ge bulk and metallic systems such as transition metals bulk.

  15. Millimeter-wave receiver design for plasma diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Hansen, S. K.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2016-01-01

    Scattered millimeter waves entering from the collective Thomson scattering diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade fusion device are generally elliptically polarized. In order to convert the millimeter waves to linearly polarized waves (required for the detector), birefringent window assemblies (sapphire) ha...

  16. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  17. Data acquisition and detector characterization of GEO600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetter, K; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Berukoff, S; Bose, S; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Cutler, C; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Dupuis, R; Freise, A; Grote, H; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hough, J; Lueck, H; Malec, M; Mohanty, S D; Mukherjee, S; Nagano, S; Papa, M A; Robertson, D; Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, B F; Sintes, A M; Strain, K A; Taylor, I J; Vecchio, A; Ward, H; Weiland, U; Willke, B; Woan, G

    2002-01-01

    The data acquisition system of the gravitational wave detector GEO600 is recording the first data now. Data from detector subsystems and environmental channels are being acquired. The data acquisition system is described and first results from the detector characterization work are being presented. We analysed environmental influences on the detector to determine noise propagation through the detector. Long-term monitoring allowed us to see long-timescale drifts in subsystems

  18. Extended wavelength InGaAs on GaAs using InAlAs buffer for back-side-illuminated short-wave infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Lars; John, Joachim; Degroote, Stefan; Borghs, Gustaaf; Hoof, Chris van; Nemeth, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an experimental study of back-side-illuminated InGaAs photodiodes grown on GaAs and sensitive in the short-wave infrared up to 2.4 μm. Standard metamorphic InGaAs or IR-transparent InAlAs buffers were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. We studied dark current and photocurrent as a function of buffer thickness, buffer material, and temperature. A saturation of the dark current with buffer thickness was not observed. The maximum resistance area product was ∼10 Ω cm2 at 295 K. The dark current above 200 K was dominated by generation-recombination current. A pronounced dependence of the photocurrent on the buffer thickness was observed. The peak external quantum efficiency was 46% (at 1.6 μm) without antireflective coating

  19. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  1. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  2. Electromagnetic waves in gravitational wave spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, M.; Bini, D.; Ortolan, A.; Fortini, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have considered the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a space-time representing an exact gravitational plane wave and calculated the induced changes on the four-potential field Aμ of a plane electromagnetic wave. By choosing a suitable photon round-trip in a Michelson interferometer, we have been able to identify the physical effects of the exact gravitational wave on the electromagnetic field, i.e. phase shift, change of the polarization vector, angular deflection and delay. These results have been exploited to study the response of an interferometric gravitational wave detector beyond the linear approximation of the general theory of relativity. A much more detailed examination of this problem can be found in our paper recently published in Classical and Quantum Gravity (28 (2011) 235007).

  3. Exploring the diphoton final state at the LHC at 13 TeV: searches for new particles, and the Higgs boson mass measurement with the ATLAS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00436367

    New high-mass states decaying into two photons are predicted in many extensions of the Standard Model (SM). The diphoton final state provides a clean experimental signature with excellent invariant mass resolution and well-known smooth backgrounds. This document presents a search for new particles with the diphoton final state at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector. The $pp$ collision data used were collected during 2015 and 2016 runs with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV. The total corresponding luminosity is 37 fb$^{-1}$. In this thesis, I show my contribution to the search of scalar particle. The studies of signal modeling for different mass and width hypothesis will be described in details. The estimation of selection efficiencies and statistical interpretations of results are performed. The data are consistent with the Standard Model background-only hypothesis. Limits on the production cross section times branching ratio to two photons of such resonances as a function of the res...

  4. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  5. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  6. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  7. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  8. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  9. Lepton detector workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imlay, R.; Iwata, S.; Jacobs, S.

    1976-01-01

    A discussion is given of the initial detector design, focusing on the cost estimates and on the inner detector modules. With regard to inner modules, the rate problem was examined for the closest elements, and the question whether one should use argon or lead-liquid scintillator calorimeters was discussed. New designs which involved major modifications to the lepton detector are considered. The major motivations for alternative designs were twofold. One was that the original detector looked quite expensive, and a study of the tradeoff of money versus physics had not really been done yet. The second point was that, since the physics region to be explored was totally new ground, one would like to leave as many options open as possible and build a detector that was as flexible as possible. A scaled-down version of the original design, which was strongly favored by this study, appears to save an appreciable amount of money with a small decrease in the initial physics scope. The more modular designs seem quite attractive, but not enough time was spent to demonstrate feasibility

  10. The status of the Brazilian spherical detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, O D; Andrade, L A; Filho, L Camargo; Costa, C A; Araujo, J C N de; Neto, E C de Rey; Souza, S T de; Fauth, A C; Frajuca, C; Frossati, G; Furtado, S R; Furtado, V G S; Magalhaes, N S; Jr, R M Marinho; Matos, E S; Meliani, M T; Melo, J L; Miranda, O D; Jr, N F Oliveira; Ribeiro, K L; Salles, K B M; Stellati, C; Jr, W F Velloso

    2002-01-01

    The first phase of the Brazilian Graviton Project is the construction and operation of the gravitational wave detector Mario Schenberg at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo. This gravitational wave spherical antenna is planned to feature a sensitivity better than h = 10 -21 Hz -1/2 at the 3.0-3.4 kHz bandwidth, and to work not only as a detector, but also as a testbed for the development of new technologies. Here we present the status of this detector

  11. Gravitational waves and electrodynamics: new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2017-01-01

    Given the recent direct measurement of gravitational waves (GWs) by the LIGO-VIRGO collaboration, the coupling between electromagnetic fields and gravity have a special relevance since it opens new perspectives for future GW detectors and also potentially provides information on the physics of highly energetic GW sources. We explore such couplings using the field equations of electrodynamics on (pseudo) Riemann manifolds and apply it to the background of a GW, seen as a linear perturbation of Minkowski geometry. Electric and magnetic oscillations are induced that propagate as electromagnetic waves and contain information as regards the GW which generates them. The most relevant results are the presence of longitudinal modes and dynamical polarization patterns of electromagnetic radiation induced by GWs. These effects might be amplified using appropriate resonators, effectively improving the signal to noise ratio around a specific frequency. We also briefly address the generation of charge density fluctuations induced by GWs and the implications for astrophysics.

  12. Gravitational waves and electrodynamics: new perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S.N. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Astrofisica e Ciencias do Espaco, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    Given the recent direct measurement of gravitational waves (GWs) by the LIGO-VIRGO collaboration, the coupling between electromagnetic fields and gravity have a special relevance since it opens new perspectives for future GW detectors and also potentially provides information on the physics of highly energetic GW sources. We explore such couplings using the field equations of electrodynamics on (pseudo) Riemann manifolds and apply it to the background of a GW, seen as a linear perturbation of Minkowski geometry. Electric and magnetic oscillations are induced that propagate as electromagnetic waves and contain information as regards the GW which generates them. The most relevant results are the presence of longitudinal modes and dynamical polarization patterns of electromagnetic radiation induced by GWs. These effects might be amplified using appropriate resonators, effectively improving the signal to noise ratio around a specific frequency. We also briefly address the generation of charge density fluctuations induced by GWs and the implications for astrophysics. (orig.)

  13. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  14. The observation of nonlinear ion cyclotron wave excitation during high-harmonic fast wave heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Saito, K.; Mutoh, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Yamada, I.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ohdachi, S.; Morita, S.; Nomura, G.; Shimpo, F.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.; Oosako, T.; Takase, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A wave detector, a newly designed magnetic probe, is installed in the large helical device (LHD). This wave detector is a 100-turn loop coil with electrostatic shield. Comparing a one-loop coil to this detector, this detector has roughly constant power coupling in the lower frequency range of 40 MHz, and it can easily detect magnetic wave in the frequency of a few megahertz. During high-harmonic fast wave heating, lower frequency waves (<10 MHz) were observed in the LHD for the first time, and for the power density threshold of lower frequency wave excitation (7.5 MHz) the power density of excited pumped wave (38.47 MHz) was approximately -46 dBm/Hz. These lower frequencies are kept constant for electron density and high energy particle distribution, and these lower frequency waves seem to be ion cyclotron waves caused by nonlinear wave-particle interaction, for example, parametric decay instability.

  15. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  16. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors - the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals - and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, “firewalls” and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy. (paper)

  17. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  18. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  19. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  20. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. New submillimeter detectors and antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, H.R.; Reible, S.A.; Sollner, G.; Parker, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary investigation has been made into the use of SIS (superconductor--insulator--superconductor) diodes for possible roles in sub-millimeter imaging systems. That is, extremely low noise, millimeter wave detectors and mixers have recently been reported which depend on single-particle tunnelling between two superconducting films separated by a thin oxide layer. The combination of excellent low-frequency sensitivity and well-developed fabrication technology make the SIS mixers particularly attractive for the systems using antenna structures and arrays in millimeter and submillimeter regions. The SIS diodes of Nb-Nb 2 O 5 -Pb showed a strong video response to the radiation which could be differentiated from the regular Josephson effect since it was not affected by a magnetic field. In exploring the three-terminal devices for possible detector and source applications in submillimeter region, the authors first determined that millimeter and submillimeter radiation could be effectively coupled to and detected in high-frequency FETs. Video response was readily obtained at 800 GHz, and carcinotron radiation at 350 GHz was mixed with the 5th harmonic of a 70 GHz klystron, producing over 45 db signal-to-noise ratio in the intermediate frequency. Since FET can function as a three-terminal oscillator simultaneously detecting submillimeter radiation or optical beats, it has interesting possibility, such as self-oscillating mixers or subharmonic local oscillators. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Transient response of self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Gebureck, P.; Stegemann, D.

    The behaviour of self-powered neutron detectors with Co, Er, Hf and Pt emitters was investigated during reactor square wave and pulse operation. The detector's response was compared with the current of an excore ionization chamber. Characteristical deviations from linearity were observed with all detectors at fast reactor periods. The exact cause of these deviations is not yet fully understood but several possibilities for the nonlinear behaviour of self-powered neutron detectors are outlined. (author)

  3. The potential for very high-frequency gravitational wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruise, A M

    2012-01-01

    The science case for observing gravitational waves at frequencies in the millihertz-kilohertz range using LIGO, VIRGO, GEO600 or LISA is very strong and the first results are expected at these frequencies. However, as gravitational wave astronomy progresses beyond the first detections, other frequency bands may be worth exploring. Early predictions of gravitational wave emission from discrete sources at very much higher frequencies (megahertz and above) have been published and more recent studies of cosmological signals from inflation, Kaluza-Klein modes from gravitational interactions in brane worlds and plasma instabilities surrounding violent astrophysical events, are all possible sources. This communication examines current observational possibilities and the detector technology required to make meaningful observations at these frequencies. (paper)

  4. Results of the IGEC-2 search for gravitational wave bursts during 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P.; Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Marini, A.; Modestino, G.; Quintieri, L.; Ronga, F.; Baggio, L.; Bassan, M.; Fafone, V.; Moleti, A.; Bignotto, M.; Cerdonio, M.; Conti, L.; Drago, M.; Liguori, N.; Bonaldi, M.; Falferi, P.; Vinante, A.; Camarda, M.

    2007-01-01

    The network of resonant bar detectors of gravitational waves resumed coordinated observations within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC-2). Four detectors are taking part in this Collaboration: ALLEGRO, AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS. We present here the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts over 6 months during 2005, when IGEC-2 was the only gravitational wave observatory in operation. The implemented network data analysis is based on a time coincidence search among AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS; ALLEGRO data was reserved for follow-up studies. The network amplitude sensitivity to bursts improved by a factor ≅3 over the 1997-2000 IGEC observations; the wider sensitive band also allowed the analysis to be tuned over a larger class of waveforms. Given the higher single-detector duty factors, the analysis was based on threefold coincidence, to ensure the identification of any single candidate of gravitational waves with high statistical confidence. The false detection rate was as low as 1 per century. No candidates were found

  5. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  6. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  7. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  8. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  9. Design Choices Underlying the Software as a Service (SaaS) Business Model from the User Perspective : Exploring the Fourth Wave of Outsourcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joha, A.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.

    2012-01-01

    Software as a Service (SaaS) can be viewed as the fourth wave of outsourcing. SaaS is a relatively new type of service delivery model in which a service provider delivers its services over the web to many users on a pay per use or period basis. In the scarce literature available, the SaaS business

  10. Exploring the role of wave drag in the stable stratified oceanic and atmospheric bottom boundary layer in the cnrs-toulouse (cnrm-game) large stratified water flume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Paci, A.; Calmer, R.; Belleudy, A.; Canonici, J.C.; Murguet, F.; Valette, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a laboratory experiment in the CNRM-GAME (Toulouse) stratified water flume of a stably stratified boundary layer, in order to quantify the momentum transfer due to orographically induced gravity waves by gently undulating hills in a boundary layer flow. In a stratified fluid, a

  11. Gravitational waves: an introduction and a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.O.

    1983-01-01

    The author gives a description of the effect an experimentalist has to measure to detect gravitational waves. He goes on to describe the design of gravitational wave detectors and the sensitivity of the components. (Auth.)

  12. Avalanche photodiodes for ISABELLE detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    At ISABELLE some requirements for detecting bursts of photons are not met by standard photomultiplier tubes. The characteristics of immunity to magnetic fields, small size (few mm), low power consumption (approx. 100 mW), insensitivity to optical overloads, and wide dynamic range (approx. 60 dB) are achieved with difficulty, if at all, with PMTs. These are characteristics of the solid state avalanche photodiode (APD), the preferred detector for light-wave communications. Successful field tests with APD detectors stimulated the design of standard optical-fiber communication systems to replace wire carriers by the early 1980's. In other characteristics, i.e., counting rate, pulse-height resolution, effective quantum efficiency, detection efficiency, and reliability, bare APDs are equivalent to standard PMTs. APDs with currently available amplifiers cannot resolve single photoelectrons but they could provide reasonable detection efficiencies and pulse-height resolution for packets of approx. > 100 photons. Commercially available APDs can cost up to 100 times as much as PMTs per active area, but they are potentially much cheaper. Six topics are discussed: (1) detectors for light-wave communication and detectors for particles, (2) avalanche photodiodes, (3) commercially available APDs, (4) dynamic response of PMTs and bare APDs, (5) photon counting with cold APDs, and (6) conclusions and recommendations

  13. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  14. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-01-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  15. Spin-wave dynamics and exchange interactions in multiferroic NdFe3(BO3)4 explored by inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosovsky, I. V.; Ovsyanikov, A. K.; Aristov, D. N.; Matveeva, P. G.; Mukhin, A. A.; Boehm, M.; Regnault, L.-P.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic excitations and exchange interactions in multiferroic NdFe3(BO3)4 were studied by inelastic neutron scattering in the phase with commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. The observed spectra were analyzed in the frame of the linear spin-wave theory. It was shown that only the model, which includes the exchange interactions within eight coordination spheres, describes satisfactorily all observed dispersion curves. The calculation showed that the spin-wave dynamics is governed by the strongest antiferromagnetic intra-chain interaction and three almost the same inter-chain interactions. Other interactions, including ferromagnetic exchange, appeared to be insignificant. The overall energy balance of the antiferromagnetic inter-chain exchange interactions, which couple the moments from the adjacent ferromagnetic layers as well as within a layer, stabilizes ferromagnetic arrangement in the latter. It demonstrates that the pathway geometry plays a crucial role in forming of the magnetic structure.

  16. Development of acoustic particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Tadayoshi; Hinode, Fujio; Konno, Osamu

    1999-01-01

    To detect acoustic sign from electron, determination of acoustic radiation from high energy electron and detector were studied. When charge particles pass through medium, energy loss generates local expansion and contraction of medium and pressure compression wave. We need caustic element with 10 -5 Pa the minimum acoustic receive sensitivity and from 10 to 100 kHz frequency sensitivity characteristic. Elements were made by Low-Q materials, piezoelectric materials (PZT). Various sharp of elements were constructed and measured. 50 mm spherical element showed 38 m V/Pa, the best sensitivity. Our developed acoustic element could detect acoustic radiation generated by electron beam from accelerator. The wave sharp detected proved the same as bipolar wave, which was given theoretically. The pressure generated by beam was proportional to the energy loss E. 200 MeV electron beam existed about 95% particles on the incident axis. So that acoustic detector on the axis proved to detect sound wave generated on the beam axis. (S.Y.)

  17. Shower maximum detector for SDC calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, J.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype for the SDC end-cap (EM) calorimeter complete with a pre-shower and a shower maximum detector was tested in beams of electrons and Π's at CERN by an SDC subsystem group. The prototype was manufactured from scintillator tiles and strips read out with 1 mm diameter wave-length shifting fibers. The design and construction of the shower maximum detector is described, and results of laboratory tests on light yield and performance of the scintillator-fiber system are given. Preliminary results on energy and position measurements with the shower max detector in the test beam are shown. (authors). 4 refs., 5 figs

  18. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Finkenzeller, J.; Kiiehn, G.; Lichtenberg, W.

    1984-01-01

    In an exemplary embodiment, a flat radiation beam is detected having a common electrode disposed parallel to the beam plane at one side and a common support with a series of individual conductors providing electrodes opposite successive portions of the common electrode and lying in a plane also parallel to the beam plane. The beam may be fan-shaped and the individual electrodes may be aligned with respective ray paths separated by uniform angular increments in the beam plane. The individual conductors and the connection thereof to the exterior of the detector housing may be formed on an insulator which can be folded into a T-shape for leading the supply conductors for alternate individual conductors toward terminals at opposite sides of the chamber

  19. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  20. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.

    1979-01-01

    An ionization smoke detector consisting of two electrodes defining an ionization chamber permitting entry of smoke, a radioactive source to ionize gas in the chamber and a potential difference applied across the first and second electrodes to cause an ion current to flow is described. The current is affected by entry of smoke. An auxiliary electrode is positioned in the ionization chamber between the first and second electrodes, and it is arranged to maintain or create a potential difference between the first electrode and the auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode may be used for testing or for adjustment of sensitivity. A collector electrode divides the chamber into two regions with the auxiliary electrode in the outer sensing region. (U.K.)

  1. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A safe and reliable apparatus for detecting products of combustion and aerosols in the atmosphere was developed which uses a beta source. It is easy to adjust for optimum performance. The ionization detector comprises a double chamber; one of the chambers is the basic sensing chamber. The sensing chamber is ported to both the secondary chambers to account for slow ambient changes in the atmosphere outside of the chamber. The voltages from the ionization chamber are adjusted with electrodes in each chamber. The ionization chamber contains baffles to direct the air to be sensed as well as an electrostatic screen. A unique electronic circuit provides an inexpensive and reliable means for detecting the signal change which occurs in the ionization chamber. The decision level of the alarm circuit can be adjusted to allow for any desired sensitivity. (D.N.)

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    , periodic waves, waves from inspiraling binaries, and stochastic backgrounds of cosmological origin. In chapter 8 the author explains the inner workings of (cylindrical and spherical) resonant-mass detectors. The presentation begins with a detailed study of the response a gravitational wave produces in an elastic body. It moves on to the exploration of a simple model for the detector's read-out system, in terms of coupled oscillators. After a survey of noise sources within a resonant bar and a discussion of the standard quantum limit and non-demolition measurements, the author describes the physics of a resonant sphere, whose normal modes of vibrations can reveal each one of the two polarization states of a gravitational wave. Interferometric detectors are the topic of chapter 9, the book's concluding chapter. The author first explains how the passage of a gravitational wave affects the optical path within a simple Michelson interferometer, and he next moves on to the more complicated (and more relevant) case of a Fabry Perot interferometer. Step by step he adds layers of complexity that eventually produce a more realistic (but still idealized) version of an interferometric detector. And after another survey of noise sources, the author describes the current status of the LIGO and VIRGO detectors. I must say that I especially appreciated the last two chapters on detector modeling. What I like most is the fact that while an understanding of gravitational waves and their sources relies mostly on general relativity and astrophysics, an understanding of detectors relies on a lot more of interesting physics. For example, elasticity theory, thermal physics, and quantum mechanics are required to describe the operations of a resonant bar, while wave and quantum optics are required to model an interferometer; the joining of gravitational-wave physics with these subjects gives rise to a very rich field of study. Chapter 9, however, contains a disappointment: except for a short

  3. Design Choices Underlying the Software as a Service (SaaS) Business Model from the User Perspective: Exploring the Fourth Wave of Outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Joha, A.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.

    2012-01-01

    Software as a Service (SaaS) can be viewed as the fourth wave of outsourcing. SaaS is a relatively new type of service delivery model in which a service provider delivers its services over the web to many users on a pay per use or period basis. In the scarce literature available, the SaaS business model is almost always analyzed from the perspective of the service provider perspective, and rarely from the user organization. Using the unified business model conceptual framework, two case studi...

  4. Looking towards gravitational wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Lisa

    2009-05-01

    It is an exciting time in gravitational wave research. The first generation ground detectors, which aim to detect gravitational waves in the audio-frequency region, have been successfully operated at their design sensitivity. One integrated year of coincident data from the three LIGO interferometers in United States has been collected between 2005 and 2007, in partial coincidence with the two European detectors, VIRGO and GEO. All the detectors are currently being upgraded, and they will come back on-line in the next few months with a factor 2 better sensitivity. A major upgrade of LIGO and VIRGO, scheduled to happen immediately after their upcoming science runs, will bring on-line second generation detectors 4 years from now. Their sensitivity is designed to be 10 times better than the first generation detectors, resulting in an expected event rate of at least a few per year. Looking farther into the future, space-based detectors such as LISA propose to cover a lower range of frequencies which are inaccessible on Earth, enhancing the opportunity of understanding our Universe trough gravitational waves.

  5. Listening for the music of gravity [TAMA and LIGO detectors

    CERN Document Server

    DeSalvo, R

    2001-01-01

    The latest generation of high-precision experiments is bringing observers one step closer to detecting the elusive song of gravity waves. The authors discuss the progress of Japan's TAMA project and the LIGO detector. (0 refs).

  6. Silicon radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    1995-01-01

    An introduction to and an overview of function principles and properties of semiconductor radiation detectors is attempted. The paper is addressed to people interested in detector development but not already experts in the field of semiconductor detectors. (orig.)

  7. Gravitational wave reception by a sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Dreitlein, J.

    1975-01-01

    The reception of gravitational waves by an elastic self-gravitating spherical detector is studied in detail. The equations of motion of a detector driven by a gravitational wave are presented in the intuitively convenient coordinate system of Fermi. An exact analytic solution is given for the homogeneous isotropic sphere. Nonlinear effects of a massive self-gravitating system are computed for a body of mass equal to that of the earth, and are shown to be numerically important

  8. Report on neutral particle detectors and QED: PEP summer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.; Bulos, F.; Buschhorn, G.

    1974-08-01

    The exploration of the neutral particle final states in e + e/sup /minus// annihilation using a 4π neutral particle detector is discussed. Charge particle final state physics is also considered in the context of a neutral detector. Design criteria are discussed, and a possible detector design is presented. 15 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Academic Training: Gravitational Waves Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 16, 17, 18 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Gravitational Waves Astronomy M. LANDRY, LIGO Hanford Observatory, Richland, USA Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www...

  10. Calibration of detector efficiency of neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hongsheng; He Xijun; Xu Rongkun; Peng Taiping

    2001-01-01

    BF 3 neutron detector has been set up. Detector efficiency is calibrated by associated particle technique. It is about 3.17 x 10 -4 (1 +- 18%). Neutron yield of neutron generator per pulse (10 7 /pulse) is measured by using the detector

  11. Millimeter wave and terahertz wave transmission characteristics in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Ping; Qin Long; Chen Weijun; Zhao Qing; Shi Anhua; Huang Jie

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on the shock tube to explore the transmission characteristics of millimeter wave and terahertz wave in high density plasmas, in order to meet the communication requirement of hypersonic vehicles during blackout. The transmission attenuation curves of millimeter wave and terahertz wave in different electron density and collision frequency were obtained. The experiment was also simulated by auxiliary differential equation finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) methods. The experimental and numerical results show that the transmission attenuation of terahertz wave in the plasma is smaller than that of millimeter wave under the same conditions. The transmission attenuation of terahertz wave in the plasma is enhanced with the increase of electron density. The terahertz wave is a promising alternative to the electromagnetic wave propagation in high density plasmas. (authors)

  12. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  14. Calibration of the ALLEGRO resonant detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Martin P [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Johnson, Warren W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hamilton, William O [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hanson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Heng, Ik Siong [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); McNeese, Daniel [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Miller, Phillip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Nettles, Damon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Weaver, Jordan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Zhang Ping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2005-09-21

    We describe a method for calibrating the ALLEGRO resonant detector. The resulting response function can be used to transform the observed data backwards to gravitational strain data. These data are the input to a cross-correlation analysis to search for stochastic gravitational waves.

  15. Calibration of the ALLEGRO resonant detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, Martin P; Johnson, Warren W; Hamilton, William O; Hanson, Jonathan; Heng, Ik Siong; McNeese, Daniel; Miller, Phillip; Nettles, Damon; Weaver, Jordan; Zhang Ping

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for calibrating the ALLEGRO resonant detector. The resulting response function can be used to transform the observed data backwards to gravitational strain data. These data are the input to a cross-correlation analysis to search for stochastic gravitational waves

  16. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers

  17. Generalized mean detector for collaborative spectrum sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a unified generalized eigenvalue based spectrum sensing framework referred to as Generalized mean detector (GMD) has been introduced. The generalization of the detectors namely (i) the eigenvalue ratio detector (ERD) involving the ratio of the largest and the smallest eigenvalues; (ii) the Geometric mean detector (GEMD) involving the ratio of the largest eigenvalue and the geometric mean of the eigenvalues and (iii) the Arithmetic mean detector (ARMD) involving the ratio of the largest and the arithmetic mean of the eigenvalues is explored. The foundation of the proposed unified framework is based on the calculation of exact analytical moments of the random variables of test statistics of the respective detectors. In this context, we approximate the probability density function (PDF) of the test statistics of the respective detectors by Gaussian/Gamma PDF using the moment matching method. Finally, we derive closed-form expressions to calculate the decision threshold of the eigenvalue based detectors by exchanging the derived exact moments of the random variables of test statistics with the moments of the Gaussian/Gamma distribution function. The performance of the eigenvalue based detectors is compared with the traditional detectors such as energy detector (ED) and cyclostationary detector (CSD) and validate the importance of the eigenvalue based detectors particularly over realistic wireless cognitive environments. Analytical and simulation results show that the GEMD and the ARMD yields considerable performance advantage in realistic spectrum sensing scenarios. Moreover, our results based on proposed simple and tractable approximation approaches are in perfect agreement with the empirical results. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  18. The GRANDE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Bond, R.; Coleman, L.; Rollefson, A.; Wold, D.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, H.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Wilson, C.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a detector facility which meets the requirements outlined above for a next-generation instrument. GRANDE (Gamma Ray and Neutrino DEtector) is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. (orig.)

  19. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  20. Neutrino bursts and gravitational waves experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnoli, C; Galeotti, P; Saavedra, O [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1978-05-01

    Several experiments have been performed in many countries to observe gravitational waves or neutrino bursts. Since their simultaneous emission may occur in stellar collapse, the authors evaluate the effect of neutrino bursts on gravitational wave antennas and suggest the usefulness of a time correlation among the different detectors.

  1. Solid state detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunarwan Prayitno; Ahmad Rifai

    2010-01-01

    Much has been charged particle detector radiation detector made by the industry, especially those engaged in the development of detection equipment and components. The development and further research will be made solid state detector with silicon material. To be able to detect charged particles (radiation), required the processing of silicon material into the detector material. The method used to make silicon detector material is a lithium evaporations. Having formed an intrinsic region contactor installation process, and with testing. (author)

  2. A Detector for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, T.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary design and development work on polarized detectors intended to enable Cosmic Microwave Background polarization measurements that will probe the first moments of the universe. The ultimate measurement will be challenging, requiring background-limited detectors and good control of systematic errors. Toward this end, we are integrating the beam control of HE-11 feedhorns with the sensitivity of transition-edge sensors. The coupling between these two devices is achieved via waveguide probe antennas and superconducting microstrip lines. This implementation allows band-pass filters to be incorporated on the detector chip. We believe that a large collection of single-mode polarized detectors will eventually be required for the reliable detection of the weak polarized signature that is expected to result from gravitational waves produced by cosmic inflation. This focal plane prototype is an important step along the path to this detection, resulting in a capability that will enable various future high performance instrument concepts.

  3. GEO 600 online detector characterization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, R; Babak, S; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T

    2005-01-01

    A world-wide network of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is currently operational. The detectors in the network are still in their commissioning phase and are expected to achieve their design sensitivity over the next year or so. Each detector is a complex instrument involving many optical, mechanical and electronic subsystems and each subsystem is a source of noise at the output of the detector. Therefore, in addition to recording the main gravitational wave data channel at the output of the interferometer, the state of each detector subsystem is monitored and recorded. The analysis of these subsidiary data serves a dual purpose: first, it helps us to identify the primary sources of noise which could then be either removed altogether or reduced substantially and second, it helps us in vetoing spurious signals at the output of the interferometer. However, since these subsidiary data are both large in volume (1 MB s -1 ) as well as complex in nature, it is not possible to look at all these data manually. We require an online monitoring and analysis tool which can process all the data channels for various noise artefacts such as transients, drifting of narrowband noise sources, noise couplings between data channels etc, and summarize the results of the analysis in a manner that can be accessed and interpreted conveniently. In this paper we describe the GEO 600 online detector characterization system (GODCS), which is the tool that is being used to monitor the output of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector situated near Hanover in Germany. We describe the various algorithms that we use and how the results of several algorithms can be combined to make meaningful statements about the state of the detector. We also give implementation details such as the software architecture and the storage and retrieval of the output of GODCS. This paper will be useful to researchers in the area of gravitational wave astronomy as a record of the various analyses and

  4. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  5. Gravitational Waves: A New Observational Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan B.

    2010-01-01

    The era of gravitational wave astronomy is rapidly approaching, with a likely start date around the middle of this decade ' Gravitational waves, emitted by accelerated motions of very massive objects, provide detailed information about strong-field gravity and its sources, including black holes and neutron stars, that electromagnetic probes cannot access. In this talk I will discuss the anticipated sources and the status of the extremely sensitive detectors (both ground and space based) that will make gravitational wave detections possible. As ground based detectors are now taking data, I will show some initial science results related to measured upper limits on gravitational wave signals. Finally Z will describe new directions including advanced detectors and joint efforts with other fields of astronomy.

  6. Development Of A Multicolor Sub/millimeter Camera Using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaerth, James A.; Czakon, N. G.; Day, P. K.; Downes, T. P.; Duan, R.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Hollister, M. I.; LeDuc, H. G.; Maloney, P. R.; Mazin, B. A.; Noroozian, O.; Sayers, J.; Siegel, S.; Vayonakis, A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting resonators useful for detecting light from the millimeter-wave to the X-ray. These detectors are easily multiplexed, as the resonances can be tuned to slightly different frequencies, allowing hundreds of detectors to be read out simultaneously using a single feedline. The Multicolor Submillimeter Inductance Camera, MUSIC, will use 2304 antenna-coupled MKIDs in multicolor operation, with bands centered at wavelengths of 0.85, 1.1, 1.3 and 2.0 mm, beginning in 2011. Here we present the results of our demonstration instrument, DemoCam, containing a single 3-color array with 72 detectors and optics similar to MUSIC. We present sensitivities achieved at the telescope, and compare to those expected based upon laboratory tests. We explore the factors that limit the sensitivity, in particular electronics noise, antenna efficiency, and excess loading. We discuss mitigation of these factors, and how we plan to improve sensitivity to the level of background-limited performance for the scientific operation of MUSIC. Finally, we note the expected mapping speed and contributions of MUSIC to astrophysics, and in particular to the study of submillimeter galaxies. This research has been funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program.

  7. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M.A.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.A.; DeRosa, R. T.; Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Fournier, J. -D.; Franco, S; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M. B.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Koranda, S.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwee, P.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J. H.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, G. H.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R.M.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toeyrae, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, H.A.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10−21. It matches

  8. First detections of gravitational waves from binary black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejger, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Recent direct detections of gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes systems herald a new era in the observational astronomy, as well as in experimental verifications of the theories of gravity. I will present the principles of detection of gravitational waves, current state-of-art laser interferometric detectors (Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo), and the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational waves. (paper)

  9. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  10. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  11. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves and Spherical Arc-Polarized Waves in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B.; Ho, Christian M.; Arballo, John K.; Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    1997-01-01

    We review observations of nonlinear plasma waves detected by interplanetary spacecraft. For this paper we will focus primarily on the phase-steepened properties of such waves. Plasma waves at comet Giacobini-Zinner measured by the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), at comets Halley and Grigg-Skjellerup measured by Giotto, and interplanetary Alfven waves measured by Ulysses, will be discussed and intercompared.

  12. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened

  13. Coherent network detection of gravitational waves: the redundancy veto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Linqing; Schutz, Bernard F

    2005-01-01

    A network of gravitational wave detectors is called redundant if, given the direction to a source, the strain induced by a gravitational wave in one or more of the detectors can be fully expressed in terms of the strain induced in others in the network. Because gravitational waves have only two polarizations, any network of three or more differently oriented interferometers with similar observing bands is redundant. The three-armed LISA space interferometer has three outputs that are redundant at low frequencies. The two aligned LIGO interferometers at Hanford WA are redundant, and the LIGO detector at Livingston LA is nearly redundant with either of the Hanford detectors. Redundant networks have a powerful veto against spurious noise, a linear combination of the detector outputs that contains no gravitational wave signal. For LISA, this 'null' output is known as the Sagnac mode, and its use in discriminating between detector noise and a cosmological gravitational wave background is well understood. But the usefulness of the null veto for ground-based detector networks has been ignored until now. We show that it should make it possible to discriminate in a model-independent way between real gravitational waves and accidentally coincident non-Gaussian noise 'events' in redundant networks of two or more broadband detectors. It has been shown that with three detectors, the null output can even be used to locate the direction to the source, and then two other linear combinations of detector outputs give the optimal 'coherent' reconstruction of the two polarization components of the signal. We discuss briefly the implementation of such a detection strategy in realistic networks, where signals are weak, detector calibration is a significant uncertainty, and the various detectors may have different (but overlapping) observing bands

  14. Gravitational wave experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, W O

    1993-01-01

    There were three oral sessions and one poster session for Workshop C1 on Gravitational Wave Experiments. There was also an informal experimental roundtable held one after- noon. The first two oral sessions were devoted mainly to progress reports from various interferometric and bar detector groups. A total of 15 papers were presented in these two sessions. The third session of Workshop C1 was devoted primarily to theoretical and experimental investigations associated with the proposed interferometric detectors. Ten papers were presented in this session. In addition, there were a total of 13 papers presented in the poster session. There was some overlap between the presentations in the third oral session and the posters since only two of the serious posters were devoted to technology not pertinent to interferometers. In general, the papers showed the increasing maturity of the experimental aspects of the field since most presented the results of completed investigations rather than making promises of wonderf...

  15. Gravitational waves and antennas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational waves and their detection represent today a hot topic, which promises to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology and theoretical physics. Technological developments have enabled the construction of such sensitive detectors that the detection of gravitational radiation and the start of a new astronomy could become a reality during the next few years. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of hiterto unseen phenomena such as coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes) fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big bang relics and the new and unexpected. In these lectures I give a brief overview of this challenging field of modern physics. Topics : Basic properties of gravitational radiation. Astrophysical sources. Principle of operation of detectors. Interferometers (both ground based and space-based), bars and spheres. Present status of the experiments, their recent results and their f...

  16. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  17. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  18. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  19. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  20. Simulating detectors dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustom, Ibrahim Farog Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear detectors are used in all aspects of nuclear measurements. All nuclear detectors are characterized by their dead time i.e. the time needed by a detector to recover from a previous incident. A detector dead time influences measurements taken by a detector and specially when measuring high decay rate (>) where is the detector dead time. Two models are usually used to correct for the dead time effect: the paralayzable and the non-paralayzable models. In the current work we use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to simulate radioactivity and the effect of dead time and the count rate of a detector with a dead time =5x10 - 5s assuming the non-paralayzable model. The simulation indicates that assuming a non -paralayzable model could be used to correct for decay rate measured by a detector. The reliability of the non-paralayzable model to correct the measured decay rate could be gauged using the Monte Carlo simulation. (Author)

  1. Forward tracking detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Forward tracking is an essential part of a detector at the international linear collider (ILC). The requirements for forward tracking are explained and the proposed solutions in the detector concepts are shown.

  2. Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jonah Maxwell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    This report has slides on Gravitational Waves; Pound and Rebka: A Shocking Fact; Light is a Ruler; Gravity is the Curvature of Spacetime; Gravitational Waves Made Simple; How a Gravitational Wave Affects Stuff Here; LIGO; This Detection: Neutron Stars; What the Gravitational Wave Looks Like; The Sound of Merging Neutron Stars; Neutron Star Mergers: More than GWs; The Radioactive Cloud; The Kilonova; and finally Summary, Multimessenger Astronomy.

  3. HIBP primary beam detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A position measuring detector was fabricated for the Heavy Ion Beam Probe. The 11 cm by 50 cm detector was a combination of 15 detector wires in one direction and 63 copper bars - .635 cm by 10 cm to measure along an orthogonal axis by means of a current divider circuit. High transmission tungsten meshes provide entrance windows and suppress secondary electrons. The detector dimensions were chosen to resolve the beam position to within one beam diameter

  4. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  5. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  6. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  7. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies, co...

  8. WORKSHOP: Scintillating fibre detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Scintillating fibre detector development and technology for the proposed US Superconducting Supercollider, SSC, was the subject of a recent workshop at Fermilab, with participation from the high energy physics community and from industry. Sessions covered the current status of fibre technology and fibre detectors, new detector applications, fluorescent materials and scintillation compositions, radiation damage effects, amplification and imaging structures, and scintillation fibre fabrication techniques

  9. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  10. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  11. Self powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, C.S.; Ramachandra Rao, M.N.; Ingale, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of self powered neutron detectors used for in-core flux measurements are described. The characteristics of the various detectors, with emitters Rh, V, Co, Py are presented. Details about the fabrication of these detectors are given. (A.K.)

  12. The JADE muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-01-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.)

  13. Economical stabilized scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshakov, O.M.; Chudakov, V.A.; Gurinovich, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    An economical scintillation detector with the stabilization system of an integral type is described. Power consumed by the photomultiplier high-voltage power source is 40 mW, energy resolution is not worse than 9%. The given detector is used in a reference detector of a digital radioisotope densimeter for light media which is successfully operating for several years

  14. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, C.

    1993-01-01

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. HP Ge planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Soldatov, A.M.; Osipenko, B.P.; Yurkowski, J.; Podkopaev, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of planar detectors manufactured of HP Ge are presented. The possibilities to use multilayer spectrometers on the base of such semiconductor detectors for nuclear physics experiments are discussed. It is shown that the obtained detectors including high square ones have spectrometrical characteristics close to limiting possible values. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  17. Upper limits on gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's second science run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D.A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors, using a method based on a wavelet time-frequency decomposition. This search is sensitive to bursts of duration much less than a second and with frequency content in the 100-1100 Hz range. It features significant improvements in the instrument sensitivity and in the analysis pipeline with respect to the burst search previously reported by LIGO. Improvements in the search method allow exploring weaker signals, relative to the detector noise floor, while maintaining a low false alarm rate, O(0.1) μHz. The sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude lies in the range of h rss ∼10 -20 -10 -19 Hz -1/2 . No gravitational wave signals were detected in 9.98 days of analyzed data. We interpret the search result in terms of a frequentist upper limit on the rate of detectable gravitational wave bursts at the level of 0.26 events per day at 90% confidence level. We combine this limit with measurements of the detection efficiency for selected waveform morphologies in order to yield rate versus strength exclusion curves as well as to establish order-of-magnitude distance sensitivity to certain modeled astrophysical sources. Both the rate upper limit and its applicability to signal strengths improve our previously reported limits and reflect the most sensitive broad-band search for untriggered and unmodeled gravitational wave bursts to date

  18. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  19. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  20. The ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian

    2006-06-26

    The contruction of the ATLAS Pixel Detector which is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system is prgressing well. Because the pixel detector will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability for all parts, combined with a low material budget. The final detector layout, new results from production modules and the status of assembly are presented.

  1. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  2. Report (summarized) for fiscal 2000 on survey for demonstration of geothermal exploration technologies. Development of exploration method using reservoir bed fluctuation (Theme 4. Development of seismic wave exploration method); 2000 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu to kensho chosa hokokusho (yoyaku). Choryuso hendo tansaho kaihatsu - 4 (jishinha tansaho kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective of developing a method effective to evaluate reservoir beds in the initial stage of development, to maintain output stability of power plants after having started the operation and to extract reservoirs existing in the vicinity of areas that have already been developed, research has been performed on a method to forecast spread of the reservoir beds and future variation, by identifying distribution of very small earthquakes generated by steam production activities, and change in three-dimensional velocity structure of elastic waves. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000. In the research of the seismic wave variation monitoring technology, AE observation was performed during a long-term blowout test of geothermal survey wells in the Akinomiya area in Ak ita Prefecture, wherein it was verified that the reservoir bed fluctuation can be identified as the number of AE occurrence. In the research of the three dimensional seismic wave variation analysis, a three dimensional velocity structure analyzing program was used to analyze the status in the Kakkonda area. In the survey of elastic wave velocity structure, a survey was carried out in the Akinomiya area in Akita Prefecture by using the reflection method. As a result, sharp fall was verified in the western side of side tracks of basic rocks, which corresponds to the past survey result. A plurality of reflection events corresponding to depths of geothermal reservoir beds were detected successfully. (NEDO)

  3. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  4. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, G. E-mail: losurdo@galileo.pi.infn.it

    2000-05-01

    The interferometric detectors of gravitational waves (GW) (such as VIRGO and LIGO) will search for events in a frequency band within a few Hz and a few kHz, where several sources are expected to emit. In this talk we outline briefly the current theoretical knowledge on the emission of GW in events such as the coalescence of compact binaries, the gravitational collapse, the spinning of a neutron stars. Expected amplitudes are compared with the target sensitivity of the VIRGO/LIGO interferometric detectors.

  5. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  6. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  7. Characterizing transient noise in the LIGO detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, L. K.

    2018-05-01

    Data from the LIGO detectors typically contain many non-Gaussian noise transients which arise due to instrumental and environmental conditions. These non-Gaussian transients can be an issue for the modelled and unmodelled transient gravitational-wave searches, as they can mask or mimic a true signal. Data quality can change quite rapidly, making it imperative to track and find new sources of transient noise so that data are minimally contaminated. Several examples of transient noise and the tools used to track them are presented. These instances serve to highlight the diverse range of noise sources present at the LIGO detectors during their second observing run. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  8. Digging Deeper: Observing Primordial Gravitational Waves below the Binary-Black-Hole-Produced Stochastic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regimbau, T; Evans, M; Christensen, N; Katsavounidis, E; Sathyaprakash, B; Vitale, S

    2017-04-14

    The merger rate of black hole binaries inferred from the detections in the first Advanced LIGO science run implies that a stochastic background produced by a cosmological population of mergers will likely mask the primordial gravitational wave background. Here we demonstrate that the next generation of ground-based detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer, will be able to observe binary black hole mergers throughout the Universe with sufficient efficiency that the confusion background can potentially be subtracted to observe the primordial background at the level of Ω_{GW}≃10^{-13} after 5 years of observation.

  9. Stress wave focusing transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  10. CVD polycrystalline diamond. A novel neutron detector and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkolnavin, R.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Polycrystalline Diamond film has been investigated as a low noise sensor for beta particles, gammas and neutrons using High Energy Physics technologies. Its advantages and disadvantages have been explored in comparison with other particle detectors such as silicon detector and other plastic scintillators. The performance and characteristic of the diamond detector have been fully studied and discussed. These studies will lead to a better understanding of how CVD diamonds perform as a detector and how to improve their performance under various conditions. A CVD diamond detector model has been proposed which is an attempt to explain the behaviour of such an extreme detector material. A novel neutron detector is introduced as a result of these studies. A good thermal and fast neutron detector can be fabricated with CVD diamond with new topologies. This detector will perform well without degradation in a high neutron radiation environment, as diamond is known to be radiation hard. It also offers better neutrons and gammas discrimination for high gamma background applications compared to other semiconductor detectors. A full simulation of the detector has also been done using GEANT, a Monte-Carlo simulation program for particle detectors. Simulation results show that CVD diamond detectors with this novel topology can detect neutrons with great directionality. Experimental work has been done on this detector in a nuclear reactor environment and accelerator source. A novel neutron source which offers a fast pulse high-energy neutrons has also been studied. With this detector, applications in neutron spectrometer for low-Z material have been pursued with various neutron detection techniques. One of these is a low-Z material identification system. The system has been designed and simulated for contraband luggage interrogation using the detector and the novel neutron source. Also other neutron related applications have been suggested. (author)

  11. CVD polycrystalline diamond. A novel neutron detector and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkolnavin, R.

    1998-07-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Polycrystalline Diamond film has been investigated as a low noise sensor for beta particles, gammas and neutrons using High Energy Physics technologies. Its advantages and disadvantages have been explored in comparison with other particle detectors such as silicon detector and other plastic scintillators. The performance and characteristic of the diamond detector have been fully studied and discussed. These studies will lead to a better understanding of how CVD diamonds perform as a detector and how to improve their performance under various conditions. A CVD diamond detector model has been proposed which is an attempt to explain the behaviour of such an extreme detector material. A novel neutron detector is introduced as a result of these studies. A good thermal and fast neutron detector can be fabricated with CVD diamond with new topologies. This detector will perform well without degradation in a high neutron radiation environment, as diamond is known to be radiation-hard. It also offers better neutrons and gammas discrimination for high gamma background applications compared to other semiconductor detectors. A full simulation of the detector has also been done using GEANT, a Monte Carlo simulation program for particle detectors. Simulation results show that CVD diamond detectors with this novel topology can detect neutrons with great directionality. Experimental work has been done on this detector in a nuclear reactor environment and accelerator source. A novel neutron source which offers a fast pulse high-energy neutrons has also been studied. With this detector, applications in neutron spectrometry for low-Z material have been pursued with various neutron detection techniques. One of these is a low-Z material identification system. The system has been designed and simulated for contraband luggage interrogation using the detector and the novel neutron source. (author)

  12. Nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present monograph is intended to treat the commonly used detectors in the field of nuclear physics covering important developments of the recent years. After a general introduction, a brief account of interaction of radiation with matter relevant to the processes in radiation detection is given in Chapter II. In addition to the ionization chamber, proportional counters and Geiger Mueller counters, several gas-filled detectors of advanced design such as those recently developed for heavy ion physics and other types of studies have been covered in Chapter III. Semiconductor detectors are dealt with in Chapter IV. The scintillation detectors which function by sensing the photons emitted by the luminescence process during the interaction of the impinging radiation with the scintillation detector medium are described in Chapter V. The topic of neutron detectors is covered in Chapter VI, as in this case the emphasis is more on the method of neutron detection rather than on detector type. Electronic instrumentation related to signal pulse processing dealt with in Chapter VII. The track etch detectors based on the visualization of the track of the impinging charge particle have also been briefly covered in the last chapter. The scope of this monograph is confined to detectors commonly used in low and medium energy nuclear physics research and applications of nuclear techniques. The monograph is intended for post-graduate students and those beginning to work with the radiation detectors. (author)

  13. The pin pixel detector--neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Rhodes, N J; Schooneveld, E M; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a neutron gas pixel detector intended for application in neutron diffraction studies is reported. Using standard electrical connector pins as point anodes, the detector is based on a commercial 100 pin connector block. A prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mmx25.4 mm has been fabricated, giving a pixel size of 2.54 mm which matches well to the spatial resolution typically required in a neutron diffractometer. A 2-Dimensional resistive divide readout system has been adapted to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics. The timing properties of the device match well to the requirements of the ISIS-pulsed neutron source.

  14. Exploring nonlocal observables in shock wave collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Christian; Grumiller, Daniel; Stanzer, Philipp; Stricker, Stefan A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Wien,Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-09

    We study the time evolution of 2-point functions and entanglement entropy in strongly anisotropic, inhomogeneous and time-dependent N=4 super Yang-Mills theory in the large N and large ’t Hooft coupling limit using AdS/CFT. On the gravity side this amounts to calculating the length of geodesics and area of extremal surfaces in the dynamical background of two colliding gravitational shockwaves, which we do numerically. We discriminate between three classes of initial conditions corresponding to wide, intermediate and narrow shocks, and show that they exhibit different phenomenology with respect to the nonlocal observables that we determine. Our results permit to use (holographic) entanglement entropy as an order parameter to distinguish between the two phases of the cross-over from the transparency to the full-stopping scenario in dynamical Yang-Mills plasma formation, which is frequently used as a toy model for heavy ion collisions. The time evolution of entanglement entropy allows to discern four regimes: highly efficient initial growth of entanglement, linear growth, (post) collisional drama and late time (polynomial) fall off. Surprisingly, we found that 2-point functions can be sensitive to the geometry inside the black hole apparent horizon, while we did not find such cases for the entanglement entropy.

  15. Geophysical Exploration. New site exploration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Tsuneo; Otomo, Hideo; Sakayama, Toshihiko

    1988-07-25

    Geophysical exploration is used for geologic survey to serve purposes in civil engineering. New methods are being developed inside and outside Japan and are used to serve various purposes. This paper discusses recently developed techniques based on the measurement of seismic waves and electric potential. It also explains seismic tomography, radar tomography, and resistivity tomography which are included in the category of geotomography. At present, effort is being made to apply geophysical exploration technology to problems which were considered to be unsuitable for conventional exploration techniques. When such effort proceeds successfully, it is necessary to develop technology for presenting results quickly and exploration equipment which can work in various conditions. (10 figs, 15 refs)

  16. Defining and Predicting Heat Waves in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nissan, H.; Burkart, K.; Coughlan, E.R.; van Aalst, M.; Mason, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a heat-wave definition for Bangladesh that could be used to trigger preparedness measures in a heat early warning system (HEWS) and explores the climate mechanisms associated with heat waves. A HEWSrequires a definition of heat waves that is both related to human health outcomes

  17. Transient multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marka, S

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive multimessenger astronomy with gravitational waves is a pioneering field bringing us interesting results and presenting us with exciting challenges for the future. During the era of the operation of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors, we will have the opportunity to investigate sources of gravitational waves that are also expected to be observable through other messengers, such as gamma rays, x-rays, optical, radio, and/or neutrino emission. Multimessenger searches for gravitational waves with the LIGO-GEO600-Virgo interferometer network have already produced insights on cosmic events and it is expected that the simultaneous observation of electromagnetic or neutrino emission could be a crucial aspect for the first direct detection of gravitational waves in the future. Trigger time, direction and expected frequency range enhances our ability to search for gravitational wave signatures with amplitudes closer to the noise floor of the detector. Furthermore, multimessenger observations will enable the extraction of otherwise unaccessible scientific insight. We summarize the status of transient multimessenger detection efforts as well as mention some of the open questions that might be resolved by advanced or third generation gravitational wave detector networks.

  18. Seasonal variations of solar neutrino rates in lithium detector

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Anatoly; Petukhov, Valery

    2002-01-01

    The presence of two monochromatic lines of approximately equal intensity: $^{7}$Be- and pep-neutrinos in the sensitivity plot of lithium detector makes the pattern of the seasonal variations of the effect from solar neutrinos very characteristic in case if the long-wave vacuum oscillations are realized. This can give the very high accuracy in the measurement of the parameters of neutrino oscillations especially if combined with the results obtained by the detector sensitive mainly to $^{7}$Be...

  19. Silicon Telescope Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurov, Yu B; Sandukovsky, V G; Yurkovski, J

    2005-01-01

    The results of research and development of special silicon detectors with a large active area ($> 8 cm^{2}$) for multilayer telescope spectrometers (fulfilled in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR) are reviewed. The detector parameters are listed. The production of totally depleted surface barrier detectors (identifiers) operating under bias voltage two to three times higher than depletion voltage is described. The possibility of fabrication of lithium drifted counters with a very thin entrance window on the diffusion side of the detector (about 10--20 $\\mu$m) is shown. The detector fabrication technique has allowed minimizing detector dead regions without degradation of their spectroscopic characteristics and reliability during long time operation in charge particle beams.

  20. Physics of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, R.

    1991-01-01

    The general concept of a radiation detector is based on three fundamental principles: sensitivity of the device to the radiation of interest which requires a large cross-section in the detector material, detector response function to the physical properties of the radiation. As an example, a scintillation detector for charged particles should allow to identify the charge of the particle, its kinetic energy and the time of impact combined with optimum resolutions. Optimum conversion of the detector response (like luminescence of a scintillator) into electronical signals for further processing. The following article will concentrate on the various aspects of the first two listed principles as far as they appear to be relevant for photon and charged particle detection using organic and inorganic scintillation detectors. (orig.)

  1. Submillimeter Wave Antenna With Slow Wave Feed Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Krozer, Viktor; Kotiranta, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    Submillimeter wave radiation, which is also referred to as terahertz radiation, has not been extensively explored until recently due to a lack of reliable components and devices in this frequency range. Current advances in technology have made it possible to explore this portion of the electromag...

  2. Hough transform search for continuous gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Badri; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Sintes, Alicia M.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Frasca, Sergio; Palomba, Cristiano

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an incoherent method to search for continuous gravitational waves based on the Hough transform, a well-known technique used for detecting patterns in digital images. We apply the Hough transform to detect patterns in the time-frequency plane of the data produced by an earth-based gravitational wave detector. Two different flavors of searches will be considered, depending on the type of input to the Hough transform: either Fourier transforms of the detector data or the output of a coherent matched-filtering type search. We present the technical details for implementing the Hough transform algorithm for both kinds of searches, their statistical properties, and their sensitivities

  3. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  4. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodo, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  5. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  6. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  7. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  8. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-03-05

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  9. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  10. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  11. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  12. The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) on board the Arase (ERG) satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Matsuda, Shoya; Imachi, Tomohiko; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hikishima, Mitsuru; Katoh, Yuto; Ota, Mamoru; Shoji, Masafumi; Matsuoka, Ayako; Shinohara, Iku

    2018-05-01

    The Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) project aims to study acceleration and loss mechanisms of relativistic electrons around the Earth. The Arase (ERG) satellite was launched on December 20, 2016, to explore in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt. In the present paper, we introduce the specifications of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) on board the Arase satellite. In the inner magnetosphere, plasma waves, such as the whistler-mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave, and magnetosonic wave, are expected to interact with particles over a wide energy range and contribute to high-energy particle loss and/or acceleration processes. Thermal plasma density is another key parameter because it controls the dispersion relation of plasma waves, which affects wave-particle interaction conditions and wave propagation characteristics. The DC electric field also plays an important role in controlling the global dynamics of the inner magnetosphere. The PWE, which consists of an orthogonal electric field sensor (WPT; wire probe antenna), a triaxial magnetic sensor (MSC; magnetic search coil), and receivers named electric field detector (EFD), waveform capture and onboard frequency analyzer (WFC/OFA), and high-frequency analyzer (HFA), was developed to measure the DC electric field and plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere. Using these sensors and receivers, the PWE covers a wide frequency range from DC to 10 MHz for electric fields and from a few Hz to 100 kHz for magnetic fields. We produce continuous ELF/VLF/HF range wave spectra and ELF range waveforms for 24 h each day. We also produce spectral matrices as continuous data for wave direction finding. In addition, we intermittently produce two types of waveform burst data, "chorus burst" and "EMIC burst." We also input raw waveform data into the software-type wave-particle interaction analyzer (S-WPIA), which derives direct correlation between waves and particles. Finally, we introduce our

  13. Plasma waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swanson, D. G

    1989-01-01

    ... Swanson, D.G. (Donald Gary), D a t e - Plasma waves. Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Plasma waves. QC718.5.W3S43 1989 ISBN 0-12-678955-X I. Title. 530.4'4 88-34388 Printed in the United Sta...

  14. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2003 a prototype of Wave Dragon has been tested in an inland sea in Denmark. This has been a great success with all subsystems tested and improved through working in an offshore environment. The project has proved the Wave Dragon device and has enabled the next stage, a production sized...

  15. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  16. Experimental signatures of gravitational wave bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubath, Florian; Foffa, Stefano; Gasparini, Maria Alice; Maggiore, Michele; Sturani, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursters are sources which emit repeatedly bursts of gravitational waves, and have been recently suggested as potentially interesting candidates for gravitational wave (GW) detectors. Mechanisms that could give rise to a GW burster can be found for instance in highly magnetized neutron stars (the 'magnetars' which explain the phenomenon of soft gamma repeaters), in accreting neutron stars and in hybrid stars with a quark core. We point out that these sources have very distinctive experimental signatures. In particular, as already observed in the γ-ray bursts from soft gamma repeaters, the energy spectrum of the events is a power-law, dN∼E -γ dE with γ≅1.6, and they have a distribution of waiting times (the times between one outburst and the next) significantly different from the distribution of uncorrelated events. We discuss possible detection strategies that could be used to search for these events in existing gravitational wave detectors

  17. Polymer fiber detectors for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Hubert; Berer, Thomas; Pühringer, Karoline; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Burgholzer, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel imaging method for medical and biological applications, combining the advantages of Diffuse Optical Imaging (high contrast) and Ultrasonic Imaging (high spatial resolution). A short laser pulse hits the sample. The absorbed energy causes a thermoelastic expansion and thereby launches a broadband ultrasonic wave (photoacoustic signal). The distribution of absorbed energy density is reconstructed from measurements of the photoacoustic signals around the sample. For collecting photoacoustic signals either point like or extended, integrating detectors can be used. The latter integrate the pressure at least in one dimension, e.g. along a line. Thereby, the three dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a two dimensional problem. For a tomography device consisting of a scanning line detector and a rotating sample, fiber-based detectors made of polymer have been recently introduced. Fiber-based detectors are easy to use and possess a constant, high spatial resolution over their entire active length. Polymer fibers provide a better impedance matching and a better handling compared with glass fibers which were our first approach. First measurement results using polymer fiber detectors and some approaches for improving the performance are presented.

  18. Model wave functions for the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certov, A.; Mathelitsch, L.; Moravcsik, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Model wave functions are constructed for the deuteron to facilitate the unambiguous exploration of dependencies on the percentage D state and on the small-, medium-, and large-distance parts of the deuteron wave function. The wave functions are constrained by those deuteron properties which are accurately known experimentally, and are in an analytic form which is easily integrable in expressions usually encountered in the use of such wave functions

  19. The Martian Oasis Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. H.; tomasko, M. G.; McEwen, A.; Rice, J.

    2000-07-01

    The next phase of unmanned Mars missions paves the way for astronauts to land on the surface of Mars. There are lessons to be learned from the unmanned precursor missions to the Moon and the Apollo lunar surface expeditions. These unmanned missions (Ranger, Lunar Orbiter, and Surveyor) provided the following valuable information, useful from both a scientific and engineering perspective, which was required to prepare the way for the manned exploration of the lunar surface: (1) high resolution imagery instrumental to Apollo landing site selection also tremendously advanced the state of Nearside and Farside regional geology; (2) demonstrated precision landing (less than two kilometers from target) and soft landing capability; (3) established that the surface had sufficient bearing strength to support a spacecraft; and (4) examination of the chemical composition and mechanical properties of the surface. The search for extinct or extant life on Mars will follow the water. However, geomorphic studies have shown that Mars has had liquid water on its surface throughout its geologic history. A cornucopia of potential landing sites with water histories (lakes, floodplains, oceans, deltas, hydrothermal regions) presently exist. How will we narrow down site selection and increase the likelihood of finding the signs of life? One way to do this is to identify 'Martian oases.' It is known that the Martian surface is often highly fractured and some areas have karst structures that support underground caves. Much of the water that formed the channels and valley networks is thought to be frozen underground. All that is needed to create the potential for liquid water is a near surface source of heat; recent lava flows and Martian meteorites attest to the potential for volcanic activity. If we can locate even one spot where fracturing, ice, and underground heat are co-located then we have the potential for an oasis. Such a discovery could truly excite the imaginations of both the

  20. Virgo: a laser interferometer to detect gravitational waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Accadia, T.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; van der Voet, H.; Mul, F.A.; Rabeling, D.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a complete description of Virgo, the French-Italian gravitational wave detector. The detector, built at Cascina, near Pisa (Italy), is a very large Michelson interferometer, with 3 km-long arms. In this paper, following a presentation of the physics requirements, leading to the