WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave cw sources

  1. A tunable continuous wave (CW) and short-pulse optical source for THz brain imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakopoulos, P; Karanasiou, I; Zakynthinos, P; Uzunoglu, N; Avramopoulos, H; Pleros, N

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate recent advances toward the development of a novel 2D THz imaging system for brain imaging applications both at the macroscopic and at the bimolecular level. A frequency-synthesized THz source based on difference frequency generation between optical wavelengths is presented, utilizing supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear optical fiber with subsequent spectral carving by means of a fiber Fabry–Perot filter. Experimental results confirm the successful generation of THz radiation in the range of 0.2–2 THz, verifying the enhanced frequency tunability properties of the proposed system. Finally, the roadmap toward capturing functional brain information by exploiting THz imaging technologies is discussed, outlining the unique advantages offered by THz frequencies and their complementarity with existing brain imaging techniques

  2. A reliable cw Lyman-α laser source for future cooling of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, Daniel; Beczkowiak, Anna; Diehl, Thomas; Koglbauer, Andreas; Sattler, Matthias; Stappel, Matthias; Steinborn, Ruth; Walz, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a reliable continuous-wave (cw) laser source at the 1 S–2 P transition in (anti)hydrogen at 121.56 nm (Lyman-α) based on four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury. A two-photon resonance in the four-wave mixing scheme is essential for a powerful cw Lyman-α source and is well investigated.

  3. A reliable cw Lyman-{alpha} laser source for future cooling of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Daniel, E-mail: kolbed@uni-mainz.de; Beczkowiak, Anna; Diehl, Thomas; Koglbauer, Andreas; Sattler, Matthias; Stappel, Matthias; Steinborn, Ruth; Walz, Jochen [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate a reliable continuous-wave (cw) laser source at the 1 S-2 P transition in (anti)hydrogen at 121.56 nm (Lyman-{alpha}) based on four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury. A two-photon resonance in the four-wave mixing scheme is essential for a powerful cw Lyman-{alpha} source and is well investigated.

  4. Resonance control for a cw [continuous wave] accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    A resonance-control technique is described that has been successfully applied to several cw accelerating structures built by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the National Bureau of Standards and for the University of Illinois. The technique involves sensing the rf fields in an accelerating structure as well as the rf power feeding into the cavity and, then, using the measurement to control the resonant frequency of the structure by altering the temperature of the structure. The temperature of the structure is altered by adjusting the temperature of the circulating cooling water. The technique has been applied to continuous wave (cw) side-coupled cavities only but should have applications with most high-average-power accelerator structures. Some additional effort would be required for pulsed systems

  5. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  6. Detailed characterization of CW- and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing in highly nonlinear fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Galili, Michael; Grüner-Nielsen, L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative comparison of continuouswave- (CW) and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in commercially available highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs), and suggest properties for which the CW and pulsed FWM bandwidths are limited in practice. The CWand pulsed-pump parametric gain is charac......We present a quantitative comparison of continuouswave- (CW) and pulsed-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in commercially available highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs), and suggest properties for which the CW and pulsed FWM bandwidths are limited in practice. The CWand pulsed-pump parametric gain...... bandwidth. However, an inverse scaling of the TOD with the dispersion fluctuations, leads to different CW-optimized fibers, which depend only on the even dispersion-orders....

  7. Mathematical characterization of continuous wave infrared stimulated luminescence signals (CW-IRSL) from feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Phan, Huy; Goodnow, Rebecca; Rosenfeld, Sara; Morthekai, P.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-wave infrared stimulated luminescence signals (CW-IRSL) from feldspars have been the subject of many experimental studies, due to their importance in luminescence dating and dosimetry. Accurate mathematical characterization of the shape of these CW-IRSL signals in feldspars is of practical and theoretical importance, especially in connection with “anomalous fading” of luminescence signals in dating studies. These signals are known to decay in a non-exponential manner and their exact mathematical shape as a function of stimulation time is an open research question. At long stimulation times the IRSL decay has been shown experimentally to follow a power law of decay, and previous researchers have attempted to fit the overall shape of these signals empirically using the well known Becquerel function (or compressed hyperbola decay law). This paper investigates the possibility of fitting CW-IRSL curves using either the Becquerel decay law, or a recently developed analytical equation based on localized electronic recombination of donor–acceptor pairs in luminescent materials. It is shown that both mathematical approaches can give excellent fits to experimental CW-IRSL curves, and the precision of the fitting process is studied by analyzing a series of curves measured using a single aliquot of a feldspar sample. Both fitting equations are solutions of differential equations involving numerically similar time dependent recombination probabilities k(t). It is concluded that both fitting equations provide approximately equivalent mathematical descriptions of the CW-IRSL curves in feldspars, and can be used as mathematical representations of the shape of CW-IRSL signals. - Highlights: • Feldspar CW-IRSL curves fitted using Becquerel decay law and new analytical equation. • Both mathematical approaches give excellent fits to experimental CW-IRSL curves. • Series of experimental CW-IRSL curves analyzed using both fitting expressions. • The time

  8. Modulated Sine Waves for Differential Absorption Measurements Using a CW Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Lin, Bing (Inventor); Nehrir, Amin R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  9. Cw hyper-Raman laser and four-wave mixing in atomic sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, M.; Kablukov, S. I.; Wellegehausen, B.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous wave hyper-Raman (HR) generation in a ring cavity on the 6s → 4p transition at 1640 nm in sodium is realized for the first time by two-photon excitation of atomic sodium on the 3s → 6s transition with a continuous wave (cw) dye laser at 590 nm and a single frequency argon ion laser at 514 nm. It is shown, that the direction and efficiency of HR lasing depends on the propagation direction of the pump waves and their frequencies. More than 30% HR gain is measured at 250 mW of pump laser powers for counter-propagating pump waves and a medium length of 90 mm. For much shorter interaction lengths and corresponding focussing of the pump waves a dramatic increase of the gain is predicted. For co-propagating pump waves, in addition, generation of 330 nm radiation on the 4p → 3s transition by a four-wave mixing (FWM) process is observed. Dependencies of HR and parametric four-wave generation have been investigated and will be discussed.

  10. Initial operation of the CW 8X H- ion source discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Geisik, C.; Schmitt, D.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    A pulsed 8Χ source was built and the H - beam current, emittance, and power efficiency were measured. These results were promising, so a cooled, dc version designed for operation at arc power levels up to 30 kW was built. Testing of the CWsource discharge is underway. The design dc power loading on the cathode surface is 900 W/cm 2 , considerably higher than achieved in any pervious Penning surface-plasma source (SPS). Thus, the electrode surfaces are cooled with pressurized, hot water. We describe the source and present the initial operating experience and arc test results

  11. Initial operation of the CW 8X H- ion source discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Allison, P.; Geisik, C.; Schmitt, D.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    A pulsed 8X source was built and the H - beam current, emittance, and power efficiency were measured. These results were promising, so a cooled, dc version designed for operation at arc power levels up to 30 kW was built. Testing of the CW 8X source discharge is underway. The design dc power loading on the cathode surface is 900 W/cm 2 , considerably higher than achieved in any previous Penning surface-plasma source (SPS). Thus, the electrode surfaces are cooled with pressurized, hot water. The authors describe the source and present the initial operating experience and arc test results

  12. CW light sources at the 589 nm sodium D2 line by sum-frequency mixing of diode pumped neodymium lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü, Y F; Lu, J; Xu, L J; Sun, G C; Zhao, Z M; Gao, X; Lin, J Q

    2010-01-01

    We present a laser architecture to obtain continuous-wave (CW) light sources at the 589 nm sodium D2 line. A 808 nm diode-pumped a Nd:YLiF 4 (Nd:YLF) crystal emitting at 1053 nm. A part of the pump power was then absorbed by the Nd:YLF crystal. The remaining was used to pump a Nd:YAG crystal emitting at 1338 nm. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 1053 and 1338 nm was then realized in a LiB 3 O 5 (LBO) crystal to reach the yellow-orange radiation. We obtained a CW output power of 235 mW at 589 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 17.8 W at 808 nm

  13. High-Temperature Monitoring of Refractory Wall Recession Using Frequency-Modulated Continuous-wave (FM-CW) Radar Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, B.; DeConick, C.; Cartee, G.; Zoughi, R.; Velez, M.; Moore, R.

    2005-01-01

    Furnaces are among the most crucial components in the glass and metallurgical industry. Nowadays, furnaces are being operated at higher temperatures and for longer periods of time thus increasing the rate of wear on the furnace refractory lining. Consequently, there is a great need for a nondestructive tool that can accurately measure refractory wall thickness at high temperatures. In this paper the utility of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) radar is investigated for this purpose

  14. Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave Fm-Cw Radar for Evaluation of Refractory Structures Used in Glass Manufacturing Furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, B.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Limmer, R.

    2009-03-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) handheld radar operating in the frequency range of 8-18 GHz, resulting in a relatively fine range resolution was designed and constructed for on-site inspection of refractory structure thickness. This paper presents the design of the radar and the results of measurements conducted on typical refractory furnace structures assembled in the laboratory.

  15. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37-42 GHz) and V/W-band (71- 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  16. Cw RFQ development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1985-01-01

    A review of research and development related to fabricating and operating radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structures at 100% duty cycle [continuous wave (cw)] is presented, with emphasis on work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, and the University of Frankfurt. Activities in other areas that have an impact on operating cw RFQ systems will be highlighted. 27 refs

  17. Development of a 200 W CW high efficiency traveling wave tube at 12 GHz. [for use in communication technology satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J. A.; Tammaru, I.

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and test results are reported for an experimental PPM focused, traveling-wave tube that produces 235 watts of CW RF power over 85 MHz centered at 12.080 GHz. The tube uses a coupled cavity RF circuit with a velocity taper for greater than 30 percent basic efficiency. Overall efficiency of 51 percent is achieved by means of a nine stage depressed collector designed at NASA Lewis Research Center. This collector is cooled by direct radiation to deep space.

  18. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  19. Production of High Intracavity UV Power From a CW Laser Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, R. T.; Chyba, T. H.; Keppel, C. E.; Gaskell, D.; Ent, R.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to create a prototype high power CW source of ultraviolet (UV) photons for photon-electron scattering at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Hall B. The facility will use optical resonant cavities to produce a high photon flux. The technical approach will be to frequency-double the 514.5 mn light from an Argon-Ion Laser to create 0.1 to 1.0 watt in the UV. The produced UV power will be stored in a resonant cavity to generate an high intracavity UV power of 102 to 103 watts. The specific aim of this project is to first design and construct the low-Q doubling cavity and lock it to the Argon-Ion wavelength. Secondly, the existing 514.5 nm high-Q build-up cavity and its locking electronics will be modified to create high intracavity UV power. The entire system will then be characterized and evaluated for possible beam line use.

  20. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system for multimegawatt CW requirements of 100 MeV proton Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Wanmode, Y.D.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Development of a 100 MeV CW proton Linac has been planned at CAT. This Linac will be needing CW rf power in the frequency ranges of 350 MHz and 700 MHz for its RFQ and DTL/CCDTL/SFDTL structures respectively. The power to the accelerating structures will be produced by either 1 MW CW or 250 kW CW klystron/inductive output tubes (HOM IOTs). The power needed by respective feed points in the structure is max. 250 kW which will be powered by splitting the power from 1 MW klystron/klystrode into four channels by using a wave-guide system. In case of using 250 kW tubes the power to the structures will be provided directly from each tube. Two types of wave-guide transmission system have been considered, viz WR 2300 for 350 MHz rf needs and WR 1500 for 700 MHz rf needs. The typical wave-guide system has been designed using the 1 MW CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window. The circulator and each power divider is terminated into the isolated ports by high power CW loads. Out of the four channels three channels have phase shifters. Present paper describes the technological aspects and design specifications-considerations for these stringent requirements. (author)

  1. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  2. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, G. E-mail: losurdo@galileo.pi.infn.it

    2000-05-01

    The interferometric detectors of gravitational waves (GW) (such as VIRGO and LIGO) will search for events in a frequency band within a few Hz and a few kHz, where several sources are expected to emit. In this talk we outline briefly the current theoretical knowledge on the emission of GW in events such as the coalescence of compact binaries, the gravitational collapse, the spinning of a neutron stars. Expected amplitudes are compared with the target sensitivity of the VIRGO/LIGO interferometric detectors.

  3. Ceramic to metal joining by using 1064 nm pulsed and CW laser energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Soo Won; Choi, Hae Woon; Kim, Joo Han

    2013-01-01

    A novel joining method for ceramic and metallic layers is proposed using laser drilling and surface tension driven liquid metal filling. A high intensity laser beam irradiated a 500 µm thick ceramic filter, and the irradiated laser drilled the ceramic layer. The pulsed or CW laser transmitted through the ceramic layer irradiated the bottom metallic layer; the molten metallic layer then filled the drilled ceramic holes by the capillary force between the liquid metal and ceramic layer. As process variables, average laser power, pulse duration, and the number of pulses were used. The scattering optical properties were also studied for both green and red lasers. There was no significant difference between the colors and the estimated extinction coefficients were -26.94 1/mm and -28.42 1/mm for the green and red lasers, respectively.

  4. Design of a GaP/Si composite waveguide for CW terahertz wave generation via difference frequency mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kyosuke; Tanabe, Tadao; Oyama, Yutaka

    2014-06-10

    We design a GaP/Si composite waveguide to achieve efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation under collinear phase-matched difference frequency mixing (DFM) between near-infrared light sources. This waveguide structure provides a strong mode confinement of both near-infrared sources and THz wave, resulting in an efficient mode overlapping. The numerical results show that the waveguide can produce guided THz wave (5.93 THz) with a power conversion efficiency of 6.6×10(-4)  W(-1). This value is larger than previously obtained with the bulk GaP crystal: 0.5×10(-9)  W(-1) [J. Lightwave Technol.27, 3057 (2009)]. Our proposed composite waveguide can be achieved by bridging the telecom wavelength and THz frequency region.

  5. Time-resolved dynamics of two-channel molecular systems in cw laser fields: Wave-packet construction in the Floquet formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, T.T.; Chateauneuf, F.; Atabek, O.; He, X.

    1995-01-01

    The description of the wave-packet time-resolved dynamics in a two-channel molecular system driven by a cw laser field is considered within the time-independent Floquet representation. It is shown that, at high field intensity, the wave-packet motions are governed solely by the pair of adiabatic dressed potential-energy surfaces (PES's) associated with a single Brillouin zone. The same expressions of the wave-packet motions in terms of the adiabatic PES's are obtained within a short-time approximation, thereby furnishing a new numerical algorithm for the wave-packet propagation in a laser-driven two-channel system at any intensity. Numerical tests of this algorithm are presented. The numerical results establish unambiguously the adiabaticity of nuclear motions at high field intensities

  6. Laser sources for polarized electron beams in cw and pulsed accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziefremidis, A; Fraser, D; Avramopoulos, H

    1999-01-01

    We report the characterization of a high power, high repetition rate, mode-locked laser system to be used in continuous wave and pulsed electron accelerators for the generation of polarized electron beams. The system comprises of an external cavity diode laser and a harmonically mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator and it can provide up to 3.4 W average power, with a corresponding pulse energy exceeding 1 nJ at 2856 MHz repetition rate. The system is tunable between 770-785 and 815-835 nm with two sets of diodes for the external cavity diode laser. (author)

  7. Wind wave source functions in opposing seas

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique

    2015-08-26

    The Red Sea is a challenge for wave modeling because of its unique two opposed wave systems, forced by opposite winds and converging at its center. We investigate the different physical aspects of wave evolution and propagation in the convergence zone. The two opposing wave systems have similar amplitude and frequency, each driven by the action of its own wind. Wave patterns at the centre of the Red Sea, as derived from extensive tests and intercomparison between model and measured data, suggest that the currently available wave model source functions may not properly represent the evolution of the local fields that appear to be characterized by a less effective wind input and an enhanced white-capping. We propose and test a possible simple solution to improve the wave-model simulation under opposing winds and waves condition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The sources of atmospheric gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, O.P.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity wave theory has been very successful in the interpretation of various upper atmospheric phenomena. This article offers a review of the present state of knowledge about the various sources of atmospheric gravity waves, particularly those which give rise to different types of travelling ionospheric disturbance. Some specific case studies are discussed. (author)

  9. A Generalized Wave Diagram for Moving Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Robert; Wiley, Sam

    2004-12-01

    Many introductory physics texts1-5 accompany the discussion of the Doppler effect and the formation of shock waves with diagrams illustrating the effect of a source moving through an elastic medium. Typically these diagrams consist of a series of equally spaced dots, representing the location of the source at different times. These are surrounded by a series of successively smaller circles representing wave fronts (see Fig. 1). While such a diagram provides a clear illustration of the shock wave produced by a source moving at a speed greater than the wave speed, and also the resultant pattern when the source speed is less than the wave speed (the Doppler effect), the texts do not often show the details of the construction. As a result, the key connection between the relative distance traveled by the source and the distance traveled by the wave is not explicitly made. In this paper we describe an approach emphasizing this connection that we have found to be a useful classroom supplement to the usual text presentation. As shown in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3, the Doppler effect and the shock wave can be illustrated by diagrams generated by the construction that follows.

  10. Source Estimation by Full Wave Form Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjögreen, Björn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Petersson, N. Anders [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing

    2013-08-07

    Given time-dependent ground motion recordings at a number of receiver stations, we solve the inverse problem for estimating the parameters of the seismic source. The source is modeled as a point moment tensor source, characterized by its location, moment tensor components, the start time, and frequency parameter (rise time) of its source time function. In total, there are 11 unknown parameters. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm to minimize the full waveform misfit between observed and computed ground motions at the receiver stations. An important underlying assumption of the minimization problem is that the wave propagation is accurately described by the elastic wave equation in a heterogeneous isotropic material. We use a fourth order accurate finite difference method, developed in [12], to evolve the waves forwards in time. The adjoint wave equation corresponding to the discretized elastic wave equation is used to compute the gradient of the misfit, which is needed by the non-linear conjugated minimization algorithm. A new source point moment source discretization is derived that guarantees that the Hessian of the misfit is a continuous function of the source location. An efficient approach for calculating the Hessian is also presented. We show how the Hessian can be used to scale the problem to improve the convergence of the non-linear conjugated gradient algorithm. Numerical experiments are presented for estimating the source parameters from synthetic data in a layer over half-space problem (LOH.1), illustrating rapid convergence of the proposed approach.

  11. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  12. CW 3μm lasing via two-photon pumping in cesium vapor with a 1W source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluska, Nathan D.; Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2018-02-01

    We report the first CW lasing from two-photon pumping via a virtual state. Pulsed and the CW lasing of the 3096 nm 72 P1/2 to 72 S1/2 line are observed from degenerate two-photon pumping of the cesium 72 S1/2 to 62 D3/2 transition. High intensity pulses excite over 17 lasing wavelengths. Under lower intensity CW excitation, 3 μm lasing is still observed with efficiencies of 0.7%. CW experiments utilized a Cs heat pipe at 150 °C to 270 °C, and a highly-focused, single pass, Ti-Sapphire pump with no aid of a cavity. Unlike normal DPALS, this architecture does not require buffer gas, and heat is released optically so a flowing system is not required. Both suggest a very simple device with excellent beam quality is possible. This proof of concept can be greatly enhanced with more optimal conditions such as non-degenerate pumping to further increase the two-photon pump cross section and the addition of a cavity to improve mode volume overlap. These improvements may lead to an increase in efficiencies to a theoretical maximum of 14%. Results suggest two-photon pumping with diodes is feasible.

  13. Variability patterns of Rossby wave source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Marilia Harumi; Albuquerque Cavalcanti, Iracema Fonseca de [National Institute for Space Research (INPE), Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies (CPTEC), Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Rossby waves (RW) propagation due to a local forcing is one of the mechanisms responsible for wave trains configurations known as teleconnections. The term teleconnection refers to anomalies patterns that are correlated in several regions of the world, causing large-scale changes in atmospheric waves patterns and temperature and precipitation regimes. The aim of teleconnections studies is to provide a better understanding of atmospheric variability and their mechanisms of action in order to identify patterns that can be tracked and predicted. The purpose of this study was to characterize seasonal and spatial variability of atmospheric RW sources. The RW source at 200 hPa was calculated for the four seasons with reanalysis data of zonal and meridional wind. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the RW sources were located on East Asia, North America, North Atlantic and Pacific. The main RW sources in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) were located over Intertropical, South Pacific, South Atlantic and South Indian Convergence Zones. Extratropical regions were also identified, mainly to the south of Australia. The vortex stretching term (S1) and the advection of absolute vorticity by the divergent wind (S2) were analyzed to discuss the physical mechanisms for RW generation. In the NH, the source at East Asia in DJF changed to a sink in JJA, related to the dominance of S1 term in DJF and S2 term in JJA. In the SH, the vortex stretching term had the dominant contribution for RW source located to the south of Australia. The main forcing for RW sources at east of Australia was the advection of absolute vorticity by divergent flow. Over South America, both terms contributed to the source in DJF. The main modes of RW source variability were discussed by using empirical orthogonal functions analysis. RW variability was characterized by wave trains configurations in both hemispheres over regions of jet streams and storm tracks, associated with favorable and unfavorable areas for RW

  14. Wind wave source functions in opposing seas

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique; Cavaleri, Luigi; Viswanadhapalli, Yesubabu; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    that the currently available wave model source functions may not properly represent the evolution of the local fields that appear to be characterized by a less effective wind input and an enhanced white-capping. We propose and test a possible simple solution

  15. Optimal wave focusing for seismic source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Farhad

    In both global and exploration seismology, studying seismic sources provides geophysicists with invaluable insight into the physics of earthquakes and faulting processes. One way to characterize the seismic source is to directly image it. Time-reversal (TR) focusing provides a simple and robust solution to the source imaging problem. However, for recovering a well- resolved image, TR requires a full-aperture receiver array that surrounds the source and adequately samples the wavefield. This requirement often cannot be realized in practice. In most source imaging experiments, the receiver geometry, due to the limited aperture and sparsity of the stations, does not allow adequate sampling of the source wavefield. Incomplete acquisition and imbalanced illumination of the imaging target limit the resolving power of the TR process. The main focus of this thesis is to offer an alternative approach to source imaging with the goal of mitigating the adverse effects of incomplete acquisition on the TR modeling. To this end, I propose a new method, named Backus-Gilbert (BG) source imaging, to optimally focus the wavefield onto the source position using a given receiver geometry. I first introduce BG as a method for focusing waves in acoustic media at a desired location and time. Then, by exploiting the source-receiver reciprocity of the Green function and the linearity of the problem, I show that BG focusing can be adapted and used as a source-imaging tool. Following this, I generalize the BG theory for elastic waves. Applying BG formalism for source imaging requires a model for the wave propagation properties of the earth and an estimate of the source location. Using numerical tests, I next examine the robustness and sensitivity of the proposed method with respect to errors in the earth model, uncertainty in the source location, and noise in data. The BG method can image extended sources as well as point sources. It can also retrieve the source mechanism. These features of

  16. CW 50W/M2 = 10.9 diode laser source by spectral beam combining based on a transmission grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Peng, Hangyu; Fu, Xihong; Liu, Yun; Qin, Li; Miao, Guoqing; Wang, Lijun

    2013-02-11

    An external cavity structure based on the -1st transmission grating is introduced to spectral beam combining a 970 nm diode laser bar. A CW output power of 50.8 W, an electro-optical conversion efficiency of 45%, a spectral beam combining efficiency of 90.2% and a holistic M(2) value of 10.9 are achieved. This shows a way for a diode laser source with several KW power and diffraction-limited beam quality at the same time.

  17. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-11-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes.

  18. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Richard H; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes. (paper)

  19. Sources and astrophysical effects of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    The probable sources of short intense gravitational wave emissions are discussed and it is concluded, on the basis of current astrophysical ideas, that the number of events detected by an apparatus such as Weber's would not be more than one pulse par century. Some proposed explanations of a higher event rate are examined briefly but it is suggested that the sensitivity would probably have to be improved by a factor 10 8 if a few events per year due to extragalactic supernovae are to be detectable. The article concludes by mentioning several other kinds of gravitational waves of potential interest in astrophysics

  20. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  1. Comparison of femtosecond laser and continuous wave UV sources for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecko, Christopher J; Munson, Katherine M; Saunders, Abbie; Sun, Guangxing; Begley, Tadhg P; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2007-01-01

    Crosslinking proteins to the nucleic acids they bind affords stable access to otherwise transient regulatory interactions. Photochemical crosslinking provides an attractive alternative to formaldehyde-based protocols, but irradiation with conventional UV sources typically yields inadequate product amounts. Crosslinking with pulsed UV lasers has been heralded as a revolutionary technique to increase photochemical yield, but this method had only been tested on a few protein-nucleic acid complexes. To test the generality of the yield enhancement, we have investigated the benefits of using approximately 150 fs UV pulses to crosslink TATA-binding protein, glucocorticoid receptor and heat shock factor to oligonucleotides in vitro. For these proteins, we find that the quantum yields (and saturating yields) for forming crosslinks using the high-peak intensity femtosecond laser do not improve on those obtained with low-intensity continuous wave (CW) UV sources. The photodamage to the oligonucleotides and proteins also has comparable quantum yields. Measurements of the photochemical reaction yields of several small molecules selected to model the crosslinking reactions also exhibit nearly linear dependences on UV intensity instead of the previously predicted quadratic dependence. Unfortunately, these results disprove earlier assertions that femtosecond pulsed laser sources provide significant advantages over CW radiation for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

  2. Spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors using continuous-wave supercontinuum sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Vishal; Prakash, Roopa; Nagarjun, K. P.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    A simple and powerful method using continuous wave supercontinuum lasers is demonstrated to perform spectrally resolved, broadband frequency response characterization of photodetectors in the NIR Band. In contrast to existing techniques, this method allows for a simple system to achieve the goal, requiring just a standard continuous wave(CW) high-power fiber laser source and an RF spectrum analyzer. From our recent work, we summarize methods to easily convert any high-power fiber laser into a CW supercontinuum. These sources in the time domain exhibit interesting properties all the way down to the femtosecond time scale. This enables measurement of broadband frequency response of photodetectors while the wide optical spectrum of the supercontinuum can be spectrally filtered to obtain this information in a spectrally resolved fashion. The method involves looking at the RF spectrum of the output of a photodetector under test when incident with the supercontinuum. By using prior knowledge of the RF spectrum of the source, the frequency response can be calculated. We utilize two techniques for calibration of the source spectrum, one using a prior measurement and the other relying on a fitted model. Here, we characterize multiple photodetectors from 150MHz bandwidth to >20GHz bandwidth at multiple bands in the NIR region. We utilize a supercontinuum source spanning over 700nm bandwidth from 1300nm to 2000nm. For spectrally resolved measurement, we utilize multiple wavelength bands such as around 1400nm and 1600nm. Interesting behavior was observed in the frequency response of the photodetectors when comparing broadband spectral excitation versus narrower band excitation.

  3. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atom Interferometry (AI) Technology for Gravity Wave Measurements demonstrates new matter wave Interferometric sensor technology for precise detection and...

  4. High-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency, all-periodically-poled, near-infrared source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2012-12-15

    We report a high-power, single-frequency, continuous-wave (cw) source tunable across 775-807 nm in the near-infrared, based on internal second harmonic generation (SHG) of a cw singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a Yb-fiber laser. The compact, all-periodically-poled source employs a 48-mm-long, multigrating MgO doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) crystal for the OPO and a 30-mm-long, fan-out grating MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically poled lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal for intracavity SHG, providing as much as 3.7 W of near-infrared power at 793 nm, together with 4 W of idler power at 3232 nm, at an overall extraction efficiency of 28%. Further, the cw OPO is tunable across 3125-3396 nm in the idler, providing as much as 4.3 W at 3133 nm with >3.8  W over 77% of the tuning range together with >3  W of near-infrared power across 56% of SHG tuning range, in high-spatial beam-quality with M2<1.4. The SHG output has an instantaneous linewidth of 8.5 MHz and exhibits a passive power stability better than 3.5% rms over more than 1 min.

  5. Multimode quantum model of a cw atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, J.J.; Haine, S.A.; Savage, C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Laser cooling allows dilute atomic gases to be cooled to within K of absolute zero. Ultracold gases were first achieved twenty years ago and have since found applications in areas such as spectroscopy, time standards, frequency standards, quantum information processing and atom optics. The atomic analogue of the lasing mode in optical lasers is Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC), in which a cooled sample of atoms condense into the lowest energy quantum state. This new state of matter was recently achieved in dilute Bose gases in 1995. Atoms coupled out of a BEC exhibit long-range spatial coherence, and provide the coldest atomic source currently available. These atomic sources are called 'atom lasers' because the BEC is analogous to the lasing mode of an optical laser. The high spectral flux from optical lasers is caused by a process called gain-narrowing, which requires continuous wave (cw) operation. Coupling a BEC quickly into an untrapped state forms a coherent atomic beam but it has a spread in momentum as large as the trapped BEC. Coupling the atoms out more slowly reduces the output linewidth at the expense of reducing the overall flux. These atom lasers are equivalent to Q-switched optical lasers. A cw atom laser with gain-narrowing would produce an increasingly monoenergetic output as the flux increased, dramatically improving the spectral flux. A cw atom laser is therefore a major goal of the atom optics community, but there are several theoretical and practical obstacles to understanding the complexities of such a system. The main obstacle to the production of a cw atom laser is the technical difficulties involved in continuously pumping the lasing mode. No complete theory exists which describes a cw atom laser. Complete cw atom laser models require a quantum field description due to their non-Markovian dynamics, significant spatial effects and the dependence of the output on the quantum statistics of the lasing mode. The extreme dimensionality

  6. All-periodically poled, high-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency tunable UV source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya N, Apurv; Jabir, M V; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on experimental demonstration of an all-periodically poled, continuous-wave (CW), high-power, single-frequency, ultra-violet (UV) source. Based on internal second-harmonic-generation (SHG) of a CW singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped in the green, the UV source provides tunable radiation across 398.94-417.08 nm. The compact source comprising of a 25-mm-long MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal of period Λ(SLT)=8.5  μm for OPO and a 5-mm-long, multi-grating (Λ(KTP)=3.3, 3.4, 3.6 and 3.8 μm), periodically poled potassium titanium phosphate (PPKTP) for intra-cavity SHG, provides as much as 336 mW of UV power at 398.94 nm, corresponding to a green-to-UV conversion efficiency of ∼6.7%. In addition, the singly resonant OPO (SRO) provides 840 mW of idler at 1541.61 nm and substantial signal power of 108 mW at 812.33 nm transmitted through the high reflective cavity mirrors. UV source provides single-frequency radiation with instantaneous line-width of ∼18.3  MHz and power >100  mW in Gaussian beam profile (ellipticity >92%) across the entire tuning range. Access to lower UV wavelengths requires smaller grating periods to compensate high phase-mismatch resulting from high material dispersion in the UV wavelength range. Additionally, we have measured the normalized temperature and spectral acceptance bandwidth of PPKTP crystal in the UV wavelength range to be ∼2.25°C·cm and ∼0.15  nm·cm, respectively.

  7. Source inversion in the full-wave tomography; Full wave tomography ni okeru source inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    In order to consider effects of characteristics of a vibration source in the full-wave tomography (FWT), a study has been performed on a method to invert vibration source parameters together with V(p)/V(s) distribution. The study has expanded an analysis method which uses as the basic the gradient method invented by Tarantola and the partial space method invented by Sambridge, and conducted numerical experiments. The experiment No. 1 has performed inversion of only the vibration source parameters, and the experiment No. 2 has executed simultaneous inversion of the V(p)/V(s) distribution and the vibration source parameters. The result of the discussions revealed that and effective analytical procedure would be as follows: in order to predict maximum stress, the average vibration source parameters and the property parameters are first inverted simultaneously; in order to estimate each vibration source parameter at a high accuracy, the property parameters are fixed, and each vibration source parameter is inverted individually; and the derived vibration source parameters are fixed, and the property parameters are again inverted from the initial values. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Design and construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHz klystron to be used as RF power source for LHC/RF component tests

    CERN Document Server

    Frischholz, Hans; Pearson, C

    1998-01-01

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with t...

  9. Ultrasound induced by CW laser cavitation bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneev, N; Montero, P Rodriguez; Ramos-Garcia, R; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Padilla-Martinez, J P

    2011-01-01

    The generation of ultrasound by a collapsing single cavitation bubble in a strongly absorbing liquid illuminated with a moderate power CW laser is described. The ultrasound shock wave is detected with hydrophone and interferometric device. To obtain a stronger pulse it is necessary to adjust a liquid absorption and a beam diameter. Their influence can be qualitatively understood with a simple model.

  10. Potential Functional Embedding Theory at the Correlated Wave Function Level. 2. Error Sources and Performance Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-14

    Quantum mechanical embedding theories partition a complex system into multiple spatial regions that can use different electronic structure methods within each, to optimize trade-offs between accuracy and cost. The present work incorporates accurate but expensive correlated wave function (CW) methods for a subsystem containing the phenomenon or feature of greatest interest, while self-consistently capturing quantum effects of the surroundings using fast but less accurate density functional theory (DFT) approximations. We recently proposed two embedding methods [for a review, see: Acc. Chem. Res. 2014 , 47 , 2768 ]: density functional embedding theory (DFET) and potential functional embedding theory (PFET). DFET provides a fast but non-self-consistent density-based embedding scheme, whereas PFET offers a more rigorous theoretical framework to perform fully self-consistent, variational CW/DFT calculations [as defined in part 1, CW/DFT means subsystem 1(2) is treated with CW(DFT) methods]. When originally presented, PFET was only tested at the DFT/DFT level of theory as a proof of principle within a planewave (PW) basis. Part 1 of this two-part series demonstrated that PFET can be made to work well with mixed Gaussian type orbital (GTO)/PW bases, as long as optimized GTO bases and consistent electron-ion potentials are employed throughout. Here in part 2 we conduct the first PFET calculations at the CW/DFT level and compare them to DFET and full CW benchmarks. We test the performance of PFET at the CW/DFT level for a variety of types of interactions (hydrogen bonding, metallic, and ionic). By introducing an intermediate CW/DFT embedding scheme denoted DFET/PFET, we show how PFET remedies different types of errors in DFET, serving as a more robust type of embedding theory.

  11. A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

  12. A Stepped Frequency CW SAR for Lightweight UAV Operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison, Keith

    2005-01-01

    A stepped-frequency continuous wave (SF-CW) synthetic aperture radar (SAR), with frequency-agile waveforms and real-time intelligent signal processing algorithms, is proposed for operation from a lightweight UAV platform...

  13. Astrometric and Timing Effects of Gravitational Waves from Localized Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Schafer, Gerhard; Gwinn, Carl R.; Eubanks, T. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    A consistent approach for an exhaustive solution of the problem of propagation of light rays in the field of gravitational waves emitted by a localized source of gravitational radiation is developed in the first post-Minkowskian and quadrupole approximation of General Relativity. We demonstrate that the equations of light propagation in the retarded gravitational field of an arbitrary localized source emitting quadrupolar gravitational waves can be integrated exactly. The influence of the gra...

  14. Tunable, continuous-wave, ultraviolet source based on intracavity sum-frequency-generation in an optical parametric oscillator using BiB₃O₆.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2013-10-21

    We report a continuous-wave (cw) source of tunable radiation across 333-345 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) using bismuth triborate, BiB₃O₆ (BIBO) as the nonlinear gain material. The source is based on internal sum-frequency-generation (SFG) in a cw singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped at 532 nm. The compact tunable source employs a 30-mm-long MgO:sPPLT crystal as the OPO gain medium and a 5-mm-long BIBO crystal for intracavity SFG of the signal and pump, providing up to 21.6 mW of UV power at 339.7 nm, with >15 mW over 64% of the SFG tuning range. The cw OPO is also tunable across 1158-1312 nm in the idler, delivering as much as 1.7 W at 1247 nm, with >1W over 65% of the tuning range. The UV output at maximum power exhibits passive power stability better than 3.4% rms and frequency stability of 193 GHz over more than one minute.

  15. Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

    Rapidly varying forces, such as those associated with impact, rapid crack propagation, and fault rupture, are sources of stress waves which propagate through a solid body. This dissertation investigates how properties of a stress wave source can be identified or constrained using measurements recorded at an array of sensor sites located far from the source. This methodology is often called the method of acoustic emission and is useful for structural health monitoring and the noninvasive study of material behavior such as friction and fracture. In this dissertation, laboratory measurements of 1--300 mm wavelength stress waves are obtained by means of piezoelectric sensors which detect high frequency (10 kHz--3MHz) motions of a specimen's surface, picometers to nanometers in amplitude. Then, stress wave source characterization techniques are used to study ball impact, drying shrinkage cracking in concrete, and the micromechanics of stick-slip friction of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and rock/rock interfaces. In order to quantitatively relate recorded signals obtained with an array of sensors to a particular stress wave source, wave propagation effects and sensor distortions must be accounted for. This is achieved by modeling the physics of wave propagation and transduction as linear transfer functions. Wave propagation effects are precisely modeled by an elastodynamic Green's function, sensor distortion is characterized by an instrument response function, and the stress wave source is represented with a force moment tensor. These transfer function models are verified though calibration experiments which employ two different mechanical calibration sources: ball impact and glass capillary fracture. The suitability of the ball impact source model, based on Hertzian contact theory, is experimentally validated for small (˜1 mm) balls impacting massive plates composed of four different materials: aluminum, steel, glass, and PMMA. Using this transfer function approach

  16. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  17. Source Illusion Devices for Flexural Lamb Waves Using Elastic Metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongquan; Liang, Zixian; Liu, Fu; Diba, Owen; Lamb, Alistair; Li, Jensen

    2017-07-21

    Inspired by recent demonstrations of metasurfaces in achieving reduced versions of electromagnetic cloaks, we propose and experimentally demonstrate source illusion devices to manipulate flexural waves using metasurfaces. The approach is particularly useful for elastic waves due to the lack of form invariance in usual transformation methods. We demonstrate compact and simple-to-implement metasurfaces for shifting, transforming, and splitting a point source. The effects are measured to be broadband and robust against a change of source positions, with agreement from numerical simulations and the Huygens-Fresnel theory. The proposed method is potentially useful for applications such as nondestructive testing, high-resolution ultrasonography, and advanced signal modulation.

  18. Source effects on surface waves from Nevada Test Site explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, H.J.; Vergino, E.S.

    1981-11-01

    Surface waves recorded on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) digital network have been used to study five underground nuclear explosions detonated in Yucca Valley at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this study is to characterize the reduced displacement potential (RDP) at low frequencies and to test secondary source models of underground explosions. The observations consist of Rayleigh- and Love-wave amplitude and phase spectra in the frequency range 0.03 to 0.16 Hz. We have found that Rayleigh-wave spectral amplitudes are modeled well by a RDP with little or no overshoot for explosions detonated in alluvium and tuff. On the basis of comparisons between observed and predicted source phase, the spall closure source proposed by Viecelli does not appear to be a significant source of Rayleigh waves that reach the far field. We tested two other secondary source models, the strike-slip, tectonic strain release model proposed by Toksoez and Kehrer and the dip-slip thrust model of Masse. The surface-wave observations do not provide sufficient information to discriminate between these models at the low F-values (0.2 to 0.8) obtained for these explosions. In the case of the strike-slip model, the principal stress axes inferred from the fault slip angle and strike angle are in good agreement with the regional tectonic stress field for all but one explosion, Nessel. The results of the Nessel explosion suggest a mechanism other than tectonic strain release

  19. Source modelling at the dawn of gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, Davide

    2016-09-01

    The age of gravitational-wave astronomy has begun. Gravitational waves are propagating spacetime perturbations ("ripples in the fabric of space-time") predicted by Einstein's theory of General Relativity. These signals propagate at the speed of light and are generated by powerful astrophysical events, such as the merger of two black holes and supernova explosions. The first detection of gravitational waves was performed in 2015 with the LIGO interferometers. This constitutes a tremendous breakthrough in fundamental physics and astronomy: it is not only the first direct detection of such elusive signals, but also the first irrefutable observation of a black-hole binary system. The future of gravitational-wave astronomy is bright and loud: the LIGO experiments will soon be joined by a network of ground-based interferometers; the space mission eLISA has now been fully approved by the European Space Agency with a proof-of-concept mission called LISA Pathfinder launched in 2015. Gravitational-wave observations will provide unprecedented tests of gravity as well as a qualitatively new window on the Universe. Careful theoretical modelling of the astrophysical sources of gravitational-waves is crucial to maximize the scientific outcome of the detectors. In this Thesis, we present several advances on gravitational-wave source modelling, studying in particular: (i) the precessional dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries; (ii) the astrophysical consequences of black-hole recoils; and (iii) the formation of compact objects in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. All these phenomena are deeply characterized by a continuous interplay between General Relativity and astrophysics: despite being a truly relativistic messenger, gravitational waves encode details of the astrophysical formation and evolution processes of their sources. We work out signatures and predictions to extract such information from current and future observations. At the dawn of a revolutionary

  20. pp waves of conformal gravity with self-interacting source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2005-01-01

    Recently, Deser, Jackiw and Pi have shown that three-dimensional conformal gravity with a source given by a conformally coupled scalar field admits pp wave solutions. In this paper, we consider this model with a self-interacting potential preserving the conformal structure. A pp wave geometry is also supported by this system and, we show that this model is equivalent to topologically massive gravity with a cosmological constant whose value is given in terms of the potential strength

  1. Controlled-source seismic interferometry with one way wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Neut, J.; Wapenaar, K.; Thorbecke, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    In Seismic Interferometry we generally cross-correlate registrations at two receiver locations and sum over an array of sources to retrieve a Green's function as if one of the receiver locations hosts a (virtual) source and the other receiver location hosts an actual receiver. One application of this concept is to redatum an area of surface sources to a downhole receiver location, without requiring information about the medium between the sources and receivers, thus providing an effective tool for imaging below complex overburden, which is also known as the Virtual Source method. We demonstrate how elastic wavefield decomposition can be effectively combined with controlled-source Seismic Interferometry to generate virtual sources in a downhole receiver array that radiate only down- or upgoing P- or S-waves with receivers sensing only down- or upgoing P- or S- waves. For this purpose we derive exact Green's matrix representations from a reciprocity theorem for decomposed wavefields. Required is the deployment of multi-component sources at the surface and multi- component receivers in a horizontal borehole. The theory is supported with a synthetic elastic model, where redatumed traces are compared with those of a directly modeled reflection response, generated by placing active sources at the virtual source locations and applying elastic wavefield decomposition on both source and receiver side.

  2. Efficient all solid-state continuous-wave yellow-orange light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janousek, Jiri; Johansson, Sandra; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We present highly efficient sum-frequency generation between two CW IR lasers using periodically poled KTP. The system is based on the 1064 and 1342 nm laser-lines of two Nd:YVO4 lasers. This is an all solid-state light source in the yellow-orange spectral range. The system is optimized in terms ...

  3. Source signature estimation from multimode surface waves via mode-separated virtual real source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lingli; Pan, Yudi

    2018-05-01

    The correct estimation of the seismic source signature is crucial to exploration geophysics. Based on seismic interferometry, the virtual real source (VRS) method provides a model-independent way for source signature estimation. However, when encountering multimode surface waves, which are commonly seen in the shallow seismic survey, strong spurious events appear in seismic interferometric results. These spurious events introduce errors in the virtual-source recordings and reduce the accuracy of the source signature estimated by the VRS method. In order to estimate a correct source signature from multimode surface waves, we propose a mode-separated VRS method. In this method, multimode surface waves are mode separated before seismic interferometry. Virtual-source recordings are then obtained by applying seismic interferometry to each mode individually. Therefore, artefacts caused by cross-mode correlation are excluded in the virtual-source recordings and the estimated source signatures. A synthetic example showed that a correct source signature can be estimated with the proposed method, while strong spurious oscillation occurs in the estimated source signature if we do not apply mode separation first. We also applied the proposed method to a field example, which verified its validity and effectiveness in estimating seismic source signature from shallow seismic shot gathers containing multimode surface waves.

  4. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ji, Taeksoo; Eom, Joo Beom

    2017-04-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz-800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis.

  5. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Eom, Joo Beom; Ji, Taeksoo

    2017-01-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz–800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis. (paper)

  6. Complex space source theory of partially coherent light wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, S R

    2010-07-01

    The complex space source theory is used to derive a general integral expression for the vector potential that generates the extended full Gaussian wave in terms of the input value of the vector potential of the corresponding paraxial beam. The vector potential and the fields are assumed to fluctuate on a time scale that is large compared to the wave period. The Poynting vector in the propagation direction averaged over a wave period is expressed in terms of the cross-spectral density of the fluctuating vector potential across the input plane. The Schell model is assumed for the cross-spectral density. The radiation intensity distribution and the power radiated are determined. The effect of spatial coherence on the radiation intensity distribution and the radiated power are investigated for different values of the physical parameters. Illustrative numerical results are provided to bring out the effect of spatial coherence on the propagation characteristics of the fluctuating light wave.

  7. NBS-LASL cw microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, S.; Cutler, R.I.; Debenham, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The NBS-LASL racetrack microtron (RIM) is a joint research project of the National Bureau of Standards and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The project goals are to determine the feasibility of, and develop the necessary technology for building high-energy, high-current, continuous-beam (cw) electron accelerators using beam recirculation and room-temperature rf accelerating structures. To achieve these goals, a demonstration accelerator will be designed, constructed, and tested. Parameters of the demonstration RIM are: injection energy - 5 MEV; energy gain per pass -12 MeV; number of passes - 15; final beam energy - 185 MeV; maximum current 550 μA. One 450 kW cw klystron operating at 2380 MHz will supply rf power to both the injector linac and the main accelerating section of the RTM. The disk and washer standing wave rf structure being developed at LASL will be used. SUPERFISH calculations indicate that an effective shunt impedance (ZT) of about 100 MΩ/m can be obtained. Thus, rf power dissipation of 25 kW/m results in an energy gain of more than 1.5 MeV/m. Accelerators of this type should be attractive for many applications. At beam energies above about 50 MeV, an RTM should be considerably cheaper to build and operate than a conventional pulsed rf linac of the same maximum energy and time-average beam power. In addition, the RTM provides superior beam quality and a continuous beam which is essential for nuclear physics experiments requiring time-coincidence measurements between emitted particles

  8. Source localization with an advanced gravitational wave detector network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We derive an expression for the accuracy with which sources can be localized using a network of gravitational wave detectors. The result is obtained via triangulation, using timing accuracies at each detector and is applicable to a network with any number of detectors. We use this result to investigate the ability of advanced gravitational wave detector networks to accurately localize signals from compact binary coalescences. We demonstrate that additional detectors can significantly improve localization results and illustrate our findings with networks comprised of the advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and LCGT. In addition, we evaluate the benefits of relocating one of the advanced LIGO detectors to Australia.

  9. Resonance control for a CW accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a resonance-control technique that has been successfully applied to several cw accelerating structures built by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the National Bureau of Standards and for the University of Illinois. The technique involves sensing the rf fields in an accelerating structure as well as the rf power feeding into the cavity and, then, using the measurement to control the resonant frequency of the structure by altering the temperature of the structure. The temperature of the structure is altered by adjusting the temperature of the circulating cooling water. The technique has been applied to continuous wave (cw) side-coupled cavities only but should have applications with most high-average-power accelerator structures. Some additional effort would be required for pulsed systems

  10. Laser amplification of optical images using a CW Nd:YAG amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a scheme for the amplification of optical images is described, using a continuous wave (CW) diode-pumped Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser module. A passively q-switched end-pumped Nd:YAG laser is used as a pump source, which carries the optical image distribution as an input which is transmitted towards the amplifier at a distance of about ten feet. For amplification, a three-side-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser module is utilized without the cavity mirrors. In this way, optical images are amplified by a factor of 3.2 and imaged at a distance of ten feet with a spatial resolution of 500 μm. (paper)

  11. Earthquake Source Parameters Inferred from T-Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, J.; Dziak, R.; Lau, T. A.; Matsumoto, H.; Goslin, J.

    2004-12-01

    The seismicity of the North Atlantic Ocean has been recorded by two networks of autonomous hydrophones moored within the SOFAR channel on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). In February 1999, a consortium of U.S. investigators (NSF and NOAA) deployed a 6-element hydrophone array for long-term monitoring of MAR seismicity between 15o-35oN south of the Azores. In May 2002, an international collaboration of French, Portuguese, and U.S. researchers deployed a 6-element hydrophone array north of the Azores Plateau from 40o-50oN. The northern network (referred to as SIRENA) was recovered in September 2003. The low attenuation properties of the SOFAR channel for earthquake T-wave propagation results in a detection threshold reduction from a magnitude completeness level (Mc) of ˜ 4.7 for MAR events recorded by the land-based seismic networks to Mc=3.0 using hydrophone arrays. Detailed focal depth and mechanism information, however, remain elusive due to the complexities of seismo-acoustic propagation paths. Nonetheless, recent analyses (Dziak, 2001; Park and Odom, 2001) indicate fault parameter information is contained within the T-wave signal packet. We investigate this relationship further by comparing an earthquake's T-wave duration and acoustic energy to seismic magnitude (NEIC) and radiation pattern (for events M>5) from the Harvard moment-tensor catalog. First results show earthquake energy is well represented by the acoustic energy of the T-waves, however T-wave codas are significantly influenced by acoustic propagation effects and do not allow a direct determination of the seismic magnitude of the earthquakes. Second, there appears to be a correlation between T-wave acoustic energy, azimuth from earthquake source to the hydrophone, and the radiation pattern of the earthquake's SH waves. These preliminary results indicate there is a relationship between the T-wave observations and earthquake source parameters, allowing for additional insights into T-wave

  12. Depth of source from long period P-waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Falguni

    1986-01-01

    Short period (SP) seismograms are much better than long period (LP) seismograms to get the time resolution needed for the focal depth estimation. However, complex scattering effects due to crustal inhomogeneities and also the multi-pathing of signals usually complicate the short period records. On the other hand the seismograms from long period signals demonstrate clear coherent body waves. Therefore, for intermediate depths (15-60 km) prediction error filtering of LP signals will be useful for identifying the depth phases. Such a study has been carried out in the first part of this report. In a group of 7 events, the p p phases have been extracted from LP signals and the depths so estimated compared well with the published data. For explosions at shallow depths (depth p phases will tend to cancel each other in LP seismograms. As the source depth increases, the cancellation becomes less effective. This feature can be used for the identification of an event as well as for getting an estimate of the source depth. This phenomenon can be successfully exploited for identifying multiple explosions, because at teleseismic distances (Δ > 30 o ) no LP (around 20s period) P waves will be seen in the seismogram due to such events whereas relatively strong SP signals and LP Rayleigh waves will be observed. This phenomenon has been studied for 16 events. For three of these events having m b as high as 6.1 and presumed to be underground explosions, one could not see any P wave on remaining 13 events (which were classified as earthquakes), it was possible to set a threshold value of m b above which an earthquake should produce LP P-wave signals at a given distance. (author)

  13. Air gun near the sea floor as shear-wave source?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijkoningen, G.G.; Dieulangard, D.; Holicki, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using an air gun near the sea floor as shear-wave source has been investigated. With an air gun near the sea floor, an evanescent P-wave in the water becomes a propagating S-wave in the sea floor, such that it seems that a pure shear-wave source has been used at the sea floor.

  14. An Analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources Solution for Plane Wave Scattering by Impedance Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources solutions for plane wave scattering by circular impedance cylinders are derived by transformation of the exact eigenfunction series solutions employing the Hankel function wave transformation. The analytical Method of Auxiliary Sources solution thus obtained...

  15. Low frequency acoustic waves from explosive sources in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Christophe; Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Roblin, Camille; Gloerfelt, Xavier

    2006-11-01

    In this study, a perturbative formulation of non linear euler equations is used to compute the pressure variation for low frequency acoustic waves from explosive sources in real atmospheres. Based on a Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) finite difference scheme, the discretization provides good properties for both sound generation and long range sound propagation over a variety of spatial atmospheric scales. It also assures that there is no wave mode coupling in the numerical simulation The background flow is obtained by matching the comprehensive empirical global model of horizontal winds HWM-93 (and MSISE-90 for the temperature profile) with meteorological reanalysis of the lower atmosphere. Benchmark calculations representing cases where there is downward and upward refraction (including shadow zones), ducted propagation, and generation of acoustic waves from low speed shear layers are considered for validation. For all cases, results show a very good agreement with analytical solutions, when available, and with other standard approaches, such as the ray tracing and the normal mode technique. Comparison of calculations and experimental data from the high explosive ``Misty Picture'' test that provided the scaled equivalent airblast of an 8 kt nuclear device (on May 14, 1987), is also considered. It is found that instability waves develop less than one hour after the wavefront generated by the detonation passes.

  16. Simulation of wind wave growth with reference source functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badulin, Sergei I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.; Pushkarev, Andrei N.

    2013-04-01

    We present results of extensive simulations of wind wave growth with the so-called reference source function in the right-hand side of the Hasselmann equation written as follows First, we use Webb's algorithm [8] for calculating the exact nonlinear transfer function Snl. Second, we consider a family of wind input functions in accordance with recent consideration [9] ( )s S = ?(k)N , ?(k) = ? ? ?- f (?). in k 0 ?0 in (2) Function fin(?) describes dependence on angle ?. Parameters in (2) are tunable and determine magnitude (parameters ?0, ?0) and wave growth rate s [9]. Exponent s plays a key role in this study being responsible for reference scenarios of wave growth: s = 4-3 gives linear growth of wave momentum, s = 2 - linear growth of wave energy and s = 8-3 - constant rate of wave action growth. Note, the values are close to ones of conventional parameterizations of wave growth rates (e.g. s = 1 for [7] and s = 2 for [5]). Dissipation function Sdiss is chosen as one providing the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?5 at high frequency range [3] (parameter ?diss fixes a dissipation scale of wind waves) Sdiss = Cdissμ4w?N (k)θ(? - ?diss) (3) Here frequency-dependent wave steepness μ2w = E(?,?)?5-g2 makes this function to be heavily nonlinear and provides a remarkable property of stationary solutions at high frequencies: the dissipation coefficient Cdiss should keep certain value to provide the observed power-law tails close to the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?-5. Our recent estimates [3] give Cdiss ? 2.0. The Hasselmann equation (1) with the new functions Sin, Sdiss (2,3) has a family of self-similar solutions of the same form as previously studied models [1,3,9] and proposes a solid basis for further theoretical and numerical study of wave evolution under action of all the physical mechanisms: wind input, wave dissipation and nonlinear transfer. Simulations of duration- and fetch-limited wind wave growth have been carried out within the above model setup to check its

  17. Localization of gravitational wave sources with networks of advanced detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pankow, C.; Vedovato, G.; Drago, M.; Prodi, G.; Mazzolo, G.; Salemi, F.; Re, V.; Yakushin, I.

    2011-01-01

    Coincident observations with gravitational wave (GW) detectors and other astronomical instruments are among the main objectives of the experiments with the network of LIGO, Virgo, and GEO detectors. They will become a necessary part of the future GW astronomy as the next generation of advanced detectors comes online. The success of such joint observations directly depends on the source localization capabilities of the GW detectors. In this paper we present studies of the sky localization of transient GW sources with the future advanced detector networks and describe their fundamental properties. By reconstructing sky coordinates of ad hoc signals injected into simulated detector noise, we study the accuracy of the source localization and its dependence on the strength of injected signals, waveforms, and network configurations.

  18. Discretized energy minimization in a wave guide with point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propst, G.

    1994-01-01

    An anti-noise problem on a finite time interval is solved by minimization of a quadratic functional on the Hilbert space of square integrable controls. To this end, the one-dimensional wave equation with point sources and pointwise reflecting boundary conditions is decomposed into a system for the two propagating components of waves. Wellposedness of this system is proved for a class of data that includes piecewise linear initial conditions and piecewise constant forcing functions. It is shown that for such data the optimal piecewise constant control is the solution of a sparse linear system. Methods for its computational treatment are presented as well as examples of their applicability. The convergence of discrete approximations to the general optimization problem is demonstrated by finite element methods.

  19. An overview of gravitational waves theory, sources and detection

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    This book describes detection techniques used to search for and analyze gravitational waves (GW). It covers the whole domain of GW science, starting from the theory and ending with the experimental techniques (both present and future) used to detect them. The theoretical sections of the book address the theory of general relativity and of GW, followed by the theory of GW detection. The various sources of GW are described as well as the methods used to analyse them and to extract their physical parameters. It includes an analysis of the consequences of GW observations in terms of astrophysics as well as a description of the different detectors that exist and that are planned for the future. With the recent announcement of GW detection and the first results from LISA Pathfinder, this book will allow non-specialists to understand the present status of the field and the future of gravitational wave science

  20. High power CW linac in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, S.; Wang, Y.L.; Emoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is developing a high power electron linac for various applications. The electron beam is accelerated in CW operation to get maximum beam current of 100 mA and energy of 10 MeV. Crucial components such as a high power L-band klystron and a high power traveling wave resonant ring (TWRR) accelerator guides were designed and manufactured and their performance were examined. These design and results from the recent high power RF tests were described in this paper. (author)

  1. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C

    2010-06-08

    We discuss a numerical approach for identifying the surface excitation that is necessary to maximize the response of a targeted subsurface formation. The motivation stems from observations in the aftermath of earthquakes, and from limited field experiments, whereby increased oil production rates were recorded and were solely attributable to the induced reservoir shaking. The observations suggest that focusing wave energy to the reservoir could serve as an effective low-cost enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper, we report on a general method that allows the determination of the source excitation, when provided with a desired maximization outcome at the targeted formation. We discuss, for example, how to construct the excitation that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential- equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized source signal. We seek to satisfy stationarity of an augmented functional, which formally leads to a triplet of state, adjoint and control problems. We use finite elements to resolve the state and adjoint problems, and an iterative scheme to satisfy the control problem to converge to the sought source signal. We report on one-dimensional numerical experiments in the time domain involving a layered medium of semi-infinite extent. The numerical results show that the targeted formation\\'s kinetic energy resulting from an optimized wave source could be several times greater than the one resulting from a blind source choice, and could overcome the mobility threshold of entrapped reservoir oil. © 2010 Nanjing Geophysical Research Institute.

  2. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, C; Kallivokas, L F; Huh, C; Lake, L W

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a numerical approach for identifying the surface excitation that is necessary to maximize the response of a targeted subsurface formation. The motivation stems from observations in the aftermath of earthquakes, and from limited field experiments, whereby increased oil production rates were recorded and were solely attributable to the induced reservoir shaking. The observations suggest that focusing wave energy to the reservoir could serve as an effective low-cost enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper, we report on a general method that allows the determination of the source excitation, when provided with a desired maximization outcome at the targeted formation. We discuss, for example, how to construct the excitation that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized source signal. We seek to satisfy stationarity of an augmented functional, which formally leads to a triplet of state, adjoint and control problems. We use finite elements to resolve the state and adjoint problems, and an iterative scheme to satisfy the control problem to converge to the sought source signal. We report on one-dimensional numerical experiments in the time domain involving a layered medium of semi-infinite extent. The numerical results show that the targeted formation's kinetic energy resulting from an optimized wave source could be several times greater than the one resulting from a blind source choice, and could overcome the mobility threshold of entrapped reservoir oil

  3. Localizing gravitational wave sources with single-baseline atom interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Jung, Sunghoon

    2018-02-01

    Localizing sources on the sky is crucial for realizing the full potential of gravitational waves for astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology. We show that the midfrequency band, roughly 0.03 to 10 Hz, has significant potential for angular localization. The angular location is measured through the changing Doppler shift as the detector orbits the Sun. This band maximizes the effect since these are the highest frequencies in which sources live for several months. Atom interferometer detectors can observe in the midfrequency band, and even with just a single baseline they can exploit this effect for sensitive angular localization. The single-baseline orbits around the Earth and the Sun, causing it to reorient and change position significantly during the lifetime of the source, and making it similar to having multiple baselines/detectors. For example, atomic detectors could predict the location of upcoming black hole or neutron star merger events with sufficient accuracy to allow optical and other electromagnetic telescopes to observe these events simultaneously. Thus, midband atomic detectors are complementary to other gravitational wave detectors and will help complete the observation of a broad range of the gravitational spectrum.

  4. Performance of a reflectometer at continuous wave and pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Monte-Carlo simulations presented here involve simulations of reflectivity measurements of one sample using a reflectometer of traditional geometry at different neutron sources. The same reflectometer was used in all simulations. Only the characteristics of the neutron source, and the technique used to measure neutron wavelength were changed. In the case of the CW simulation, a monochromating crystal was used to select a nearly monochromatic beam (MB) from the neutron spectrum. In the simulations of the pulse sources, the time needed to traverse a fixed distance was measured, from which neutron wavelength is deduced

  5. Zero-dispersion wavelength independent quasi-CW pumped supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) pumped supercontinuum generation depends strongly on the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of the fiber due to the low peak power. Here we study several photonic crystal fibers by use of a gain-switched CW pump laser and investigate for what power level the supercontinuum...

  6. Linking source region and ocean wave parameters with the observed primary microseismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, C.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2017-12-01

    In previous studies, the contribution of Love waves to the primary microseismic noise field was found to be comparable to those of Rayleigh waves. However, so far only few studies analysed both wave types present in this microseismic noise band, which is known to be generated in shallow water and the theoretical understanding has mainly evolved for Rayleigh waves only. Here, we study the relevance of different source region parameters on the observed primary microseismic noise levels of Love and Rayleigh waves simultaneously. By means of beamforming and correlation of seismic noise amplitudes with ocean wave heights in the period band between 12 and 15 s, we analysed how source areas of both wave types compare with each other around Europe. The generation effectivity in different source regions was compared to ocean wave heights, peak ocean gravity wave propagation direction and bathymetry. Observed Love wave noise amplitudes correlate comparably well with near coastal ocean wave parameters as Rayleigh waves. Some coastal regions serve as especially effective sources for one or the other wave type. These coincide not only with locations of high wave heights but also with complex bathymetry. Further, Rayleigh and Love wave noise amplitudes seem to depend equally on the local ocean wave heights, which is an indication for a coupled variation with swell height during the generation of both wave types. However, the wave-type ratio varies directionally. This observation likely hints towards a spatially varying importance of different source mechanisms or structural influences. Further, the wave-type ratio is modulated depending on peak ocean wave propagation directions which could indicate a variation of different source mechanism strengths but also hints towards an imprint of an effective source radiation pattern. This emphasizes that the inclusion of both wave types may provide more constraints for the understanding of acting generation mechanisms.

  7. An efficient continuous-wave 591 nm light source based on sum-frequency mixing of a diode pumped Nd:GdVO4–Nd:CNGG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y D; Liu, J H

    2013-01-01

    We report a laser architecture to obtain continuous-wave (CW) yellow-orange light sources at the 591 nm wavelength. An 808 nm diode pumped a Nd:GdVO 4 crystal emitting at 1063 nm. A part of the pump power was then absorbed by the Nd:CNGG crystal. The remaining pump power was used to pump a Nd:CNGG crystal emitting at 1329 nm. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 1063 and 1329 nm was then realized in a LiB 3 O 5 (LBO) crystal to reach the yellow-orange radiation. We obtained a CW output power of 494 mW at 591 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 17.8 W at 808 nm. (paper)

  8. RF Wave Simulation Using the MFEM Open Source FEM Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillerman, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Kolev, T.

    2016-10-01

    A new plasma wave simulation environment based on the finite element method is presented. MFEM, a scalable open-source FEM library, is used as the basis for this capability. MFEM allows for assembling an FEM matrix of arbitrarily high order in a parallel computing environment. A 3D frequency domain RF physics layer was implemented using a python wrapper for MFEM and a cold collisional plasma model was ported. This physics layer allows for defining the plasma RF wave simulation model without user knowledge of the FEM weak-form formulation. A graphical user interface is built on πScope, a python-based scientific workbench, such that a user can build a model definition file interactively. Benchmark cases have been ported to this new environment, with results being consistent with those obtained using COMSOL multiphysics, GENRAY, and TORIC/TORLH spectral solvers. This work is a first step in bringing to bear the sophisticated computational tool suite that MFEM provides (e.g., adaptive mesh refinement, solver suite, element types) to the linear plasma-wave interaction problem, and within more complicated integrated workflows, such as coupling with core spectral solver, or incorporating additional physics such as an RF sheath potential model or kinetic effects. USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  9. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment

  10. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, A. L.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  11. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  12. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. I - General asymptotic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic wave emission from several localized, periodic, kinematically specified fluid velocity fields are calculated using Lighthill's method for finding the far-field wave forms. The waves propagate through an isothermal and uniform plasma with a constant B field. General properties of the energy flux are illustrated with models of pulsating flux tubes and convective rolls. Interference theory from geometrical optics is used to find the direction of minimum fast-wave emission from multipole sources and slow-wave emission from discontinuous sources. The distribution of total flux in fast and slow waves varies with the ratios of the source dimensions l to the acoustic and Alfven wavelengths.

  13. Integration of a versatile bridge concept in a 34 GHz pulsed/CW EPR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Alan; Donohue, Matthew P.; Epel, Boris; Madhu, Shraeya; Szalai, Veronika A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a 34 GHz continuous wave (CW)/pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer capable of pulse-shaping that is based on a versatile microwave bridge design. The bridge radio frequency (RF)-in/RF-out design (500 MHz to 1 GHz input/output passband, 500 MHz instantaneous input/output bandwidth) creates a flexible platform with which to compare a variety of excitation and detection methods utilizing commercially available equipment external to the bridge. We use three sources of RF input to implement typical functions associated with CW and pulse EPR spectroscopic measurements. The bridge output is processed via high speed digitizer and an in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) demodulator for pulsed work or sent to a wideband, high dynamic range log detector for CW. Combining this bridge with additional commercial hardware and new acquisition and control electronics, we have designed and constructed an adaptable EPR spectrometer that builds upon previous work in the literature and is functionally comparable to other available systems.

  14. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atom Interferometry (AI) Technology for Gravity Wave Measurements demonstrates new matter wave Interferometric sensor technology for precise detection and...

  15. CW SRF systems with ingot niobium and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Ganapati

    2011-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator systems are needed not only for discovery science initiatives through out the world but they are also expected to find applications in a wide variety of programs including advanced reactor cycles using thorium as nuclear fuel, commercial and university compact linacs and FEL's. However these state of the art particle accelerator systems are very expensive to build and consume significant power in their operations. In the present world economic, energy sustainability and global warming concerns, we must improve the efficiency of the CW SRF accelerator systems considerably and in a cost effective manner. In this presentation I will review the current status of the CW SRF systems including the recent advances in improving the quality factor of the SRF cavities at very much reduced costs with simplified process procedures. (author)

  16. Effects of pressure rise on cw laser ablation of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify mechanisms responsible for the initiation of continuous wave (cw) laser ablation of tissue and investigate the role of pressure in the ablation process. Porcine aorta samples were irradiated in a chamber pressurized from 1 X 10-4 to 12 atmospheres absolute pressure. Acrylic and Zn-Se windows in the experimental pressure chamber allowed video and infrared cameras to simultaneously record mechanical and thermal events associated with cw argon laser ablation of these samples. Video and thermal images of tissue slabs documented the explosive nature of cw laser ablation of soft biological media and revealed similar ablation threshold temperatures and ablation onset times under different environmental pressures; however, more violent initiation explosions with decreasing environmental pressures were observed. These results suggest that ablation initiates with thermal alterations in the mechanical strength of the tissue and proceeds with an explosion induced by the presence superheated liquid within the tissue.

  17. CW organic dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuccio, S.A.; Peterson, O.G.

    1975-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing continuous emission from a lasing medium comprising organic dye molecules in solution are described. Continuous emission is accomplished by flowing the medium through a focused optical cavity while simultaneously producing a population inversion in that portion of the medium flowing in close proximity to the focal point of the cavity. The population inversion is produced by pumping the medium longitudinally, along the optical axis of the cavity, preferably by the focused output of a continuous-wave argon laser. Sufficient thermal energy is continuously dissipated from the medium to maintain the optical homogeneity thereof at or above the quality required for continuous emission

  18. High power and spectral purity continuous-wave photonic THz source tunable from 1 to 4.5 THz for nonlinear molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, J.; Breunig, I.; Schunemann, P. G.; Buse, K.; Vodopyanov, K. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report a diffraction-limited photonic terahertz (THz) source with linewidth OP) gallium arsenide (GaAs) via intracavity frequency mixing between the two closely spaced resonating signal and idler waves of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) operating near λ = 2 μm. The doubly resonant type II OPO is based on a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) pumped by a single-frequency Yb:YAG disc laser at 1030 nm. We take advantage of the enhancement of both optical fields inside a high-finesse OPO cavity: with 10 W of 1030 nm pump, 100 W of intracavity power near 2 μm was attained with GaAs inside cavity. This allows dramatic improvement in terms of generated THz power, as compared to the state-of-the art CW methods. We achieved >25 μW of single-frequency tunable CW THz output power scalable to >1 mW with proper choice of pump laser wavelength.

  19. Energy scaling of terahertz-wave parametric sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanqi; Cong, Zhenhua; Qin, Zengguang; Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Weitao; Wu, Dong; Li, Ning; Fu, Qiang; Lu, Qingming; Zhang, Shaojun

    2015-02-23

    Terahertz-wave parametric oscillators (TPOs) have advantages of room temperature operation, wide tunable range, narrow line-width, good coherence. They have also disadvantage of small pulse energy. In this paper, several factors preventing TPOs from generating high-energy THz pulses and the corresponding solutions are analyzed. A scheme to generate high-energy THz pulses by using the combination of a TPO and a Stokes-pulse-injected terahertz-wave parametric generator (spi-TPG) is proposed and demonstrated. A TPO is used as a source to generate a seed pulse for the surface-emitted spi-TPG. The time delay between the pump and Stokes pulses is adjusted to guarantee they have good temporal overlap. The pump pulses have a large pulse energy and a large beam size. The Stokes beam is enlarged to make its size be larger than the pump beam size to have a large effective interaction volume. The experimental results show that the generated THz pulse energy from the spi-TPG is 1.8 times as large as that obtained from the TPO for the same pumping pulse energy density of 0.90 J/cm(2) and the same pumping beam size of 3.0 mm. When the pumping beam sizes are 5.0 and 7.0 mm, the enhancement times are 3.7 and 7.5, respectively. The spi-TPG here is similar to a difference frequency generator; it can also be used as a Stokes pulse amplifier.

  20. CW RFQ fabrication and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.; Young, L.; Roybal, P.

    1998-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a four-vane RFQ to deliver a 100 mA CW proton beam at 6.7 MeV is described. This linac is an Oxygen-Free Electrolytic (OFE) copper structure 8 m in length and was fabricated using hydrogen furnace brazing as the joining technology

  1. Theory for beam-plasma millimeter-wave radiation source experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on theoretical studies for millimeter-wave plasma source experiments. In the device, millimeter-wave radiation is generated in a plasma-filled waveguide driven by counter-streaming electron beams. The beams excite electron plasma waves which couple to produce radiation at twice the plasma frequency. Physics topics relevant to the high electron beam current regime are discussed

  2. The gyrotron - a natural source of high-power orbital angular momentum millimeter-wave beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, M.; Sawant, A.; Choe, M. S.; Choi, E. M.

    2017-08-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of electromagnetic-wave beams provides further diversity to multiplexing in wireless communication. The present report shows that higher-order mode gyrotrons are natural sources of high-power OAM millimeter (mm) wave beams. The well-defined OAM of their rotating cavity modes operating at near cutoff frequency has been derived by photonic and electromagnetic wave approaches.

  3. Spectral filtering for CW searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Antonio, S; Frasca, S; Palomba, C

    2009-01-01

    In the hierarchical all-sky search method for periodic sources developed in the Virgo Collaboration, after the first incoherent step based on the Hough transform we have a number of candidates that must be analyzed using a much longer time baseline periodogram. In this step, we correct the signal power spread due to the Earth rotation, which becomes relevant for observation times greater than ∼1 sidereal day, using a bank of matched filters on the power spectrum. Describing the wave as the combination of a linearly polarized and a circularly polarized component, the spread depends on two parameters: the polarization angle of the linearly polarized wave component and the percentage of linear polarization. Here we discuss in detail the issue of how many filters must be built to properly cover the parameter space and give some implementation details of the procedure.

  4. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H^{-} beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kW of proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fraction of the main H^{-} beam, magnetic splitting of H^{-} and H^{0}, and stripping of H^{0} to H^{+}. The method allows slow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  5. High-power single-mode cw dye ring laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H W; Stein, L; Froelich, D; Fugger, B; Welling, H [Technische Univ. Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1977-12-01

    Due to spatial hole burning, standing-wave dye lasers require a large amount of selectivity inside the cavity for single-mode operation. The output power of these lasers is limited by losses caused by the frequency selecting elements. In a travelling-wave laser, on the other hand, spatial hole burning does not exist, thereby eliminating the need for high selectivity. A travelling-wave cw dye laser was realized by unidirectional operation of a ring laser, yielding single mode output powers of 1.2 W at 595 nm and of 55 mW in the UV-region with intracavity frequency doubling.

  6. Refined Source Terms in WAVEWATCH III with Wave Breaking and Sea Spray Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    dissipation and breaking, nonlinear wave-wave interaction, bottom friction, wave-mud interaction, wave-current interaction as well as sea spray flux. These...shallow water outside the surf zone. After careful testing within a comprehensive suite of test bed cases, these refined source terms will be...aim to refine the parameterization of air-sea and upper ocean fluxes, including wind input and sea spray as well as dissipation, and hence improve

  7. Comparison of GSM Modulated and CW Radiofrequency Radiation on Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicic, I.; Marjanovic, A.M.; Trosic, I.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare effect of global system of mobile (GSM) modulation and continuous wave (CW) radiofrequency radiation (RF) on proliferation ability and viability of V79 Chinese hamster lung cells. Previously prepared samples of cells in culture were exposed for 1, 2 and 3 hours both to 915 MHz GSM modulated and to 935 MHz CW RF field in gigahertz transversal electromagnetic mode cell (GTEM-cell). Electric field strength for cells exposed to GSM modulation was set at 10 V/m and for CW exposed cells was 8.2 V/m. Average specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated to be for GSM 0.23 W/kg and for CW 0.12 W/kg. V79 samples were plated in concentration of 1x10 4 cells/mL. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counts for each hour of exposure during five post-exposure days. Trypan blue exclusion test was used to determine cell viability. In comparison to control cell samples, proliferation of GSM irradiated cells showed significant decrease after 3 hours of exposure on the second and third post-exposure day. CW exposed cell samples showed significant decrease after 3 hours of exposure on the third post-exposure day. Viability of GSM and CW exposed cells did not significantly differ from matched control cell samples. Both applied RF fields have shown similar effect on cell culture growth, and cell viability of V79 cell line. In addition, applied GSM modulated RF radiation demonstrate bigger influence on proliferation of cells. (author)

  8. Low frequency wave sources in the outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and near Earth solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Constantinescu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the Earth magnetosphere generates a broad variety of plasma waves through different mechanisms. The four Cluster spacecraft allow one to determine the regions where these waves are generated and their propagation directions. One of the tools which takes full advantage of the multi-point capabilities of the Cluster mission is the wave telescope technique which provides the wave vector using a plane wave representation. In order to determine the distance to the wave sources, the source locator – a generalization of the wave telescope to spherical waves – has been recently developed. We are applying the source locator to magnetic field data from a typical traversal of Cluster from the cusp region and the outer magnetosphere into the magnetosheath and the near Earth solar wind. We find a high concentration of low frequency wave sources in the electron foreshock and in the cusp region. To a lower extent, low frequency wave sources are also found in other magnetospheric regions.

  9. High-speed photonically assisted analog-to-digital conversion using a continuous wave multiwavelength source and phase modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortnik, Bartosz J; Fetterman, Harold R

    2008-10-01

    A more simple photonically assisted analog-to-digital conversion system utilizing a cw multiwavelength source and phase modulation instead of a mode-locked laser is presented. The output of the cw multiwavelength source is launched into a dispersive device (such as a single-mode fiber). This fiber creates a pulse train, where the central wavelength of each pulse corresponds to a spectral line of the optical source. The pulses can then be either dispersed again to perform discrete wavelength time stretching or demultiplexed for continuous time analog-to-digital conversion. We experimentally demonstrate the operation of both time stretched and interleaved systems at 38 GHz. The potential of integrating this type of system on a monolithic chip is discussed.

  10. Radiation of planar electromagnetic waves by a line source in anisotropic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Qiang; Jiang Weixiang; Cui Tiejun

    2010-01-01

    We show experimentally that a line source in an anisotropic metamaterial directly radiates planar electromagnetic waves instead of cylindrical waves, when one component of the permeability tensor approaches zero. The impedance of this material can be perfectly matched to that of free space, which can significantly reduce the reflections between the source and the superstrate, as in traditional highly directive antennas based on zero index metamaterials. Such a unique property determines the two-way propagation of electromagnetic waves excited by a line source, instead of all-way propagation. From this feature, a highly directive emission of electromagnetic waves is achieved using the anisotropic metamaterial with arbitrary shape. We have designed and fabricated the anisotropic metamaterial in the microwave region, and observed the generation of plane waves and their highly directive emission. The proposed plane-wave emission is independent of the shape variance of the anisotropic metamaterial, which can be utilized in the design of conformal antennas.

  11. Source parameter inversion for wave energy focusing to a target inclusion embedded in a three-dimensional heterogeneous halfspace

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.; Fathi, Arash; Poursartip, Babak; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a methodology for computing the optimal spatio-temporal characteristics of surface wave sources necessary for delivering wave energy to a targeted subsurface formation. The wave stimulation is applied to the target formation to enhance

  12. 3-component beamforming analysis of ambient seismic noise field for Love and Rayleigh wave source directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2014-05-01

    Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves observed in the microseism band of the ambient seismic noise field is still limited, including the understanding of source locations and source mechanisms. Multi-component array methods are suitable to address this issue. In this work we use a 3-component beamforming algorithm to obtain source directions and polarization states of the ambient seismic noise field within the primary and secondary microseism bands recorded at the Gräfenberg array in southern Germany. The method allows to distinguish between different polarized waves present in the seismic noise field and estimates Love and Rayleigh wave source directions and their seasonal variations using one year of array data. We find mainly coinciding directions for the strongest acting sources of both wave types at the primary microseism and different source directions at the secondary microseism.

  13. Addendum to foundations of multidimensional wave field signal theory: Gaussian source function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Baddour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many important physical phenomena are described by wave or diffusion-wave type equations. Recent work has shown that a transform domain signal description from linear system theory can give meaningful insight to multi-dimensional wave fields. In N. Baddour [AIP Adv. 1, 022120 (2011], certain results were derived that are mathematically useful for the inversion of multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, but more importantly provide useful insight into how source functions are related to the resulting wave field. In this short addendum to that work, it is shown that these results can be applied with a Gaussian source function, which is often useful for modelling various physical phenomena.

  14. Addendum to foundations of multidimensional wave field signal theory: Gaussian source function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Natalie

    2018-02-01

    Many important physical phenomena are described by wave or diffusion-wave type equations. Recent work has shown that a transform domain signal description from linear system theory can give meaningful insight to multi-dimensional wave fields. In N. Baddour [AIP Adv. 1, 022120 (2011)], certain results were derived that are mathematically useful for the inversion of multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, but more importantly provide useful insight into how source functions are related to the resulting wave field. In this short addendum to that work, it is shown that these results can be applied with a Gaussian source function, which is often useful for modelling various physical phenomena.

  15. A Source Term for Wave Attenuation by Sea Ice in WAVEWATCH III (registered trademark): IC4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    blue and 4 locations in the ice: 1, 2, 5, and 10 km. Notice the steepening of the high frequency face and the shift of the peak to slightly lower...Term for Wave Attenuation by Sea Ice in WAVEWATCH III®: IC4 ClarenCe O. COllins iii W. eriCk rOgers Ocean Dynamics and Prediction Branch Oceanography...Wave model Sea ice Ocean surface waves Arctic Ocean WAVEWATCH III Spectral wave modeling Source terms Wave hindcasting 73-N2K2-07-5 Naval Research

  16. A wave generation toolbox for the open‐source CFD library: OpenFoam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The open‐source CFD library OpenFoam® contains a method for solving free surface Newtonian flows using the Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a volume of fluid method. In this paper, it is demonstrated how this has been extended with a generic wave generation and absorption...... method termed ‘wave relaxation zones’, on which a detailed account is given. The ability to use OpenFoam for the modelling of waves is demonstrated using two benchmark test cases, which show the ability to model wave propagation and wave breaking. Furthermore, the reflection coefficient from outlet...... made freely available through the OpenFoam‐Extend Community....

  17. Incorporating information from source simulations into searches for gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Patrick R; Ray-Majumder, Saikat

    2004-01-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources of gravitational waves is a realistic goal for the current generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Short duration bursts of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae or mergers of binary black holes may bring a wealth of astronomical and astrophysical information. The weakness of the waves and the rarity of the events urges the development of optimal methods to detect the waves. The waves from these sources are not generally known well enough to use matched filtering however; this drives the need to develop new ways to exploit source simulation information in both detection and information extraction. We present an algorithmic approach to using catalogues of gravitational-wave signals developed through numerical simulation, or otherwise, to enhance our ability to detect these waves. As more detailed simulations become available, it is straightforward to incorporate the new information into the search method. This approach may also be useful when trying to extract information from a gravitational-wave observation by allowing direct comparison between the observation and simulations

  18. Integration of a versatile bridge concept in a 34 GHz pulsed/CW EPR spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Alan; Donohue, Matthew P; Epel, Boris; Madhu, Shraeya; Szalai, Veronika A

    2018-03-01

    We present a 34 GHz continuous wave (CW)/pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer capable of pulse-shaping that is based on a versatile microwave bridge design. The bridge radio frequency (RF)-in/RF-out design (500 MHz to 1 GHz input/output passband, 500 MHz instantaneous input/output bandwidth) creates a flexible platform with which to compare a variety of excitation and detection methods utilizing commercially available equipment external to the bridge. We use three sources of RF input to implement typical functions associated with CW and pulse EPR spectroscopic measurements. The bridge output is processed via high speed digitizer and an in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) demodulator for pulsed work or sent to a wideband, high dynamic range log detector for CW. Combining this bridge with additional commercial hardware and new acquisition and control electronics, we have designed and constructed an adaptable EPR spectrometer that builds upon previous work in the literature and is functionally comparable to other available systems. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. New exact travelling wave solutions for the generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized F-expansion method with a computerized symbolic computation is used for constructing a new exact travelling wave solutions for the generalized nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a source. As a result, many exact travelling wave solutions are obtained which include new periodic wave solution, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions. The method is straightforward and concise, and it can also be applied to other nonlinear evolution equations in physics

  20. Does the source energy change when gravitaion waves are emitted in the einstein's gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in the Einstein's gravitation theory the total ''energy'' of a plane gravitational wave calculated with any pseudotensor is equal to zero. The known Einstein's result, according to which the energy of a sourceis decreased when plane weak gravitational waves are emitted, have no place in the Einstein's gravitational theory. The examples are given of exact wave solutions for which the pseudotensor is strictly equal to zero. The energy-momentum of any weak gravitational waves is always equal to zero in the Einstein's gravitation theory. When such waves are emitted the energy of the source cannot change, although these waves are real curvature waves. By the means in the Einstein's gravitation theory the energy, e, is in essenc generated from nothing

  1. Short-period atmospheric gravity waves - A study of their statistical properties and source mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedzelman, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves for the one year period beginning 19 October 1976 around Palisades, New York, are investigated to determine their statistical properties and sources. The waves have typical periods of 10 min, pressure amplitudes of 3 Pa and velocities of 30 m/s. In general, the largest, amplitude waves occur during late fall and early winter when the upper tropospheric winds directly overhead are fastest and the static stability of the lower troposphere is greatest. Mean wave amplitudes correlate highly with the product of the mean maximum wind speed and the mean low level stratification directly aloft. A distinct diurnal variation of wave amplitudes with the largest waves occurring in the pre-dawn hours is also observed as a result of the increased static stability then. The majority of waves are generated by shear instability; however, a number of waves are generated by distant sources such as nuclear detonations or large thunderstorms. The waves with distant sources can be distinguished on the basis of their generally much higher coherency across the grid and velocities that depart markedly from the wind velocity at any point in the sounding.

  2. Turbulence and Waves as Sources for the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, S. R.

    2008-05-01

    Gene Parker's insights from 50 years ago provided the key causal link between energy deposition in the solar corona and the acceleration of solar wind streams. However, the community is still far from agreement concerning the actual physical processes that give rise to this energy. It is still unknown whether the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wavelike fluctuations) or if mass and energy is input more intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. No matter the relative importance of reconnections and loop-openings, though, we do know that waves and turbulent motions are present everywhere from the photosphere to the heliosphere, and it is important to determine how they affect the mean state of the plasma. In this presentation, I will give a summary of wave/turbulence models that seem to succeed in explaining the time-steady properties of the corona (and the fast and slow solar wind). The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration in these models comes from anisotropic turbulent cascade, which is driven by the partial reflection of low-frequency Alfven waves propagating along the open magnetic flux tubes. Specifically, a 2D model of coronal holes and streamers at solar minimum reproduces the latitudinal bifurcation of slow and fast streams seen by Ulysses. The radial gradient of the Alfven speed affects where the waves are reflected and damped, and thus whether energy is deposited below or above Parker's critical point. As predicted by earlier studies, a larger coronal expansion factor gives rise to a slower and denser wind, higher temperature at the coronal base, less intense Alfven waves at 1 AU, and correlative trends for commonly measured ratios of ion charge states and FIP-sensitive abundances that are in general agreement with observations. Finally, I will outline the types of future observations that would be most able to test and refine these ideas.

  3. Near Source Energy Partitioning for Regional Waves in 2D and 3D Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Xiao-Bi; Lay, Thome; Wu, Ru-Shan

    2008-01-01

    ...) to calculate seismic wave excitation and propagation in near-source region. An embedded array slowness analysis is used for quantifying how energy will be partitioned into the long-range propagation regime...

  4. Gain-switched CW fiber laser for improved supercontinuum generation in a PCF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Noordegraaf, Danny; Skovgaard, P.M.W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate supercontinuum generation in a PCF pumped by a gain-switched high-power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser. The pulses generated by gain-switching have a peak power of more than 700 W, a duration around 200 ns, and a repetition rate of 200 kHz giving a high average power of almost 30 W....... By coupling such a pulse train into a commercial nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, a supercontinuum is generated with a spectrum spanning from 500 to 2250 nm, a total output power of 12 W, and an infrared flatness of 6 dB over a bandwidth of more than 1000 nm with a power density above 5 dBm/nm (3 m......W/nm). This is considerably broader than when operating the same system under CW conditions. The presented approach is attractive due to the high power, power scalability, and reduced system complexity compared to picosecond-pumped supercontinuum sources. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  5. Sketches of a hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbrouck, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    Generation of shear waves in shallow seismic investigations (those to depths usually less than 100 m) can be accomplished by horizontally striking with a hammer either the end of a wood plank or metal structure embedded at the ground surface. The dimensioned sketches of this report are of a steel, hammer-impact, spiked-base, shear-wave source. It has been used on outcrops and in a desert environment and for conducting experiments on the effect of rotating source direction.

  6. Surface hardening using cw CO2 laser: laser heat treatment, modelation, and experimental work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, German; Alum, Jorge

    1996-02-01

    In the present work are given the results of the application of laser metal surface hardening techniques using a cw carbon dioxide laser as an energy source on steel 65 G. The laser heat treatment results are presented theoretically and experimentally. Continuous wave carbon dioxide laser of 0.6, 0.3, and 0.4 kW were used. A physical model for the descriptions of the thermophysical laser metal interactions process is given and a numerical algorithm is used to solve this problem by means of the LHT code. The results are compared with the corresponding experimental ones and a very good agreement is observed. The LHT code is able to do predictions of transformation hardening by laser heating. These results will be completed with other ones concerning laser alloying and cladding presented in a second paper.

  7. Characteristics of Love and Rayleigh waves in ambient noise: wavetype ratio, source location and seasonal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, C.; Perleth, M.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise has become an important source of signal for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about the common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism bands is still limited. This applies in particular to constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the differently polarized wave types present in the noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. The focus lies on frequencies around the primary and secondary microseismic bands. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured at each array, and a dependence on direction is observed. We constrain the corresponding source regions of both wave types by backprojection. By using a full year of data in 2013, we are able to track the seasonal changes in our observations of Love-to-Rayleigh ratio and source locations.

  8. Wave resistance calculation method combining Green functions based on Rankine and Kelvin source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jingyu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Ojectives] At present, the Boundary Element Method(BEM of wave-making resistance mostly uses a model in which the velocity distribution near the hull is solved first, and the pressure integral is then calculated using the Bernoulli equation. However,the process of this model of wave-making resistance is complex and has low accuracy.[Methods] To address this problem, the present paper deduces a compound method for the quick calculation of ship wave resistance using the Rankine source Green function to solve the hull surface's source density, and combining the Lagally theorem concerning source point force calculation based on the Kelvin source Green function so as to solve the wave resistance. A case for the Wigley model is given.[Results] The results show that in contrast to the thin ship method of the linear wave resistance theorem, this method has higher precision, and in contrast to the method which completely uses the Kelvin source Green function, this method has better computational efficiency.[Conclusions] In general, the algorithm in this paper provides a compromise between precision and efficiency in wave-making resistance calculation.

  9. Mechanical considerations in cw linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    An 80-MHz radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has been designed, fabricated and operated at 100% duty factor (cw) for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project at Los Alamos. This paper describes the design features, fabrication techniques, and operational problems of the device. The RFQ is an assembly of heavy steel, copper-plated weldments. It measures about 15 ft (4.5 m) long by 5 ft (1.5 m) in diameter and weighs over 12 t. Major components are two pair of diametrically orthogonal vanes mounted in a core cylinder. The core is assembled into a manifold cylinder that couples rf power into the vane quadrants. The design features discussed include assembly of hollow wall, flood-cooled components; high-conductivity rf seals; removable and adjustable vanes; and tuning devices. Fabrication challenges such as close-tolerance weldments, vane-tip-contour machining and large-component plating requirements are covered

  10. Combination of highly nonlinear fiber, an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot filter to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of a supercontinuum continuous-wave optical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yinbo; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun

    2005-05-20

    We present a theoretical study of a supercontinuum (SC) continuous-wave (cw) optical source generation in highly nonlinear fiber and its noise properties through numerical simulations based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Fluctuations of pump pulses generate substructures between the longitudinal modes that result in the generation of white noise and then in degradation of coherence and in a decrease of the modulation depths and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A scheme for improvement of the SNR of a multiwavelength cw optical source based on a SC by use of the combination of a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot (FP) filter is presented. Numerical simulations show that the improvement in modulation depth is relative to the HNLF's length, the 3-dB bandwidth of the optical bandpass filter, and the reflection ratio of the FP filter and that the average improvement in modulation depth is 13.7 dB under specified conditions.

  11. Coherence properties of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by a multi-mode cw diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Osung; Ra, Young-Sik; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2009-07-20

    Coherence properties of the photon pair generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by a multi-mode cw diode laser are studied with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Each photon of the pair enters a different input port of the interferometer and the biphoton coherence properties are studied with a two-photon detector placed at one output port. When the photon pair simultaneously enters the interferometer, periodic recurrence of the biphoton de Broglie wave packet is observed, closely resembling the coherence properties of the pump diode laser. With non-zero delays between the photons at the input ports, biphoton interference exhibits the same periodic recurrence but the wave packet shapes are shown to be dependent on both the input delay as well as the interferometer delay. These properties could be useful for building engineered entangled photon sources based on diode laser-pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion.

  12. On the radio source scintillations caused by plasma inhomogeneities behind a shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenov, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    The turbulence in the interplanetary and interstellar medium is shown to become anisotropic and statistically inhomogeneous after a shock wave passing. Scintillation intensity spectra of radio sources are estimated. The possibilities to derive the inhomogeneity spectra and source brightness distribution from scintillation changes are discussed

  13. A wavenumber approach to analysing the active control of plane waves with arrays of secondary sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Cheer, Jordan; Bhan, Lam; Shi, Chuang; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2018-04-01

    The active control of an incident sound field with an array of secondary sources is a fundamental problem in active control. In this paper the optimal performance of an infinite array of secondary sources in controlling a plane incident sound wave is first considered in free space. An analytic solution for normal incidence plane waves is presented, indicating a clear cut-off frequency for good performance, when the separation distance between the uniformly-spaced sources is equal to a wavelength. The extent of the near field pressure close to the source array is also quantified, since this determines the positions of the error microphones in a practical arrangement. The theory is also extended to oblique incident waves. This result is then compared with numerical simulations of controlling the sound power radiated through an open aperture in a rigid wall, subject to an incident plane wave, using an array of secondary sources in the aperture. In this case the diffraction through the aperture becomes important when its size is compatible with the acoustic wavelength, in which case only a few sources are necessary for good control. When the size of the aperture is large compared to the wavelength, and diffraction is less important but more secondary sources need to be used for good control, the results then become similar to those for the free field problem with an infinite source array.

  14. On the comparsion of the Spherical Wave Expansion-to-Plane Wave Expansion and the Sources Reconstruction Method for Antenna Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Yuri; Cappellin, Cecilia; Las-Heras, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    A comparison between two recently developed methods for antenna diagnostics is presented. On one hand, the Spherical Wave Expansion-to-Plane Wave Expansion (SWE-PWE), based on the relationship between spherical and planar wave modes. On the other hand, the Sources Reconstruction Method (SRM), based...

  15. Pulsar timing residuals due to individual non-evolving gravitational wave sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Ming-Lei; Zhao Cheng-Shi; Yan Bao-Rong; Yang Ting-Gao; Gao Yu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The pulsar timing residuals induced by gravitational waves from non-evolving single binary sources are affected by many parameters related to the relative positions of the pulsar and the gravitational wave sources. We will analyze the various effects due to different parameters. The standard deviations of the timing residuals will be calculated with a variable parameter fixing a set of other parameters. The orbits of the binary sources will be generally assumed to be elliptical. The influences of different eccentricities on the pulsar timing residuals will also be studied in detail. We find that the effects of the related parameters are quite different, and some of them display certain regularities

  16. Limitations On The Creation of Continuously Surfable Waves Generated By A Pressure Source Moving In A Circular Path

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmied, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this work was to investigate the novel idea to produce continuous breaking waves, whereby a pressure source was rotated within an annular wave pool. The concept was that the pressure source generates non-breaking waves that propagate inward to the inner ring of

  17. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C; Kallivokas, L F; Huh, C; Lake, L W

    2010-01-01

    that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential- equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized

  18. Numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation from land-excited large volume air-gun source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, W.; Zhang, W.

    2017-12-01

    The land-excited large volume air-gun source can be used to study regional underground structures and to detect temporal velocity changes. The air-gun source is characterized by rich low frequency energy (from bubble oscillation, 2-8Hz) and high repeatability. It can be excited in rivers, reservoirs or man-made pool. Numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation from the air-gun source helps to understand the energy partitioning and characteristics of the waveform records at stations. However, the effective energy recorded at a distance station is from the process of bubble oscillation, which can not be approximated by a single point source. We propose a method to simulate the seismic wave propagation from the land-excited large volume air-gun source by finite difference method. The process can be divided into three parts: bubble oscillation and source coupling, solid-fluid coupling and the propagation in the solid medium. For the first part, the wavelet of the bubble oscillation can be simulated by bubble model. We use wave injection method combining the bubble wavelet with elastic wave equation to achieve the source coupling. Then, the solid-fluid boundary condition is implemented along the water bottom. And the last part is the seismic wave propagation in the solid medium, which can be readily implemented by the finite difference method. Our method can get accuracy waveform of land-excited large volume air-gun source. Based on the above forward modeling technology, we analysis the effect of the excited P wave and the energy of converted S wave due to different water shapes. We study two land-excited large volume air-gun fields, one is Binchuan in Yunnan, and the other is Hutubi in Xinjiang. The station in Binchuan, Yunnan is located in a large irregular reservoir, the waveform records have a clear S wave. Nevertheless, the station in Hutubi, Xinjiang is located in a small man-made pool, the waveform records have very weak S wave. Better understanding of

  19. Simulation of ultrasonic surface waves with multi-Gaussian and point source beam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Li, Xiongbing; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, multi-Gaussian beam models have been developed to solve many complicated bulk wave propagation problems. However, to date those models have not been extended to simulate the generation of Rayleigh waves. Here we will combine Gaussian beams with an explicit high frequency expression for the Rayleigh wave Green function to produce a three-dimensional multi-Gaussian beam model for the fields radiated from an angle beam transducer mounted on a solid wedge. Simulation results obtained with this model are compared to those of a point source model. It is shown that the multi-Gaussian surface wave beam model agrees well with the point source model while being computationally much more efficient

  20. An evaluation of gravity waves and gravity wave sources in the Southern Hemisphere in a 7 km global climate simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, L A; Alexander, M J; Coy, L; Liu, C; Molod, A; Putman, W; Pawson, S

    2017-07-01

    In this study, gravity waves (GWs) in the high-resolution GEOS-5 Nature Run are first evaluated with respect to satellite and other model results. Southern Hemisphere winter sources of non-orographic GWs in the model are then investigated by linking measures of tropospheric non-orographic gravity wave generation tied to precipitation and frontogenesis with absolute gravity wave momentum flux in the lower stratosphere. Finally, non-orographic GW momentum flux is compared to orographic gravity wave momentum flux and compared to previous estimates. The results show that the global patterns in GW amplitude, horizontal wavelength, and propagation direction are realistic compared to observations. However, as in other global models, the amplitudes are weaker and horizontal wavelengths longer than observed. The global patterns in absolute GW momentum flux also agree well with previous model and observational estimates. The evaluation of model non-orographic GW sources in the Southern Hemisphere winter shows that strong intermittent precipitation (greater than 10 mm h -1 ) is associated with GW momentum flux over the South Pacific, whereas frontogenesis and less intermittent, lower precipitation rates (less than 10 mm h -1 ) are associated with GW momentum flux near 60°S. In the model, orographic GWs contribute almost exclusively to a peak in zonal mean momentum flux between 70 and 75°S, while non-orographic waves dominate at 60°S, and non-orographic GWs contribute a third to a peak in zonal mean momentum flux between 25 and 30°S.

  1. CW EPR parameters reveal cytochrome P450 ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Molly M; Rodriguez, Carlo A; Atkins, William M; Bowman, Michael K

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monoxygenses utilize heme cofactors to catalyze oxidation reactions. They play a critical role in metabolism of many classes of drugs, are an attractive target for drug development, and mediate several prominent drug interactions. Many substrates and inhibitors alter the spin state of the ferric heme by displacing the heme's axial water ligand in the resting enzyme to yield a five-coordinate iron complex, or they replace the axial water to yield a nitrogen-ligated six-coordinate iron complex, which are traditionally assigned by UV-vis spectroscopy. However, crystal structures and recent pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies find a few cases where molecules hydrogen bond to the axial water. The water-bridged drug-H 2 O-heme has UV-vis spectra similar to nitrogen-ligated, six-coordinate complexes, but are closer to "reverse type I" complexes described in older liteature. Here, pulsed and continuous wave (CW) EPR demonstrate that water-bridged complexes are remarkably common among a range of nitrogenous drugs or drug fragments that bind to CYP3A4 or CYP2C9. Principal component analysis reveals a distinct clustering of CW EPR spectral parameters for water-bridged complexes. CW EPR reveals heterogeneous mixtures of ligated states, including multiple directly-coordinated complexes and water-bridged complexes. These results suggest that water-bridged complexes are under-represented in CYP structural databases and can have energies similar to other ligation modes. The data indicates that water-bridged binding modes can be identified and distinguished from directly-coordinated binding by CW EPR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Locating the Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami source using acoustic-gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Andriamiranto Raveloson; Rainer Kind; Xiaohui Yuan; L. Cerana

    2012-01-01

    The giant Tohoku-Oki earthquake of 11 March 2011 in offshore Japan did not only generate tsunami waves in the ocean but also infrasound (or acoustic-gravity) waves in the atmosphere. We indentified ultra-long-period signals (>500s) in the recordings of infrasound stations in northeast Asia, the northwest Pacific, and Alaska. Their source was fond close to the earthquake epicenter. Therefore, we conclude that in general, infrasound observations after a large offshore earthquake are evidence th...

  3. Seismic Wave Generation and Propagation from Complex 3D Explosion Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-28

    source region to regional and teleseismic distances. We simulated the nonproliferation experiment (NPE) including the effects of surface topography...monitoring, Tectonic Strain Release, Nonproliferation Experiment, Shoal 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...understanding shear wave generation is that symmetry constraints imposed by 1D and 2D calculations act to suppress shear waves. Imposition of 2D axisymmetry

  4. Observation of drift wave propagation as a source of tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guiding; Liu Wandong; Yu Changxuan

    1998-01-01

    Core and edge turbulences were measured by Langmuir probe arrays in the KT-5C tokamak plasma. The radial wavenumber spectra show a quasimode like structure which results in a net radial outward propagation of the turbulent fluctuations. The measured fluctuation levels and wave action fluxes are in good agreement with model predictions by Mattor et al., suggesting that drift wave propagation could be a source of edge turbulence

  5. Seasonal variation and sources of atmospheric gravity waves in the Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last recent ten years, our knowledge of gravity waves in the Antarctic has been significantly improved through numerous studies using balloon and satellite observations and high-resolution model simulations. In this report, we introduce results from two studies which were performed as a part of the NIPR project "Integrated analysis of the material circulation in the Antarctic atmosphere-cryosphere-ocean" (2004-2009, i.e., Yoshiki et al. (2004 and Sato and Yoshiki (2008. These two studies focused on the seasonal variation and sources of the gravity waves in the Antarctic, because horizontal wavelengths and phase velocities depend largely on the wave sources. The former study used original high-resolution data from operational radiosonde observations at Syowa Station. In the lowermost stratosphere, gravity waves do not exhibit characteristic seasonal variation; instead, the wave energy is intensified when lower latitude air intrudes into the area near Syowa Station in the upper troposphere. This intrusion is associated with blocking events or developed synoptic-scale waves. In the lower and middle stratosphere, the gravity wave energy is maximized in spring and particularly intensified when the axis of the polar night jet approaches Syowa Station. The latter study is based on intensive radiosonde observation campaigns that were performed in 2002 at Syowa Station as an activity of JARE-43. Gravity wave propagation was statistically examined using two dimensional (i.e., vertical wavenumber versus frequency spectra in each season. It was shown that the gravity waves are radiated upward and downward from an unbalanced region of the polar night jet. This feature is consistent with the gravity-wave resolving GCM simulation.

  6. AGILE Observations of the Gravitational-wave Source GW170104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F. [ASI Space Science Data Center (SSDC), via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Tavani, M.; Ursi, A.; Argan, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Minervini, G.; Cardillo, M.; Piano, G. [INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Donnarumma, I. [ASI, via del Politecnico snc, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bulgarelli, A.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Fioretti, V. [INAF-IASF-Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Marisaldi, M. [Birkeland Centre for Space Science, Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Giuliani, A. [INAF-IASF Milano, via E.Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Longo, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste and INFN, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Munar-Adrover, P. [Unitat de Física de les Radiacions, Departament de Física, and CERES-IEEC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Pilia, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); and others

    2017-10-01

    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) detected on 2017 January 4 a significant gravitational-wave (GW) event (now named GW170104). We report in this Letter the main results obtained from the analysis of hard X-ray and gamma-ray data of the AGILE mission that repeatedly observed the GW170104 localization region (LR). At the LVC detection time T {sub 0} AGILE observed about 36% of the LR. The gamma-ray imaging detector did not reveal any significant emission in the energy range 50 MeV–30 GeV. Furthermore, no significant gamma-ray transients were detected in the LR that was repeatedly exposed over timescales of minutes, hours, and days. We also searched for transient emission using data near T {sub 0} of the omnidirectional detector MCAL operating in the energy band 0.4–100 MeV. A refined analysis of MCAL data shows the existence of a weak event (that we call “E2”) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.4 σ lasting about 32 ms and occurring 0.46 ± 0.05 s before T {sub 0}. A study of the MCAL background and of the false-alarm rate of E2 leads to the determination of a post-trial significance between 2.4σ and 2.7σ for a temporal coincidence with GW170104. We note that E2 has characteristics similar to those detected from the weak precursor of GRB 090510. The candidate event E2 is worth consideration for simultaneous detection by other satellites. If associated with GW170104, it shows emission in the MeV band of a short burst preceding the final coalescence by 0.46 s and involving ∼10{sup −7} of the total rest mass energy of the system.

  7. Analytical solution for the transient wave propagation of a buried cylindrical P-wave line source in a semi-infinite elastic medium with a fluid surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhendong; Ling, Daosheng

    2018-02-01

    This article develops an analytical solution for the transient wave propagation of a cylindrical P-wave line source in a semi-infinite elastic solid with a fluid layer. The analytical solution is presented in a simple closed form in which each term represents a transient physical wave. The Scholte equation is derived, through which the Scholte wave velocity can be determined. The Scholte wave is the wave that propagates along the interface between the fluid and solid. To develop the analytical solution, the wave fields in the fluid and solid are defined, their analytical solutions in the Laplace domain are derived using the boundary and interface conditions, and the solutions are then decomposed into series form according to the power series expansion method. Each item of the series solution has a clear physical meaning and represents a transient wave path. Finally, by applying Cagniard's method and the convolution theorem, the analytical solutions are transformed into the time domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate some interesting features in the fluid layer, the interface and the semi-infinite solid. When the P-wave velocity in the fluid is higher than that in the solid, two head waves in the solid, one head wave in the fluid and a Scholte wave at the interface are observed for the cylindrical P-wave line source.

  8. Uncertainty principles for inverse source problems for electromagnetic and elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesmaier, Roland; Sylvester, John

    2018-06-01

    In isotropic homogeneous media, far fields of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves radiated by compactly supported volume currents, and elastic waves radiated by compactly supported body force densities can be modelled in very similar fashions. Both are projected restricted Fourier transforms of vector-valued source terms. In this work we generalize two types of uncertainty principles recently developed for far fields of scalar-valued time-harmonic waves in Griesmaier and Sylvester (2017 SIAM J. Appl. Math. 77 154–80) to this vector-valued setting. These uncertainty principles yield stability criteria and algorithms for splitting far fields radiated by collections of well-separated sources into the far fields radiated by individual source components, and for the restoration of missing data segments. We discuss proper regularization strategies for these inverse problems, provide stability estimates based on the new uncertainty principles, and comment on reconstruction schemes. A numerical example illustrates our theoretical findings.

  9. Nuclear activated cw chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    A cw chemical laser which uses processed radioactive waste to produce active atoms from a chemically inactive gas before being mixed with another molecule such as hydrogen or deuterium is disclosed. This laser uses no toxic or corrosive fuels and does not require any electrical or other type of auxiliary power supply. The energy released by the radioactive material is used to produce the active atoms such as fluorine. This is accomplished by using the radiation products from processed radioactive waste to dissociate the inert gas in the plenum of the laser. The radioactive material is held in the passageway walls of a device similar to a heat exchanger. The exchanger device may be located in the gas generator section of a chemical laser. The inactive gas is passed through the exchanger device and while passing through it the radiation from the radioactive material dissociates the gas, producing a concentration of free active atoms. This active atom generator then feeds the nozzle bank or mixing section of a laser to produce a lasing action

  10. Joint Inversion of Earthquake Source Parameters with local and teleseismic body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Ni, S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In the classical source parameter inversion algorithm of CAP (Cut and Paste method, by Zhao and Helmberger), waveform data at near distances (typically less than 500km) are partitioned into Pnl and surface waves to account for uncertainties in the crustal models and different amplitude weight of body and surface waves. The classical CAP algorithms have proven effective for resolving source parameters (focal mechanisms, depth and moment) for earthquakes well recorded on relatively dense seismic network. However for regions covered with sparse stations, it is challenging to achieve precise source parameters . In this case, a moderate earthquake of ~M6 is usually recorded on only one or two local stations with epicentral distances less than 500 km. Fortunately, an earthquake of ~M6 can be well recorded on global seismic networks. Since the ray paths for teleseismic and local body waves sample different portions of the focal sphere, combination of teleseismic and local body wave data helps constrain source parameters better. Here we present a new CAP mothod (CAPjoint), which emploits both teleseismic body waveforms (P and SH waves) and local waveforms (Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves) to determine source parameters. For an earthquake in Nevada that is well recorded with dense local network (USArray stations), we compare the results from CAPjoint with those from the traditional CAP method involving only of local waveforms , and explore the efficiency with bootstraping statistics to prove the results derived by CAPjoint are stable and reliable. Even with one local station included in joint inversion, accuracy of source parameters such as moment and strike can be much better improved.

  11. Fan-structure wave as a source of earthquake instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Today frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength at confined compression corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This determines the lithospheric strength and the primary earthquake mechanism associated with frictional stick-slip instability on pre-existing faults. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism the rock failure, associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as 'domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip, is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new domino-blocks), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the lower limit of the lithospheric strength and favours the generation of new faults in pristine rocks in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along pre-existing faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created

  12. Millimeter wave technology IV and radio frequency power sources; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltse, J.C.; Coleman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on mm-wave technology and radio-frequency power sources discusses topics in the fields of vacuum devices, mm-wave antennas and transmission lines, mm-wave systems and subsystems, and mm-wave techniques and components. Attention is given to recent experiments with planar orotrons, a high peak power X-band gyroklystron for linear supercolliders, cathode-driven crossed-field amplifiers, multi-MW quasi-optical gyrotrons, the radiation coupling of interinjection-locked oscillators, air-to-air mm-wave communications, mm-wave active and passive sensors for terrain mapping, and mm-wave components for electronically controllable antennas

  13. Source and path effects in the wave fields of tremor and explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.; Saccorotti, G.; Martini, M.; Dawson, P.; De Luca, G.; Milana, G.; Scarpa, R.

    1997-01-01

    The wave fields generated by Strombolian activity are investigated using data from small-aperture seismic arrays deployed on the north flank of Stromboli and data from seismic and pressure transducers set up near the summit crater. Measurements of slowness and azimuth as a function of time clearly indicate that the sources of tremor and explosions are located beneath the summit crater at depths shallower than 200 m with occasional bursts of energy originating from sources extending to a depth of 3 km. Slowness, azimuth, and particle motion measurements reveal a complex composition of body and surface waves associated with topography, structure, and source properties. Body waves originating at depths shallower than 200 m dominate the wave field at frequencies of 0.5-2.5 Hz, and surface waves generated by the surficial part of the source and by scattering sources distributed around the island dominate at frequencies above 2.5 Hz. The records of tremor and explosions are both dominated by SH motion. Far-field records from explosions start with radial motion, and near-field records from those events show dominantly horizontal motion and often start with a low-frequency (1-2 Hz) precursor characterized by elliptical particle motion, followed within a few seconds by a high-frequency radial phase (1-10 Hz) accompanying the eruption of pyroclastics. The dominant component of the near- and far-field particle motions from explosions, and the timing of air and body wave phases observed in the near field, are consistent with a gaspiston mechanism operating on a shallow (<200 m deep), vertical crack-like conduit. Models of a degassing fluid column suggest that noise emissions originating in the collective oscillations of bubbles ascending in the magma conduit may provide an adequate self-excitation mechanism for sustained tremor generation at Stromboli. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Coupled Hydrodynamic and Wave Propagation Modeling for the Source Physics Experiment: Study of Rg Wave Sources for SPE and DAG series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmat, C. S.; Delorey, A.; Rougier, E.; Knight, E. E.; Steedman, D. W.; Bradley, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation reports numerical modeling efforts to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave generation and propagation from underground explosions, with a focus on Rg waves. The numerical model is based on the coupling of hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus, CASH and HOSS), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Validation datasets are provided by the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) which is a series of highly instrumented chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site with yields from 100kg to 5000kg. A first series of explosions in a granite emplacement has just been completed and a second series in alluvium emplacement is planned for 2018. The long-term goal of this research is to review and improve current existing seismic sources models (e.g. Mueller & Murphy, 1971; Denny & Johnson, 1991) by providing first principles calculations provided by the coupled codes capability. The hydrodynamic codes, Abaqus, CASH and HOSS, model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. A new material model for unconsolidated alluvium materials has been developed and validated with past nuclear explosions, including the 10 kT 1965 Merlin event (Perret, 1971) ; Perret and Bass, 1975). We use the efficient Spectral Element Method code, SPECFEM3D (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998; 2002), and Geologic Framework Models to model the evolution of wavefield as it propagates across 3D complex structures. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests which provide evidence that the damage processes happening in the vicinity of the explosions create secondary seismic sources. These sources interfere with the original explosion moment and reduces the apparent seismic moment at the origin of Rg waves up to 20%.

  15. 1 CW green self-frequency-doubled Yb:YAl3(BO3)4 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, P.; Dawes, J.; Wang, P.; Piper, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We report 1.1 W continuous wave (CW) green output from a 977nm diode-end-pumped self-frequency-doubled Yb:YAB laser, with a diode-to-green optical conversion efficiency of 10%. Wavelength tunability from 513-546nm has been demonstrated

  16. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  17. Prediction of Near-Field Wave Attenuation Due to a Spherical Blast Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Kwang; Park, Duhee

    2017-11-01

    Empirical and theoretical far-field attenuation relationships, which do not capture the near-field response, are most often used to predict the peak amplitude of blast wave. Jiang et al. (Vibration due to a buried explosive source. PhD Thesis, Curtin University, Western Australian School of Mines, 1993) present rigorous wave equations that simulates the near-field attenuation to a spherical blast source in damped and undamped media. However, the effect of loading frequency and velocity of the media have not yet been investigated. We perform a suite of axisymmetric, dynamic finite difference analyses to simulate the propagation of stress waves induced by spherical blast source and to quantify the near-field attenuation. A broad range of loading frequencies, wave velocities, and damping ratios are used in the simulations. The near-field effect is revealed to be proportional to the rise time of the impulse load and wave velocity. We propose an empirical additive function to the theoretical far-field attenuation curve to predict the near-field range and attenuation. The proposed curve is validated against measurements recorded in a test blast.

  18. Nonlinear waveform distortion and shock formation in the near field of a continuous wave piston source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Cathignol, Dominique

    2004-05-01

    A classical effect of nonlinear acoustics is that a plane sinusoidal acoustic wave propagating in a nonlinear medium transforms to a sawtooth wave with one shock per cycle. However, the waveform evolution can be quite different in the near field of a plane source due to diffraction. Previous numerical simulations of nonlinear acoustic waves in the near field of a circular piston source predict the development of two shocks per wave cycle [Khokhlova et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 95-108 (2001)]. Moreover, at some locations the peak pressure may be up to 4 times the source amplitude. The motivation of this work was to experimentally verify and further explain the phenomena of the nonlinear waveform distortion. Measurements were conducted in water with a 47-mm-diameter unfocused transducer, working at 1-MHz frequency. For pressure amplitudes higher than 0.5 MPa, two shocks per cycle were observed in the waveform beyond the last minimum of the fundamental harmonic amplitude. With the increase of the observation distance, these two shocks collided and formed one shock (per cycle), i.e., the waveform developed into the classical sawtooth wave. The experimental results were in a very good agreement with the modeling based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation.

  19. Skeletonized inversion of surface wave: Active source versus controlled noise comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Hanafy, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a skeletonized inversion method that inverts the S-wave velocity distribution from surface-wave dispersion curves. Instead of attempting to fit every wiggle in the surface waves with predicted data, it only inverts the picked dispersion curve, thereby mitigating the problem of getting stuck in a local minimum. We have applied this method to a synthetic model and seismic field data from Qademah fault, located at the western side of Saudi Arabia. For comparison, we have performed dispersion analysis for an active and controlled noise source seismic data that had some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive characteristics. Our results demonstrated that skeletonized inversion can obtain reliable 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models for our geologic setting. A limitation is that we need to build layered initial model to calculate the Jacobian matrix, which is time consuming.

  20. Skeletonized inversion of surface wave: Active source versus controlled noise comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-07-14

    We have developed a skeletonized inversion method that inverts the S-wave velocity distribution from surface-wave dispersion curves. Instead of attempting to fit every wiggle in the surface waves with predicted data, it only inverts the picked dispersion curve, thereby mitigating the problem of getting stuck in a local minimum. We have applied this method to a synthetic model and seismic field data from Qademah fault, located at the western side of Saudi Arabia. For comparison, we have performed dispersion analysis for an active and controlled noise source seismic data that had some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive characteristics. Our results demonstrated that skeletonized inversion can obtain reliable 1D and 2D S-wave velocity models for our geologic setting. A limitation is that we need to build layered initial model to calculate the Jacobian matrix, which is time consuming.

  1. On electromagnetic wave propagation through a plasma sheath produced by a moving ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenova, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Features of the interaction of electromagnetic waves are considered with a nonstationary plasma layer of a finite thickness, produced in an immovable gas by a movable ionization source. It is shown that a static magnetic field excited on the ionization front in build-up of electrons produced in the incident wave field reemits the energy to the electromagnetic wave during the plasma relaxation caused by recombination processes. As a result the electromagnetic wave of a finite amplitude may propagate behind the nonstationary layer of an ''opaque'' (ωsub(p)sup(2)>>ωsub(urc)sup((0))sup(2)) plasma as distinct from the layer of a movable stationary plasma with the same parameters

  2. 2D and 3D numerical modeling of seismic waves from explosion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, K.L.; Stevens, J.L.; Barker, T.G.; Shkoller, B.; Day, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, nonlinear and linear 2D axisymmetric finite difference codes have been used in conjunction with far-field seismic Green's functions to simulate seismic waves from a variety of sources. In this paper we briefly review some of the results and conclusions that have resulted from numerical simulations and explosion modeling in support of treaty verification research at S-CUBED in the last decade. We then describe in more detail the results from two recent projects. Our goal is to provide a flavor for the kinds of problems that can be examined with numerical methods for modeling excitation of seismic waves from explosions. Two classes of problems have been addressed; nonlinear and linear near-source interactions. In both classes of problems displacements and tractions are saved on a closed surface in the linear region and the representation theorem is used to propagate the seismic waves to the far-field

  3. Source study of local coalfield events using the modal synthesis of shear and surface waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacBeth, C.D.; Redmayne, D.W.

    1989-10-01

    Results from the BGS LOWNET array from the Midlothian coalfield in Scotland have been studied. Vertical component seismograms have been analysed using a waveform matching technique based on the modal summation method for constructing synthetic seismograms. Results of the analysis are applied to S and surface wave portions of the seismogram. Effects of different earth structures, source depths, source orientation, and type of event, rockburst or triggered earthquake 2-3 km from the mine workings, can be evaluated.

  4. Generation of dynamo waves by spatially separated sources in the Earth and other celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, E.

    2017-12-01

    The amplitude and the spatial configuration of the planetary and stellar magnetic field can changing over the years. Celestial bodies can have cyclic, chaotic or unchanging in time magnetic activity which is connected with a dynamo mechanism. This mechanism is based on the consideration of the joint influence of the alpha-effect and differential rotation. Dynamo sources can be located at different depths (active layers) of the celestial body and can have different intensities. Application of this concept allows us to get different forms of solutions and some of which can include wave propagating inside the celestial body. We analytically showed that in the case of spatially separated sources of magnetic field each source generates a wave whose frequency depends on the physical parameters of its source. We estimated parameters of sources required for the generation nondecaying waves. We discus structure of such sources and matter motion (including meridional circulation) in the liquid outer core of the Earth and active layers of other celestial bodies.

  5. Maximum Available Accuracy of FM-CW Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ricny

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the principles and above all with the maximum available measuring accuracy analyse of FM-CW (Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radars, which are usually employed for distance and velocity measurements of moving objects in road traffic, as well as air traffic and in other applications. These radars often form an important part of the active safety equipment of high-end cars – the so-called anticollision systems. They usually work in the frequency bands of mm waves (24, 35, 77 GHz. Function principles and analyses of factors, that dominantly influence the distance measurement accuracy of these equipments especially in the modulation and demodulation part, are shown in the paper.

  6. Quantum Communication with a High-Rate Entangled Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Lekki, John D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  7. Optimizing the regimes of the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector for multiple source types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashov, I. S.; Simakov, D. A.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Danilishin, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    We developed algorithms which allow us to find regimes of the signal-recycled Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometer [for example, the Advanced Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO)], optimized concurrently for two (binary inspirals + bursts) and three (binary inspirals + bursts + millisecond pulsars) types of gravitational wave sources. We show that there exists a relatively large area in the interferometer parameters space where the detector sensitivity to the first two kinds of sources differs only by a few percent from the maximal ones for each kind of source. In particular, there exists a specific regime where this difference is ≅0.5% for both of them. Furthermore, we show that even more multipurpose regimes are also possible that provide significant sensitivity gain for millisecond pulsars with only minor sensitivity degradation for binary inspirals and bursts.

  8. Iterative and range test methods for an inverse source problem for acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Carlos; Kress, Rainer; Serranho, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We propose two methods for solving an inverse source problem for time-harmonic acoustic waves. Based on the reciprocity gap principle a nonlinear equation is presented for the locations and intensities of the point sources that can be solved via Newton iterations. To provide an initial guess for this iteration we suggest a range test algorithm for approximating the source locations. We give a mathematical foundation for the range test and exhibit its feasibility in connection with the iteration method by some numerical examples

  9. Proposal of coherent Cherenkov radiation matched to circular plane wave for intense terahertz light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a new intense terahertz-wave source based on coherent Cherenkov radiation (CCR). • A hollow conical dielectric is used to generate the CCR beam. • The wave front of the CCR beam can be matched to the basal plane. • The peak-power of the CCR beam is above 1 MW per micropulse with a short interval of 350 ps. - Abstract: We propose a high-peak-power terahertz-wave source based on an electron accelerator. By passing an electron beam through a hollow conical dielectric with apex facing the incident electron beam, the wave front of coherent Cherenkov radiation generated on the inner surface of the hollow conical dielectric matches the basal plane. Using the electron beam generated at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application at Nihon University, the calculated power of coherent Cherenkov radiation that matched the circular plane (CCR-MCP) was above 1 MW per micropulse with a short interval of 350 ps, for wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm. The electron beam is not lost for generating the CCR-MCP beam by using the hollow conical dielectric. It is possible to combine the CCR-MCP beams with other light sources based on an accelerator

  10. Continuous-wave terahertz light from optical parametric oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowade, Rosita

    2010-12-15

    Continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are working horses for spectroscopy in the near and mid infrared. However, in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz), the pump threshold is more than 100 W due to the high absorption in nonlinear crystals and thus exceeds the power of standard cw single-frequency pump sources. In this thesis the first cw OPO capable of generating terahertz radiation is demonstrated. To overcome the high threshold, the signal wave of a primary infrared process is resonantly enhanced to serve as the pump wave for a cascaded parametric process with one wave being at the terahertz frequency level. A terahertz output power of more than two microwatts is measured and tuning is achieved from 1.3 to 1.7 THz. This terahertz source emits a narrow-band, diffraction-limited beam which remains mode-hop free over more than one hour. Such a device inhibits high potential for applications in areas like astronomy, telecommunications or high-resolution spectroscopy. (orig.)

  11. Continuous-wave terahertz light from optical parametric oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowade, Rosita

    2010-12-01

    Continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) are working horses for spectroscopy in the near and mid infrared. However, in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz), the pump threshold is more than 100 W due to the high absorption in nonlinear crystals and thus exceeds the power of standard cw single-frequency pump sources. In this thesis the first cw OPO capable of generating terahertz radiation is demonstrated. To overcome the high threshold, the signal wave of a primary infrared process is resonantly enhanced to serve as the pump wave for a cascaded parametric process with one wave being at the terahertz frequency level. A terahertz output power of more than two microwatts is measured and tuning is achieved from 1.3 to 1.7 THz. This terahertz source emits a narrow-band, diffraction-limited beam which remains mode-hop free over more than one hour. Such a device inhibits high potential for applications in areas like astronomy, telecommunications or high-resolution spectroscopy. (orig.)

  12. Use of Z pinch radiation sources for high pressure shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Trott, W.M.; Chandler, G.A.; Holland, K.G.; Fleming, K.J.; Trucano, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in pulsed power technology demonstrate use of intense radiation sources (Z pinches) for driving planar shock waves in samples with spatial dimensions larger than possible with other radiation sources. Initial indications are that the use of Z pinch sources can be used to produce planar shock waves in samples with diameters of a few millimeters and thicknesses approaching one half millimeter. These dimensions allow increased accuracy of both shock velocity and particle velocity measurements. The Z pinch radiation source uses imploding metal plasma induced by self-magnetic fields applied to wire arrays to produce high temperature x-ray environments in vacuum hohlraum enclosures. Previous experiments have demonstrated that planar shock waves can be produced with this approach. A photograph of a wire array located inside the vacuum hohlraum is shown here. Typically, a few hundred individual wires are used to produce the Z pinch source. For the shock wave experiments being designed, arrays of 120 to 240 tungsten wires with a diameter of 40 mm and with individual diameters of about 10 microm are used. Preliminary experiments have been performed on the Z pulsed radiation source to demonstrate the ability to obtain VISAR measurements in the Z accelerator environment. Analysis of these results indicate that another effect, not initially anticipated, is an apparent change in refractive index that occurs in the various optical components used in the system. This effect results in an apparent shift in the frequency of reflected laser light, and causes an error in the measured particle velocity. Experiments are in progress to understand and minimize this effect

  13. A traveling wave approach to plasma pumping for X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in high-brightness excimer lasers and in optical angular multiplexing of excimer lasers presents an opportunity to provide very intense pumping of X-ray sources, both in favorable geometry and in travelling waves, all at low cost. The traveling-wave strategy can be tailored to the parameters of the system to be pumped. This design option can be of great importance for systems lasing at wavelengths in the kilovolt regime where upper level lifetimes are short, and where mirror technology is presently tenuous. Features of several design strategies are explored. (author)

  14. Identification of Standing Pressure Waves Sources in Primary Loops of NPP with WWER and PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Proskuriakov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurement and calculation of Eigen frequencies of coolant pressure oscillations in primary loops of NPP are presented. The simple calculation model based on equivalence of electric circuit with elastic wave propagation in liquids and gases, which gives a sensible interpretation of standing pressure waves sources is developed. It is shown, that pressurizer manifest itself as managed Helmholtz resonator generating a number of SPW (with Eigen frequencies of steam volume, water volume and their combination with coolant volume of respiratory line.

  15. Depth-of-field effects in wiggler radiation sources: Geometrical versus wave optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Walker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis is carried out of the optical properties of synchrotron radiation emitted by multipole wigglers, concentrating on the effective source size and brightness and the so-called “depth of field” effects, concerning which there has been some controversy in the literature. By comparing calculations made with both geometrical optics and wave optics methods we demonstrate that the two approaches are not at variance, and that the wave optics results tend towards those of geometrical optics under well-defined conditions.

  16. Development of a 100 W, single frequency, CW Nd:YAG Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitch, P.J.; Mudge, D.; Munch, J.; Hamilton, M.W.; Ostermeyer, M.; Hosken, D.; Brooks, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High power, diode-laser-pumped, continuous wave (cw) solid-state lasers with excellent beam quality, efficiency and reliability are required for demanding applications, including gravitational wave interferometry, where current additional requirements include single frequency, low noise and Nd:YAG. Our approach is a chain of injection locked laser oscillators, theoretically capable of achieving the lowest noise possible. We use a single-frequency (100 mW) master laser to injection lock a medium-power (10 W) laser that in turn injection locks a 100 W laser. Injection locking requires an optimized, single mode, power slave laser at each stage. We shall describe the nearly completed 10 W brass-board laser, which will also be deployed at the ACIGA Test Facility at Gingin. We shall also describe our 100 W laser using a scalable diode pumping scheme, an active control of thermal lensing and a stable-unstable resonator. Initial tests showed mode control to be limited by thermal focusing and thermally induced birefringence in the Nd:YAG medium at 70 W output. Recent efforts have identified the source of the thermal lens and significantly reduced its magnitude, leading to a modified design. We shall present our latest results from the experiments to demonstrate single mode, single frequency laser at 100 W

  17. Status of the development of the EU 170 GHz/1 MW/CW gyrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr., E-mail: ioannis.pagonakis@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Albajar, Ferran [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and The Development of Fusion Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Alberti, Stefano [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Avramidis, Konstantinos [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bonicelli, Tullio [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and The Development of Fusion Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Braunmueller, Falk [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Bruschi, Alex [Plasma Physics Institute, National Research Council of Italy, Milano (Italy); Chelis, Ioannis [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (Greece); Cismondi, Fabio [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and The Development of Fusion Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Gantenbein, Gerd [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hermann, Virgile [Thales Electron Devices (TED), Vélizy-Villacoublay (France); Hesch, Klaus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hogge, Jean-Philippe [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Jelonnek, John; Jin, Jianbo; Illy, Stefan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Ioannidis, Zisis C. [Faculty of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Greece); Kobarg, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-10-15

    The progress in the development of the European 170 GHz, 1 MW/CW gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating & current drive (ECH&CD) on ITER is reported. A continuous wave (CW) prototype is being manufactured by Thales Electron Devices (TED), France, while a short-pulse (SP) prototype gyrotron is in parallel under manufacture at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), with the purpose of validating the design of the CW industrial prototype components. The fabrication of most of the sub-assemblies of the SP prototype has been completed. In a first step, an existing magnetron injection gun (MIG) available at KIT was used. Despite this non-ideal configuration, the experiments provided a validation of the design, substantiated by an excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The tube, operated without a depressed collector, is able to produce more than 1 MW of output power with efficiency in excess of 30%, as expected, and compatible with the ITER requirements.

  18. Enhanced accuracy of the microwave field strength measurement in a CW-EPR by pulsed modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvin, B.; Carić, D.; Kveder, M.

    2018-02-01

    The microwave magnetic field strength, B1, in the cavity of a conventional continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance, CW-EPR, spectrometer was measured by employing modulation sidebands, MS, in the EPR spectrum. MS spectrum in CW-EPR is produced by applying the modulation frequency, ωrf, which exceeds the linewidth, δB, given in frequency units. An amplitude-modulated CW-EPR, AM-CW-EPR, was selected as detection method. Theoretical description of AM-CW-EPR spectrum was modified by adding Bloch-Siegert-like shift obtained by taking into account the cumulative effect of the non-resonant interactions between the driving fields and the spin system. This approach enables to enhance the precision of B1 measurement. In order to increase the sensitivity of the method when saturation effects, due to higher intensity of B1, decrease the resolution of AM-CW-EPR spectrum, detection at the second harmonic of CW-EPR has been employed.

  19. Enhanced accuracy of the microwave field strength measurement in a CW-EPR by pulsed modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvin, B; Carić, D; Kveder, M

    2018-02-01

    The microwave magnetic field strength, B 1 , in the cavity of a conventional continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance, CW-EPR, spectrometer was measured by employing modulation sidebands, MS, in the EPR spectrum. MS spectrum in CW-EPR is produced by applying the modulation frequency, ω rf , which exceeds the linewidth, δB, given in frequency units. An amplitude-modulated CW-EPR, AM-CW-EPR, was selected as detection method. Theoretical description of AM-CW-EPR spectrum was modified by adding Bloch-Siegert-like shift obtained by taking into account the cumulative effect of the non-resonant interactions between the driving fields and the spin system. This approach enables to enhance the precision of B 1 measurement. In order to increase the sensitivity of the method when saturation effects, due to higher intensity of B 1 , decrease the resolution of AM-CW-EPR spectrum, detection at the second harmonic of CW-EPR has been employed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Linking optical and infrared observations with gravitational wave sources through transient variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, C W

    2008-01-01

    Optical and infrared observations have thus far detected more celestial cataclysms than have been seen in gravity waves (GW). This argues that we should search for gravity wave signatures that correspond to transient variables seen at optical wavelengths, at precisely known positions. There is an unknown time delay between the optical and gravitational transient, but knowing the source location precisely specifies the corresponding time delays across the gravitational antenna network as a function of the GW-to-optical arrival time difference. Optical searches should detect virtually all supernovae that are plausible gravitational radiation sources. The transient optical signature expected from merging compact objects is not as well understood, but there are good reasons to expect detectable transient optical/IR emission from most of these sources as well. The next generation of deep wide-field surveys (for example PanSTARRS and LSST) will be sensitive to subtle optical variability, but we need to fill the 'blind spots' that exist in the galactic plane, and for optically bright transient sources. In particular, a galactic plane variability survey at λ∼ 2 μm seems worthwhile. Science would benefit from closer coordination between the various optical survey projects and the gravity wave community

  1. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2014-12-28

    © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. We discuss an optimization methodology for focusing wave energy to subterranean formations using strong motion actuators placed on the ground surface. The motivation stems from the desire to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem. The underlying wave propagation problems are abstracted in two spatial dimensions, and the semi-infinite extent of the physical domain is negotiated by a buffer of perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs) placed at the domain’s truncation boundary. We discuss two possible numerical implementations: Their utility for deciding the tempo-spatial characteristics of optimal wave sources is shown via numerical experiments. Overall, the simulations demonstrate the inverse source method’s ability to simultaneously optimize load locations and time signals leading to the maximization of energy delivery to a target formation.

  2. Design of the miniaturized free electron laser module as an efficient source of the THz waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Chul; Ahn, Seong Joon; Kim, Ho Seob; Kim, Dae-Wook; Ahn, Seungjoon

    2011-01-01

    Since the tremendous potential of the THz wave for the bio-technological applications has been found, there has been a lot of interest paid to development of the THz-wave sources. The miniaturized free electron laser (FEL) module based on the microcolumn can be a very convenient THz wave emitter because of its compactness. In this work, we tried to design the miniaturized FEL module to achieve the optimized electron beam (e-beam) trajectory in the module by using 3D simulation tool. We found that the accelerator bias, the length and radius of the limiting aperture were important parameters to obtain the strong and parallel e-beam. We have also proposed the ring-type grids to get more symmetrical behavior of the e-beam in the wiggler.

  3. Design of the miniaturized free electron laser module as an efficient source of the THz waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul [Department of Optometry, Eulji University, 212 Yangji-dong, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Joon [Department of I and C Engineering, Sun Moon University, Tangjeong-myeon, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Seob; Kim, Dae-Wook [Department of Information Display, Sun Moon University, 100 Kalsan-ri, Tangjeong-myun, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seungjoon, E-mail: sjan@sunmoon.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Sun Moon University, 100 Kalsan-ri, Tangjeong-myun, Asan-si, Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-21

    Since the tremendous potential of the THz wave for the bio-technological applications has been found, there has been a lot of interest paid to development of the THz-wave sources. The miniaturized free electron laser (FEL) module based on the microcolumn can be a very convenient THz wave emitter because of its compactness. In this work, we tried to design the miniaturized FEL module to achieve the optimized electron beam (e-beam) trajectory in the module by using 3D simulation tool. We found that the accelerator bias, the length and radius of the limiting aperture were important parameters to obtain the strong and parallel e-beam. We have also proposed the ring-type grids to get more symmetrical behavior of the e-beam in the wiggler.

  4. A compact, CW mid-infrared intra-cavity Nd:Lu0.5Y0.5VO4∖KTA-OPO at 3.5 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Y M; Zhu, H Y; Feng, Z R; Xu, C W; Tang, D Y; Zhang, J; Wang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    We report a continuous-wave (CW) KTA (KTiOAsO 4 )-OPO (optical parametric oscillator) with a compact linear cavity utilizing an LD pumped mixed crystal Nd:Lu 0.5 Y 0.5 VO 4 laser as the pump source for the first time. A singly resonant oscillator with low signal light loss was designed to reduce the OPO’s threshold. Maximum output powers of 630 mW at 3475 nm and 190 mW at 1536 nm were obtained at a pump power of 13.2 W. A total conversion efficiency of 6.2% was achieved with respect to the incident diode pump power. The performance of this work demonstrates that a CW KTA-OPO derived by an LD pumped Nd 3+ doped solid laser can also produce efficient mid-infrared light. (letter)

  5. Three-Dimensional Passive-Source Reverse-Time Migration of Converted Waves: The Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahang; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    At seismic discontinuities in the crust and mantle, part of the compressional wave energy converts to shear wave, and vice versa. These converted waves have been widely used in receiver function (RF) studies to image discontinuity structures in the Earth. While generally successful, the conventional RF method has its limitations and is suited mostly to flat or gently dipping structures. Among the efforts to overcome the limitations of the conventional RF method is the development of the wave-theory-based, passive-source reverse-time migration (PS-RTM) for imaging complex seismic discontinuities and scatters. To date, PS-RTM has been implemented only in 2D in the Cartesian coordinate for local problems and thus has limited applicability. In this paper, we introduce a 3D PS-RTM approach in the spherical coordinate, which is better suited for regional and global problems. New computational procedures are developed to reduce artifacts and enhance migrated images, including back-propagating the main arrival and the coda containing the converted waves separately, using a modified Helmholtz decomposition operator to separate the P and S modes in the back-propagated wavefields, and applying an imaging condition that maintains a consistent polarity for a given velocity contrast. Our new approach allows us to use migration velocity models with realistic velocity discontinuities, improving accuracy of the migrated images. We present several synthetic experiments to demonstrate the method, using regional and teleseismic sources. The results show that both regional and teleseismic sources can illuminate complex structures and this method is well suited for imaging dipping interfaces and sharp lateral changes in discontinuity structures.

  6. Waves and Turbulence in the Solar Corona: A Surplus of Sources and Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2018-06-01

    The Sun's corona is a hot, dynamic, and highly stochastic plasma environment, and we still do not yet understand how it is heated. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be filled with waves and turbulent eddies. Models that invoke the dissipation of these magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. In this presentation I will review some new insights about the different ways these waves are thought to be created and destroyed. For example: (1) Intergranular bright points in the photosphere are believed to extend upwards as coronal flux tubes, and their transverse oscillations are driven by the underlying convection. New high-resolution MHD simulations predict the kinetic energy spectra of the resulting coronal waves and serve as predictions for upcoming DKIST observations. (2) Magnetic reconnection in the supergranular network of the low corona can also generate MHD waves, and new Monte Carlo models of the resulting power spectra will be presented. The total integrated power in these waves is typically small in comparison to that of photosphere-driven waves, but they dominate the total spectrum at periods longer than about 30 minutes. (3) Because each magnetic field line in the corona is tied to at least one specific chromospheric footpoint (each with its own base pressure), the corona also plays host to field-aligned "density striations." These fluctuations vary with the supergranular network on timescales of roughly a day, but they also act as a spatially varying background through which the higher-frequency waves propagate. These multiple sources of space/time variability must be taken into account to properly understand off-limb measurements from CoMP and EIS/Hinode, as well as in-situ measurements from Parker Solar Probe.

  7. Harnessing Alternative Energy Sources to Enhance the Design of a Wave Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Wave energy has the power to replace a non-renewable source of electricity for a home near the ocean. I built a small-scale wave generator capable of producing approximately 5 volts of electricity. The generator is an array of 16 small generators, each consisting of 200 feet of copper wire, 12 magnets, and a buoy. I tested my design in the Pacific Ocean and was able to power a string of lights I had attached to the generator. While the waves in the ocean moved my buoys, my design was powered by the vertical motion of the waves. My generator was hit with significant horizontal wave motion, and I realized I wasn't taking advantage of that direction of motion. To make my generator produce more electricity, I experimented with capturing the energy of the horizontal motion of water and incorporated that into my generator design. My generator, installed in the ocean, is also exposed to sun and wind, and I am exploring the potential of solar and wind energy collection in my design to increase the electricity output. Once I have maximized my electricity output, I would like to explore scaling up my design.

  8. An Inverse Source Problem for a One-dimensional Wave Equation: An Observer-Based Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2013-05-25

    Observers are well known in the theory of dynamical systems. They are used to estimate the states of a system from some measurements. However, recently observers have also been developed to estimate some unknowns for systems governed by Partial differential equations. Our aim is to design an observer to solve inverse source problem for a one dimensional wave equation. Firstly, the problem is discretized in both space and time and then an adaptive observer based on partial field measurements (i.e measurements taken form the solution of the wave equation) is applied to estimate both the states and the source. We see the effectiveness of this observer in both noise-free and noisy cases. In each case, numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach. Finally, we compare the performance of the observer approach with Tikhonov regularization approach.

  9. Quantum Interference between Autonomous Single-Photon Sources from Doppler-Broadened Atomic Ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Teak; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Park, Jiho; Kim, Heonoh; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-01-01

    To realize a quantum network based on quantum entanglement swapping, bright and completely autonomous sources are essentially required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) quantum interference between two independent bright photon pairs generated via the spontaneous four-wave mixing in Doppler-broadened ladder-type 87Rb atoms. Bright autonomous heralded single photons are operated in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with no synchronization or supplemental filters. The four-fol...

  10. On exact solitary wave solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, T Solomon; Kumar, C Nagaraja; Panigrahi, Prasanta K

    2005-01-01

    We use a fractional transformation to connect the travelling wave solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE), phase locked with a source, to the elliptic equations satisfying, f-Prime ± af ± λf 3 = 0. The solutions are necessarily of rational form, containing both trigonometric and hyperbolic types as special cases. Bright and dark solitons, as well as singular solitons, are obtained in a suitable range of parameter values. (letter to the editor)

  11. Optimization method for identifying the source term in an inverse wave equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Deiveegan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate the inverse problem of identifying a space-wise dependent source term of wave equation from the measurement on the boundary. On the basis of the optimal control framework, the inverse problem is transformed into an optimization problem. The existence and necessary condition of the minimizer for the cost functional are obtained. The projected gradient method and two-parameter model function method are applied to the minimization problem and numerical results are illustrated.

  12. Variable Power, Short Microwave Pulses Generation using a CW Magnetron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIUPA, R.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fine control of microwave power radiation in medical and scientific applications is a challenging task. Since a commercial Continuous Wave (CW magnetron is the most inexpensive microwave device available today on the market, it becomes the best candidate for a microwave power generator used in medical diathermy and hyperthermia treatments or high efficiency chemical reactions using microwave reactors as well. This article presents a new method for driving a CW magnetron with short pulses, using a modified commercial Zero Voltage Switching (ZVS inverter, software driven by a custom embedded system. The microwave power generator designed with this method can be programmed for output microwave pulses down to 1% of the magnetron's power and allows microwave low frequency pulse modulation in the range of human brain electrical activity, intended for medical applications. Microwave output power continuous control is also possible with the magnetron running in the oscillating area, using a dual frequency Pulse Width Modulation (PWM, where the low frequency PWM pulse is modulating a higher resonant frequency required by the ZVS inverter's transformer. The method presented allows a continuous control of both power and energy (duty-cycle at the inverter's output.

  13. Source parameter inversion for wave energy focusing to a target inclusion embedded in a three-dimensional heterogeneous halfspace

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2016-12-28

    We discuss a methodology for computing the optimal spatio-temporal characteristics of surface wave sources necessary for delivering wave energy to a targeted subsurface formation. The wave stimulation is applied to the target formation to enhance the mobility of particles trapped in its pore space. We formulate the associated wave propagation problem for three-dimensional, heterogeneous, semi-infinite, elastic media. We use hybrid perfectly matched layers at the truncation boundaries of the computational domain to mimic the semi-infiniteness of the physical domain of interest. To recover the source parameters, we define an inverse source problem using the mathematical framework of constrained optimization and resolve it by employing a reduced-space approach. We report the results of our numerical experiments attesting to the methodology\\'s ability to specify the spatio-temporal description of sources that maximize wave energy delivery. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Numerical Study on the Excitation of Guided Waves in Rectangular Plates Using Multiple Point Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Duan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic guided waves are widely used to inspect and monitor the structural integrity of plates and plate-like structures, such as ship hulls and large storage-tank floors. Recently, ultrasonic guided waves have also been used to remove ice and fouling from ship hulls, wind-turbine blades and aeroplane wings. In these applications, the strength of the sound source must be high for scanning a large area, or to break the bond between ice, fouling and plate substrate. More than one transducer may be used to achieve maximum sound power output. However, multiple sources can interact with each other, and form a sound field in the structure with local constructive and destructive regions. Destructive regions are weak regions and shall be avoided. When multiple transducers are used it is important that they are arranged in a particular way so that the desired wave modes can be excited to cover the whole structure. The objective of this paper is to provide a theoretical basis for generating particular wave mode patterns in finite-width rectangular plates whose length is assumed to be infinitely long with respect to its width and thickness. The wave modes have displacements in both width and thickness directions, and are thus different from the classical Lamb-type wave modes. A two-dimensional semi-analytical finite element (SAFE method was used to study dispersion characteristics and mode shapes in the plate up to ultrasonic frequencies. The modal analysis provided information on the generation of modes suitable for a particular application. The number of point sources and direction of loading for the excitation of a few representative modes was investigated. Based on the SAFE analysis, a standard finite element modelling package, Abaqus, was used to excite the designed modes in a three-dimensional plate. The generated wave patterns in Abaqus were then compared with mode shapes predicted in the SAFE model. Good agreement was observed between the

  15. Modeling Volcanic Eruption Parameters by Near-Source Internal Gravity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, M; Barfucci, G; De Angelis, S; Delle Donne, D; Lacanna, G; Marchetti, E

    2016-11-10

    Volcanic explosions release large amounts of hot gas and ash into the atmosphere to form plumes rising several kilometers above eruptive vents, which can pose serious risk on human health and aviation also at several thousands of kilometers from the volcanic source. However the most sophisticate atmospheric models and eruptive plume dynamics require input parameters such as duration of the ejection phase and total mass erupted to constrain the quantity of ash dispersed in the atmosphere and to efficiently evaluate the related hazard. The sudden ejection of this large quantity of ash can perturb the equilibrium of the whole atmosphere triggering oscillations well below the frequencies of acoustic waves, down to much longer periods typical of gravity waves. We show that atmospheric gravity oscillations induced by volcanic eruptions and recorded by pressure sensors can be modeled as a compact source representing the rate of erupted volcanic mass. We demonstrate the feasibility of using gravity waves to derive eruption source parameters such as duration of the injection and total erupted mass with direct application in constraining plume and ash dispersal models.

  16. Integrating a Traveling Wave Tube into an AECR-U ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Ratti, Alessandro; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2011-07-01

    An RF system of 500W - 10.75 to 12.75 GHz was designed and integrated into the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance - Upgrade (AECR-U) ion source of the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AECR-U produces ion beams for the Cyclotron giving large flexibility of ion species and charge states. The broadband frequency of a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) allows modifying the volume that couples and heats the plasma. The TWT system design and integration with the AECR-U ion source and results from commissioning are presented.

  17. An Adaptive Observer-Based Algorithm for Solving Inverse Source Problem for the Wave Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.; Zayane, Chadia; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Observers are well known in control theory. Originally designed to estimate the hidden states of dynamical systems given some measurements, the observers scope has been recently extended to the estimation of some unknowns, for systems governed by partial differential equations. In this paper, observers are used to solve inverse source problem for a one-dimensional wave equation. An adaptive observer is designed to estimate the state and source components for a fully discretized system. The effectiveness of the algorithm is emphasized in noise-free and noisy cases and an insight on the impact of measurements’ size and location is provided.

  18. An Adaptive Observer-Based Algorithm for Solving Inverse Source Problem for the Wave Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2015-08-31

    Observers are well known in control theory. Originally designed to estimate the hidden states of dynamical systems given some measurements, the observers scope has been recently extended to the estimation of some unknowns, for systems governed by partial differential equations. In this paper, observers are used to solve inverse source problem for a one-dimensional wave equation. An adaptive observer is designed to estimate the state and source components for a fully discretized system. The effectiveness of the algorithm is emphasized in noise-free and noisy cases and an insight on the impact of measurements’ size and location is provided.

  19. Method to measure a relative transverse velocity of a source-lens-observer system using gravitational lensing of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yousuke; Futamase, Toshifumi; Hattori, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational waves propagate along null geodesics like light rays in the geometrical optics approximation, and they may have a chance to suffer from gravitational lensing by intervening objects, as is the case for electromagnetic waves. Long wavelengths of gravitational waves and compactness of possible sources may enable us to extract information in the interference among the lensed images. We point out that the interference term contains information of relative transverse velocity of the source-lens-observer system, which may be obtained by possible future space-borne gravitational wave detectors such as BBO/DECIGO.

  20. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.

    1997-01-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning

  1. Synthesis of Directional Sources Using Wave Field Synthesis, Possibilities, and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corteel E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of directional sources using wave field synthesis is described. The proposed formulation relies on an ensemble of elementary directivity functions based on a subset of spherical harmonics. These can be combined to create and manipulate directivity characteristics of the synthesized virtual sources. The WFS formulation introduces artifacts in the synthesized sound field for both ideal and real loudspeakers. These artifacts can be partly compensated for using dedicated equalization techniques. A multichannel equalization technique is shown to provide accurate results thus enabling for the manipulation of directional sources with limited reconstruction artifacts. Applications of directional sources to the control of the direct sound field and the interaction with the listening room are discussed.

  2. Cw operation of the FMIT RFQ accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, we have achieved reliable cw operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. In addition to the operational experiences in achieving this status, some of the modifications of the vacuum system, cooling system, and rf structure are discussed. Preliminary beam-characterization results are presented. 10 refs., 8 figs

  3. CW operation of the FMIT RFQ accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    Experiences in attaining cw operation of the radio-frequency quadrupole for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility are presented. Modifications of the vacuum system, changes in the rf structure, and operational experiences are discussed, as well as preliminary results of initial beam-characterization measurements. 4 references, 2 figures

  4. Cw rf operation of the FMIT RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Brandeberry, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The 80-MHz RFQ for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility prototype accelerator has been rf conditioned for cw operation to the design field level of 17.5 MV/m (1.68 x Kilpatrick limit). Experimental results and operating experience will be discussed

  5. A CW Gunn diode bistable switching element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, M.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments with a current-controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode are reported. Switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by current pulses of short duration (5-10 ns). Rise times of the order of several nanoseconds could be obtained.

  6. New high power CW klystrons at TED

    CERN Document Server

    Beunas, A; Marchesin, R

    2003-01-01

    Thales Electron Devices (TED) has been awarded a contract by CERN to develop and produce 20 units of the klystrons needed to feed the Large Hadrons Collider (LHC). Each of these delivers 300 kW of CW RF power at 400 MHz. Three klystrons have been delivered to CERN up to now.

  7. Effects of half-wave and full-wave power source on the anodic oxidation process on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximei; Zhu, Liqun; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong; Li, Yihong

    2009-03-01

    Anodic films have been prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloys in 1 mol/L Na 2SiO 3 with 10 vol.% silica sol addition under the constant voltage of 60 V at room temperature by half-wave and full-wave power sources. The weight of the anodic films has been scaled by analytical balance, and the thickness has been measured by eddy current instrument. The surface morphologies, chemical composition and structure of the anodic films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the thickness and weight of the anodic films formed by the two power sources both increase with the anodizing time, and the films anodized by full-wave power source grow faster than that by half-wave one. Furthermore, we have fitted polynomial to the scattered data of the weight and thickness in a least-squares sense with MATLAB, which could express the growth process of the anodic films sufficiently. The full-wave power source is inclined to accelerate the growth of the anodic films, and the half-wave one is mainly contributed to the uniformity and fineness of the films. The anodic film consists of crystalline Mg 2SiO 4 and amorphous SiO 2.

  8. Effects of half-wave and full-wave power source on the anodic oxidation process on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ximei [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)], E-mail: wangximei126@126.com; Zhu Liqun; Li Weiping; Liu Huicong; Li Yihong [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Anodic films have been prepared on the AZ91D magnesium alloys in 1 mol/L Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} with 10 vol.% silica sol addition under the constant voltage of 60 V at room temperature by half-wave and full-wave power sources. The weight of the anodic films has been scaled by analytical balance, and the thickness has been measured by eddy current instrument. The surface morphologies, chemical composition and structure of the anodic films have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the thickness and weight of the anodic films formed by the two power sources both increase with the anodizing time, and the films anodized by full-wave power source grow faster than that by half-wave one. Furthermore, we have fitted polynomial to the scattered data of the weight and thickness in a least-squares sense with MATLAB, which could express the growth process of the anodic films sufficiently. The full-wave power source is inclined to accelerate the growth of the anodic films, and the half-wave one is mainly contributed to the uniformity and fineness of the films. The anodic film consists of crystalline Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and amorphous SiO{sub 2}.

  9. Guided wave imaging of oblique reflecting interfaces in pipes using common-source synthetic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zeqing; Sun, Anyu; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2018-04-01

    Cross-mode-family mode conversion and secondary reflection of guided waves in pipes complicate the processing of guided waves signals, and can cause false detection. In this paper, filters operating in the spectral domain of wavenumber, circumferential order and frequency are designed to suppress the signal components of unwanted mode-family and unwanted traveling direction. Common-source synthetic focusing is used to reconstruct defect images from the guided wave signals. Simulations of the reflections from linear oblique defects and a semicircle defect are separately implemented. Defect images, which are reconstructed from the simulation results under different excitation conditions, are comparatively studied in terms of axial resolution, reflection amplitude, detectable oblique angle and so on. Further, the proposed method is experimentally validated by detecting linear cracks with various oblique angles (10-40°). The proposed method relies on the guided wave signals that are captured during 2-D scanning of a cylindrical area on the pipe. The redundancy of the signals is analyzed to reduce the time-consumption of the scanning process and to enhance the practicability of the proposed method.

  10. High-energy astrophysics and the search for sources of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P T; Evans, P

    2018-05-28

    The dawn of the gravitational-wave (GW) era has sparked a greatly renewed interest into possible links between sources of high-energy radiation and GWs. The most luminous high-energy sources-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-have long been considered as very likely sources of GWs, particularly from short-duration GRBs, which are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as binary neutron stars and a neutron star-black hole binary. In this paper, we discuss: (i) the high-energy emission from short-duration GRBs; (ii) what other sources of high-energy radiation may be observed from binary mergers; and (iii) how searches for high-energy electromagnetic counterparts to GW events are performed with current space facilities. While current high-energy facilities, such as Swift and Fermi, play a crucial role in the search for electromagnetic counterparts, new space missions will greatly enhance our capabilities for joint observations. We discuss why such facilities, which incorporate new technology that enables very wide-field X-ray imaging, are required if we are to truly exploit the multi-messenger era.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  11. High-energy astrophysics and the search for sources of gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P. T.; Evans, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dawn of the gravitational-wave (GW) era has sparked a greatly renewed interest into possible links between sources of high-energy radiation and GWs. The most luminous high-energy sources-gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)-have long been considered as very likely sources of GWs, particularly from short-duration GRBs, which are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as binary neutron stars and a neutron star-black hole binary. In this paper, we discuss: (i) the high-energy emission from short-duration GRBs; (ii) what other sources of high-energy radiation may be observed from binary mergers; and (iii) how searches for high-energy electromagnetic counterparts to GW events are performed with current space facilities. While current high-energy facilities, such as Swift and Fermi, play a crucial role in the search for electromagnetic counterparts, new space missions will greatly enhance our capabilities for joint observations. We discuss why such facilities, which incorporate new technology that enables very wide-field X-ray imaging, are required if we are to truly exploit the multi-messenger era. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  12. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  13. Vacuum source-field correlations and advanced waves in quantum optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stokes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The solution to the wave equation as a Cauchy problem with prescribed fields at an initial time $t=0$ is purely retarded. Similarly, in the quantum theory of radiation the specification of Heisenberg picture photon annihilation and creation operators at time $t \\gt 0$ in terms of operators at $t=0$ automatically yields purely retarded source-fields. However, we show that two-time quantum correlations between the retarded source-fields of a stationary dipole and the quantum vacuum-field possess advanced wave-like contributions. Despite their advanced nature, these correlations are perfectly consistent with Einstein causality. It is shown that while they do not significantly contribute to photo-detection amplitudes in the vacuum state, they do effect the statistics of measurements involving the radiative force experienced by a point charge in the field of the dipole. Specifically, the dispersion in the charge's momentum is found to increase with time. This entails the possibility of obtaining direct experimental evidence for the existence of advanced waves in physical reality, and provides yet another signature of the quantum nature of the vacuum.

  14. Deep Rapid Optical Follow-Up of Gravitational Wave Sources with the Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, Philip

    2018-01-01

    The detection of an electromagnetic counterpart associated with a gravitational wave detection by the Advanced LIGO and VIRGO interferometers is one of the great observational challenges of our time. The large localization regions and potentially faint counterparts require the use of wide-field, large aperture telescopes. As a result, the Dark Energy Camera, a 3.3 sq deg CCD imager on the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO in Chile is the most powerful instrument for this task in the Southern Hemisphere. I will report on the results from our joint program between the community and members of the dark energy survey to conduct rapid and efficient follow-up of gravitational wave sources. This includes systematic searches for optical counterparts, as well as developing an understanding of contaminating sources on timescales not normally probed by traditional untargeted supernova surveys. I will additionally comment on the immense science gains to be made by a joint detection and discuss future prospects from the standpoint of both next generation wide-field telescopes and next generation gravitational wave detectors.

  15. CW operation of high-power blue laser diodes with polished facets on semi-polar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) GaN substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Pourhashemi, A.; Farrell, R.M.; Cohen, D.A.; Becerra, D.L.; DenBaars, S.P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) operation of high-power blue laser diodes (LDs) with polished facets on semi-polar (202̅1̅) gallium nitride (GaN) substrates is demonstrated. Ridge waveguide LDs were fabricated using indium GaN waveguiding layers and GaN cladding layers. At a lasing wavelength of 452 nm, the peak two-facet CW output power from an LD with uncoated facets was 1.71 W at a current of 3 A, corresponding to an optical power density of 32.04 MW/cm2 on each facet. The dependence of output power on current did not change with repeated CW measurements, indicating that the polished facets did not degrade under high-power CW operation. These results show that polished facets are a viable alternative to cleaved or etched facets for high-power CW semi-polar LDs.

  16. CW operation of high-power blue laser diodes with polished facets on semi-polar ( 20 2 ¯ 1 ¯ ) GaN substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Pourhashemi, A.

    2016-10-11

    Continuous wave (CW) operation of high-power blue laser diodes (LDs) with polished facets on semi-polar (202̅1̅) gallium nitride (GaN) substrates is demonstrated. Ridge waveguide LDs were fabricated using indium GaN waveguiding layers and GaN cladding layers. At a lasing wavelength of 452 nm, the peak two-facet CW output power from an LD with uncoated facets was 1.71 W at a current of 3 A, corresponding to an optical power density of 32.04 MW/cm2 on each facet. The dependence of output power on current did not change with repeated CW measurements, indicating that the polished facets did not degrade under high-power CW operation. These results show that polished facets are a viable alternative to cleaved or etched facets for high-power CW semi-polar LDs.

  17. Stable grid refinement and singular source discretization for seismic wave simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2009-10-30

    An energy conserving discretization of the elastic wave equation in second order formulation is developed for a composite grid, consisting of a set of structured rectangular component grids with hanging nodes on the grid refinement interface. Previously developed summation-by-parts properties are generalized to devise a stable second order accurate coupling of the solution across mesh refinement interfaces. The discretization of singular source terms of point force and point moment tensor type are also studied. Based on enforcing discrete moment conditions that mimic properties of the Dirac distribution and its gradient, previous single grid formulas are generalized to work in the vicinity of grid refinement interfaces. These source discretization formulas are shown to give second order accuracy in the solution, with the error being essentially independent of the distance between the source and the grid refinement boundary. Several numerical examples are given to illustrate the properties of the proposed method.

  18. Open source acceleration of wave optics simulations on energy efficient high-performance computing platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey; Bos, Jeremy P.

    2017-05-01

    We compare several modifications to the open-source wave optics package, WavePy, intended to improve execution time. Specifically, we compare the relative performance of the Intel MKL, a CPU based OpenCV distribution, and GPU-based version. Performance is compared between distributions both on the same compute platform and between a fully-featured computing workstation and the NVIDIA Jetson TX1 platform. Comparisons are drawn in terms of both execution time and power consumption. We have found that substituting the Fast Fourier Transform operation from OpenCV provides a marked improvement on all platforms. In addition, we show that embedded platforms offer some possibility for extensive improvement in terms of efficiency compared to a fully featured workstation.

  19. Evidence for Alfvén Waves in Source Flares of Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucik, R.; Innes, D.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Nitta, N.

    2017-12-01

    Impulsive solar energetic particle events, characterised by a peculiar elemental composition with the rare elements like 3He and ultra-heavy ions enhanced by factors up to ten thousand above their thermal abundance, have been puzzling for almost 50 years. The solar sources of these events have been commonly associated with coronal jets, believed to be a signature of magnetic reconnection involving field lines open to interplanetary space. Here we present some of the most intense events, highly enriched in both 3He and heavier ions. The corresponding high-resolution, extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations have revealed for the first time a helical structure in the source flare with a jet-like shape. A mini-filament at the base of the jet appears to trigger these events. The events were observed with the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories on the backside of the Sun, during the period of increased solar activity in 2014. During the last decade, it has been established that the helical motions in coronal jets represent propagating Alfvén waves. Revealing such magnetic-untwisting waves in the solar sources of highly enriched events in this study is consistent with a stochastic acceleration mechanism. An examination of jets in previously reported impulsive solar energetic particle events indicates that they tend to be large-scale blowout jets, sometimes cleanly showing a twisted configuration.The work of R. Bucik is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft grant BU 3115/2-1.

  20. Fine structure of the electromagnetic fields formed by backward surface waves in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Ono, Kouichi

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters have been studied in an azimuthally symmetric surface wave-excited plasma (SWP) source, by using a two-dimensional numerical analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approximation to Maxwell's equations self-consistently coupled with a fluid model for plasma evolution. The FDTD/fluid hybrid simulation was performed for different gas pressures in Ar and different microwave powers at 2.45 GHz, showing that the surface waves (SWs) occur along the plasma-dielectric interfaces to sustain overdense plasmas. The numerical results indicated that the electromagnetic SWs consist of two different waves, Wave-1 and Wave-2, having relatively shorter and longer wavelengths. The Wave-1 was seen to fade away with increasing pressure and increasing power, while the Wave-2 remained relatively unchanged over the range of pressure and power investigated. The numerical results revealed that the Wave-1 propagates as backward SWs whose phase velocity and group velocity point in the opposite directions. In contrast, the Wave-2 appeared to form standing waves, being ascribed to a superposition of forward SWs whose phase and group velocities point in the same direction. The fadeaway of the Wave-1 or backward SWs at increased pressures and increased powers was seen with the damping rate increasing in the axial direction, being related to the increased plasma electron densities. A comparison with the conventional FDTD simulation indicated that such fine structure of the electromagnetic fields of SWs is not observed in the FDTD simulation with spatially uniform and time-independent plasma distributions; thus, the FDTD/fluid hybrid model should be employed in simulating the electromagnetic fields and plasma parameters in SWPs with high accuracy

  1. Design of 57.5 MHz CW RFQ structure for the Rare Isotope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver LINAC for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz 4 m long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low ...

  2. A kilonova as the electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational-wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, S. J.; Chen, T.-W.; Jerkstrand, A.; Coughlin, M.; Kankare, E.; Sim, S. A.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Krühler, T.; Leloudas, G.; Magee, M.; Shingles, L. J.; Smith, K. W.; Young, D. R.; Tonry, J.; Kotak, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Lyman, J. D.; Homan, D. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Anderson, J. P.; Angus, C. R.; Ashall, C.; Barbarino, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Berton, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Bulla, M.; Bulger, J.; Cannizzaro, G.; Cano, Z.; Cartier, R.; Cikota, A.; Clark, P.; De Cia, A.; Della Valle, M.; Denneau, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Dessart, L.; Dimitriadis, G.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Firth, R. E.; Flewelling, H.; Flörs, A.; Franckowiak, A.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Greiner, J.; Gromadzki, M.; Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hamanowicz, A.; Hanlon, L.; Harmanen, J.; Heintz, K. E.; Heinze, A.; Hernandez, M.-S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hook, I. M.; Izzo, L.; James, P. A.; Jonker, P. G.; Kerzendorf, W. E.; Klose, S.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kowalski, M.; Kromer, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lawrence, A.; Lowe, T. B.; Magnier, E. A.; Manulis, I.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Mattila, S.; McBrien, O.; Müller, A.; Nordin, J.; O'Neill, D.; Onori, F.; Palmerio, J. T.; Pastorello, A.; Patat, F.; Pignata, G.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Pumo, M. L.; Prentice, S. J.; Rau, A.; Razza, A.; Rest, A.; Reynolds, T.; Roy, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Salmon, L.; Schady, P.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Schweyer, T.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sullivan, M.; Szegedi, H.; Taddia, F.; Taubenberger, S.; Terreran, G.; van Soelen, B.; Vos, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Walton, N. A.; Waters, C.; Weiland, H.; Willman, M.; Wiseman, P.; Wright, D. E.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yaron, O.

    2017-11-01

    Gravitational waves were discovered with the detection of binary black-hole mergers and they should also be detectable from lower-mass neutron-star mergers. These are predicted to eject material rich in heavy radioactive isotopes that can power an electromagnetic signal. This signal is luminous at optical and infrared wavelengths and is called a kilonova. The gravitational-wave source GW170817 arose from a binary neutron-star merger in the nearby Universe with a relatively well confined sky position and distance estimate. Here we report observations and physical modelling of a rapidly fading electromagnetic transient in the galaxy NGC 4993, which is spatially coincident with GW170817 and with a weak, short γ-ray burst. The transient has physical parameters that broadly match the theoretical predictions of blue kilonovae from neutron-star mergers. The emitted electromagnetic radiation can be explained with an ejected mass of 0.04 ± 0.01 solar masses, with an opacity of less than 0.5 square centimetres per gram, at a velocity of 0.2 ± 0.1 times light speed. The power source is constrained to have a power-law slope of -1.2 ± 0.3, consistent with radioactive powering from r-process nuclides. (The r-process is a series of neutron capture reactions that synthesise many of the elements heavier than iron.) We identify line features in the spectra that are consistent with light r-process elements (atomic masses of 90-140). As it fades, the transient rapidly becomes red, and a higher-opacity, lanthanide-rich ejecta component may contribute to the emission. This indicates that neutron-star mergers produce gravitational waves and radioactively powered kilonovae, and are a nucleosynthetic source of the r-process elements.

  3. A kilonova as the electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational-wave source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, S J; Chen, T-W; Jerkstrand, A; Coughlin, M; Kankare, E; Sim, S A; Fraser, M; Inserra, C; Maguire, K; Chambers, K C; Huber, M E; Krühler, T; Leloudas, G; Magee, M; Shingles, L J; Smith, K W; Young, D R; Tonry, J; Kotak, R; Gal-Yam, A; Lyman, J D; Homan, D S; Agliozzo, C; Anderson, J P; Angus, C R; Ashall, C; Barbarino, C; Bauer, F E; Berton, M; Botticella, M T; Bulla, M; Bulger, J; Cannizzaro, G; Cano, Z; Cartier, R; Cikota, A; Clark, P; De Cia, A; Della Valle, M; Denneau, L; Dennefeld, M; Dessart, L; Dimitriadis, G; Elias-Rosa, N; Firth, R E; Flewelling, H; Flörs, A; Franckowiak, A; Frohmaier, C; Galbany, L; González-Gaitán, S; Greiner, J; Gromadzki, M; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Gutiérrez, C P; Hamanowicz, A; Hanlon, L; Harmanen, J; Heintz, K E; Heinze, A; Hernandez, M-S; Hodgkin, S T; Hook, I M; Izzo, L; James, P A; Jonker, P G; Kerzendorf, W E; Klose, S; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z; Kowalski, M; Kromer, M; Kuncarayakti, H; Lawrence, A; Lowe, T B; Magnier, E A; Manulis, I; Martin-Carrillo, A; Mattila, S; McBrien, O; Müller, A; Nordin, J; O'Neill, D; Onori, F; Palmerio, J T; Pastorello, A; Patat, F; Pignata, G; Podsiadlowski, Ph; Pumo, M L; Prentice, S J; Rau, A; Razza, A; Rest, A; Reynolds, T; Roy, R; Ruiter, A J; Rybicki, K A; Salmon, L; Schady, P; Schultz, A S B; Schweyer, T; Seitenzahl, I R; Smith, M; Sollerman, J; Stalder, B; Stubbs, C W; Sullivan, M; Szegedi, H; Taddia, F; Taubenberger, S; Terreran, G; van Soelen, B; Vos, J; Wainscoat, R J; Walton, N A; Waters, C; Weiland, H; Willman, M; Wiseman, P; Wright, D E; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Yaron, O

    2017-11-02

    Gravitational waves were discovered with the detection of binary black-hole mergers and they should also be detectable from lower-mass neutron-star mergers. These are predicted to eject material rich in heavy radioactive isotopes that can power an electromagnetic signal. This signal is luminous at optical and infrared wavelengths and is called a kilonova. The gravitational-wave source GW170817 arose from a binary neutron-star merger in the nearby Universe with a relatively well confined sky position and distance estimate. Here we report observations and physical modelling of a rapidly fading electromagnetic transient in the galaxy NGC 4993, which is spatially coincident with GW170817 and with a weak, short γ-ray burst. The transient has physical parameters that broadly match the theoretical predictions of blue kilonovae from neutron-star mergers. The emitted electromagnetic radiation can be explained with an ejected mass of 0.04 ± 0.01 solar masses, with an opacity of less than 0.5 square centimetres per gram, at a velocity of 0.2 ± 0.1 times light speed. The power source is constrained to have a power-law slope of -1.2 ± 0.3, consistent with radioactive powering from r-process nuclides. (The r-process is a series of neutron capture reactions that synthesise many of the elements heavier than iron.) We identify line features in the spectra that are consistent with light r-process elements (atomic masses of 90-140). As it fades, the transient rapidly becomes red, and a higher-opacity, lanthanide-rich ejecta component may contribute to the emission. This indicates that neutron-star mergers produce gravitational waves and radioactively powered kilonovae, and are a nucleosynthetic source of the r-process elements.

  4. CW Laser radar for combustion diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmqvist Elin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A CW-laser radar system developed for combustion diagnostics is described. The system is based on triangulation to attain range information. A portable system has been constructed and here we show some result from measurements in various flames, for example Rayleigh scattering thermometry and monitoring of particle distributions with high temporal and spatial resolution. The concept can equally well be based on pulsed lasers, allowing suppression of background emission through gated detection.

  5. Bright broadband coherent fiber sources emitting strongly blue-shifted resonant dispersive wave pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Haohua; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We predict and realize the targeted wavelength conversion from the 1550-nm band of a fs Er:fiber laser to an isolated band inside 370-850 nm, corresponding to a blue-shift of 700-1180 nm. The conversion utilizes resonant dispersive wave generation in widely available optical fibers with good...... efficiency (~7%). The converted band has a large pulse energy (~1 nJ), high spectral brightness (~1 mW/nm), and broad Gaussian-like spectrum compressible to clean transform-limited ~17 fs pulses. The corresponding coherent fiber sources open up portable applications of optical parametric oscillators and dual......-output synchronized ultrafast lasers....

  6. Efficient Low-Voltage Operation of a CW Gyrotron Oscillator at 233 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Melissa K; Bajaj, Vikram S; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2007-02-01

    The gyrotron oscillator is a source of high average power millimeter-wave through terahertz radiation. In this paper, we report low beam power and high-efficiency operation of a tunable gyrotron oscillator at 233 GHz. The low-voltage operating mode provides a path to further miniaturization of the gyrotron through reduction in the size of the electron gun, power supply, collector, and cooling system, which will benefit industrial and scientific applications requiring portability. Detailed studies of low-voltage operation in the TE(2) (,) (3) (,) (1) mode reveal that the mode can be excited with less than 7 W of beam power at 3.5 kV. During CW operation with 3.5-kV beam voltage and 50-mA beam current, the gyrotron generates 12 W of RF power at 233.2 GHz. The EGUN electron optics code describes the low-voltage operation of the electron gun. Using gun-operating parameters derived from EGUN simulations, we show that a linear theory adequately predicts the low experimental starting currents.

  7. Visco-elastic controlled-source full waveform inversion without surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Marco; Krause, Martin; Bleibinhaus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    We developed a frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion for onshore seismic experiments with topography. The forward modeling is based on a finite-difference time-domain algorithm by Robertsson that uses the image-method to ensure a stress-free condition at the surface. The time-domain data is Fourier-transformed at every point in the model space during the forward modeling for a given set of frequencies. The motivation for this approach is the reduced amount of memory when computing kernels, and the straightforward implementation of the multiscale approach. For the inversion, we calculate the Frechet derivative matrix explicitly, and we implement a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme that allows for computing the resolution matrix. To reduce the size of the Frechet derivative matrix, and to stabilize the inversion, an adapted inverse mesh is used. The node spacing is controlled by the velocity distribution and the chosen frequencies. To focus the inversion on body waves (P, P-coda, and S) we mute the surface waves from the data. Consistent spatiotemporal weighting factors are applied to the wavefields during the Fourier transform to obtain the corresponding kernels. We test our code with a synthetic study using the Marmousi model with arbitrary topography. This study also demonstrates the importance of topography and muting surface waves in controlled-source full waveform inversion.

  8. Global existence and nonexistence for the viscoelastic wave equation with nonlinear boundary damping-source interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this work is to study a model of the viscoelastic wave equation with nonlinear boundary/interior sources and a nonlinear interior damping. First, applying the Faedo-Galerkin approximations combined with the compactness method to obtain existence of regular global solutions to an auxiliary problem with globally Lipschitz source terms and with initial data in the potential well. It is important to emphasize that it is not possible to consider density arguments to pass from regular to weak solutions if one considers regular solutions of our problem where the source terms are locally Lipschitz functions. To overcome this difficulty, we use an approximation method involving truncated sources and adapting the ideas in [13] to show that the existence of weak solutions can still be obtained for our problem. Second, we show that under some restrictions on the initial data and if the interior source dominates the interior damping term, then the solution ceases to exist and blows up in finite time provided that the initial data are large enough.

  9. Global existence and nonexistence for the viscoelastic wave equation with nonlinear boundary damping-source interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem; Nascimento, Flá vio A Falcã o

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study a model of the viscoelastic wave equation with nonlinear boundary/interior sources and a nonlinear interior damping. First, applying the Faedo-Galerkin approximations combined with the compactness method to obtain existence of regular global solutions to an auxiliary problem with globally Lipschitz source terms and with initial data in the potential well. It is important to emphasize that it is not possible to consider density arguments to pass from regular to weak solutions if one considers regular solutions of our problem where the source terms are locally Lipschitz functions. To overcome this difficulty, we use an approximation method involving truncated sources and adapting the ideas in [13] to show that the existence of weak solutions can still be obtained for our problem. Second, we show that under some restrictions on the initial data and if the interior source dominates the interior damping term, then the solution ceases to exist and blows up in finite time provided that the initial data are large enough.

  10. An Open-Source Standard T-Wave Alternans Detector for Benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, A; Nemati, S; Clifford, Gd

    2008-09-14

    We describe an open source algorithm suite for T-Wave Alternans (TWA) detection and quantification. The software consists of Matlab implementations of the widely used Spectral Method and Modified Moving Average with libraries to read both WFDB and ASCII data under windows and Linux. The software suite can run in both batch mode and with a provided graphical user interface to aid waveform exploration. Our software suite was calibrated using an open source TWA model, described in a partner paper [1] by Clifford and Sameni. For the PhysioNet/CinC Challenge 2008 we obtained a score of 0.881 for the Spectral Method and 0.400 for the MMA method. However, our objective was not to provide the best TWA detector, but rather a basis for detailed discussion of algorithms.

  11. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography: Applications to the Nevada and North Korean test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Wang, N.; Bao, X.; Flinders, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Scattered waves generated near the source contains energy converted from the near-field waves to the far-field propagating waves, which can be used to achieve location accuracy beyond the diffraction limit. In this work, we apply a novel full-wave location method that combines a grid-search algorithm with the 3D Green's tensor database to locate the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada test site and the North Korean nuclear tests. We use the first arrivals (Pn/Pg) and their immediate codas, which are likely dominated by waves scattered at the surface topography near the source, to determine the source location. We investigate seismograms in the frequency of [1.0 2.0] Hz to reduce noises in the data and highlight topography scattered waves. High resolution topographic models constructed from 10 and 90 m grids are used for Nevada and North Korea, respectively. The reference velocity model is based on CRUST 1.0. We use the collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids to calculate the strain Green's tensor and obtain synthetic waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity. The `best' solution is found based on the least-square misfit between the observed and synthetic waveforms. To suppress random noises, an optimal weighting method for three-component seismograms is applied in misfit calculation. Our results show that the scattered waves are crucial in improving resolution and allow us to obtain accurate solutions with a small number of stations. Since the scattered waves depends on topography, which is known at the wavelengths of regional seismic waves, our approach yields absolute, instead of relative, source locations. We compare our solutions with those of USGS and other studies. Moreover, we use differential waveforms to locate pairs of the North Korea tests from years 2006, 2009, 2013 and 2016 to further reduce the effects of unmodeled heterogeneities and errors in the reference velocity model.

  12. WASS: An open-source pipeline for 3D stereo reconstruction of ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Filippo; Torsello, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise

    2017-10-01

    Stereo 3D reconstruction of ocean waves is gaining more and more popularity in the oceanographic community and industry. Indeed, recent advances of both computer vision algorithms and computer processing power now allow the study of the spatio-temporal wave field with unprecedented accuracy, especially at small scales. Even if simple in theory, multiple details are difficult to be mastered for a practitioner, so that the implementation of a sea-waves 3D reconstruction pipeline is in general considered a complex task. For instance, camera calibration, reliable stereo feature matching and mean sea-plane estimation are all factors for which a well designed implementation can make the difference to obtain valuable results. For this reason, we believe that the open availability of a well tested software package that automates the reconstruction process from stereo images to a 3D point cloud would be a valuable addition for future researches in this area. We present WASS (http://www.dais.unive.it/wass), an Open-Source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction. Our tool completely automates all the steps required to estimate dense point clouds from stereo images. Namely, it computes the extrinsic parameters of the stereo rig so that no delicate calibration has to be performed on the field. It implements a fast 3D dense stereo reconstruction procedure based on the consolidated OpenCV library and, lastly, it includes set of filtering techniques both on the disparity map and the produced point cloud to remove the vast majority of erroneous points that can naturally arise while analyzing the optically complex nature of the water surface. In this paper, we describe the architecture of WASS and the internal algorithms involved. The pipeline workflow is shown step-by-step and demonstrated on real datasets acquired at sea.

  13. Coherent properties of a tunable low-energy electron-matter-wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooch, A.; Seidling, M.; Kerker, N.; Röpke, R.; Rembold, A.; Chang, W. T.; Hwang, I. S.; Stibor, A.

    2018-01-01

    A general challenge in various quantum experiments and applications is to develop suitable sources for coherent particles. In particular, recent progress in microscopy, interferometry, metrology, decoherence measurements, and chip-based applications rely on intensive, tunable, coherent sources for free low-energy electron-matter waves. In most cases, the electrons get field emitted from a metal nanotip, where its radius and geometry toward a counter electrode determines the field distribution and the emission voltage. A higher emission is often connected to faster electrons with smaller de Broglie wavelengths, requiring larger pattern magnification after matter-wave diffraction or interferometry. This can be prevented with a well-known setup consisting of two counter electrodes that allow independent setting of the beam intensity and velocity. However, it needs to be tested if the coherent properties of such a source are preserved after the acceleration and deceleration of the electrons. Here, we study the coherence of the beam in a biprism interferometer with a single atom tip electron field emitter if the particle velocity and wavelength varies after emission. With a Wien filter measurement and a contrast correlation analysis we demonstrate that the intensity of the source at a certain particle wavelength can be enhanced up to a factor of 6.4 without changing the transverse and longitudinal coherence of the electron beam. In addition, the energy width of the single atom tip emitter was measured to be 377 meV, corresponding to a longitudinal coherence length of 82 nm. The design has potential applications in interferometry, microscopy, and sensor technology.

  14. Studing Regional Wave Source Time Functions Using A Massive Automated EGF Deconvolution Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J. "; Schaff, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Reliably estimated source time functions (STF) from high-frequency regional waveforms, such as Lg, Pn and Pg, provide important input for seismic source studies, explosion detection, and minimization of parameter trade-off in attenuation studies. The empirical Green’s function (EGF) method can be used for estimating STF, but it requires a strict recording condition. Waveforms from pairs of events that are similar in focal mechanism, but different in magnitude must be on-scale recorded on the same stations for the method to work. Searching for such waveforms can be very time consuming, particularly for regional waves that contain complex path effects and have reduced S/N ratios due to attenuation. We have developed a massive, automated procedure to conduct inter-event waveform deconvolution calculations from many candidate event pairs. The procedure automatically evaluates the “spikiness” of the deconvolutions by calculating their “sdc”, which is defined as the peak divided by the background value. The background value is calculated as the mean absolute value of the deconvolution, excluding 10 s around the source time function. When the sdc values are about 10 or higher, the deconvolutions are found to be sufficiently spiky (pulse-like), indicating similar path Green’s functions and good estimates of the STF. We have applied this automated procedure to Lg waves and full regional wavetrains from 989 M ≥ 5 events in and around China, calculating about a million deconvolutions. Of these we found about 2700 deconvolutions with sdc greater than 9, which, if having a sufficiently broad frequency band, can be used to estimate the STF of the larger events. We are currently refining our procedure, as well as the estimated STFs. We will infer the source scaling using the STFs. We will also explore the possibility that the deconvolution procedure could complement cross-correlation in a real time event-screening process.

  15. Parameterizing unresolved obstacles with source terms in wave modeling: A real-world application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentaschi, Lorenzo; Kakoulaki, Georgia; Vousdoukas, Michalis; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Feyen, Luc; Besio, Giovanni

    2018-06-01

    Parameterizing the dissipative effects of small, unresolved coastal features, is fundamental to improve the skills of wave models. The established technique to deal with this problem consists in reducing the amount of energy advected within the propagation scheme, and is currently available only for regular grids. To find a more general approach, Mentaschi et al., 2015b formulated a technique based on source terms, and validated it on synthetic case studies. This technique separates the parameterization of the unresolved features from the energy advection, and can therefore be applied to any numerical scheme and to any type of mesh. Here we developed an open-source library for the estimation of the transparency coefficients needed by this approach, from bathymetric data and for any type of mesh. The spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III was used to show that in a real-world domain, such as the Caribbean Sea, the proposed approach has skills comparable and sometimes better than the established propagation-based technique.

  16. Source-receiver two-way wave extrapolation for prestack exploding-reflector modelling and migration

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-10-08

    Most modern seismic imaging methods separate input data into parts (shot gathers). We develop a formulation that is able to incorporate all available data at once while numerically propagating the recorded multidimensional wavefield forward or backward in time. This approach has the potential for generating accurate images free of artiefacts associated with conventional approaches. We derive novel high-order partial differential equations in the source-receiver time domain. The fourth-order nature of the extrapolation in time leads to four solutions, two of which correspond to the incoming and outgoing P-waves and reduce to the zero-offset exploding-reflector solutions when the source coincides with the receiver. A challenge for implementing two-way time extrapolation is an essential singularity for horizontally travelling waves. This singularity can be avoided by limiting the range of wavenumbers treated in a spectral-based extrapolation. Using spectral methods based on the low-rank approximation of the propagation symbol, we extrapolate only the desired solutions in an accurate and efficient manner with reduced dispersion artiefacts. Applications to synthetic data demonstrate the accuracy of the new prestack modelling and migration approach.

  17. Experiment for buried pipes by stepped FM-CW radar; Step shiki FM-CW radar ni yoru maisetsukan tansa jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Ito, M. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tanabe, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    The underground radar exploration is adopted to surveys of cavity under the road and buried pipes since the result of high resolution is obtained. However, the explorative depth of the radar is shallow, 2-3m in soil basement, and its applicable field has been limited. The continuous wave radar (FM-CW radar) was devised to get deeper explorative depth, but has been used for the geological structure survey such as the fault survey since it is lower in resolution as compared with the pulse radar. Therefore, to make use of characteristics of the continuous wave radar and enhance resolution in the shallow part, an experiment on buried pipes was conducted for the purpose of assessing and improving the FM-CW radar. In this processing, the wave form treatment used in the reflection method seismic survey was adopted for the radar survey. There are some problems, but it is effective to adopt the same algorithm to that used in the seismic survey to the radar exploration. The explorative depth was discussed from the damping rate of electromagnetic waves and dynamic range of facilities of the experimental site, and 7m was obtained. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Efficient continuous-wave eye-safe region signal output from intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; Ding Xin; Sheng Quan; Yin Su-Jia; Shi Chun-Peng; Li Xue; Wen Wu-Qi; Yao Jian-Quan; Yu Xuan-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) tunable intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on the multi-period periodically poled lithium niobate and using a laser diode (LD) end-pumped CW 1064 nm Nd:YVO 4 laser as the pump source. A highly efficiency CW operation is realized through a careful cavity design for mode matching and thermal stability. The signal tuning range is 1401–1500 nm obtained by varying the domain period. The maximum output power of 2.2 W at 1500 nm is obtained with a 17.1 W 808 nm LD power and the corresponding conversion efficiency is 12.9%. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a χ 2 minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky

  20. Engineering design of 500KW CW collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Mishra, Deepak; Prasad, M.; Hannuarakar, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    An electron beam collector for 500kW beam power has been designed to test the electron gun. The gun is designed for 250kW, 350MHz CW Klystron with 50% efficiency. This will also help in preliminary studies related to final collector design for Klystron. This paper presents the design parameters, thermal analysis and mechanical features of the design. Electron trajectory on inside wall of the collector is determined with EGUN and computational flow dynamics simulation was done on ANSYS for cooling requirements. (author)

  1. Uncertainties in the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman source through nonlinear stochastic inversion of tsunami waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, M.; Roy, D.; Rajendran, K.; Guillas, S.; Dias, F.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical inversions for earthquake source parameters from tsunami wave data usually incorporate subjective elements to stabilize the search. In addition, noisy and possibly insufficient data result in instability and non-uniqueness in most deterministic inversions, which are barely acknowledged. Here, we employ the satellite altimetry data for the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman tsunami event to invert the source parameters. We also include kinematic parameters that improve the description of tsunami generation and propagation, especially near the source. Using a finite fault model that represents the extent of rupture and the geometry of the trench, we perform a new type of nonlinear joint inversion of the slips, rupture velocities and rise times with minimal a priori constraints. Despite persistently good waveform fits, large uncertainties in the joint parameter distribution constitute a remarkable feature of the inversion. These uncertainties suggest that objective inversion strategies should incorporate more sophisticated physical models of seabed deformation in order to significantly improve the performance of early warning systems. PMID:28989311

  2. Automatic Wave Equation Migration Velocity Analysis by Focusing Subsurface Virtual Sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Bingbing

    2017-11-03

    Macro velocity model building is important for subsequent pre-stack depth migration and full waveform inversion. Wave equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) utilizes the band-limited waveform to invert for the velocity. Normally, inversion would be implemented by focusing the subsurface offset common image gathers (SOCIGs). We re-examine this concept with a different perspective: In subsurface offset domain, using extended Born modeling, the recorded data can be considered as invariant with respect to the perturbation of the position of the virtual sources and velocity at the same time. A linear system connecting the perturbation of the position of those virtual sources and velocity is derived and solved subsequently by Conjugate Gradient method. In theory, the perturbation of the position of the virtual sources is given by the Rytov approximation. Thus, compared to the Born approximation, it relaxes the dependency on amplitude and makes the proposed method more applicable for real data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by applying the proposed method on both isotropic and anisotropic VTI synthetic data. A real dataset example verifies the robustness of the proposed method.

  3. Studying Regional Wave Source Time Functions Using the Empirical Green's Function Method: Application to Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J.; Schaff, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Schult, F.

    2013-12-01

    Reliably estimated source time functions (STFs) from high-frequency regional waveforms, such as Lg, Pn and Pg, provide important input for seismic source studies, explosion detection and discrimination, and minimization of parameter trade-off in attenuation studies. We have searched for candidate pairs of larger and small earthquakes in and around China that share the same focal mechanism but significantly differ in magnitudes, so that the empirical Green's function (EGF) method can be applied to study the STFs of the larger events. We conducted about a million deconvolutions using waveforms from 925 earthquakes, and screened the deconvolved traces to exclude those that are from event pairs that involved different mechanisms. Only 2,700 traces passed this screening and could be further analyzed using the EGF method. We have developed a series of codes for speeding up the final EGF analysis by implementing automations and user-graphic interface procedures. The codes have been fully tested with a subset of screened data and we are currently applying them to all the screened data. We will present a large number of deconvolved STFs retrieved using various phases (Lg, Pn, Sn and Pg and coda) with information on any directivities, any possible dependence of pulse durations on the wave types, on scaling relations for the pulse durations and event sizes, and on the estimated source static stress drops.

  4. Automatic Wave Equation Migration Velocity Analysis by Focusing Subsurface Virtual Sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Bingbing; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Macro velocity model building is important for subsequent pre-stack depth migration and full waveform inversion. Wave equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) utilizes the band-limited waveform to invert for the velocity. Normally, inversion would be implemented by focusing the subsurface offset common image gathers (SOCIGs). We re-examine this concept with a different perspective: In subsurface offset domain, using extended Born modeling, the recorded data can be considered as invariant with respect to the perturbation of the position of the virtual sources and velocity at the same time. A linear system connecting the perturbation of the position of those virtual sources and velocity is derived and solved subsequently by Conjugate Gradient method. In theory, the perturbation of the position of the virtual sources is given by the Rytov approximation. Thus, compared to the Born approximation, it relaxes the dependency on amplitude and makes the proposed method more applicable for real data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by applying the proposed method on both isotropic and anisotropic VTI synthetic data. A real dataset example verifies the robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  6. High power microwave source with a three dimensional printed metamaterial slow-wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don

    2016-01-01

    For over the last decade, the concept of metamaterials has led to new approaches for considering the interaction of radiation with complex structures. However, practical manifestations of such a device operating at high power densities have proven difficult to achieve due to the resonant nature of metamaterials and the resultant high electric fields, which place severe constraints on manufacturing the slow wave structures. In this paper, we describe the first experimental manifestation of a high power microwave device utilizing a metallic slow wave structure (metamaterial-like) fabricated using additive manufacturing. The feasibility of utilizing additive manufacturing as a technique for building these relatively complicated structures has thus been demonstrated. The MW class microwave source operates in the C-band and shows frequency tunablility with electron beam voltage. The basic electromagnetic characteristics of this device, the construction using additive manufacturing, and the basic performance as a microwave oscillator are considered. Due to the tunable nature of the device, it shows promise not only as an oscillator but also as a microwave amplifier. Therefore, the dispersive characteristics and a discussion of the anticipated gain is included as it relates to an amplifier configuration.

  7. High power microwave source with a three dimensional printed metamaterial slow-wave structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don [Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, Albuquerque, New Mexico 871117 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    For over the last decade, the concept of metamaterials has led to new approaches for considering the interaction of radiation with complex structures. However, practical manifestations of such a device operating at high power densities have proven difficult to achieve due to the resonant nature of metamaterials and the resultant high electric fields, which place severe constraints on manufacturing the slow wave structures. In this paper, we describe the first experimental manifestation of a high power microwave device utilizing a metallic slow wave structure (metamaterial-like) fabricated using additive manufacturing. The feasibility of utilizing additive manufacturing as a technique for building these relatively complicated structures has thus been demonstrated. The MW class microwave source operates in the C-band and shows frequency tunablility with electron beam voltage. The basic electromagnetic characteristics of this device, the construction using additive manufacturing, and the basic performance as a microwave oscillator are considered. Due to the tunable nature of the device, it shows promise not only as an oscillator but also as a microwave amplifier. Therefore, the dispersive characteristics and a discussion of the anticipated gain is included as it relates to an amplifier configuration.

  8. Observational constraints on multimessenger sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Imre; Finley, Chad; Corsi, Alessandra; Márka, Szabolcs

    2011-12-16

    Many astronomical sources of intense bursts of photons are also predicted to be strong emitters of gravitational waves (GWs) and high-energy neutrinos (HENs). Moreover some suspected classes, e.g., choked gamma-ray bursts, may only be identifiable via nonphoton messengers. Here we explore the reach of current and planned experiments to address this question. We derive constraints on the rate of GW and HEN bursts based on independent observations by the initial LIGO and Virgo GW detectors and the partially completed IceCube (40-string) HEN detector. We then estimate the reach of joint GW+HEN searches using advanced GW detectors and the completed km(3) IceCube detector to probe the joint parameter space. We show that searches undertaken by advanced detectors will be capable of detecting, constraining, or excluding, several existing models with 1 yr of observation. © 2011 American Physical Society

  9. Problems with the sources of the observed gravitational waves and their resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgov A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent direct registration of gravitational waves by LIGO and astronomical observations of the universe at redshifts 5-10 demonstrate that the standard astrophysics and cosmology are in tension with the data. The origin of the source of the GW150914 event, which presumably is a binary of coalescing black holes with masses about 30 solar masses, each with zero spin, as well as the densely populated universe at z= 5-10 by superheavy black holes, blight galaxies, supernovae, and dust does not fit the standard astrophysical picture. It is shown here that the model of primordial black hole (PBH formation, suggested in 1993, nicely explains all these and more puzzles, including those in contemporary universe, such as MACHOs and the mass spectrum of the observed solar mass black holes.. The mass spectrum and density of PBH is predicted. The scenario may possibly lead to abundant antimatter in the universe and even in the Galaxy.

  10. A cw 4-rod RFQ linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A cw 4-rod RFQ linac system has been designed, constructed, and tested as an accelerator section of a MeV-class ion implanter system. The tank diameter is only 60 cm for 34 MHz operating frequency. An equally spaced arrangement of the RFQ electrode supporting plates is proved to be suitable for a low resonant frequency 4-rod RFQ structure. The RFQ electrode cross section is not circular but rectangular to make the handling and maintenance of the electrodes easier. The machining of the electrode is done three dimensionally. Second order corrections in the analyzing magnet of the LEBT (Low Energy Beam Transport) section assure a better transmission through and the matching to the RFQ. A new approach is introduced to measure the rf characteristics of the 4-rod RFQ. This method requires only a few capacitors and a network analyzer. Both the rf and thermal stability of the 4-rod RFQ are tested up to cw 50 kW. Beam experiments with several ions confirm the acceleration of beams to the goal energy of 83 keV/u. The ion beam intensities obtained at the RFQ output for He + , N 2+ , and C + are 32, 13, and 220 pμA, respectively. The measured beam transmissions of >80% agree with the PARMTEQ calculations. The ion implantation method also gives definitive information on the energies of an RFQ output beam. ((orig.))

  11. Signal information available for plume source tracking with and without surface waves and learning by undergraduates assisting with the research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Megan Beth

    Autonomous vehicles have had limited success in locating point sources of pollutants, chemicals, and other passive scalars. However, animals such as stomatopods, a mantis shrimp, track odor plumes easily for food, mates, and habitat. Laboratory experiments using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measured odor concentration downstream of a diffusive source with and without live stomatopods to investigate their source-tracking strategies in unidirectional and "wave-affected" (surface waves with a mean current) flows. Despite the dearth of signal, extreme temporal variation, and meandering plume centerline, the stomatopods were able to locate the source, especially in the wave-affected flow. Differences in the two plumes far from the source (>160 cm) appeared to help the animals in the wave-affected flow position themselves closer to the source (fluid mechanics, and there was little evidence of learning by participation in the RAship. One RA's conceptions of turbulence did change, but a group workshop seemed to support this learning more than the RAship. The documented conceptions could aid in curriculum design, since situating new information within current knowledge seems to deepen learning outcomes. The RAs' conceptions varied widely with some overlap of ideas. The interviews also showed that most RAs did not discuss molecular diffusion as part of the mixing process and some remembered information from course demonstrations, but applied them inappropriately to the interview questions.

  12. Shear-wave velocity models and seismic sources in Campanian volcanic areas: Vesuvius and Phlegraean fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidarelli, M; Zille, A; Sarao, A [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Natale, M; Nunziata, C [Dipartimento di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Panza, G F [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    This chapter summarizes a comparative study of shear-wave velocity models and seismic sources in the Campanian volcanic areas of Vesuvius and Phlegraean Fields. These velocity models were obtained through the nonlinear inversion of surface-wave tomography data, using as a priori constraints the relevant information available in the literature. Local group velocity data were obtained by means of the frequency-time analysis for the time period between 0.3 and 2 s and were combined with the group velocity data for the time period between 10 and 35 s from the regional events located in the Italian peninsula and bordering areas and two station phase velocity data corresponding to the time period between 25 and 100 s. In order to invert Rayleigh wave dispersion curves, we applied the nonlinear inversion method called hedgehog and retrieved average models for the first 30-35 km of the lithosphere, with the lower part of the upper mantle being kept fixed on the basis of existing regional models. A feature that is common to the two volcanic areas is a low shear velocity layer which is centered at the depth of about 10 km, while on the outside of the cone and along a path in the northeastern part of the Vesuvius area this layer is absent. This low velocity can be associated with the presence of partial melting and, therefore, may represent a quite diffused crustal magma reservoir which is fed by a deeper one that is regional in character and located in the uppermost mantle. The study of seismic source in terms of the moment tensor is suitable for an investigation of physical processes within a volcano; indeed, its components, double couple, compensated linear vector dipole, and volumetric, can be related to the movements of magma and fluids within the volcanic system. Although for many recent earthquake events the percentage of double couple component is high, our results also show the presence of significant non-double couple components in both volcanic areas. (author)

  13. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-06-08

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer.

  14. Diode-side-pumped 131 W, 1319 nm single-wavelength cw Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiyong, Zhu; Ge, Zhang; Chenghui, Huang; Yong, Wei; Lingxiong, Huang; Jing, Chen; Weidong, Chen; Zhenqiang, Chen

    2007-01-20

    A diode-side-pumped high-power 1319 nm single-wavelength Nd:YAG continuous wave (cw) laser is described. Through reasonable coating design of the cavity mirrors, the 1064 nm strongest line as well as the 1338 nm one have been successfully suppressed. The laser output powers corresponding to four groups of different output couplers operating at 1319 nm single wavelength have been compared. The output coupler with the transmission T=5.3% has the highest output power, and a 131 W cw output power was achieved at the pumping power of 555 W. The optical-optical conversion efficiency is 23.6%, and the slope efficiency is 46%. The output power is higher than the total output power of the dual-wavelength laser operating at 1319 nm and 1338 nm in the experiment.

  15. Diode-pumped CW Nd:SGG laser at 1070 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, W; Sun, G C; Yu, X; Li, B Z; Jin, G Y

    2011-01-01

    We report for the first time (to our knowledge) a diode-pumped Nd:SGG laser emitting at 1070 nm. A power of 1.23 W at 1070 nm has been achieved in continuous-wave (CW) operation with a fiber-coupled laser diode emitting 18.2 W at 806 nm. Intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) in CW mode has also been demonstrated with a power of 328 mW at 535 nm by using a LiB 3 O 5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal. The green beam quality factor M 2 was less than 1.22. The green power stability was less 2.5% in 4 hour

  16. Palladium nanoparticles produced by CW and pulsed laser ablation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutinguiza, M., E-mail: mohamed@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Comesaña, R. [Materials Engineering, Applied Mechanics and Construction Department, University of Vigo, EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Lusquiños, F. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Riveiro, A. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Escuela Naval Militar, Plaza de España 2, 36920 Marín (Spain); Val, J. del; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo EEI, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    Palladium nanoparticles are receiving important interest due to its application as catalyst. In this work Pd nanoparticles have been obtained by ablating a Pd target submerged in de-ionized using both, pulsed as well as continuous wave (CW) laser. The influence of laser parameters involved in the formation in nanoparticles has been studied. Crystalline phases, morphology and optical properties of the obtained colloidal nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. The obtained colloidal suspensions consisted of pure Pd nanoparticles showing spherical shape with diameters ranging from few nanometers to 5–60 nm. The moderate irradiance delivered by the CW laser favours high production of uniform nanoparticles.

  17. Improving seismic crustal models in the Corinth Gulf, Greece and estimating source depth using PL-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackář, Jiří; Zahradník, Jiří

    2013-04-01

    A recent shallow earthquake in the Corinth Gulf, Greece (Mw 5.3, January 18, 2010; Sokos et al., Tectonophysics 2012) generated unusual long-period waves (periods > 5 seconds), well recorded at several near-regional stations between the P - and S-wave arrival. The 5-second period, being significantly longer than the source duration, indicates a structural effect. The wave is similar to PL-wave or Pnl-wave, but with shorter periods and observed in much closer distances (ranging from 30 to 200 km). For theoretical description of the observed wave, structural model is required. No existing regional crustal model generates that wave, so we need to find another model, better in terms of the PL-wave existence and strength. We find such models by full waveform inversion using the subset of stations with strong PL-wave. The Discrete Wavenumber method (Bouchon, 1981; Coutant 1989) is used for forward problem and the Neighborhood Algorithm (Sambridge, 1999) for stochastic search (more details in poster by V. Plicka and J. Zahradník). We obtain a suite of models well fitting synthetic seismograms and use some of these models to evaluate dependence of the studied waves on receiver distance and azimuth as well as dependence on source depth. We compare real and synthetic dispersion curves (derived from synthetic seismograms) as an independent validation of found model and discuss limitations of using dispersion curves for these cases. We also relocated the event in the new model. Then we calculate the wavefield by two other methods: modal summation and ray theory to better understand the nature of the PL-wave. Finally, we discuss agreement of found models with published crustal models in the region. The full waveform inversion for structural parameters seems to be powerful tool for improving seismic source modeling in cases we do not have accurate structure model of studied area. We also show that the PL-wave strength has a potential to precise the earthquake depth

  18. Solar, wind and waves: Natural limits to renewable sources of energy within the Earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleidon, Axel [Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Renewable sources of energy, such as solar, wind, wave, or hydropower, utilize energy that is continuously generated by natural processes within the Earth system from the planetary forcing. Here we estimate the limits of these natural energy conversions and the extent to which these can be used as renewable energy sources using the laws of thermodynamics. At most, wind power in the order of 1 000 TW (1 TW = 1E12 W) can be derived from the total flux of incoming solar radiation of 175 000 TW, which is consistent with estimates based on observations. Other generation rates that are derived from the kinetic energy of wind are in the order of 10-100 TW. In comparison, the human primary energy demand of about 17 TW constitutes a considerable fraction of these rates. We provide some further analysis on the limits of wind power using a combination of conceptual models, observational data, and numerical simulation models. We find that many current estimates of wind power substantially overestimate the potential of wind power because the effect of kinetic energy extraction on the air flow is neglected. We conclude that the only form of renewable energy that is available in substantial amounts and that is associated with minor climatic impacts is solar power.

  19. Null stream analysis of Pulsar Timing Array data: localisation of resolvable gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Janna; Veitch, John; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Super-massive black hole binaries are expected to produce a gravitational wave (GW) signal in the nano-Hertz frequency band which may be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in the coming years. The signal is composed of both stochastic and individually resolvable components. Here we develop a generic Bayesian method for the analysis of resolvable sources based on the construction of `null-streams' which cancel the part of the signal held in common for each pulsar (the Earth-term). For an array of N pulsars there are N - 2 independent null-streams that cancel the GW signal from a particular sky location. This method is applied to the localisation of quasi-circular binaries undergoing adiabatic inspiral. We carry out a systematic investigation of the scaling of the localisation accuracy with signal strength and number of pulsars in the PTA. Additionally, we find that source sky localisation with the International PTA data release one is vastly superior than what is achieved by its constituent regional PTAs.

  20. Deep Vs Profiling Along the Top of Yucca Mountain Using a Vibroseis Source and Surface Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokoe, K.; Rosenblad, B.; Wong, I.; Bay, J.; Thomas, P.; Silva, W.

    2004-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was approved as the site for development of the geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy has been conducting studies to characterize the site and assess its future performance as a geologic repository. As part of these studies, a program of deep seismic profiling, to depths of 200 m, was conducted along the top of Yucca Mountain to evaluate the shear-wave velocity (V s ) structure of the repository block. The resulting V s data were used as input into the development of ground motions for the preclosure seismic design of the repository and for postclosure performance assessment. The noninvasive spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) method was employed in the deep profiling. Field measurements involved the use of a modified Vibroseis as the seismic source. The modifications allowed the Vibroseis to be controlled by a signal analyzer so that slow frequency sweeps could be performed while simultaneous narrow-band filtering was performed on the receiver outputs. This process optimized input energy from the source and signal analysis of the receiver outputs. Six deep V s profiles and five intermediate-depth (about 100 m) profiles were performed along the top of Yucca Mountain over a distance of about 5 km. In addition, eleven shallower profiles (averaging about 45-m deep) were measured using a bulldozer source. The shallower profiles were used to augment the deeper profiles and to evaluate further the near-surface velocity structure. The V s profiles exhibit a strong velocity gradient within 5 m of the surface, with the mean V s value more than doubling. Below this depth, V s gradually increases from a mean value of about 900 to 1000 m/s at a depth of 150 m. Between the depths of 150 and 210 m, V s increases more rapidly to about 1350 m/s, but this trend is based on limited data. At depths less than 50 m, anisotropy in V s was measured for surveys conducted

  1. P-wave pulse analysis to retrieve source and propagation effects in the case of Vrancea earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, E.; Popa, M.; Placinta, A.; Grecu, B.; Radulian, M.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic source parameters and attenuation structure properties are obtained from the first P-wave pulse analysis and empirical Green's function deconvolution. The P pulse characteristics are combined effects of source and path properties. To reproduce the real source and structure parameters it is crucial to apply a method able to distinguish between the different factors affecting the observed seismograms. For example the empirical Green's function deconvolution method (Hartzell, 1978) allows the retrieval of the apparent source time function or source spectrum corrected for path, site and instrumental effects. The apparent source duration is given by the width of the deconvoluted source pulse and is directly related to the source dimension. Once the source time function established, next we can extract the parameters related to path effects. The difference between the pulse recorded at a given station and the source pulse obtained by deconvolution is a measure of the attenuation along the path from focus to the station. On the other hand, the pulse width variations with azimuth depend critically on the fault plane orientation and source directivity. In favourable circumstances (high signal/noise ratio, high resolution and station coverage), the method of analysis proposed in this paper allows the constraint of the rupture plane among the two nodal planes characterizing the fault plane solution, even for small events. P-wave pulse analysis was applied for 25 Vrancea earthquakes recorded between 1999 and 2003 by the Romanian local network to determine source parameters and attenuation properties. Our results outline high-stress drop seismic energy release with relatively simple rupture process for the considered events and strong lateral variation of attenuation of seismic waves across Carpathians Arc. (authors)

  2. Wave-induced release of methane : littoral zones as a source of methane in lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Federwisch, Luisa; Peeters, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of surface waves and the associated disturbance of littoral sediments for the release and later distribution of dissolved methane in lakes. Surface wave field, wave-induced currents, acoustic backscatter strength, and the concentration and distribution of dissolved methane were measured simultaneously in Lake Constance, Germany. The data indicate that surface waves enhance the release of dissolved methane in the shallow littoral zone via burst-like releases of...

  3. Infrared observations of gravitational-wave sources in Advanced LIGO's second observing run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound Singer, Leo; Kasliwal, Mansi; Lau, Ryan; Cenko, Bradley; Global Relay of Observatories Watching Transients Happen (GROWTH)

    2018-01-01

    Advanced LIGO observed gravitational waves (GWs) from a binary black hole merger in its first observing run (O1) in September 2015. It is anticipated that LIGO and Virgo will soon detect the first binary neutron star mergers. The most promising electromagnetic counterparts to such events are kilonovae: fast, faint transients powered by the radioactive decay of the r-process ejecta. Joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic observations of such transients hold the key to many longstanding problems, from the nature of short GRBS to the cosmic production sites of the r-process elements to "standard siren" cosmology. Due to the large LIGO/Virgo error regions of 100 deg2, synoptic survey telescopes have dominated the search for LIGO counterparts. Due to the paucity of infrared instruments with multi-deg2 fields of view, infrared observations have been lacking. Near-infrared emission should not only be a more robust signature of kilonovae than optical emission (independent of viewing angle), but should also be several magnitudes brighter and be detectable for much longer, weeks after merger rather than days. In Advanced LIGO's second observing run, we used the FLAMINGOS-2 instrument on Gemini-South to hunt for the near-infrared emission from GW sources by targeted imaging of the most massive galaxies in the LIGO/Virgo localization volumes. We present the results of this campaign, rates, and interpretation of our near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy. We show that leveraging large-scale structure and targeted imaging of the most massive ~10 galaxies in a LIGO/Virgo localization volume may be a surprisingly effective strategy to find the electromagnetic counterpart.

  4. WASS: an open-source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Filippo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Torsello, Andrea; Barbariol, Francesco; Carniel, Sandro; Sclavo, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    Stereo 3D reconstruction of ocean waves is gaining more and more popularity in the oceanographic community. In fact, recent advances of both computer vision algorithms and CPU processing power can now allow the study of the spatio-temporal wave fields with unprecedented accuracy, especially at small scales. Even if simple in theory, multiple details are difficult to be mastered for a practitioner so that the implementation of a 3D reconstruction pipeline is in general considered a complex task. For instance, camera calibration, reliable stereo feature matching and mean sea-plane estimation are all factors for which a well designed implementation can make the difference to obtain valuable results. For this reason, we believe that the open availability of a well-tested software package that automates the steps from stereo images to a 3D point cloud would be a valuable addition for future researches in this area. We present WASS, a completely Open-Source stereo processing pipeline for sea waves 3D reconstruction, available at http://www.dais.unive.it/wass/. Our tool completely automates the recovery of dense point clouds from stereo images by providing three main functionalities. First, WASS can automatically recover the extrinsic parameters of the stereo rig (up to scale) so that no delicate calibration has to be performed on the field. Second, WASS implements a fast 3D dense stereo reconstruction procedure so that an accurate 3D point cloud can be computed from each stereo pair. We rely on the well-consolidated OpenCV library both for the image stereo rectification and disparity map recovery. Lastly, a set of 2D and 3D filtering techniques both on the disparity map and the produced point cloud are implemented to remove the vast majority of erroneous points that can naturally arise while analyzing the optically complex nature of the water surface (examples are sun-glares, large white-capped areas, fog and water areosol, etc). Developed to be as fast as possible, WASS

  5. A tunable dual-wavelength pump source based on simulated polariton scattering for terahertz-wave generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Bo; Liu, Jinsong; Yao, Jianquan; Li, Enbang

    2013-01-01

    We propose a dual-wavelength pump source by utilizing stimulated polariton scattering in a LiNbO 3 crystal. The residual pump and the generated tunable Stokes waves can be combined to generate THz-wave generation via difference frequency generation (DFG). With a pump energy of 49 mJ, Stokes waves with a tuning range from 1067.8 to 1074 nm have been generated, and an output energy of up to 14.9 mJ at 1070 nm has been achieved with a conversion efficiency of 21.7%. A sum frequency generation experiment was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme for THz-wave DFG. (paper)

  6. A tsunami wave propagation analysis for the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant considering the tsunami sources of western part of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Hyun Me; Kim, Min Kyu; Sheen, Dong Hoon; Choi, In Kil

    2013-01-01

    The accident which was caused by a tsunami and the Great East-Japan earthquake in 2011 occurred at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site. It is obvious that the NPP accident could be incurred by the tsunami. Therefore a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) for an NPP site should be required in Korea. The PTHA methodology is developed on the PSHA (Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis) method which is performed by using various tsunami sources and their weights. In this study, the fault sources of northwestern part of Japan were used to analyze as the tsunami sources. These fault sources were suggested by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). To perform the PTHA, the calculations of maximum and minimum wave elevations from the result of tsunami simulations are required. Thus, in this study, tsunami wave propagation analysis were performed for developing the future study of the PTHA

  7. Eighth CW and High Average Power RF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the next Continuous Wave and High Average RF Power Workshop, CWRF2014, to take place at Hotel NH Trieste, Trieste, Italy from 13 to 16 May, 2014. This is the eighth in the CWRF workshop series and will be hosted by Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. (www.elettra.eu). CWRF2014 will provide an opportunity for designers and users of CW and high average power RF systems to meet and interact in a convivial environment to share experiences and ideas on applications which utilize high-power klystrons, gridded tubes, combined solid-state architectures, high-voltage power supplies, high-voltage modulators, high-power combiners, circulators, cavities, power couplers and tuners. New ideas for high-power RF system upgrades and novel ways of RF power generation and distribution will also be discussed. CWRF2014 sessions will start on Tuesday morning and will conclude on Friday lunchtime. A visit to Elettra and FERMI will be organized during the workshop. ORGANIZING COMMITTEE (OC): Al...

  8. Development a low-cost carbon monoxide sensor using homemade CW-DFB QCL and board-level electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jingmin; Yu, Haiye; Zheng, Chuantao; Wang, Lijun; Sui, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yiding

    2018-05-01

    A mid-infrared sensor was demonstrated for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) at trace level. In order to reduce cost, a homemade continuous-wave mode distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (CW-DFB QCL), a mini gas cell with 1.6-m optical length, and some self-development electronic modules were adopted as excitation source, absorption pool, and signal controlling and processing tool, respectively. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and phase sensitive detection (PSD) techniques as well as wavelet filtering software algorithm were used to reduce the influence of light source fluctuation and system noise and to improve measurement precision and sensitivity. Under the selected P(11) absorption line located at 2099.083 cm-1, a limit of detection (LoD) of 26 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at atmospheric pressure was achieved with a 1-s acquisition time. Allan deviation was used to characterize the long-term performance of the CO sensor, and a measurement precision of ∼3.4 ppbv was observed with an optimal integration time of ∼114 s. As a field measurement, a continuous monitoring on indoor CO concentration for a period of 24 h was conducted, which verified the reliable and robust operation of the developed sensor.

  9. Application of the Method of Auxiliary Sources for the Analysis of Plane-Wave Scattering by Impedance Spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2002-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is applied to 3D scattering problems involving spherical impedance scatterers. The MAS results are compared with the reference spherical wave expansion (SWE) solution. It is demonstrated that good agreement is achieved between the MAS and SWE results....

  10. Effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of sheared parallel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on both dissipative toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of mean sheared parallel flow are examined. The first part of this work extends the development of a local model of ionization-driven drift wave turbulence [Phys. Fluids B 4, 877 (1992)] to include the effects of magnetic shear and poloidal source asymmetry, as well as poloidal mode coupling due to both magnetic drifts and the source asymmetry. Numerical and analytic investigation confirm that ionization effects can destabilize collisional toroidal drift waves. However, the mode structure is determined primarily by the magnetic drifts, and is not overly effected by the poloidal source asymmetry. The ionization source drives a purely inward particle flux, which can explain the anomalously rapid uptake of particles which occurs in response to gas puffing. In the second part of this work, the role poloidal asymmetries in both the source and turbulent particle diffusion play in the generation of sheared mean parallel flow is examined. Analysis indicates that predictions of sonic parallel shear flow [v parallel (r)∼c s ] are an unphysical result of the assumption of purely parallel flow (i.e., v perpendicular =0) and the neglect of turbulent parallel momentum transport. Results indicate that the flow produced is subcritical to the parallel shear flow instability when diamagnetic effects are properly considered

  11. Electromagnetic Modeling of Distributed-Source-Excitation of Coplanar Waveguides: Applications to Traveling-Wave Photomixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Davide; Neto, Andrea; Wyss, Rolf A.

    2001-01-01

    In this work an electromagnetic model and subsequent design is presented for a traveling-wave, coplanar waveguide (CPW) based source that will operate in the THz frequency regime. The radio frequency (RF) driving current is a result of photoexcitation of a thin GaAs membrane using two frequency-offset lasers. The GaAs film is grown by molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) and displays sub-ps carrier lifetimes which enable the material conductivity to be modulated at a very high rate. The RF current flows between electrodes deposited on the GaAs membrane which are biased with a DC voltage source. The electrodes form a CPW and are terminated with a double slot antenna that couples the power to a quasi-optical system. The membrane is suspended above a metallic reflector to launch all radiation in one direction. The theoretical investigation and consequent design is performed in two steps. The first step consists of a direct evaluation of the magnetic current distribution on an infinitely extended coplanar waveguide excited by an impressed electric current distributed over a finite area. The result of the analysis is the difference between the incident angle of the laser beams and the length of the excited area that maximizes the RF power coupled to the CPW. The optimal values for both parameters are found as functions of the CPW and membrane dimensions as well as the dielectric constants of the layers. In the second step, a design is presented of a double slot antenna that matches the CPW characteristic impedance and gives good overall performance. The design is presently being implemented and measurements will soon be available.

  12. Application of distributed point source method (DPSM) to wave propagation in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooladi, Samaneh; Kundu, Tribikram

    2017-04-01

    Distributed Point Source Method (DPSM) was developed by Placko and Kundu1, as a technique for modeling electromagnetic and elastic wave propagation problems. DPSM has been used for modeling ultrasonic, electrostatic and electromagnetic fields scattered by defects and anomalies in a structure. The modeling of such scattered field helps to extract valuable information about the location and type of defects. Therefore, DPSM can be used as an effective tool for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT). Anisotropy adds to the complexity of the problem, both mathematically and computationally. Computation of the Green's function which is used as the fundamental solution in DPSM is considerably more challenging for anisotropic media, and it cannot be reduced to a closed-form solution as is done for isotropic materials. The purpose of this study is to investigate and implement DPSM for an anisotropic medium. While the mathematical formulation and the numerical algorithm will be considered for general anisotropic media, more emphasis will be placed on transversely isotropic materials in the numerical example presented in this paper. The unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites which are widely used in today's industry are good examples of transversely isotropic materials. Development of an effective and accurate NDT method based on these modeling results can be of paramount importance for in-service monitoring of damage in composite structures.

  13. Prospects for CW and LP operation of the European XFEL in hard X-ray regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Sekutowicz, J.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2014-03-01

    The European XFEL will operate nominally at 17.5 GeV in SP (short pulse) mode with 0.65 ms long bunch train and 10 Hz repetition rate. A possible upgrade of the linac to CW (continuous wave) or LP (long pulse) modes with a corresponding reduction of electron beam energy is under discussion since many years. Recent successes in the dedicated R and D program allow to forecast a technical feasibility of such an upgrade in the foreseeable future. One of the challenges is to provide sub-Aangstrom FEL operation in CW and LP modes. In this paper we perform a preliminary analysis of a possible operation of the European XFEL in the hard X-ray regime in CW and LP modes with the energies of 7 GeV and 10 GeV, respectively. We consider lasing in the baseline XFEL undulator as well as in a new undulator with a reduced period. We show that, with reasonable requirements on electron beam quality, lasing on the fundamental will be possible in sub-Aangstrom regime. As an option for generation of brilliant photon beams at short wavelengths we also consider harmonic lasing that has recently attracted a significant attention.

  14. Spin states of reduced fullerenes (C60 and C120O) by CW and pulsed EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Drew, S.C.; Pilbrow, J.R.; Boyd, P.D.W.; Paul, P.; Reed, C.A.; Sun, D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The ESTN (Electron Spin Transient Nutation) EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) experiments reported at Wagga 2002 showed that the spin states of the reduced fullerenes C 120 O (2-), C 120 O (3-) and C 120 O (4-) were S = 1, S = 1/2 and S = 1 respectively. Further experiments using CW (Continuous Wave) EPR have confirmed the results of Paul et al. and have now shown that these states are the ground states of these anions. In the case of C 60 (3-), the recent CW and ESTN EPR experiments have shown that the electronic ground state of this anion is S = 1/2. The observation of ground states of low multiplicity for these anions is contrary to expectations based on MO calculations and the application of Hund's rules. A series of CW EPR experiments on C 60 (3-) have shown that some previous results may need to be re-interpreted. This arises from the delineation of the effects of microwave power, modulation amplitude and frequency, sample temperature and freezing rate on the EPR spectrum which is the combination of a broad line, attributed to C 60 (3-), and a 'spike' attributed to C 120 O impurities and other oxygen related species. Our results cast doubt on the existence of Jahn-Teller effects at low temperatures and of a low-lying spin quartet excited state

  15. Investigation of radical locations in various sesame seeds by CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Hara, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the location of radical in various sesame seeds using continuous-wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9-GHz EPR imaging. CW EPR detected persistent radicals (single line) for various sesame seeds. The EPR linewidth of black sesame seeds was narrower than that of the irradiated white sesame seeds. A very small signal was detected for the white sesame seeds. Two-dimensional (2D) imaging using a 9-GHz EPR imager showed that radical locations vary for various sesame seeds. The paramagnetic species in black sesame seeds were located on the seed coat (skin) and in the hilum region. The signal with the highest intensity was obtained from the hilum part. A very low-intensity image was observed for the white sesame seeds. In addition, the 2D imaging of the irradiated white sesame seeds showed that free radicals were located throughout the entire seed. For the first time, CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging showed the exact location of radical species in various sesame seeds.

  16. Prospects for CW and LP operation of the European XFEL in hard X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, R.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Sekutowicz, J.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2014-03-15

    The European XFEL will operate nominally at 17.5 GeV in SP (short pulse) mode with 0.65 ms long bunch train and 10 Hz repetition rate. A possible upgrade of the linac to CW (continuous wave) or LP (long pulse) modes with a corresponding reduction of electron beam energy is under discussion since many years. Recent successes in the dedicated R and D program allow to forecast a technical feasibility of such an upgrade in the foreseeable future. One of the challenges is to provide sub-Aangstrom FEL operation in CW and LP modes. In this paper we perform a preliminary analysis of a possible operation of the European XFEL in the hard X-ray regime in CW and LP modes with the energies of 7 GeV and 10 GeV, respectively. We consider lasing in the baseline XFEL undulator as well as in a new undulator with a reduced period. We show that, with reasonable requirements on electron beam quality, lasing on the fundamental will be possible in sub-Aangstrom regime. As an option for generation of brilliant photon beams at short wavelengths we also consider harmonic lasing that has recently attracted a significant attention.

  17. Wavelength tunable CW red laser generated based on an intracavity-SFG composite cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. N.; Bai, Y.; Lei, G. Z.; Bai, B.; Sun, Y. X.; Hu, M. X.; Wang, C.; Bai, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    We report a wavelength-tunable watt-level continuous wave (CW) red laser that uses a composite cavity based on an intracavity sum-frequency generation (SFG). The composite cavity is composed of a LD side-pumped Nd: GdVO4 p-polarized 1062.9 nm resonant cavity and a resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) of s-polarized signal light using a periodically poled crystal MgO: PPLN. Based on the temperature tuning from 30 °C to 200 °C, the CW red laser beams are obtained in a tunable waveband from 634.4 nm to 649.1 nm, corresponding to a tunable output waveband from 3278.0 nm to 2940.2 nm of the mid-infrared idler lights. The maximum CW output power of the red laser at 634.4 nm and the idler light at 3278.0 nm reach 3.03 W and 4.13 W under 30 °C, respectively.

  18. Magnon Accumulation by Clocked Laser Excitation as Source of Long-Range Spin Waves in Transparent Magnetic Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jäckl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical tools are promising for spin-wave generation because of the possibilities of ultrafast manipulation and local excitation. However, a single laser pulse can inject spin waves (SWs only with a broad frequency spectrum, resulting in short propagation distances and low wave amplitudes. Here, we excite a magnetic garnet film by a train of fs-laser pulses with a 1-GHz repetition rate so that the pulse separation is shorter than the decay time of magnetic modes, which allows us to achieve a collective impact on the magnetization and establish a quasistationary source of spin waves, namely, a coherent accumulation of magnons (“magnon cloud”. This approach has several appealing features: (i The magnon source is tunable, (ii the SW amplitude can be significantly enhanced, (iii the SW spectrum is quite narrow, providing long-distance propagation, (iv the periodic pumping results in an almost constant-in-time SW amplitude for the distances larger than 20  μm away from the source, and (v the SW emission shows pronounced directionality. These results expand the capabilities of ultrafast coherent optical control of magnetization and pave the way for applications in data processing, including the quantum regime. The quasistationary magnon accumulation might also be of interest for applications in magnon Bose-Einstein condensates.

  19. Investigation of Seismic Waves from Non-Natural Sources: A Case Study for Building Collapse and Surface Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houng, S.; Hong, T.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and excitation mechanism of incidents or non-natural events have been widely investigated using seismological techniques. With introduction of dense seismic networks, small-sized non-natural events such as building collapse and chemical explosions are well recorded. Two representative non-natural seismic sources are investigated. A 5-story building in South Korea, Sampoong department store, was collapsed in June 25, 1995, causing casualty of 1445. This accident is known to be the second deadliest non-terror-related building collapse in the world. The event was well recorded by a local station in ~ 9 km away. P and S waves were recorded weak, while monotonic Rayleigh waves were observed well. The origin time is determined using surface-wave arrival time. The magnitude of event is determined to be 1.2, which coincides with a theoretical estimate based on the mass and volume of building. Synthetic waveforms are modeled for various combinations of velocity structures and source time functions, which allow us to constrain the process of building collapse. It appears that the building was collapsed once within a couple of seconds. We also investigate a M2.1 chemical explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas on April 18, 2013. It was reported that more than one hundred people were dead or injured by the explosion. Seismic waveforms for nearby stations are collected from Incorporated Research Institution of Seismology (IRIS). The event was well recorded at stations in ~500 km away from the source. Strong acoustic signals were observed at stations in a certain great-circle direction. This observation suggests preferential propagation of acoustic waves depending on atmospheric environment. Waveform cross-correlation, spectral analysis and waveform modeling are applied to understand the source physics. We discuss the nature of source and source excitation mechanism.

  20. The development of a XEOL and TR XEOL detection system for the I18 microfocus beamline Diamond light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.P.; Finch, A.A.; Mosselmans, J.F.W.; Quinn, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and capabilities of a new Continuous Wave X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence (CW-XEOL) and Time Resolved X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence (TR-XEOL) facility on the I18 beamline at the DIAMOND light source, the UK national synchrotron facility. Experimental data from a suite of framework silicates are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system. Experiments studied include simple (CW-XEOL) spectroscopy, (TR XEOL) lifetime experiments dose and dose rate dependence (CW-XEOL) experiments, spatial (TR XEOL) on heterogeneous sample, wavelength resolved (TR XEOL), Optically Derived X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, (OD XAS). - Highlights: ► We describe the capabilities of a new CW-XEOL and TR-XEOL detection system for a hard X-ray beamline. ► We model TR XEOL with luminescence lifetimes from ∼25 ps to ∼400 ps from framework silicates. ► CW XEOL, 200–900 nm with a resolution of ∼0.9 nm is used to complete dose and dose rate experiments. ► Micro-beam high spatial resolution XEOL within X-ray excitation energies 2–20 keV.

  1. Circuits and systems for CW and pulsed high-field electron spin resonance

    OpenAIRE

    David Robert, Bolton

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the design and realisation of components for a new state of the art 94GHz Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometer capable of operating in both pulsed and CW modes. The complete spectrometer is designed to provide phase coherent 1kW peak power sub-nanosecond π/2 pulses having variable duration and repetition rate. The mm-wave response of a paramagnetic sample to these pulses is detected with a superheterodyne detector. Such a system would offer a step change in...

  2. Visibility and aerosol measurement by diode-laser random-modulation CW lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Baba, H.; Sakurai, K.; Ueno, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of diode laser (DL) random-modulation continuous wave (RM-CW) lidar measurements are reported. The ability of the measurement of the visibility, vertical aerosol profile, and the cloud ceiling height is demonstrated. Although the data shown here were all measured at night time, the daytime measurement is, of course, possible. For that purpose, accurate control of the laser frequency to the center frequency of a narrow band filter is required. Now a new system with a frequency control is under construction.

  3. CW all optical self switching in nonlinear chalcogenide nano plasmonic directional coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamed-Jahromi, Leila; Hatami, Mohsen

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we obtain the coupling coefficient of plasmonic directional coupler (PDC) made up of two parallel monolayer waveguides filled with high nonlinear chalcogenide material for TM mode in continues wave (CW) regime. In addition, we assume each waveguides acts as a perturbation to other waveguide. Four nonlinear-coupled equations are derived. Transfer distances are numerically calculated and used for deriving length of all optical switch. The length of designed switch is in the range of 10-1000 μm, and the switching power is in the range of 1-100 W/m. Obtained values are suitable for designing all optical elements in the integrated optical circuits.

  4. First 200 kW CW operation of a 60 GHz gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Evans, S.; Felch, K.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Shively, J.; Spang, S.

    1983-01-01

    The gyrotron is a microwave tube which employs the electron cyclotron maser interaction to produce high power output at millimeter wavelengths. It has important and growing applications for heating of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion experiments. The Varian 60 GHz gyrotron has recently generated microwave power in excess of 200 kW during CW operation, wth excellent dynamic range and operating stability. This is the highest average power ever produced by a microwave tube in the millimeter wave region. A description of the gyrotron design and test results are presented

  5. Acoustic-gravity waves generated by atmospheric and near-surface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Kholodov, Alexander S.; Krysanov, Boris Yu.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Vorontsov, Artem M.

    2013-04-01

    . The ionospheric footprints of atmospheric disturbances are given. The effects of AGW evolution after launching the rockets are studied. One of the possible applications of RT imaging of wavelike disturbances is the study of AGW and TID as probable precursors of the earthquakes. The key difficulty here is to distinguish between the AGW and atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances of non-seismic nature (for example, those caused by the enhanced solar-geomagnetic activity), which can be done by analyzing spatial two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures revealed by tomographic methods. The examples of AGW RT imaging based on the real experimental satellite data measured in regions of the Europe, North America and Asia are demonstrated. The example of AGW and TID generation by the tsunami wave after the Tohoku earthquake is presented. Our results prove the capability of RT methods to detect wavelike disturbances in the ionosphere, which are caused by the near-surface sources, and to distinguish between these disturbances and the influence from the atmosphere and space. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants 11-05-01157 and 13-05-01122 ).

  6. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  7. Mitigation technologies for damage induced by pressure waves in high-power mercury spallation neutron sources (1). Material surface improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Wakui, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Shoubu, Takahisa; Takeuchi, Hirotsugu; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed in the world. Proton beams will be used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by microjets and/or shock waves that are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. Bubble collapse behavior was observed by using a high-speed video camera, as well as simulated numerically. Localized impact due to cavitation bubble collapse was quantitatively estimated through comparison between numerical simulation and experiment. A novel surface treatment technique that consists of carburizing and nitriding processes was developed and the treatment condition was optimized to mitigate the pitting damage due to localized impacts. (author)

  8. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF COMPACT BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES AND OTHER EXOTICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-01-01

    The environment near supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic nuclei contains a large number of stars and compact objects. A fraction of these are likely to be members of binaries. Here we discuss the binary population of stellar black holes and neutron stars near SMBHs and focus on the secular evolution of such binaries, due to the perturbation by the SMBH. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbit around the SMBH are strongly affected by secular Kozai processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (Kozai cycles). During periapsis approach, at the highest eccentricities during the Kozai cycles, gravitational wave (GW) emission becomes highly efficient. Some binaries in this environment can inspiral and coalesce at timescales much shorter than a Hubble time and much shorter than similar binaries that do not reside near an SMBH. The close environment of SMBHs could therefore serve as a catalyst for the inspiral and coalescence of binaries and strongly affect their orbital properties. Such compact binaries would be detectable as GW sources by the next generation of GW detectors (e.g., advanced-LIGO). Our analysis shows that ∼0.5% of such nuclear merging binaries will enter the LIGO observational window while on orbits that are still very eccentric (e ∼> 0.5). The efficient GW analysis for such systems would therefore require the use of eccentric templates. We also find that binaries very close to the SMBH could evolve through a complex dynamical (non-secular) evolution, leading to emission of several GW pulses during only a few years (though these are likely to be rare). Finally, we note that the formation of close stellar binaries, X-ray binaries, and their merger products could be induced by similar secular processes, combined with tidal friction rather than GW emission as in the case of compact object binaries.

  9. High-power and highly reliable 638-nm band BA-LD for CW operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Takehiro; Kuramoto, Kyosuke; Abe, Shinji; Kusunoki, Masatsugu; Miyashita, Motoharu; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2018-02-01

    High-power laser diodes (LDs) are strongly demanded as light sources of display applications. In multiple spatial light modulator-type projectors or liquid crystal displays, the light source LDs are operated under CW condition. The high-power 638-nm band broad-area LD for CW operation was newly developed. The LD consisted of two stripes with each width of 75 μm to reduce both an optical power density at a front facet and a threshold current. The newly improved epitaxial technology was also applied to the LD to suppress an electron overflow from an active layer. The LD showed superior output characteristics, such as output of 1.77 W at case temperature of 55 °C with wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 23%, which was improved by 40% compared with the current product. The peak WPE at 25 °C reached 40.6% under the output power of 2.37 W, CW, world highest.

  10. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Akerman, M.A.; Becraft, W.R.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to prouce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applicatiosn in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions effeciently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summariezed. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Akerman, M.A.; Becraft, W.R.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to produce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applications in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions efficiently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summarized. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. A replacement solvent for dimethylsulfoxide /DMSO/ in CW dye lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbelin, J.M.; McKay, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of propylene glycol carbonate as a replacement solvent for dimethyl sulfoxide in a Coherent model 599-21 CW dye laser has been investigated. Up to 40 milliwatts of single frequency output was achieved at 875 nm.

  13. Correlation Wave-Front Sensing Algorithms for Shack-Hartmann-Based Adaptive Optics using a Point Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poynee, L A

    2003-01-01

    Shack-Hartmann based Adaptive Optics system with a point-source reference normally use a wave-front sensing algorithm that estimates the centroid (center of mass) of the point-source image 'spot' to determine the wave-front slope. The centroiding algorithm suffers for several weaknesses. For a small number of pixels, the algorithm gain is dependent on spot size. The use of many pixels on the detector leads to significant propagation of read noise. Finally, background light or spot halo aberrations can skew results. In this paper an alternative algorithm that suffers from none of these problems is proposed: correlation of the spot with a ideal reference spot. The correlation method is derived and a theoretical analysis evaluates its performance in comparison with centroiding. Both simulation and data from real AO systems are used to illustrate the results. The correlation algorithm is more robust than centroiding, but requires more computation

  14. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  15. 3 μm CW lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Kurt J; Pfeffer, Christian P; Sousa, John Gary; D'Alleva, Nicholas; Aslani, Arash; Gorski, Grzegorz; Kenna, Margaret; Poe, Dennis S

    2013-03-08

    This paper describes the development and implementation of 3 μm lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery. Two different lasers were investigated. The first, an Er-doped, CW zirconate glass fiber laser optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.76 μm with concomitant green incoherent emission that served as a convenient visible illumination beam. The second, a 1 W CW Er:YAG solid-state laser also optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.94 μm, coincident with the strongest infrared water absorption peak. Running CW, both lasers are expected to avoid the loud acoustical shocks associated with pulsed lasers. Myringotomies were carried out with the Er:YAG laser on anaesthetized guinea pigs and the effects of the laser were documented. Laser ablated samples of tympanic membrane, soft tissue and bone were histologically examined. Histology results indicated that the CW Er:YAG laser is a potential candidate for a new myringotomy tool and possibly for otologic microsurgery, but deliverable power levels need to be increased to the 2 W (or higher) level. This work was funded under NIH SBIR Grant No. 5R44DC004899.

  16. Photon-Pair Sources Based on Intermodal Four-Wave Mixing in Few-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rottwitt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave mixing in optical fibers has been proven to have many applications within processing of classical optical signals. In addition, recent developments in multimode fibers have made it possible to achieve the necessary phase-matching for efficient four-wave mixing over a very wide bandwidth. Thus, the combination of multimode fiber optics and four-wave mixing is very attractive for various applications. This is especially the case for applications in quantum communication, for example in photon-pair generation. This is the subject of this work, where we discuss the impact of fluctuations in core radius on the quality of the heralded single-photon states and demonstrate experimental results of intermodal spontaneous four-wave mixing for photon-pair generation.

  17. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A., E-mail: alper.erturk@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  18. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-01-01

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver

  19. Optimization of CW-OSL parameters for improved dose detection threshold in Al2O3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, N.S.; Dhabekar, B.; Kulkarni, M.S.; Muthe, K.P.; Mishra, D.R.; Soni, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) is relatively a simple technique that offers good signal to noise ratio (SNR) and involves simple instrumentation. This study reports the influence and optimization of CW-OSL parameters on minimum detectable dose (MDD) using α-Al 2 O 3 :C phosphor. It is found that at a given stimulation intensity MDD in CW-OSL mode depends on signal integration time. At lower integration times MDD is inferior. It exhibits an improvement for intermediate values, shows a plateau region and deteriorates as integration time increases further. MDD is found to be ∼127 μGy at 4 mW/cm 2 stimulation intensity for integration time of 0.1 s, which improves to ∼10.5 μGy for 60 s. At stimulation intensity of 72 mW/cm 2 , MDD is 37 μGy for integration time of 60 s and improves significantly to 7 μGy for 1 s. - Highlights: • CW-OSL parameters are optimized to obtain best SNR and MDD in Al 2 O 3 :C. • MDD is found to depend on signal integration time and stimulation intensity. • With time, MDD initially improves, stabilizes then deteriorates. • At a given intensity, MDD is optimum for a certain range of integration time

  20. Demonstration of frequency control and CW diode laser injection control of a titanium-doped sapphire ring laser with no internal optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Clayton H.; Brockman, Philip; Hess, Robert V.; Modlin, Edward A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental frequency narrowing studies of a Ti:sapphire ring laser with no intracavity optical elements are reported. Frequency narrowing has been achieved using a birefringent filter between a partially reflecting reverse wave suppressor mirror and the ring cavity output mirror. Results of CW diode laser injection seeding are reported.

  1. Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma generated by radiation from CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 lasers in different gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskii, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    The interaction between high-power CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical-breakdown plasma near a metal surface is investigated. The characteristics of the breakdown plasma are examined as functions of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis of the results obtained was performed using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  2. Gravitational wave emission from a bounded source: A treatment in the full nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveiral, H.P. de; Damiao Soares, I.

    2004-03-01

    The dynamics of a bounded gravitational collapsing configuration emitting gravitational waves is studied. The exterior spacetime is described by Robinson-Trautman geometries and have the Schwarzschild black hole as its final gravitational configuration, when the gravitational wave emission ceases. The full nonlinear regime is examined by using the Galerkin method that allows us to reduce the equations governing the dynamics to a finite-dimensional dynamical system, after a proper truncation procedure. Gravitational wave emission patterns from given initial configurations are exhibited for several phases of the collapse and the mass-loss ratio that characterizes the amount of mass extracted by the gravitational wave emission is evaluated. We obtain that the smaller initial mass M init of the configuration, the more rapidly the Schwarzschild solution is attained and a larger fraction of M init is lost in the process of gravitational wave emission. Within all our numerical experiments, the distribution of the mass fraction extracted by gravitational wave emission is shown to satisfy the distribution law of nonextensive statistics and this result is independent of the initial configurations considered. (author)

  3. Numerical Prediction of Wave Patterns Due to Motion of 3D Bodies by Kelvin-Havelock Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassemi Hassan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the numerical evaluation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of submerged and surface piercing moving bodies. Generally, two main classes of potential methods are used for hydrodynamic characteristic analysis of steady moving bodies which are Rankine and Kelvin-Havelock singularity distribution. In this paper, the Kelvin- Havelock sources are used for simulating the moving bodies and then free surface wave patterns are obtained. Numerical evaluation of potential distribution of a Kelvin-Havelock source is completely presented and discussed. Numerical results are calculated and presented for a 2D cylinder, single source, two parallel moving source, sphere, ellipsoid and standard Wigley hull in different situation that show acceptable agreement with results of other literatures or experiments.

  4. Design of diode electron gun for 250 kW CW klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, M.; Pande, S.A.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    A 250 kW CW klystron at frequencies 350 MHz and 700 MHz is being developed at Centre for Advanced Technology. These klystrons are required for forthcoming project like 100 MeV proton Linac for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) as a main rf sources. In order to develop klystrons, we have designed the diode electron gun, which delivers more than 10 A beam current at 50 kV. This paper describes the simulation results of electron gun with computer code EGUN. (author)

  5. Combining historical eyewitness accounts on tsunami-induced waves and numerical simulations for getting insights in uncertainty of source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Jeremy; Rousseau, Marie; Lemoine, Anne; Pedreros, Rodrigo; Lambert, Jerome; benki, Aalae

    2017-04-01

    Recent tsunami events including the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami have caused many casualties and damages to structures. Advances in numerical simulation of tsunami-induced wave processes have tremendously improved forecast, hazard and risk assessment and design of early warning for tsunamis. Among the major challenges, several studies have underlined uncertainties in earthquake slip distributions and rupture processes as major contributor on tsunami wave height and inundation extent. Constraining these uncertainties can be performed by taking advantage of observations either on tsunami waves (using network of water level gauge) or on inundation characteristics (using field evidence and eyewitness accounts). Despite these successful applications, combining tsunami observations and simulations still faces several limitations when the problem is addressed for past tsunamis events like 1755 Lisbon. 1) While recent inversion studies can benefit from current modern networks (e.g., tide gauges, sea bottom pressure gauges, GPS-mounted buoys), the number of tide gauges can be very scarce and testimonies on tsunami observations can be limited, incomplete and imprecise for past tsunamis events. These observations often restrict to eyewitness accounts on wave heights (e.g., maximum reached wave height at the coast) instead of the full observed waveforms; 2) Tsunami phenomena involve a large span of spatial scales (from ocean basin scales to local coastal wave interactions), which can make the modelling very demanding: the computation time cost of tsunami simulation can be very prohibitive; often reaching several hours. This often limits the number of allowable long-running simulations for performing the inversion, especially when the problem is addressed from a Bayesian inference perspective. The objective of the present study is to overcome both afore-described difficulties in the view to combine historical observations on past tsunami-induced waves

  6. Beyond Open Source: According to Jim Hirsch, Open Technology, Not Open Source, Is the Wave of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jim Hirsch, an associate superintendent for technology at Piano Independent School District in Piano, Texas. Hirsch serves as a liaison for the open technologies committee of the Consortium for School Networking. In this interview, he shares his opinion on the significance of open source in K-12.

  7. Continuous-wave ceramic Nd:YAG laser at 1123 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S S; Wang, Q P; Zhang, X Y; Cong, Z H; Fan, S Z; Liu, Z J; Sun, W J

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic Nd:YAG (cNd:YAG) materials are employed to generate 1123-nm laser. A fiber-coupled continuous-wave (CW) 808-nm diode laser is used as the pumping source. With an incident diode power of 26.1 W, a CW output power of up to 10.8 W is obtained with a 10-mm-long ceramic Nd:YAG rod (1.0 at.%-Nd-doped). The conversion efficiency from diode power to 1123-nm laser power is 41.4%. The laser performance of another 10-mm-long cNd:YAG rod with a Nd-doping concentration of 0.6 at.% is studied as a comparison

  8. Terraced-heterostructure large-optical-cavity AlGaAs diode laser - A new type of high-power CW single-mode device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, D.; Connolly, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    A new terraced lateral wave confining structure is obtained by liquid phase epitaxy over channeled substrates misoriented perpendicular to the channels' direction. Single spatial and longitudinal mode CW operation is achieved to 50 mW from one facet, in large spot sizes (2 x 7.5 micron, 1/e squared points in intensity) and narrow beams (6 deg x 23 deg), full width half-power). At 70 C ambient temperature CW lasing is obtained to 15 mW from one facet. Weak mode confinement in an asymmetric lateral waveguides provides discrimination against high-order mode oscillation.

  9. Modeling subduction earthquake sources in the central-western region of Colombia using waveform inversion of body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve-Jaramillo, Hugo; Valencia-Mina, William; Cano-Saldaña, Leonardo; Vargas, Carlos A.

    2018-05-01

    Source parameters of four earthquakes located within the Wadati-Benioff zone of the Nazca plate subducting beneath the South American plate in Colombia were determined. The seismic moments for these events were recalculated and their approximate equivalent rupture area, slip distribution and stress drop were estimated. The source parameters for these earthquakes were obtained by deconvolving multiple events through teleseismic analysis of body waves recorded in long period stations and with simultaneous inversion of P and SH waves. The calculated source time functions for these events showed different stages that suggest that these earthquakes can reasonably be thought of being composed of two subevents. Even though two of the overall focal mechanisms obtained yielded similar results to those reported by the CMT catalogue, the two other mechanisms showed a clear difference compared to those officially reported. Despite this, it appropriate to mention that the mechanisms inverted in this work agree well with the expected orientation of faulting at that depth as well as with the wave forms they are expected to produce. In some of the solutions achieved, one of the two subevents exhibited a focal mechanism considerably different from the total earthquake mechanism; this could be interpreted as the result of a slight deviation from the overall motion due the complex stress field as well as the possibility of a combination of different sources of energy release analogous to the ones that may occur in deeper earthquakes. In those cases, the subevents with very different focal mechanism compared to the total earthquake mechanism had little contribution to the final solution and thus little contribution to the total amount of energy released.

  10. Short-period AM CVn systems as optical, X-ray and gravitational-wave sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, G.; Yungelson, L.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    We model the population of AM CVn systems in the Galaxy and discuss the detectability of these systems with optical, X-ray and gravitational-wave detectors. We concentrate on the short-period (P < 1500 s) systems, some of which are expected to be in a phase of direct-impact accretion. Using a

  11. Wireless link using on-chip photonic integrated millimeter-wave sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzmán, R. C.; Gordón, C.; Carpintero, G.; Leijtens, X.; Lawniczak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years wireless link data traffic has drastically increased due to a change in the way today's society creates, shares, and consumes information. Millimeter-waves (30-300 GHz) have a great advantage due to the wide bandwidths available for carrying information, enabling broadband

  12. Simulation analysis of rectangular dielectric-loaded traveling wave amplifiers for THz sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbiao Wang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear simulation results for a 220-GHz rectangular dielectric-loaded traveling-wave amplifier are presented. Simulations are used to check a linear theory that is developed by phenomenological introduction of an effective dielectric parameter for electron beam channel, and it is found that the rf power gains from Pierce three-wave theory and particle simulations are in reasonable agreement. It is shown that the rf power gain during initial beam-wave interaction is positive; the falling on the initial rf power profile, which has been thought to be the rf power transferred to the beam for bunching buildup (negative gain effect, is probably resulting from numerical errors. Beam-wave interaction mechanism is analyzed by examining the evolution of beam bunching centers. Influences of various parameters on amplifier performance are examined, and transverse space-charge effect is analyzed. A symmetric excitation scheme for rf couplers is proposed, and rf field jumps on the common intersection line of vacuum, dielectric, and metal wall, which were found in rf simulations, are explained theoretically.

  13. The effect of sources on horizons that may develop when plane gravitational waves collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, Subrahmanyan; Xanthopoulos, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    Colliding plane gravitational waves that lead to the development of a horizon and a subsequent time-like singularity are coupled with an electromagnetic field, a perfect fluid, and null dust (consisting of massless particles). The coupling of the gravitational waves with an electromagnetic field does not affect, in any essential way, the development of the horizon or the time-like singularity if the polarizations of the colliding gravitational waves are not parallel. If the polarizations are parallel, the space-like singularity which occurs in the vacuum is transformed into a horizon followed by a three-dimensional time-like singularity by the merest presence of the electromagnetic field. The coupling of the gravitational waves with a perfect fluid and null dust affect the development of horizons and singularities in radically different ways: the perfect fluid affects the development decisively in all cases but qualitatively in the same way, while null dust prevents the development of horizons and allows only the development of space-like singularities. The contrasting behaviours of a perfect fluid and of null dust in the framework of general relativity is compared with the behaviours one may expect, under similar circumstances, in the framework of special relativity. (author)

  14. Modeling of open quantum dots and wave billiards using imaginary potentials for the source and the sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, Karl-Fredrik; Yakimenko, Irina I; Hakanen, Jani

    2010-01-01

    A heuristic model for particle states and current flow in open ballistic two-dimensional (2D) quantum dots/wave billiards is proposed. The model makes use of complex potentials first introduced in phenomenological nuclear inelastic scattering theory (the optical model). Here we assume that external input and output leads connecting the system to the source and the drain regions may be represented by complex potentials. In this way, a current may be set up between the two 'pseudo-leads'. Probability densities and current flows for an open quantum dot are analyzed here numerically and the results are compared with the microwave measurements used to emulate the system. The model is of conceptual as well as practical interest. In addition to quantum billiards, it may be used as a tool per se to analyze transport in classical wave analogues, such as microwave resonators, acoustic resonators, effects of leakage on such systems, etc.

  15. Comparison between off-resonance and electron Bernstein waves heating regime in a microwave discharge ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G.; Di Giugno, R.; Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Lanaia, D.; Ciavola, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F. [Universita di Messina, Ctr. da Papardo-Sperone, 98100 Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); IET-Institute of Energy Technology, LEC-Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    A microwave discharge ion source (MDIS) operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania has been used to compare the traditional electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating with an innovative mechanisms of plasma ignition based on the electrostatic Bernstein waves (EBW). EBW are obtained via the inner plasma electromagnetic-to-electrostatic wave conversion and they are absorbed by the plasma at cyclotron resonance harmonics. The heating of plasma by means of EBW at particular frequencies enabled us to reach densities much larger than the cutoff ones. Evidences of EBW generation and absorption together with X-ray emissions due to high energy electrons will be shown. A characterization of the discharge heating process in MDISs as a generalization of the ECR heating mechanism by means of ray tracing will be shown in order to highlight the fundamental physical differences between ECR and EBW heating.

  16. Active tectonics in Central Italy: Constraint from surface wave tomography and source moment tensor inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimera, G.; Aoudia, A.; Panza, G.F.; Sarao, A.

    2002-06-01

    We make a multiscale investigation of the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure and of the active tectonics along a stripe from the Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic coast, with emphasis on the Umbria-Marche area, by means of surface-wave tomography and inversion experiments for structure and seismic moment tensor retrieval. The data include: a large number of new local and regional group velocity measurements sampling the Umbria-Marche Apennines and the Adria margin respectively; new and published phase velocity measurements sampling Italy and surroundings; deep seismic soundings which, crossing the whole Peninsula from the Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic coasts, go through the Umbria-Marche area. The local group velocity maps cover the area reactivated by the 1997-1998 Umbria-Marche earthquake sequence. These maps suggest an intimate relation between the lateral variations and distribution of the active fault systems and related sedimentary basins. Such relation is confirmed by the non-linear inversion of the local dispersion curves. To image the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system from the Tyrrhenian to the Adriatic coast, we fix the upper crust parameters consistently with our Umbria-Marche models and with pertinent deep seismic sounding data and invert the regional long period dispersion measurements. At a local scale, in the Umbria-Marche area, the retrieved models for the upper crust reveal the importance of the inherited compressional tectonics on the ongoing extensional deformation and related seismic activity. The lateral and in-depth structural changes in the upper crust are likely controlling fault segmentation and seismogenesis. Source inversion studies of the large crustal events of the 1997 earthquake sequence show the dominance of normal faulting mechanisms, whereas selected aftershocks between the fault segments reveal that the prevailing deformation at the step-over is of strike-slip faulting type and may control the lateral fault extent. At the

  17. Ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions from the West Coast experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. W.; Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Short gravity-capillary waves, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean waves. These short waves are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale wave probe. Modulation transfer functions (the ratio of the cross spectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed and backscattered microwave power to the autospectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed) were measured at 9.375 and 1.5 GHz (Bragg wavelengths of 2.3 and 13 cm) for winds up to 10 m/s and ocean wave periods from 2-18 s. The measurements were compared with the relaxation-time model; the principal result is that a source of modulation other than straining by the horizontal component of orbital speed, possibly the wave-induced airflow, is responsible for most of the modulation by waves of typical ocean wave period (10 s). The modulations are large; for unit coherence, spectra of radar images of deep-water waves should be proportional to the quotient of the slope spectra of the ocean waves by the ocean wave frequency.

  18. The U.S. Navy's Global Wind-Wave Models: An Investigation into Sources of Errors in Low-Frequency Energy Predictions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, W

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an investigation to determine the relative importance of various sources of error in the two global-scale models of wind-generated surface waves used operationally by the U.S. Navy...

  19. iPTF17cw: An Engine-driven Supernova Candidate Discovered Independent of a Gamma-Ray Trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsi, A.; Palliyaguru, N. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Tech University, Box 1051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Cenko, S. B.; Singer, L. P.; Kutyrev, A. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kasliwal, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Blagorodnova, N.; Kupfer, T.; Vedantham, H. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, R. [Department of Astronomy/Mount Laguna Observatory, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Goldstein, A. M.; Connaughton, V. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Perley, D. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Piascik, A. S.; Steele, I. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Fremling, C.; Taddia, F., E-mail: alessandra.corsi@ttu.edu [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2017-09-20

    We present the discovery, classification, and radio-to-X-ray follow-up observations of iPTF17cw, a broad-lined (BL) type Ic supernova (SN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Although it is unrelated to the gravitational wave trigger, this SN was discovered as a happy by-product of the extensive observational campaign dedicated to the follow-up of Advanced LIGO event GW 170104. The spectroscopic properties and inferred peak bolometric luminosity of iPTF17cw are most similar to the gamma-ray-burst (GRB)-associated SN, SN 1998bw, while the shape of the r -band light curve is most similar to that of the relativistic SN, SN 2009bb. Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the iPTF17cw field reveal a radio counterpart ≈10 times less luminous than SN 1998bw, and with a peak radio luminosity comparable to that of SN 2006aj/GRB 060218 and SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Our radio observations of iPTF17cw imply a relativistically expanding outflow. However, further late-time observations with the VLA in its most extended configuration are needed to confirm fading of the iPTF17cw radio counterpart at all frequencies. X-ray observations carried out with Chandra reveal the presence of an X-ray counterpart with a luminosity similar to that of SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Searching the Fermi catalog for possible γ -rays reveals that GRB 161228B is spatially and temporally compatible with iPTF17cw. The similarity to SN 1998bw and SN 2009bb, the radio and X-ray detections, and the potential association with GRB 161228B all point to iPTF17cw being a new candidate member of the rare sample of optically discovered engine-driven BL-Ic SNe associated with relativistic ejecta.

  20. iPTF17cw: An Engine-driven Supernova Candidate Discovered Independent of a Gamma-Ray Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsi, A.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Cenko, S. B.; Singer, L. P.; Kutyrev, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Blagorodnova, N.; Kupfer, T.; Vedantham, H.; Quimby, R.; Frail, D. A.; Goldstein, A. M.; Connaughton, V.; Perley, D. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Piascik, A. S.; Steele, I. A.; Fremling, C.; Taddia, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the discovery, classification, and radio-to-X-ray follow-up observations of iPTF17cw, a broad-lined (BL) type Ic supernova (SN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Although it is unrelated to the gravitational wave trigger, this SN was discovered as a happy by-product of the extensive observational campaign dedicated to the follow-up of Advanced LIGO event GW 170104. The spectroscopic properties and inferred peak bolometric luminosity of iPTF17cw are most similar to the gamma-ray-burst (GRB)-associated SN, SN 1998bw, while the shape of the r -band light curve is most similar to that of the relativistic SN, SN 2009bb. Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the iPTF17cw field reveal a radio counterpart ≈10 times less luminous than SN 1998bw, and with a peak radio luminosity comparable to that of SN 2006aj/GRB 060218 and SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Our radio observations of iPTF17cw imply a relativistically expanding outflow. However, further late-time observations with the VLA in its most extended configuration are needed to confirm fading of the iPTF17cw radio counterpart at all frequencies. X-ray observations carried out with Chandra reveal the presence of an X-ray counterpart with a luminosity similar to that of SN 2010bh/GRB 100316D. Searching the Fermi catalog for possible γ -rays reveals that GRB 161228B is spatially and temporally compatible with iPTF17cw. The similarity to SN 1998bw and SN 2009bb, the radio and X-ray detections, and the potential association with GRB 161228B all point to iPTF17cw being a new candidate member of the rare sample of optically discovered engine-driven BL-Ic SNe associated with relativistic ejecta.

  1. Single sources in the low-frequency gravitational wave sky: properties and time to detection by pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2018-06-01

    We calculate the properties, occurrence rates and detection prospects of individually resolvable `single sources' in the low-frequency gravitational wave (GW) spectrum. Our simulations use the population of galaxies and massive black hole binaries from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to comprehensive semi-analytic models of the binary merger process. Using mock pulsar timing arrays (PTA) with, for the first time, varying red-noise models, we calculate plausible detection prospects for GW single sources and the stochastic GW background (GWB). Contrary to previous results, we find that single sources are at least as detectable as the GW background. Using mock PTA, we find that these `foreground' sources (also `deterministic'/`continuous') are likely to be detected with ˜20 yr total observing baselines. Detection prospects, and indeed the overall properties of single sources, are only moderately sensitive to binary evolution parameters - namely eccentricity and environmental coupling, which can lead to differences of ˜5 yr in times to detection. Red noise has a stronger effect, roughly doubling the time to detection of the foreground between a white-noise only model (˜10-15 yr) and severe red noise (˜20-30 yr). The effect of red noise on the GWB is even stronger, suggesting that single source detections may be more robust. We find that typical signal-to-noise ratios for the foreground peak near f = 0.1 yr-1, and are much less sensitive to the continued addition of new pulsars to PTA.

  2. Apertureless near-field/far-field CW two-photon microscope for biological and material imaging and spectroscopic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Sánchez, Erik J

    2010-12-10

    We present the development of a versatile spectroscopic imaging tool to allow for imaging with single-molecule sensitivity and high spatial resolution. The microscope allows for near-field and subdiffraction-limited far-field imaging by integrating a shear-force microscope on top of a custom inverted microscope design. The instrument has the ability to image in ambient conditions with optical resolutions on the order of tens of nanometers in the near field. A single low-cost computer controls the microscope with a field programmable gate array data acquisition card. High spatial resolution imaging is achieved with an inexpensive CW multiphoton excitation source, using an apertureless probe and simplified optical pathways. The high-resolution, combined with high collection efficiency and single-molecule sensitive optical capabilities of the microscope, are demonstrated with a low-cost CW laser source as well as a mode-locked laser source.

  3. Custom chipset and compact module design for a 75–110 GHz laboratory signal source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Matthew A; Boyd, Tod A; Castro, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development and characterization of a compact, full-waveguide bandwidth (WR-10) signal source for general-purpose testing of mm-wave components. The monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) based multichip module is designed for compactness and ease-of-use, especially in size-constrained test sets such as a wafer probe station. It takes as input a cm-wave continuous-wave (CW) reference and provides a factor of three frequency multiplication as well as amplification, output power adjustment, and in situ output power monitoring. It utilizes a number of custom MMIC chips such as a Schottky-diode limiter and a broadband mm-wave detector, both designed explicitly for this module, as well as custom millimeter-wave multipliers and amplifiers reported in previous papers. (paper)

  4. A 2 MW, CW, 170 GHz gyrotron for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piosczyk, B.; Arnold, A.; Alberti, S.

    2003-01-01

    A 140 GHz gyrotron for CW operation is under development for the stellarator W7-X. With a prototype tube a microwave output power of about 0.9 MW has been obtained in pulses up to 180 s, limited by the capability of the high voltage power supply. The development work on coaxial cavity gyrotrons has demonstrated the feasibility of manufacturing of a 2 MW, CW 170 GHz tube that could be used for ITER. The problems specific to the coaxial arrangement have been investigated and all relevant information needed for an industrial realization of a coaxial gyrotron have been obtained in short pulse experiments (up to 17 ms). The suitability of critical components for a 2 MW, CW coaxial gyrotron has been studied and a first integrated design has been done. (author)

  5. A New Wave Equation Based Source Location Method with Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-05-26

    Locating the source of a passively recorded seismic event is still a challenging problem, especially when the velocity is unknown. Many imaging approaches to focus the image do not address the velocity issue and result in images plagued with illumination artifacts. We develop a waveform inversion approach with an additional penalty term in the objective function to reward the focusing of the source image. This penalty term is relaxed early to allow for data fitting, and avoid cycle skipping, using an extended source. At the later stages the focusing of the image dominates the inversion allowing for high resolution source and velocity inversion. We also compute the source location explicitly and numerical tests show that we obtain good estimates of the source locations with this approach.

  6. Possible wave modes of wideband nonthermal continuum radiation in its source region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grimald, S.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A06209/1-A06209/8 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : nonthermal continuum * NTC * wave modes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  7. Plasma scattering measurement using a submillimeter wave gyrotron as a radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, I.; Idehara, T.; Itakura, Y.; Myodo, M.; Hori, T.; Hatae, T.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma scattering measurement is an effective technique to observe low frequency density fluctuations excited in plasma. The spatial and wave number resolutions and the S/N ratio of measurement depend on the wavelength range, the size and the intensity of a probe beam. A well-collimated, submillimeter wave beam is suitable for improving the spatial and wave number resolutions. Application of high frequency gyrotron is effective in improving the S/N ratio of the measurement because of its capacity to deliver high power. Unlike the molecular vapor lasers, the gyrotrons generate diverging beam of radiation with TE mn mode structure. It is therefore necessary to convert the output radiation into a Gaussian beam. A quasi-optical antenna is a suitable element for the conversion system under consideration since it is applicable to several TE 0n and TE 1n modes. In order to apply the gyrotron to plasma scattering measurement, we have stabilized the output (P = 110 W, f = 354 GHz) of gyrotron up to the level (ΔP/P < 1 %, Δf< 10 kHz). The gyrotron output can be stabilized by decreasing the fluctuation of the cathode potential. (authors)

  8. Study of clay behaviour around a heat source by frequency spectrum analysis of seismic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloovere, P. de.

    1993-01-01

    Wave propagated into soft rock is not completely described by purely linear elastic theory. Through spectrum analysis of wave, one can see that several frequencies are selected by the ground. ME2i uses this method to check grouting, piles a.s.o. The Mol experiment (on Radioactive Waste Disposal) aims to prove that little changes into heated clay can be detected by 'frequential seismic'. A cross-hole investigation system has been installed and tests have been performed for two years with a shear-hammer named MARGOT built to work inside horizontal boreholes: - Before heating the tests show the same results every time: . main frequency at 330 hertz; . maximal frequency at 520 hertz; - During heating: . the rays at 330 and 520 hertz disappear; . The frequencies in the range 100 - 300 hertz are prevailing; - After heating spectra have again their original shape. These results show that the effect is clear around an heated zone. The next steps should be: - Interpretation with computer's codes treating of wave propagation into a viscoelastic body; - Experimentations: . at the opening of a new gallery; . on big samples; . on granites and salt. 9 refs., 4 appendices

  9. Demonstration of improved seismic source inversion method of tele-seismic body wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Y.; Okuwaki, R.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic rupture inversion of tele-seismic body wave has been widely applied to studies of large earthquakes. In general, tele-seismic body wave contains information of overall rupture process of large earthquake, while the tele-seismic body wave is inappropriate for analyzing a detailed rupture process of M6 7 class earthquake. Recently, the quality and quantity of tele-seismic data and the inversion method has been greatly improved. Improved data and method enable us to study a detailed rupture process of M6 7 class earthquake even if we use only tele-seismic body wave. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the improved data and method through analyses of the 2016 Rieti, Italy earthquake (Mw 6.2) and the 2016 Kumamoto, Japan earthquake (Mw 7.0) that have been well investigated by using the InSAR data set and the field observations. We assumed the rupture occurring on a single fault plane model inferred from the moment tensor solutions and the aftershock distribution. We constructed spatiotemporal discretized slip-rate functions with patches arranged as closely as possible. We performed inversions using several fault models and found that the spatiotemporal location of large slip-rate area was robust. In the 2016 Kumamoto, Japan earthquake, the slip-rate distribution shows that the rupture propagated to southwest during the first 5 s. At 5 s after the origin time, the main rupture started to propagate toward northeast. First episode and second episode correspond to rupture propagation along the Hinagu fault and the Futagawa fault, respectively. In the 2016 Rieti, Italy earthquake, the slip-rate distribution shows that the rupture propagated to up-dip direction during the first 2 s, and then rupture propagated toward northwest. From both analyses, we propose that the spatiotemporal slip-rate distribution estimated by improved inversion method of tele-seismic body wave has enough information to study a detailed rupture process of M6 7 class earthquake.

  10. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical...... optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars...

  11. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kucukcoban, Sezgin; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2014-01-01

    to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem

  12. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229  nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J M; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-15

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the fourth harmonic using two successive second-harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier (TA) as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes Cd111 and Cd113, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  13. Generating millimeter-wave Bessel beam with orbital angular momentum using reflective-type metasurface inherently integrated with source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yizhu; Yang, Jiawei; Meng, Hongfu; Dou, Wenbin; Hu, Sanming

    2018-04-01

    Metasurfaces, orbital angular momenta (OAM), and non-diffractive Bessel beams have been attracting worldwide research. Combining the benefits of these three promising techniques, this paper proposes a metasurface-based reflective-type approach to generate a first-order Bessel beam carrying OAM. To validate this approach, a millimeter-wave metasurface is analyzed, designed, fabricated, and measured. Experimental results agree well with simulation. Moreover, this reflective-type metasurface, generating a Bessel beam with OAM, is inherently integrated with a planar feeding source in the same single-layer printed circuit board. Therefore, the proposed design features low profile, low cost, easy integration with front-end active circuits, and no alignment error between the feeding source and the metasurface.

  14. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent ra...

  15. Wide-band continuous-wave terahertz source with a vertically integrated photomixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peytavit, E.; Lampin, J.-F.; Hindle, F.; Yang, C.; Mouret, G.

    2009-10-01

    A transverse electromagnetic horn antenna is monolithically integrated with a low temperature grown GaAs vertical photodetector on a silicon substrate forming a vertically integrated photomixer. Continuous-wave terahertz radiation is generated at frequencies up to 3.5 THz with a power level reaching 20 nW around 3 THz. Microwave and material concepts allow both qualitative and quantitative explanations of the experimental results. The thin film microstrip line topology has been adapted for active devices by an Au-Au thermocompression layer transfer technique and seems to be a promising generic tool for a new generation of efficient terahertz devices.

  16. Source-receiver two-way wave extrapolation for prestack exploding-reflector modelling and migration

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Fomel, Sergey; Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    or backward in time. This approach has the potential for generating accurate images free of artiefacts associated with conventional approaches. We derive novel high-order partial differential equations in the source-receiver time domain. The fourth

  17. Ion cyclotron waves: Direct compariosn between ground-based measurements and observations in the source region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraut, S.; Gendrin, R.; Roux, A.; de Villedary, C.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of ion cyclotron waves (ICW's) were performed on GEOS spacecraft and in the vicinity of their magnetic footprints with the French Mobile station. The detailed comparison between the two sets of data shown that while ICW's having F + gyrofrequency at the equator, generally propagate to the ground, only 50% of those generated above F/sub He/ can reach the ground station. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with the conclusions that Rauch and Roux [1982] drew on the basis of measurements reported by Young et al 1981]. In an He + -rich plasma, ICW's with F>F/sub He/ suffer a reflection where the frequency locally matches the local bi-ion hybrid frequency. We extend the calculations of Rauch and Roux and calculate, as a function of the He + concentration, the tunneling of ICW's through the stopband induced by the presence of minor He + ions. It is shown that the transmission coefficient strongly depends upon the wave frequency for a given He + abundance ratio. The results obtained are shown to be supported by existing observations

  18. Advances in High Power Calorimetric Matched Loads for Short Pulses and CW Gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin, W.M.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gandini, F.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Muzzini, V.; Nardone, A.; Sozzi, C.; Spinicchia, N.

    2006-01-01

    The development of high power gyrotrons for plasma physics research needs proper matched and calorimetric loads able to absorb and measure the power, which nowadays is foreseen to be as high as 2 MW during CW operations. To this end IFP/CNR has developed a family of matched loads useful in the mm-wave frequency band for applications ranging from a few ms to CW in pulse length. The different loads in the family, made of an integrating sphere with a partially reflecting coating on the inner wall, are characterized by having the same absorbing geometry for the incoming beam and a different heat removal system for the specific application. Some important advances have been recently achieved from the point of view of the uniformity of power distribution on the absorbing wall and of the load construction. With high precision achieved in the coating thickness a better control of the heating power distribution is possible by proper shaping of the local reflectivity, in addition to the shaping of the mirror dispersing the input beam. A more sophisticated model describing the power distribution has been developed, taking into account a variable thickness of the absorbing coating, the proper shape of the spreading mirror, the frequency of the incoming radiation and the shape of the input beam. Lower coating thickness is shown to be preferable, at equal local reflectivity, from the point of view of a lower peak temperature and thermal stress. The paper describes a load with variable coating thickness along the meridian of the sphere, showing a uniform power deposition on the inner walls. The cooling pipe is completely electroformed on the spherical copper shell, ensuring the maintenance of the correct curvature of the inner surface and a fast heat conduction from the absorbing coating to the water through the thin copper body. For CW use all heated parts of the load must be cooled and this is achieved by 16 electroformed spiral channels. Both short pulse loads (0.1-1 s) and

  19. Doppler limited rotational transitions of OH and SH radicals measured by continuous-wave terahertz photomixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliet, Sophie; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Guinet, Mickaël; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2011-12-01

    A continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) source generated by photomixing has been employed to detect and quantify radicals produced in a cold plasma probing their spin-rotation transitions. Due to their dual interest for both atmospherists and astrophysicists, the hydroxyl OH and the mercapto SH radicals have been chosen. The photomixing technique which can access the largest range of THz frequencies of any known coherent source, allowed to resolve the Doppler-limited hyperfine transitions of OH in the 2.5 THz frequency region. Line profile analysis of the hyperfine components demonstrated that OH radicals have been detected in this region at a ppm level at a temperature close to 490 K. The hyperfine structure of SH has been resolved for the first time above 1 THz. Ten new frequency transitions have been measured in the 1.3-2.6 THz frequency range using the CW-THz synthesizer based on a frequency comb. With relative uncertainties better than 10 -7, the CW-THz frequencies measured in this study are now competitive with those measured by other instruments such as frequency multiplication chains or FT-FIR spectrometers and are now capable to improve the predictions of the complete high-resolution spectra of these radicals collected in the atmospheric and astrophysical spectroscopic databases. versioncorrigeeAC 2011-07-18 17:32 2011 Arnaud Cuisset.

  20. Parameter-space metric of semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletsch, Holger J.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous gravitational-wave (CW) signals such as emitted by spinning neutron stars are an important target class for current detectors. However, the enormous computational demand prohibits fully coherent broadband all-sky searches for prior unknown CW sources over wide ranges of parameter space and for yearlong observation times. More efficient hierarchical ''semicoherent'' search strategies divide the data into segments much shorter than one year, which are analyzed coherently; then detection statistics from different segments are combined incoherently. To optimally perform the incoherent combination, understanding of the underlying parameter-space structure is requisite. This problem is addressed here by using new coordinates on the parameter space, which yield the first analytical parameter-space metric for the incoherent combination step. This semicoherent metric applies to broadband all-sky surveys (also embedding directed searches at fixed sky position) for isolated CW sources. Furthermore, the additional metric resolution attained through the combination of segments is studied. From the search parameters (sky position, frequency, and frequency derivatives), solely the metric resolution in the frequency derivatives is found to significantly increase with the number of segments.

  1. Processing Interband Cascade Laser for High Temperature CW Operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tober, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A narrow ridge-waveguide mid-IR interband cascade laser based on Type-II InAs/GaInSh heterostructures processed with a thick gold heat spreading layer operated CW at temperatures ranging from 80 K to 214.4 K...

  2. CW-FIT: Group Contingency Effects across the Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Howard P.; Iwaszuk, Wendy M.; Kamps, Debra; Shumate, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a group-contingency intervention on student behavior across academic instructional periods. Research suggests group contingencies are evidence-based practices, yet calls for investigation to determine the best conditions and groups suited for this type of intervention. CW-FIT (Class-Wide Function-related…

  3. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  4. Quantum mechanical features of optically pumped CW FIR lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligson, D.; Leite, J. R. R.; Sanchez, A.; Feld, M. S.; Ducloy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  5. Gain measurements in CO2 CW low pressure lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, N.A.S.; Chanes Junior, J.B.; Jayaram, K.

    1983-01-01

    A series of gain measurements in low pressure CO 2 CW laser were performed in order to study the behaviour of a CO 2 laser ampliflier as a function of pressure and discharge current. A theoretical model, based on rate equations is also presented to describe the laser behaviour and the experimental procedure adopted. (C.L.B.) [pt

  6. Observations of the First Electromagnetic Counterpart to a Gravitational-wave Source by the TOROS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, M. C.; Macri, L. M.; Garcia Lambas, D.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Nilo Castellón, J. L.; Ribeiro, T.; Sánchez, B.; Schoenell, W.; Abramo, L. R.; Akras, S.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Artola, R.; Beroiz, M.; Bonoli, S.; Cabral, J.; Camuccio, R.; Castillo, M.; Chavushyan, V.; Coelho, P.; Colazo, C.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Cuevas Larenas, H.; DePoy, D. L.; Domínguez Romero, M.; Dultzin, D.; Fernández, D.; García, J.; Girardini, C.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Gurovich, S.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Kanaan, A.; Lares, M.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; López-Cruz, O.; Marshall, J. L.; Melia, R.; Molino, A.; Padilla, N.; Peñuela, T.; Placco, V. M.; Quiñones, C.; Ramírez Rivera, A.; Renzi, V.; Riguccini, L.; Ríos-López, E.; Rodriguez, H.; Sampedro, L.; Schneiter, M.; Sodré, L.; Starck, M.; Torres-Flores, S.; Tornatore, M.; Zadrożny, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of prompt optical follow-up of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave event GW170817 by the Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration. We detected highly significant dimming in the light curves of the counterpart ({{Δ }}g=0.17+/- 0.03 mag, {{Δ }}r=0.14+/- 0.02 mag, {{Δ }}I=0.10+/- 0.03 mag) over the course of only 80 minutes of observations obtained ˜35 hr after the trigger with the T80-South telescope. A second epoch of observations, obtained ˜59 hr after the event with the EABA 1.5 m telescope, confirms the fast fading nature of the transient. The observed colors of the counterpart suggest that this event was a “blue kilonova” relatively free of lanthanides.

  7. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF CLOSE DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS AS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES: EVOLUTIONARY CHANNELS, BIRTH RATES, AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinzhong; Han Zhanwen; Zhang Fenghui; Zhang Yu

    2010-01-01

    Close double white dwarfs (CDWDs) are believed to dominate the Galactic gravitational wave (GW) radiation in the frequency range 10 -4 to 0.1 Hz, which will be detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) detector. The aim of this detector is to detect GW radiation from astrophysical sources in the universe and to help improve our understanding of the origin of the sources and their physical properties (masses and orbital periods). In this paper, we study the probable candidate sources in the Galaxy for the LISA detector: CDWDs. We use the binary population synthesis approach of CDWDs together with the latest findings of the synthesis models from Han, who proposed three evolutionary channels: (1) stable Roche lobe overflow plus common envelope (RLOF+CE), (2) CE+CE, and (3) exposed core plus CE. As a result, we systematically investigate the detailed physical properties (the distributions of masses, orbital periods, and chirp masses) of the CDWD sources for the LISA detector, examine the importance of the three evolutionary channels for the formation of CDWDs, and carry out Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that RLOF+CE and CE+CE are the main evolutionary scenarios leading to the formation of CDWDs. For the LISA detectable sources, we also explore and discuss the importance of these three evolutionary channels. Using the calculated birth rate, we compare our results to the LISA sensitivity curve and the foreground noise floor of CDWDs. We find that our estimate for the number of CDWD sources that can be detected by the LISA detector is greater than 10,000. We also find that the detectable CDWDs are produced via the CE+CE channel and we analyze the fraction of the detectable CDWDs that are double helium (He+He), or carbon-oxygen plus helium (CO+He) WD binary systems.

  8. Near-source attenuation of high-frequency body waves beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshk, Shahram; Sedaghati, Farhad; Nazemi, Nima

    2018-03-01

    Attenuation characteristics in the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) are estimated from 157 local seismograph recordings out of 46 earthquakes of 2.6 ≤ M ≤ 4.1 with hypocentral distances up to 60 km and focal depths down to 25 km. Digital waveform seismograms were obtained from local earthquakes in the NMSZ recorded by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis. Using the coda normalization method, we tried to determine Q values and geometrical spreading exponents at 13 center frequencies. The scatter of the data and trade-off between the geometrical spreading and the quality factor did not allow us to simultaneously derive both these parameters from inversion. Assuming 1/ R 1.0 as the geometrical spreading function in the NMSZ, the Q P and Q S estimates increase with increasing frequency from 354 and 426 at 4 Hz to 729 and 1091 at 24 Hz, respectively. Fitting a power law equation to the Q estimates, we found the attenuation models for the P waves and S waves in the frequency range of 4 to 24 Hz as Q P = (115.80 ± 1.36) f (0.495 ± 0.129) and Q S = (161.34 ± 1.73) f (0.613 ± 0.067), respectively. We did not consider Q estimates from the coda normalization method for frequencies less than 4 Hz in the regression analysis since the decay of coda amplitude was not observed at most bandpass filtered seismograms for these frequencies. Q S/ Q P > 1, for 4 ≤ f ≤ 24 Hz as well as strong intrinsic attenuation, suggest that the crust beneath the NMSZ is partially fluid-saturated. Further, high scattering attenuation indicates the presence of a high level of small-scale heterogeneities inside the crust in this region.

  9. Characterization of a klystrode as a RF source for high-average-power accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.; Keffeler, D.; Roybal, W.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The klystrode is a relatively new type of RF source that has demonstrated dc-to-RF conversion efficiencies in excess of 70% and a control characteristic uniquely different from those for klystron amplifiers. The different control characteristic allows the klystrode to achieve this high conversion efficiency while still providing a control margin for regulation of the accelerator cavity fields. The authors present test data from a 267-MHz, 250-kW, continuous-wave (CW) klystrode amplifier and contrast this data with conventional klystron performance, emphasizing the strengths and weaknesses of the klystrode technology for accelerator applications. They present test results describing that limitation for the 250-kW, CW klystrode and extrapolate the data to other frequencies. A summary of the operating regime explains the clear advantages of the klystrode technology over the klystron technology

  10. Wave power as a source of energy along the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, V.K.

    stream_size 16 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Power_Directory_1992_141.pdf.txt stream_source_info Power_Directory_1992_141.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  11. Low complexity source and channel coding for mm-wave hybrid fiber-wireless links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Pang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of channel and source coding applied for an experimentally realized hybrid fiber-wireless W-band link. Error control coding performance is presented for a wireless propagation distance of 3 m and 20 km fiber transmission. We report on peak signal-to-noise ratio perfor...

  12. A New Wave Equation Based Source Location Method with Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    with illumination artifacts. We develop a waveform inversion approach with an additional penalty term in the objective function to reward the focusing of the source image. This penalty term is relaxed early to allow for data fitting, and avoid cycle skipping, using

  13. Design and testing of a 750MHz CW-EPR digital console for small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Emoto, Miho C; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a digital console for three-dimensional (3D) continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging of a small animal to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and lower the cost of the EPR imaging system. A RF generation board, an RF acquisition board and a digital signal processing (DSP) & control board were built for the digital EPR detection. Direct sampling of the reflected RF signal from a resonator (approximately 750MHz), which contains the EPR signal, was carried out using a band-pass subsampling method. A direct automatic control system to reduce the reflection from the resonator was proposed and implemented in the digital EPR detection scheme. All DSP tasks were carried out in field programmable gate array ICs. In vivo 3D imaging of nitroxyl radicals in a mouse's head was successfully performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The optimized advanced demonstrator for the SC CW heavy ion linac at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Malte; Basten, Markus; Busch, Marco; Dziuba, Florian; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Tiede, Rudolf [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gettmann, Viktor; Heilmann, Manuel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Barth, Winfried; Mickat, Sascha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); HIM, Helmholtzinstitut, Mainz (Germany); Miski-Oglu, Maksym [HIM, Helmholtzinstitut, Mainz (Germany); Aulenbacher, Kurt [KPH, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For future experiments with heavy ions at the coulomb barrier within the SHE research project a multi-stage R and D program of GSI, HIM and IAP is currently under progress. It aims at developing a superconducting (sc) continuous wave (cw) LINAC with multiple CH-cavities as key components. As intermediate step towards the whole LINAC, the Optimized Advanced Demonstrator is proposed. Consisting of short CH-cavities and cryostats, it could provide several advantages regarding velocity acceptance, higher tolerance with respect to frequency and field deviation, easier mounting, handling and maintenance as well as a more robust longitudinal beam dynamic. The beam dynamics concept is based on EQUUS (Equidistant Multigap Structure) constant-beta cavities. The corresponding simulations for the proposed next extension stage - the Optimized Advanced Demonstrator - will be presented.

  15. Design and testing of a 750 MHz CW-EPR digital console for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Emoto, Miho C.; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a digital console for three-dimensional (3D) continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging of a small animal to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and lower the cost of the EPR imaging system. A RF generation board, an RF acquisition board and a digital signal processing (DSP) & control board were built for the digital EPR detection. Direct sampling of the reflected RF signal from a resonator (approximately 750 MHz), which contains the EPR signal, was carried out using a band-pass subsampling method. A direct automatic control system to reduce the reflection from the resonator was proposed and implemented in the digital EPR detection scheme. All DSP tasks were carried out in field programmable gate array ICs. In vivo 3D imaging of nitroxyl radicals in a mouse's head was successfully performed.

  16. Thermo-mechanical design of a CW sweep plate emittance scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathke, J.; Peacock, M.; Sredniawski, J.

    1996-01-01

    A sweep plate emittance scanner for use with high power, continuous wave (CW) beams has been designed, fabricated and commissioned at Northrop Grumman. The design is capable of scanning beams of up to 20 kW beam power with a spot diameter as small as 2 cm. The scanner pod is mounted on a ball screw driven linear bearing table that is driven through the beam by a stepper motor at velocities up to 30 cm/sec. This paper presents the thermo-mechanical analysis of the pod moving through a gaussian beam and the details of the mechanical design of the pod and motion system. Analyses to determine scanner cooling schemes and structural materials are presented. (author)

  17. Generation of continuous-wave 194 nm laser for mercury ion optical frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hongxin; Wu, Yue; Chen, Guozhu; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu; Precision measurement; atomic clock Team

    2015-05-01

    194 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser is an essential part in mercury ion optical frequency standard. The continuous-wave tunable radiation sources in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region of the spectrum is also serviceable in high-resolution spectroscopy with many atomic and molecular lines. We introduce a scheme to generate continuous-wave 194 nm radiation with SFM in a Beta Barium Borate (BBO) crystal here. The two source beams are at 718 nm and 266 nm, respectively. Due to the property of BBO, critical phase matching (CPM) is implemented. One bow-tie cavity is used to resonantly enhance the 718 nm beam while the 266 nm makes a single pass, which makes the configuration easy to implement. Considering the walk-off effect in CPM, the cavity mode is designed to be elliptical so that the conversion efficiency can be promoted. Since the 266 nm radiation is generated by a 532 nm laser through SHG in a BBO crystal with a large walk-off angle, the output mode is quite non-Gaussian. To improve mode matching, we shaped the 266 nm beam into Gaussian modes with a cylindrical lens and iris diaphragm. As a result, 2.05 mW 194 nm radiation can be generated. As we know, this is the highest power for 194 nm CW laser using SFM in BBO with just single resonance. The work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103 and No. 11204374).

  18. Design of the 3.7 GHz, 500 kW CW circulator for the LHCD system of the SST-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Harish V., E-mail: hvdixit48@yahoo.com [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Jadhav, Aviraj R. [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Jain, Yogesh M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Cheeran, Alice N. [Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400019 (India); Gupta, Vikas [Vidyavardhini' s College of Engineering and Technology, Vasai, Maharashtra 401202 (India); Sharma, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design of a 500 kW CW circulator for LHCD system at 3.7 GHz. • Mechanism for thermal management of ferrite tile. • Scheme for uniform magnetisation of the ferrite tiles. • Design of high CW power CW quadrature and 180 ° hybrid coupler. - Abstract: Circulators are used in high power microwave systems to protect the vacuum source against reflection. The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system of SST-1 tokamak commissioned at IPR, Gandhinagar in India comprises of four high power circulators to protect klystrons (supplying 500 kW CW each at 3.7 GHz) which power the system. This paper presents the design of a Differential Phase Shift Circulator (DPSC) capable of handling 500 kW CW power at 3.7 GHz so that four circulators can be used to protect the four available klystrons. As the DPSC is composed by three main components, viz., magic tee, ferrite phase shifter and 3 dB hybrid coupler, the designing of each of the proposed components is described. The design of these components is carried out factoring various multiphysics aspects of RF, heating due to high CW power and magnetic field requirement of the ferrite phase shifter. The primary objective of this paper is to present the complete RF, magnetic and thermal design of a high CW power circulator. All the simulations have been carried out in COMSOL Multiphysics. The designed circulator exhibits an insertion loss of 0.13 dB with a worst case VSWR of 1.08:1. The total length of the circulator is 3 m.

  19. A Comparison of Potential IM-CW Lidar Modulation Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Ismail, Syed

    2014-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements through the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) Decadal Survey recommended space mission are critical for improving our understanding of CO2 sources and sinks. IM-CW (Intensity Modulated Continuous Wave) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS science requirements. In previous laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used linear swept frequency modulation to discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate clouds, which is a requirement for the inversion of the CO2 column-mixing ratio from the instrument optical depth measurements, has been demonstrated with the linear swept frequency modulation technique. We are concurrently investigating advanced techniques to help improve the auto-correlation properties of the transmitted waveform implemented through physical hardware to make cloud rejection more robust in special restricted scenarios. Several different carrier based modulation techniques are compared including orthogonal linear swept, orthogonal non-linear swept, and Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK). Techniques are investigated that reduce or eliminate sidelobes. These techniques have excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth (by way of a new cyclic digital filter), which will reduce bias error in the presence of multiple scatterers. Our analyses show that the studied modulation techniques can increase the accuracy of CO2 column measurements from space. A comparison of various properties such as signal to noise ratio (SNR) and time-bandwidth product are discussed.

  20. Multimessenger search for sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos: Initial results for LIGO-Virgo and IceCube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a multimessenger search for coincident signals from the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories and the partially completed IceCube high-energy neutrino detector, including periods of joint operation between 2007–2010. These include parts of the 2005–2007 run...... and the 2009–2010 run for LIGO-Virgo, and IceCube’s observation periods with 22, 59 and 79 strings. We find no significant coincident events, and use the search results to derive upper limits on the rate of joint sources for a range of source emission parameters. For the optimistic assumption of gravitational-wave...... waves and neutrinos will aid discovery in the advanced gravitational-wave detector era....

  1. The Swift/UVOT catalogue of NGC 4321 star-forming sources: a case against density wave theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Cropper, Mark; Kawata, Daisuke; Page, Mat; Hoversten, Erik A.

    2012-08-01

    We study the star-forming regions in the spiral galaxy NGC 4321 (M100). We take advantage of the spatial resolution (2.5 arcsec full width at half-maximum) of the Swift/Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope camera and the availability of three ultraviolet (UV) passbands in the region 1600 spiral arms. The Hα luminosities of the sources have a strong decreasing radial trend, suggesting more massive star-forming regions in the central part of the galaxy. When segregated with respect to near-UV (NUV)-optical colour, blue sources have a significant excess of flux in the IR at 8 μm, revealing the contribution from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, although the overall reddening of these sources stays below E(B - V) = 0.2 mag. The distribution of distances to the spiral arms is compared for subsamples selected according to Hα luminosity, NUV-optical colour or ages derived from a population synthesis model. An offset would be expected between these subsamples as a function of radius if the pattern speed of the spiral arm were constant - as predicted by classic density wave theory. No significant offsets are found, favouring instead a mechanism where the pattern speed has a radial dependence.

  2. Energy and momentum deposition to plasmas due to the lower hybrid wave by a finite source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Abe, Hirotada; Itatani, Ryohei.

    1981-10-01

    Heating and current generation due to the lower hybrid wave are studied using the particle simulation. In contrast with previous work, where only the single mode is treated, main interests of this work are focused on the physical problems on a propagation cone consisting of many Fourier-expanded modes. It is found that the trajectory of the propagation cone is well described up to the lower hybrid resonance layer using both cold plasma approximation and the WKB method. An ion cross-field drift due to the ponderomotive force is observed. It is a main discovery that the modes in the higher side of the spectrum of the antenna play a key role for creation of the ion high energy tail. This process cannot be explained by the linear theory and is called the cascade process judging from the time variation of the damping of each mode. The particle model is significantly improved using the elongated grid and the quadric spatial interpolation. Many applications of this model to the simulations on other problems are expected to be very fruitful in the research of the plasma physics and nuclear fusion. (author)

  3. Wave fronts of electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous high-density magnetized plasma, the spatial properties of the wave fronts and ray trajectories of electromagnetic ordinary and extraordinary cyclotron harmonic waves are investigated. Those waves which are radiated from a local source are found to have wave fronts which are almost parallel to the magnetic field. Also, the reflective properties of the electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves are confirmed

  4. A tapered multi-gap multi-aperture pseudospark-sourced electron gun based X-band slow wave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Lamba, R. P.; Hossain, A. M.; Pal, U. N.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Prakash, R.

    2017-11-01

    The experimental study of a tapered, multi-gap, multi-aperture pseudospark-sourced electron gun based X-band plasma assisted slow wave oscillator is presented. The designed electron gun is based on the pseudospark discharge concept and has been used to generate a high current density and high energy electron beam simultaneously. The distribution of apertures has been arranged such that the field penetration potency inside the backspace of the hollow-cathode is different while passing through the tapered gap region. This leads to non-concurrent ignition of the discharge through all the channels which is, in general, quite challenging in the case of multi-aperture plasma cathode electron gun geometries. Multiple and successive hollow cathode phases are reported from this electron gun geometry, which have been confirmed using simulations. This geometry also has led to the achievement of ˜71% fill factor inside the slow wave oscillator for an electron beam of energy of 20 keV and a beam current density in the range of 115-190 A/cm2 at a working argon gas pressure of 18 Pa. The oscillator has generated broadband microwave output in the frequency range of 10-11.7 GHz with a peak power of ˜10 kW for ˜50 ns.

  5. Relations between turbulent regions of interplanetary magnetic field and Jovian decametric radio wave emissions from the main source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, H.; Morioka, A.

    1981-01-01

    Jovian decametric radio wave emissions that were observed at Goddard Space Flight Center, U.S.A. for a period from 1 October to 31 December, 1974 and data obtained at Mt. Zao observatory, Tohoku University, Japan, for a period from 14 July to 6 December, 1975 have been used to investigate the relationship of the occurrence of the Jovian decametric radio waves (JDW), from the main source, to the geomagnetic disturbance index, ΣKAPPA sub(rho). The dynamic cross-correlation between JDW and ΣKAPPAsubrho indicates an enhanced correlation for certain values of delay time. The delay time is consistent with predicted values based on a model of rotating turbulent regions in interplanetary space associated with two sector boundaries of the interplanetary magnetic field, i.e. the rotating sector boundaries of the interplanetary magnetic field first encounter the Earth's magnetosphere producing the geomagnetic field disturbances, and after a certain period, they encounter the Jovian magnetosphere. There are also cases where the order of the encounter is opposite, i.e. the sector boundaries encounter first Jovian magnetosphere and encounter the Earth's magnetosphere after a certain period. (author)

  6. Upgraded millimeter-wave interferometer for measuring the electron density during the beam extraction in the negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuzawa, T., E-mail: tokuzawa@nifs.ac.jp; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Ito, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kaneko, O. [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 4-3-13 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    The upgraded millimeter-wave interferometer with the frequency of 70 GHz is installed on a large-scaled negative ion source. Measurable line-averaged electron density is from 2 × 10{sup 15} to 3 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} in front of the plasma grid. Several improvements such as the change to shorter wavelength probing with low noise, the installation of special ordered horn antenna, the signal modulation for a high accuracy digital phase detection, the insertion of insulator, and so on, are carried out for the measurement during the beam extraction by applying high voltage. The line-averaged electron density is successfully measured and it is found that it increases linearly with the arc power and drops suddenly at the beam extraction.

  7. Compact Tunable Narrowband Terahertz-Wave Source Based on Difference Frequency Generation Pumped by Dual Fiber Lasers in MgO:LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshio; Satoh, Takumi; Higashi, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yoshiharu

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate a high-average-power, single longitudinal-mode, and tunable terahertz (THz)-wave source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) in a MgO:LiNbO3 (MgO:LN) crystal. The waves for DFG are generated using a pair of Yb-doped pulsed fiber lasers with a master oscillator power fiber amplifier configuration. The average power of the THz-wave output reaches 450 μW at 1.07 THz (280 μm) at a linewidth of 7.2 GHz, and the tunability ranges from 0.35 to 1.07 THz under the pulse repetition frequency of 500 kHz. A short burn-in test of the THz wave is also carried out, and the output power stability is within ± 5% of the averaged power without any active stabilizing technique. The combination of MgO:LN-DFG and stable and robust fiber laser sources is highly promising for the development of high-average-power THz-wave sources, particularly in the high transmission sub-THz region. This approach may enable new applications of THz-wave spectroscopy in imaging and remote sensing.

  8. CW laser properties of Nd:GdYAG, Nd:LuYAG, and Nd:GdLuAG mixed crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, J. Q.; Xu, X. D.; Li, D. Z.; Zhou, D. H.; Wu, F.; Zhao, Z. W.; Xu, J.; Tang, D. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Three mixed crystals, Nd:GdYAG, Nd:LuYAG, and Nd:GdLuAG, were grown by Czochralski method. We report the continuous-wave (CW) Nd:GdYAG, Nd:LuYAG, and Nd:GdLuAG laser operation under laser diode pumping. The maximum output powers are 4.11, 5.31, and 7.47 W, with slope efficiency of 73.0, 55.3, and 57.1%, respectively. With replacing Lu3+ or Y3+ ions with large Gd3+ ions, the pump efficiency increases.

  9. Properties of a novel radiophotoluminescent readout system using a cw modulated UV laser diode and phase-sensitive technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C.; Kurobori, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed and constructed a novel readout system for measuring a dose-dependent radiophotoluminescence (RPL) signal of a silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeter. The present reader consists of a modulated continuous-wave (cw) ultraviolet (UV) laser diode at 375 nm as an excitation and a phase-sensitive technique using a lock-in amplifier. Preliminary results using a home-made reader are compared with those of the conventional technique based on a combination of a pulsed UV N 2 laser excitation at 337 nm and a photon counting system.

  10. CW and pulsed operation of a diode-end-pumped Tm:GdVO4 laser at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z G; Song, C W; Li, Y F; Ju, Y L; Wang, Y Z

    2009-01-01

    A room-temperature diode-end-pumped acousto-optical (AO) Q-switched Tm:GdVO 4 laser was firstly reported. The minimum AO Q-switch pulse width was measured to be about 48 ns with output power of 2 W and repetition rate of 5 kHz. Continuous-wave output power of 2.8 W at 1912 nm was obtained under the absorbed pump power of 15 W. In addition, laser pulse widths and the ratio of QCW power/CW power at different repetition rates were discussed

  11. Pulsed and cw laser oscillations in LiF:F-2 color center crystal under laser diode pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Vassiliev, Sergey V; Konjushkin, Vasily A; Gapontsev, Valentin P

    2006-07-15

    Continuous-wave laser oscillations in LiF:F-2 crystal optically pumped by a laser diode at 970 nm were demonstrated for what is believed to be the first time. The slope efficiency of 14% and conversion efficiency of 5.5% were achieved for 80 micros pump pulse duration and 5 Hz pulse repetition rate. An efficiency twice as low was measured at a 6.25 kHz pulse repetition rate (50% off-duty factor) and in cw mode of laser operation.

  12. All-solid-state quasi-CW yellow laser with intracavity self-Raman conversion and sum frequency generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kananovich, A; Grabtchikov, A; Orlovich, V; Demidovich, A; Danailov, M

    2010-01-01

    Quasi continuous-wave (qCW) yellow emission (pulse duration 5 ms, repetition rate 20 Hz) at 559 nm is demonstrated through intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) of Stokes and fundamental fields in Nd:YVO 4 diode pumped self-Raman laser for the first time. Average in pulse output power at 559 nm was 0.47 W for 22 W of pump power, which corresponds to 2.1% of diode-to-yellow efficiency. The pulsed mode of operation was due to diode pump modulation and was used to reduce thermal stress of the crystal

  13. Study of Physical Properties of SiCw/Al Composites During Unloaded Thermal Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xin-ming; TIAN zhi-gang; CHENG hua; ZHU Xiao-gang; CHEN Wen-li

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites squeeze cast during unloaded thermal cycling was determined and analyzed. The study had shown that the thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites reduced greatly with temperature raising. The thermal expansion coefficient of artificial ageing treatment SiCw/Al composites during unloaded thermal cycling reduced gradually, while the thermal expansion coefficient of squeezing SiCw/Al composites increased gradually. In addition, the thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites reduced drastically with fiber fraction increasing.

  14. The effect of venous pulsation on the forehead pulse oximeter wave form as a possible source of error in Spo2 calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Kirk H; Tamai, Doris; Jablonka, Denis; Gesquiere, Michael; Stout, Robert G; Silverman, David G

    2005-03-01

    Reflective forehead pulse oximeter sensors have recently been introduced into clinical practice. They reportedly have the advantage of faster response times and immunity to the effects of vasoconstriction. Of concern are reports of signal instability and erroneously low Spo(2) values with some of these new sensors. During a study of the plethysmographic wave forms from various sites (finger, ear, and forehead) it was noted that in some cases the forehead wave form became unexpectedly complex in configuration. The plethysmographic signals from 25 general anesthetic cases were obtained, which revealed the complex forehead wave form during 5 cases. We hypothesized that the complex wave form was attributable to an underlying venous signal. It was determined that the use of a pressure dressing over the sensor resulted in a return of a normal plethysmographic wave form. Further examination of the complex forehead wave form reveal a morphology consistent with a central venous trace with atrial, cuspidal, and venous waves. It is speculated that the presence of the venous signal is the source of the problems reported with the forehead sensors. It is believed that the venous wave form is a result of the method of attachment rather than the use of reflective plethysmographic sensors.

  15. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd 3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho 3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb 3+ to Yb 3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar + laser, Kr + laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc

  16. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  17. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Caplan, M.; Jory, H.

    1983-09-01

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues

  18. On-demand semiconductor source of 780-nm single photons with controlled temporal wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, Lucas; Jahn, Jan-Philipp; Wolters, Janik; Reindl, Marcus; Huo, Yongheng; Trotta, Rinaldo; Rastelli, Armando; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Treutlein, Philipp; Warburton, Richard J.

    2018-05-01

    We report on a fast, bandwidth-tunable single-photon source based on an epitaxial GaAs quantum dot. Exploiting spontaneous spin-flip Raman transitions, single photons at 780 nm are generated on demand with tailored temporal profiles of durations exceeding the intrinsic quantum dot lifetime by up to three orders of magnitude. Second-order correlation measurements show a low multiphoton emission probability [g2(0 ) ˜0.10 -0.15 ] at a generation rate up to 10 MHz. We observe Raman photons with linewidths as low as 200 MHz, which is narrow compared to the 1.1-GHz linewidth measured in resonance fluorescence. The generation of such narrow-band single photons with controlled temporal shapes at the rubidium wavelength is a crucial step towards the development of an optimized hybrid semiconductor-atom interface.

  19. Locating S-wave sources for the SPE-5 explosion using time reversal methods and a close-in, 1000 sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S. C.; Pitarka, A.; Mellors, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is producing new data to study the generation of seismic waves from explosive sources. Preliminary results show that far-field S-waves are generated both within the non-elastic volume surrounding explosive sources and by P- to S-wave scattering. The relative contribution of non-elastic phenomenology and elastic-wave scattering to far-field S-waves has been debated for decades, and numerical simulations based on the SPE experiments are addressing this question. The match between observed and simulated data degrades with event-station distance and with increasing time in each seismogram. This suggests that a more accurate model of subsurface elastic properties could result in better agreement between observed and simulated seismograms. A detailed model of subsurface structure has been developed using geologic maps and the extensive database of borehole logs, but uncertainty in structural details remains high. The large N instrument deployment during the SPE-5 experiment offers an opportunity to use time-reversal techniques to back project the wave field into the subsurface to locate significant sources of scattered energy. The large N deployment was nominally 1000, 5 Hz sensors (500 Z and 500 3C geophones) deployed in a roughly rectangular array to the south and east of the SPE-5 shot. Sensor spacing was nominally 50 meters in the interior portion of the array and 100 meters in the outer region, with two dense lines at 25 m spacing. The array covers the major geologic boundary between the Yucca Flat basin and the granitic Climax Stock in which the SPE experiments have been conducted. Improved mapping of subsurface scatterers is expected to result in better agreement between simulated and observed seismograms and aid in our understanding of S-wave generation from explosions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. National CW GeV Electron Microtron laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a CW GeV electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high-resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. To meet this need, Argonne National Laboratory proposes to build a CW GeV Electron Microtron (GEM) laboratory as a national user facility. The microtron accelerator has been chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating costs and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a six-sided CW microtron (hexatron) is presented. The hexatron and three experimental areas will be housed in a well-shielded complex of existing buildings that provide all utilities and services required for an advanced accelerator and an active research program at a savings of $30 to 40 million. Beam lines have been designed to accommodate the transport of polarized beams to each area. The total capital cost of the facility will be $78.6 million and the annual budget for accelerator operations will be $12.1 million. Design and construction of the facility will require four and one half years. Staged construction with a 2 GeV phase costing $65.9 million is also discussed

  1. GeV C.W. electron microtron design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a GeV C.W. electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high-resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. In this report major current problems are reviewed and the details of prospective measurements which could be made with a GeV C.W. electron facility are discussed, together with their impact on an understanding of nuclear forces and the structure of nuclear matter. The microtron accelerator has been chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a 2 GeV double-sided C.W. electron microtron is presented. The accelerator can furnish three beams with independently controlled energy and intensity. The maximum current per beam is 100 μamps. Although the precise objective for maximum beam energy is still a subject of debate, the design developed in this study provides the base technology for microtron accelerators at higher energies (2 to 6 GeV) using multi-sided geometries

  2. A Variable Energy CW Compact Accelerator for Ion Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Carol J. [Fermilab; Taylor, J. [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, R. [Huddersfield U.; Schulte, R. [Loma Linda U.

    2016-03-10

    Cancer is the second-largest cause of death in the U.S. and approximately two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy with the majority of the radiation treatments performed using x-rays produced by electron linacs. Charged particle beam radiation therapy, both protons and light ions, however, offers advantageous physical-dose distributions over conventional photon radiotherapy, and, for particles heavier than protons, a significant biological advantage. Despite recognition of potential advantages, there is almost no research activity in this field in the U.S. due to the lack of clinical accelerator facilities offering light ion therapy in the States. In January, 2013, a joint DOE/NCI workshop was convened to address the challenges of light ion therapy [1], inviting more than 60 experts from diverse fields related to radiation therapy. This paper reports on the conclusions of the workshop, then translates the clinical requirements into accelerat or and beam-delivery technical specifications. A comparison of available or feasible accelerator technologies is compared, including a new concept for a compact, CW, and variable energy light ion accelerator currently under development. This new light ion accelerator is based on advances in nonscaling Fixed-Field Alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator design. The new design concepts combine isochronous orbits with long (up to 4m) straight sections in a compact racetrack format allowing inner circulating orbits to be energy selected for low-loss, CW extraction, effectively eliminating the high-loss energy degrader in conventional CW cyclotron designs.

  3. CW lasing of Ho in KLu(WO4)2 in-band pumped by a diode-pumped Tm:KLu(WO4)2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Xavier; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Carvajal, Joan Josep; Díaz, Francesc; Aguiló, Magdalena; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin

    2010-09-27

    We demonstrate continuous wave (CW) room temperature laser operation of the monoclinic Ho(3+)-doped KLu(WO(4))(2) crystal using a diode-pumped Tm(3+):KLu(WO(4))(2) laser for in-band pumping. The slope efficiency achieved amounts to ~55% with respect to the absorbed power and the maximum output power of 648 mW is generated at 2078 nm.

  4. Theory of CW lidar aerosol backscatter measurements and development of a 2.1 microns solid-state pulsed laser radar for aerosol backscatter profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The performance and calibration of a focused, continuous wave, coherent detection CO2 lidar operated for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter coefficient, B(m), was examined. This instrument functions by transmitting infrared (10 micron) light into the atmosphere and collecting the light which is scattered in the rearward direction. Two distinct modes of operation were considered. In volume mode, the scattered light energy from many aerosols is detected simultaneously, whereas in the single particle mode (SPM), the scattered light energy from a single aerosol is detected. The analysis considered possible sources of error for each of these two cases, and also considered the conditions where each technique would have superior performance. The analysis showed that, within reasonable assumptions, the value of B(m) could be accurately measured by either the VM or the SPM method. The understanding of the theory developed during the analysis was also applied to a pulsed CO2 lidar. Preliminary results of field testing of a solid state 2 micron lidar using a CW oscillator is included.

  5. Sources and Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, John K.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2009-05-01

    We study the spatial distribution of oscillatory power in two sequences of high-cadence, high-resolution images taken by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. The sequences consist of simultaneous, co-registered G-Band (GB) and Ca II H-Line (HL) images with pixel scale 80 km and fields of view 40 x 40 Mm and 80 x 40 Mm. The first sequence has cadence 21 s over 3 hours on 2007 April 14; the other has cadence 24 s over 2 hours on 2007 March 30. Both sequences include network and internetwork at heliocentric angle 35 degrees. Time averaging of Morlet wavelet transforms gives smoothed Fourier spectra for each spatial location in the GB and HL data. We averaged over four different frequency bands to highlight different physical regimes: "evolutionary” timescales (f web of a cellular pattern with scales 2 - 3 Mm. These are found to coincide with the boundaries of stable clusters of granules. These dark boundaries may correspond to downflows that control the cell structuring and that could be the source of acoustic power.

  6. Integration of wave energy and other marine renewable energy sources with the needs of coastal societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Manasseh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine renewable energy has the potential to solve both the energy-security and coastal-protection problems affecting coastal societies. In this article, the potential benefits arising from the combination of marine renewable energy technologies with infrastructural needs for coastal protection and other local needs are analysed. Classifications of technologies are developed to inform future coastal planning. Explanations of the resources and technologies are presented in layperson’s term. The threat of coastal inundation under climate-change scenarios is a major global issue. The investment in new infrastructure demanded by cities, ports and communities at risk of inundation could very substantially reduce the levelised cost of electricity from renewable sources, provided the infrastructure is designed with the dual purpose of power generation and coastal protection. Correspondingly, the sale of electricity from such infrastructure could defray the long-term cost of installing coastal protection. Furthermore, many marine renewable energy technologies provide a platform on which other forms of renewable energy generation could be mounted. It is noted that the complex geophysical and engineering issues arising from this opportunity must be assessed considering socio-economic factors.

  7. Calculation of wave resistance by using Kochin function in the Rankine source method; Rankinsosuho ni okeru kochin kansu wo mochiita zoha teiko keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasukawa, H [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In order to avoid negative wave resistance (which is physically incomprehensible) generated in calculating wave resistance by using the Rankine source method, a proposal was made on a wave resistance calculation method using the Kochin function which describes behavior of speed potential in regions far apart from a hull. The Baba`s condition was used as a free surface condition for the speed potential which expresses wave motions around a hull. This has allowed a new Kochin function which uses as unknown the speed potential on the hull surface and the free surface near the hull to be defined and combined with the Rankine source method. A comparison was made between the calculated values for wave resistance, hull subsidence and trim change of an ore transporting vessel (SR107 type of ship) in a fully loaded condition and the result of water tank tests. The wave resistance values derived from pressure integration have all become negative when the Froude number is from 0.1 to 0.2, while no negative resistance has appeared in the calculations by using the Kochin function, but the result has agreed with that of the water tank tests. Accuracy of the calculations at low speeds was improved. The trim change in the calculations was slightly smaller than that in the water tank tests. The subsidence showed a good agreement. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Hyper-Rayleigh scattering and hyper-Raman scattering of dye-adsorbed silver nanoparticles induced by a focused continuous-wave near-infrared laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ihama, Takashi; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    We report that hyper-Rayleigh scattering, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, and two-photon excited luminescence occur intermittently by focusing a continuous-wave near-infrared (cw-NIR) laser into a colloidal silver solution including rhodamine 6G (R6G) and sodium chloride (NaCl). On the other hand, continuous hyper-Rayleigh scattering is observed from colloidal silver free from R6G and NaCl, demonstrating that hyper-Raman scattering and two-photon excited luminescence are attributed to R6G and their intermittent features are dependent on the colloidal dispersion. These results suggest that the cw-NIR laser has three roles; the source of the nonlinear response, optical trapping of nanoparticles, and making nanoparticle aggregates possessing the high activity for the nonlinear response

  9. Distance and Properties of NGC 4993 as the Host Galaxy of the Gravitational-wave Source GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Myungshin; Yoon, Yongmin; Lee, Seong-Kook J.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Joonho; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Troja, Eleonora; Choi, Changsu; Lim, Gu; Ko, Jongwan; Shim, Hyunjin

    2017-11-01

    Recently, the optical counterpart of the gravitational-wave source GW170817 has been identified in the NGC 4993 galaxy. Together with evidence from observations in electromagnetic waves, the event has been suggested as a result of a merger of two neutron stars (NSs). We analyze the multi-wavelength data to characterize the host galaxy property and its distance to examine if the properties of NGC 4993 are consistent with this picture. Our analysis shows that NGC 4993 is a bulge-dominated galaxy with {r}{eff}˜ 2{--}3 {kpc} and a Sérsic index of n=3{--}4 for the bulge component. The spectral energy distribution from 0.15 to 24 μm indicates that this galaxy has no significant ongoing star formation, a mean stellar mass of (0.3{--}1.2)× {10}11 {M}⊙ , a mean stellar age greater than ˜3 Gyr, and a metallicity of about 20%-100% of solar abundance. Optical images reveal dust lanes and extended features that suggest a past merging activity. Overall, NGC 4993 has characteristics of normal, but slightly disturbed elliptical galaxies. Furthermore, we derive the distance to NGC 4993 with the fundamental plane relation using 17 parameter sets of 7 different filters and the central stellar velocity dispersion from the literature, finding an angular diameter distance of 37.7 ± 8.7 Mpc. NGC 4993 is similar to some host galaxies of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) but much different from those of long GRBs, supporting the picture of GW170817 as a result of the merger of two NSs.

  10. Up to 30 mW of broadly tunable CW green-to-orange light, based on sum-frequency mixing of Cr4+:forsterite and Nd:YVO4 lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper Liltorp; McWilliam, Allan; G. Leburn, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Efficient generation of continuous-wave (CW) tunable light in the yellow region is reported. The method is based on sum-frequency mixing of a tunable Cr4+:forsterite laser with a Nd:YVO4 laser. A periodically poled lithium niobate crystal was placed intra-cavity in a Nd:YVO4 laser, and the Cr4...

  11. Parametrics for Molecular Deuterium Concentrations in the Source Region of the UW-IEC Device Using an Ion Acoustic Wave Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, D. R.; Emmert, G. A.

    2007-11-01

    The ion source region of the UW-Inertial Electrostatic Confinement device is comprised of a filament assisted DC discharge plasma that exists between the wall of the IEC vacuum chamber and the grounded spherical steel grid that makes up the anode of the IEC device. A 0-dimensional rate equation calculation of the molecular deuterium ion species concentration has been applied utilizing varying primary electron energy, and neutral gas pressure. By propagating ion acoustic waves in the source region of the IEC device the concentrations of molecular deuterium ion species have been determined for these varying plasma conditions, and high D3^+ concentrations have been verified. This was done by utilizing the multi-species ion acoustic wave dispersion relation, which relates the phase speed of the multi-species ion acoustic wave, vph, to the sum in quadrature of the concentration weighted ion acoustic sound speeds of the individual ion species.

  12. Exact modelling of the optical bistability in ferroelectics via two-wave mixing: A system with full nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushaini, Muhammad Asif A.; Ibrahim, Abdel-Baset M. A.; Choudhury, P. K.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a complete mathematical model of the phenomenon of optical bistability (OB) resulting from the degenerate two-wave mixing (TWM) process of laser beams interacting with a single nonlinear layer of ferroelectric material. Starting with the electromagnetic wave equation for optical wave propagating in nonlinear media, a nonlinear coupled wave (CW) system with both self-phase modulation (SPM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) sources of nonlinearity are derived. The complete CW system with full nonlinearity is solved numerically and a comparison between both the cases of with and without SPM at various combinations of design parameters is given. Furthermore, to provide a reliable theoretical model for the OB via TWM process, the results obtained theoretically are compared with the available experimental data. We found that the nonlinear system without SPM fails to predict the bistable response at lower combinations of the input parameters. However, at relatively higher values, the solution without SPM shows a reduction in the switching contrast and period in the OB response. A comparison with the experimental results shows better agreement with the system with full nonlinearity.

  13. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  14. Safety of panitumumab-IRDye800CW and cetuximab-IRDye800CW for fluorescence-guided surgical navigation in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rebecca W; Teraphongphom, Nutte; de Boer, Esther; van den Berg, Nynke S; Divi, Vasu; Kaplan, Michael J; Oberhelman, Nicholas J; Hong, Steven S; Capes, Elissa; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Warram, Jason M; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the safety and feasibility of leveraging therapeutic antibodies for surgical imaging. Procedures: We conducted two phase I trials for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies cetuximab-IRDye800CW (n=12) and panitumumab-IRDye800CW (n=15). Adults with biopsy-confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma scheduled for standard-of-care surgery were eligible. For cetuximab-IRDye800CW, cohort 1 was intravenously infused with 2.5 mg/m 2 , cohort 2 received 25 mg/m 2 , and cohort 3 received 62.5 mg/m 2 . For panitumumab-IRDye800CW, cohorts received 0.06 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg, and 1 mg/kg, respectively. Electrocardiograms and blood samples were obtained, and patients were followed for 30 days post-study drug infusion. Results: Both fluorescently labeled antibodies had similar pharmacodynamic properties and minimal toxicities. Two infusion reactions occurred with cetuximab and none with panitumumab. There were no grade 2 or higher toxicities attributable to cetuximab-IRDye800CW or panitumumab-IRDye800CW; fifteen grade 1 adverse events occurred with cetuximab-IRDye800CW, and one grade 1 occurred with panitumumab-IRDye800CW. There were no significant differences in QTc prolongation between the two trials (p=0.8). Conclusions: Panitumumab-IRDye800CW and cetuximab-IRDye800CW have toxicity and pharmacodynamic profiles that match the parent compound, suggesting that other therapeutic antibodies may be repurposed as imaging agents with limited preclinical toxicology data.

  15. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  16. Van Allen Probe Observations of Chorus Wave Activity, Source and Seed electrons, and the Radiation Belt Response During ICME and CIR Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, S.; Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Farrugia, C. J.; Paulson, K. W.; Huang, C. L.; Boyd, A. J.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C.

    2017-12-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves are electromagnetic waves that have been shown to be a major contributor to enhancements in the outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. The temperature anisotropy of source electrons (10s of keV) provides the free energy for chorus waves, which can accelerate sub-relativistic seed electrons (100s of keV) to relativistic energies. This study uses Van Allen Probe observations to examine the excitation and plasma conditions associated with chorus wave observations, the development of the seed population, and the outer radiation belt response in the inner magnetosphere, for 25 ICME and 35 CIR storms. Plasma data from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument and magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) are used to identify chorus wave activity and to model a linear theory based proxy for chorus wave growth. A superposed epoch analysis shows a peak of chorus wave power on the dawnside during the storm main phase that spreads towards noon during the storm recovery phase. According to the linear theory results, this wave activity is driven by the enhanced convection driving plasma sheet electrons across the dayside. Both ICME and CIR storms show comparable levels of wave growth. Plasma data from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) are used to observe the seed and relativistic electrons. A superposed epoch analysis of seed and relativistic electrons vs. L shows radiation belt enhancements with much greater frequency in the ICME storms, coinciding with a much stronger and earlier seed electron enhancement in the ICME storms.

  17. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-I. Partanen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol–climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global sea salt emission of 805 Tg yr−1 (uncertainty range 378–1233 Tg yr−1 was much lower than typically found in previous studies. Modelled sea salt and sodium ion concentrations agreed relatively well with measurements in the smaller size ranges at Mace Head (annual normalized mean model bias −13% for particles with vacuum aerodynamic diameter Dva Da Da Da −2, in contrast to previous studies. This positive effect was ascribed to the tendency of sea salt aerosol to suppress both the in-cloud supersaturation and the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from sulfate. These effects can be accounted for only in models with sufficiently detailed aerosol microphysics and physics-based parameterizations of cloud activation. However, due to a strong negative direct effect, the simulated effective radiative forcing (total radiative effect was −0.2 W m−2. The simulated radiative effects of the primary marine organic emissions were small, with a direct effect of 0.03 W m−2 and an indirect effect of −0.07 W m−2.

  18. Diamond Based DDR IMPATTs: Prospects and Potentiality as Millimeter-Wave Source at 94 GHz Atmospheric Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Acharyya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Large-signal simulation is carried out in this paper to investigate the prospects and potentiality of Double-Drift Region (DDR Impact Avalanche Transit Time (IMPATT device based on semiconducting type-IIb diamond as millimeter-wave source operating at 94 GHz atmospheric window frequency. Large-signal simulation method developed by the authors and presented in this paper is based on non-sinusoidal voltage excitation. The simulation is carried out to obtain the large-signal characteristics such as RF power output, DC to RF conversion efficiency etc. of DDR diamond IMPATT device designed to operate at 94 GHz. The results show that the device is capable of delivering a peak RF power output of 7.01 W with 10.18% DC to RF conversion efficiency for a bias current density of 6.0×10^8 A m^-2 and voltage modulation of 60% at 94 GHz; whereas for the same voltage modulation 94 GHz DDR Si IMPATT can deliver only 693.82 mW RF power with 8.74 efficiency for the bias current density of 3.4×10^8 A m^-2.

  19. COALESCENCE OF STRANGE-QUARK PLANETS WITH STRANGE STARS: A NEW KIND OF SOURCE FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Lu, T., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Strange-quark matter (SQM) may be the true ground state of hadronic matter, indicating that the observed pulsars may actually be strange stars (SSs), but not neutron stars. According to the SQM hypothesis, the existence of a hydrostatically stable sequence of SQM stars has been predicted, ranging from 1 to 2 solar mass SSs, to smaller strange dwarfs and even strange planets. While gravitational wave (GW) astronomy is expected to open a new window to the universe, it will shed light on the search for SQM stars. Here we show that due to their extreme compactness, strange planets can spiral very close to their host SSs without being tidally disrupted. Like inspiraling neutron stars or black holes, these systems would serve as new sources of GW bursts, producing strong GWs at the final stage. The events occurring in our local universe can be detected by upcoming GW detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope. This effect provides a unique probe to SQM objects and is hopefully a powerful tool for testing the SQM hypothesis.

  20. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  1. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  2. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars at a sampling rate of 2 Hz. Based on our experimental results, we describe a practical guideline for designing a wind lidar operating beyond the coherence regime.

  3. He-Ne and CW CO2 laser long-path systems for gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a laboratory prototype dual He-Ne laser system for the detection of methane leaks from underground pipelines and solid-waste landfill sites using differential absorption of radiation backscattered from topographic targets. A laboratory-prototype dual CW carbon dioxide laser system also using topographic backscatter is discussed, and measurement results for methanol are given. With both systems, it was observed that the time-varying differential absorption signal was useful in indicating the presence of a gas coming from a nearby source. Limitations to measurement sensitivity, especially the role of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are described. The speckle results for hard targets are contrasted with those from atmospheric aerosols. The appendix gives appropriate laser lines and values of absorption coefficients for the hydrazine fuel gases.

  4. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  5. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  6. Ion sources for cyclotron applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Bachman, D.A.; McDonald, D.S.; Young, A.T.

    1992-07-01

    The use of a multicusp plasma generator as an ion source has many advantages. The development of both positive and negative ion beams based on the multicusp source geometry is presented. It is shown that these sources can be operated at steady state or cw mode. As a result they are very suitable for cyclotron operations

  7. Explosion Generated Seismic Waves and P/S Methods of Discrimination from Earthquakes with Insights from the Nevada Source Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pitarka, A.; Pyle, M. L.; Pasyanos, M.; Mellors, R. J.; Dodge, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The relative amplitudes of seismic P-waves to S-waves are effective at identifying underground explosions among a background of natural earthquakes. These P/S methods appear to work best at frequencies above 2 Hz and at regional distances ( >200 km). We illustrate this with a variety of historic nuclear explosion data as well as with the recent DPRK nuclear tests. However, the physical basis for the generation of explosion S-waves, and therefore the predictability of this P/S technique as a function of path, frequency and event properties such as size, depth, and geology, remains incompletely understood. A goal of current research, such as the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to improve our physical understanding of the mechanisms of explosion S-wave generation and advance our ability to numerically model and predict them. The SPE conducted six chemical explosions between 2011 and 2016 in the same borehole in granite in southern Nevada. The explosions were at a variety of depths and sizes, ranging from 0.1 to 5 tons TNT equivalent yield. The largest were observed at near regional distances, with P/S ratios comparable to much larger historic nuclear tests. If we control for material property effects, the explosions have very similar P/S ratios independent of yield or magnitude. These results are consistent with explosion S-waves coming mainly from conversion of P- and surface waves, and are inconsistent with source-size based models. A dense sensor deployment for the largest SPE explosion allowed this conversion to be mapped in detail. This is good news for P/S explosion identification, which can work well for very small explosions and may be ultimately limited by S-wave detection thresholds. The SPE also showed explosion P-wave source models need to be updated for small and/or deeply buried cases. We are developing new P- and S-wave explosion models that better match all the empirical data. Historic nuclear explosion seismic data shows that the media in which

  8. C-w operation of a 2-MeV RFQ accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have achieved reliable cw operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator and have accelerated 40 mA of H 2 + beam to an energy of 2 MeV. The technical considerations for future cw accelerator designs, based on our experience in achieving cw operation, will be presented. Also to be discussed are measurements of beam emittance, matching into the RFQ, and beam transmission through the accelerator. These measurements will be compared with results of theoretical simulations of the device. The diagnostics instrumentation developed for characterizing intense cw beams also will be discussed, as well as the performance of those devices

  9. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  10. Structural rearrangements in the C/W(001) surface system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, P.F.; Mullins, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the surface structure of the C/W(001) surface system at submonolayer C coverages using Auger-electron spectroscopy and high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy. Core-level spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of an atom's local electronic environment; by examining the core levels of the W atoms in the selvedge region, we monitored the response of the substrate to C adsorption. The average shift of the 4f core-level binding energy provided evidence for a heretofore unknown surface reconstruction that occurs upon submonolayer C adsorption. We also performed line-shape analysis on these core-level spectra, and have thereby elucidated the mechanism by which the low-coverage (√2 x √2 )R45 degree structure evolves to a c(3 √2 x √2 )R45 degree arrangement upon further C adsorption. The line-shape analysis also provides corroborating evidence for a proposed model of the saturated C/W(001)-(5x1) surface structure, and suggests that the first two or three atomic W layers are perturbed by the C adsorption and attendant reconstruction

  11. SCARDEC: a new technique for the rapid determination of seismic moment magnitude, focal mechanism and source time functions for large earthquakes using body-wave deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, M.; Charléty, J.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Delouis, B.; Vergoz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and fast magnitude determination for large, shallow earthquakes is of key importance for post-seismic response and tsumami alert purposes. When no local real-time data are available, which is today the case for most subduction earthquakes, the first information comes from teleseismic body waves. Standard body-wave methods give accurate magnitudes for earthquakes up to Mw= 7-7.5. For larger earthquakes, the analysis is more complex, because of the non-validity of the point-source approximation and of the interaction between direct and surface-reflected phases. The latter effect acts as a strong high-pass filter, which complicates the magnitude determination. We here propose an automated deconvolutive approach, which does not impose any simplifying assumptions about the rupture process, thus being well adapted to large earthquakes. We first determine the source duration based on the length of the high frequency (1-3 Hz) signal content. The deconvolution of synthetic double-couple point source signals—depending on the four earthquake parameters strike, dip, rake and depth—from the windowed real data body-wave signals (including P, PcP, PP, SH and ScS waves) gives the apparent source time function (STF). We search the optimal combination of these four parameters that respects the physical features of any STF: causality, positivity and stability of the seismic moment at all stations. Once this combination is retrieved, the integration of the STFs gives directly the moment magnitude. We apply this new approach, referred as the SCARDEC method, to most of the major subduction earthquakes in the period 1990-2010. Magnitude differences between the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) and the SCARDEC method may reach 0.2, but values are found consistent if we take into account that the Global CMT solutions for large, shallow earthquakes suffer from a known trade-off between dip and seismic moment. We show by modelling long-period surface waves of these events that

  12. Recent Additions in the Modeling Capabilities of an Open-Source Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom, N.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2015-04-20

    WEC-Sim is a midfidelity numerical tool for modeling wave energy conversion devices. The code uses the MATLAB SimMechanics package to solve multibody dynamics and models wave interactions using hydrodynamic coefficients derived from frequency-domain boundary-element methods. This paper presents the new modeling features introduced in the latest release of WEC-Sim. The first feature discussed conversion of the fluid memory kernel to a state-space form. This enhancement offers a substantial computational benefit after the hydrodynamic body-to-body coefficients are introduced and the number of interactions increases exponentially with each additional body. Additional features include the ability to calculate the wave-excitation forces based on the instantaneous incident wave angle, allowing the device to weathervane, as well as import a user-defined wave elevation time series. A review of the hydrodynamic theory for each feature is provided and the successful implementation is verified using test cases.

  13. Analytic model of the stress waves propagation in thin wall tubes, seeking the location of a harmonic point source in its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaratti, Mario Francisco Guerra

    2006-01-01

    Leaks in pressurized tubes generate acoustic waves that propagate through the walls of these tubes, which can be captured by accelerometers or by acoustic emission sensors. The knowledge of how these walls can vibrate, or in another way, how these acoustic waves propagate in this material is fundamental in the detection and localization process of the leak source. In this work an analytic model was implemented, through the motion equations of a cylindrical shell, with the objective to understand the behavior of the tube surface excited by a point source. Since the cylindrical surface has a closed pattern in the circumferential direction, waves that are beginning their trajectory will meet with another that has already completed the turn over the cylindrical shell, in the clockwise direction as well as in the counter clockwise direction, generating constructive and destructive interferences. After enough time of propagation, peaks and valleys in the shell surface are formed, which can be visualized through a graphic representation of the analytic solution created. The theoretical results were proven through measures accomplished in an experimental setup composed of a steel tube finished in sand box, simulating the condition of infinite tube. To determine the location of the point source on the surface, the process of inverse solution was adopted, that is to say, known the signals of the sensor disposed in the tube surface , it is determined through the theoretical model where the source that generated these signals can be. (author)

  14. Celeris: A GPU-accelerated open source software with a Boussinesq-type wave solver for real-time interactive simulation and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkol, Sasan; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce an interactive coastal wave simulation and visualization software, called Celeris. Celeris is an open source software which needs minimum preparation to run on a Windows machine. The software solves the extended Boussinesq equations using a hybrid finite volume-finite difference method and supports moving shoreline boundaries. The simulation and visualization are performed on the GPU using Direct3D libraries, which enables the software to run faster than real-time. Celeris provides a first-of-its-kind interactive modeling platform for coastal wave applications and it supports simultaneous visualization with both photorealistic and colormapped rendering capabilities. We validate our software through comparison with three standard benchmarks for non-breaking and breaking waves.

  15. Constraint on the magma sources in Luzon Island Philippines by using P and S wave local seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, N. C.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, P. F.

    2017-12-01

    The subduction of South China Sea beneath the Luzon Island has caused a complex setting of seismicity and magmatism because of the proposed ridge subduction and slab tearing. To constrain the validity of slab tearing induced by ridge subduction and their effect, we performed a P and S wave seismic tomography travel time inversion using LOTOS code. The dataset has been retrieved from International Seismological Centre from 1960 to 2008. A 1D velocity inverted by using VELEST with a Vp/Vs ratio of 1.74 is used as the starting input velocity for tomographic inversion. Total of 20905 P readings and 8126 S readings from 2355 earthquakes events were used to invert for velocity structure beneath Luzon Island. The horizontal tomographic results show low-velocity, high Vp/Vs regions at the shallow depth less than 50 km which are interpreted as the magmatic chambers of the volcanic system in Luzon. At the suspected region of slab tearing at 16oN to 18oN, two sources of magma have been indentified: slab window magma at shallow depth (< 50 km) and magma induced by mantle wedge partial melting from higher depth. This slab melting may have changed the composition of magmatic to become more silicic with high viscosity, which explains the volcanic gap in this region. At the region of 14oN to 15oN, large magma chambers under active volcanos are identified which explain the active volcanism in this region. Contrast to the region of slab tearing, in this region, the magma chambers are fed by only magma from partial melting of mantle wedge from the depth higher than 100 km. These observations are consistent with previous work on the slab tearing of South China Sea and the activities of volcanism in the Luzon Island.

  16. Host galaxy properties of mergers of stellar binary black holes and their implications for advanced LIGO gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Lu, Youjun; Zhao, Yuetong

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the host galaxy properties of stellar binary black hole (SBBH) mergers is important for revealing the origin of the SBBH gravitational wave sources detected by advanced LIGO and helpful for identifying their electromagnetic counterparts. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the host galaxy properties of SBBHs by implementing semi-analytical recipes for SBBH formation and merger into cosmological galaxy formation model. If the time delay between SBBH formation and merger ranges from ≲ Gyr to the Hubble time, SBBH mergers at redshift z ≲ 0.3 occur preferentially in big galaxies with stellar mass M* ≳ 2 × 1010 M⊙ and metallicities Z peaking at ˜0.6 Z⊙. However, the host galaxy stellar mass distribution of heavy SBBH mergers (M•• ≳ 50 M⊙) is bimodal with one peak at ˜109 M⊙ and the other peak at ˜2 × 1010 M⊙. The contribution fraction from host galaxies with Z ≲ 0.2 Z⊙ to heavy mergers is much larger than that to less heavy mergers. If SBBHs were formed in the early Universe (e.g. z > 6), their mergers detected at z ≲ 0.3 occur preferentially in even more massive galaxies with M* > 3 × 1010 M⊙ and in galaxies with metallicities mostly ≳ 0.2 Z⊙ and peaking at Z ˜ 0.6 Z⊙, due to later cosmic assembly and enrichment of their host galaxies. SBBH mergers at z ≲ 0.3 mainly occur in spiral galaxies, but the fraction of SBBH mergers that occur in elliptical galaxies can be significant if those SBBHs were formed in the early Universe; and about two-thirds of those mergers occur in the central galaxies of dark matter haloes. We also present results on the host galaxy properties of SBBH mergers at higher redshift.

  17. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States); Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Kanner, Jonah [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California CA 91125 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  18. High-power, continuous-wave, solid-state, single-frequency, tunable source for the ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadhi, A; Apurv Chaitanya, N; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2014-06-15

    We report the development of a compact, high-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency, ultraviolet (UV) source with extended wavelength tunability. The device is based on single-pass, intracavity, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) of the signal radiation of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) working in the visible and near-IR wavelength range. The SRO is pumped in the green with a 25-mm-long, multigrating, MgO doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) as nonlinear crystal. Using three grating periods, 8.5, 9.0, and 9.5 μm of the MgO:sPPLT crystal and a single set of cavity mirrors, the SRO can be tuned continuously across 710.7-836.3 nm in the signal and corresponding idler across 2115.8-1462.1 nm with maximum idler power of 1.9 W and maximum out-coupled signal power of 254 mW. By frequency-doubling the intracavity signal with a 5-mm-long bismuth borate (BIBO) crystal, we can further tune the SRO continuously over 62.8 nm across 355.4-418.2 nm in the UV with maximum single-frequency UV power, as much as 770 mW at 398.28 nm in a Gaussian beam profile. The UV radiation has an instantaneous line-width of ∼14.5  MHz and peak-peak frequency stability of 151 MHz over 100 s. More than 95% of the tuning range provides UV power >260  mW. Access to lower UV wavelengths can in principle be realized by operating the SRO in the visible using shorter grating periods.

  19. Dissociating the contributions of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep to emotional item and source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groch, S; Zinke, K; Wilhelm, I; Born, J

    2015-07-01

    Sleep benefits the consolidation of emotional memories, and this influence is commonly attributed to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of sleep. However, the contributions of sleep stages to memory for an emotional episode may differ for the event per se (i.e., item memory), and the context in which it occurred (source memory). Here, we examined the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep on the consolidation of emotionally negative and neutral item (picture recognition) and source memory (recall of picture-location and picture-frame color association) in humans. In Study 1, the participants (n=18) learned 48 negative and 48 neutral pictures which were presented at specific locations and preceded by colored frames that had to be associated with the picture. In a within-subject design, learning was either followed by a 3-h early-night SWS-rich or by a late-night REM sleep-rich retention interval, then retrieval was tested. Only after REM-rich sleep, and not after SWS-rich sleep, was there a significant emotional enhancement, i.e., a significantly superior retention of emotional over neutral pictures. On the other hand, after SWS-rich sleep the retention of picture-frame color associations was better than after REM-rich sleep. However, this benefit was observed only for neutral pictures; and it was completely absent for the emotional pictures. To examine whether this absent benefit reflected a suppressive effect of emotionality on associations of minor task relevance, in Study 2 we manipulated the relevance of the picture-frame color association by combining it with information about monetary reward, following otherwise comparable procedures. Here, rewarded picture-frame color associations were equally well retained over SWS-rich early sleep no matter if the frames were associated with emotional or neutral pictures. Results are consistent with the view that REM sleep favors the emotional enhancement of item memory whereas SWS appears to contribute primarily

  20. Quasi-CW diode-pumped self-starting adaptive laser with self-Q-switched output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G; Damzen, M J

    2007-05-14

    An investigation is made into a quasi-CW (QCW) diode-pumped holographic adaptive laser utilising an ultra high gain (approximately 10(4)) Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier. The laser produces pulses at 1064 nm with energy approximately 0.6 mJ, duration laser configuration, the output was amplified to obtain pulses of approximately 5.6 mJ energy, approximately 7 ns duration and approximately 1 MW peak power. The output spatial quality is also M(2)diode-pumped self-adaptive holographic lasers can provide a useful source of high peak power, short duration pulses with excellent spatial quality and narrow linewidth spectrum.

  1. Power-scalable, polarization-stable, dual-colour DFB fibre laser system for CW terahertz imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, Finn; Pedersen, Jens Engholm; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    Imaging with electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz (THz) range has received a large amount of attention during recent years. THz imaging systems have diverse potential application areas such as security screening, medical diagnostics and non-destructive testing. We will discuss a power......-scalable, dual-colour, polarization-maintaining distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser system with an inherent narrow linewidth from the DFB fibre laser oscillators. The laser system can be used as source in CW THz systems employing photomixing (optical heterodyning) for generation and detection...

  2. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  3. Survey on neutron production by electron beam from high power CW electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, S.

    1999-04-01

    In Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, the development of high current CW electron linear accelerator is in progress. It is possible for an accelerator to produce neutrons by means of a spallation and photo nuclear reactions. Application of neutron beam produced by bremsstrahlung is one of ways of the utilization for high current electron accelerator. It is actual that many electron linear accelerators which maximum energy is higher than a few hundreds MeV are used as neutron sources. In this report, an estimate of neutron production is evaluated for high current CW electron linear accelerator. The estimate is carried out by 10 MeV beam which is maximum energy limited from the regulation and rather low for neutron production. Therefore, the estimate is also done by 17 and 35 MeV beam which is possible to be accelerated. Beryllium is considered as a target for lower electron energy in addition to Lead target for higher energy, because Beryllium has low threshold energy for neutron production. The evaluation is carried out in account of the target thickness optimized by the radiation length and neutron cross section reducing the energy loss for both of electron and neutron, so as to get the maximum number of neutrons. The result of the calculations shows neutron numbers 1.9 x 10 10 , 6.1 x 10 13 and 4.8 x 10 13 (n/s), respectively, for 10, 17, and 35 MeV with low duty. The thermal removal from the target is one of critical points. The additional shielding and cooling system is necessary in order to endure radiation. A comparison with other facilities are also carried out. The estimate of neutron numbers suggests the possibility to be applied for neutron radiography and measurement of nuclear data by means of Lead spectrometer, for example. (author)

  4. OpenSWPC: an open-source integrated parallel simulation code for modeling seismic wave propagation in 3D heterogeneous viscoelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuto; Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    We have developed an open-source software package, Open-source Seismic Wave Propagation Code (OpenSWPC), for parallel numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in 3D and 2D (P-SV and SH) viscoelastic media based on the finite difference method in local-to-regional scales. This code is equipped with a frequency-independent attenuation model based on the generalized Zener body and an efficient perfectly matched layer for absorbing boundary condition. A hybrid-style programming using OpenMP and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is adopted for efficient parallel computation. OpenSWPC has wide applicability for seismological studies and great portability to allowing excellent performance from PC clusters to supercomputers. Without modifying the code, users can conduct seismic wave propagation simulations using their own velocity structure models and the necessary source representations by specifying them in an input parameter file. The code has various modes for different types of velocity structure model input and different source representations such as single force, moment tensor and plane-wave incidence, which can easily be selected via the input parameters. Widely used binary data formats, the Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) and the Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) are adopted for the input of the heterogeneous structure model and the outputs of the simulation results, so users can easily handle the input/output datasets. All codes are written in Fortran 2003 and are available with detailed documents in a public repository.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  6. Source Estimation for the Damped Wave Equation Using Modulating Functions Method: Application to the Estimation of the Cerebral Blood Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on modulating functions is proposed to estimate the Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF). The problem is written in an input estimation problem for a damped wave equation which is used to model the spatiotemporal variations

  7. Toward the Extreme Ultra Violet Four Wave Mixing Experiments: From Table Top Lasers to Fourth Generation Light Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Cucini; Andrea Battistoni; Filippo Bencivenga; Alessandro Gessini; Riccardo Mincigrucci; Erika Giangrisostomi; Emiliano Principi; Flavio Capotondi; Emanuele Pedersoli; Michele Manfredda; Maya Kiskinova; Claudio Masciovecchio

    2015-01-01

    Three different Transient Grating setups are presented, with pulsed and continuous wave probe at different wavelengths, ranging from infrared to the extreme ultra violet region. Both heterodyne and homodyne detections are considered. Each scheme introduces variations with respect to the previous one, allowing moving from classical table top laser experiments towards a new four wave mixing scheme based on free electron laser radiation. A comparison between the various setups and the first resu...

  8. Relativistic jet with shock waves like model of superluminal radio source. Jet relativista con ondas de choque como modelo de radio fuentes superluminales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the compact radio sources at milliarcsecond angular resolution can be explained in terms of shock waves propagating along bent jets. These jets consist of narrow-angle cones of plasma flowing at bulk relativistic velocities, within tangled magnetic fields, emitting synchrotron radiation. We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kenimatic evolution and time flux density evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 and to obtain its jet physical parameters. (Author) 23 ref.

  9. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  10. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating cw at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F.Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200 to 8000-A spectral range. These devices operate cw with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends cw operation for the first time into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum

  11. Studies of calorimeter absorbers for CW and pulsed CO2 lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    Solid and liquid absorbers, used in calorimeters to measure the power and energy of cw and pulsed CO 2 lasers, have been studied from 9.24 to 10.76 μm (cw) and near 10.588 μm (pulsed). The principal materials used were magnesium oxide, lithium fluoride, polystyrene, polytetrafluorethylene, carbon tetrachloride and kerosene. (U.S.)

  12. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-15

    In this study, noninvasive 9GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe(3+), and Mn(2+) complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  14. Internal optical losses in very thin CW heterojunction laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. K.; Kressel, H.; Ladany, I.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented showing the relationship between the internal laser absorption and structural parameters appropriate for CW room-temperature lasers. These diodes have submicron-thick recombination regions, and very small spacings between the heat sink and the recombination region to minimize the thermal resistance. The optical loss is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of radiation confinement to the active region. In particular, absorption in the surface GaAs layer providing the ohmic contact becomes very significant when the intermediate (AlGa)As layer is reduced below about 1 micron. It is further shown that excessive penetration into the GaAs regions gives rise to anomalies in the far-field radiation profiles in the direction perpendicular to the junction plane.

  15. Study of pseudo noise CW diode laser for ranging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo S.; Ramaswami, Ravi

    1992-01-01

    A new Pseudo Random Noise (PN) modulated CW diode laser radar system is being developed for real time ranging of targets at both close and large distances (greater than 10 KM) to satisy a wide range of applications: from robotics to future space applications. Results from computer modeling and statistical analysis, along with some preliminary data obtained from a prototype system, are presented. The received signal is averaged for a short time to recover the target response function. It is found that even with uncooperative targets, based on the design parameters used (200-mW laser and 20-cm receiver), accurate ranging is possible up to about 15 KM, beyond which signal to noise ratio (SNR) becomes too small for real time analog detection.

  16. Apsidal Motion Study of Close Binary System CW Cephei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New observations for the times of minimum lights of a well-known apsidal motion star CW Cephei were made using a 0.6 m wide field telescope at Jincheon station of Chungbuk National University Observatory, Korea during the 2015 observational season. We determined new times of minimum lights from these observations and analyzed O-C diagrams together with collected times of minima to study both the apsidal motion and the Light Time Effect (LTE suggested in the system. The new periods of the apsidal motion and the LTE were calculated as 46.6 and 39.3 years, respectively, which were similar but improved accuracy than earlier ones investigated by Han et al. (2002, Erdem et al. (2004 and Wolf et al. (2006.

  17. Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lihachev, A; Lesinsh, J; Jakovels, D; Spigulis, J

    2011-01-01

    Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of ∼12 mm 2 , and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of ∼4 cm 2 . The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes - 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  18. Emittance compensation of CW DC-gun photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Wu Dai; Xu Zhou; Li Ming; Yang Xingfan

    2011-01-01

    Emittance growth induced by space charge effect is very important, especially for CW DC-gun photoinjector. In this work, the linear space charge force and its effect on electron beam transverse emittance are studied, and the principle and properties of emittance compensation by solenoid are analyzed. The CAEP DC-gun photoinjector with a solenoid is also simulated by code Parmela. Simulated results indicate that the normalized transverse emittance of an 80 pC bunch at the 350 keV DC-gun ex-it is 5.14 mm · mrad. And after compensated by a solenoid, it becomes 1.27 mm · mrad. The emittance of beam is well compensated. (authors)

  19. Experimental verification of the air kerma to absorbed dose conversion factor Cw,u.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, B J; Wittkämper, F W; Aalbers, A H; van Dijk, E

    1987-01-01

    In a recently published code of practice for the dosimetry of high-energy photon beams, the absorbed dose to water is determined using an ionization chamber having an air kerma calibration factor and applying the air kerma to absorbed dose conversion factor Cw,u. The consistency of these Cw,u values has been determined for four commonly employed types of ionization chambers in photon beams with quality varying between 60Co gamma-rays and 25 MV X-rays. Using a graphite calorimeter, Cw,u has been determined for a graphite-walled ionization chamber (NE 2561) for the same qualities. The values of Cw,u determined with the calorimeter are within the experimental uncertainty equal to Cw,u values determined according to any of the recent dosimetry protocols.

  20. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent.

  1. CW substrate-free metal-cavity surface microemitters at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chien-Yao; Chang, Shu-Wei; Chuang, Shun Lien; Germann, Tim D; Pohl, Udo W; Bimberg, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper substrate-free metal-cavity surface microemitters are demonstrated. The optical cavity is formed by a metal reflector, metal-surrounded sidewall and n-doped distributed-Bragg reflector, which provides optical feedback and carrier injection. We describe a simple design principle with the modal properties modified by geometry and metal-insulator cladding. Both resonant cavity light-emitting diodes (1.85 µm diameter and 0.6 µm height) and lasers (2.0 µm diameter and 2.5 µm height) are successfully fabricated and characterized. These two types of devices operate at room temperature under continuous-wave (CW) operation. Since the devices are substrate-free, they can be bonded to any substrates. From the threshold currents of the lasers, we obtain a high characteristic temperature of 425 K in the range of 10–27 °C. We also discuss a general approach to improve the diffraction from small-aperture devices

  2. Crude Oil Remote Sensing, Characterization and Cleaning with CW and Pulsed Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Chirita, Arc; Gallegos, Sonia C.

    2014-01-01

    For detection, identification and characterization of crude oil we combine several optical methods of remote sensing of crude oil films and emulsions (coherent fringe projection illumination (CFP), holographic in-line interferometry (HILI), and laser induced fluorescence). These methods allow the three-dimensional characterization of oil spills, important for practical applications. Combined methods of CFP and HILI are described in the frame of coherent superposition of partial interference patterns. It is shown, that in addition to detection/identification laser illumination in the green-blue region can also degrade oil slicks. Different types of surfaces contaminated by oil spills are tested: oil on the water, oil on the flat solid surfaces and oil on the curved surfaces of pipes. For the detection and monitoring of the laser-induced oil degradation in pipes, coherent fiber bundles were used. Both continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed lasers are tested using pump-probe schemes. This finding suggests that properly structured laser clean-up can be an alternative environmentally-friendly method of decontamination, as compared to the currently used chemical methods that are dangerous to environment.

  3. A computer control system for the PNC high power cw electron linac. Concept and hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, T.; Hirano, K.; Takei, Hayanori; Nomura, Masahiro; Tani, S. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Kato, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Design and construction of a high power cw (Continuous Wave) electron linac for studying feasibility of nuclear waste transmutation was started in 1989 at PNC. The PNC accelerator (10 MeV, 20 mA average current, 4 ms pulse width, 50 Hz repetition) is dedicated machine for development of the high current acceleration technology in future need. The computer control system is responsible for accelerator control and supporting the experiment for high power operation. The feature of the system is the measurements of accelerator status simultaneously and modularity of software and hardware for easily implemented for modification or expansion. The high speed network (SCRAM Net {approx} 15 MB/s), Ethernet, and front end processors (Digital Signal Processor) were employed for the high speed data taking and control. The system was designed to be standard modules and software implemented man machine interface. Due to graphical-user-interface and object-oriented-programming, the software development environment is effortless programming and maintenance. (author)

  4. Grazing Eclipsing Dwarf Nova CW Monocerotis: Dwarf Nova-Type Outburst in a Possible Intermediate Polar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taichi; Uemura, Makoto; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Tanabe, Kenji; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Kida, Mayumi; Nishi, Yuichi; Tanaka, Sawa; Ueoka, Rie; Yasui, Hideki; Vanmunster, Tonny; Nogami, Daisaku; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2003-04-01

    We observed the 2002 October-November outburst of the dwarf nova CW Mon.The outburst showed a clear signature of a premaximum halt, and a more rapid decline after reaching the outburst maximum.On two separate occasions, during the premaximum stage and near the outburst maximum, shallow eclipses were recorded. This finding confirms the previously suggested possibility of the grazing eclipsing nature of this system.The separate occurrence of the eclipses and the premaximum halt can be understood as being the result of a combination of a two-step ignition of an outburst and the inside-out propagation of the heating wave.We detected a coherent short-period (0.02549d) signal on two subsequent nights around the optical maximum.This signal was likely present during the maximum phase of the 2000 January outburst.We interpret this signal as being a signature of the intermediate polar (IP) type pulses.The rather strange outburst properties, strong and hard X-ray emission, and the low luminosity of the outburst maximum might be understood as a consequence of the supposed IP nature.The ratio between the suggested spin period and the orbital period, however, is rather unusual for a system having an orbital period of ˜ 0.176 d.

  5. Experimental investigation of standing wave effect in dual-frequency capacitively coupled argon discharges: role of a low-frequency source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Liu, Yong-Xin; Kawamura, E.; Wen, De-Qi; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, You-Nian

    2018-05-01

    It is well known that the plasma non-uniformity caused by the standing wave effect has brought about great challenges for plasma material processing. To improve the plasma uniformity, a low-frequency (LF) power source is introduced into a 100 MHz very-high-frequency (VHF) capacitively coupled argon plasma reactor. The effect of the LF parameters (LF voltage amplitude ϕ L and LF source f L) on the radial profile of plasma density has been investigated by utilizing a hairpin probe. The result at a low pressure (1 Pa) is compared to the one obtained by a 2D fluid-analytical capacitively coupled plasma model, showing good agreement in the plasma density radial profile. The experimental results show that the plasma density profile exhibits different dependences on ϕ L and f L at different gas pressures/electrode driven types (i.e., the two rf sources are applied on one electrode (case I) and separate electrodes (case II)). At low pressures (e.g., 8 Pa), the pronounced standing wave effect revealed in a VHF discharge can be suppressed at a relatively high ϕ L or a low f L in case I, because the HF sheath heating is largely weakened due to strong modulation by the LF source. By contrast, ϕ L and f L play insignificant roles in suppressing the standing wave effect in case II. At high pressures (e.g., 20 Pa), the opposite is true. The plasma density radial profile is more sensitive to ϕ L and f L in case II than in case I. In case II, the standing wave effect is surprisingly enhanced with increasing ϕ L at higher pressures; however, the center-high density profile caused by the standing wave effect can be compensated by increasing f L due to the enhanced electrostatic edge effect dominated by the LF source. In contrast, the density radial profile shows a much weaker dependence on ϕ L and f L in case I at higher pressures. To understand the different roles of ϕ L and f L, the electron excitation dynamics in each case are analyzed based on the measured spatio

  6. Computational investigation of feedback loop as a potential source of neuromechanical wave speed discrepancy in swimming animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Namu; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2017-11-01

    Aquatic locomotion relies on feedback loops to generate the flexural muscle moment needed to attain the reference shape. Experimentalists have consistently reported a difference between the electromyogram (EMG) and curvature wave speeds. The EMG wave speed has been found to correlate with the cross-sectional moment wave. The correlation, however, remains unexplained. Using feedback dependent controller models, we demonstrate two scenarios - one at higher passive elastic stiffness and another at lower passive elastic stiffness of the body. The former case becomes equivalent to the penalty type mathematical model for swimming used in prior literature and it does not reproduce neuromechanical wave speed discrepancy. The latter case at lower elastic stiffness does reproduce the wave speed discrepancy and appears to be biologically most relevant. These findings are applied to develop testable hypotheses about control mechanisms that animals might be using at during low and high Reynolds number swimming. This work is supported by NSF Grants DMS-1547394, CBET-1066575, ACI-1460334, and IOS-1456830. Travel for NP is supported by Institute for Defense Analyses.

  7. Diseño y validación de un radar CW-FM a 94 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Varela Agrelo, David

    2013-01-01

    Diseño y validación de un radar CW-FM a 9g GHz 94 GHz CW-FM radar design and mesurement campaign validation. Desarrollo de un radar CW-FM a 94GHz y verificación de los resultados obtenidos durante la etapa de medidas. Desevolupament d'un radar CW-FM a 94GHz i verificació dels resultat obteinguts durante l'etapa de mesures.

  8. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  9. Toward the Extreme Ultra Violet Four Wave Mixing Experiments: From Table Top Lasers to Fourth Generation Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cucini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different Transient Grating setups are presented, with pulsed and continuous wave probe at different wavelengths, ranging from infrared to the extreme ultra violet region. Both heterodyne and homodyne detections are considered. Each scheme introduces variations with respect to the previous one, allowing moving from classical table top laser experiments towards a new four wave mixing scheme based on free electron laser radiation. A comparison between the various setups and the first results from extreme ultra violet transient grating experiments is also discussed.

  10. Intersubband Rabi oscillations in asymmetric nanoheterostructures: implications for a tunable continuous-wave source of a far-infrared and THz radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, V A

    2012-06-01

    A tunable continuous-wave source of a far-infrared and THz radiation based on a semiconductor nanoheterostructure with asymmetric quantum wells is suggested. It utilizes Rabi oscillations at a transition between quantum well subbands excited by external femtosecond pulses of a mid-infrared electromagnetic field. Due to quantum well broken inversion symmetry the subbands possess different average dipole moments, which enables the creation of polarization at the Rabi frequency as the subband populations change. It is shown that if this polarization is excited so that it is periodic in space, then, though being pulsed, it can produce continuous-wave output radiation. Changing the polarization space period and the time intervals between the exciting pulses, one can tune the frequency of this radiation throughout the far-infrared and THz range. In the present work a concrete multiple quantum well heterostructure design and a scheme of its space-periodic polarization are suggested. It is shown that for existing sources of mid-infrared femtosecond pulses the proposed scheme can provide a continuous-wave output power of order the power of far-infrared and THz quantum cascade lasers. Being added to the possibility of its output frequency tuning, this can make the suggested device attractive for fundamental research and various applications.

  11. Interpretation of cw-ESR spectra of p-methyl-thio-phenyl-nitronyl nitroxide in a nematic liquid crystalline phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; Zerbetto, Mirco; Brustolon, Marina; Polimeno, Antonino; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante

    2012-03-07

    In this paper we report on the characterization by continuous wave electron spin resonance spectroscopy (cw-ESR) of a nitronyl nitroxide radical in a nematic phase. A detailed analysis is performed by exploiting an innovative modeling strategy alternative to the usual spectral simulation approach: most of the molecular parameters needed to calculate the spectrum are evaluated a priori and the ESR spectrum is obtained by direct application of the stochastic Liouville equation. Allowing a limited set of fitting parameters it is possible to reproduce satisfactorily ESR spectra in the temperature range 260 K-340 K including the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition (325.1 K). Our results open the way to a more quantitative understanding of the ordering and mobility of nitronyl nitroxide radicals in nanostructured environments.

  12. Diode-pumped CW frequency-doubled Nd:CNGG-BiBO blue laser at 468 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü, Y F; Xia, J; Lin, J Q; Gao, X; Dong, Y; Xu, L J; Sun, G C; Zhao, Z M; Tan, Y; Chen, J F; Liu, Z X; Li, C L; Cai, H X; Liu, Z T; Ma, Z Y; Ning, G B

    2011-01-01

    Efficient and compact blue laser output at 468 nm is generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous-wave (CW) diode-pumped Nd:CNGG laser at 935 nm. With 17.8 W of diode pump power and the frequency-doubling crystal BiB 3 O 6 (BiBO), a maximum output power of 490 mW in the blue spectral range at 468 nm has been achieved, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 2.8%; the output power stability over 4 h is better than 2.6%. To the best of our knowledge, this is first work on intracavity frequency doubling of a diode pumped Nd:CNGG laser at 935 nm

  13. CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging investigation of stable paramagnetic species and their antioxidant activities in dry shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Hara, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the antioxidant activities and locations of stable paramagnetic species in dry (or drying) shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) using continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9 GHz EPR imaging. CW 9 GHz EPR detected paramagnetic species (peak-to-peak linewidth (ΔHpp) = 0.57 mT) in the mushroom. Two-dimensional imaging of the sharp line using a 9 GHz EPR imager showed that the species were located in the cap and shortened stem portions of the mushroom. No other location of the species was found in the mushroom. However, radical locations and concentrations varied along the cap of the mushroom. The 9 GHz EPR imaging determined the exact location of stable paramagnetic species in the shiitake mushroom. Distilled water extracts of the pigmented cap surface and the inner cap of the mushroom showed similar antioxidant activities that reduced an aqueous solution of 0.1 mM 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl. The present results suggest that the antioxidant activities of the edible mushroom extracts are much weaker than those of ascorbic acid. Thus, CW EPR and EPR imaging revealed the location and distribution of stable paramagnetic species and the antioxidant activities in the shiitake mushroom for the first time.

  14. CW and AO Q-switched operation of a dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO4 laser pumped by two diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L J; Bai, Y F; Liu, Y W; He, Z L; Wang, J; Yao, B Q; Zhou, S; Xing, M N

    2013-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) mode and acousto-optic (AO) Q-switched mode operation of a dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO 4 laser is reported. The dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO 4 laser with output wavelength of 2.05 μm was pumped by two laser diodes (LDs). The Tm, Ho:GdVO 4 crystals were cooled by liquid nitrogen and pumped by two fiber-coupled LDs with a center output wavelength of 801.0 nm. A 20.5 W output power was obtained at a 255 mm physical cavity length in CW mode operation, and a 19.6 W average power was obtained at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 10 kHz with a 19 ns pulse duration. Also, the efficiency loss of the laser is not more than 4.4% from CW mode to Q-switch mode, and the M 2 factor, which is measured by the traveling knife-edge method, does not exceed 1.2. (paper)

  15. AIR FLOW AND ENVIRONMENTAL WIND VISUALIZATION USING A CW DIODE PUMPED FREQUENCY DOUBLED Nd:YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea UDREA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results obtained in developing a visualisation technique for non-invasive analysis of air flow inside INCAS subsonic wind tunnel and its appendages are presented. The visualisation technique is based on using a green light sheet generated by a continuous wave (cw longitudinally diode pumped and frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The output laser beam is expanded on one direction and collimated on rectangular direction. The system is tailored to the requirements of qualitative analysis and vortex tracking requirements inside the INCAS 2.5m x 2.0m subsonic wind tunnel test section, for measurements performed on aircraft models. Also the developed laser techniques is used for non-invasive air flow field analysis into environmental facilities settling room (air flow calming area. Quantitative analysis is enabled using special image processing tools upon movies and pictures obtained during the experiments. The basic experimental layout in the wind tunnel takes advantage of information obtained from the investigation of various aircraft models using the developed visualisation technique. These results are further developed using a Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV experimental technique.The focus is on visualisation techniques to be used for wind flow characterization at different altitudes in indus-trial and civil buildings areas using a light sheet generated by a Nd:YAG cw pumped and doubled laser at 532 nm wave-length. The results are important for prevention of biological/chemical disasters such as spreading of extremely toxic pol-lutants due to wind. Numerical simulations of wind flow and experimental visualisation results are compared. A good agreement between these results is observed.

  16. Passive monitoring of a sea dike during a tidal cycle using sea waves as a seismic noise source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Anaëlle; Feuvre, Mathieu Le; Cote, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    Over the past decade, ambient seismic noise has been used successfully to monitor various geological objects with high accuracy. Recently, it has been shown that surface seismic waves propagating within a sea dike body can be retrieved from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise generated by sea waves. We use sea wave impacts to monitor the response of a sea dike during a tidal cycle using empirical Green's functions. These are obtained either by cross-correlation or deconvolution, from signals recorded by sensors installed linearly on the crest of a dike. Our analysis is based on delay and spectral amplitude measurements performed on reconstructed surface waves propagating along the array. We show that localized variations of velocity and attenuation are correlated with changes in water level as a probable consequence of water infiltration inside the structure. Sea dike monitoring is of critical importance for safety and economic reasons, as internal erosion is generally only detected at late stages by visual observations. The method proposed here may provide a solution for detecting structural weaknesses, monitoring progressive internal erosion, and delineating areas of interest for further geotechnical studies, in view to understanding the erosion mechanisms involved.

  17. Comparison of isolate dadih with yeast dadih in improving nutrition quality of Cassava Waste (CW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, N.

    2018-03-01

    The cassava industry in North Sumatra Province was one of the most significant agricultural industries. Waste from the cassava industry which was called cassava waste/CW/Onggok was used as feed for ruminants such as cattle, sheep and monogastric such as pigs. The low nutrients in CW caused the need to find a way for improving the nutrients quality. This research was conducted with the aim to help livestockers to ferment their livestock feed. This study compared the ability of fermentation between dadih isolate with dadih yeast. Dadih is traditional food in Indonesia where milk is fermented in bamboo tube. Dadih yeast was made by mixing dadih and whey with flour, made in around shape and sun dried. The results showed that pH of CW by dadih isolate was the lowest while crude protein, crude fiber and fat in CW treated with dadih isolate were improved significantly compared either to control or to dadih starter while fermented CW was better than non-fermented CW. It was recommended livestockers to ferment CW by using either by dadih isolate or dadih starter.

  18. 10-GHz return-to-zero pulse source tunable in wavelength with a single- or multiwavelength output based on four-wave mixing in a newly developed highly nonlinear fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, A. T.; Oxenlowe, L.; Peucheret, Christophe

    2001-01-01

    In this letter, a novel scheme for a wavelength-tunable pulse source (WTPS) is proposed and characterized. It is based on four-wave mixing (FWM) in a newly developed highly nonlinear fiber between a return-to-zero (RZ) pulsed signal at a fixed wavelength and a continuous wave probe tunable...

  19. Novel packaging for CW and QCW diode laser modules for operation with high power and duty cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Wilhelm; Lotz, Jens; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens

    2018-02-01

    Continuous wave (CW) and quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operated diode laser bars and arrays have found a wide range of industrial, medical, scientific, military and space applications with a broad variety in wavelength, pulse energy, pulse duration and beam quality. Recent applications require even higher power, duty cycles and power density. The heat loss will be dissipated by conductive cooling or liquid cooling close to the bars. We present the latest performance and reliability data of two novel high-brightness CW and QCW arrays of customized and mass-production modules, in compact and robust industry design for operation with high power and high duty cycles. All designs are based on single diode packages consisting of 10mm laser bars, soft or hard soldered between expansion matched submounts. The modular components cover a wide span of designs which differ basically in water/conduction (active/passive) cooled, single, linear (horizontal and vertical) arranged designs, as well as housed and unhoused modules. The different assembling technologies of active and passive cooled base plates affect the heat dissipation and therefore the reachable power at different QCW operating conditions, as well as the lifetime. As an example, a package consisting of 8 laser diodes, connected to a 28.8*13.5*7.0mm3 DCB (direct copper bonded) submount, passively or actively cooled is considered. This design is of particular interest for mobile applications seamless module to module building system, with an infinite number of laser bars at 1.7mm pitch. Using 940nm bars we can reach an optical output power per bar of 450W at 25°C base plate temperature with 10Hz, 1.2% duty cycle and 1.2ms pulse duration. As an additional example, micro channel coolers can be vertically stacked up to 50 diodes with a 1,15mm pitch. This design is suitable for all applications, demanding also compactness and light weight and high power density. Using near infrared bars and others, we can reach an optical

  20. A Distributed Lag Autoregressive Model of Geostationary Relativistic Electron Fluxes: Comparing the Influences of Waves, Seed and Source Electrons, and Solar Wind Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laura; Engebretson, Mark; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Lessard, Marc; Gjerloev, Jesper; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2018-05-01

    Relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit depends on enhancement and loss processes driven by ultralow frequency (ULF) Pc5, chorus, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, seed electron flux, magnetosphere compression, the "Dst effect," and substorms, while solar wind inputs such as velocity, number density, and interplanetary magnetic field Bz drive these factors and thus correlate with flux. Distributed lag regression models show the time delay of highest influence of these factors on log10 high-energy electron flux (0.7-7.8 MeV, Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites). Multiple regression with an autoregressive term (flux persistence) allows direct comparison of the magnitude of each effect while controlling other correlated parameters. Flux enhancements due to ULF Pc5 and chorus waves are of equal importance. The direct effect of substorms on high-energy electron flux is strong, possibly due to injection of high-energy electrons by the substorms themselves. Loss due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is less influential. Southward Bz shows only moderate influence when correlated processes are accounted for. Adding covariate compression effects (pressure and interplanetary magnetic field magnitude) allows wave-driven enhancements to be more clearly seen. Seed electrons (270 keV) are most influential at lower relativistic energies, showing that such a population must be available for acceleration. However, they are not accelerated directly to the highest energies. Source electrons (31.7 keV) show no direct influence when other factors are controlled. Their action appears to be indirect via the chorus waves they generate. Determination of specific effects of each parameter when studied in combination will be more helpful in furthering modeling work than studying them individually.

  1. Component resolved bleaching study in natural calcium fluoride using CW-OSL, LM-OSL and residual TL glow curves after bleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, Vasiliki; Polymeris, George S.; Sfampa, Ioanna K.; Tsirliganis, Nestor C.; Kitis, George

    2017-01-01

    Natural calcium fluoride has been commonly used as thermoluminescence (TL) dosimeter due to its high luminescence intensity. The aim of this work includes attempting a correlation between specific TL glow curves after bleaching and components of linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM-OSL) as well as continuous wave OSL (CW-OSL). A component resolved analysis was applied to both integrated intensity of the RTL glow curves and all OSL decay curves, by using a Computerized Glow-Curve De-convolution (CGCD) procedure. All CW-OSL and LM-OSL components are correlated to the decay components of the integrated RTL signal, apart from two RTL components which cannot be directly correlated with either LM-OSL or CW-OSL component. The unique, stringent criterion for this correlation deals with the value of the decay constant λ of each bleaching component. There is only one, unique bleaching component present in all three luminescence entities which were the subject of the present study, indicating that each TL trap yields at least three different bleaching components; different TL traps can indicate bleaching components with similar values. According to the data of the present work each RTL bleaching component receives electrons from at least two peaks. The results of the present study strongly suggest that the traps that contribute to TL and OSL are the same. - Highlights: • A component resolved bleaching study was attempted to CaF_2:N in terms of CW-OSL, LM-OSL and RTL. • Bleaching decay constants originating from different TL peaks yield overlapping values. • Three to five individual components were used in order to describe the bleaching behavior in all luminescence entities. • There is only one, unique bleaching component present in all three luminescence entities.

  2. Crystal growth, spectroscopic and CW laser properties of Nd0.03Lu2.871Gd0.099Al5O12 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, J. Q.; Xu, X. D.; Cheng, S. S.; Li, D. Z.; Zhou, D. H.; Wu, F.; Zhao, Z. W.; Xu, J.

    2011-11-01

    Nd0.03Lu2.871Gd0.099Al5O12 (Nd:LuGdAG) crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The absorption, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime of Nd:LuGdAG crystal at room temperature were investigated for the first time. We reported the continuous-wave (CW) Nd:LuGdAG laser operation under diode pumping. Output power of 1.43 W at 1064 nm was achieved with a slope efficiency of 34.1%. All the results show that Nd:LuGdAG crystal is a promising laser material.

  3. Performance of a 967 nm CW diode end-pumped Er:GSGG laser at 2.79 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z H; Sun, D L; Wang, S Z; Luo, J Q; Li, X L; Huang, L; Hu, A L; Tang, Y Q; Guo, Q

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated a 967 nm diode end-pumped Er:GSGG laser operated at 2.794 μm with spectral width 3.6 nm in the continuous wave (CW) mode. A maximum output power of 440 mW is obtained at an incident pumping power of 3.4 W, which corresponds to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 13% and slope efficiency of 13.2%. The results suggest that a short cavity and efficient cooling setup for the crystal help to improve laser performance. (paper)

  4. A Tunable CW Orange Laser Based on a Cascaded MgO:PPLN Single-Pass Sum-Frequency Generation Module

    OpenAIRE

    Dismas K. Choge; Huai-Xi Chen; Bao-Lu Tian; Yi-Bin Xu; Guang-Wei Li; Wan-Guo Liang

    2018-01-01

    We report an all-solid-state continuous wave (CW) tunable orange laser based on cascaded single-pass sum-frequency generation with fundamental wavelengths at 1545.7 and 975.2 nm using two quasi-phase-matched (QPM) MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) crystals. Up to 10 mW of orange laser is generated in the cascaded module corresponding to a 10.4%/W nonlinear conversion efficiency. The orange output showed a temperature tuning rate of ~0.05 nm/°C, and the beam quality (M2) ...

  5. Design and operation of 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators for power levels up to 1 MW CW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Craig, L.J.; Felch, K.; Ives, L.; Lopez, N.; Spang, S.

    1986-12-01

    Varian has designed and tested 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators that have generated output powers of 100 kW CW and 200 kW for 1 ms pulses. Upcoming tubes will be designed to operate at power levels of 200 kW CW and ultimately up to 1 MW CW. The important design considerations which are addressed in the higher power tubes include the design of the electron gun, interaction circuit, and output window. These issues will be discussed and the results of the earlier 140 GHz gyrotron work at Varian will be summarized.

  6. Design and operation of 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators for power levels up to 1 MW CW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Craig, L.J.; Felch, K.; Ives, L.; Lopez, N.; Spang, S.

    1986-12-01

    Varian has designed and tested 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators that have generated output powers of 100 kW CW and 200 kW for 1 ms pulses. Upcoming tubes will be designed to operate at power levels of 200 kW CW and ultimately up to 1 MW CW. The important design considerations which are addressed in the higher power tubes include the design of the electron gun, interaction circuit, and output window. These issues will be discussed and the results of the earlier 140 GHz gyrotron work at Varian will be summarized

  7. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L.

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE 15,2,1 interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs

  8. A diode-end-pumped Nd:GYSGG continuous wave laser at 1104 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, B J; Kang, H X; Zhang, C G; Chen, P; Gao, R L; Liang, J; Gao, H J; Zhang, Q L; Sun, D L; Yin, S T; Luo, J Q

    2013-01-01

    The continuous wave (CW) laser performance of Nd:GYSGG at 1104 nm is investigated for the first time, to our knowledge. A CW laser output power of 4.7 W is obtained when the pump power of the 808 nm fiber coupled laser diode is 19.1 W, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 24.6% and slope efficiency of 37%. (paper)

  9. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-01-01

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications

  10. First lasing of the Darmstadt cw free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Brunken, M; Eichhorn, R; Genz, H; Gräf, H D; Loos, H; Richter, A; Schweizer, B; Stascheck, A; Wesp, T

    1999-01-01

    The Darmstadt CW FEL designed for wavelengths between 3 and 10 mu m driven by the superconducting electron accelerator S-DALINAC first lased on December 1st, 1996 and has operated thereafter successfully in the wavelength region between 6.6 and 7.8 mu m. The pulsed electron beam employed had a micro pulse length of about 2ps, with a repetition rate of 10 MHz and a peak current of 2.7 A while its energy was varied between 29.6 and 31.5 MeV. A wedged pole hybrid undulator, with 80 periods each of 0.032 m length and a magnetic field strength of 0.15-0.4T, was located in between a 15.01 m long optical cavity equipped with two high reflectivity (99.8) mirrors of 0.05 m diameter. Due to the low beam current special care with respect to the electron and optical beam properties was necessary to meet the stringent conditions in order to reach a minute small signal gain of at least a few percent resulting in amplification. Saturation was obtained after about 2000 repetitions of the photon pulse inside the cavity. The D...

  11. Sea-dumped CW munitions - the European component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.; Stock, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to outline the European magnitude of sea-dumped CW munitions. Hereby the paper attempts to provide an overview on historical dumping activities, both for conventional and chemical munitions. The potential dangers which might result from these dumping activities are discussed in brief. Among others the differences in deep sea dumping and dumping in shallow waters are evaluated. Further, the presentation will outline and discuss the different technology steps: (a) identification, (b) recovery, (c) transportation and (d) destruction (on- or off-shore), necessary for possible cleaning of dumping sites. Thereafter an evaluation of the different technologies available/applied is performed, in particular on the destruction part. Hereby the already practised experience is displayed. Based upon existing treaty regimes an actual judgment of possible application of treaty provisions for demanding cleaning up operations is discussed. The question if treaty obligations can be used to force cleaning operations is debated. A possible match of the technology package available with the scope/magnitude of the munitions dumping problem is discussed. Hereby the gaps between the size of the problem and the most suitable technologies for recovery and destruction are illustrated. The resulting answers should be regarded as possible technical guidelines for future development activities as well existing limitations to solve the problems. The papers will result in some general guidelines for future prospect on the issues of dumped munitions, in particular chemical munitions under the European context.(author)

  12. Internal optical losses in very thin cw heterojunction laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.K.; Kressel, H.; Ladany, I.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented showing the relationship between the internal laser absorption and structural parameters appropriate for cw room-temperature lasers. These diodes have submicron-thick recombination regions, and very small spacings between the heat sink and the recombination region to minimize the thermal resistance. The optical loss is shown to be strongly dependent on the degree of radiation confinement to the active region. In particular, absorption in the surface GaAs layer providing the ohmic contact becomes very significant when the intermediate (AlGa)As layer is reduced below about 1 μm. It is further shown that excessive penetration into the GaAs regions gives rise to anomalies in the far-field radiation profiles in the direction perpendicular to the junction plane. Proper design of the internal structure of the laser avoids large increases of the threshold current density as well as large decreases in the external differential quantum efficiency from interaction with the contact layer. The design curves presented can be used to predict the gain required at threshold for a broad range of structural parameters of interest in low-threshold laser design

  13. Micromachining for Si etching using CW CO_2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hawat, Sh.; Naddaf, M.; Al-Sadat, W.; Wiess, Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Many experiments were carried out to achieve etching for silicon samples located on glass substrate (Pyrex or Quartz) using CW CO_2 laser under treating conditions which were in the case of linear scanning as: the power was 35-47 W, the number of round trips was 10-60 and the linear scanning speed was 17-75 mm/s, and in the case of fixed sample they were as: the power was 40 W and the exposure time was between 2-6 min. The obtained results were different depending on the form of etching and its quality, according to the applied treating conditions on the silicon samples, taking the treated silicon surface attached directly to the glass substrate surface or taking the opposite side of the silicon sample. The etching of the first type was easy to get, but the second one was more difficult to obtain, which requires very strong conditions. The best of these results were recorded using a quartz substrate under treating conditions: the laser power was 42.5 W, the number of round trips was 30, and the scanning speed was 75 mm/s, so the etching was limited to separate spots produced on the surface of the sample. In the all cases, the pictures of spots and lines formed on treated Si samples were taken using scanning electron microscope (SEM) for both sides of the studied samples.(author)

  14. Micromachining for Si etching using CW CO 2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawat, Sh.; Naddaf, M.; Al-Sadat, W.; Weiss, Sh.

    2012-08-01

    Many experiments were carried out to achieve etching for silicon samples located on glass substrate (Pyrex or Quartz) using Cw CO 2 laser under treating conditions which were in the case of linear scanning as: the power was 35-47 W, the number of round trips was 10-60 and the linear scanning speed was 17-75 mm/s, and in the case of fixed sample they were as: the power was 40 W and the exposure time was between 2-6 min. The obtained results were different depending on the form of etching and its quality, according to the applied treating conditions on the silicon samples, taking the treated silicon surface attached directly to the glass substrate surface or taking the opposite side of the silicon sample. The etching of the first type was easy to get, but the second one was more difficult to obtain, which requires very strong conditions. The best of these results were recorded using a quartz substrate under treating conditions: the laser power was 42.5 W, the number of round trips was 30, and the scanning speed was 75 mm/s, so the etching was limited to separate spots produced on the surface of the sample. In the all cases, the pictures of spots and lines formed on treated Si samples were taken using scanning electron microscope (SEM) for both sides of the studied samples. (authors)

  15. Source Estimation for the Damped Wave Equation Using Modulating Functions Method: Application to the Estimation of the Cerebral Blood Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-10-19

    In this paper, a method based on modulating functions is proposed to estimate the Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF). The problem is written in an input estimation problem for a damped wave equation which is used to model the spatiotemporal variations of blood mass density. The method is described and its performance is assessed through some numerical simulations. The robustness of the method in presence of noise is also studied.

  16. Negative refraction of elastic waves in 2D phononic crystals: Contribution of resonant transmissions to the construction of the image of a point source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Hladky-Hennion

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Negative refraction properties of a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC, made of a triangular lattice of steel rods embedded in epoxy are investigated both experimentally and numerically. First, experiments have been carried out on a prism shaped PC immersed in water. Then, for focusing purposes, a flat lens is considered and the construction of the image of a point source is analyzed in details, when indices are matched between the PC and the surrounding fluid medium, whereas acoustic impedances are mismatched. Optimal conditions for focusing longitudinal elastic waves by such PC flat lens are then discussed.

  17. A slow mode wave as a possible source of Pi 2 and associated particle precipitation: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saka

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available An intensification of auroral luminosity referred to as an auroral break-up often accompanies the onset of geomagnetic pulsation (Pi 2 at the dip-equator. One such auroral break-up occurred at 2239 UT on 16 June, 1986, being accompanied by weak substorm activity (AE~50 nT which was recorded in all-sky image of Syowa Station, Antarctica (66.2°S, 71.8°E in geomagnetic coordinates. The associated Pi 2 magnetic pulsation was detected by a fluxgate magnetometer in the afternoon sector at the dip-equator (Huancayo, Peru; 1.44°N, 355.9° in geomagnetic coordinates; 12.1°S, 75.2°W in geographic coordinates; L=1.00. In spite of the large separation of the two stations in longitude and latitude, the auroral break-up and subsequent luminosity modulation were seen to be correlated with the wave form of the ground Pi 2 pulsation. This occurred in such a way that the luminosity maximum was seen to occur at the phase of maximum amplitudes of Pi 2 wave form. We argue that the observed correlation could be interpreted as indicating a Pi 2-modulation of a field-aligned acceleration of the low energy electrons that may occur near the equator of the midnight magnetosphere.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; energetic particles · precipitating; MHD waves and instabilities

  18. A slow mode wave as a possible source of Pi 2 and associated particle precipitation: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saka

    Full Text Available An intensification of auroral luminosity referred to as an auroral break-up often accompanies the onset of geomagnetic pulsation (Pi 2 at the dip-equator. One such auroral break-up occurred at 2239 UT on 16 June, 1986, being accompanied by weak substorm activity (AE~50 nT which was recorded in all-sky image of Syowa Station, Antarctica (66.2°S, 71.8°E in geomagnetic coordinates. The associated Pi 2 magnetic pulsation was detected by a fluxgate magnetometer in the afternoon sector at the dip-equator (Huancayo, Peru; 1.44°N, 355.9° in geomagnetic coordinates; 12.1°S, 75.2°W in geographic coordinates; L=1.00. In spite of the large separation of the two stations in longitude and latitude, the auroral break-up and subsequent luminosity modulation were seen to be correlated with the wave form of the ground Pi 2 pulsation. This occurred in such a way that the luminosity maximum was seen to occur at the phase of maximum amplitudes of Pi 2 wave form. We argue that the observed correlation could be interpreted as indicating a Pi 2-modulation of a field-aligned acceleration of the low energy electrons that may occur near the equator of the midnight magnetosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; energetic particles · precipitating; MHD waves and instabilities

  19. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system.

  20. Separation of radiated sound field components from waves scattered by a source under non-anechoic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    to the source. Thus the radiated free-field component is estimated simultaneously with solving the inverse problem of reconstructing the sound field near the source. The method is particularly suited to cases in which the overall contribution of reflected sound in the measurement plane is significant....

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma formed by cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation in various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation was made of the interaction between high-power cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical breakdown plasma near a metal surface. Characteristics of the breakdown plasma were studied as a function of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis was made of the results using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  2. A new approach to model CW CO2 laser using rate equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-11

    Nov 11, 2016 ... Abstract. Two popular methods to analyse the operation of CW CO2 lasers use the temperature model and ... Grouping of the vibration levels helped in restrict- ..... [10] D C Tyte, Carbon dioxide lasers, in: Advances in quan-.

  3. How should the JAERI neutron source be designed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Noboru

    1996-01-01

    The importance of a next-generation neutron source in JAERI is discussed. The feasibility and the performances of three types of neutron sources, namely continuous wave spallation source (CWSS), long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) and short-pulse spallation source (SPSS), are compared based on a proposed JAERI accelerator, a superconducting (SC) proton linac (1-1.5 GeV, 25-16 mA in peak current, finally CW). How to realize one of the world's best neutron source using such a linac with a modest beam-current and what type of neutron source is the best for such a linac are the most important current problems. Since the accelerator is not favorable for LPSS due to a lower peak current and there exist serious technical problems for a CWSS target, a short-pulse spallation source would be the best candidate to realize a 5 MW-class SPSS like ESS, provided that the H - -injection to a compressor ring over a long pulse duration (>2 ms) is feasible. (author)

  4. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  5. Research on cw electron accelerators using room-temperature rf structures: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This joint NBS-Los Alamos project of ''Research on CW Electron Accelerators Using Room-Temperature RF Structures'' began seven years ago with the goal of developing a technology base for cw electron accelerators. In this report we describe our progress during FY 1986 and present our plans for completion of the project. First, however, it is appropriate to review the past contributions of the project, describe its status, and indicate its future benefits

  6. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, H.; Minowa, T.; Shimazu, M.

    1988-01-01

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 10 3 cm -3 at the ionization area. (author)

  7. The apparent source size of type III radio bursts: Preliminary results by the STEREO/WAVES instruments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupař, Vratislav; Maksimovic, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cecconi, B.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Hoang, S.; Goetz, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1216, č. 1 (2010), s. 284-287 ISSN 0094-243X. [International Solar Wind Conference /12./. Saint-Milo, 21.06.2009-26.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA AV ČR IAA301120601; GA MŠk ME09107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : WAVES Instrument * Solar Radio Emissions * Singular Value Decomposition technique Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Test result of 5 GHz, 500 kW CW prototype klystron for KSTAR LHCD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, H., E-mail: heejindo@nfri.re.kr [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, S. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H.; Bae, Y.S.; Yang, H.L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 350-333 (Korea, Republic of); Delpech, L.; Magne, R.; Hoang, G.T. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Park, H.; Cho, M.H.; Namkung, W. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A 5 GHz LHCD system is being designed for current drive and profile modification necessary for AT mode and steady-state operation of the KSTAR tokamak. A prototype 500 kW CW klystron operating at 5 GHz was developed for the steady-state RF source. In this klystron, a multi-cell cavity is introduced to reduce cavity voltage and ohmic power loss. The klystron is designed with a triode system for optimization of gain, efficiency and beam control. The high voltage for the cathode is turned by using a thyristor switching system at the low voltage transformer unit. For anode voltage control, a mod-anode voltage divider system is used which utilize the parallel-circuit of the FET switch and Zener diodes. The RF output power of the klystron was 300 kW for 800 s and 450 kW for 20 s. The maximal temperature at collector top surface was 83 deg. C and power loss at the tube body did not exceed 10 kW, the interlock level for the protection of the klystron. Detailed results of the klystron system test and commissioning are presented.

  9. RF system developments for CW and/or long pulse linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    High Power Proton Linacs are under development or proposed for development at Los Alamos and elsewhere. By current standards these linacs all require very large amounts of RF power. The Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) is a CW accelerator with an output current and energy of 100 mA and 1,700 MeV, respectively. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), in its ultimate configuration, is a pulsed accelerator with an average output power of 4 MW of beam. Other accelerators such as those that address transmutation and upgrades to LANSCE have similar requirements. For these high average power applications, the RF systems represent approximately half of the total cost of the linac and are thus key elements in the design and configuration of the accelerator. Los Alamos is fortunate to be actively working on both APT and SNS. For these programs the author is pursuing a number of component developments which are aimed at one or more of the key issues for large RF systems: technical performance, capital cost, reliability, and operating efficiency. This paper briefly describes some of the linac applications and then provides updates on the key RF developments being pursued

  10. 1 MW, 352.2 MHz, CW and Pulsed RF test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badapanda, M.K.; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Upadhyay, Rinki; Tyagi, Rajiv; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    A 1 MW, 352.2 MHz, RF test stand based on Thales make TH 2089 klystron amplifier is being developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore for characterization and qualification of RF components, cavities and related subsystems. Provision to vary RF power from 50 kW to 1 MW with adequate flexibility for testing wide range of HV components, RF components and cavities is incorporated in this test stand. The paper presents a brief detail of various power supplies like high voltage cathode bias power supply, modulating anode power supply, filament power supply, electromagnet power supplies and ion pump power supplies along with their interconnections for biasing TH 2089 klystron amplifier. A digital control and interlock system is being developed to realize proper sequence of operation of various power supplies and to monitor the status of crucial parameters in this test set up. This RF test stand will be a unique national facility, capable of providing both CW and pulse RF power for realizing reliable RF power sources for various projects including the development of high energy proton linac under ADSS program of the Department of Atomic Energy. (author)

  11. Doppler-shift proton fraction measurement on a CW proton injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Sherman, J.D.; Zaugg, T.J.; Arvin, A.H.; Bolt, A.S.; Richards, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A spectrometer/Optical Multi-channel Analyzer has been used to measure the proton fraction of the cw proton injector developed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos. This technique, pioneered by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), was subsequently adopted by the international fusion community as the standard for determining the extracted ion fractions of neutral beam injectors. Proton fractions up to 95 ± 3% have been measured on the LEDA injector. These values are in good agreement with results obtained by magnetically sweeping the ion beam, collimated by a slit, across a Faraday cup. Since the velocity distribution of each beam species is measured, it also can be used to determine beam divergence. While divergence has not yet been ascertained due to the wide slit widths in use, non-Gaussian distributions have been observed during operation above the design-matched perveance. An additional feature is that the presence of extracted water ions can be observed. During ion source conditioning at 75 kV, an extracted water fraction > 30% was briefly observed

  12. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window.

  13. Rapidly tunable continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator pumped by a fiber laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, M.E.; Gross, P.; Boller, Klaus J.; Auerbach, M.; Wessels, P.; Fallnich, C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on rapid, all-electronically controlled wavelength tuning of a continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an ytterbium fiber laser. The OPO is singly resonant for the signal wave and consists of a 40-mm-long periodically poled lithium niobate crystal in a

  14. A source of illumination for low-noise ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Strain, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    A low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow sensors having a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. These sensors were designed to detect ‘Violin-Mode’ resonances in the suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors. The source of illumination (emitter) described here used a single column of 8 × miniature near infrared LEDs (λ = 890 nm). These emitters cast the shadows of 400 μm diameter fused silica suspension fibres onto their complementary shadow-displacement detectors, located at a distance of 74 fibre diameters (29.6 mm) behind the axes of the fibres themselves. Violin-Mode vibrations of each fibre were sensed as differential ac photocurrents in the corresponding ‘split-photodiode’ detector. This paper describes the design, construction, noise analysis, and measures that were taken in the conception of the emitters, in order to produce high-contrast shadows at such distant detectors. In this way it proved possible to obtain, simultaneously, a very high transfer sensitivity to Violin-Mode vibration of the fibres, and a very low level of detection noise—close to the fundamental shot noise limit—whilst remaining within the constraints of this simple design of emitter. The shadow detector is described in an accompanying paper.

  15. Finite-Difference Modeling of Seismic Wave Scattering in 3D Heterogeneous Media: Generation of Tangential Motion from an Explosion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, E. T.; Pitarka, A.; Mellors, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Evan Hirakawa, Arben Pitarka, and Robert Mellors One challenging task in explosion seismology is development of physical models for explaining the generation of S-waves during underground explosions. Pitarka et al. (2015) used finite difference simulations of SPE-3 (part of Source Physics Experiment, SPE, an ongoing series of underground chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site) and found that while a large component of shear motion was generated directly at the source, additional scattering from heterogeneous velocity structure and topography are necessary to better match the data. Large-scale features in the velocity model used in the SPE simulations are well constrained, however, small-scale heterogeneity is poorly constrained. In our study we used a stochastic representation of small-scale variability in order to produce additional high-frequency scattering. Two methods for generating the distributions of random scatterers are tested. The first is done in the spatial domain by essentially smoothing a set of random numbers over an ellipsoidal volume using a Gaussian weighting function. The second method consists of filtering a set of random numbers in the wavenumber domain to obtain a set of heterogeneities with a desired statistical distribution (Frankel and Clayton, 1986). This method is capable of generating distributions with either Gaussian or von Karman autocorrelation functions. The key parameters that affect scattering are the correlation length, the standard deviation of velocity for the heterogeneities, and the Hurst exponent, which is only present in the von Karman media. Overall, we find that shorter correlation lengths as well as higher standard deviations result in increased tangential motion in the frequency band of interest (0 - 10 Hz). This occurs partially through S-wave refraction, but mostly by P-S and Rg-S waves conversions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore

  16. Forensic Application of FM-CW and Pulse Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Koppenjan; R. S. Freeland; M. L. Miller; R. E. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology has supplied vital assistance in criminal investigations. However, law enforcement personnel desire further developments such that the technology is rapidly deployable, and that it provides both a simple user interface and sophisticated target identification. To assist in the development of target identification algorithms, our efforts involve gathering background GPR data for the various site conditions and circumstances that often typify clandestine burials. For this study, forensic anthropologists established shallow-grave plots at The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) that are specific to GPR research. These plots contain donated human cadavers lying in various configurations and depths, surrounded by assorted construction material and backfill debris. We scanned the plots using two GPR technologies: (1) a multi-frequency synthetic-aperture FM-CW radar (200-700 MHz) (GPR-X) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), Bechtel Nevada (Koppenjan et al., 2000), and (2) a commercial pulse radar (SIR-20) manufactured by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (400 and 900 MHz)(GSSI). The sweep-frequency data show the large biological mass decomposing within the torso as encircled ''hot spots.'' The 400-MHz pulse radar exhibit major horizontal reflectors above the body, with shadow reflectors (horizontal multiples) occurring beneath the body at 60 cm depth. The 400-MHz antenna was able to discern the grave walls and folded tarp covering the lower body. Under these moist, clay-rich conditions, the 900-MHz antenna was able to penetrate slightly beyond 30 cm beneath the concrete layer. However, neither system was able to penetrate beyond a one meter depth in the moist, clay-rich soil (fine, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalf). Example scans from each system are provided, along with a discussion of the survey protocol and general performance.

  17. Evaluation of environmental impact from APCA/CW partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milmoe, P.H.; Ross, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the APCA/Climate Wise Partnership and its potential energy and environmental impacts. The authors discuss the issues surrounding greenhouse gas emissions from the production of cement, new and future technologies, and the primary drivers and barriers associated with reducing emissions. The APCA/CW Partner actions and the aggregated impacts of these actions that are undertaken through this partnership are examined. These impacts include cost and energy savings and emission reductions for the current year, and estimated for the year 2000. Comparing these impacts to industrial CO 2 benchmarks indicate the level of effort and what additionally needs to be accomplished. The current results from this partnership indicate that in the remainder of the industry adopts their level of effort, greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced well below the business-as-usual benchmarks. The US cement industry accounts for about 1.5% of US industrial energy use and about 5% of US industrial carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. In 1997 Climate Wise and the American Portland Cement Alliance (APCA) embarked upon a unique partnership to turn energy efficiency and pollution prevention into a corporate asset. This partnership consists of the 16 APCA member companies, representing nearly 60% of US cement manufacturing capacity. Climate Wise, working with APCA and industry representatives, developed the cement industry Action Plan Software, reporting workbook, and sample Action Plan. Through these tools, continued technical support, and the hard work of the APCA companies, this partnership is showing positive results. Over half of the APCA Climate Wise partners have submitted Action Plans - detailing a comprehensive array of current and future actions to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These Action Plans have supplied valuable information about how this industry is reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

  18. The Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) design and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M. (Grumman Space and Electronics Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States)); Nightingale, M.P.S. (AEA Industrial Technology, Culham (United Kingdom)); Yule, T.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The design of the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) and the status of the fabricated hardware is presented. The CWDD is a high brightness, 352 MHz, CW linear accelerator designed to deliver a 7.54 MeV, 80 mA D[sup [minus

  19. Gravitational wave sources from Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of their host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacucci, Fabio; Loeb, Abraham; Salvadori, Stefania

    2017-10-01

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) generated by merging black holes has recently opened up a new observational window into the Universe. The mass of the black holes in the first and third Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) detections (36-29 M⊙ and 32-19 M⊙) suggests low-metallicity stars as their most likely progenitors. Based on high-resolution N-body simulations, coupled with state-of-the-art metal enrichment models, we find that the remnants of Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of galaxies. The probability of a GW signal to be generated by Pop III stars reaches ∼90 per cent at ∼0.5 kpc from the galaxy centre, compared to a benchmark value of ∼5 per cent outside the core. The predicted merger rates inside bulges is ∼60 × βIII Gpc-3 yr-1 (βIII is the Pop III binarity fraction). To match the 90 per cent credible range of LIGO merger rates, we obtain: 0.03 proof for the existence of Pop III stars.

  20. Ground and Satellite Observations of ULF Waves Artificially Produced by HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Shroff, H.; Doxas, I.; Papadopoulos, D.; Milikh, G.; Parrot, M.

    2008-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating at ULF frequencies using the HAARP heater was performed from April 28 to May 3, 2008 (http://www.haarp.alaska.edu). Simultaneous ground-based ULF measurements were made locally at Gakona, AK and at Lake Ozette, WA that is 2000 km away. The ground-based results showed that ULF amplitudes measured at Gakona are mostly proportional to the electrojet strength above HAARP, indicating electrojet modulation to be the source of the local ULF waves. However, the timing of ULF events recorded at Lake Ozette did not correlated with the electrojet strength at Gakona, indicating that modulation of F region pressure is the more likely source for distant ULF waves. These observations are consistent with the theoretical understanding that ULF waves generated by current modulation are shear Alfven waves propagating along the magnetic field line, thus at high latitude their observations are limited to the vicinity of the heated spot. On the other hand, propagation of ULF waves at significant lateral distances requires generation of magnetosonic waves since they are the only mode that propagates isotropically and can thus couple efficiently in the Alfvenic duct. In addition to ground-based observations, the DEMETER satellite also provided space measurements of the heating effects during its passes over HAARP. The DEMETER results showed direct detection of HAARP ULF waves at 0.1 Hz. Moreover, density dips were observed every time HAARP was operated at CW mode, which provides clear evidence of duct formation by direct HF heating at F peak. Details of these results will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.