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Sample records for water-immersion restraint stress

  1. Plasma CRH response to water immersion-restraint stress in rats bearing a hypothalamic knife cut.

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    Nishioka, T; Iyota, K; Takao, T; Suemaru, S; Numata, Y; Hashimoto, K

    1994-08-01

    We reported earlier that the plasma level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) remained high 120 min after the onset of such strong sustained stress as ether-laparotomy or water immersion-restraint, which reflected the persistent secretion of CRH from the hypothalamic median eminence (ME). We investigated the change in plasma CRH during water immersion-restraint stress in rats bearing an anterolateral cut around the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) which cuts the CRH neurons from the PVN to the ME. Concentrations of CRH in the hypothalamus, extrahypothalamic tissues and peripheral blood were measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma ACTH was measured with an immunoradiometric assay kit. Plasma baseline ACTH and CRH concentrations did not differ significantly in the sham vs. cut groups. At 120 min after the onset of stress, plasma ACTH concentrations were definitely higher in both groups. In the cut group, plasma CRH at 120 min after stress did not differ significantly from the baseline level, whereas plasma CRH at 120 min was definitely higher in the sham group. Baseline CRH concentrations in the ME did not differ greatly in the two groups. CRH concentrations in the ME of both groups had decreased appreciably 120 min after the onset of stress as compared with baseline CRH, and the CRH decrease was greater in the cut group than in the sham group. CRH in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) and adrenal gland of both groups showed no significant change at 120 min, compared with the control. These findings confirm that the continuous CRH increase in plasma during sustained stress is derived mainly from the hypothalamus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of Hemin on Brain Alterations and Neuroglobin Expression in Water Immersion Restraint Stressed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merhan Ragy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, the heme oxygenase (HO system has been reported to be very active and its modulation seems to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Hemin as HO-1 inducer has been shown to attenuate neuronal injury so the goal of this study was to assess the effect of hemin therapy on the acute stress and how it would modulate neurological outcome. Thirty male albino rats were divided into three groups: control group and stressed group with six-hour water immersion restraint stress (WIRS and stressed group, treated with hemin, in which each rat received a single intraperitoneal injection of hemin at a dose level of 50 mg/kg body weight at 12 hours before exposure to WIRS. Stress hormones, oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde (MDA, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured and expressions of neuroglobin and S100B mRNA in brain tissue were assayed. Our results revealed that hemin significantly affects brain alterations induced by acute stress and this may be through increased expression of neuroglobin and through antioxidant effect. Hemin decreased blood-brain barrier damage as it significantly decreased the expression of S100B. These results suggest that hemin may be an effective therapy for being neuroprotective against acute stress.

  3. Palm vitamin E reduces catecholamines, xanthine oxidase activity and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fahami Nur Azlina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the effects of Palm vitamin E (PVE and α-tocopherol (α-TF supplementations on adrenalin, noradrenalin, xanthine oxidase plus dehydrogenase (XO + XD activities and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS. Methods Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats (200-250 g were randomly divided into three equal sized groups. The control group was given a normal diet, while the treated groups received the same diet with oral supplementation of PVE or α-TF at 60 mg/kg body weight. After the treatment period of 28 days, each group was further subdivided into two groups with 10 rats without exposing them to stress and the other 10 rats were subjected to WIRS for 3.5 hours. Blood samples were taken to measure the adrenalin and noradrenalin levels. The rats were then sacrificed following which the stomach was excised and opened along the greater curvature and examined for lesions and XO + XD activities. Results The rats exposed to WIRS had lesions in their stomach mucosa. Our findings showed that dietary supplementations of PVE and α-TF were able to reduce gastric lesions significantly in comparison to the stressed control group. WIRS increased plasma adrenalin and noradrenalin significantly. PVE and α-TF treatments reduced these parameters significantly compared to the stressed control. Conclusions Supplementations with either PVE or α-TF reduce the formation of gastric lesions. Their protective effect was related to their abilities to inhibit stress induced elevation of adrenalin and noradrenalin levels as well as through reduction in xanthine oxidase and dehydrogenase activities.

  4. Betaine attenuates memory impairment after water-immersion restraint stress and is regulated by the GABAergic neuronal system in the hippocampus.

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    Kunisawa, Kazuo; Kido, Kiwamu; Nakashima, Natsuki; Matsukura, Takuya; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Hiramatsu, Masayuki

    2017-02-05

    GABA mediated neuronal system regulates hippocampus-dependent memory and stress responses by controlling plasticity and neuronal excitability. Here, we demonstrate that betaine ameliorates water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced memory impairments. This improvement was inhibited by a betaine/GABA transporter-1 (GABA transporter-2: GAT2) inhibitor, NNC 05-2090. In this study, we investigated whether memory amelioration by betaine was mediated by the GABAergic neuronal system. Adult male mice were co-administered betaine and GABA receptor antagonists after WIRS. We also examined whether memory impairment after WIRS was attenuated by GABA receptor agonists. The memory functions were evaluated using a novel object recognition test 3-6 days after WIRS and/or the step-down type passive avoidance test at 7-8 days. The co-administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (1mg/kg) or the GABAB receptor antagonist phaclofen (10mg/kg) 1h after WIRS suppressed the memory-improving effects induced by betaine. Additionally, the administration of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (1mg/kg) or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (10mg/kg) 1h after WIRS attenuated memory impairments. These results were similar to the data observed with betaine. The treatment with betaine after WIRS significantly decreased the expression of GABA transaminase, and this effect was partially blocked by NNC 05-2090 in the hippocampus. WIRS caused a transient increase in hippocampal GABA levels and the changes after WIRS were not affected by betaine treatment in an in vivo microdialysis study. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of betaine may be mediated in part by changing the GABAergic neuronal system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates gastric mucosal injury induced by restraint water-immersion stress via activation of KATP channel and NF-κB dependent pathway

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    Sun, Hong-Zhao; Zheng, Shan; Lu, Kai; Hou, Feng-Tian; Bi, Jie-Xue; Liu, Xue-Lian; Wang, Shan-Shan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on restraint water-immersion stress (RWIS)-induced gastric lesions in rats and the influence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway on such an effect. METHODS Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group, a physiological saline (PS) group, a sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) group, a glibenclamide (Gl) group, Gl plus NaHS group, a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) group, and a PDTC plus NaHS group. Gastric mucosal injury was induced by RWIS for 3 h in rats, and gastric mucosal damage was analyzed after that. The PS, NaHS (100 μmol/kg body weight), Gl (100 μmol/kg body weight), Gl (100 μmol/kg or 150 μmol/kg body weight) plus NaHS (100 μmol/kg body weight), PDTC (100 μmol/kg body weight), and PDTC (100 μmol/kg body weight) plus NaHS (100 μmol/kg body weight) were respectively injected intravenously before RWIS. RESULTS RWIS induced serious gastric lesions in the rats in the PS pretreatment group. The pretreatment of NaHS (a H2S donor) significantly reduced the damage induced by RWIS. The gastric protective effect of the NaHS during RWIS was attenuated by PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor, and also by glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker, in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION These results suggest that exogenous H2S plays a protective role against RWIS injury in rats, possibly through modulation of KATP channel opening and the NF-κB dependent pathway. PMID:28104983

  6. Effect of glutathione on gastric mucosal lesion induced by restraint water-immersion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li Wan; Chang Liu Wang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of glutathione (GSH) on stress gastric mucosal lesion.METHODS The stress gastric mucosal lesion as produced by restraint water-immersion in rats and gastricmucosal lesion, gastric mucosal GSH content, gastric acid secretion and gastric barrier mucus secretion wereexamined. We also observed the effect of GSH on gastric mucosal lesion and the effect of N-ethylmaleimine(NEM) and indomethacin on GSH protection. Comparisons between two groups were made using the Students t test.RESULTS GSH (100 and 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally protected against stress gastric mucosal lesion(P0.05). The preinjection of NEM (10 mg/kg, sc.), a sulfhydryl-blocking reagent, or indomethacin(5 mg/kg, im.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, had no effect on protection of GSH (P>0.05). GSH(100mg/kg) significantly increased secretion of gastric barrier mucus (P0.05).CONCLUSION GSH can inhibit the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by restraint water-immersion. The protective effect of GSH was due, in part, to promoting the secretion of gastric barriermucus, but not to suppress the gastric acid secretion. The protection effect of GSH has no relation withgastric mucosal GSH and PGs.

  7. 雌孕激素通过调节一氧化氮影响束缚应激小鼠结肠动力%Estradiol and Progesterone Regulate the Activities of Colonic Smooth Muscle in Water-immersion and Restraint Stress Mice by Modulating NO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红霞; 潘虹; 施真; 王华

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Stress affects gastrointestinal motility ang causes more severe symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. This study adopts water-immersion and restraint stress mice model of irritable bowel syndrome and observe effect of estradiol and progesterone on the colon mobility and changes of nitric oxide in the colon. Then we investigate the regulatory effect of estradiol and progesterone on the colon mobility and its mechanism and provide the theory basis for clinical treatment IBS. Methods: The irritable bowel syndrome mice model was induced by Water-immersion and restraint stress. The muscular tension was measured by observing dung points and the muscular tension of isolated muscle strips from colon in mice was measured by transducer. Nitrate/nitrite colorimetric assay was used to detect the NO content in colon. Results: Water-immersion and restraint stress increased the colon mobility and reduced colon NO level. Compared with the model group,estradiol partly reversed the above effects. Progesterone and estradiol+progesterone intensify these effects. Conclusion: Estradiol and progesterone regulate the activities of colonic smooth muscle in Water-immersion and restraint stress mice by modulating NO. The intensity of colon mobility evaluated and the content of nitric oxide in the colon reduced in the water-immersion and restraint stress mice model of irritable bowel syndrome. Estradio reverses the above effects and progesterone strengthen the above effects.%目的:应激对胃肠动力有重要的影响,可引起肠易激综合征患者症状的发作或加重,本研究采用束缚-浸水应激诱导肠易激综合征模型小鼠,分别予以雌激素、孕激素和雌激素+孕激素处理,观察结肠动力学及NO含量指标,以探讨雌、孕激素能否改善应激诱发的结肠功能异常并探讨其调节机制,进从为临床治疗肠易激综合征提供理论依据.方法:建立束缚浸水应激诱发的肠易激综合征小鼠模型,制备离体结

  8. Gastric mucosal damage in water immersion stress:Mechanism and prevention with GHRP-6

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    Shu Guo; Qian Gao; Qing Jiao; Wei Hao; Xue Gao; Ji-Min Cao

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the mechanism of gastric mucosal demage induced by water immersion restraint stress (WRS) and its prevention by growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6).METHODS:Male Wistar rats were subjected to conscious or unconscious (anesthetized) WRS,simple restraint (SR),free swimming (FS),non-water fluid immersion,immersion without water contact,or rats were placed in a cage surrounded by sand.To explore the sensitivity structures that influence the stress reaction besides skin stimuli,a group the rats had their eyes occluded.Cervical bilateral trunk vagotomy or atropine injection was performed in some rats to assess the parasympathetic role in mucosal damage.Gastric mucosal lesions,acid output and heart rate variability were measured.Plasma renin,endothelin-1 and thromboxane B2 and gastric heat shock protein 70 were also assayed.GHRP-6 was injected [intraperitoneal (IP) or intracerebroventricular (ICV)]2 h before the onset of stress to observe its potential prevention of the mucosal lesion.RESULTS:WRS for 6 h induced serious gastric mucosal lesion [lesion area,WRS 81.8 ± 6.4 mm2 vs normal control 0.0 ± 0.0 mm2,P < 0.01],decreased the heart rate,and increased the heart rate variability and gastric acid secretion,suggesting an increase in vagal nervecarrying stimuli.The mucosal injury was inversely correlated with water temperature (lesion area,WRS at 35 ℃ 56.4 ± 5.2 mm2 vs WRS at 23 ℃ 81.8 ± 6.4 mm2,P < 0.01) and was consciousness-dependent.The injury could not be prevented by eye occlusion,but could be prevented by avoiding contact of the rat body with the water by dressing it in an impermeable plastic suit.When water was replaced by vegetable oil or liquid paraffin,there were gastric lesions in the same grade of water immersion.When rat were placed in a cage surrounded by sand,there were no gastric lesions.All these data point to a remarkable importance of cutenuous information transmitted to the high neural center that by vagal nerves

  9. Effect of HRP and AP Labeling on Fos Expression in Catecholamine Neurons of the NTS of Rats During Restraint Water-immersion Stress%HRP和AP呈现束缚-浸水应激大鼠NTS儿茶酚胺能神经元Fos表达的效果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵东芹; 艾洪滨

    2011-01-01

    用辣根过氧化物酶(HRP)单酶先后标记Fos和酪氨酸羟化酶(TH),用二氨基联苯胺(DAB)增强剂和DAB分别呈色;以及同时用碱性磷酸酶(AP)和HRP双酶分别标记TH和Fos,再分别用5-溴-4-氯-3-吲哚磷酸盐(BCIP)和氯化硝基四氮唑蓝(NBT)对TH和DAB对Fos呈色,比较免疫双标时两种不同酶标记显色方法对研究大鼠孤束核(NTS)内儿茶酚胺能神经元在束缚-浸水应激中作用效果的影响.两种显色方法的免疫阳性神经元都清晰易辩,结果应激组NTS内Fos,TH及Fos/TH双标阳性神经元数目均显著增加.但HRP单酶双底物显色系统耗时长、非特异性着色强,在抗体种属来源不同时可优先考虑使用HRP/AP双酶双底物显色.%A dual immunohistochemical technique is used to detect the effect of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) labeling on Fos expression in catecholaminergic neurons of the neucleus of solitary tract (NTS) of rats during restraint water-immersion stress (RWIS). One method is that horse radish peroxidase (HRP) labeled Fos and TH in turn, and then using diaminobenzidine hydrochloride (DAB), intensified with 0. 05% cobalt chloride and 0. 05% nickel ammonium sulfate, to visualize Fos-immunoreactive neurons (Fos-IR) , and DAB to TH-immunoreactive neurons (TH-IR). The other method is that HRP labeled Fos and alkaline phosphatase (AP) labeled TH neurons, and then using DAB and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3- indolylphosphate (BCIP)/nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to visualize Fos-IR and TH-IR respectively. Fos-IR nuclei, TH-IR, Fos and TH double labeled neurons evidently increase in stressed rats. The two methods all fit to reveal the phenotypic nature of the activated neurons. But using HRP labeling Fos and TH respectively would cost much more time and lead to a nonspecific immunoreactivity, and if the antibodies come from different species in origin, HRP/AP is a priority.

  10. Pharmacological investigations on adaptation in rats subjected to cold water immersion stress.

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    Agrawal, Arvind; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether adaptogenic factors may be transferred from stress adapted rats to naïve rats and to explore the nature of endogenous adaptogens by pharmacological modulation. The rats were subjected to cold water immersion stress by placing them individually in a tank of water (depth=15.5cm; temperature=16±2°C) for 5min. The rats were subjected to single episode of cold water immersion stress for acute stress; while for adaptation, the rats were subjected to repeated episodes of same stressor for 5 consecutive days. The plasma of stress adapted rats was administered to naïve rats before subjecting to acute stress. The stress related behavioral alterations were assessed using the actophotometer, the hole board, the open field and the social interaction tests. Acute stress with single episode of cold water immersion was associated with behavioral alterations. However, the behavioral alterations were significantly restored on subjecting repeated episodes of cold water immersion. Administration of plasma of stress adapted rats also attenuated acute stress associated behavioral alterations. Administration of naltrexone abolished the restoration of behavioral changes as a part of adaptive process in repeated stress subjected rats as well as the anti-stress effects of plasma of stress adapted rat. It may be concluded that opioids may be the potential endogenous adaptogens that tend to restore the homeostasis during repeated episodes of stress. Furthermore, the endogenous adaptogens may be transferred in the form of plasma from repeated stress subjected rats to the naïve rats to confer the anti-stress properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of dexmedetomidine on sufentanil pretreatment rats with acute gastric mucosal lessions induced by water-immersion-restraint stress%右美托咪定或(和)舒芬太尼预处理对浸水束缚应激大鼠急性胃黏膜损害的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹明; 屠伟峰; 刘晓燕; 郄文斌

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨右美托咪定(DEX)预处理或(和)舒芬太尼(SUF)预处理对浸水束缚应激(WIRS)大鼠急性胃黏膜损害的影响.方法:30只Wistar大鼠随机分成正常对照组(NC组,n=6)、WIRS对照组(WC组,n=6)、DEX预处理组(DP组,n=6)、SUF预处理组(SP组,n=6)、DEX复合SUF预处理组(DSP组,n=6).DP组:腹腔注射7.5 μg/kg 10 min后进行WIRS; SP组:腹腔注射10 μg/kg2 min后进行WIRS;DSP组:腹腔注射7.5 μg/kg DEX 8 min后再注射SUF 10 μg/kg,2 min后进行WIRS;以等容积生理盐水腹腔注射后10 min进行WIRS作为WC组.所有实验大鼠于WIRS 6 h后给予10%水合氯醛3 mL/kg腹腔注射麻醉,剖腹取出全胃后先进行胃液pH测定、胃黏膜损伤指数(GI)评定,然后按要求留取胃黏膜组织标本以检测胃黏膜组织超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)、髓过氧化物酶(MPO)和一氧化氮合酶(NOS)的含量和病理学检查.结果:DEX预处理后,MDA、MPO升高幅度都较WC组明显降低,pH、SOD下降幅度明显减少,GI和胃黏膜损伤病理改变较WC组减轻(P< 0.05),但NOS的变化没有统计学意义(P>0.05);与SP组比较,DSP组SOD、MDA、GI、pH、MPO、NOS的变化无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:DEX预处理可有效减轻WIRS诱发的急性胃黏膜损伤,其确切机制尚不清楚,可能与控制伤害性应激反应、降低氧化应激、降低胃酸和抑制炎症反应有关,但并没有使舒芬太尼对胃黏膜损伤的保护作用增强.%Objectives To explore the effects of dexmedetomidine on sufentanil pretreatment rats with acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by water-immersion-restraint stress. Methods Thirty wistar rats were randomly assigned to normal control group (Group NC, n = 6); WIRS controlled group (Group WC, n = 6, intraperitoneal infusion of saline 10 min before WIRS); DEX pretreatment group (Group DP, n = 6, intraperitoneal infusion of dexmedetomidine at 7.5 μg/kg 10 min before WIRS); SF pretreatment group (Group SP, n

  12. 束缚-浸水应激对大鼠迷走背核胆碱能神经元活动的影响%Influence of restraint water-immersion stress on activity of cholinergic neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵东芹; 艾洪滨

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究束缚-浸水应激(RWIS)大鼠迷走神经背核(DMV)中胆碱能神经元的活动情况.方法 随机将10只雄性Wistar大鼠分为对照组和应激组,采用Fos和胆碱乙酰化酶(ChAT)免疫组织化学双标技术,统计对照组和应激组Fos、ChAT、Fos/ChAT双标阳性神经元数目.结果 与对照组相比,应激组大鼠DMV大量神经元表达Fos,Fos阳性神经元主要集中于DMV尾段和吻段(P<0.01);CHAT 阳性神经元主要分布于DMV中段和尾段,应激组大鼠DMV中单位面积内ChAT阳性神经元数目减少(P<0.01);Fos/ChAT双标阳性神经元的分布与Fos阳性神经元分布情况相似,RWIS组Fos/ChAT双标阳性神经元数目显著增加(P<0.01),Fos/ChAT双标阳性神经元占ChAT 阳性神经元的比例在对照组和RWIS组中分别为7.17%、21.12%(P<0.01).结论 DMV中胆碱能神经元参与RWIS调控过程.%Objective To investigate activity of cholinergic neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) in response to water-immersion stress (RWIS) in rats. Methods Ten rats were randomly divided into the control group and the RWIS group. Fos-immunoreactive (Fos-IR), choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive (ChAT-IR) and double labeled (Fos/ChAT-IR) neurons were counted using dual Fos and ChAT immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with unstressed rats, Fos-lR neurons dramatically increased in the DMV of RWIS rats ( P <0.01 ), and Fos expression was higher in the caudal portion of the NTS compared with the rostral and intermedial portions. ChAT-IR neurons decreased and were mainly observed in the caudal and intermediate portions of the DMV in RWIS rats(P <0.01 ). Percentages of Fos/ChAT-IR norons in ChAT-IR neurons in unstressed and RWIS rats were 7.17% and 21.12%, respectively( P <0.01 ). Conclusion Cholinergic neurons in DMV are involved in the stress response.

  13. Effectiveness of cold water immersion for treating exertional heat stress when immediate response is not possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, A D; Friesen, B J; Carlson, M J; Casa, D J; Kenny, G P

    2015-06-01

    Immediate treatment with cold water immersion (CWI) is the gold standard for exertional heatstroke. In the field, however, treatment is often delayed due to delayed paramedic response and/or inaccurate diagnosis. We examined the effect of treatment (reduction of rectal temperature to 37.5 °C) delays of 5, 20, and 40 min on core cooling rates in eight exertionally heat-stressed (40.0 °C rectal temperature) individuals. We found that rectal temperature was elevated above baseline (P  0.05). Rectal core cooling rates were similar among conditions (5 min: 0.20 ± 0.01; 20 min: 0.17 ± 0.02; 40 min: 0.17 ± 0.01 °C/min; P > 0.05). The rectal temperature afterdrop following CWI was similar across conditions (5 min: 35.95; 20 min: 35.61; 40 min: 35.87 °C; P > 0.05). We conclude that the effectiveness of 2 °C CWI as a treatment for exertional heat stress remains high even when applied with a delay of 40 min. Therefore, our results support that CWI is the most appropriate treatment for exertional heatstroke as it is capable of quickly reversing hyperthermia even when treatment is commenced with a significant delay.

  14. Interleukin-6 responses to water immersion therapy after acute exercise heat stress: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elaine C; Watson, Greig; Casa, Douglas; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William; Vingren, Jakob L; Spiering, Barry A; Maresh, Carl M

    2012-01-01

    Cold-water immersion is the criterion standard for treatment of exertional heat illness. Cryotherapy and water immersion also have been explored as ergogenic or recovery aids. The kinetics of inflammatory markers, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), during cold-water immersion have not been characterized. To characterize serum IL-6 responses to water immersion at 2 temperatures and, therefore, to initiate further research into the multidimensional benefits of immersion and the evidence-based selection of specific, optimal immersion conditions by athletic trainers. Controlled laboratory study. Human performance laboratory Patients or Other Participants: Eight college-aged men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.08 m, mass = 77.14 ± 9.77 kg, body fat = 10% ± 3%, and maximal oxygen consumption = 50.48 ± 4.75 mL·kg(-1) min(-1)). Participants were assigned randomly to receive either cold (11.70°C ± 2.02°C, n = 4) or warm (23.50°C ± 1.00°C, n = 4) water-bath conditions after exercise in the heat (temperature = 37°C, relative humidity = 52%) for 90 minutes or until volitional cessation. Whole-body cooling rates were greater in the cold water-bath condition for the first 6 minutes of water immersion, but during the 90-minute, postexercise recovery, participants in the warm and cold water-bath conditions experienced similar overall whole-body cooling. Heart rate responses were similar for both groups. Participants in the cold water-bath condition experienced an overall slight increase (30.54% ± 77.37%) in IL-6 concentration, and participants in the warm water-bath condition experienced an overall decrease (-69.76% ± 15.23%). We have provided seed evidence that cold-water immersion is related to subtle IL-6 increases from postexercise values and that warmer water-bath temperatures might dampen this increase. Further research will elucidate any anti-inflammatory benefit associated with water-immersion treatment and possible multidimensional uses of cooling

  15. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  16. The effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammation and cell stress responses in human skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jonathan M; Roberts, Llion A; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid; Krog, Simone; Aas, Sigve N; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Markworth, James F; Coombes, Jeff S; Cameron-Smith, David; Raastad, Truls

    2017-02-01

    Cold water immersion and active recovery are common post-exercise recovery treatments. A key assumption about the benefits of cold water immersion is that it reduces inflammation in skeletal muscle. However, no data are available from humans to support this notion. We compared the effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammatory and cellular stress responses in skeletal muscle from exercise-trained men 2, 24 and 48 h during recovery after acute resistance exercise. Exercise led to the infiltration of inflammatory cells, with increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins, and the subcellular translocation of heat shock proteins in muscle. These responses did not differ significantly between cold water immersion and active recovery. Our results suggest that cold water immersion is no more effective than active recovery for minimizing the inflammatory and stress responses in muscle after resistance exercise. Cold water immersion and active recovery are common post-exercise recovery treatments. However, little is known about whether these treatments influence inflammation and cellular stress in human skeletal muscle after exercise. We compared the effects of cold water immersion versus active recovery on inflammatory cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neurotrophins and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in skeletal muscle after intense resistance exercise. Nine active men performed unilateral lower-body resistance exercise on separate days, at least 1 week apart. On one day, they immersed their lower body in cold water (10°C) for 10 min after exercise. On the other day, they cycled at a low intensity for 10 min after exercise. Muscle biopsies were collected from the exercised leg before, 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise in both trials. Exercise increased intramuscular neutrophil and macrophage counts, MAC1 and CD163 mRNA expression (P cold water immersion is no more effective than active recovery for reducing inflammation or

  17. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  18. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart.

  19. Restraint stress and social defeat: What they have in common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Simone Cristina; Canteras, Newton Sabino

    2015-07-01

    Bob Blanchard was a great inspiration for our studies on the neural basis of social defense. In the present study, we compared the hypothalamic pattern of activation between social defeat and restraint stress. As important stress situations, both defeated and immobilized animals displayed a substantial increase in Fos in the parvicellular part of the paraventricular nucleus,mostly in the region that contains the CRH neurons. In addition, socially defeated animals, but not restrained animals, recruited elements of the medial hypothalamic conspecific-responsive circuit, a region also engaged in other forms of social behavior. Of particular interest, both defeated and immobilized animals presented a robust increase in Fos expression in specific regions of the lateral hypothalamic area (i.e., juxtaparaventricular and juxtadorsomedial regions) likely to convey septo-hippocampal information encoding the environmental boundary restriction observed in both forms of stress, and in the dorsomedial part of the dorsal premammillary nucleus which seems to work as a key player for the expression of, at least, part of the behavioral responses during both restraint and social defeat. These results indicate interesting commonalities between social defeat and restraint stress, suggesting, for the first time, a septo-hippocampal–hypothalamic path likely to respond to the environmental boundary restriction that may act as common stressor component for both types of stress. Moreover, the comparison of the neural circuits mediating physical restraint and social defense revealed a possible path for encoding the entrapment component during social confrontation.

  20. Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymen, Stéphanie D; Rojas, Isolde G; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip T

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting.

  1. Internal stress in children and parental attitude to dental treatment with passive restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsuchihashi, Natsumi; Uehara, Naoko; Takagi, Yuzo; Miwa, Zenzo; Sugimoto, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

      PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the internal stress in uncooperative children treated under passive restraint and the changes of it in later treatments under cooperative condition with no need of restraint...

  2. Internal stress in children and parental attitude to dental treatment with passive restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsuchihashi, Natsumi; Uehara, Naoko; Takagi, Yuzo; Miwa, Zenzo; Sugimoto, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the internal stress in uncooperative children treated under passive restraint and the changes of it in later treatments under cooperative condition with no need of restraint...

  3. Two strategies for response to 14 °C cold-water immersion: is there a difference in the response of motor, cognitive, immune and stress markers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazaitis, Marius; Eimantas, Nerijus; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Mickeviciene, Dalia; Steponaviciute, Rasa; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2014-01-01

    Here, we address the question of why some people have a greater chance of surviving and/or better resistance to cold-related-injuries in prolonged exposure to acute cold environments than do others, despite similar physical characteristics. The main aim of this study was to compare physiological and psychological reactions between people who exhibited fast cooling (FC; n = 20) or slow cooling (SC; n = 20) responses to cold water immersion. Individuals in whom the T(re) decreased to a set point of 35.5 °C before the end of the 170-min cooling time were indicated as the FC group; individuals in whom the T(re) did not decrease to the set point of 35.5 °C before the end of the 170-min cooling time were classified as the SC group. Cold stress was induced using intermittent immersion in bath water at 14 °C. Motor (spinal and supraspinal reflexes, voluntary and electrically induced skeletal muscle contraction force) and cognitive (executive function, short term memory, short term spatial recognition) performance, immune variables (neutrophils, leucocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, IL-6, TNF-α), markers of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity (cortisol, corticosterone) and autonomic nervous system activity (epinephrine, norepinephrine) were monitored. The data obtained in this study suggest that the response of the FC group to cooling vs the SC group response was more likely an insulative-hypothermic response and that the SC vs the FC group displayed a metabolic-insulative response. The observations that an exposure time to 14 °C cold water--which was nearly twice as short (96-min vs 170-min) with a greater rectal temperature decrease (35.5 °C vs 36.2 °C) in the FC group compared with the SC group--induces similar responses of motor, cognitive, and blood stress markers were novel. The most important finding is that subjects with a lower cold-strain-index (SC group) showed stimulation of some markers of innate immunity and suppression of markers of specific

  4. Two strategies for response to 14 °C cold-water immersion: is there a difference in the response of motor, cognitive, immune and stress markers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Brazaitis

    Full Text Available Here, we address the question of why some people have a greater chance of surviving and/or better resistance to cold-related-injuries in prolonged exposure to acute cold environments than do others, despite similar physical characteristics. The main aim of this study was to compare physiological and psychological reactions between people who exhibited fast cooling (FC; n = 20 or slow cooling (SC; n = 20 responses to cold water immersion. Individuals in whom the T(re decreased to a set point of 35.5 °C before the end of the 170-min cooling time were indicated as the FC group; individuals in whom the T(re did not decrease to the set point of 35.5 °C before the end of the 170-min cooling time were classified as the SC group. Cold stress was induced using intermittent immersion in bath water at 14 °C. Motor (spinal and supraspinal reflexes, voluntary and electrically induced skeletal muscle contraction force and cognitive (executive function, short term memory, short term spatial recognition performance, immune variables (neutrophils, leucocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, IL-6, TNF-α, markers of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity (cortisol, corticosterone and autonomic nervous system activity (epinephrine, norepinephrine were monitored. The data obtained in this study suggest that the response of the FC group to cooling vs the SC group response was more likely an insulative-hypothermic response and that the SC vs the FC group displayed a metabolic-insulative response. The observations that an exposure time to 14 °C cold water--which was nearly twice as short (96-min vs 170-min with a greater rectal temperature decrease (35.5 °C vs 36.2 °C in the FC group compared with the SC group--induces similar responses of motor, cognitive, and blood stress markers were novel. The most important finding is that subjects with a lower cold-strain-index (SC group showed stimulation of some markers of innate immunity and suppression of markers of

  5. Greater physiological and behavioral effects of interrupted stress pattern compared to daily restraint stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Repeated stress can trigger a range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety. The propensity to develop abnormal behaviors after repeated stress is related to the severity, frequency and number of stressors. However, the pattern of stress exposure may contribute to the impact of stress. In addition, the anxiogenic nature of repeated stress exposure can be moderated by the degree of coping that occurs, and can be reflected in homotypic habituation to the repeated stress. However, expectations are not clear when a pattern of stress presentation is utilized that diminishes habituation. The purpose of these experiments is to test whether interrupted stress exposure decreases homotypic habituation and leads to greater effects on anxiety-like behavior in adult male rats. We found that repeated interrupted restraint stress resulted in less overall homotypic habituation compared to repeated daily restraint stress. This was demonstrated by greater production of fecal boli and greater corticosterone response to restraint. Furthermore, interrupted restraint stress resulted in a lower body weight and greater adrenal gland weight than daily restraint stress, and greater anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Control experiments demonstrated that these effects of the interrupted pattern could not be explained by differences in the total number of stress exposures, differences in the total number of days that the stress periods encompased, nor could it be explained as a result of only the stress exposures after an interruption from stress. These experiments demonstrate that the pattern of stress exposure is a significant determinant of the effects of repeated stress, and that interrupted stress exposure that decreases habituation can have larger effects than a greater number of daily stress exposures. Differences in the pattern of stress exposure are therefore an important factor to consider when predicting the severity of the effects of repeated

  6. Restraint stress alters immune parameters and induces oxidative stress in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-12-01

    The influence of stress on embryo implantation is not well understood. Prior studies have focused on later gestational stages and the long-term impact of stress on immune function. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of restraint stress on the immune parameters and the oxidative states of the uterus during implantation. In this study, pregnant CD1 mice were subjected to restraint stress (4 h/d) on embryonic day 1 (E1) and sacrificed on E3, E5, and E7. Maternal plasma corticosterone (CORT) secretion and implantation sites in the uterus were examined. The uterine (excluding embryos) homogenate and uterine lymphocytes were collected to examine oxidative stress states and associated immune parameters. The results demonstrated that restraint stress increased maternal plasma CORT secretion and reduced the number of implantation sites by 15.3% on E5 and by 26.1% on E7. Moreover, restraint stress decreased the density of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the endometrium by 22.1-47.9% and increased the density of mast cells in the myometrium by 55.6-76.9%. Restraint stress remarkably decreased the CD3(+)CD4(+) T/CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell ratio (by 26.2-28.9%) and attenuated uterine lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of cytokines. In addition, restraint stress threatened the intracellular equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants, resulting in decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) (32.2% and 45.7%), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (15.5% and 26.1%), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) (18.4% and 18.2%) activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) (34.4% and 43.0%) contents on E5 and E7. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that restraint stress causes abnormal implantation and negatively impacts immune parameters in association with oxidative stress in mice.

  7. Effect of restraint stress on nociceptive responses in rats: role of the histaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibironke, G F; Mordi, N E

    2011-12-20

    Stress induced analgesia (SIA) is well known, but the reverse phenomenon, hyperalgesia is poorly documented. This study investigated the role of the histaminergic system in restraint stress hyperalgesia in rats, using thermal stimulation method (hot plate and tail flick tests). Paw licking and tail withdrawal latencies were taken before and after restraint for about one hour. Significant decreases (p<0.05) were obtained in these latencies after the restraint in both tests. Administration of H1 and H2 receptor blockers, chlorpheniramine and cimetidine respectively 30 mins before the restraint still resulted in significant reductions (p<0.05) in these latencies, connoting the persistence of hyperalgesia, showing that histamine H1 and H2 receptors did not participate in the mechanism of restraint stress hyperalgesia. We therefore suggest a histaminergic independent mechanism for restraint stress induced hyperalgesia.

  8. Restraint Stress Intensifies Interstitial K+ Accumulation during Severe Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Christian; Janc, Oliwia A.; Kempkes, Belinda; Callis, Carolina Araya; Flügge, Gabriele; Hülsmann, Swen; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress affects neuronal networks by inducing dendritic retraction, modifying neuronal excitability and plasticity, and modulating glial cells. To elucidate the functional consequences of chronic stress for the hippocampal network, we submitted adult rats to daily restraint stress for 3 weeks (6 h/day). In acute hippocampal tissue slices of stressed rats, basal synaptic function and short-term plasticity at Schaffer collateral/CA1 neuron synapses were unchanged while long-term potentiation was markedly impaired. The spatiotemporal propagation pattern of hypoxia-induced spreading depression episodes was indistinguishable among control and stress slices. However, the duration of the extracellular direct current potential shift was shortened after stress. Moreover, K+ fluxes early during hypoxia were more intense, and the postsynaptic recoveries of interstitial K+ levels and synaptic function were slower. Morphometric analysis of immunohistochemically stained sections suggested hippocampal shrinkage in stressed rats, and the number of cells that are immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in the CA1 subfield indicating activation of astrocytes. Western blots showed a marked downregulation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 in stressed rats. Yet, resting membrane potentials, input resistance, and K+-induced inward currents in CA1 astrocytes were indistinguishable from controls. These data indicate an intensified interstitial K+ accumulation during hypoxia in the hippocampus of chronically stressed rats which seems to arise from a reduced interstitial volume fraction rather than impaired glial K+ buffering. One may speculate that chronic stress aggravates hypoxia-induced pathophysiological processes in the hippocampal network and that this has implications for the ischemic brain. PMID:22470344

  9. Response of restraint stress-selected lines of Japanese quail to heat stress and Escherichia coli challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese quail selected for divergent corticosterone (Cort) response to restraint stress were evaluated for their susceptibility to heat stress and challenge with Escherichia coli. These quail lines are designated as the high stress (HS), low stress (LS), and the random-bred control (CS) lines. Hea...

  10. The effects of sex and hormonal status on restraint-stress-induced working memory impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Avis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restraint stress has been shown to elicit numerous effects on hippocampal function and neuronal morphology, as well as to induce dendritic remodeling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. However, the effects of acute restraint stress on PFC cognitive function have not been investigated, despite substantial evidence that the PFC malfunctions in many stress-related disorders. Methods The present study examined the effects of restraint stress on PFC function in both male rats and cycling female rats in either the proestrus (high estrogen or estrus (low estrogen phase of the estrus cycle. Animals were restrained for 60 or 120 minutes and then tested on spatial delayed alternation, a PFC-mediated task. Performance after stress was compared to performance on a different day under no-stress conditions, and analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Sixty minutes of restraint impaired only females in proestrus, while 120 minutes of restraint produced significant impairments in all animals. Increases in task completion times did not affect performance. Conclusion These results demonstrate an interaction between hormonal status and cognitive response to stress in female rats, with high estrogen levels being associated with amplified sensitivity to stress. This effect has been previously observed after administration of a pharmacological stressor (the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, and results from both studies may be relevant to the increased prevalence of stress-related disorders, such as major depressive disorder, in cycling women. Overall, the results show that restraint stress has important effects on the cognitive functions of the PFC, and that hormonal influences in the PFC are an important area for future research.

  11. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  12. Effect of honey on the reproductive system of male rat offspring exposed to prenatal restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, M N; Mohamed, M

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to prenatal stress is associated with impaired reproductive function in male rat offspring. Honey is traditionally used by the Malays for enhancement of fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of honey on reproductive system of male rat offspring exposed to prenatal restraint stress. Dams were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): control, honey, stress and honey + stress groups. Dams from honey and honey + stress groups received oral honey (1.2 g kg(-1) body weight) daily from day 1 of pregnancy, meanwhile dams from stress and honey + stress groups were subjected to restraint stress (three times per day) from day 11 of pregnancy until delivery. At 10 weeks old, each male rat offspring was mated with a regular oestrus cycle female. Male sexual behaviour and reproductive performance were evaluated. Then, male rats were euthanised for assessment on reproductive parameters. Honey supplementation during prenatal restraint stress significantly increased testis and epididymis weights as well as improved the percentages of abnormal spermatozoa and sperm motility in male rat offspring. In conclusion, this study might suggest that supplementation of honey during pregnancy seems to reduce the adverse effects of restraint stress on reproductive organs weight and sperm parameters in male rat offspring.

  13. How Farm Animals React and Perceive Stressful Situations Such As Handling, Restraint, and Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temple Grandin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An animal that has been carefully acclimated to handling may willingly re-enter a restrainer. Another animal may have an intense agitated behavioral reaction or refuse to re-enter the handling facility. Physiological measures of stress such as cortisol may be very low in the animal that re-enters willingly and higher in animals that actively resist restraint. Carefully acclimating young animals to handling and restraint can help improve both productivity and welfare by reducing fear stress. Some of the topics covered in this review are: How an animal perceives handling and restraint, the detrimental effects of a sudden novel event, descriptions of temperament and aversion tests and the importance of good stockmanship.

  14. Effects of the chronic restraint stress induced depression on reward-related learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pan; Wang, Kezhu; Lu, Cong; Dong, Liming; Chen, Yixi; Wang, Qiong; Shi, Zhe; Yang, Yanyan; Chen, Shanguang; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-03-15

    Chronic mild or unpredictability stress produces a persistent depressive-like state. The main symptoms of depression include weight loss, despair, anhedonia, diminished motivation and mild cognition impairment, which could influence the ability of reward-related learning. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic restraint stress on the performance of reward-related learning of rats. We used the exposure of repeated restraint stress (6h/day, for 28days) to induce depression-like behavior in rats. Then designed tasks including Pavlovian conditioning (magazine head entries), acquisition and maintenance of instrumental conditioning (lever pressing) and goal directed learning (higher fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement) to study the effects of chronic restraint stress. The results indicated that chronic restraint stress influenced rats in those aspects including the acquisition of a Pavlovian stimulus-outcome (S-O) association, the formation and maintenance of action-outcome (A-O) causal relation and the ability of learning in higher fixed ratio schedule. In conclusion, depression could influence the performances in reward-related learning obviously and the series of instrumental learning tasks may have potential as a method to evaluate cognitive changes in depression.

  15. Serotonin transporter in lymphocytes of rats exposed to physical restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Martel, Matilde; Urbina, Mary; Fazzino, Fili; Lima, Lucimey

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and stress cause transcriptional and functional changes on the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the central nervous system. Stress can produce specific modifications of SERT in lymphocytes, which could be associated with alterations in immune response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a physical restraint stress protocol on (1) rat lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and (2) SERT kinetic parameters, i.e. binding capacity (Bmax), affinity (Kd) and Hill coefficient (nH). Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in Plexiglass boxes (5 h daily for 5 days), and blood was obtained by cardiac puncture on day 6. Serum corticosterone was quantitated by an immunoenzymatic assay. Lymphocytes were isolated by density gradients and adhesion to plastic, of which there was sufficient material for further experiments, then cultured with or without the mitogen concanavalin A (Con A, 2 μg/ml) and fluoxetine (1-50 μM). Cell proliferation was measured with tetrazolium salts, and [(3)H]paroxetine was used as a SERT-specific ligand for binding assays. Restraint produced a significant increase in serum corticosterone of stressed rats. The proliferative response to Con A was similar in the controls and stressed animals. Fluoxetine reduced cell proliferation with and without Con A. Restraint diminished the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine on proliferation. Restraint also increased Bmax and Kd, but decreased nH. Treatment of rats with actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, reduced Bmax in stressed animals. Restraint stress modulated the effect of fluoxetine on cell proliferation, probably through the modification of the presence and the function of SERT. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Interactive effects of dietary restraint and adiposity on stress-induced eating and the food choice of children

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Individual Differences Model posits that individual differences in physiological and psychological factors explain eating behaviors in response to stress. The purpose was to determine the effects of individual differences in adiposity, dietary restraint and stress reactivity on children's energy...

  17. Restraint feeds stress: The relationship between eating disorder symptoms, stress generation, and the interpersonal theory of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Dorian; Smith, April; Bodell, Lindsay

    2014-12-01

    Integrating research on stress generation and the interpersonal theory of suicide we examined whether eating disorder symptoms are related to stress generation and whether negative life events (stressors) contribute to feelings of burdensomeness and low belongingness. At two time points (approximately 1month apart), participants (n=186; 75% female) completed questionnaires measuring eating disorder symptoms, negative life events, burdensomeness, and belongingness. Regression analyses indicated that while controlling for depression, anxiety, and baseline frequency of negative events, dietary restraint significantly predicted negative events at follow-up. Dietary restraint indirectly influenced higher levels of perceived burdensomeness and low belongingness through its influence on negative events. Thus, dietary restraint may contribute to stress generation, and in turn exacerbate feelings of burdensomeness and low belongingness, two important constructs of the interpersonal theory of suicide. Greater understanding of these factors could lead to more effective and targeted suicide interventions for individuals who restrict food intake.

  18. Myricetin Attenuates Depressant-Like Behavior in Mice Subjected to Repeated Restraint Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zegang Ma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that oxidative stress may be implicated in chronic stress-induced depression. Several flavonoids with anti-oxidative effects have been proved to be anti-depressive. Myricetin is a well-defined flavonoid with the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects of chronic administration of myricetin on depressant-like behaviors in mice subjected to repeated restraint (4 h/day for 21 days. Our results showed that myricetin administration specifically reduced the immobility time in mice exposed to chronic stress, as tested in both forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Myricetin treatment improved activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX in the hippocampus of stressed mice. In addition, myricetin treatment decreased plasma corticosterone levels of those mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. The effects of myricetin on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in hippocampus were also investigated. The results revealed that myricetin normalized the decreased BDNF levels in mice subjected to repeated restraint stress. These findings provided more evidence that chronic administration of myricetin improves helpless behaviors. The protective effects of myricetin might be partially mediated by an influence on BDNF levels and might be attributed to myricetin-mediated anti-oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

  19. Influence of omega-3 fatty acid status on the way rats adapt to chronic restraint stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Hennebelle

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids are important for several neuronal and cognitive functions. Altered omega-3 fatty acid status has been implicated in reduced resistance to stress and mood disorders. We therefore evaluated the effects of repeated restraint stress (6 h/day for 21 days on adult rats fed omega-3 deficient, control or omega-3 enriched diets from conception. We measured body weight, plasma corticosterone and hippocampus glucocorticoid receptors and correlated these data with emotional and depression-like behaviour assessed by their open-field (OF activity, anxiety in the elevated-plus maze (EPM, the sucrose preference test and the startle response. We also determined their plasma and brain membrane lipid profiles by gas chromatography. Repeated restraint stress caused rats fed a control diet to lose weight. Their plasma corticosterone increased and they showed moderate behavioural changes, with increases only in grooming (OF test and entries into the open arms (EPM. Rats fed the omega-3 enriched diet had a lower stress-induced weight loss and plasma corticosterone peak, and reduced grooming. Rats chronically lacking omega-3 fatty acid exhibited an increased startle response, a stress-induced decrease in locomotor activity and exaggerated grooming. The brain omega-3 fatty acids increased as the dietary omega-3 fatty acids increased; diets containing preformed long-chain omega-3 fatty acid were better than diets containing the precursor alpha-linolenic acid. However, the restraint stress reduced the amounts of omega-3 incorporated. These data showed that the response to chronic restraint stress was modulated by the omega-3 fatty acid supply, a dietary deficiency was deleterious while enrichment protecting against stress.

  20. Contrasting effects of diazepam and repeated restraint stress on latent inhibition in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeau, Raymond; Marcello, Stefania; Andersen, Jacob Sparre; Pani, Luca

    2007-11-02

    The effects on latent inhibition (LI; a delay in conditioning when a CS has been pre-exposed without consequences) of repeated restraint stress and the anxiolytic drug diazepam were examined in C57BL/6 mice to know whether previous aversive events or anxiolysis are factors determining the expression of LI. The LI model was optimized for this strain particularly sensitive to stress (using both the CER and the conditioned freezing procedures) and characterized with typical (haloperidol) and atypical (clozapine and olanzapine) antipsychotic drugs administered either during the conditioning or the pre-exposure phases. An acute challenge with amphetamine, a dopamine releaser, was done to verify the enhancement of hyperactivity in C57BL/6 mice after the restraint stress sensitization. At all doses tested, diazepam decreased latent inhibition when administered during the pre-exposure phase (similarly to atypical antipsychotic drugs). Repeated restraint stress enhanced LI by blocking the CS-induced freezing in pre-exposed mice. In contrast, pre-treatment with diazepam before pre-exposure allowed the expression of CS-induced freezing in stressed mice pre-exposed to the tone. It is suggested that stress and anxiolytic drugs can have opposite effects on attention or perseveration processes during learning of conflicting contingency responses.

  1. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

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    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  2. Housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, M Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-03-01

    The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC) housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups) subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC) having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP) being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS) in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  3. Environmental Enrichment Blunts Ethanol Consumption after Restraint Stress in C57BL/6 Mice

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    Marianno, Priscila; Abrahao, Karina Possa

    2017-01-01

    Elevated alcohol intake after abstinence is a key feature of the addiction process. Some studies have shown that environmental enrichment (EE) affects ethanol intake and other reinforcing effects. However, different EE protocols may vary in their ability to influence alcohol consumption and stress-induced intake. The present study evaluated whether short (3 h) or continuous (24 h) EE protocols affect ethanol consumption after periods of withdrawal. Mice were challenged with stressful stimuli (24 h isolation and restraint stress) to evaluate the effects of stress on drinking. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a two-bottle choice drinking-in-the-dark paradigm for 15 days (20% ethanol and water, 2 h/day, acquisition phase). Control mice were housed under standard conditions (SC). In the first experiment, one group of mice was housed under EE conditions 24 h/day (EE24h). In the second experiment, the exposure to EE was reduced to 3 h/day (EE3h). After the acquisition phase, the animals were deprived of ethanol for 6 days, followed by 2 h ethanol access once a week. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) during ethanol withdrawal. During the last 2 weeks, the mice were exposed to 24 h ethanol access. A 1-h restraint stress test was performed immediately before the last ethanol exposure. EE24h but not EE3h increased anxiety-like behavior during withdrawal compared to controls. Neither EE24h nor EE3h affected ethanol consumption during the 2 h weekly exposure periods. However, EE24h and EE3h mice that were exposed to acute restraint stress consumed less ethanol than controls during a 24 h ethanol access. These results showed that EE reduces alcohol intake after an acute restraint stress. PMID:28107511

  4. Antioxidant Effects of Some Drugs on Immobilization Stress Combined with Cold Restraint Stress

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    Svetlana Trivic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effect on antioxidant potential of some commonly used drugs (morphine, tramadol, bromocriptine, haloperidol and azithromycin on immobilization stress (IS combined with cold restraint stress (CRS in the rat. After the drug treatment the animals were kept immobilized in the cold chamber at 4±0.3ºC for 3 hours and then decapitaed and the livers were extracted. The following parameters were determined in the liver homogenate: content of reduced glutathione, activities of catalase, xanthine oxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxidase, and lipid peroxidation intensity. A battery of biochemical assays was used and the resulting data were statistically analyzed. Combined stress exhibited a prooxidative action (increased catalase activity, lowered content of reduced glutathione. Significantly enhanced catalase activity that was observed in all groups compared to the control indicates that the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolite is hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes very rapidly (very high catalase activity, thus hindering formation of OH radicals as the most toxic ROS. None of the tested drugs showed a protective effect on combined IS and CRS. The intensity of lipid peroxidation did not change either in the combined stress or under additional influence of the drugs. Probably, under our experimental conditions, the time was not sufficiently long to observe damage of lipid membrane by ROS.

  5. Evaluation of response to restraint stress by salivary corticosterone levels in adult male mice.

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    Nohara, Masakatsu; Tohei, Atsushi; Sato, Takumi; Amao, Hiromi

    2016-06-01

    Saliva as a sampling method is a low invasive technique for the detection of physiologically active substances, as opposed to sampling the plasma or serum. In this study, we obtained glucocorticoids transferred from the blood to the saliva from mice treated with 2.0 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal injection of cortisol. Next, to evaluate the effect of restraint stress using mouse saliva-collected under anesthesia by mixed anesthetic agents-we measured plasma and salivary corticosterone levels at 60 min after restraint stress. Moreover, to evaluate salivary corticosterone response to stress in the same individual mouse, an adequate recovery period (1, 3 and 7 days) after anesthesia was examined. The results demonstrate that exogenous cortisol was detected in the saliva and the plasma, in mice treated with cortisol. Restraint stress significantly increased corticosterone levels in both the plasma and saliva (Pstress significantly increased salivary corticosterone levels in all three groups (1-, 3- and 7-day recovery). However, the statistical evidence of corticosterone increase is stronger in the 7-day recovery group (Plevels in saliva reflect its levels in the plasma, and salivary corticosterone is a useful, less-invasive biomarker of physical stress in mice. The present study may contribute to concepts of Reduction and Refinement of the three Rs in small animal experiments.

  6. Cold water immersion: kill or cure?

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    Tipton, M J; Collier, N; Massey, H; Corbett, J; Harper, M

    2017-08-23

    What is the topic of this review? This is the first review to look across the broad field of 'cold water immersion' and to determine the threats and benefits associated with it as both a hazard and a treatment. What advances does it highlight? The level of evidence supporting each of the areas reviewed is assessed. Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation-related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  7. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

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    Heather M Buechel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/ stress hormone/ allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation, and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 mo. and aged (21 mo. male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress groups (n = 9-12/ group. We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the three hour restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 hours after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  8. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

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    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  9. Effect of cold-restraint stress and zinc acexamate on gastric mucus production in intact glands.

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    Escolar, G; Navarro, C; Sendros, S; Bulbena, O

    1987-11-01

    Gastric mucus content was morphometrically evaluated in gastric glands of normal and cold-restraint stressed rats. Variations induced by treatment with zinc acexamate (200 mg/kg p.o.) were also investigated. Stress decreased the glycoprotein content in glands located in areas of injury. However, in intact glands from the same animals, the glycoprotein content was increased and the proportion of sulphated macromolecules greatly augmented. Zinc acexamate reduced the severity of damage in stressed rats. Although it augmented mucus content it prevented the modification in sulphated macromolecules in these rats. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of gastric mucus in preventing gastric damage.

  10. Sarcandra glabra Extract Reduces the Susceptibility and Severity of Influenza in Restraint-Stressed Mice

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    Hui-Juan Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcandra glabra, as a type of “antipyretic-detoxicate drugs”, has always been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. The Sarcandra glabra extract (SGE is applied frequently as anti-inflammatory and anti-infectious drug in folk medicine. However, relative experiment data supporting this effective clinical consequence was limited. In order to mimic the physiological conditions of the susceptible population, we employed restraint stress mouse model to investigate the effect of SGE against influenza. Mice were infected with influenza virus three days after restraint, while SGE was orally administrated for 10 consecutive days. Body weight, morbidity, and mortality were recorded daily. Histopathologic changes, susceptibility genes expressions and inflammatory markers in lungs were determined. Our results showed that restraint stress significantly increased susceptibility and severity of influenza virus. However, oral administration of SGE could reduce morbidity, mortality and significantly prolonged survival time. The results further showed that SGE had a crucial effect on improving susceptibility markers levels to recover the balance of host defense system and inhibiting inflammatory cytokines levels through down-regulation of NF-κB protein expression to ameliorate the lung injury. These data showed that SGE reduced the susceptibility and severity of influenza.

  11. Effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum treatment on restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice

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    Prakash Atish K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A stressful stimulus is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Antidepressants are used to manage stress and their related effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum in restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. Methods Animals were immobilized for a period of 6 hr. St. John's Wort (50 and 100 mg/kg was administered 30 minutes before the animals were subjecting to acute immobilized stress. Various behavioral tests parameters for anxiety, locomotor activity and nociceptive threshold were assessed followed by biochemical assessments (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein subsequently. Results 6-hr acute restraint stress caused severe anxiety like behavior, antinociception and impaired locomotor activity as compared to unstressed animals. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in malondialdehyde, nitrites concentration, depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity as compared to unstressed animal brain. Five days St. John's Wort treatment in a dose of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated restraint stress-induced behavioral (improved locomotor activity, reduced tail flick latency and antianxiety like effect and oxidative damage as compared to control (restraint stress. Conclusion Present study highlights the modest activity of St. John's Wort against acute restraint stress induced modification.

  12. 7 CFR 305.22 - Hot water immersion treatment schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hot water immersion treatment schedules. 305.22 Section 305.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Heat Treatments § 305.22 Hot water immersion treatment schedules. (a) T102-d...

  13. Effects of acupuncture on behavioral, cardiovascular and hormonal responses in restraint-stressed Wistar rats

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    Guimarães C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well-known entity and may be defined as a threat to the homeostasis of a being. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of acupuncture on the physiological responses induced by restraint stress. Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic technique which is used in the treatment and prevention of diseases. Its proposed mechanisms of action are based on the principle of homeostasis. Adult male Wistar EPM-1 rats were divided into four groups: group I (N = 12, unrestrained rats with cannulas previously implanted into their femoral arteries for blood pressure and heart rate measurements; group II (N = 12, rats that were also cannulated and were submitted to 60-min immobilization; group III (N = 12, same as group II but with acupuncture needles implanted at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 during the immobilization period; group IV (N = 14, same as group III but with needles implanted at points not related to acupuncture (non-acupoints. During the 60-min immobilization period animals were assessed for stress-related behaviors, heart rate, blood pressure and plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Group III animals showed a significant reduction (60% on average, P<0.02 in restraint-induced behaviors when compared to groups II and IV. Data from cardiovascular and hormonal assessments indicated no differences between group III and group II and IV animals, but tended to be lower (50% reduction on average in group I animals. We hypothesize that acupuncture at points SP6, S36, REN17, P6 and DU20 has an anxiolytic effect on restraint-induced stress that is not due to a sedative action

  14. The Physiological Response to Cold Water Immersion Following a Mixed Martial Arts Training Session.

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    Lindsay, Angus; Carr, Sam; Cross, Sean; Petersen, Carl; Lewis, John G; Gieseg, Steven P

    2017-01-17

    Combative sport is one of the most physically intense forms of exercise, yet the effect of recovery interventions has been largely unexplored. We investigated the effect of cold water immersion on structural, inflammatory and physiological stress biomarkers following a mixed martial arts contest preparation training session in comparison to passive recovery. Semi-professional MMA competitors (n=15) were randomly assigned to a cold water immersion (15 min at 10°C) or passive recovery protocol (ambient air) completed immediately following a contest preparation training session. Markers of muscle damage (urinary myoglobin), inflammation/oxidative stress (urinary neopterin + total neopterin (neopterin + 7,8-dihydroneopterin)) and hypothalamic-pituitary axis activation (saliva cortisol) were determined before, immediately post and one, two and 24 hours post-session. Ratings of perceived soreness and fatigue, counter movement jump and gastrointestinal temperature were also measured. Concentrations of all biomarkers increased significantly (p<0.05) post-session. Cold water immersion attenuated increases in urinary neopterin (p<0.05, d = 0.58), total neopterin (p<0.05, d = 0.89) and saliva cortisol after two hours (p<0.05, d = 0.68) and urinary neopterin again at 24 hours (p<0.01, d = 0.57) in comparison to passive recovery. Perceived soreness, fatigue and gastrointestinal temperatures were also lower for the cold water immersion group at several time points post-session whilst counter movement jump did not differ. Combative sport athletes who are subjected to impact-induced stress may benefit from immediate cold water immersion as a simple recovery intervention that reduces delayed onset muscle soreness as well as macrophage and HPA activation whilst not impairing functional performance.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling dampens the HPA axis response to restraint stress.

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    Evanson, Nathan K; Herman, James P

    2015-10-15

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of the neural portion of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and signals through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In the current studies we investigated the role of hypothalamic paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of the HPA axis response to restraint stress in rats. Direct injection of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) into the PVN prior to restraint leads to blunting of the HPA axis response in awake animals. Consistent with this result, infusion of the group I receptor antagonist hexyl-homoibotenic acid (HIBO) potentiates the HPA axis response to restraint. The excitatory effect of blocking paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate signaling is blocked by co-administration of dexamethasone into the PVN. However, the inhibitory effect of DHPG is not affected by co-administration of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM-251 into the PVN. Together, these results suggest that paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling acts to dampen HPA axis reactivity. This effect appears to be similar to the rapid inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids at the PVN, but is not mediated by endocannabinoid signaling.

  16. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

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    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  17. Ameliorative potential of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats.

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    Manchanda, Rajneet K; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in acute stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats subjected to restraint stress. The rats were placed in the restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using the hole-board, social interactions and open field tests. Restraint stress resulted in a decrease in the frequency of head dips, rearing in the hole board, line crossings and rearings in the open field, and an increase in avoidance behaviors in the social interaction tests. Sodium cromoglycate (25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, ip), a mast cell stabilizer, and diethyldithiocarbamic acid (75 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, ip), a selective NF-κB inhibitor, were employed to modulate restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The administration of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid significantly attenuated the restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The noted beneficial effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid may possibly be attributed to mast cell stabilization and inhibition of NF-κB activity, respectively.

  18. A self-medication hypothesis for increased vulnerability to drug abuse in prenatally restraint stressed rats.

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    Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Gatta, Eleonora; Mairesse, Jérôme; Van Camp, Gilles; Fagioli, Francesca; Maccari, Stefania; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related events that occur in the perinatal period can permanently change brain and behavior of the developing individual and there is increasing evidence that early-life adversity is a contributing factor in the etiology of drug abuse and mood disorders. Neural adaptations resulting from early-life stress may mediate individual differences in novelty responsiveness and in turn contribute to drug abuse vulnerability. Prenatal restraint stress (PRS) in rats is a well-documented model of early stress known to induce long-lasting neurobiological and behavioral alterations including impaired feedback mechanisms of the HPA axis, enhanced novelty seeking, and increased sensitiveness to psychostimulants as well as anxiety/depression-like behavior. Together with the HPA axis, functional alterations of the mesolimbic dopamine system and of the metabotropic glutamate receptors system appear to be involved in the addiction-like profile of PRS rats.

  19. Restraint stress enhances alcohol intake in adolescent female rats but reduces alcohol intake in adolescent male and adult female rats.

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    Wille-Bille, Aranza; Ferreyra, Ana; Sciangula, Martina; Chiner, Florencia; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2017-08-14

    Adolescents may be more sensitive to stress-induced alcohol drinking than adults, which would explain the higher prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence in late adolescence than in adulthood. The present study analyzed the impact of restraint stress on the initiation of alcohol intake across 2 weeks of intermittent, two-bottle choice intake in male and female adolescent rats and adult female rats. Restraint stress significantly increased alcohol intake and preference in female adolescent rats but decreased alcohol intake and preference in male adolescent and female adult rats. The effects of restraint stress on alcohol intake were mitigated in adolescent females following administration of the κ opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine. Adolescent but not adult female rats that were subjected to restraint stress spent more time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Female adolescents exposed to stress also exhibited greater risk-taking behaviors in a concentric square field test compared with non-stressed controls. These results indicate age- and sex-related differences in the sensitivity to alcohol-stress interactions that may facilitate the initiation of alcohol use in female adolescents. The facilitatory effect of stress on alcohol intake was related to greater exploratory and risk-taking behaviors in young females after stress exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The central effect of biological Amines on immunosuppressive effect of restraint stress in rat

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    Zeraati F

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of some histaminergic agents were evaluated on stress- induced immunosuppression in immunized nale rats. In rat immunized with sheep red blood cells ( SRBCs. Restraint stress (RS prevented the booster-induced rise in anti-SRBC antibody titre and cell immunity response. Intracerebroventicular (I.C>V injection of histamine (150 µg/rat induced a similar effect with RS. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 µg/rat reduced the inhibitory effect of Ras on immune function. Also histamine could inhibit the effect of RS on immune function. Also histamine could inhibitory the effect of chlorpheniramine when injected simultaneously. Pretreatment with ranidine (10 µg/rat had not a significant effect. Serotonin (3 µg/rat and dopamine (0.2 µg/rat could reverse the effects of chlorpheniromine when injected with chlorpheniramine (P<0.05. Epinephrine (0.2 µg/rat had not a significant effect. The results indicate that histamine mediates the immunosuppression of restraint stress by influencing the histamine H1 receptor in the brain and this effects of histamine may be modulated by serotoninergic and dopaminergic system.

  1. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

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    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  2. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

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    Juan Andrés Orellana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  3. Effect of chronic restraint stress on inhibitory gating in the auditory cortex of rats.

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    Ma, Lanlan; Li, Wai; Li, Sibin; Wang, Xuejiao; Qin, Ling

    2017-05-01

    A fundamental adaptive mechanism of auditory function is inhibitory gating (IG), which refers to the attenuation of neural responses to repeated sound stimuli. IG is drastically impaired in individuals with emotional and cognitive impairments (i.e. posttraumatic stress disorder). The objective of this study was to test whether chronic stress impairs the IG of the auditory cortex (AC). We used the standard two-tone stimulus paradigm and examined the parametric qualities of IG in the AC of rats by recording the electrophysiological signals of a single-unit and local field potential (LFP) simultaneously. The main results of this study were that most of the AC neurons showed a weaker response to the second tone than to the first tone, reflecting an IG of the repeated input. A fast negative wave of LFP showed consistent IG across the sampled AC sites, whereas a slow positive wave of LFP had less IG effect. IG was diminished following chronic restraint stress at both, the single-unit and LFP level, due to the increase in response to the second tone. This study provided new evidence that chronic stress disrupts the physiological function of the AC. Lay Summary The effects of chronic stress on IG were investigated by recording both, single-unit spike and LFP activities, in the AC of rats. In normal rats, most of the single-unit and N25 LFP activities in the AC showed an IG effect. IG was diminished following chronic restraint stress at both, the single-unit and LFP level.

  4. RU486 Reverses Emotional Disorders by Influencing Astrocytes and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Chronic Restraint Stress Challenged Rats

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    Liru Dong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the effect of RU486 (mifepristone on emotional disorders in chronic restraint stress-induced rats and to explore the mechanisms of that phenomenon. Methods: For this purpose, 80 healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: the normal group (Con group, The Con group members received no treatment, eating and drinking freely, the chronic restraint stress group (CRS group, normal Sprague Dawley rats treated with chronic restraint stress, 6 h/day for 21days, the propylene glycol group (CRS+propylene glycol and the RU486 group (CRS+RU486. RU486 or propylene glycol was administered 30 mins before each CRS procedure. Twenty-four hours after CRS exposure, we investigated the effects of CRS on the anxiety-like behavior using an elevated plus-maze (EPM. To explore the mechanisms of RU486 on anxiety, we measured the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP and β-subunit of S100 (S100β via immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was demonstrated by flow cytometry. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress markers, glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and Cysteine aspartic acid specific protease-12 (Caspase-12, were detected by western blot analysis. Results: Compared to the control group, rats in the CRS and propylene glycol group showed decreased exploratory behavior on the open arms during EPM testing, and these reductions were accompanied by significantly reduced GFAP and S100β expression, increased apoptosis and GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 expression in the amygdala. However, RU486 increases the exploratory behavior and reverses the changes of GFAP, S100β, GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12 and protects cells against apoptosis. Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest that exposure to chronic restraint stress decreases the number of astrocytes and induces apoptosis and ER stress in the amygdala, which are possible causes for psychiatric

  5. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

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    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  6. Agmatine abolishes restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior and hippocampal antioxidant imbalance in mice.

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    Freitas, Andiara E; Bettio, Luis E B; Neis, Vivian B; Santos, Danúbia B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila B; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2014-04-01

    Agmatine has been recently emerged as a novel candidate to assist the conventional pharmacotherapy of depression. The acute restraint stress (ARS) is an unavoidable stress situation that may cause depressive-like behavior in rodents. In this study, we investigated the potential antidepressant-like effect of agmatine (10mg/kg, administered acutely by oral route) in the forced swimming test (FST) in non-stressed mice, as well as its ability to abolish the depressive-like behavior and hippocampal antioxidant imbalance induced by ARS. Agmatine reduced the immobility time in the mouse FST (1-100mg/kg) in non-stressed mice. ARS caused an increase in the immobility time in the FST, indicative of a depressive-like behavior, as well as hippocampal lipid peroxidation, and an increase in the activity of hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, reduced catalase (CAT) activity and increased SOD/CAT ratio, an index of pro-oxidative conditions. Agmatine was effective to abolish the depressive-like behavior induced by ARS and to prevent the ARS-induced lipid peroxidation and changes in SOD, GR and CAT activities and in SOD/CAT activity ratio. Hippocampal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were not altered by any experimental condition. In conclusion, the present study shows that agmatine was able to abrogate the ARS-induced depressive-like behavior and the associated redox hippocampal imbalance observed in stressed restraint mice, suggesting that its antidepressant-like effect may be dependent on its ability to maintain the pro-/anti-oxidative homeostasis in the hippocampus.

  7. Dorsal and ventral hippocampus modulate autonomic responses but not behavioral consequences associated to acute restraint stress in rats.

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    América A Scopinho

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has suggested that the dorsal (DH and the ventral (VH poles of the hippocampus are structurally, molecularly and functionally different regions. While the DH is preferentially involved in the modulation of spatial learning and memory, the VH modulates defensive behaviors related to anxiety. Acute restraint is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP, intense heart rate (HR increases, skeletal muscle vasodilatation and cutaneous vasoconstriction, which are accompanied by a rapid skin temperature drop followed by body temperature increases. In addition to those autonomic responses, animals submitted to restraint also present behavioral changes, such as reduced exploration of the open arms of an elevated plus-maze (EPM, an anxiogenic-like effect. In the present work, we report a comparison between the effects of pharmacological inhibition of DH and VH neurotransmission on autonomic and behavioral responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the unspecific synaptic blocker cobalt chloride (CoCl2, 1mM into the DH or VH attenuated BP and HR responses, as well as the decrease in the skin temperature, elicited by restraint stress exposure. Moreover, DH or VH inhibition before restraint did not change the delayed increased anxiety behavior observed 24 h later in the EPM. The present results demonstrate for the first time that both DH and VH mediate stress-induced autonomic responses to restraint but they are not involved in the modulation of the delayed emotional consequences elicited by such stress.

  8. Tests of the Aversive Summation Hypothesis in Rats: Effects of Restraint Stress on Consummatory Successive Negative Contrast and Extinction in the Barnes Maze

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    Ortega, Leonardo A.; Prado-Rivera, Mayerli A.; Cardenas-Poveda, D. Carolina; McLinden, Kristina A.; Glueck, Amanda C.; Gutierrez, German; Lamprea, Marisol R.; Papini, Mauricio R.

    2013-01-01

    The present research explored the effects of restraint stress on two situations involving incentive downshift: consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC) and extinction of escape behavior in the Barnes maze. First, Experiment 1 confirmed that the restraint stress procedure used in these experiments increased levels of circulating…

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain JB-1 reverses restraint stress-induced gut dysmotility.

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    West, C; Wu, R Y; Wong, A; Stanisz, A M; Yan, R; Min, K K; Pasyk, M; McVey Neufeld, K-A; Karamat, M I; Foster, J A; Bienenstock, J; Forsythe, P; Kunze, W A

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress affects the gut with dysmotility being a common consequence. Although a variety of microbes or molecules may prevent the dysmotility, none reverse the dysmotility. We have used a 1 hour restraint stress mouse model to test for treatment effects of the neuroactive microbe, L. rhamnosus JB-1(™) . Motility of fluid-filled ex vivo gut segments in a perfusion organ bath was recorded by video and migrating motor complexes measured using spatiotemporal maps of diameter changes. Stress reduced jejunal and increased colonic propagating contractile cluster velocities and frequencies, while increasing contraction amplitudes for both. Luminal application of 10E8 cfu/mL JB-1 restored motor complex variables to unstressed levels within minutes of application. L. salivarius or Na.acetate had no treatment effects, while Na.butyrate partially reversed stress effects on colonic frequency and amplitude. Na.propionate reversed the stress effects for jejunum and colon except on jejunal amplitude. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a potential for certain beneficial microbes as treatment of stress-induced intestinal dysmotility and that the mechanism for restoration of function occurs within the intestine via a rapid drug-like action on the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Correlation between changes of central neurotransmitter expression and stress response in mice A restraint time-course analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bao; Xinsheng Yao; Liang Zhao; Yanqing Lü; Hiroshi Kurihara

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Changes in central neurotransmitter expression play an important role in stress response and forms the basis for stress-induced psychological and behavior changes.OBJECTIVE:To observe the effects of different restraint stress intervals on brain monoamine neurotransmitter expression,and to investigate the correlation between stress response and neurotransmitter levels.DESIGN:Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING:Chinese Herb and Natural Medicine Institute,Pharmacological College of Jinan University.MATERIALS:Sixty 7-week-old male Kunming mice of clean grade,weighing 18-22 g,were provided by the Guangdong Medical Experimental Animal Center.The experiment was in accordance with animal ethics standards.METHODS:This study was performed at the Chinese Herb and Natural Medicine Institute,Pharmacological College of Jinan University from June 2006 to May 2007.A restraint device for mice was constructed according to published reports.Experimental mice were adaptively fed for 1 week and randomly divided into a control group(n=10)and an experimental group(n=50).The experimental group was sub-divided into five restraint intervals:4,8,12,18,and 24 hours(n=10 mice per time point).Animals in the experimental group were not allowed to eat or drink during the restraint period.Mice in the control group did not undergo restraint,but had identical food and water restrictions.Cerebral cortex and hypothalamus were separated based on observational times and protein was extracted using perchloric acid.Central monoamine neurotransmitter levels were measured using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Levels of norepinephrine(NE),dopamine hydrochloride(DA),3,4-dihydroxyphen-ylanetic acid (DOPAC),homovanillic acid(HVA),5-hydroxytryptamine(5-HT),and 5-hydroxyindoleac-etic acid(5-HIAA)in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus of mice.RESULTS:Sixty mice were included in the final analysis.①NE levels in the cerebral

  11. Hormonal and molecular effects of restraint stress on formalin-induced pain-like behavior in male and female mice.

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    Long, Caela C; Sadler, Katelyn E; Kolber, Benedict J

    2016-10-15

    The evolutionary advantages to the suppression of pain during a stressful event (stress-induced analgesia (SIA)) are obvious, yet the reasoning behind sex-differences in the expression of this pain reduction are not. The different ways in which males and females integrate physiological stress responses and descending pain inhibition are unclear. A potential supraspinal modulator of stress-induced analgesia is the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). This limbic brain region is involved in both the processing of stress and pain; the CeA is anatomically and molecularly linked to regions of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and descending pain network. The CeA exhibits sex-based differences in response to stress and pain that may differentially induce SIA in males and females. Here, sex-based differences in behavioral and molecular indices of SIA were examined following noxious stimulation. Acute restraint stress in male and female mice was performed prior to intraplantar injections of formalin, a noxious inflammatory agent. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors were measured for 60min following formalin injection and mechanical hypersensitivity was evaluated 120 and 180min post-injection. Restraint stress altered formalin-induced spontaneous behaviors in male and female mice and formalin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male mice. To assess molecular indices of SIA, tissue samples from the CeA and blood samples were collected at the 180min time point. Restraint stress prevented formalin-induced increases in extracellular signal regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation in the male CeA, but no changes associated with pERK2 were seen with formalin or restraint in females. Sex differences were also seen in plasma corticosterone concentrations 180min post injection. These results demonstrate sex-based differences in behavioral, molecular, and hormonal indices of acute stress in mice that extend for 180min after stress and noxious stimulation.

  12. ROLE OF D2 DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ON MODULATION OF THE LEUKOCYTE FORMULA IN RESTRAINT STRESSED RATS

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    Lucian Hritcu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is a monoamine neurotransmitter of both central and peripheral nervous system. Its role in the neural-immune communication has been discussed in the present study. Results reveal that in vivo blockade of D2 dopamine receptor by means of sulpiride, a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptor produce changes in functional activities of the immune effector cells. Adults rats pretreated once with LPS (a bacterial product (25µg/250µl, i.p., produce an immune response, were subjected to i.p. injection with sulpiride (4 mg/kg b.w., i.p., a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptors, after 3 days postimmunization. After 18 days later, we assessed the total leukocyte number, neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils number. In summary, we provide that D2 dopamine receptor blockade suppress or enhance the immune effector cells number in restraint stress.

  13. Intranasal cotinine improves memory, and reduces depressive-like behavior, and GFAP+ cells loss induced by restraint stress in mice.

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    Perez-Urrutia, Nelson; Mendoza, Cristhian; Alvarez-Ricartes, Nathalie; Oliveros-Matus, Patricia; Echeverria, Florencia; Grizzell, J Alex; Barreto, George E; Iarkov, Alexandre; Echeverria, Valentina

    2017-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic psychological stress, and major depressive disorder have been found to be associated with a significant decrease in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of rodents. Cotinine is an alkaloid that prevents memory impairment, depressive-like behavior and synaptic loss when co-administered during restraint stress, a model of PTSD and stress-induced depression, in mice. Here, we investigated the effects of post-treatment with intranasal cotinine on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, visual recognition memory as well as the number and morphology of GFAP+ immunoreactive cells, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice subjected to prolonged restraint stress. The results revealed that in addition to the mood and cognitive impairments, restraint stress induced a significant decrease in the number and arborization of GFAP+ cells in the brain of mice. Intranasal cotinine prevented these stress-derived symptoms and the morphological abnormalities GFAP+ cells in both of these brain regions which are critical to resilience to stress. The significance of these findings for the therapy of PTSD and depression is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Administration of Lactobacillus helveticus NS8 improves behavioral, cognitive, and biochemical aberrations caused by chronic restraint stress.

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    Liang, S; Wang, T; Hu, X; Luo, J; Li, W; Wu, X; Duan, Y; Jin, F

    2015-12-03

    Increasing numbers of studies have suggested that the gut microbiota is involved in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. Chronic stress can cause behavioral, cognitive, biochemical, and gut microbiota aberrations. Gut bacteria can communicate with the host through the microbiota-gut-brain axis (which mainly includes the immune, neuroendocrine, and neural pathways) to influence brain and behavior. It is hypothesized that administration of probiotics can improve chronic-stress-induced depression. In order to examine this hypothesis, the chronic restraint stress depression model was established in this study. Adult specific pathogen free (SPF) Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 21 days of restraint stress followed by behavioral testing (including the sucrose preference test (SPT), elevated-plus maze test, open-field test (OFT), object recognition test (ORT), and object placement test (OPT)) and biochemical analysis. Supplemental Lactobacillus helveticus NS8 was provided every day during stress until the end of experiment, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (CIT) served as a positive control. Results showed that L. helveticus NS8 improved chronic restraint stress-induced behavioral (anxiety and depression) and cognitive dysfunction, showing an effect similar to and better than that of CIT. L. helveticus NS8 also resulted in lower plasma corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, higher plasma interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels, restored hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) levels, and more hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression than in chronic stress rats. Taken together, these results indicate an anti-depressant effect of L. helveticus NS8 in rats subjected to chronic restraint stress depression and that this effect could be due to the microbiota-gut-brain axis. They also suggest the therapeutic potential of L. helveticus NS8 in stress-related and possibly other

  15. Effect of chronic restraint stress on human colorectal carcinoma growth in mice.

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    Qiang Lin

    Full Text Available Stress alters immunological and neuroendocrinological functions. An increasing number of studies indicate that chronic stress can accelerate tumor growth, but its role in colorectal carcinoma (CRC progression is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS on CRC cell growth in nude mice and the possible underlying mechanisms. In this study, we showed that CRS increased the levels of plasma catecholamines including epinephrine (E and norepinephrine (NE, and stimulated the growth of CRC cell-derived tumors in vivo. Treatment with the adrenoceptor (AR antagonists phentolamine (PHE, α-AR antagonist and propranolol (PRO, β-AR antagonist significantly inhibited the CRS-enhanced CRC cell growth in nude mice. In addition, the stress hormones E and NE remarkably enhanced CRC cell proliferation and viability in culture, as well as tumor growth in vivo. These effects were antagonized by the AR antagonists PHE and PRO, indicating that the stress hormone-induced CRC cell proliferation is AR dependent. We also observed that the β-AR antagonists atenolol (ATE, β1- AR antagonist and ICI 118,551 (ICI, β2- AR antagonist inhibited tumor cell proliferation and decreased the stress hormone-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2 in vitro and in vivo. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also blocked the function of the stress hormone, suggesting the involvement of ERK1/2 in the tumor-promoting effect of CRS. We conclude that CRS promotes CRC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice by stimulating CRC cell proliferation through the AR signaling-dependent activation of ERK1/2.

  16. 寒、热方剂对水浸应激型胃溃疡寒、热证模型大鼠胃组织SOD活性、MDA含量的影响%The Influence of Cold or Heat Prescription on SOD Activity,MDA Contents in Gastric Tissue on Gastric Ulcer Induced by Bondage Water Immersion Stress Combined with Cold or Heat Syndrome Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冀; 毕珺辉; 柴剑波; 李胜志; 高彦宇; 肖洪彬; 赵雪莹

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨水浸应激型胃溃疡寒、热证模型的自由基代谢机制及寒、热方剂对该模型的自由基代谢的影响,阐明其方证相应的客观规律.方法:采用寒因素(冰水,0.3 mol/LNaOH液)、热因素(8%干辣椒粉的60%乙醇混悬液)分别结合水浸应激法,建立实验性大鼠胃溃疡寒、热证模型.采用黄嘌呤氧化酶法(羟氨法)、硫代巴比妥酸法检测胃组织中SOD活力及MDA含量.结果:SOD方面,水应激胃溃疡组、水应激胃溃疡寒证组、水应激胃溃疡热证组与空白比较活力下降,有显著性差异(P<0.01),但寒证与热证间比较无明显差异.MDA方面,水应激胃溃疡组、水应激胃溃疡热证组、单纯热证组与与空白比较含量明显升高,有显著性差异(P<0.01),且以水应激胃溃疡热证组升高最为显著.大黄黄连泻心汤、理中丸可选择性针对相应的寒性、热性模型体现出对自由基代谢的调节作用.结论:通过“方证相应”理论验证了“病证结合”胃溃疡寒、热证模型的可行性.水浸应激型胃溃疡寒、热证模型存在自由基代谢异常.MDA可作为水浸应激型胃溃疡热证的微观指征.%Objective: To explore the free radical metabolize mechanism of gastric ulcer model induced by bondage water immersion stress combined with cold or heat syndrome, and the influence of cold or heat prescription on free radical me-tabolizable mechanism. And to observe the basic mechanism of action and objective regularity of "formula - syndrome corresponding" of cold or heat formula on gastric ulcer model combined with cold or heat syndrome. Methods; Adopting cold or heat factors combined with bondage water immersion stress methods to establish gastric ulcer model combined with cold and heat syndrome. Using xanthine oxidase method to detect the activity of SOD and thibabituric acid(TBA) method to detect the contents of MDA in gastric tissue. Results:Compared with the blank group, the

  17. NMDA antagonist MK 801 in nucleus accumbens core but not shell disrupts the restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference in rats.

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    De Giovanni, Laura N; Guzman, Andrea S; Virgolini, Miriam B; Cancela, Liliana M

    2016-12-15

    Relapse is a common feature of cocaine addiction. In rodents, it can be elicited by cues, stress or the drug. Restraint stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP) is a useful model to study the mechanisms involved in stress-induced relapse of drug-seeking behavior. There is evidence that the glutamate NMDA receptors are critically involved in drug- and cue-induced reinstatement of seeking behavior and drug-CPP responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of NMDA receptors within core vs. shell nucleus accumbens (NAc) subregions to restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-CPP. After extinction of cocaine-conditioned preference, animals were administered MK 801 systemically or directly into intra-core or intra-shell, and restrained for 30min or left undisturbed in their home-cages. First, we demonstrated that restraint stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-CPP depends on the duration of restraint as well as on the context in which it is applied. Second, this effect was blocked by systemic MK 801 administration either before or after restraint. Third, intra-core but not intra-shell administration abrogated the restraint stress-induced reinstatement. These findings show that NMDA receptors within NAc core, but not shell, play a critical role in restraint stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-CPP.

  18. Effects of chronic restraint-induced stress on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse splenocytes.

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    Katsube, Takanori; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Varès, Guillaume; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Both ionizing radiation (IR) and psychological stress (PS) cause detrimental effects on humans. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced PS (CRIPS) diminished the functions of Trp53 and enhanced radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous (Trp53(+/-)) mice. These findings had a marked impact on the academic field as well as the general public, particularly among residents living in areas radioactively contaminated by nuclear accidents. In an attempt to elucidate the modifying effects of CRIPS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53(+/+)) animals, investigations involving multidisciplinary analyses were performed. We herein demonstrated that CRIPS induced changes in the frequency of IR-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in splenocytes. Five-week-old male Trp53(+/+) C57BL/6J mice were restrained for 6h per day for 28 consecutive days, and total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 4Gy was performed on the 8th day. Metaphase chromosome spreads prepared from splenocytes at the end of the 28-day restraint regimen were painted with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 3. The results obtained showed that CRIPS alone did not induce CAs, while TBI caused significant increases in CAs, mostly translocations. Translocations appeared at a lower frequency in mice exposed to TBI plus CRIPS than in those exposed to TBI alone. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of the other types of CAs (insertions, dicentrics, and fragments) visualized with FISH between these experimental groups (TBI+CRIPS vs. TBI). These results suggest that CRIPS does not appear to synergize with the clastogenicity of IR.

  19. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6–8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled ‘Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum’ [1].

  20. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Jereme G; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Lee, Johnny K; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-03-01

    This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled 'Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum' [1].

  1. Activation of the HPA axis and depression of feeding behavior induced by restraint stress are separately regulated by PACAPergic neurotransmission in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sunny Zhihong; Eiden, Lee E

    2016-07-01

    We measured serum CORT elevation in wild-type and PACAP-deficient C57BL/6N male mice after acute (1 h) or prolonged (2-3 h) daily restraint stress for 7 d. The PACAP dependence of CORT elevation was compared to that of stress-induced hypophagia. Daily restraint induced unhabituated peak CORT elevation, and hypophagia/weight loss, of similar magnitude for 1, 2, and 3 h of daily restraint, in wild-type mice. Peak CORT elevation, and hypophagia, were both attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice for 2 and 3 h daily restraint. Hypophagia induced by 1-h daily restraint was also greatly reduced in PACAP-deficient mice, however CORT elevation, both peak and during recovery from stress, was unaffected. Thus, hypothalamic PACAPergic neurotransmission appears to affect CRH gene transcription and peptide production, but not CRH release, in response to psychogenic stress. A single exposure to restraint sufficed to trigger hypophagia over the following 24 h. PACAP deficiency attenuated HPA axis response (CORT elevation) to prolonged (3 h) but not acute (1 h) single-exposure restraint stress, while hypophagia induced by either a single 1 h or a single 3 h restraint were both abolished in PACAP-deficient mice. These results suggest that PACAP's actions to promote suppression of food intake following an episode of psychogenic stress is unrelated to the release of CRH into the portal circulation to activate the pituitary-adrenal axis. Furthermore, demonstration of suppressed food intake after a single 1-h restraint stress provides a convenient assay for investigating the location of the synapses and circuits mediating the effects of PACAP on the behavioral sequelae of psychogenic stress.

  2. Hemodynamic and thermoregulatory responses to lower body water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Matthew D; Kim, Cihul-Ho; Seo, Yongsuk; Ryan, Edward J; Glickman, Ellen L

    2012-10-01

    Lower body water immersion (LBWI) is experienced in the marine industry but the physiological responses to LBWI are unclear. The purpose of the current experiment was to test the effects of water temperature and immersion duration on rectal temperature, heart rate, stroke volume, blood pressure, metabolic rate, and thermal sensation in healthy subjects. Nine young men underwent two 60-min trials of seated LBWI to the iliac crest in a counterbalanced fashion. On one occasion, the water was 35 degrees C (LBWI-Neutral) and on the other it was 13 degrees C (LBWI-Cold); the upper body remained thermoneutral and dry throughout. As expected, exposure to cold water reduced mean skin temperature and individuals reported cold thermal sensation. Mean arterial pressure was significantly higher at 60 min of LBWI-Cold (86 +/- 7 mmHg) compared to LBWI-Neutral (76 +/- 5 mmHg) while heart rate tended to be lower. The change in rectal temperature from baseline to 30 min of LBWI-Cold (delta = -0.01 +/- 0.21degrees C) was significantly smaller than the change in T(re) from 30 to 60 min of LBWI-Cold (delta = -0.46 +/- 0.16 degrees C). Despite this accelerated drop in core temperature during minutes 30-60, metabolic rate did not increase significantly. LBWI-Cold reduces core temperature and increases arterial blood pressure via an increase in total peripheral resistance. This experimental model may help scientists better understand the body during cold stress. Further, people who are occupationally exposed to cold water (when the torso, hands, and arms remain thermoneutral) may be at increased risk for hypothermia.

  3. Chronic restraint stress impairs neurogenesis and hippocampus-dependent fear memory in mice: possible involvement of a brain-specific transcription factor Npas4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jaesuk; Koike, Hiroyuki; Ibi, Daisuke; Toth, Erika; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Nitta, Atsumi; Yoneyama, Masanori; Ogita, Kiyokazu; Yoneda, Yukio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2010-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the hippocampus occurs throughout life in a wide range of species and could be associated with hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Stress is well established to seriously perturb physiological/psychological homeostasis and affect hippocampal function. In the present study, to investigate the effect of chronic restraint stress in early life on hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampus-dependent memory, 3-week-old mice were subjected to restraint stress 6 days a week for 4 weeks. The chronic restraint stress significantly decreased the hippocampal volume by 6.3% and impaired hippocampal neurogenesis as indicated by the reduced number of Ki67-, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine- and doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus. The chronic restraint stress severely impaired hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory without affecting hippocampus-independent fear memory. The expression level of brain-specific transcription factor neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4) mRNA in the hippocampus was down-regulated by the restraint stress or by acute corticosterone treatment. Npas4 immunoreactivity was detected in progenitors, immature and mature neurons of the dentate gyrus in control and stressed mice. Our findings suggest that the chronic restraint stress decreases hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to an impairment of hippocampus-dependent fear memory in mice. Corticosterone-induced down-regulation of Npas4 expression may play a role in stress-induced impairment of hippocampal function.

  4. Structural and functional alterations to rat medial prefrontal cortex following chronic restraint stress and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Deena S.; Pavlides, Constantine; Hunter, Richard G.; Bloss, Erik B.; Hof, Patrick R.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic stress has been shown in animal models to result in altered dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). It has been hypothesized that the stress-induced dendritic retractions and spine loss lead to disrupted connectivity that results in stress-induced functional impairment of mPFC. While these alterations were initially viewed as a neurodegenerative event, it has recently been established that stress induced dendritic alterations are reversible if animals are given time to recover from chronic stress. However, whether spine growth accompanies dendritic extension remains to be demonstrated. It is also not known if recovery-phase dendritic extension allows for re-establishment of functional capacity. The goal of this study, therefore, was to characterize the structural and functional effects of chronic stress and recovery on the infralimbic (IL) region of the rat mPFC. We compared neuronal morphology of layer V IL pyramidal neurons from animals subjected to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) to those that experienced CRS followed by a 21 day recovery period. Layer V pyramidal cell functional capacity was assessed by intra-IL long-term potentiation (LTP) both in the absence and presence of SKF38393, a dopamine receptor partial agonist and a known PFC LTP modulator. We found that stress-induced IL apical dendritic retraction and spine loss co-occur with receptor-mediated impairments to catecholaminergic facilitation of synaptic plasticity. We also found that while post-stress recovery did not reverse distal dendritic retraction, it did result in over-extension of proximal dendritic neuroarchitecture and spine growth as well as a full reversal of CRS-induced impairments to catecholaminergic-mediated synaptic plasticity. Our results support the hypothesis that disease-related PFC dysfunction is a consequence of network disruption secondary to altered structural and functional plasticity and that circuitry

  5. Effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices

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    Torres I.L.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that glucocorticoids released during stress might impair neuronal function by decreasing glucose uptake by hippocampal neurons. Previous work has demonstrated that glucose uptake is reduced in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices 24 h after exposure to acute stress, while no effect was observed after repeated stress. Here, we report the effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices and on plasma glucose and corticosterone levels. Male adult Wistar rats were exposed to restraint 1 h/day for 50 days in the chronic model. In the acute model there was a single exposure. Immediately or 24 h after stress, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected, sliced, and incubated with Krebs buffer, pH 7.4, containing 5 mM glucose and 0.2 µCi D-[U-14C] glucose. CO2 production from glucose was estimated. Trunk blood was also collected, and both corticosterone and glucose were measured. The results showed that corticosterone levels after exposure to acute restraint were increased, but the increase was smaller when the animals were submitted to repeated stress. Blood glucose levels increased after both acute and repeated stress. However, glucose utilization, measured as CO2 production in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices, was the same in stressed and control groups under conditions of both acute and chronic stress. We conclude that, although stress may induce a decrease in glucose uptake, this effect is not sufficient to affect the energy metabolism of these cells.

  6. Prenatal noise and restraint stress interact to alter exploratory behavior and balance in juvenile rats, and mixed stress reverses these effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badache, Soumeya; Bouslama, Slim; Brahmia, Oualid; Baïri, Abdel Madjid; Tahraoui, Abdel Krim; Ladjama, Ali

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to investigate in adolescent rats the individual and combined effects of prenatal noise and restraint stress on balance control, exploration, locomotion and anxiety behavior. Three groups of pregnant rats were exposed to daily repeated stress from day 11 to day 19 of pregnancy: 3 min noise (Noise Stress, NS); 10 min restraint (restraint stress, RS); or 3 min noise followed by 10 min restraint (mixed stress, MS). On postnatal days (PND) 44, 45 and 46, four groups of male rats (Control, NS, RS:, MS; 16 rats each), were tested as follows: (1) beam walking (BW), (2) open field (OF) and (3) elevated plus maze (EPM). Our results show that the NS group had significantly impaired balance control, locomotion and both horizontal and vertical exploration (p stress, especially noise, which group had the largest adrenal glands. Overall, contrary to expectation, combined prenatal stressors can interact to increase anxiety level, but diminish alteration of exploration, locomotion and impaired balance control, which were strongly induced by noise stress. Lay summary: Experience of stress in pregnancy can have negative effects on the offspring that are long-lasting. Here, we used laboratory rats to see whether repeated episodes of exposure to loud noise or preventing free movement, alone or together, during pregnancy had different effects on behaviors of the adolescent offspring. Using standard tests, we found the prenatal stresses caused the offspring to be anxious, and not to balance when moving around as well as normal offspring; the degree of impairment depended on the type of stress - loud noise exposure had the greatest effects, but if the stresses were combined the effects were not worse. The results point to the need to aim to avoid stress in pregnant women.

  7. Free cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase levels during a six-hour-water immersion in healthy young men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, N.; Wirth, D.; Fraßl, W.; Kowoll, R.; Schlemmer, M.; Vogler, S.; Kirsch, K. A.; Kirschbaum, C.; Gunga, H.-C.

    2005-08-01

    Limited data are available on the response of stress systems to microgravity. Increased activity of stress systems is reported during space flight, but unchanged or decreased activity during simulated microgravity. We here investigated the impact of head-out water immersion on the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) system.Eight healthy young men were exposed to a six-hour water immersion in a thermo neutral bath and a control condition. Saliva samples were taken before, during, and after interventions to assess cortisol as an index for HPA axis activity, and salivary α-amylase as an index for SAM system activity.Cortisol levels uniformly decreased during both conditions. Amylase levels increased during both conditions, but were significantly lower during the first half of water immersion compared to the control condition.In conclusion, the HPA axis is not influenced by simulated microgravity, while SAM system activity shows initial decreases during water immersion.

  8. Prenatal restraint stress generates two distinct behavioral and neurochemical profiles in male and female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Zuena

    Full Text Available Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS in rats is a validated model of early stress resulting in permanent behavioral and neurobiological outcomes. Although sexual dimorphism in the effects of PRS has been hypothesized for more than 30 years, few studies in this long period have directly addressed the issue. Our group has uncovered a pronounced gender difference in the effects of PRS (stress delivered to the mothers 3 times per day during the last 10 days of pregnancy on anxiety, spatial learning, and a series of neurobiological parameters classically associated with hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Adult male rats subjected to PRS ("PRS rats" showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM, a reduction in the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus, a reduction in the activity of mGlu1/5 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the ventral hippocampus, and an increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and pro-BDNF in the hippocampus. In contrast, female PRS rats displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM, improved learning in the Morris water maze, an increase in the activity of mGlu1/5 receptors in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus, and no changes in hippocampal neurogenesis or BDNF levels. The direction of the changes in neurogenesis, BDNF levels and mGlu receptor function in PRS animals was not consistent with the behavioral changes, suggesting that PRS perturbs the interdependency of these particular parameters and their relation to hippocampus-dependent behavior. Our data suggest that the epigenetic changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity induced by early environmental challenges are critically sex-dependent and that the behavioral outcome may diverge in males and females.

  9. Prenatal Restraint Stress Generates Two Distinct Behavioral and Neurochemical Profiles in Male and Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolini, Paola; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Chiodi, Valentina; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Gradini, Roberto; Catalani, Assia; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) in rats is a validated model of early stress resulting in permanent behavioral and neurobiological outcomes. Although sexual dimorphism in the effects of PRS has been hypothesized for more than 30 years, few studies in this long period have directly addressed the issue. Our group has uncovered a pronounced gender difference in the effects of PRS (stress delivered to the mothers 3 times per day during the last 10 days of pregnancy) on anxiety, spatial learning, and a series of neurobiological parameters classically associated with hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Adult male rats subjected to PRS (“PRS rats”) showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), a reduction in the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus, a reduction in the activity of mGlu1/5 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the ventral hippocampus, and an increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF in the hippocampus. In contrast, female PRS rats displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM, improved learning in the Morris water maze, an increase in the activity of mGlu1/5 receptors in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus, and no changes in hippocampal neurogenesis or BDNF levels. The direction of the changes in neurogenesis, BDNF levels and mGlu receptor function in PRS animals was not consistent with the behavioral changes, suggesting that PRS perturbs the interdependency of these particular parameters and their relation to hippocampus-dependent behavior. Our data suggest that the epigenetic changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity induced by early environmental challenges are critically sex-dependent and that the behavioral outcome may diverge in males and females. PMID:18478112

  10. Zinc and imipramine reverse the depression-like behavior in mice induced by chronic restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qin; Li, Hongxia; Tian, Xue; Shen, Zhilei; Wang, Xiaoli; Mo, Fengfeng; Huang, Junlong; Shen, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a common psychopathological disorders. Studies of depression have indicated that zinc play a role in the depression pathophysiology and treatment. In present study, we examined the effects of zinc and imipramine supplement alone or combination of zinc and imipramine in mice induced by chronic restraint stress (CRS). Moreover, the possible roles of zinc receptor (G protein-coupled receptor 39, GPR39)-related pathway was investigated. Decreased weight and increased corticosterone (CORT) were observed after 3 weeks CRS exposure. It was shown that CRS induced lower serum zinc, higher hippocampal zinc, increased immobility time in tail suspension test and decreased movement distance in spontaneous activity test, which could be normalized by zinc (30 mg/kg) and imipramine (20 mg/kg) supplement alone and combination of zinc (15 mg/kg) and imipramine (5 mg/kg) for 3 weeks after CRS exposure. Moreover, the changes in mRNA expressions of GPR39, cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and n-methytl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) could be reversed by the same treatment mentioned above. These results suggested that zinc dyshomeostasis in serum and hippocampus and depression-like behavior in CRS exposure animals observed in present study could be normalized by zinc and imipramine. The combination of zinc and imipramine in low dose has synergetic effects. The possible mechanism might be correlated to GPR39 receptor-related pathway.

  11. Estresse oxidativo no plasma sanguíneo de indivíduos submetidos ao esforço físico agudo seguido de crioimersão corporal Oxidative stress in blood plasma in persons who are submitted to cold water immersion after acute physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Peres Prado

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a influência da crioimersão corporal (CIC imediata ao esforço físico agudo no estresse oxidativo (EOx no plasma sanguíneo. Participaram do presente estudo 12 homens, com idade média de 22±1 anos, submetidos ao teste de esforço físico intenso em esteira, seguido de CIC em um tanque com água a 10ºC durante 10 minutos contínuos. Do repouso ao final da CIC, os indivíduos foram monitorados através de alguns parâmetros como: o índice de percepção subjetiva do esforço (IPE expresso conforme escala de Borg, frequência cardíaca (FC, pressão arterial (PA e temperatura corporal (TC através da temperatura timpânica. A análise morfológica do EOx plasmático foi realizada de acordo com o método denominado Morfologia Óptica do Estresse Oxidativo no Plasma (MEOP, utilizando-se gotas de sangue capilar. Observou-se uma significativa elevação (pThe purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of cold water immersion (CWI following acute physical exercise on the oxidative stress in the blood plasma. Twelve men with average age of 22±1 years old, participated this study. All of them underwent the treadmill stress test followed by CWI in tank with water at 10ºC for 10 minutes. During this process, they were monitored and a set of parameters were analyzed: physical effort perception (Borg Scale, Heart Rate (HR, Blood Pressure (BP and body heat, by measuring tympanic temperature. The morphological analysis of oxidative stress in blood plasma was done in accordance with a method known as Optical Morphology of the Oxidative Stress on Blood Plasma, which uses drops of capillary blood. A significant increase (p<0.01 in the rate of oxidative stress in plasma was noted after intense physical effort when compared with the rate of stress while at rest. However, the stress rate was significantly decreased (p<0.001 after CWI. Although further scientific studies should be carried out on the above mentioned

  12. Effect of restraint stress on depression-like behaviors in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Restraint stress is a typical psychophysiological stressor. Simulating the early passion and difficulty in walking of patients after attack of stroke meets onset features.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of restraint stress on depression-like behaviors in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemic injury, and to investigate the feasibility for its being as modeling method of depression model after stroke.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Aerospace Medicine of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 240 - 270 g, provided by the Experimental Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA were used in the current study.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Faculty of Aerospace Medicine of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between August 2005 and August 2006. ①Experiment intervention: The rats were randomized into middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO) +stress group, simple MCAO group, sham-operation + stress group and simple sham-operation group, with 12 rats in each group.Rats in the first two groups were developed into cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models by suture-occluded method. Rats in the MCAO+stress group were modeled and restraint stress scheme was performed. At week 5 after modeling, the rats were placed in self-made restraining tubes, 2 hours/time, once a day, for 2 successive weeks. The common carotid artery, external and internal carotid arteries of rats in the latter two groups were exposed. The stress way of sham-operation+ stress group was the same as that of MCAO+ stress group. ②The neurological status grading and motor performance evaluation (screen test, rota-rod test and balance beam test) were conducted in rats with simple sham-operation group and MCAO group before, 1st and 28th days after modeling. Depression-like behavior

  13. Electroacupuncture pretreatment exhibits anti-depressive effects by regulating hippocampal proteomics in rats with chronic restraint stress

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    Zhuo Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effect of electroacupuncture on depression is widely recognized. However, the signal transduction pathways and target proteins involved remain unclear. In the present study, rat models of chronic restraint stress were used to explore the mechanism by which electroacupuncture alleviates depression. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, and electroacupuncture groups. Chronic restraint stress was induced in the model and electroacupuncture groups by restraining rats for 28 days. In the electroacupuncture group, electroacupuncture pretreatment at Baihui (GV20 and Yintang (GV29 acupoints was performed daily (1 mA, 2 Hz, discontinuous wave, 20 minutes prior to restraint for 28 days. Open field tests and body weight measurements were carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at specific time points. On day 28, the crossing number, rearing number, and body weights of the model group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Behavior test results indicated that rat models of depressive-like symptoms were successfully established by chronic restraint stress combined with solitary raising. On day 28, an isobaric tag for a relative and absolute quantitation-based quantitative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in hippocampal samples obtained from the model and electroacupuncture groups. The potential function of these differential proteins was predicted through the use of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG database. Twenty-seven differential proteins (uncharacteristic proteins expected were selected from the model and electroacupuncture groups. In addition to unknown protein functions, COG are mainly concentrated in general prediction function, mechanism of signal transduction, amino acid transport and metabolism groups. This suggests that electroacupuncture improved depressive-like symptoms by regulating differential proteins, and most of these related

  14. Electroacupuncture pretreatment exhibits anti-depressive effects by regulating hippocampal proteomics in rats with chronic restraint stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo Guo; Xu-hui Zhang; Ya Tu; Tian-wei Guo; Yun-chu Wu; Xue-qin Yang; Lan Sun; Xin-jing Yang; Wen-yue Zhang; Yu Wang

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effect of electroacupuncture on depression is widely recognized. However, the signal transduction pathways and target proteins involved remain unclear. In the present study, rat models of chronic restraint stress were used to explore the mechanism by which electroacupuncture alleviates depression. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, and electroacupuncture groups. Chronic restraint stress was induced in the model and elec-troacupuncture groups by restraining rats for 28 days. In the electroacupuncture group, electroacupuncture pretreatment atBaihui (GV20) andYintang (GV29) acupoints was per-formed daily (1 mA, 2 Hz, discontinuous wave, 20 minutes) prior to restraint for 28 days. Open ifeld tests and body weight measurements were carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at speciifc time points. On day 28, the crossing number, rearing number, and body weights of the model group were signiifcantly lower than those in the control group. Behavior test results indicated that rat models of depressive-like symptoms were successfully established by chronic restraint stress combined with solitary raising. On day 28, an isobaric tag for a relative and abso-lute quantitation-based quantitative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in hippocampal samples obtained from the model and electroacupuncture groups. The potential function of these differential proteins was predicted through the use of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) database. Twenty-seven differential pro-teins (uncharacteristic proteins expected) were selected from the model and electroacupuncture groups. In addition to unknown protein functions, COG are mainly concentrated in general prediction function, mechanism of signal transduction, amino acid transport and metabolism groups. This suggests that electroacupuncture improved depressive-like symptoms by regulating differential proteins, and most of these related proteins

  15. Distinct effects of repeated restraint stress on basolateral amygdala neuronal membrane properties in resilient adolescent and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Andrea; Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2014-08-01

    Severe and repeated stress has damaging effects on health, including initiation of depression and anxiety. Stress that occurs during development has long-lasting and particularly damaging effects on emotion. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a key role in many affective behaviors, and repeated stress causes different forms of BLA hyperactivity in adolescent and adult rats. However, the mechanism is not known. Furthermore, not every individual is susceptible to the negative consequences of stress. Differences in the effects of stress on the BLA might contribute to determine whether an individual will be vulnerable or resilient to the effects of stress on emotion. The purpose of this study is to test the cellular underpinnings for age dependency of BLA hyperactivity after stress, and whether protective changes occur in resilient individuals. To test this, the effects of repeated stress on membrane excitability and other membrane properties of BLA principal neurons were compared between adult and adolescent rats, and between vulnerable and resilient rats, using in vitro whole-cell recordings. Vulnerability was defined by adrenal gland weight, and verified by body weight gain after repeated restraint stress, and fecal pellet production during repeated restraint sessions. We found that repeated stress increased the excitability of BLA neurons, but in a manner that depended on age and BLA subnucleus. Furthermore, stress resilience was associated with an opposite pattern of change, with increased slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) potential, whereas vulnerability was associated with decreased medium AHP. The opposite outcomes in these two populations were further distinguished by differences of anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze that were correlated with BLA neuronal excitability and AHP. These results demonstrate a substrate for BLA hyperactivity after repeated stress, with distinct membrane properties to target, as well as age-dependent factors that

  16. Modification of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity by memantine in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress: implications for memory and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Aidi, Ahmed Amro; Ali, Mohamed Mostafa; Attia, Yasser Mahmoud; Rashed, Laila Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Stress is any condition that impairs the balance of the organism physiologically or psychologically. The response to stress involves several neurohormonal consequences. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its release is increased by stress that predisposes to excitotoxicity in the brain. Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate glutamatergic receptors antagonist and has shown beneficial effect on cognitive function especially in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the work was to investigate memantine effect on memory and behavior in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress with the evaluation of serum markers of stress and the expression of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity. Forty-two male rats were divided into seven groups (six rats/group): control, acute restraint stress, acute restraint stress with Memantine, repeated restraint stress, repeated restraint stress with Memantine and Memantine groups (two subgroups as positive control). Spatial working memory and behavior were assessed by performance in Y-maze. We evaluated serum cortisol, tumor necrotic factor, interleukin-6 and hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, synaptophysin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our results revealed that Memantine improved spatial working memory in repeated stress, decreased serum level of stress markers and modified the hippocampal synaptic plasticity markers in both patterns of stress exposure; in ARS, Memantine upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulated the expression of calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and in repeated restraint stress, it upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and downregulated calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression.

  17. Protective effect of Momordica charantia water extract against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice and the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qin; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Tang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Momordica charantia is used in China for its jianghuo (heat-clearing and detoxifying) effects. The concept of shanghuo (the antonym of jianghuo, excessive internal heat) in traditional Chinese medicine is considered a type of stress response of the body. The stress process involves internal organs, especially the liver. Objective: We hypothesized that Momordica charantia water extract (MWE) has a hepatoprotective effect and can protect the body from stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of MWE against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice. Design: The mice were intragastrically administered with MWE (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg bw) daily for 7 days. The Normal Control (NC) and Model groups were administered distilled water. A positive control group was intragastrically administered vitamin C 250 mg/kg bw. After the last administration, mice were restrained for 20 h. Results: MWE reduced the serum AST and ALT, reduced the NO content and the protein expression level of iNOSin the liver; significantly reduced the mitochondrial ROS content, increased the mitochondrial membrane potential and the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and II in restraint-stressed mice. Conclusions: The results indicate that MWE has a protective effect against liver injury in restraint-stressed mice. Abbreviations: MWE: Momordica charantia water extract; M. charantia: Momordica charantia L.; ROS: reactive oxygen species; NO: nitric oxide; iNOS: inducible nitric oxide synthase; IL-1β: interleukin-1 beta; TNF-α: tumor necrosis factor alpha; IL-6: interleukin 6; IFN-γ: interferon gamma; VC: vitamin C; ALT: alanine transaminase; AST: aspartate aminotransferase; GSH: glutathione; GSH-PX: glutathione peroxidase; MDA: malondialdehyde; BCA: bicinchoninic acid; TBARS: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; Trolox: 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid; JC-B: Janus Green B; DW: dry weight; FC: Folin-Ciocalteu; GAE

  18. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters.

  19. Activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptors enhances glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus of prenatally restraint stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Gatta, Eleonora; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Soichot, Marion; Deruyter, Lucie; Camp, Gilles Van; Bouwalerh, Hammou; Fagioli, Francesca; Pittaluga, Anna; Allorge, Delphine; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin receptors are known to modulate synaptic transmission and network activity in the hippocampus, but their precise function has been only partially elucidated. Here, we have found that activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptor with the potent agonist, carbetocin, enhanced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus with no effect on GABA release. This evidence paved the way for examining the effect of carbetocin treatment in "prenatally restraint stressed" (PRS) rats, i.e., the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy. Adult PRS rats exhibit an anxious/depressive-like phenotype associated with an abnormal glucocorticoid feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and, remarkably, with a reduced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus. Chronic systemic treatment with carbetocin (1mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 2-3 weeks) in PRS rats corrected the defect in glutamate release, anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, and abnormalities in social behavior, in the HPA response to stress, and in the expression of stress-related genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. Of note, carbetocin treatment had no effect on these behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters in prenatally unstressed (control) rats, with the exception of a reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor gene in the amygdala. These findings disclose a novel function of oxytocin receptors in the hippocampus, and encourage the use of oxytocin receptor agonists in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders in adult life.

  20. Chronic restraint stress in rats causes sustained increase in urinary corticosterone excretion without affecting cerebral or systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Maigaard, Katrine; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2013-01-01

    and Tnf). The metabolism cage housing in itself did not significantly influence a range of biological stress markers. In the restraint stress group, there was a sustained 2.5 fold increase in 24h corticosterone excretion from day 2 after stress initiation. However, neither whole-body nor cerebral measures...

  1. Evaluation of the protective effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil on the dentate gyrus following chronic restraint stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Bhari Talip

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic restraint stress has been shown to cause a number of morphological changes in the hippocampal formation of rats. Tocotrienol, an isoform of vitamin E, exhibits numerous health benefits, different from those of tocopherol. Recent studies have demonstrated that tocotrienol prevents stress-induced changes in the gastric mucosa, thus indicating that it may also protect other organs such as the brain from the damaging effects of stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF extracted from palm oil on the dentate gyrus of rats following exposure to chronic restraint stress. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control, stress, tocotrienol and combination of stress and tocotrienol. Animals were stressed by restraining them for 5 hours every day for 21 consecutive days. TRF was administered via oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Our results showed that the plasma corticosterone level was significantly increased in response to stress, compared to the control. The results confirmed previous findings that chronic restraint stress suppresses cellular proliferation and reduces granule cell number in the dentate gyrus. However, TRF supplementation failed to prevent or minimize these stress-induced changes. Therefore, we conclude that TRF at the current dosage is not effective in preventing the morphological changes in the dentate gyrus induced by chronic restraint stress.

  2. Effects of acute restraint stress on different components of memory as assessed by object-recognition and object-location tasks in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Fan, Ya-Xin; Wang, Wei; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Studies on how acute stress and the stress-related hormones affect learning and memory have yielded inconsistent findings, which might be due to some variables such as the properties of stressors, the nature of memory, the protocols for behavioral tasks and the characteristics of the subjects. However, the impacts of acute stress on different memory components have not been clearly demonstrated within one single experiment. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of 1-h restraint stress and the stress-induced plasma corticosterone elevation on memory acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval in mice, using object-recognition task (ORT) and object-location task (OLT) with a 4-h or 24-h intertrial interval (ITI). The results showed that, regardless of ITI, the recognition memory retrieval was significantly disrupted by acute restraint stress exposure, which started 75 min before the test session of both ORT and OLT. Acute restraint stress performed immediately after memory acquisition interrupted the consolidation of short-term recognition memories (4-h ITI) into long-term ones (24-h ITI). Moreover, the disrupted memory retrieval or consolidation was strongly related to the stress-induced plasma corticosterone elevation in a negative manner. These preliminary results clarified that acute restraint stress differently impacts three memory components, and the enhanced plasma corticosterone level under stressful situation plays critical roles in the information processing of memory under the stressful situation.

  3. Stress in the wild: chronic predator pressure and acute restraint affect plasma DHEA and corticosterone levels in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A E M; Zanette, L Y; Clinchy, M; Goodenough, N; Soma, K K

    2013-05-01

    The effects of chronic stressors on glucocorticoid levels are well described in laboratory rodents, but far less is known about the effects of chronic stressors on wild animals or on dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. DHEA can be produced by the adrenal cortex and has prominent antiglucocorticoid properties. Here, we examined wild songbirds to elucidate the relationship between chronic predator pressure and plasma DHEA and corticosterone levels. We measured circulating steroid levels at baseline and after acute restraint in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. During the breeding season, males in low predator pressure (LPP) environments had higher baseline DHEA levels than males in high predator pressure (HPP) environments. Also, acute restraint decreased DHEA levels in LPP males only but increased corticosterone levels in HPP and LPP males similarly. During the nonbreeding season, DHEA and corticosterone levels were lower than during the breeding season, and acute restraint decreased DHEA levels in both HPP and LPP males. Unlike males, breeding females showed no effect of predator pressure on baseline DHEA or corticosterone levels. These data suggest that naturalistic chronic and acute stressors affect circulating DHEA and corticosterone levels in wild animals and highlight the importance of using multiple endpoints when studying the physiological effects of chronic stress.

  4. Modulatory influence of rarely repeated of immobilization episodes on the interleukin-1β-dependent reaction of blood leukocytes and hepatoprotective effect of restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseilikman, O B; Tseilikman, V E; Linin, A V; Gubkin, D A; Rudina, E A; Trubetskoy, S A; Ivanov, P V; Pozdnyakov, E A

    2011-02-01

    Repeated episodes of 1-h restraint stress were accompanied by a decrease in the sensitivity of blood leukocytes and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases of the liver to recombinant IL-1β. These changes are associated with the anti-inflammatory hepatoprotective effect of chronic stress.

  5. Theacrine, a purine alkaloid obtained from Camellia assamica var. kucha, attenuates restraint stress-provoked liver damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Xi; Li, Yi-Fang; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Chen, Wei-Min; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2013-07-03

    Theacrine (1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid), a purine alkaloid, has proven to be beneficial in maintaining several brain functions and is being studied for potential medicinal uses in recent years. In this study, we isolated theacrine from Camellia assamica var. kucha and investigated its protective effects on liver damage induced by restraint stress in mice. Results showed that 18 h of restraint stress could induce liver damage, with an obvious increase in levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). This finding was further confirmed by hepatic pathological examination, which showed inflammatory cell infiltration and focal necrosis of hepatocytes. However, oral administration of theacrine (10, 20, 30 mg/kg for 7 consecutive days) was found to decrease plasma ALT and AST levels, reduce hepatic mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ), and reverse the histologic damages in stressed mice. Simultaneously, theacrine also significantly decreased the content of malondialdehyde and increased oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) level in the plasma and liver of stressed mice. These results suggested that the protective effects of theacrine on stress-induced liver damage might be correlated with its antioxidative activity. The antioxidative capacity of theacrine was further evaluated by in vitro ORAC and cellular antioxidant activity assay. The results suggested that the antioxidative capacity of theacrine was not due to the direct action on free radical clearance. Moreover, the elevated activities and gene expressions of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the reduced activity of xanthine oxidase by theacrine treatment in stressed mice suggested that the antioxidative activity might be due to the strengthening of the antioxidant system in vivo. On the basis of the above results, theacrine is possibly a good candidate for protecting against or treating lifestyle

  6. A new application of LBNP to measure orthostatic tolerance before and after 0-g simulation (water immersion).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordinsky, J R; Gebhardt, U; Borger, H J; Birk, J

    1980-12-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) remains an important device for the generation of orthostatic stress in the space flight environment as well as a tool to measure inflight and postflight changes in orthostatic response. These applied levels of LBNP have typically not exceeded 50-60 mm Hg negative pressure. Information is incomplete as to the levels of absolute LBNP orthostatic tolerance, and the factors responsible for their variance. A better definition of the tolerance limits for males and females could be expected to aid the evaluation of lower levels of LBNP. An LBNP device was built to study absolute orthostatic tolerance; additionally, another LBNP device was constructed to permit orthostatic tolerance testing directly after a controlled water immersion period. Absolute LBNP orthostatic tolerance patterns are analyzed for a group of males and females (series I). A preliminary statement on the variations of LBNP orthostatic tolerance after limited periods of water immersion and bed rest is also provided (series II).

  7. Intrapericardial Denervation: Responses to Water Immersion in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Kenneth H.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1995-01-01

    Eleven anesthetized rhesus monkeys were used to study cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine alterations associated with 120 min of head-out water immersion. Five animals underwent complete intrapericardial denervation using the Randall technique, while the remaining six monkeys served as intact controls. Each animal was chronically instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe on the ascending aorta, a strain gauge pressure transducer implanted in the apex of the left ventricle (LV), and electrocardiogram leads anchored to the chest wall and LV. During immersion, LV end-diastolic pressure, urine flow, glomerular filtration rate, sodium excretion, and circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) each increased (P less than 0.05) for intact and denervated monkeys. There were no alterations in free water clearance in either group during immersion, yet fractional excretion of free water increased (P less than 0.05) in the intact monkeys. Plasma renin activity (PRA) decreased (P less than 0.05) during immersion in intact monkeys but not the denervated animals. Plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration decreased (P less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of immersion in both groups but was not distinguishable from control by 60 min of immersion in denervated monkeys. These data demonstrate that complete cardiac denervation does not block the rise in plasma ANP or prevent the natriuresis associated with head-out water immersion. The suppression of PVP during the first minutes of immersion after complete cardiac denervation suggests that extracardiac sensing mechanisms associated with the induced fluid shifts may be responsible for the findings.

  8. Temporal changes of the adrenal endocrine system in a restraint stressed mouse and possibility of postmortem indicators of prolonged psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Abe, Yuki; Ihama, Yoko; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuji; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-07-01

    We investigated temporal changes of adrenal endocrine systems through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenomedullary (SA) axis in restraint stressed mice. Restraint stress for 1 day to 3 weeks caused a significant increase in serum levels of ACTH and glucocorticoids accompanied with an increase in adrenal weights, indicating activation of the HPA axis. Reflecting the overproduction of glucocorticoids, adrenal cholesterol content decreased. Moreover, adrenal gene expression involved in cholesterol supply, including scavenger receptor-class B type I, HMG-CoA reductase, and hormone-sensitive lipase, was increased over the same period. After 4 weeks stress, all of these changes returned to control levels. In contrast, adrenal gene expression of chromogranin A, which is cosecreted with catecholamine via the SA axis, was increased with 1 day to 2 weeks of stress, and decreased with 3-4 weeks of stress. Our results suggest that analyses of adrenal endocrine systems based on the combination of several markers examined here would be useful for not only proving prolonged psychological stress experience but also determining its duration.

  9. Chronic exercise prevents repeated restraint stress-provoked enhancement of immobility in forced swimming test in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Jang-Kyu; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    We assessed whether chronic treadmill exercise attenuated the depressive phenotype induced by restraint stress in ovariectomized mice (OVX). Immobility of OVX in the forced swimming test was comparable to that of sham mice (CON) regardless of the postoperative time. Immobility was also no difference between restrained mice (exposure to periodic restraint for 21 days; RST) and control mice (CON) on post-exposure 2nd and 9th day, but not 15th day. In contrast, the immobility of ovariectomized mice with repeated stress (OVX + RST) was profoundly enhanced compared to ovariectomized mice-alone (OVX), and this effect was reversed by chronic exercise (19 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks; OVX + RST + Ex) or fluoxetine administration (20 mg/kg, OVX + RST + Flu). In parallel with behavioral data, the immunoreactivity of Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) in OVX was significantly decreased by repeated stress. However, the reduced numbers of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in OVX + RST were restored in response to chronic exercise (OVX + RST + Ex) and fluoxetine (OVX + RST + Flu). In addition, the expression pattern of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) was similar to that of the hippocampal proliferation and neurogenesis markers (Ki-67 and DCX, respectively). These results suggest that menopausal depression may be induced by an interaction between repeated stress and low hormone levels, rather than a deficit in ovarian secretion alone, which can be improved by chronic exercise.

  10. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  11. Hypervolemia and plasma vasopressin response during water immersion in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Morse, J. T.; Barnes, P. R.; Silver, J.; Keil, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Immersion studies were performed on seven mildly dehydrated male subjects to examine the effect of suppression of plasma vasopressin (PVP) on diuresis in water immersion. The water was kept at close to 34.5 C and the subjects remained in the water for 4 hr after sitting for 2 hr. Na and K levels in the serum and urine were analyzed, as were osmolality, red blood cell count, renin activity, total protein, albumin amounts, hematocrit, and hemoglobin. Plasma volume was monitored from samples drawn at specified intervals during immersion. The plasma volume increased significantly 30 min after immersion, but no PVP was observed. The dehydration induced elevated serum osmotic concentrations. It is concluded that the hydration condition before immersion and the volume of fluid intake during immersion affects the hemodilution during immersion.

  12. Effects of chronic restraint stress on the global DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells: Modulation by physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, L V; Volpini, V L; Nascimento, L M; Silva, W R; Verissimo, L F; Estrada, V B; Pelosi, G G; Gomes, M V

    2017-07-28

    The potential of behavioral stress to affect epigenetic mechanisms of non-encephalic tissues is still underestimated. In the present study we evaluated the effects of chronic behavioral stress on the DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells. Furthermore, we evaluated the potential of physical exercise to modulate the changes evoked by behavioral stress in lung cells. Male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) animals submitted to chronic restraint stress (CRS) (ST group) during the period of the 67th-80th postnatal day (PND); (2) animals submitted to physical exercise (EX group) during the 53rd-79th PND; (3) animals submitted to swimming during the 53rd-79th PND and to CRS during the 67th-80th PND (EX-ST group); and (4) animals not submitted to stress or swimming protocols (CTL). Global DNA methylation was quantified using an ELISA-based approach and gene expression was evaluated by real time PCR. A decreased global DNA methylation profile was observed in the ST group, however physical exercise demonstrated protection of lung cells from this stress-related hypomethylation. Increased expression of the Dnmt1 gene was evidenced in the ST group, whereas physical exercise was shown to protect lung cells from this stress-related effect in the EX-ST group. Comparative analysis of the ST and EX groups revealed opposite effects on the expression of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b; however, a stress-related increase in expression of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b was not seen in the EX-ST group. Our data showed that behavioral stress induced significant changes in the DNA methylation profile of rat lung cells and that this could be modulated by physical exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intra-amygdala injection of GABAA agonist, muscimol, reduces tachycardia and modifies cardiac sympatho-vagal balance during restraint stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, N; Ngampramuan, S; Nalivaiko, E

    2007-08-24

    At present, little is known about the brain origin of stress-induced cardiac sympathetic drive responsible for stress-induced tachycardia. Our aim was to determine the effect of bilateral microinjections of the GABA(A) receptor agonist, muscimol, into the amygdaloid complex on both the heart rate and cardiac autonomic activity during restraint stress. Experiments were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9), with pre-implanted electrocardiographic electrodes. Heart rate increased sharply after the onset of the restraint and reached a peak 1-2 min later (from 344+/-6-440+/-20 BPM). Subsequently, heart rate began to fall, and during the next 10-15 min approached the steady-state level of 384+/-11. After vehicle, mean heart rate during each of three 10-min restraint epochs was significantly higher compared with the pre-restraint level. After muscimol, mean heart rate was significantly elevated only during the first 10 min of restraint. There was no difference in the early peak tachycardia between both conditions. Muscimol substantially accelerated the fall of the HR from the peak to the steady-state level, and thus the area under the curve value for muscimol (503+/-162 BPM x min) was significantly smaller than that for vehicle (1221+/-231 BPM x min); Pheart rate decreased and the low-frequency power increased during the restraint, resulting in a significant rise of the low frequency/high frequency ratio from 1.2+/-0.2-2.8+/-0.6 (n=9, Pheart rate variability indices.

  14. Water immersion is associated with an increase in aquaporin-2 excretion in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valenti, G.; Fraszl, W.; Addabbo, F.; Tamma, G.; Procino, G.; Satta, E.; Cirillo, M.; Santo, N.G. De; Drummer, C.; Bellini, L.; Kowoll, R.; Schlemmer, M.; Vogler, S.; Kirsch, K.A.; Svelto, M.; Gunga, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report the alterations in renal water handling in healthy volunteers during a 6 h thermoneutral water immersion at 34 to 36 degrees C. We found that water immersion is associated with a reversible increase in total urinary AQP2 excretion.

  15. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on chronic restraint stress induced learning and memory impairments in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchan; Kan, Hongwei; Yin, Yanyan; Wu, Wangyang; Hu, Wen; Wang, Mingming; Li, Weiping; Li, Weizu

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major neurological diseases of the elderly. Chronic stress, which can induce atrophy and functional impairments in several key brain areas such as the frontal cortex and hippocampus, plays an important role in the generation and progression of AD. Currently, there are no effective drug treatment options for preventing chronic stress induced learning and memory impairments and neuronal damage. Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) is a steroidal saponin abundantly contained in ginseng. This study explored the neuroprotective effects of Rg1 on chronic restraint stress (CRS) induced learning and memory impairments in a mouse model. Our results showed that Rg1 (5mg/kg) significantly protected against learning and memory impairments induced by CRS in a Morris water maze. Besides, Rg1 (2, 5mg/kg) was able to decrease ROS generation and attenuate the neuronal oxidative damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus CA1 in mice. Additionally, the inhibition of NOX2, p47phox and RAC1 expression is also involved in the action mechanisms of Rg1 in this experimental model. This study provided an experimental basis for the clinical application of Rg1 in chronic stress induced neuronal oxidative damage.

  16. Is water immersion useful for analyzing gravity resistance responses in terrestrial plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooume, Kentaro; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2004-11-01

    Water immersion has been used as a simulator of microgravity for analyzing gravity responses in semiaquatic plants such as rice. To examine whether or not water immersion for a short experimental period is a useful microgravity simulator even in terrestrial plants, we analyzed effects of water immersion on the cell wall rigidity and metabolisms of its constituents in azuki bean epicotyls. The cell wall rigidity of epicotyls grown underwater was significantly lower than that in the control. Water immersion also caused a decrease in molecular mass of xyloglucans as well as the thinning of the cell wall. Such changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of the cell wall underwater were similar to those observed in microgravity conditions in space. These results suggest that water immersion for a short period is a useful system for analyzing gravity resistance responses even in terrestrial plants.

  17. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The role of galanin system in modulating depression, anxiety, and addiction-like behaviors after chronic restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Seese, R R; Yun, K; Peng, T; Wang, Z

    2013-08-29

    There is high comorbidity between stress-related psychiatric disorders and addiction, suggesting they may share one or more common neurobiological mechanisms. Because of its role in both depressive and addictive behaviors, the galanin system is a strong candidate for such a mechanism. In this study, we tested if galanin and its receptors are involved in stress-associated behaviors and drug addiction. Mice were exposed to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS); subsequently, mRNA levels of galanin, galanin receptors (GalRs), the rate-limiting enzymes for the synthesis of monoamines, and monoamine autoreceptors were measured in the nucleus accumbens by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, we tested the effects of this stress on morphine-induced addictive behaviors. We found that CRS induced anxiety and depression-like behaviors, impaired the formation and facilitated the extinction process in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), and also blocked morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. These behavioral results were accompanied by a CRS-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of galanin, GalR1, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tryptophan hydroxylase 2, and 5-HT1B receptor. Interestingly, treatment with a commonly used antidepressant, fluoxetine, normalized the CRS-induced behavioral changes based on reversing the higher expression of galanin and TH while increasing the expression of GalR2 and α2A-adrenceptor. These results indicate that activating the galanin system, with corresponding changes to noradrenergic systems, following chronic stress may modulate stress-associated behaviors and opiate addiction. Our findings suggest that galanin and GalRs are worthy of further exploration as potential therapeutic targets to treat stress-related disorders and drug addiction.

  19. Chronic Restraint Stress Induces an Isoform-Specific Regulation on the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, K.; Sandi, C.

    2002-01-01

    Existing evidence indicates that 21-days exposure of rats to restraint stress induces dendritic atrophy in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus. This phenomenon has been related to altered performance in hippocampal-dependent learning tasks. Prior studies have shown that hippocampal expression of cell adhesion molecules is modified by such stress treatment, with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) decreasing and L1 increasing, their expression, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Given that NCAM comprises several isoforms, we investigated here whether chronic stress might differentially affect the expression of the three major isoforms (NCAM-120, NCAM-140, NCAM-180) in the hippocampus. In addition, as glucocorticoids have been implicated in the deleterious effects induced by chronic stress, we also evaluated plasma corticosterone levels and the hippocampal expression of the corticosteroid mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The results showed that the protein concentration of the NCAM-140 isoform decreased in the hippoampus of stressed rats. This effect was isoform-specific, because NCAM-120 and NCAM-180 levels were not significantly modified. In addition, whereas basal levels of plasma corticosterone tended to be increased, MR and GR concentrations were not significantly altered. Although possible changes in NCAM-120, NCAM-180 and corticosteroid receptors at earlier time points of the stress period cannot be ignored; this study suggests that a down-regulation of NCAM-140 might be implicated in the structural alterations consistently shown to be induced in the hippocampus by chronic stress exposure. As NCAM-140 is involved in cell-cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth, these findings suggest that this molecule might be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in the complex interactions among neurodegeneration-related events. PMID:12757368

  20. Potential antidepressant-like activity of silymarin in the acute restraint stress in mice: Modulation of corticosterone and oxidative stress response in cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Vishnu N; Dhakane, Valmik D; Patel, Bhoomika M

    2016-10-01

    Silymarin is a polyphenolic flavanoid of Silybum marianum, elicited neuroprotection and antidepressant like activity in stressed model. It was found to increase 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in the cortex and dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in the cerebellum in normal mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential antidepressant-like activity of silymarin in the acute restraint stress (ARS) in mice. The ARS was induced by immobilizing the mice for a period of 7h using rodent restraint device preventing them for any physical movement. One hour prior to ARS, silymarin was administered at doses of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg per oral to non stressed and ARS mice. Various behavioral parameters like immobility time in force swim test, locomotor activity in open field test, and biochemical alterations, serum corticosterone, 5-HT, DA, NE level, malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzymes (GSH, CAT and SOD) in hippocampus and cerebral cortex in non stressed and ARS subjected mice were investigated. Experimental findings reveals mice subjected to ARS exhibited significant increase immobility time, serum corticosterone, MDA formation and impaired SOD and CAT activities in hippocampus and cerebral cortex as compared to non stressed mice. Silymarin treatment (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg) significantly attenuated immobility time, corticosterone and restored the antioxidant enzymes after ARS. The present experimental findings indicate that silymarin exhibits antidepressant like activity probably either through alleviating oxidative stress by modulation of corticosterone response, and antioxidant defense system in hippocampus and cerebral cortex in ARS mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  1. Cold water immersion recovery after simulated collision sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointon, Monique; Duffield, Rob

    2012-02-01

    This investigation examined the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) recovery after simulated collision sport exercise. Ten male rugby athletes performed three sessions consisting of a 2 × 30-min intermittent-sprint exercise (ISE) protocol with either tackling (T) or no tackling (CONT), followed by a 20-min CWI intervention (TCWI) or passive recovery (TPASS and CONT) in a randomized order. The ISE consisted of a 15-m sprint every minute separated by self-paced bouts of hard running, jogging, and walking for the remainder of the minute. Every sixth rotation, participants performed 5 × 10-m runs, receiving a shoulder-led tackle to the lower body on each effort. Sprint time and distance covered during ISE were recorded, with voluntary (maximal voluntary contraction; MVC) and evoked neuromuscular function (voluntary activation; VA), electromyogram (root mean square (RMS)), ratings of perceived muscle soreness (MS), capillary and venous blood markers for metabolites and muscle damage, respectively measured before and after exercise, immediately after recovery, and 2 and 24 h after recovery. Total distance covered during exercise was significantly greater in CONT (P = 0.01), without differences between TPASS and TCWI (P > 0.05). TCWI resulted in increased MVC, VA, and RMS immediately after recovery (P muscle damage (P > 0.05), lactate was significantly reduced after recovery compared with TPASS (P = 0.04). CWI also resulted in reduced MS 2 h after recovery compared with TPASS (P muscle contractile properties and perceptions of soreness after collision-based exercise.

  2. Neuromuscular function during knee extension exercise after cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-06-23

    Human adaptability to cold environment has been focused on in the physiological anthropology and related research area. Concerning the human acclimatization process in the natural climate, it is necessary to conduct a research assessing comprehensive effect of cold environment and physical activities in cold. This study investigated the effect of cold water immersion on the exercise performance and neuromuscular function during maximal and submaximal isometric knee extension. Nine healthy males participated in this study. They performed maximal and submaximal (20, 40, and 60% maximal load) isometric knee extension pre- and post-immersion in 23, 26, and 34 °C water. The muscle activity of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was measured using surface electromyography (EMG). The percentages of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) and mean power frequency (MPF) of EMG data were analyzed. The post-immersion maximal force was significantly lower in 23 °C than in 26 and 34 °C conditions (P water temperature conditions at 40 and 60% maximal intensities (P muscle fibers conduction velocity. To compensate for the impairment of each muscle fibers function, more muscle fibers might be recruited to maintain the working load. This might result in the greater amplitude of EMG after the cold immersion.

  3. Hemodilution, vasopressin suppression, and diuresis during water immersion in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Keil, L. C.; Shvartz, E.

    1981-01-01

    The possible role of hemodilution in the early stages of water immersion in the suppression of antidiuretic hormone (vasopressin) and subsequent diuresis in man is investigated. Parameters characterizing hemodilution as well as water balance and intercompartmental fluid levels were measured before, during and after the immersion of ten subjects in a semireclining position in tap water up to their necks at 34.6 C for 8 hr. Results indicate that hemodilution and the suppression of vasopressin and plasma renin activity were present by the second hour of immersion, with the early hemodilution due to a slight increase in plasma volume with no change in plasma sodium or osmotic contents, even though urine volume and osmotic excretion rates increased significantly. Hyponatremia, hyposmotemia and plasma renin activity suppression are observed to continue to the end of immersion, resulting in final decreases of 15.6% in plasma volume, 18.8% in extracellular volume, 19.6% in interstitial volume and 10.7% in red cell volume. Findings suggest the transfer of hypotonic fluid into the vascular system, which contributes to vasopressin suppression observed during immersion.

  4. Sex-specific impairment and recovery of spatial learning following the end of chronic unpredictable restraint stress: potential relevance of limbic GAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J Bryce; Taylor, Sara B; Hoffman, Ann N; Campbell, Alyssa N; Lucas, Louis R; Conrad, Cheryl D

    2015-04-01

    Chronic restraint stress alters hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in a sex-dependent manner, impairing spatial performance in male rats and leaving intact or facilitating performance in female rats. Moreover, these stress-induced spatial memory deficits improve following post-stress recovery in males. The current study examined whether restraint administered in an unpredictable manner would eliminate these sex differences and impact a post-stress period on spatial ability and limbic glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) expression. Male (n=30) and female (n=30) adult Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to non-stressed control (Con), chronic stress (Str-Imm), or chronic stress given a post-stress recovery period (Str-Rec). Stressed rats were unpredictably restrained for 21 days using daily non-repeated combinations of physical context, duration, and time of day. Then, all rats were tested on the radial arm water maze (RAWM) for 2 days and given one retention trial on the third day, with brains removed 30min later to assess GAD65 mRNA. In Str-Imm males, deficits occurred on day 1 of RAWM acquisition, an impairment that was not evident in the Str-Rec group. In contrast, females did not show significant outcomes following chronic stress or post-stress recovery. In males, amygdalar GAD65 expression negatively correlated with RAWM performance on day 1. In females, hippocampal CA1 GAD65 positively correlated with RAWM performance on day 1. These results demonstrate that GABAergic function may contribute to the sex differences observed following chronic stress. Furthermore, unpredictable restraint and a recovery period failed to eliminate the sex differences on spatial learning and memory.

  5. Effects of seated and standing cold water immersion on recovery from repeated sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Jonathan D C; van Someren, Ken A; Bell, Phillip G; Spence, John R; Jewell, Andrew P; Gaze, David; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two different hydrostatic pressures (seated or standing) during cold water immersion at attenuating the deleterious effects of strenuous exercise on indices of damage and recovery. Twenty four male well-trained games players (age 23 ± 3 years; body mass 81.4 ± 8.7 kg: [Formula: see text]O2max 57.5 ± 4.9 ml∙kg(-1)∙min(-1)) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) and were randomly assigned to either a control, seated cold water immersion or a standing cold water immersion (14 min at 14°C). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction, counter-movement jump, creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) were measured before and up to 72 h following the LIST. All dependent variables showed main effects for time (P cold water immersion interventions. Seated cold water immersion was associated with lower DOMS than standing cold water immersion (effect size = 1.86; P = 0.001). These data suggest that increasing hydrostatic pressure by standing in cold water does not provide an additional recovery benefit over seated cold water immersion, and that both seated and standing immersions have no benefit in promoting recovery following intermittent sprint exercise.

  6. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Simon S.; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y.; Choi, Manfi M.; Cheng, Juno C.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration. PMID:26735552

  7. Physical exercise affects the epigenetic programming of rat brain and modulates the adaptive response evoked by repeated restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimoto, R K; Toffoli, L V; Manfredo, M H F; Volpini, V L; Martins-Pinge, M C; Pelosi, G G; Gomes, M V

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics has recently been linked to molecular adaptive responses evoked by physical exercise and stress. Herein we evaluated the effects of physical exercise on global DNA methylation and expression of the Dnmt1 gene in the rat brain and also verified its potential to modulate responses evoked by repeated restraint stress (RRS). Wistar rats were classified into the following experimental groups: (1) physically active (EX): animals submitted to swimming during postnatal days 53-78 (PND); (2) stress (ST): animals submitted to RRS during 75-79PND; (3) exercise-stress (EX-ST): animals submitted to swimming during 53-78PND and to RRS during 75-79PND, and (4) control (CTL): animals that were not submitted to intervention. Samples from the hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus were obtained at 79PND. The global DNA methylation profile was assessed using an ELISA-based method and the expression of Dnmt1 was evaluated by real-time PCR. Significantly increased methylation was observed in the hypothalamus of animals from the EX group in comparison to CTL. Comparative analysis involving the EX-ST and ST groups revealed increased global DNA methylation in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus of EX-ST, indicating the potential of physical exercise in modulating the responses evoked by RRS. Furthermore, decreased expression of the Dnmt1 gene was observed in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of animals from the EX-ST group. In summary, our data indicate that physical exercise affects DNA methylation of the hypothalamus and might modulate epigenetic responses evoked by RRS in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of water immersion on posttraining recovery in Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, George P; Varley, Matthew C; Wyckelsma, Victoria L; McKenna, Michael J; Minahan, Clare L; Aughey, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    The authors investigated the efficacy of a single exposure to 14 min of cold-water immersion (COLD) and contrast water therapy (CWT) on posttraining recovery in Australian football (AF). Fourteen AF players participated in 3 wk of standardized training. After week 1 training, all players completed a passive recovery (PAS). During week 2, COLD or CWT was randomly assigned. Players undertook the opposing intervention in week 3. Repeat-sprint ability (6 × 20 m), countermovement and squat jumps, perceived muscle soreness, and fatigue were measured pretraining and over 48 h posttraining. Immediately posttraining, groups exhibited similar performance and psychometric declines. At 24 h, repeat-sprint time had deteriorated by 4.1% for PAS and 1.0% for CWT but was fully restored by COLD (0.0%). At 24 and 48 h, both COLD and CWT attenuated changes in mean muscle soreness, with COLD (0.6 ± 0.6 and 0.0 ± 0.4) more effective than CWT (1.9 ± 0.7 and 1.0 ± 0.7) and PAS having minimal effect (5.5 ± 0.6 and 4.0 ± 0.5). Similarly, after 24 and 48 h, COLD and CWT both effectively reduced changes in perceived fatigue, with COLD (0.6 ± 0.6 and 0.0 ± 0.6) being more successful than CWT (0.8 ± 0.6 and 0.7 ± 0.6) and PAS having the smallest effect (2.2 ± 0.8 and 2.4 ± 0.6). AF training can result in prolonged physical and psychometric deficits persisting for up to 48 h. For restoring physical-performance and psychometric measures, COLD was more effective than CWT, with PAS being the least effective. Based on these results the authors recommend that 14 min of COLD be used after AF training.

  9. A New Mechanism of Vitamin C Effects on A/FM/1/47(H1N1 Virus-Induced Pneumonia in Restraint-Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that vitamin C could protect against influenza infection, but little is known about the mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the influence and possible mechanisms of vitamin C on pneumonia induced by influenza virus in stressed mice. Results showed that restraint stress significantly increased the mortality and the severity of pneumonia in mice caused by A/FM/1/47(H1N1 virus infection, which was attenuated by oral administration of vitamin C (125 and 250 mg/kg. Moreover, vitamin C administration significantly decreased expression of susceptibility genes, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, and increased expression of NF-κB. These work in conjunction to induce type I interferons (IFNs and elicit innate antiviral response as key factors in RIG-I-mediated signal transduction pathway. The above effects of vitamin C were further found to relate with inhibition of excess CORT synthesis by regulating steroid hydroxylating enzymes in adrenal gland. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-caused pneumonia might be related to its inhibition of CORT synthesis, which reduces the susceptibility to influenza viral infection in restraint-stressed mice. These findings provide a new mechanism for the effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in restraint-stressed mice.

  10. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance.

  11. Effect of Cold Water Immersion or Contrast Water Therapy on Muscle Soreness After Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C A Lauber; S Hickle; J Jargstorf; W West

    2017-01-01

    An abstract of a study by Lauber et al determining if post-exercise cold-water immersion decreases muscle soreness compared to contrast water therapy at 48 hours post delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS...

  12. Effect of longitudinal physical training and water immersion on orthostatic tolerance in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Dunn, E. R.; Nesvig, C.; Keil, L. C.; Harrison, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of six months of moderately intense aerobic training on 60-deg head-up tilt tolerance was assessed before and after 6 hrs of water-immersion deconditioning by comparing the orthostatic and fluid-electrolyte-endocrine responses of five male subjects before and after these tests. It was found that six months of training has no significant effect on 60-deg head-up tilt tolerance. Thus, during pretraining, the water immersion tilt-tolerance was found to decrease from about 74 min before to 34 min after water immersion, while during posttraining, water immersion tilt tolerance decreased from 74 min to 44 min. Fluid-electrolyte-endocrine responses were also essentially the same during all four tilts. Plasma volume decreased by 9.0 to 12.6 percent; plasma sodium and osmotic concentrations were unchanged; and serum protein and plasma renin activity increased.

  13. The Alterations of IL-1Beta, IL-6, and TGF-Beta Levels in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Chronic Restraint Stress Rats after Electroacupuncture (EA) Pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tianwei Guo; Zhuo Guo; Xinjing Yang; Lan Sun; Sihan Wang; A. Yingge; Xiaotian He; Tu Ya

    2014-01-01

    Immunological reactions induced by proinflammatory cytokines have been involved in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders. Recent studies showed that Electroacupuncture (EA) was able to reduce depressive symptoms; however, the underlying mechanism and its potential targets remain unknown. In the present study, we used a 21-day chronic restraint stress rats as a model to investigate how EA could alleviate depression. Open field test was carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at sel...

  14. The Alterations of IL-1Beta, IL-6, and TGF-Beta Levels in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Chronic Restraint Stress Rats after Electroacupuncture (EA Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwei Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological reactions induced by proinflammatory cytokines have been involved in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders. Recent studies showed that Electroacupuncture (EA was able to reduce depressive symptoms; however, the underlying mechanism and its potential targets remain unknown. In the present study, we used a 21-day chronic restraint stress rats as a model to investigate how EA could alleviate depression. Open field test was carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at selected time points. At the end of study, immunohistochemistry (IHC was performed to detect the expressions of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TGF-beta in hippocampal CA3 region. We found that chronic restraint stress significantly decreased behavioral activities, whereas EA stimulation at points Baihui (GV 20 and Yintang (GV 29 showed protective effect during the test period. In addition, the IL-1beta, IL-6, and TGF-beta increased in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress, while EA downregulated the levels of IL-1beta and IL-6. These findings implied that EA pretreatment could alleviate depression through modulating IL-1beta and IL-6 expression levels in hippocampal CA3 region.

  15. The Alterations of IL-1Beta, IL-6, and TGF-Beta Levels in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Chronic Restraint Stress Rats after Electroacupuncture (EA) Pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianwei; Guo, Zhuo; Yang, Xinjing; Sun, Lan; Wang, Sihan; Yingge, A; He, Xiaotian; Ya, Tu

    2014-01-01

    Immunological reactions induced by proinflammatory cytokines have been involved in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders. Recent studies showed that Electroacupuncture (EA) was able to reduce depressive symptoms; however, the underlying mechanism and its potential targets remain unknown. In the present study, we used a 21-day chronic restraint stress rats as a model to investigate how EA could alleviate depression. Open field test was carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at selected time points. At the end of study, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to detect the expressions of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TGF-beta in hippocampal CA3 region. We found that chronic restraint stress significantly decreased behavioral activities, whereas EA stimulation at points Baihui (GV 20) and Yintang (GV 29) showed protective effect during the test period. In addition, the IL-1beta, IL-6, and TGF-beta increased in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress, while EA downregulated the levels of IL-1beta and IL-6. These findings implied that EA pretreatment could alleviate depression through modulating IL-1beta and IL-6 expression levels in hippocampal CA3 region.

  16. Comparison of biochemical stress indicators in juvenile captive estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) following physical restraint or chemical restraint by midazolam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Annabelle; Phalen, David

    2013-07-01

    Using a prospective, randomized study design we demonstrate that midazolam sedation minimizes acidosis compared with physical restraint in captive juvenile estuarine crocodiles during handling or noninvasive procedures at preferred body temperature. A dose of midazolam (5.0 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly into the forelimb of 20 male estuarine crocodiles weighing 2-3.5 kg. Their heart and respiratory rate and degree of sedation were monitored until recovery and then daily for 7 subsequent days. Blood samples were taken at 30, 60, 90, 180, and 360 min. We recorded lactate, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO2), hematocrit, glucose, and blood pH. A second group (1.9-2.6 kg) was physically restrained for 5 min and the same parameters recorded. Physically restrained animals demonstrated elevated heart rate, respiratory rate, glucose, lactate, and anion gap compared with the midazolam-treated group. Physically restrained animals had lower pH, bicarbonate, and partial pressure of CO2 compared with the midazolam-treated group. Behavior in the physically restrained group in the days following the study was disrupted, with reluctance to feed and bask, compared with midazolam-treated animals whose behavior was normal. We conclude that midazolam administered in the forelimb of captive estuarine crocodiles of 2-3.5 kg provides predictable onset and duration of sedation enabling physical examination, sample collection, and translocation of the animals with minimal disturbance to lactate, pH, and CO2. Behavior following recovery appears normal.

  17. Restraint stress differentially regulates inflammation and glutamate receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanesan, Monica; Haiar, Jacob M; Watt, Michael J; Newton, Samuel S

    2017-03-01

    The inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 and BALB/c have been used widely in preclinical psychiatric research. The differences in stress susceptibility of available strains has provided a useful platform to test pharmacological agents and behavioral responses. Previous brain gene profiling efforts have indicated that the inflammation and immune response gene pathway is the predominant gene network in the differential stress response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. The implication is that a composite stress paradigm that includes a sequence of extended, varied and unpredictable stressors induces inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that the regulation of inflammation genes in the brain could constitute a primary stress response and tested this by employing a simple stress protocol, repeated exposure to the same stressor for 10 days, 2 h of restraint per day. We examined stress-induced regulation of 13 proinflammatory cytokine genes in male BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice using quantitative PCR. Elevated cytokine genes included tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin 6 (IL6), interleukin 10 (IL10), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family members and interleukin 1 receptor 1 (IL1R1). In addition, we examined restraint stress-induced regulation of 12 glutamate receptor genes in both strains. Our results show that restraint stress is sufficient to elevate the expression of inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus of both BABLB/c and C57BL/6 mice, but they differ in the genes that are induced and the magnitude of change. Cell types that are involved in this response include endothelial cells and astrocytes. Lay summary Repeated exposure to a simple restraint stress altered the activities of genes involved in inflammation and the functions of the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate. These changes in the hippocampus of the mouse brain showed differences that were dependent on the strain of mice and the length of the stress exposure. The effects

  18. The effect of water immersion on short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water immersion therapy is used to treat a variety of cardiovascular, respiratory, and orthopedic conditions. It can also benefit some neurological patients, although little is known about the effects of water immersion on neural activity, including somatosensory processing. To this end, we examined the effect of water immersion on short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs elicited by median nerve stimuli. Short-latency SEP recordings were obtained for ten healthy male volunteers at rest in or out of water at 30°C. Recordings were obtained from nine scalp electrodes according to the 10-20 system. The right median nerve at the wrist was electrically stimulated with the stimulus duration of 0.2 ms at 3 Hz. The intensity of the stimulus was fixed at approximately three times the sensory threshold. Results Water immersion significantly reduced the amplitudes of the short-latency SEP components P25 and P45 measured from electrodes over the parietal region and the P45 measured by central region. Conclusions Water immersion reduced short-latency SEP components known to originate in several cortical areas. Attenuation of short-latency SEPs suggests that water immersion influences the cortical processing of somatosensory inputs. Modulation of cortical processing may contribute to the beneficial effects of aquatic therapy. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR (UMIN000006492

  19. Effects of nitric oxide on gastric ulceration induced by nicotine and cold-restraint stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Sheng Qui; Qi-Bing Mei; Li Liu; Kam-Meng Tchou-Wong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Stress induces gastric ulceration in human and experimental animals. People tend to smoke more cigarettes when under stress. Nitric oxide (NO) and nicotine have opposing effects on gastric integrity. The present study examined the possible therapeutic benefit of NO in nicotinetreated rats with stress-induced gastric ulceration.METHODS: Rats drank a nicotine solution while control rats drank tap water for 20 days. The alkoloid was then replaced by water with or without supplementation of isosorbide dinitrate (NO donor) for an additional 10 days. Isosorbide dinitrate was given twice shortly before experiments (acute)or three times daily by oral gavages for 10 days after the rats stopped drinking nicotine solution. At the end of experiments,ulcer index, gastric adhesion mucus content and MPO activity were measured and analysed.RESULTS: Nicotine treatment decreased gastric mucus content and intensified stress-induced gastric ulcer. A higher ulcer index persisted even after the rats stopped drinking nicotine solution for 10 days. Acute NO donor showed no benefit on both mucus and ulcer index in nicotine treatment or/and stress condition. Chronic NO donor treatment reversed the worsening action of nicotine in stomach. Stress increased gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, which was antagonized by chronic NO treatment. However, nicotine was unlikely to change mucosal MPO activity.CONCLUSION: The intensifying action of nicotine on stressinduced gastric ulceration persists for 10 days after cessation.Nicotine treatment significantly decreases gastric mucus content that can be restored by chronic NO donor treatment.The present study suggests that NO antagonizes the ulcerogenic action of nicotine through a cytoprotective way.

  20. Chronic restraint stress promotes learning and memory impairment due to enhanced neuronal endoplasmic reticulum stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong-Rong; Hu, Wen; Yin, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yu-Chan; Li, Wei-Ping; Li, Wei-Zu

    2015-02-01

    Chronic stress has been implicated in many types of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that chronic restraint stress (CRS) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and oxidative damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in mice. In the present study, we investigated the effects of CRS (over a period of 8 weeks) on learning and memory impairment and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in male mice. The Morris water maze was used to investigate the effects of CRS on learning and memory impairment. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis were also used to determine the expression levels of protein kinase C α (PKCα), 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF). The results revealed that CRS significantly accelerated learning and memory impairment, and induced neuronal damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus CA1 region. Moreover, CRS significantly increased the expression of PKCα, CHOP and MANF, and decreased that of GRP78 in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Our data suggest that exposure to CRS (for 8 weeks) significantly accelerates learning and memory impairment, and the mechanisms involved may be related to ER stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus.

  1. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible...... changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number...... induces depression-like behavior, without significantly changing neurogenesis, the total number of neurons or the volume of the hippocampus. Further, electroconvulsive stimulation prevents stress-induced depression-like behavior and increases neurogenesis. The total number of neurons and the granule cell...

  2. Effect of prenatal restraint stress and morphine co-administration on plasma vasopressin concentration and anxiety behaviors in adult rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhjiri, Elnaz; Saboory, Ehsan; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Rasmi, Yousef; Khalafkhani, Davod

    2017-03-01

    Stressful events and exposure to opiates during gestation have important effects on the later mental health of the offspring. Anxiety is among the most common mental disorders. The present study aimed to identify effects of prenatal restraint stress and morphine co-administration on plasma vasopressin concentration (PVC) and anxiety behaviors in rats. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups (n = 6, each): saline, morphine, stress + saline and stress + morphine treatment. The stress procedure consisted of restraint twice per day, two hours per session, for three consecutive days starting on day 15 of pregnancy. Rats in the saline and morphine groups received either 0.9% saline or morphine intraperitoneally on the same days. In the morphine/saline + stress groups, rats were exposed to restraint stress and received either morphine or saline intraperitoneally. All offspring were tested in an elevated plus maze (EPM) on postnatal day 90 (n = 6, each sex), and anxiety behaviors of each rat were recorded. Finally, blood samples were collected to determine PVC. Prenatal morphine exposure reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Co-administration of prenatal stress and morphine increased locomotor activity (LA) and PVC. PVC was significantly lower in female offspring of the morphine and morphine + stress groups compared with males in the same group, but the opposite was seen in the saline + stress group. These data emphasize the impact of prenatal stress and morphine on fetal neuroendocrine development, with long-term changes in anxiety-like behaviors and vasopressin secretion. These changes are sex specific, indicating differential impact of prenatal stress and morphine on fetal neuroendocrine system development. Lay Summary Pregnant women are sometimes exposed to stressful and painful conditions which may lead to poor outcomes for offspring. Opiates may provide pain and stress relief to these mothers. In this study, we used an experimental model of

  3. Effect of Beta vulgaris Linn. leaves extract on anxiety- and depressive-like behavior and oxidative stress in mice after acute restraint stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjbihari Sulakhiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Beta vulgaris is commonly known as "beet root" possessing antioxidant, anticancer, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, wound healing, and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective: To study the protective effect of Beta vulgaris Linn. ethanolic extract (BVEE of leaves against acute restraint stress (ARS-induced anxiety- and depressive-like behavior and oxidative stress in mice. Materials and Methods: Mice (n = 6 were pretreated with BVEE (100 and 200 mg/kg, p. o. for 7 days and subjected to ARS for 6 h to induce behavioral and biochemical changes. Anxiety- and depressive-like behavior were measured by using different behavioral paradigms such as open field test (OFT, elevated plus maze (EPM, forced swim test (FST, and tail suspension test (TST 40 min postARS. Brain homogenate was used to analyze oxidative stress parameters, that is, malondialdehyde (MDA and reduced glutathione (GSH level. Results: BVEE pretreatment significantly (P < 0.05 reversed the ARS-induced reduction in EPM parameters, that is, percentage entries and time spent in open arms and in OFT parameters, that is, line crossings, and rearings in mice. ARS-induced increase in the immobility time in FST and TST was attenuated significantly (P < 0.05 by BVEE pretreatment at both the dosage. An increase in MDA and depletion of GSH level postARS was prevented significantly (P < 0.05 with BVEE pretreatment at both the dosage (100 and 200 mg/kg. Conclusion: BVEE exhibits anxiolytic and antidepressant activity in stressed mice along with good antioxidant property suggesting its therapeutic potential in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  4. Influence of astragaloside on gastric mucosa of stress ulcer rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-wu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of astragaloside (AST) on the gastric mucosal injury of water immersion restraint stress ulcer rat. Methods The stress ulcer model was made by water immersion and restraint. The gastric mucosal injury index was observed. The SOD activity, the MDA contents and the gene expression of melatonin receptor 1 and 2 were detected in gastric mucosa. Results Compared with the normal group, the model group showed mucous edema, hyperemia and even ulcer damage. The injury index and the MDA content of gastric mucosa in model group were significantly increased (P<0.05), the SOD activity of gastric obviously depressed(P<0.01), and the melatonin receptor 1 and 2 mRNA expressions of damaged gastric mucosa were also lower. After administration of AST, the gastric mucosal ulcer index and MDA contents relieved obviously (P<0.01, P<0.05), the SOD activity and the expressions of melatonin receptor 1 and 2 mRNA raised up (P<0.01, P<0.05).Conclusions AST could prevent the gastric mucosal damage of rat in stress ulcer. And the mechanism of the gastric mucosal protection should be concerned with regulating the melatonin receptor and lessening the injury of oxygen free radical.

  5. 寒、热方剂对束缚水浸应激型胃溃疡寒、热证模型大鼠血清TXB2、NT含量的影响%The Influence of Cold or Heat Prescription on TXB2, NT Contents in Serum on Gastric Ulcer Induced by Bondage Water Immersion Stress Combined with Cold or Heat Syndrome Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冀; 柴剑波; 李胜志; 赵雪莹; 毕珺辉; 高彦宇

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the forming mechanism of gastric ulcer model induced by bondage water immersion stress combined with cold or heat syndrome. And to observe the basic mechanism of action and objective regularity of " formula - syndrome corresponding" of cold or heat formula on gastric ulcer model combined with cold or heat syndrome. Methods; Adopting cold or heat factors combined with bondage water immersion stress methods to establish gastric ulcer model combined with cold and heat syndrome. Using euzymelinked immunosorbent assay to detect the contents of TXB2 ,NT in serum. Results:Compared with the blank group, the contents of TXB2 in serum increased remarkably in each model groups (P <0. 01). The contents of TXB2 increased more remarkably in "disease - syndrome combination" model than those in simple syndrome or simple disease model. Compared with the blank group, the contents of NT in serum decreased remarkably in each model group(P<0.05 or P <0. 01). But there is no obvious difference among the model groups. Dahuang Huanglian Xiexin decoction or Lizhong pill could respectively decreased the contents of TXB2 and increase the contents of NT in serum of heat - ulcer group or cold - ulcer group obviously ( P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Conclusions; On the basis of the theory of "formula - syndrome corresponding" , verifying the feasibility of duplicating "disease -syndrome combination" model, that is gastric ulcer model combined with cold or heat syndrome. The therapeutic action of Dahuang Huanglian Xiexin decoction on heat - gastric ulcer, or Lizhong pill on cold - gastric ulcer can both be achieved by decreasing the contents of TXB2, increasing the contents of NT in serum.%目的:探讨水浸应激型胃溃疡寒、热证模型的形成机制及寒、热方剂对该模型的作用机理及其方证相应的客观规律.方法:采用寒、热因素结合水浸应激法建立大鼠胃溃疡寒、热证模型,采用酶联免疫法检测受试大鼠血栓素B2(TXB2)

  6. 大黄黄连泻心汤、理中丸对水浸应激型、幽门结扎型胃溃疡寒、热证模型大鼠血清COR含量的影响%The Influence of Dahuang Huanglian Xiexin Decoction and Lizhong Pill on COR Contents in Serum on Gastric Ulcer Induced by Bondage Water Immersion Stress or Pylorus Deligation Combined with Cold or Heat Syndrome Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冀; 李胜志; 柴剑波; 毕珺辉; 胡晓阳

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨水浸应激型、幽门结扎型胃溃疡中医寒、热证模型的形成机制及寒、热方剂对胃溃疡寒、热证模型的基本作用机理并进一步探讨方证相应的客观规律.方法:采用寒、热因素结合束缚水浸、幽门结扎法应激法分别建立大鼠胃溃疡寒、热证动物模型,采用酶联免疫法检测各实验组受试大鼠血清COR的含量.结果:水浸应激型、幽门结扎型胃溃疡模型中除单寒组、寒假组外各模型组大鼠血清COR的含量与空白对照组比较均明显升高(P <0.05或P<0.01),以热因素表达明显,血清COR的含量可作为溃疡热证的微观指征.寒性方剂大黄黄连泻心汤可显著降低热性模型大鼠血清COR的含量(P<0.05或P<0.01);理中丸对其血清COR的含量影响不显著(P>0.05).结论:通过“方证相应”理论验证了“病证结合”的胃溃疡寒、热模型复制成功,寒性方剂大黄黄连泻心汤对热性溃疡的治疗作用,可通过抑制大鼠血清皮质醇的分泌而实现.%Objective: To explore the forming mechanism of gastric ulcer model induced by bondage water immersion stress or pylorus deligation combined with cold or heat syndrome. And to observe the basic mechanism of action of cold or heat formula on gastric ulcer model combined with cold or heat syndrome and the objective regularity of "formula - syndrome corresponding". Methods; Adopting cold or heat factors combined with bondage water immersion stress or pylorus deligation methods to establish gastric ulcer model combined with cold and heat syndrome. Using euzymelinked immunosorbent assay to detect the contents of COR in serum. Results:Compared with the blank group, except the cold syndrome group and the fake cold syndrome group, the contents of COR in serum increased remarkably in each model group, (P <0. 05 or P <0. 01) . The heat factors expressed obviously among the model groups, and the contents of COR could be regarded as the

  7. Effect of cold-water immersion duration on body temperature and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Ken; Laursen, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    This study compared the effect of 5, 10 and 20 min of cold-water (14 degrees C) immersion on rectal and muscle temperature and neuromuscular function. Twelve cyclists performed four cycling time-to-exhaustion trials in hot conditions (40 degrees C and 40%rh), followed 25 min later by cold-water immersion for 5, 10 or 20 min or 20 min in room temperature (24 degrees C; control). Rectal temperature was measured continuously, and muscle temperature was measured before, immediately after and 45 min after the time-to-exhaustion-test, as well as before and after water immersion. Sixty-second maximal voluntary isometric torque and isokinetic torque of the knee extensors were measured before, immediately after and 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test. A greater rate of decrease in rectal temperature was observed in all water immersion conditions 45-80 min after time-to-exhaustion-test compared with control. Compared with control, muscle temperature 45 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all water immersion conditions; however, muscle temperature was lower for the 10- and 20-min conditions compared with 5 min. Isometric torque measured 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all conditions. Isokinetic torque was lower for all conditions immediately and 55-min post-time-to-exhaustion-test. Of the durations measured, 5 min of cold-water immersion appeared as the most appropriate duration for reducing rectal temperature but limiting decreases in muscle temperature.

  8. Repeated otilonium bromide administration prevents neurotransmitter changes in colon of rats underwent to wrap restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Chiara; Evangelista, Stefano; Girod, Vincent; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria Giuliana

    2017-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic drug successfully used for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Its efficacy has been attributed to the block of L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels and muscarinic and tachykinin receptors in the smooth muscle. Furthermore, in healthy rats, repeated OB administration modified neurotransmitter expression and function suggesting other mechanisms of action. On this basis, we investigated whether repeated OB treatment prevented the functional and neurochemical changes observed in the colon of rats underwent to wrap restrain stress (WRS) a psychosocial stressor considered suitable to reproduce the main IBS signs and symptoms. In control, WRS and OB/WRS rats functional parameters were measured in vivo and morphological investigations were done ex vivo in the colon. The results showed that OB counteracts most of the neurotransmitters changes caused by WRS. In particular, the drug prevents the decrease in SP-, NK1r-, nNOS-, VIP-, and S100β-immunoreactivity (IR) and the increase in CGRP-, and CRF1r-IR. On the contrary, OB does not affect the increase in CRF2r-IR neurons observed in WRS rats and does not interfere with the mild mucosal inflammation due to WRS. Finally, OB per se increases the Mr2 expression in the muscle wall and decreases the number of the myenteric ChAT-IR neurons. Functional findings show a significantly reduction in the number of spontaneous abdominal contraction in OB treated rats. The ability of OB to block L-type Ca(2+) channels, also expressed by enteric neurons, might represent a possible mechanism through which OB exerts its actions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  10. Disrupted MEK/ERK signaling in the medial orbital cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei of the prefrontal cortex in a chronic restraint stress mouse model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Yea-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Yu-Han; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2014-09-19

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, and causes a constant feeling of sadness and lose of interest, which often leads to suicide. Evidence suggests that depression is associated with aberrant MEK/ERK signaling. However, studies on MEK/ERK signaling in depression have only been done in a few brain regions, such as the hippocampus and mesolimbic reward pathways. Recent studies also implicate the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in depression. Thus, we examined the changes in MEK/ERK signaling in subregions of the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6 mice by immunohistochemistry using phospho-MEK1/2 (Ser 217/221) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) antibodies. Mice were subjected to 21 consecutive days of restraint stress (for 2h daily), and depression-like behavior was evaluated using a sociability test and tail suspension test. The antidepressant, imipramine (20mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before restraint stress exposure. Chronic/repeated restraint stress produced depressive-like behavior, such as increased social avoidance in the social interaction test, and enhanced immobility time in the tail suspension test. This depressive behavior was ameliorated by imipramine. The behavioral changes well corresponded to a decrease in MEK/ERK immunoreactivity in the medial orbital (MO) cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei (DEn), which was averted by imipramine, but not in cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and motor cortex. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling is disrupted in the DEn and MO subregions of the prefrontal cortex in the depressive phenotype, and that blocking a decrease in activated MEK/ERK is inherent to the antidepressant imipramine response.

  11. Ovarian hormone modulates 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptors mRNA expression in rat colon with restraint stress-induced bowel dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Jin Li; Bao-Ping Yu; Wei-Guo Dong; He-Sheng Luo; Long Xu; Mu-Qi Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of ovarian hormone on the expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptors (5-HT3R)in rat colon of restraint stress-induced bowel dysfunction.METHODS: Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly dMded into three groups of 8 each: sham operation,ovariectomy (OVX) and ovariectomy with estrogen (E2) andprogesterone (P) replacement therapy (OVX+E2+P). The rats were subjected to 1-h restraint stress 4 wk after operation. The changes of defecation were monitored by collection of fecal pellets. The gonadal steroids were measured in duplicate by radioimmunoassay (RTA). The expression of 5-HT3R mRNA in the colon was studied by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Compared with sham group and OVX+E2+P group, OVX group showed increase in fecal pellets and decrease in the time of vitreous pellets excretion (P<0.01).Serum levels of E2 and P were suppressed in OVX group and restored following treatment with ovarian steroids (P<0.01), and the levels of 5-HT3R mRNA in the colon of ovariectomized rats were significantly increased, the expression of 5-HT3R mRNA was significantly decreased in hormone replacement therapy group (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Ovarian hormone plays a role in the regulation of 5-HT3R expressions in restraint stress-induced bowel dysfunction of rats. The interactions between ovarian steroids and gastrointestinal tract may have major pathophysiologicalimplications in 5-HT-related disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  12. Post exercise ice water immersion: Is it a form of active recovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef Fatimah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ice water immersion and contrast temperature water immersion therapy post exercise is fast becoming a common practice among athletes involved in a variety of sports. Several mechanisms have been put forth to explain the rationale for its use. However, there is still a lack of evidence from a sufficiently large-scale trial to support the routine practice and formal incorporation into certain sporting guidelines. We describe here two athletes who applied the therapy post exercise and presented to the Emergency Department with delayed onset muscle pain.

  13. Water immersion recovery for athletes: effect on exercise performance and practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versey, Nathan G; Halson, Shona L; Dawson, Brian T

    2013-11-01

    Water immersion is increasingly being used by elite athletes seeking to minimize fatigue and accelerate post-exercise recovery. Accelerated short-term (hours to days) recovery may improve competition performance, allow greater training loads or enhance the effect of a given training load. However, the optimal water immersion protocols to assist short-term recovery of performance still remain unclear. This article will review the water immersion recovery protocols investigated in the literature, their effects on performance recovery, briefly outline the potential mechanisms involved and provide practical recommendations for their use by athletes. For the purposes of this review, water immersion has been divided into four techniques according to water temperature: cold water immersion (CWI; ≤20 °C), hot water immersion (HWI; ≥36 °C), contrast water therapy (CWT; alternating CWI and HWI) and thermoneutral water immersion (TWI; >20 to recovery of performance in a variety of sports, with immersion in 10-15 °C water for 5-15 min duration appearing to be most effective at accelerating performance recovery. However, the optimal CWI duration may depend on the water temperature, and the time between CWI and the subsequent exercise bout appears to influence the effect on performance. The few studies examining the effect of post-exercise HWI on subsequent performance have reported conflicting findings; therefore the effect of HWI on performance recovery is unclear. CWT is most likely to enhance performance recovery when equal time is spent in hot and cold water, individual immersion durations are short (~1 min) and the total immersion duration is up to approximately 15 min. A dose-response relationship between CWT duration and recovery of exercise performance is unlikely to exist. Some articles that have reported CWT to not enhance performance recovery have had methodological issues, such as failing to detect a decrease in performance in control trials, not

  14. Can Cold Water Immersion Enhance Recovery in Elite Olympic Weightlifters? An Individualized Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpchen, Jan; Wagner, Maximilian; Ferrauti, Alexander; Kellmann, Michael; Pfeiffer, Mark; Meyer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    We investigated whether cold water immersion (CWI) after intensive training sessions can enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters, taking into account each athlete's individual response pattern. The entire German male Olympic weightlifting national team participated in the study (n = 7), ensuring collection of data from elite athletes only. Using a randomized cross-over design, the athletes went through 2 high-intensity training microcycles consisting of 5 training sessions that were either followed by a CWI or passive recovery. Barbell speed in a snatch pull movement, blood parameters, and subjective ratings of general fatigue and recovery were assessed throughout the study. Physical performance at 2 snatch pull intensities (85% one repetition maximum [1RM]: -0.15% vs. -0.22%, p = 0.94; 90% 1RM: -0.7% vs. +1.23%, p = 0.25) did not differ significantly (condition × time). Although questionnaires revealed a significant decline in the ratings of overall recovery (p < 0.001) and a significantly higher rating of overall stress (p = 0.03) over time, no significant differences between conditions (p = 0.14; p = 0.98) could be revealed. Similarly, neither of the analyzed blood parameters changed significantly between conditions over time (creatine kinase: p = 0.53; urea: p = 0.43; cortisol: p = 0.59; testosterone: p = 0.53; testosterone:cortisol ratio: p = 0.69). In general, CWI did not prove to be an effective tool to enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters over a 3-day intensive training period. However, even though the group was rather homogeneous with regard to performance, there were considerable intersubject differences in their response to CWI. It seems that athletes are best advised on a case-by-case basis.

  15. Effects of acute restraint-induced stress on glucocorticoid receptors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, G S; Vincelli, J; Tio, D L; Hovda, D A

    2012-05-17

    We have previously reported that experimental mild traumatic brain injury results in increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post-injury weeks, as determined by analyzing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation following restraint-induced stress. This is the same time period when rehabilitative exercise has proven to be ineffective after a mild fluid-percussion injury (FPI). Here we evaluated effects of stress on neuroplasticity. Adult male rats underwent either an FPI or sham injury. Additional rats were only exposed to anesthesia. Rats were exposed to 30 min of restraint stress, followed by tail vein blood collection at post-injury days (PID) 1, 7, and 14. The response to dexamethasone (DEX) was also evaluated. Hippocampal tissue was collected 120 min after stress onset. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) along with glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors was determined by Western blot analysis. Results indicated injury-dependent changes in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors that were influenced by the presence of dexamethasone. Control and FPI rats responded differentially to DEX in that GR increases after receiving the lower dose of DEX were longer lasting in the FPI group. A suppression of MR was found at PID 1 in vehicle-treated FPI and Sham groups. Decreases in the precursor form of BDNF were observed in different FPI groups at PIDs 7 and 14. These findings suggest that the increased sensitivity to stressful events during the first post-injury weeks, after a mild FPI, has an impact on hippocampal neuroplasticity.

  16. Predicted Water Immersion Survival Times for Anti-Exposure Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    which to determine what garments need to be worn and when. Therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a family of risk curves based on the...females who are known to lose more body heat than men3, and also does not account for wave effects, fatigue, last mealtime , injuries, attitude, etc...garments. These heat stress data combined with the immersion survivability estimates can be used to generate a family of curves to provide comprehensive

  17. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane S. G. Macedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. METHOD: The peak values of the root mean square (RMS were obtained from 35 healthy and active university subjects after the use of a tilt platform to force the ankle into 30° of inversion before, immediately after, and 10, 20, and 30 minutes after water immersion at 4±2°C, for 20 minutes. The Shapiro-Wilk test, repeated measures analysis, Bonferroni's post-hoc, and linear regression analysis provided the results. RESULTS: Peak RMS was significantly lower at all times after cold water immersion, with residual effect of up to 30 minutes, when compared to pre-immersion for all muscles, except for immediate post-immersion for the gluteus medius. CONCLUSIONS: After cold water immersion of the ankle, special care should be taken in activities that require greater neuromuscular control.

  18. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated 1-km cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a short cold water immersion (CWI) intervention on rectal and muscle temperature, isokinetic strength and 1-km cycling time trial performance in the heat. Ten male cyclists performed a 1-km time trial at 35.0+/-0.3 degrees C and 40.0+/-3.0% relative humidity, followed by 20 min recovery sitting in either cold water (14 degrees C) for 5 min or in 35 degrees C air (control); a second 1-km time trial immediately followed. Peak and mean cycling power output were recorded for both time trials. Rectal and muscle temperature, and maximal isokinetic concentric torque of the knee extensors were measured before and immediately after the first and second time trials. Rectal temperature was not different between cold water immersion and control conditions at any time points. After the second time trial, however, muscle temperature was significantly lower (-1.3+/-0.7 degrees C) in cold water immersion compared with the control trial. While peak and mean power decreased from the first to second time trial in both conditions (-86+/-54 W and -24+/-16 W, respectively), maximal isokinetic concentric torque was similar between conditions at all time points. The 5 min cold water immersion intervention lowered muscle temperature but did not affect isokinetic strength or 1-km cycling performance. Copyright (c) 2008 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Christiane S G; Alonso, Carolina S; Liporaci, Rogério F; Vieira, Fernando; Guirro, Rinaldo R J

    2014-01-01

    Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. The peak values of the root mean square (RMS) were obtained from 35 healthy and active university subjects after the use of a tilt platform to force the ankle into 30° of inversion before, immediately after, and 10, 20, and 30 minutes after water immersion at 4±2°C, for 20 minutes. The Shapiro-Wilk test, repeated measures analysis, Bonferroni's post-hoc, and linear regression analysis provided the results. Peak RMS was significantly lower at all times after cold water immersion, with residual effect of up to 30 minutes, when compared to pre-immersion for all muscles, except for immediate post-immersion for the gluteus medius. After cold water immersion of the ankle, special care should be taken in activities that require greater neuromuscular control.

  20. Inactivation of salmonella in shell eggs by hot water immersion and its effect on quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal inactivation kinetics of heat resistant strains of Salmonella Enteritidis in shell eggs processed by hot water immersion were determined, and the effects of the processing on egg quality were evaluated. Shell eggs were inoculated with a composite of heat resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SE)...

  1. Effects of cold water immersion on lower extremity joint biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Claudiane Arakaki; da Rocha, Emmanuel Souza; Stefanyshyn, Darren John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of cryotherapy on lower extremity running biomechanics. Twenty-six healthy male volunteers were randomised into two intervention groups: cold water (cold water at ~11°C) or tepid water (tepid water at ~26°C). They were required to run at 4.0 ± 0.2 m · s(-1) before and after they underwent water immersion for 20 min. Differences between pre- and post-intervention were used to compare the influence of water intervention during running. Peak joint angles, peak joint moments, peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and contact time (CT) were calculated using three-dimensional gait analysis. Independent t-tests were applied with a significant alpha level set at 0.05. Decreased peak propulsive and vertical GRF, decreased plantarflexion moments, increased hip flexion angle and longer CT were observed following cold water immersion. Although cold water immersion (cryotherapy) affected the running movement, none of the alterations have been related to running biomechanical patterns associated with injuries. Therefore, our results indicated that cold water immersion appears safe prior to running activities.

  2. Water immersion during labor and birth: is there an extra cost for hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G

    2017-06-01

    Water immersion during labor and birth is growing in popularity, and many hospitals are now considering offering this service to laboring women. Some advantages of water immersion are demonstrated, but others remain uncertain, and particularly, few studies have examined the financial impact of such a device on hospitals. This study simulated what could be the extra cost of water immersion for hospitals. Clinical outcomes were drawn from the results of systematic reviews already published, and cost units were those used in the Quebec health network. A decision tree was used with microsimulations of representative laboring women. Sensitivity analyses were performed as regards analgesic use and labor duration. Microsimulations indicated an extra cost between $166.41 and $274.76 (2014 Canadian dollars) for each laboring woman as regards the scenario considered. The average extra cost was $221.12 (95% confidence interval, 219.97-222.28). While water immersion allows better clinical outcomes, implementation and other costs are higher than the savings generated, which leads to a small extra cost to allow women to potentially have more relaxation and less pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Thermoregulation during Cold Water Immersion is Unimpaired by Muscle Glycogen Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    a decrease in plasma glucose oxidation, and a concomitant increase in muscle glycogenolysis as compared to rest (14). Other animal experiments suggest... glycogenolysis . Alternatively, the increased plasma glycerol during cold water immersion in the low-glycogen trial indicates that enhanced lipolysis is

  4. Cold-water immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bleakley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library (2010, Issue 1, Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL, British Nursing Index and archive (BNI, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro. We also searched the reference lists of articles, handsearched journals and conference proceedings and contacted experts. In November 2011, we updated the searches of Central (2011, Issue 4, Medline (up to November Week 3 2011, Embase (to 2011 Week 46 and CINAHL (to 28 November 2011 to check for more recent publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing the effect of using cold-water immersion after exercise with: passive intervention (rest/no intervention, contrast immersion, warm-water immersion, active recovery, compression, or a different duration/dosage of cold-water immersion. Primary outcomes were pain (muscle soreness or tenderness (pain on palpation, and subjective recovery (return to previous activities without signs or symptoms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently evaluated study quality and extracted data. Some of the data were obtained following author correspondence or extracted from graphs in the trial reports. Where possible, data were pooled using the fixed-effect model. MAIN RESULTS: Seventeen small trials were included, involving a total of 366 participants. Study quality was low. The temperature, duration and

  5. INCENTIVE SPIROMETRY AND BREATHING EXERCISES WERE NOT ABLE TO IMPROVE RESTRICTIVE PULMONARY CHARACTERISTICS INDUCED BY WATER IMMERSION IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline A. Vepo,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available pulmonary volumes and capacities which could be at least in part similar to that happen in healthy individuals during water immersion. Objectives: To investigate if respiratory effects of water immersion are partially due to enhanced return venous from legs and arms and if physiotherapeutic techniques incentive spirometry (IS and breathing exercises (BE are able to improve pulmonary volumes and capacities in healthy subjects during water immersion. Design: Randomised, within-participant experimental study. Participants: 18 healthy subjects. Intervention: Stage 1 was realized to investigate the cardiorespiratory effects of water immersion with and without a cuff-induced venous compression. Stage 2 was conducted to explain the effects of physiotherapeutic techniques IS and BE during water immersion. Main outcome measures: The pulmonary function (forced vital capacity - FVC, forced expiratory volume the first second - FEV1, ratio of FEV/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate - PEFR and forced expiratory flow of 25-75% FVC - FEF25-75% was evaluated. Results: Water immersion decreased FVC and FEV1 after 10 minutes of immersion. After a total compression of arms and legs the reduction on FVC and FEV1 was not observed, even with only partial compression of legs (P>0.05. Conclusions: Water immersion promotes pulmonary restrictive characteristics due to increased venous return mainly from legs. The application IS and BE did not normalize the spirometric values.

  6. Erythropoietin prevents the effect of chronic restraint stress on the number of hippocampal CA3c dendritic terminals-relation to expression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity, angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalling, Nadia; Hageman, Ida; Miskowiak, Kamilla

    2017-01-01

    Stress-induced allostatic load affects a variety of biological processes including synaptic plasticity, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. Erythropoietin (EPO) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has shown promising neuroprotective effects....... Recombinant human EPO is currently highlighted as a new candidate treatment for cognitive impairment in neuropsychiatric disorders. Because EPO enhances synaptic plasticity, attenuates oxidative stress, and inhibits generation of proinflammatory cytokines, EPO may be able to modulate the effects of stress......-induced allostatic load at the molecular level. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how EPO and repeated restraint stress, separately and combined, influence (i) behavior in the novelty-suppressed feeding test of depression/anxiety-related behavior; (ii) mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins involved...

  7. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Simon S; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y; Choi, Manfi M; Cheng, Juno C; Yeung, Ella W

    2016-01-01

    Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration.

  8. Mechanical restraint in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jesper; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Sestoft, Dorte Maria;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how potential mechanical restraint preventive factors in hospitals are associated with the frequency of mechanical restraint episodes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study employed a retrospective association design, and linear regression was used to assess the associations. FINDING...

  9. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires...... several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. METHODS: There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean......: Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold...

  10. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Christie L; Yanagihara, Angel A

    2016-04-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s). However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes.

  11. Heated Debates: Hot-Water Immersion or Ice Packs as First Aid for Cnidarian Envenomations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie L. Wilcox

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian envenomations are an important public health problem, responsible for more deaths than shark attacks annually. For this reason, optimization of first-aid care is essential. According to the published literature, cnidarian venoms and toxins are heat labile at temperatures safe for human application, which supports the use of hot-water immersion of the sting area(s. However, ice packs are often recommended and used by emergency personnel. After conducting a systematic review of the evidence for the use of heat or ice in the treatment of cnidarian envenomations, we conclude that the majority of studies to date support the use of hot-water immersion for pain relief and improved health outcomes.

  12. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold...... immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response....

  13. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane S. G. Macedo; Alonso,Carolina S.; Liporaci, Rogério F.; Fernando Vieira; Guirro,Rinaldo R. J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. METHOD: The peak values of the root mean square (RMS) were obtained from 35 healthy and active univ...

  14. The effects of cold-water immersion on power output and heart rate in elite cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Jason; Campbell, Teri S; Powell, Kasey L; Pincivero, Danny M

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cold-water immersion on power output, heart rate, and time to peak power in 10 well-trained cyclists. The Compu-trainer Professional Model 8001 computerized stationary trainer was used to evaluate maximum power, average power, and time to peak power during a simulated cycling sprint. The heart rate was measured using a Polar heart rate monitor. Subjects performed 2 maximum-effort sprints (for approximately 30 seconds) separated by either an experimental condition (15 minutes of cold-water immersion at 12 degrees C up to the level of the iliac crest) or a control condition (15 minutes of quiet sitting). All subjects participated under both control and experimental conditions in a counterbalanced design in which 5 subjects performed the experimental condition first and the other 5 subjects performed the control condition first. Each condition was separated by at least 2 days. The time to peak power was not different between the 2 conditions. Maximum and average powers declined by 13.7 and 9.5% for the experimental condition but only by 4.7 and 2.3% for the control condition, respectively. The results also demonstrated a significantly greater decline in maximum heart rate after cold-water immersion (8.1%) than under the control condition (2.4%). Average heart rate showed a decrease of 4.2% under the experimental condition, as compared with an increase of 1.5% under the control condition. The major findings of this study suggest that a relatively brief period of cold-water immersion can manifest significant physiological effects that can impair cycling performance.

  15. The effect of head-down tilt and water immersion on intracranial pressure in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Lanny C.; Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Hines, John; Severs, Walter B.

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is investigated in primates during and after -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) and immersion in water to examine the effects of the headward fluid shift related to spaceflight. Following the HDT the primates are subjected to head-out thermoneutral water immersion, and the ICP is subsequently measured. ICP is found to increase from 3.8 +/- 1.1 to 5.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg during the horizontal control period. ICP stabilizes at -6.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg and then increases to -2.2 +/- 1.9 mm Hg during partial immersion, and ICP subsequently returns to preimmersion levels after immersion. These data indicate that exposure to HDT or water immersion lead to an early sharp increase in ICP, and water immersion alone leads to higher ICP levels. A significant conclusion of the work is that the ICP did not approach pathological levels, and this finding is relevant to human spaceflight research.

  16. Postexercise cold-water immersion improves intermittent high-intensity exercise performance in normothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avina; Mulligan, James; Egaña, Mikel

    2016-11-01

    A brief cold water immersion between 2 continuous high-intensity exercise bouts improves the performance of the latter compared with passive recovery in the heat. We investigated if this effect is apparent in normothermic conditions (∼19 °C), employing an intermittent high-intensity exercise designed to reflect the work performed at the high-intensity domain in team sports. Fifteen young active men completed 2 exhaustive cycling protocols (Ex1 and Ex2: 12 min at 85% ventilatory threshold (VT) and then an intermittent exercise alternating 30-s at 40% peak power (Ppeak) and 30 s at 90% Ppeak to exhaustion) separated by 15 min of (i) passive rest, (ii) 5-min cold-water immersion at 8 °C, and (iii) 10-min cold-water immersion at 8 °C. Core temperature, heart rate, rates of perceived exertion, and oxygen uptake kinetics were not different during Ex1 among conditions. Time to failure during the intermittent exercise was significantly (P intermittent high-intensity exercise compared with passive rest in normothermia due, at least in part, to reductions in core temperature, circulatory strain, and effort perception.

  17. Physical Restraint in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Peterson, Reece L.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on educating children in the least restrictive environment has resulted in the use of physical restraint procedures across all educational placement settings, including public schools. Since its initial use, restraint has been controversial. Professionals who use physical restraint claim that it is necessary to safely manage…

  18. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required.

  19. 长期慢性束缚水浸应激对大鼠胃窦Cajal间质细胞数量的影响%Long-term chronic water immersion-restraint stress alters the number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the gastric antrum of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹; 夏志伟; 韩亚京

    2010-01-01

    目的:研究不同时程低强度束缚水浸应激对大鼠Cajal间质细胞(interstitial cells of Cajal,ICC)数量的影响,探讨慢性应激导致胃动力改变与ICC的相关性.方法:雄性SPF级SD大鼠48只被随机分为6组,即实验3 d、7 d、28 d组和对照3 d、7 d、28 d组,每组8只.实验组23℃水域箱内束缚水浸1h/d,对照组自由摄食饮水.4 d、8d、29d晨序贯脱颈处死.取膜胃小弯侧(ICC-1)、腺胃小弯侧(ICC-3)、腺胃大弯侧上1/3处(ICC-5)、腺胃幽门旁0.5 cm处(ICC-7)组织各一块放入固定液中,制成石蜡切片:抗c-kit免疫组织化学染色,观察不同层次ICC计数.结果:正常大鼠胃内ICC主要分布在肌内(ICC-MY)和肌间(ICC-IM),而黏膜下(ICC-SM)和深肌丛(ICC-DMP)较少.实验3 d组的各层ICC数量与对照组相比无明显差异,实验7 d和28 d组大鼠不同部位、不同层次及同一部位不同层次ICC数量明显异于同期对照组.应激时间长短对不同部位不同层次及同一部位不同层次ICC总数有明显影响,其大致规律是先正常后增加再减少,即先升高后降低.应激主要引起ICC-MY及ICC-IM数量发生变化,而本来较少的ICC-SM和ICC-DMP受影响较轻.结论:长时间低强度的慢性束缚水浸应激可以使大鼠胃窦ICC数量发生变化.

  20. EFFECTS OF CAPSAICIN ON C-FOS PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN NEURONS OF DMV AND NTS AND GASTRIC ULCER OF RATS IN WATER IMMERSION-RESTRAINT STRESS%辣椒素对束缚-浸水应激大鼠DMV和NTS神经元c-fos蛋白表达和胃溃疡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兆平; 马晓丽; 张薇薇; 孙海基; 艾洪滨

    2008-01-01

    目的观察辣椒索对束缚-浸水应激大鼠脑于迷走运动背核(DMV)和孤束核(NTS)c-fos蛋白表达和胃溃疡的影响,并探讨c-fos蛋白在DMV和NTS表达与胃溃疡的关系.方法大鼠皮下注射辣椒素,束缚-浸水应激,免疫组织化学技术检测原癌基因c-fos在脑干的DMV和NTS的蛋白表达,计算胃溃疡的指数.结果与盐水对照组相比,注射辣椒索组DMV和NTS中c-fos阳性细胞数显著减少(P<0.01),胃溃疡指数明显降低(P<0.05).结论辣椒素抑制束缚-浸水应激大鼠DMV和NTS神经元c-fos蛋白表达和胃溃疡的,DMV,NTS及辣椒素敏感传入神经可能参与应激性胃溃疡的形成.

  1. AT1 and AT2 Receptors in the Prelimbic Cortex Modulate the Cardiovascular Response Evoked by Acute Exposure to Restraint Stress in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Taíz F S; Fassini, Aline; Corrêa, Fernando M

    2017-07-10

    The prelimbic cortex (PL) is an important structure in the neural pathway integrating stress responses. Brain angiotensin is involved in cardiovascular control and modulation of stress responses. Blockade of angiotensin receptors has been reported to reduce stress responses. Acute restraint stress (ARS) is a stress model, which evokes sustained blood pressure increase, tachycardia, and reduction in tail temperature. We therefore hypothesized that PL locally generated angiotensin and angiotensin receptors modulate stress autonomic responses. To test this hypothesis, we microinjected an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin antagonists into the PL, prior to ARS. Male Wistar rats were used; guide cannulas were bilaterally implanted in the PL for microinjection of vehicle or drugs. A polyethylene catheter was introduced into the femoral artery to record cardiovascular parameters. Tail temperature was measured using a thermal camera. ARS was started 10 min after PL treatment with drugs. Pretreatment with ACE inhibitor lisinopril (0.5 nmol/100 nL) reduced the pressor response, but did not affect ARS-evoked tachycardia. At a dose of 1 nmol/100 nL, it reduced both ARS pressor and tachycardic responses. Pretreatment with candesartan, AT1 receptor antagonist reduced ARS-evoked pressor response, but not tachycardia. Pretreatment with PD123177, AT2 receptor antagonist, reduced tachycardia, but did not affect ARS pressor response. No treatment affected ARS fall in tail temperature. Results suggest involvement of PL angiotensin in the mediation of ARS cardiovascular responses, with participation of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. In conclusion, results indicate that PL AT1-receptors modulate the ARS-evoked pressor response, while AT2-receptors modulate the tachycardic component of the autonomic response.

  2. Protective effect of 3,4-methylenedioxyphenol (sesamol) on stress-related mucosal disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chen, Yi-Wei; Chu, Pei-Yi; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related mucosal disease (SRMD) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. 3,4-Methylenedioxyphenol (sesamol) has been reported to have potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sesamol on water immersion restraint- (WIR-) induced SRMD in rats. Rat gastric ulcer and hemorrhage were induced by WIR. Rats were pretreated orally with various doses of sesamol (0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg, resp.) 30 min before WIR. Gastric mucosal ulceration, hemoglobin, lipid peroxidation, mucus secretion, proinflammatory cytokines, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB levels were determined 4 h after WIR. In addition, the infiltration of neutrophil and macrophage into gastric mucosa was also determined after WIR. Water immersion restraint increased gastric mucosal ulcer and hemorrhage, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels but failed to affect mucosal lipid peroxidation and mucus secretion compared with non-WIR. Sesamol significantly decreased gastric ulceration and hemorrhage and inhibited mucosal TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production and NF-κB activity in WIR-treated rats. In addition, increased myeloperoxidase and CD68 levels in gastric mucosa were found in WIR-treated rats compared to non-WIR rats. Sesamol did not affect myeloperoxidase but decreased CD68 levels in mucosa in WIR-treated rats. Sesamol may protect against SRMD by inhibiting gastric mucosal proinflammatory cytokines in rats.

  3. Effects of sports massage and intermittent cold-water immersion on recovery from matches by basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, Anne; Calleja-González, Julio; Hippocrate, Audrey; Clarke, Neil David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intermittent cold-water immersion and massage on perceptual and performance markers of recovery by basketball players after competitive matches. Eight men (age 23 ± 3 years; stature 190.5 ± 8.9 cm; body mass 90.3 ± 9.6 kg; body fat 12.8 ± 4.8%) and eight women (age 22 ± 2 years; stature 179.0 ± 8.5 cm; body mass 77.6 ± 9.2 kg; body fat 22.5 ± 6.6%) basketball players participated. Massage, cold-water immersion or control were applied immediately after competitive matches, followed by assessments of perceptual measures of recovery and physical performance, countermovement jump and repeated-sprint ability 24 h after intervention. There was lower perception of fatigue overall and in the legs immediately after the massage and cold-water immersion condition (P recovery interventions on repeated-sprint measures (P at best 0.067, η²(P) at best 0.68). The results suggest that both massage and cold-water immersion improve perceptual measures of recovery. Furthermore, cold-water immersion improves jump performance although neither such immersion nor massage had an effect on repeated-sprint ability. This suggests that, overall, cold-water immersion is more useful than massage in the recovery from basketball matches, especially in women.

  4. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-08-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation in respiratory rate (from 12 +/- 3 to 21 +/- 5 breaths, min(-1)) and tidal volume (1022 +/- 142 to 1992 +/- 253 ml). Though end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased from 4.9 +/- 0.13 to 3.9 +/- 0.21 kPa, CBFV was insignificantly reduced by 7 +/- 4% during immersion with a brief nadir of 21 +/- 4%. Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold-water immersion could benefit from education in cold-shock response and the possibility of reducing the ventilatory response voluntarily.

  5. Effect of cold-water immersion on skeletal muscle contractile properties in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Matoso, Darío; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; Sarmiento, Samuel; de Saa, Yves; Calderón, Javier

    2011-05-01

    This study was designed to analyze changes in muscle response after cold-water immersion. The vastus lateralis of the dominant leg was analyzed in 12 professional soccer players from the Spanish 2nd Division B using tensiomyography, before and after four cold-water immersions at 4°C lasting 4 mins each. Core temperature, skin temperature, and heart rate were monitored. A significant interaction (P ≤ 0.05) was found in muscle deformation between control conditions (5.12 ± 2.27 mm) and (1) immersion 3 (3.64 ± 2.27 mm) and (2) immersion 4 (3.38 ± 1.34 mm). A steady decrease was also observed in response velocity (immersion 1, -7.3%; immersion 2, -25.9%; immersion 3, -30.0%; immersion 4, -36.6%) and contraction velocity (immersion 1, -11.5%; immersion 2, -22.1%; immersion 3, -35.0%; immersion 4, -41.9%), with statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in relation to the reference values commencing with the third immersion. No significant differences were found between control conditions in subsequent exposures to cold water for the values of response time and contraction time. Sustained time and reaction time showed an increase during repeated exposures and with longer exposure time, although the increase was not statistically significant. This study shows that repeated cold-water immersions (4 × 4 mins at 4°C) cause considerable alterations to muscle behavior. These alterations significantly affect the state of muscles and their response capacity, particularly in relation to muscle stiffness and muscle contraction velocity.

  6. Cold-water immersion versus passive therapy to decrease delayed onset muscular soreness: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alberto Aguilera Eguía

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Late onset muscle soreness, also known as delayed onset muscle soreness, is a painful musculoskeletal condition that may occur 24-48 and up to 72 hours after the completion of unusual physical or high intensity exercise involving eccentric muscle activity. In the field of physical rehabilitation, immersion in cold water is a common intervention mainly used in sports medicine, to minimize delayed onset muscle soreness and promote recovery after exercise. Objective To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of immersion in cold water after high intensity exercise and answer the following question: In subjects who exercise regularly, can cold-water immersion compared to passive therapy (rest reduce late-onset muscle soreness? Methods The article "Cold Water Immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise," a Cochrane systematic review authored by Bleakley et al (2012, was analyzed. Results Immersion in cold water can decrease delayed onset of muscle pain after high intensity exercise. Twenty-four hours after the intervention, the mean standardized difference was -0.55 (95% CI: -0.84 to -0.27; 48 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.66 (95% CI: -0.97 to -0.35; 72 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.93 (95% CI: -1.36 to -0.51 and up to 96 hours after, mean standardized difference was -0.58 (95% CI: -1.00 to -0.16. Conclusion Despite the methodological limitations present in the studies included in the systematic review analyzed, we found the recommendation for cold water immersion (cryotherapy reasonable in individuals with late muscle pain caused by high intensity sports.

  7. Influence of cold water immersion on limb and cutaneous blood flow at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Warren; Black, Mark A; Jones, Helen; Milson, Jordon; Morton, James; Dawson, Brian; Atkinson, Greg; Green, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    Cold water immersion reduces exercise-induced muscle damage. Benefits may partly arise from a decline in limb blood flow; however, no study has comprehensively investigated the influence of different degrees of cooling undertaken via cold water immersion on limb blood flow responses. To determine the influence of cold (8°C) and cool (22°C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow. Controlled laboratory study. Nine men were placed in a semireclined position and lowered into 8°C or 22°C water to the iliac crest for two 5-minute periods interspersed with 2 minutes of nonimmersion. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, deep and superficial muscle temperature, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, thigh cutaneous blood velocity (laser Doppler), and superficial femoral artery blood flow (duplex ultrasound) were measured during immersion and for 30 minutes after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure). Reductions in rectal temperature (8°C, 0.2° ± 0.1°C; 22°C, 0.1° ± 0.1°C) and thigh skin temperature (8°C, 6.2° ± 0.5°C; 22°C, 3.2° ± 0.2°C) were greater in 8°C water than in 22°C (P water compared with 22°C (P = .01). These data suggest that immersion at both temperatures resulted in similar whole limb blood flow but, paradoxically, more blood was distributed to the skin in the colder water. This suggests that colder temperatures may be associated with reduced muscle blood flow, which could provide an explanation for the benefits of cold water immersion in alleviating exercise-induced muscle damage in sports and athletic contexts. Colder water temperatures may be more effective in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle damage and injury rehabilitation because of greater reductions in muscle blood flow.

  8. Atrial distension, haemodilution, and acute control of renin release during water immersion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Pump, B; Bie, P;

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that atrial distension (stimulation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors) is not the single pivotal stimulus for the acute suppression of renin release during water immersion in humans and that immersion-induced haemodilution constitutes an important additional stimulus...... immersion. During WI, central venous pressure (CVP) and left atrial diameter (LAD) increased (P mL(-1) h......), and markedly inhibited suppression of PRA, which decreased by 0.4 +/- 0.1 ng mL(-1) h(-1) (to 87 +/- 4% of baseline values, P

  9. Effect of hydration on plasma volume and endocrine responses to water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Silver, J. E.; Geelen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of hydration status on early endocrine responses and on osmotic and intravascular volume changes during immersion was determined in humans undergoing successive periods of dehydration, immersion, rehydration, and immersion. Immersion caused an isotonic expansion of plasma volume, as well as suppression of plasma renin activity and aldosterone, which all occurred independently of hydration status. On the other hand, the concentration of plasma vasopressin (PVP) was found to decrease during dehydrated immersion, but not during rehydrated immersion. It is concluded that plasma tonicity is not a factor influencing PVP suppression during water immersion.

  10. Cold-water immersion and other forms of cryotherapy: physiological changes potentially affecting recovery from high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gillian E; Wells, Greg D

    2013-09-01

    High-intensity exercise is associated with mechanical and/or metabolic stresses that lead to reduced performance capacity of skeletal muscle, soreness and inflammation. Cold-water immersion and other forms of cryotherapy are commonly used following a high-intensity bout of exercise to speed recovery. Cryotherapy in its various forms has been used in this capacity for a number of years; however, the mechanisms underlying its recovery effects post-exercise remain elusive. The fundamental change induced by cold therapy is a reduction in tissue temperature, which subsequently exerts local effects on blood flow, cell swelling and metabolism and neural conductance velocity. Systemically, cold therapy causes core temperature reduction and cardiovascular and endocrine changes. A major hindrance to defining guidelines for best practice for the use of the various forms of cryotherapy is an incongruity between mechanistic studies investigating these physiological changes induced by cold and applied studies investigating the functional effects of cold for recovery from high-intensity exercise. When possible, studies investigating the functional recovery effects of cold therapy for recovery from exercise should concomitantly measure intramuscular temperature and relevant temperature-dependent physiological changes induced by this type of recovery strategy. This review will discuss the acute physiological changes induced by various cryotherapy modalities that may affect recovery in the hours to days (<5 days) that follow high-intensity exercise.

  11. The mGlu2/3 Receptor Agonists LY354740 and LY379268 Differentially Regulate Restraint-Stress-Induced Expression of c-Fos in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3 receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets due to the ability of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists to modulate excitatory transmission at specific synapses. LY354740 and LY379268 are selective and potent mGlu2/3 receptor agonists that show both anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects in animal models. We compared the efficacy of LY354740 and LY379268 in attenuating restraint-stress-induced expression of the immediate early gene c-Fos in the rat prelimbic (PrL and infralimbic (IL cortex. LY354740 (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.p. showed statistically significant and dose-related attenuation of stress-induced increase in c-Fos expression, in the rat cortex. By contrast, LY379268 had no effect on restraint-stress-induced c-Fos upregulation (0.3–10 mg/kg, i.p.. Because both compounds inhibit serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR-induced c-Fos expression, we hypothesize that LY354740 and LY379268 have different in vivo properties and that 5-HT2AR activation and restraint stress induce c-Fos through distinct mechanisms.

  12. Altered Gravity Simulated by Parabolic Flight and Water Immersion Leads to Decreased Trunk Motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiliang Wang

    Full Text Available Gravity is one of the important environmental factors that influence the physiologies and behaviors of animals and humans, and changes in gravity elicit a variety of physiological and behavioral alterations that include impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions. To elucidate the effects of gravity on human physiology and behavior, we examined changes in wrist and trunk activities and heart rate during parabolic flight and the activity of wrist and trunk in water immersion experiments. Data from 195 person-time parabolas performed by eight subjects revealed that the trunk motion counts decreased by approximately half during ascending legs (hypergravity, relative to the data acquired before the parabolic flights. In contrast, the wrist activity remained unchanged. The results from the water immersion experiments demonstrated that in the underwater condition, both the wrist and trunk activities were significantly decreased but the latter decreased to a much lower level. Together, these data suggest that gravitational alterations can result in differential influences on the motions of the wrist and the trunk. These findings might be important for understanding the degeneration of skeleton and muscular system and performance of astronauts in microgravity.

  13. Effect of water immersion methods on post-exercise recovery from simulated team sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jeremy; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Wallman, Karen; Beilby, John

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of hot/cold contrast water immersion (CWI), cold-water immersion (COLD) and no recovery treatment (control) as post-exercise recovery methods following exhaustive simulated team sports exercise. Repeated sprint ability, strength, muscle soreness and inflammatory markers were measured across the 48-h post-exercise period. Eleven male team-sport athletes completed three 3-day testing trials, each separated by 2 weeks. On day 1, baseline measures of performance (10 m x 20 m sprints and isometric strength of quadriceps, hamstrings and hip flexors) were recorded. Participants then performed 80 min of simulated team sports exercise followed by a 20-m shuttle run test to exhaustion. Upon completion of the exercise, and 24h later, participants performed one of the post-exercise recovery procedures for 15 min. At 48 h post-exercise, the performance tests were repeated. Blood samples and muscle soreness ratings were taken before and immediately after post-exercise, and at 24h and 48 h post-exercise. In comparison to the control and CWI treatments, COLD resulted in significantly lower (pCOLD also facilitated a more rapid return to baseline repeated sprint performances. The only benefit of CWI over control was a significant reduction in muscle soreness 24h post-exercise. This study demonstrated that COLD following exhaustive simulated team sports exercise offers greater recovery benefits than CWI or control treatments.

  14. Thermal insulation and body temperature wearing a thermal swimsuit during water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Hanai, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Shintaro; Nomura, Takeo

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a thermal swimsuit on body temperatures, thermoregulatory responses and thermal insulation during 60 min water immersion at rest. Ten healthy male subjects wearing either thermal swimsuits or normal swimsuits were immersed in water (26 degrees C or 29 degrees C). Esophageal temperature, skin temperatures and oxygen consumption were measured during the experiments. Metabolic heat production was calculated from oxygen consumption. Heat loss from skin to the water was calculated from the metabolic heat production and the change in mean body temperature during water immersion. Total insulation and tissue insulation were estimated by dividing the temperature difference between the esophagus and the water or the esophagus and the skin with heat loss from the skin. Esophageal temperature with a thermal swimsuit was higher than that with a normal swimsuit at the end of immersion in both water temperature conditions (pinsulation with the thermal swimsuit was higher than that with a normal swimsuit due to insulation of the suit at both water temperatures (pinsulation was similar in all four conditions, but significantly higher with the thermal swimsuit in both water temperature conditions (pinsulation and reduce heat loss from the skin. Therefore, subjects with thermal swimsuits can maintain higher body temperatures than with a normal swimsuit and reduce shivering thermo-genesis.

  15. Prolonged water immersion. Effects on blood pressure maturation in normotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, F; Reggiani, P; Ciulla, M; Meazza, R; Branzi, G

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the impact of simulated microgravity and of chronic removal of hydrostatic pressure gradients on blood pressure maturation and body growth in rats. A special device was developed in our laboratory to transfer prolonged "dry" water immersion (a technique that has been used for training astronauts under hypogravic conditions) to six Sprague-Dawley test rats (immersion-G group). The time course of heart rate, systolic blood pressure, urinary output, and body weight was monitored from weaning to maturity and then compared with those responses from six sex- and age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats grown in a gravity environment (group G). A downward shift in systolic blood pressure and body weight maturation curves was observed in immersion-G rats from the age of 60 days. Cessation of dry water immersion produced a gradual, significant rise in systolic blood pressure but not in body weight to control values. No marked changes in heart rate and urinary output between G and immersion-G rats were noticed throughout the investigation. Our results provide indirect evidence that an interference in the natural history of blood pressure maturation was introduced by immersion, which dissociated the effects of body weight increase during growth from the effects of ageing per se. It is concluded that the physiological increase in systolic blood pressure during growth is partly gravity-dependent.

  16. IS BLOOD LACTATE REMOVAL DURING WATER IMMERSED CYCLING FASTER THAN DURING CYCLING ON LAND?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrízio Di Masi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare lactate removal during active recovery performed during cycling in water immersion (CW and during cycling on land (CL, after a similar exercise bout in male adults. Eleven healthy and physically active men, aged between 20 and 26 years old participated in the experiment. Before the experimental tests, the ventilatory threshold of the subjects was determined. Each subject completed the experimental tests twice, with one week separating the two periods of experiment. The subjects exercised on the treadmill during 6 min at a speed 10% above the speed corresponding to their ventilatory threshold. Subsequently, the subjects recovered from the exercise bout either on a stationary bike (CL or on a aquatic-specific bike (CW. On the subsequent week the subjects performed the same protocol but with a different recovery condition. Recovery condition assignment for the first test was counterbalanced (six subjects started with one condition and five with the other. Capillary blood samples were collected after each test and during the recovery period (at 3, 6, 9 and 15 minutes and blood lactate was measured. The blood lactate values during CW were lower than during CL and significant differences were observed at the 6th minute (p < 0.05 and at the 15th minute of recovery (p < 0.05. Therefore, we may conclude that active recovery using cycling in water immersion may be more efficient than cycling on land for blood lactate removal.

  17. Altered Gravity Simulated by Parabolic Flight and Water Immersion Leads to Decreased Trunk Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peiliang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Dongni; Tian, Yu; Li, Fan; Zhang, Shaoyao; Zhang, Lin; Guo, Yaoyu; Liu, Weibo; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Shanguang; Guo, Jinhu

    2015-01-01

    Gravity is one of the important environmental factors that influence the physiologies and behaviors of animals and humans, and changes in gravity elicit a variety of physiological and behavioral alterations that include impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions. To elucidate the effects of gravity on human physiology and behavior, we examined changes in wrist and trunk activities and heart rate during parabolic flight and the activity of wrist and trunk in water immersion experiments. Data from 195 person-time parabolas performed by eight subjects revealed that the trunk motion counts decreased by approximately half during ascending legs (hypergravity), relative to the data acquired before the parabolic flights. In contrast, the wrist activity remained unchanged. The results from the water immersion experiments demonstrated that in the underwater condition, both the wrist and trunk activities were significantly decreased but the latter decreased to a much lower level. Together, these data suggest that gravitational alterations can result in differential influences on the motions of the wrist and the trunk. These findings might be important for understanding the degeneration of skeleton and muscular system and performance of astronauts in microgravity.

  18. Cold-water immersion alters muscle recruitment and balance of basketball players during vertical jump landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Christiane de Souza Guerino; Vicente, Rafael Chagas; Cesário, Mauricio Donini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cold-water immersion on the electromyographic (EMG) response of the lower limb and balance during unipodal jump landing. The evaluation comprised 40 individuals (20 basketball players and 20 non-athletes). The EMG response in the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus, rectus femoris, hamstring and gluteus medius; amplitude and mean speed of the centre of pressure, flight time and ground reaction force (GRF) were analysed. All volunteers remained for 20 min with their ankle immersed in cold-water, and were re-evaluated immediately post and after 10, 20 and 30 min of reheating. The Shapiro-Wilk test, Friedman test and Dunn's post test (P < 0.05) were used. The EMG response values decreased for the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus and rectus femoris of both athletes and non-athletes (P < 0.05). The comparison between the groups showed that the EMG response was lower for the athletes. Lower jump flight time and GRF, greater amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure were predominant in the athletes. Cold-water immersion decreased the EMG activity of the lower limb, flight time and GRF and increased the amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure.

  19. Effects of short term water immersion on peripheral reflex excitability in hemiplegic and healthy individuals: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, N.J.; Valtonen, A.M.; Waller, B.; Pöyhönen, T.; Avela, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reflex excitability is increased in hemiplegic patients compared to healthy controls. One challenge of stroke rehabilitation is to decrease the effects of hyperreflexia, which may be possible with water immersion. Methods/Aims: The present study examined the effects of acute water immersion on electrically-evoked Hmax:Mmax ratios (a measure of reflex excitability) in 7 hyperreflexive hemiplegic patients and 7 age-matched healthy people. Hmax:Mmax ratios were measured from soleus on dry land (L1), immediately after (W1) and 5 minutes after immersion (W5), and again after five minutes on land (L5). Results: Water immersion led to an acute increase in Hmax:Mmax ratio in both groups. However, after returning to dry land, there was a non-significant decrease in the Hmax:Mmax ratio of 8% in the hemiplegic group and 10% in healthy controls compared to pre-immersion values. Interpretation: A short period of water immersion can decrease peripheral reflex excitability after returning to dry land in both healthy controls and post-stroke patients, although longer immersion periods may be required for sustainable effects. Water immersion may offer promise as a low-risk, non-invasive and non-pharmaceutical method of decreasing hyperreflexivity, and could thus support aquatic rehabilitation following stroke. PMID:26944824

  20. Effects of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Learning and Memory in a Reward-directed Instrumental Conditioning Task in Chronic Restraint Stressed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezhu, Wang; Pan, Xu; Cong, Lu; Liming, Dong; Beiyue, Zhang; Jingwei, Lu; Yanyan, Yang; Xinmin, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is one of the major active ingredients of Panax ginseng and has showed notable improving learning and memory effects in several behavioral tasks, such as water maze, shuttle-box, and step-through, based on avoidance. However, there was no report about the role of Rg1 on the performance of reward-directed instrumental conditioning, which could reflect the adaptive capacity to ever-changing environments. Thus, in this study, the reward devaluation test and conditional visual discrimination task were conducted to study the ameliorating effects of Rg1 on cognitive deficits, especially the loss of adaptation capacity in chronic restraint stress (CRS) rat model. Our results showed that rat subjected to CRS became insensitive to the changes in outcome value, and it significantly harmed the rat's performance in conditional visual discrimination task. Moreover, the levels of BDNF, TrkB, and Erk phosphorylation were decreased in the prefrontal cortex of CRS rats. However, these changes were effectively reversed by Rg1 (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.). Therefore, it demonstrated that Rg1 has a good ability to improve learning and memory and also ameliorate impaired adaptive capacity induced by CRS. This amelioration effect of Rg1 might be mediated partially by BDNF/TrkB/Erk pathway in prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Hypericum Perforatum L. Hypericaceae/Guttiferae Sunflower, Olive and Palm Oil Еxtracts Attenuate Cold Restraint Stress – Induced Gastric Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Tadić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Three Hypericum perforatum L., Hypericaceae (St. John’s Wort oil extracts (HPE were prepared according to the prescriptions from traditional medicine – fresh flowering tops were macerated in three different vegetable oils: sunflower (E1, olive (E2 and palm oil (E3 for 40 days, exposed to the sunlight. The aim of the study was to investigate the gastroprotective activity of the obtained extracts in respect to their quercetin content. HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of quercetin in all of the investigated HPEs, but in different amounts: 15.1, 5.8 and 21.7 μg/mL in E1, E2, and E3, respectively. Gastroprotective activity was evaluated using cold-restraint stress (CRS induced rat gastric mucosa lesions test. All of the HPEs showed gastroprotective activity, which was close to that achieved by the one of the most studied anti-ulcer flavonoids, quercetin [percentages of inhibition of ulcer index (UI were 35, 62 and 40 % in E1, E2 and E3, respectively]. Contrary to the lowest quercetin content, HPE prepared with olive oil (E2 offered the highest protection against gastric damaging action of CRS. It may be assumed that this is due to other constituents of E2, which probably play an additional role in complex gastroprotective activity.

  2. Stimulatory effects of Cuminum cyminum and flavonoid glycoside on Cyclosporine-A and restraint stress induced immune-suppression in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Krishan Avtar; Amina, Musarat; Bani, Sarang

    2010-04-15

    Many herbs and spices are known to modulate the immune system and have been shown to restore the immunity in immuno-compromised individuals. Spices generally used to increase the taste and flavor of food also has the history of usage as an ayurvedic medicine. Therefore to explore the health modulating effects of Cuminum cyminum and to identify the active compound, immunomodulatory properties were evaluated using flowcytometry and ELISA in normal and immune-suppressed animals. C. cyminum and compound 1 stimulated the T cells and Th1 cytokines expression in normal animals. Swiss albino mice subjected to Cyclosporine-A induced immune-suppression were dosed orally with C. cyminum (25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) on consecutive days. The results showed that administration significantly increased T cells (CD4 and CD8) count and Th1 predominant immune response in a dose dependent manner thereby suggesting immunomodulatory activity through modulation of T lymphocytes expression. In restraint stress induced immune-suppressed animals, compound 1 countered the depleted T lymphocytes, decreased the elevated corticosterone levels and size of adrenal glands and increased the weight of thymus and spleen. Based on the data we may conclude that C. cyminum is a potent immunomodulator and may develop as a lead to recover the immunity of immuno-compromised individuals.

  3. 急、慢性束缚应激对小鼠情绪和学习记忆能力的不同影响%Different effects on emotion and cognition induced by acute restraint stress and chronic restraint stress in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周科成; 佳娜提; 吴黄辉; 王锋; 胡伟; 寇俊萍

    2013-01-01

    目的:观察急性束缚应激和慢性束缚应激对小鼠情绪和学习记忆能力的影响.方法:小鼠按体重和自发活动随机分成三组,即空白对照组,急性应激组和慢性应激组.采用束缚躯体的方法建立急慢性应激模型,并用自发活动实验检测小鼠的情绪状态,避暗实验检测小鼠的学习记忆能力.结果:自发活动实验中急性束缚应激组小鼠平均速度与空白组相比有显著增加(P<0.01),中央区活动时间和中央区活动路程百分比则显著增加(P<0.05),慢性应激组平均速度与空白组相比有显著减小(P<0.01),中央区活动时间和中央区活动路程百分比显著减小(P<0.05);避暗测试中急性应激组避暗潜伏期和错误次数没有改变,而慢性应激组潜伏期显著减小(P<0.05)、错误次数急显著增加(P<0.01).结论:急性束缚应激会使小鼠产生烦躁情绪、但不会改变其学习记忆能力;慢性束缚应激会使小鼠产生抑郁样情绪,会损害其学习记忆能力.%Objective: To investigate the effects of acute restraint stress (ARS) and chronic restraint stress (CRS) on the emotional change and cognitive ebility of mice. Methods: Mice were divided to three groups according body weight and spontaneous activity state i. e. control group, ARS and CRS. Acute restraint stress and chronic restraint stress animal models were established and changes of emotional and cognitive performances were examined by open field and step-through tests. Results: In open field test, ARS group showed lower mean velocity (P <0.01) , time in central zone (P <0. 05) and the percentage of distance in zone/total (P <0. 05) , while CRS group significantly reduced ( P <0. 05). There is no change of step-through latency and number of mistakes in ARS group, however, step-through latency significantly increased (P<0. 01) and number of mistakes deceased in CRS group (P<0. 05). Conclusion:The present results suggested that

  4. Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Spiers, Jereme G; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mild stress has been shown to cause hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) overexpression and the resultant nitric oxide (NO) production has been implicated in the etiology of depression. However, the extent of nitrosative changes including NOS enzymatic activity and the overall output of NO production in regions of the brain like the hippocampus and striatum following acute stress has not been characterized. In this study, outbred male Wistar rats aged 6-7 weeks were randomly allocated into 0 (control), 60, 120, or 240 min stress groups and neural regions were cryodissected for measurement of constitutive and inducible NOS enzymatic activity, nitrosative status, and relative gene expression of neuronal and inducible NOS. Hippocampal constitutive NOS activity increased initially but was superseded by the inducible isoform as stress duration was prolonged. Interestingly, hippocampal neuronal NOS and interleukin-1β mRNA expression was downregulated, while the inducible NOS isoform was upregulated in conjunction with other inflammatory markers. This pro-inflammatory phenotype within the hippocampus was further confirmed with an increase in the glucocorticoid-antagonizing macrophage migration inhibitory factor, Mif, and the glial surveillance marker, Ciita. This indicates that despite high levels of glucocorticoids, acute stress sensitizes a neuroinflammatory response within the hippocampus involving both pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible NOS while concurrently modulating the immunophenotype of glia. Furthermore, there was a delayed increase in striatal inducible NOS expression while no change was found in other pro-inflammatory mediators. This suggests that short term stress induces a generalized increase in inducible NOS signaling that coincides with regionally specific increased markers of adaptive immunity and inflammation within the brain.

  5. The use of water immersion as a recovery intervention following high-intensity excercise : an investigation of the physiological and performance effects

    OpenAIRE

    Crampton, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the lack of a clear scientific basis for its usage, cold water immersion (CWI) and contrast water therapy (CWT) are commonly used recovery interventions in elite sport. Anecdotally, a number of theoretical benefits have been advanced to support the use of water immersion, including the suggestion that CWI and/or CWT facilitate lactate clearance following high-intensity exercise. Therefore, the primary aim of this thesis was to investigate the effect of different water immersion protoc...

  6. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part III. Body temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine active winter swimmer men were subjected to four exposures each imitating a form of hot or cold exposures or their combination practiced among the Finns: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. All exposures were repeated and ended with recovery at room temperature. Body core and surface temperatures were recorded. One surface probe was placed between the scapulae to detect any signs of thermogenic activity by brown adipose tissue upon cold exposures. In the sauna control of core temperature was lost at esophageal temperature Tes 38 degrees C where the mean skin temperature exceeded the Tes. The brief ice water immersions did not disturb the thermal balance of the body core. The interscapular surface temperature recording provided circumstantial evidence of functioning thermogenic tissue in the area.

  7. The effect of active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery on subsequent knee extension and flexion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Strejcová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recovery is an important aspect of every physical activity. Many athletes train hard without giving their body time to recover which can lead to overreaching, burnout or poor performance. Currently cold-water immersion recovery and active recovery have emerged as some of the most popular interventions enabling faster recovery. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of three kinds of recovery (active recovery, cold water immersion, passive recovery on medium-term knee strength in the extension and flexion. METHODS: Fourteen athletes at the age of 26.6 ± 4.4 years performed, in a random cross-over design, 3 sessions with 3 repeated medium-term isokinetic tests. The effect of active recovery, passive rest and cold water immersion were assessed by 3 × 3 (time × recovery repeated-measure ANOVA, respectively. The dependent variables were – peak torque, total work and average power. RESULTS: We found significantly lower absolute differences between the first and third trial in knee extension for peak torque after the active recovery (↑ 0.9 N × m than after the cold water immersion (↓ 14.6 N × m or the passive recovery (↓ 13.9 N × m. The decrease of the average power was significantly lower differences after the active recovery (↓ 5 W than after the cold water immersion (↓ 23.7 W or passive recovery (↓ 25.9 W. The changes in total work were not significant. We did not found any changes in the isokinetic strength for the knee flexors after different kinds of recovery. Maximal heart rate (HRmax was significantly higher during the active recovery than during the cold water immersion and the passive recovery (173 ± 14, 166 ± 14 and 167 ± 14 rpm. We have found significant differences in the average heart rates (HRavg during active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery (124 ± 8, 97 ± 9 and 107 ± 12 rpm. CONCLUSION: We found the positive effect of the active recovery on the subsequent medium-term performance for

  8. Alterations in acid-base homeostasis during water immersion in normal man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.; Schneider, N. S.; Vaamonde, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of water immersion on renal bicarbonate and acid excretion were assessed in 10 normal male subjects. Immersion resulted in a highly significant progressive increase in the rate of sodium and bicarbonate excretion, and in urine pH. Immersion was also associated with a significant increase in urine P-CO2; this increase presupposes a maintained rate of hydrogen secretion in the distal tubular segment. The rapidity of onset of the bicarbonaturia (2 hrs of immersion) and the concomitant increase in urinary P-CO2 suggest that enhanced bicarbonate excretion of immersion cannot be completely accounted for by immersion-induced suppression of aldosterone, and that the natriuresis and bicarbonaturia of immersion is mediated in part by an increased proximal rejection of sodium and bicarbonate.

  9. Influence of cold-water immersion on limb blood flow after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Chris; Jones, Helen; Low, David A; Green, Daniel J; Howatson, Glyn; Gregson, Warren

    2017-06-01

    This study determined the influence of cold (8°C) and cool (22°C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow following resistance exercise. Twelve males completed 4 sets of 10-repetition maximum squat exercise and were then immersed, semi-reclined, into 8°C or 22°C water for 10-min, or rested in a seated position (control) in a randomized order on different days. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, muscle temperature, thigh and calf skin blood flow and superficial femoral artery blood flow were measured before and after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure). The colder water reduced thigh skin temperature and deep muscle temperature to the greatest extent (P cold and cool water similarly reduce femoral artery and cutaneous blood flow responses but not muscle temperature following resistance exercise.

  10. Effects of vasopressin administration on diuresis of water immersion in normal humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.; Denunzio, A. G.; Loutzenhiser, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of vasopressin suppression on the diuresis encountered during water immersion is investigated in studies on normal humans immersed to the neck. Six hydrated male subjects were studied on two occasions while undergoing 6 h of immersion without or during the administration of aqueous vasopressin for the initial 4 h. Neck immersion is found to result in a significant increase in urinary flow rate beginning in the first hour and persisting throughout the immersion. The administration of vasopressin markedly attenuated the diuretic response throughout the period of infusion, while cessation of vasopressin administration during the final 2 h of immersion resulted in a marked offset of the antidiuresis. Results thus support the view that the suppression of antidiuretic hormone contributes to the immersion diuresis of hydrated subjects.

  11. Fluorescent layers for characterization of sectioning microscopy with coverslipuncorrected and water immersion objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method to generate thin (thickness > 200 nm) and ultrathin (thickness < 200 nm) fluorescent layers to be used for microscope optical characterization. These layers are obtained by ultramicrotomy sectioning of fluorescent acrylic slides. This technique generates sub-resolution sheets with high fluorescence emission and uniform thickness, permitting to determine the z-response of different optical sectioning systems. Compared to the state of the art, the here proposed technique allows shorter and easier manufacturing procedure. Moreover, these fluorescent layers can be employed without protective coverslips, allowing the use of the Sectioned Imaging Property (SIP)-chart characterization method with coverslip-uncorrected objectives, water immersion objectives and micro-endoscopes. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  12. Ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lung during head-out water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derion, Toniann; Guy, Harold J. B.; Tsukimoto, Koichi; Schaffartzik, Walter; Prediletto, Renato; Poole, David C.; Knight, Douglas R.; Wagner, Peter D.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of altered pulmonary gas exchange during water immersion were studied in 12 normal males: 6 young (aged 20-29) and 6 older (aged 40-45). It is concluded that, in young subjects with closing volume (CV) less than expiratory reserve volume (ERV), gas exchange was enhanced during immersion, because normal ventilation-perfusion relations were preserved, and by mass balance, the ventilation/O2 uptake changes elevated arterial P(O2). In older males with CV greater than ERV and 52 percent of tidal volume below CV, immersion-induced airways closure during tidal breathing was associated with minimally increased shunt that did not significantly impair gas exchange. It is suggested that airways closure of this degree is of little importance to gas exchange.

  13. Ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lung during head-out water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derion, Toniann; Guy, Harold J. B.; Tsukimoto, Koichi; Schaffartzik, Walter; Prediletto, Renato; Poole, David C.; Knight, Douglas R.; Wagner, Peter D.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of altered pulmonary gas exchange during water immersion were studied in 12 normal males: 6 young (aged 20-29) and 6 older (aged 40-45). It is concluded that, in young subjects with closing volume (CV) less than expiratory reserve volume (ERV), gas exchange was enhanced during immersion, because normal ventilation-perfusion relations were preserved, and by mass balance, the ventilation/O2 uptake changes elevated arterial P(O2). In older males with CV greater than ERV and 52 percent of tidal volume below CV, immersion-induced airways closure during tidal breathing was associated with minimally increased shunt that did not significantly impair gas exchange. It is suggested that airways closure of this degree is of little importance to gas exchange.

  14. Two-axis water-immersible microscanning mirror for scanning optics and acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Fast multiaxis scanning is useful for not only optical but also acoustic microscopic imaging. Although they have been used for optical scanning, the application of (MEMS) scanning mirrors in acoustic microscopy is still very limited due to their small mirror plate size, and more importantly, inability to operate in liquids (as ultrasound coupling media). A microfabricated two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror for optical and acoustic microscopy is reported. It has an optical and acoustically reflective mirror plate (6 mm×4 mm) to provide numerical aperture for ultrasound beam steering. Electromagnetic and mechanical analysis and simulation were conducted to estimate the mechanical tilting angle and resonance frequency of both fast and slow axes, which matches well with the measurement results. The fast axis has a resonant frequency of 320 Hz in air and 220 Hz in water, which is more than 10 times higher than that of the slow axis (24 Hz in air and 14 Hz in water). Under a 100-mA driving current, the scanning angles of the fast axis reached ±9.5 deg in both air and water at the resonance frequency, respectively. The scanning angles of the slow axis reached ±15 deg in air and ±12.5 deg in water at resonant frequencies, respectively. Raster scanning of a collimated laser beam was achieved by driving both axes simultaneously close to their own resonance frequencies. The feasibility of using the two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror in scanning acoustic microscopy was also demonstrated.

  15. Ice‐water immersion and delayed‐onset muscle soreness: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellwood, Kylie Louise; Brukner, Peter; Williams, David; Nicol, Alastair; Hinman, Rana

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine if ice‐water immersion after eccentric quadriceps exercise minimises the symptoms of delayed‐onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design A prospective randomised double‐blind controlled trial was undertaken. 40 untrained volunteers performed an eccentric loading protocol with their non‐dominant leg. Interventions Participants were randomised to three 1‐min immersions in either ice water (5±1°C) or tepid water (24°C). Main outcome measures Pain and tenderness (visual analogue scale), swelling (thigh circumference), function (one‐legged hop for distance), maximal isometric strength and serum creatine kinase (CK) recorded at baseline, 24, 48 and 72 h after exercise. Changes in outcome measures over time were compared to determine the effect of group allocation using independent t tests or Mann–Whitney U tests. Results No significant differences were observed between groups with regard to changes in most pain parameters, tenderness, isometric strength, swelling, hop‐for‐distance or serum CK over time. There was a significant difference in pain on sit‐to‐stand at 24 h, with the intervention group demonstrating a greater increase in pain than the control group (median change 8.0 vs 2.0 mm, respectively, p = 0.009). Conclusions The protocol of ice‐water immersion used in this study was ineffectual in minimising markers of DOMS in untrained individuals. This study challenges the wide use of this intervention as a recovery strategy by athletes. PMID:17261562

  16. Effect of Water Immersion on Dual-task Performance: Implications for Aquatic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Sydney Y; Louder, Talin J; Foster, Shayla; Bressel, Eadric

    2016-09-01

    Much is known about cardiovascular and biomechanical responses to exercise during water immersion, yet an understanding of the higher-order neural responses to water immersion is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare cognitive and motor performance between land and water environments using a dual-task paradigm, which served as an indirect measure of cortical processing. A quasi-experimental crossover research design is used. Twenty-two healthy participants (age = 24.3 ± 5.24 years) and a single-case patient (age = 73) with mild cognitive impairment performed a cognitive (auditory vigilance) and motor (standing balance) task separately (single-task condition) and simultaneously (dual-task condition) on land and in chest-deep water. Listening errors from the auditory vigilance task and centre of pressure (CoP) area for the balance task measured cognitive and motor performance, respectively. Listening errors for the single-task and dual-task conditions were 42% and 45% lower for the water than land condition, respectively (effect size [ES] = 0.38 and 0.55). CoP area for the single-task and dual-task conditions, however, were 115% and 164% lower on land than in water, respectively, and were lower (≈8-33%) when balancing concurrently with the auditory vigilance task compared with balancing alone, regardless of environment (ES = 0.23-1.7). This trend was consistent for the single-case patient. Participants tended to make fewer 'cognitive' errors while immersed chest-deep in water than on land. These same participants also tended to display less postural sway under dual-task conditions, but more in water than on land. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Physical restraint and procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vyvere, A; Dumont, C

    2013-09-01

    The widespread practice of physical restraint of the elderly has used in most case in order to protect elders against injuries after falls or to manage behaviour agitation during delirium for example. However, "protect" isn't correct because of the adverse effects have been reported as falls increase, pressures sores, depression, aggression and death. In fact, efficacy of restraints for safeguarding patients from injury has not been demonstrated clinically. This paper reviews the current medico-legal knowledge regarding physical restraint use in this frail population and suggests some considerations about ethical practice and procedure evaluation.

  18. Chronic agomelatine treatment corrects the abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of motor activity and sleep/wake cycle induced by prenatal restraint stress in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Jerome; Silletti, Viviana; Laloux, Charlotte; Zuena, Anna Rita; Giovine, Angela; Consolazione, Michol; van Camp, Gilles; Malagodi, Marithe; Gaetani, Silvana; Cianci, Silvia; Catalani, Assia; Mennuni, Gioacchino; Mazzetta, Alessandro; van Reeth, Olivier; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Maccari, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant acting as an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist/5-HT2C serotonin receptor antagonist. Because of its peculiar pharmacological profile, this drug caters the potential to correct the abnormalities of circadian rhythms associated with mood disorders, including abnormalities of the sleep/wake cycle. Here, we examined the effect of chronic agomelatine treatment on sleep architecture and circadian rhythms of motor activity using the rat model of prenatal restraint stress (PRS) as a putative 'aetiological' model of depression. PRS was delivered to the mothers during the last 10 d of pregnancy. The adult progeny ('PRS rats') showed a reduced duration of slow wave sleep, an increased duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an increased number of REM sleep events and an increase in motor activity before the beginning of the dark phase of the light/dark cycle. In addition, adult PRS rats showed an increased expression of the transcript of the primary response gene, c-Fos, in the hippocampus just prior to the beginning of the dark phase. All these changes were reversed by a chronic oral treatment with agomelatine (2000 ppm in the diet). The effect of agomelatine on sleep was largely attenuated by treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist, S22153, which caused PRS-like sleep disturbances on its own. These data provide the first evidence that agomelatine corrects sleep architecture and restores circadian homeostasis in a preclinical model of depression and supports the value of agomelatine as a novel antidepressant that resynchronizes circadian rhythms under pathological conditions.

  19. Physical restraint and procedure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van de Vyvere, A; Dumont, C

    2013-01-01

    The widespread practice of physical restraint of the elderly has used in most case in order to protect elders against injuries after falls or to manage behaviour agitation during delirium for example...

  20. The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A; Siqueira, A F; Ferreira-Junior, J B; do Carmo, J; Durigan, J L Q; Blazevich, A; Bottaro, M

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of 5 and 15°C cold-water immersion on recovery from exercise resulting in exercise-induced muscle damage. 42 college-aged men performed 5×20 drop-jumps and were randomly allocated into one of 3 groups: (1) 5°C; (2) 15°C; or (3) control. After exercise, individuals from the cold-water immersion groups had their lower limbs immerged in iced water for 20 min. Isometric knee extensor torque, countermovement jump, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h post-exercise. There was no between-group difference in isometric strength recovery (p=0.73). However, countermovement jump recovered quicker in cold-water immersion groups compared to control group (pmuscle soreness (p=0.06) in 15°C group compared to control at 24 h post-exercise. The result suggests that cold-water immersion promote recovery of stretch-shortening cycle performance, but not influence the recovery of maximal contractile force. Immersion at warmer temperature may be more effective than colder temperatures promoting recovery from strenuous exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 protects against stress-induced ulcers via regulation of glucocorticoid production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Luo, Pengfei; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yuelu; Wang, Xingtong; Chang, Fei; Zhang, Yuechan; Tang, Hongtai; Xia, Zhaofan

    2017-01-01

    Stress-induced gastric ulcer is an important life-threatening condition, while the molecular basis of its development is incompletely understood. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune pattern recognition receptor, can induce pro-inflammatory transcription, aggravating a stress ulcer. The present study found that TLR4 played a protective role in a mouse model of water immersion (23 °C) restraint stress. Wild-type (WT) and TLR4(-/-) male mice were respectively divided into five groups (5 per group), and exposed to the stressor for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 hours. Gastric ulcer index, determined post mortem, increased with time in both types of mice but was greater in TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, increased serum cortisol and corticosterone concentrations were observed in WT mice only, and such increases were detected only in WT mice 4 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). Moreover, the administration of cortisol alleviated the gastric injury in TLR4(-/-) mice. Western blotting showed expression in the adrenal of P450scc (CYP11A1), the first rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of steroids, was increased 4 h after water immersion restraint stress or LPS treatment in WT mice, but was conversely decreased in TLR4(-/-) mice after either stressor. Furthermore, in adrenal glands of TLR4(-/-) mice, structural distortion of mitochondria (which contain CYP11A1) was found with electron microscopy, and lack of lipid-storing droplets was found using light microscopy on adrenal cryosections stained with Oil red O. These data indicate that TLR4 plays a protective role in stress-induced gastric ulcer that is exerted via impacting synthesis of glucocorticoid in the adrenal gland.

  2. The Effects of Acute Restraint Stress on Plasma Levels of Prolactin and Corticosterone across Life-History Stages in a Short-Lived Bird: Gambel's White-Crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jesse S; Meddle, Simone L; Wingfield, John C

    2015-01-01

    The general reproductive effort model attempts to predict the resources that will be allocated to a current reproductive bout or to future survival by aborting the current reproductive attempt. Life-history theory predicts that short-lived species should devote more resources toward a reproductive event because brood value is far greater compared with that of long-lived species that have multiple breeding opportunities. Previous bird studies have used patterns of hormone secretion to understand the regulation of parental investment in response to environmental challenges, such as stress. The two key hormones investigated have been prolactin, which promotes parental investment, and corticosterone, which can reduce parental investment. Research on long-lived seabirds showed that prolactin levels decrease in response to a stressor, but the magnitude of the decline was positively correlated with future reproductive potential. However, little is known about the role of prolactin in short-lived species. Here we present prolactin and corticosterone data from a short-lived Arctic breeding, migratory songbird-the white-crowned sparrow, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii-at multiple stages of the breeding and nonbreeding seasons following standardized acute restraint stress. These data show that both prolactin and corticosterone are modulated seasonally. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in response to acute restraint stress during the breeding season in both sexes, but prolactin levels did not change in response to acute restraint stress at any stage of the annual cycle. We found no relationship between corticosterone or prolactin at either baseline or peak induced levels during any stage of breeding.

  3. Pharmacological Correction of Stress-Induced Gastric Ulceration by Novel Small-Molecule Agents with Antioxidant Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Kudryavtsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine novel small-molecule agents influencing the pathogenesis of gastric lesions induced by stress. To achieve this goal, four novel organic compounds containing structural fragments with known antioxidant activity were synthesized, characterized by physicochemical methods, and evaluated in vivo at water immersion restraint conditions. The levels of lipid peroxidation products and activities of antioxidative system enzymes were measured in gastric mucosa and correlated with the observed gastroprotective activity of the active compounds. Prophylactic single-dose 1 mg/kg treatment with (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline efficiently decreases up to 86% stress-induced stomach ulceration in rats. Discovered small-molecule antiulcer agents modulate activities of gastric mucosa tissue superoxide dismutase, catalase, and xanthine oxidase in concerted directions. Gastroprotective effect of (2-hydroxyphenylthioacetyl derivatives of L-lysine and L-proline at least partially depends on the correction of gastric mucosa oxidative balance.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE COLD WATER IMMERSIONS ON INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Howatson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersions (CWI in the recovery of exercise induced muscle damage. A randomised group consisting of eighteen males, mean ± s age, height and body mass were 24 ± 5 years, 1.82 ± 0.06 m and 85.7 ± 16.6 kg respectively, completed a bout of 100 drop jumps. Following the bout of damaging exercise, participants were randomly but equally assigned to either a 12 min CWI (15 ± 1 °C; n = 9 group who experienced immersions immediately post-exercise and every 24 h thereafter for the following 3 days, or a control group (no treatment; n = 9. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC of the knee extensors, creatine kinase activity (CK, muscle soreness (DOMS, range of motion (ROM and limb girth were measured pre-exercise and then for the following 96 h at 24 h increments. In addition MVC was also recorded immediately post-exercise. Significant time effects were seen for MVC, CK, DOMS and limb girth (p 0.05. These results suggest that repeated CWI do not enhance recovery from a bout of damaging eccentric contractions

  5. Cardiorespiratory effects of warm water immersion in elderly patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cider, Asa; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant; Schaufelberger, Maria; Andersson, Bert

    2005-11-01

    Hydrotherapy might be included in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), but little is known about the acute cardiorespiratory reaction in warm water. The aim of this study was to assess the acute cardiorespiratory effect of immersion in warm water, in a clinical setting, in elderly patients with CHF compared with healthy age and sex matched persons. Twelve patients (three females) with CHF, NYHA II-III, age 64 +/- 6 years, and 12 healthy subjects were studied. Cardiorespiratory changes, on land and in a temperature-controlled swimming pool (33-34 degrees C) were assessed during rest and exercise, in a sitting position, using continuous gas analyses. There were no significant differences, land versus water, in carbon dioxide production, total ventilation, respiratory frequency, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate or blood pressure in either of the groups. A significant difference was found in oxygen uptake, at rest, land versus water in patients with CHF in comparison with healthy subjects (-0.2 +/- 0.4 versus +0.3 +/- 0.6 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P < 0.01). Oxygen kinetics (tau) increased significantly (P = 0.01) in both groups during exercise in water. Hydrotherapy was well tolerated and the vast majority of the cardiorespiratory responses, during warm water immersion in a clinical setting, are similar in patients with CHF compared with healthy subjects. However, further larger studies, are needed to better understand the physiological reactions during hydrotherapy.

  6. Postexercise cold-water immersion does not attenuate muscle glycogen resynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Warren; Allan, Robert; Holden, Susan; Phibbs, Padraic; Doran, Dominic; Campbell, Iain; Waldron, Sarah; Joo, Chang Hwa; Morton, James P

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postexercise cold-water immersion (CWI, via its associated reductions in skeletal muscle blood flow) attenuates muscle glycogen resynthesis during short-term recovery from exhaustive exercise. In a repeated-measures design, nine recreationally active men performed an exhaustive glycogen depleting cycling protocol (consisting of intermittent exercise the night before and steady-state exercise on the subsequent morning of the main trial) followed by 10 min of lower-limb CWI (8°C) or remained seated in normal ambient conditions (CONT). Subjects were fed carbohydrate (CHO) at an ingestion rate of 0.6 g·kg body mass at 30 min postexercise and at 1, 2, and 3 h postexercise. Reductions in thigh skin temperature and muscle temperature during postexercise recovery were greater in CWI compared with CONT (P muscle glycogen (CONT and CWI postexercise = 76 ± 43 and 77 ± 26 mmol·kg dry weight [dw], respectively; mean ± SD) progressively increased (P muscle glycogen resynthesis rates during short-term recovery even when CHO availability is considered suboptimal. Athletes who regularly incorporate CWI as a recovery strategy to alleviate symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage should therefore not be concerned with potential negative effects of the associated reductions in muscle blood flow on the restoration of muscle glycogen stores.

  7. The influence of cold water immersions on adaptation following a single bout of damaging exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Goodall, S; van Someren, K A

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of cold water immersions (CWIs) following damaging exercise on the repeated bout effect (RBE). Sixteen males performed two bouts of drop jump exercise separated by 14-21 days. Participants were equally, but randomly assigned to either a CWI (12-min CWI at 15 degrees C) or control group (12-min seated rest). Treatments were given immediately after the first exercise bout, 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. No interventions were given following the second bout. Maximum voluntary contraction (MIVC), soreness (DOMS), creatine kinase (CK), thigh girth and range of motion (ROM) were recorded before and for 96 h following the initial and repeated bouts of damaging exercise. All variables, except ROM, showed a significant time effect (P muscle damage following the initial bout; there were no differences between the CWI and control groups after the initial bout. Following the repeated bout of exercise there was a significant attenuation in the reduction of MIVC (P = 0.002) and a reduction in DOMS (P < 0.001), which is indicative of the RBE. There were no significant differences between groups following the repeated bout of damaging exercise. These data show that CWI had no effect following damaging exercise and did not inhibit the RBE. Despite CWI being used routinely, its efficacy remains unclear and there is a need to elucidate the benefits of this intervention on recovery and adaptation to provide practitioners with evidence based practice.

  8. The Efficacy of Repeated Cold Water Immersion on Recovery Following a Simulated Rugby Union Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sean; John, Pattison; Brown, Freddy; Hill, Jessica

    2017-09-06

    Training and athletic competition frequently results in exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersion (CWI) on recovery following a simulated rugby union match. Sixteen male, club level rugby players were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to either a CWI group or control (CON) group. Following the simulated rugby match the CWI group underwent 2 x 5 min immersions at a temperature of 10°C separated by 2.5 min seated at room temperature, whilst the CON group remained seated for 15 min. Creatine kinase (CK), perceived muscle soreness, counter movement jump (CMJ) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, post-exercise, 24 h and 48 h following exercise. Large effect sizes were observed for muscle soreness at 24 and 48 h post exercise with lower soreness values observed in the CWI group. Large effect sizes were observed for CMJ at all time points and at 24 and 48 h post for MVIC with improved recovery of muscle function observed in the CWI group compared to the CON group. Lastly a moderate effect size was observed for CK immediately post exercise followed by large effect sizes at 24 and 48h post exercise, with CK concentration blunted in the CWI group. Overall these findings provide some support for the use of CWI to enhance recovery from EIMD following a simulated rugby union match.

  9. Chronic electroconvulsive stimulation but not chronic restraint stress modulates mRNA expression of voltage-dependent potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 in the rat piriform cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjæresen, Marie-Louise; Hageman, Ida; Plenge, Per

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which stress and electroconvulsive therapy exert opposite effects on the course of major depression are not known. Potential candidates might include the voltage-dependent potassium channels. Potassium channels play an important role in maintaining the resting membrane potential...... and controlling neuronal excitability. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the effects of one or several electroconvulsive stimulations and chronic restraint stress (6 h/day for 21 days) on the expression of voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv7.2, Kv11.1, and Kv11.3 mRNA in the rat brain using in situ...... hybridization. Repeated, but not acute, electroconvulsive stimulation increased Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 mRNA levels in the piriform cortex. In contrast, restraint stress had no significant effect on mRNA expression of Kv7.2, Kv11.1, or Kv11.3 in any of the brain regions examined. Thus, it appears that the investigated...

  10. Food Consumption, Restraint, and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-05

    the cover story of the experiment. Each subject consumed two caramels , a cup of hot bouillon soup, two dried apricots, an ounce of quinine water...subject viewed several objects (including the nuts ) and were asked to think about and feel free to touch, feel, or doodle with the toys, or eat the...manipulation of anxiety were correlated with eating salty nuts , a significant negative correlation was 13 I, . ~ :’ 14 revealed for normal weight

  11. Influence of prior intense exercise and cold water immersion in recovery for performance and physiological response during subsequent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    ) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from...... the qualifying and final races in 4000-m individual pursuit. In part B, twelve trained cyclists with an average (±SD) ⩒O2-peak of 67 ± 5 mL/min/kg performed a protocol mimicking a qualifying race (QUAL) followed 3 h later by a performance test (PT) with each exercise period encompassing intense exercise for ~4...... min preceded by an identical warm-up period in both a control setting (CON) and using cold water immersion in recovery (CWI; 15 min at 15°C). Performance was lowered (P cyclists during World championships in part A. In part B...

  12. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part II. Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine men were subjected to four temperature exposures: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. Exposures were repeated and ended with a 30-minute recovery. Heart rates were recorded continuously and blood pressures were determined six times during each experiment. Rate pressure products and indications of cardiac stroke work were calculated from the data. The results demonstrated decreased total peripheral resistance (TPR) to the blood flow in response to the heat of the sauna (C), with concurrent increase in cardiac oxygen demand and negligible increase in the stroke work. Cold exposures (D) increased the TPR. Cold did not increase the cardiac oxygen demand but increased the stroke work. The alternation of heat and cold (A) or cool (B) presented the most intensive strain on the heart.

  13. Effects of water immersion on the recovery of upper and lower body anaerobic power following a wrestling session

    OpenAIRE

    Asim Cengiz; Mehmet Settar Kocak

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine effects of cold-water immersion after exercise on powerresponses of wrestlers. Twenty elite male wrestlers were formed by similar age, height, weight and fitness parameters. The wrestling training session included a 60-minute of vigorous exercise. It consisted of warm-up exercises, standing technical and tactical exercises that mostly allocates arm and leg muscles. Vertical jump height, ropes climb height, and delayed onset of soreness was measured before,...

  14. What is the biochemical and physiological rationale for using cold-water immersion in sports recovery? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Chris M; Davison, Gareth W

    2010-02-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) is a popular recovery intervention after exercise. The scientific rationale is not clear, and there are no clear guidelines for its use. The aim of this review was to study the physiological and biochemical effect of short periods of CWI. A computer-based literature search, citation tracking and related articles searches were undertaken. Primary research studies using healthy human participants, immersed in cold water (sports recovery still remains unclear.

  15. Possible involvement of integrin signaling pathway in the process of recovery from restraint stress in rats%整合素信号通路可能参与大鼠束缚应激后的恢复过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高玉振; 郭试瑜; 印其章; Xiang—Qin; CUI; 久光正; 蒋星红

    2007-01-01

    目的 筛选与束缚应激大鼠应激反应恢复速度相关的基因,探讨应激反应个体恢复的分子机制.方法 观察大鼠2小时束缚应激后血浆促肾上腺皮质激素(adrenocorticotropic-hormone,ACTH)及皮质酮的变化规律,根据应激结束后1小时的血浆ACTH及皮质酮下降程度将大鼠分为快速恢复组与慢速恢复组.采用微阵列技术检测快速恢复组与慢速恢复组下丘脑组织基因表达的差异,用实时逆转录-聚合酶链反应验证部分基因的表达差异.结果 基因芯片分析结果显示:大部分基因在两组间并无差异表达,在11个差异表达的基因中,快速恢复组中参与整合素信号通路的踝蛋白(talin)、整合素α6和丝/苏氨酸蛋白磷酸酶PP1β催化亚基(serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit,PP1B)基因有1.5倍上调,而结合粘附分子1(junctional adhesion molecule 1,F11r)基因有1.5倍下调.实时逆转录-聚合酶链反应结果与芯片分析结果一致.结论 本研究构建了束缚应激大鼠恢复过程的下丘脑基因表达谱,结果提示整合素信号通路可能参与应激的恢复过程.%Objective To search novel genes or pathways involved in the recovery process after restraint stress in rats.Methods We compared the hypothalamus transcriptional profiles of two different recovery patterns (fast recovery vs slow recovery) from restraint stress in rats using oligonucleotide microarray, the recovery pattern was determined by the decrement of plasma adrenocorticotropic-hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels during one hour recovery period after stress. A real-time quantitative RT-PCR was applied to validate the differential expressed genes. Results Analysis of the microarray data showed that most of genes were not differentially expressed between fast recovery group and slow recovery group. Among the differentially expressed genes we found that talin, together with serine/threonine protein phosphatase

  16. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life.

  17. The Physical Restraint Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Professional and government committees are examining use of physical restraints with troubled youth as a result of reports of problems with its use. Examples of what is being done to improve practice standards in area of crisis intervention include limiting how often restrictive procedures can be use; stating the technique must never negatively…

  18. Seat belt restraint system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, A.; Matsuhiro, D.

    1972-01-01

    Shoulder-harness and lap-belt restraint system was designed to be worn by individuals of widely different sizes and to permit normal body motion except under sudden deceleration. System is divided into two basic assemblies, lap belt and torso or shoulder harness. Inertia-activated reels immediately lock when seat experiences sudden deceleration.

  19. Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

  20. Effect of cold water immersion on 100-m sprint performance in well-trained swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parouty, Jonathan; Al Haddad, Hani; Quod, Marc; Leprêtre, Pierre Marie; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on sprint swimming performance in simulated competition conditions. Ten well-trained swimmers (5 males, 5 females; 19.0 +/- 3.9 years) performed two 100-m swimming sprints (S1 and S2) interspersed with a 30-min passive recovery period, during which athletes were randomly assigned to 5 min of CWI (14 degrees C) or an out-of-water control condition (CON 28 degrees C). During tests, sprint times, heart rate (HR), pre- and post-race parasympathetic activity via HR variability (natural logarithm of the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals; Ln rMSSD) and blood lactate accumulation ([La](ac)) and clearance ([La](cle)) were recorded. Rates of perceived recovery (RPR) and exertion (RPE) were evaluated before and after each sprint. CWI was associated with a 'likely' decrease in swimming performance [1.8% (90% CI 0.2, 3.5)], as well as 'likely' lower peak HR [-1.9% (-3.6, -0.2)]. CWI was also associated with a 'likely' smaller decrease in Ln rMSSD after the first sprint [-16.7% (-30.9, -4.1)]. RPR was 'likely' better [+27.2% (-3.7, 68.0)] following CWI. 'unclear' effects were observed for [La](ac) [+24.7% (-13.4, 79.5)], [La](cle) [-7.6% (-24.2, 12.7)] or RPE [+2.0% (-12.3, 18.5)]. Following CWI, changes in sprint times were 'largely' correlated with changes in peak HR (r = 0.80). Despite a subjective perception of improved recovery following CWI, this recovery intervention resulted in slower swimming times in well-trained athletes swimming in simulated competition conditions.

  1. Benefit of warm water immersion on biventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardassis Dimitris

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular physical activity and exercise are well-known cardiovascular protective factors. Many elderly patients with heart failure find it difficult to exercise on land, and hydrotherapy (training in warm water could be a more appropriate form of exercise for such patients. However, concerns have been raised about its safety. The aim of this study was to investigate, with echocardiography and Doppler, the acute effect of warm water immersion (WWI and effect of 8 weeks of hydrotherapy on biventricular function, volumes and systemic vascular resistance. A secondary aim was to observe the effect of hydrotherapy on brain natriuretic peptide (BNP. Methods Eighteen patients [age 69 ± 8 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 31 ± 9%, peakVO2 14.6 ± 4.5 mL/kg/min] were examined with echocardiography on land and in warm water (34°C. Twelve of these patients completed 8 weeks of control period followed by 8 weeks of hydrotherapy twice weekly. Results During acute WWI, cardiac output increased from 3.1 ± 0.8 to 4.2 ± 0.9 L/min, LV tissue velocity time integral from 1.2 ± 0.4 to 1.7 ± 0.5 cm and right ventricular tissue velocity time integral from 1.6 ± 0.6 to 2.5 ± 0.8 cm (land vs WWI, p There was no change in the cardiovascular response or BNP after 8 weeks of hydrotherapy. Conclusion Hydrotherapy was well tolerated by all patients. The main observed cardiac effect during acute WWI was a reduction in heart rate, which, together with a decrease in afterload, resulted in increases in systolic and diastolic biventricular function. Although 8 weeks of hydrotherapy did not improve cardiac function, our data support the concept that exercise in warm water is an acceptable regime for patients with heart failure.

  2. Central and peripheral adjustments during high-intensity exercise following cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Coombes, Jeff S; Buchheit, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the acute effects of cold water immersion (CWI) or passive recovery (PAS) on physiological responses during high-intensity interval training (HIIT). In a crossover design, 14 cyclists completed 2 HIIT sessions (HIIT1 and HIIT2) separated by 30 min. Between HIIT sessions, they stood in cold water (10 °C) up to their umbilicus, or at room temperature (27 °C) for 5 min. The natural logarithm of square-root of mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (ln rMSSD) was assessed pre- and post-HIIT1 and HIIT2. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (Q), O2 uptake (VO2), total muscle hemoglobin (t Hb) and oxygenation of the vastus lateralis were recorded (using near infrared spectroscopy); heart rate, Q, and VO2 on-kinetics (i.e., mean response time, MRT), muscle de-oxygenation rate, and anaerobic contribution to exercise were calculated for HIIT1 and HIIT2. ln rMSSD was likely higher [between-trial difference (90% confidence interval) [+13.2% (3.3; 24.0)] after CWI compared with PAS. CWI also likely increased SV [+5.9% (-0.1; 12.1)], possibly increased Q [+4.4% (-1.0; 10.3)], possibly slowed Q MRT [+18.3% (-4.1; 46.0)], very likely slowed VO2 MRT [+16.5% (5.8; 28.4)], and likely increased the anaerobic contribution to exercise [+9.7% (-1.7; 22.5)]. CWI between HIIT slowed VO2 on-kinetics, leading to increased anaerobic contribution during HIIT2. This detrimental effect of CWI was likely related to peripheral adjustments, because the slowing of VO2 on-kinetics was twofold greater than that of central delivery of O2 (i.e., Q). CWI has detrimental effects on high-intensity aerobic exercise performance that persist for ≥ 45 min.

  3. Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function after resistance exercise.

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    Roberts, Llion A; Nosaka, Kazunori; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2014-10-15

    We investigated the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on the recovery of muscle function and physiological responses after high-intensity resistance exercise. Using a randomized, cross-over design, 10 physically active men performed high-intensity resistance exercise followed by one of two recovery interventions: 1) 10 min of CWI at 10°C or 2) 10 min of active recovery (low-intensity cycling). After the recovery interventions, maximal muscle function was assessed after 2 and 4 h by measuring jump height and isometric squat strength. Submaximal muscle function was assessed after 6 h by measuring the average load lifted during 6 sets of 10 squats at 80% of 1 repetition maximum. Intramuscular temperature (1 cm) was also recorded, and venous blood samples were analyzed for markers of metabolism, vasoconstriction, and muscle damage. CWI did not enhance recovery of maximal muscle function. However, during the final three sets of the submaximal muscle function test, participants lifted a greater load (P muscle temperature decreased ∼7°C below postexercise values and remained below preexercise values for another 35 min. Venous blood O2 saturation decreased below preexercise values for 1.5 h after CWI. Serum endothelin-1 concentration did not change after CWI, whereas it decreased after active recovery. Plasma myoglobin concentration was lower, whereas plasma IL-6 concentration was higher after CWI compared with active recovery. These results suggest that CWI after resistance exercise allows athletes to complete more work during subsequent training sessions, which could enhance long-term training adaptations. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. The Effects of Cold Water Immersion after Rugby Training on Muscle Power and Biochemical Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Takeda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During rugby game, or intensive rugby training there are many high intensity explosive exercises and eccentric muscle contractions, therefore adequate recovery is very important to rugby players. In the present study we have tested the effects of cold water immersion (CWI after game-simulated (80 min. rugby training on muscle power recovery and blood markers of muscle damage. Twenty well-trained collegiate male rugby players (age: 20.3 ± 0.6 years old, body height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m, body weight: 85.4 ± 2.0 kg, body fat: 18.2 ± 1.4 % volunteered for this study. This study was conducted as a cross-over design; i.e., the subjects were randomly assigned either to CWI (n = 10 or passive rest condition (n = 10 for the 1st trial and 1 week later the subjects were switched conditions for the 2nd trial. After the simulated rugby training, including tackles and body contacts, muscle functional ability and blood markers of muscle damage were tested immediately, after CWI or passive rest, and again 24 hours later. Statistical analysis of all muscle functional tests (10 m dash, counter movement jump, reaction time, side steps except for 10 seconds maximal pedaling power and blood makers of muscle damage (aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and creatinine revealed significant main effects for time (p < 0.05. However, no statistically significant interactions were found in any of the muscle functional tests and blood markers between groups and time courses. Our results suggest that a rugby game induces muscle damage and reduces muscle function. However, CWI has no significant restorative effect after an 80-minute rugby game in terms of muscle damage.

  5. Post-exercise cold water immersion does not alter high intensity interval training-induced exercise performance and Hsp72 responses, but enhances mitochondrial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paula Fernandes; Magalhães, Sílvia Mourão; Fonseca, Ivana Alice Teixeira; da Costa Santos, Vanessa Batista; de Matos, Mariana Aguiar; Peixoto, Marco Fabrício Dias; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Crandall, Craig; Araújo, Hygor Nunes; Silveira, Leonardo Reis; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; de Castro Magalhães, Flávio; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of regular post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI) on intramuscular markers of cellular stress response and signaling molecules related to mitochondria biogenesis and exercise performance after 4 weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT). Seventeen healthy subjects were allocated into two groups: control (CON, n = 9) or CWI (n = 8). Each HIIT session consisted of 8-12 cycling exercise stimuli (90-110 % of peak power) for 60 s followed by 75 s of active recovery three times per week, for 4 weeks (12 HIIT sessions). After each HIIT session, the CWI had their lower limbs immersed in cold water (10 °C) for 15 min and the CON recovered at room temperature. Exercise performance was evaluated before and after HIIT by a 15-km cycling time trial. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre and 72 h post training. Samples were analyzed for heat shock protein 72 kDa (Hsp72), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) assessed by western blot. In addition, the mRNA expression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 and 2 (NRF1 and 2), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMK2) and enzymes citrate synthase (CS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT1), and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK4) were assessed by real-time PCR. Time to complete the 15-km cycling time trial was reduced with training (p  0.05). No differences were observed with training or condition for mRNA expression of PGC-1α (p = 0.31), CPT1 (p = 0.14), CS (p = 0.44), and NRF-2 (p = 0.82). However, HFS-1 (p = 0.007), PDK4 (p = 0.03), and Tfam (p = 0.03) mRNA were higher in CWI. NRF-1 decrease in both groups after training (p = 0.006). CaMK2 decreased with HIIT (p = 0.003) but

  6. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated cycling performance and limb blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, J; O'Hagan, C; Stefanovic, B; Walker, M; Gill, N; Askew, C D

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) and active recovery (ACT) on resting limb blood flow, rectal temperature and repeated cycling performance in the heat. Ten subjects completed two testing sessions separated by 1 week; each trial consisted of an initial all-out 35-min exercise bout, one of two 15-min recovery interventions (randomised: CWI or ACT), followed by a 40-min passive recovery period before repeating the 35-min exercise bout. Performance was measured as the change in total work completed during the exercise bouts. Resting limb blood flow, heart rate, rectal temperature and blood lactate were recorded throughout the testing sessions. There was a significant decline in performance after ACT (mean (SD) -1.81% (1.05%)) compared with CWI where performance remained unchanged (0.10% (0.71%)). Rectal temperature was reduced after CWI (36.8°C (1.0°C)) compared with ACT (38.3°C (0.4°C)), as was blood flow to the arms (CWI 3.64 (1.47) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 16.85 (3.57) ml/100 ml/min) and legs (CW 4.83 (2.49) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 4.83 (2.49) ml/100 ml/min). Leg blood flow at the end of the second exercise bout was not different between the active (15.25 (4.33) ml/100 ml/min) and cold trials (14.99 (4.96) ml/100 ml/min), whereas rectal temperature (CWI 38.1°C (0.3°C); ACT 38.8°C (0.2°C)) and arm blood flow (CWI 20.55 (3.78) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 23.83 (5.32) ml/100 ml/min) remained depressed until the end of the cold trial. These findings indicate that CWI is an effective intervention for maintaining repeat cycling performance in the heat and this performance benefit is associated with alterations in core temperature and limb blood flow.

  7. Benefit of warm water immersion on biventricular function in patients with chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner Sveälv, Bente; Cider, Åsa; Täng, Margareta Scharin; Angwald, Eva; Kardassis, Dimitris; Andersson, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity and exercise are well-known cardiovascular protective factors. Many elderly patients with heart failure find it difficult to exercise on land, and hydrotherapy (training in warm water) could be a more appropriate form of exercise for such patients. However, concerns have been raised about its safety. The aim of this study was to investigate, with echocardiography and Doppler, the acute effect of warm water immersion (WWI) and effect of 8 weeks of hydrotherapy on biventricular function, volumes and systemic vascular resistance. A secondary aim was to observe the effect of hydrotherapy on brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Methods Eighteen patients [age 69 ± 8 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 31 ± 9%, peakVO2 14.6 ± 4.5 mL/kg/min] were examined with echocardiography on land and in warm water (34°C). Twelve of these patients completed 8 weeks of control period followed by 8 weeks of hydrotherapy twice weekly. Results During acute WWI, cardiac output increased from 3.1 ± 0.8 to 4.2 ± 0.9 L/min, LV tissue velocity time integral from 1.2 ± 0.4 to 1.7 ± 0.5 cm and right ventricular tissue velocity time integral from 1.6 ± 0.6 to 2.5 ± 0.8 cm (land vs WWI, p < 0.0001, respectively). Heart rate decreased from 73 ± 12 to 66 ± 11 bpm (p < 0.0001), mean arterial pressure from 92 ± 14 to 86 ± 16 mmHg (p < 0.01), and systemic vascular resistance from 31 ± 7 to 22 ± 5 resistant units (p < 0.0001). There was no change in the cardiovascular response or BNP after 8 weeks of hydrotherapy. Conclusion Hydrotherapy was well tolerated by all patients. The main observed cardiac effect during acute WWI was a reduction in heart rate, which, together with a decrease in afterload, resulted in increases in systolic and diastolic biventricular function. Although 8 weeks of hydrotherapy did not improve cardiac function, our data support the concept that exercise in warm water is an acceptable regime for patients with heart failure. PMID

  8. Studies of acid-base homeostasis during simulated weightlessness: Application of the water immersion model to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of water immersion on acid-base homeostasis were investigated under carefully controlled conditions. Studies of renal acidification were carried out on seven healthy male subjects, each consuming a diet containing 150 meq sodium and 100 meq potassium. Control and immersion studies were carried out on each subject on the fourth and sixth days, respectively, of dietary equilibration, by which time all subjects had achieved sodium balance. The experimental protocols on study days were similar (except for the amount of water administered).

  9. Effect of immediate and delayed cold water immersion after a high intensity exercise session on subsequent run performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Landers, Grant; Wallman, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) performed immediately or 3 h after a high intensity interval exercise session (HIIS) on next-day exercise performance. Eight male athletes performed three HIIS at 90%VO2max velocity followed by either a passive recovery (CON), CWI performed immediately post-exercise (CWI(0)) or CWI performed 3 h post-exercise (CWI(3)). Recovery trials were performed in a counter balanced manner. Participants then returned 24 h later and completed a muscle soreness and a totally quality recovery perception (TQRP) questionnaire, which was then followed by the Yoyo Intermittent Recovery Test [level 1] (YRT). Venous blood samples were collected pre-HIIS and pre-YRT to determine C-Reactive Protein (CRP) levels. Significantly more shuttles were performed during the YRT following CWI(0) compared to the CON trial (p=0.017, ES = 0. 8), while differences between the CWI(3) and the CON trials approached significance (p = 0.058, ES = 0.5). Performance on the YRT between the CWI(0) and CWI(3) trials were similar (p = 0.147, ES = 0. 3). Qualitative analyses demonstrated a 98% and 92% likely beneficial effect of CWI(0) and CWI(3) on next day performance, compared to CON, respectively, while CWI(0) resulted in a 79% likely benefit when compared to CWI(3). CRP values were significantly lower pre-YRT, compared to baseline, following CWI(0) (p = 0.0.36) and CWI(3) (p = 0.045), but were similar for CON (p = 0.157). Muscle soreness scores were similar between trials (p = 1.10), while TQRP scores were significantly lower for CON compared to CWI(0) (p = 0.002 ) and CWI(3) (p = 0.024). Immediate CWI resulted in superior next-day YRT performance compared to CON, while delayed (3 h) CWI was also likely to be beneficial. Qualitative analyses suggested that CWI(0) resulted in better performance than CWI(3). These results are important for athletes who do not have immediate access to CWI following exercise. Key points

  10. Studies of acid-base homeostasis during simulated weightlessness: Application of the water immersion model to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of water immersion on acid-base homeostasis were investigated under carefully controlled conditions. Studies of renal acidification were carried out on seven healthy male subjects, each consuming a diet containing 150 meq sodium and 100 meq potassium. Control and immersion studies were carried out on each subject on the fourth and sixth days, respectively, of dietary equilibration, by which time all subjects had achieved sodium balance. The experimental protocols on study days were similar (except for the amount of water administered).

  11. 营养型鸡精对拘束应激小鼠免疫功能的改善作用%Effects of Chicken Essence on Immune Activity in Restraint Stressed Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李怡芳; 曾怀苇; 陈邦添; 何蓉蓉; 栗原博

    2011-01-01

    作者研究了营养型鸡精对拘束负荷小鼠免疫功能的改善作用.将小鼠随机分为正常对照组,拘束应激组,25 mg/kg RU486(糖皮质激素受体拮抗剂组),1 mL/hg BEC(营养型鸡精)组及2mL/hg BEC组,每组10只.除正常对照组外,其余各组连续灌胃给药5 d后拘束负荷18 h,拘束恢复3 d后取血取脾脏测定相关指标.结果显示:BEC不仅可以明显改善拘束应激时小鼠脾脏的损伤,提高脾淋巴细胞总数,而且能显著降低应激小鼠血浆中皮质酮的含量,抑制相关凋亡因子的基因表达,提高线粒体膜电位,减少细胞色素C的释放.BEC可以通过抑制应激小鼠脾淋巴细胞的凋亡来维护脾淋巴细胞数目和功能,改善应激负荷引起的免疫抑制作用.%This study aims to study the effect of BEC (BRANDS Chicken Essence, BEC) on immune system in restraint stressed mice. Mice were randomly divided into 5 groups with 10 mice each group: normal control group, restraint control group, 25 mg/kg RU486 (GR antagonist)group, 1 mL/100 g BEC and 2 mL/100 g BEC. The treatment groups were orally administrated with BEC or RU486 for consecutive 5 days, while normal control and stress control groups were given the same volume of water. On the 5th day, all mice were restraint for 18 h except normal group. After 3 days recovery, mice were sacrificed. Blood was distilled and spleens were received to prepare lymphocytes for following tests. The results showed that BEC not only could protect the reduced spleen index and spleen lymphocytes, but also could inhibit the elevated content of corticosterone in plasma. RT-PCR analysis showed that BEC also could recover GR mRNA, Bcl2 mRNA and Bax mRNA in spleen lymphocytes nearly to normal. Meantime, the mitochondrion membrane potential (△Ψmt), the content of CytC in cytoplasm or mitochondrion of spleen lymphocytes were also recovered to normal when compared to stressed mice. All of these results indicated that BEC could protect

  12. Restraint stress changes heart sensitivity to arrhythmogenic drugs%制动应激改变心脏对致心律失常药物的敏感性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙安阳; 李德兴; 王幼林; 李庆平

    1995-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of acute restraint stress on ventricular electric stability (VES)and its mechanisms of action. METHODS:VES was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro by the changes of arrhythmogenic responses to icv or ip aconitine in rats and iv BaCl2 or adrenaline in rabbits following restraint stress for different durations. Pretreatments and the assay of heart-specific enzymes were made. RESULTS: The heart sensitivity to these drugs was promoted after stress for 2 h,but obtunded after stress for 8 h (the latency of ventricular arrhythmia to icv aconitine was shortened from 4. 1± 0. 9 min in control rats to 2.9±0. 9 min after stress for 2 h, P<0.05; but prolonged to 9.3± 3.8 min after stress for 8 h, P < 0.05). In Langendorff heart, the changes of VES induced by stress were similar to those in vivo, but to lesser degree. Pretreatment with adrenalectomy inhibited the descending phase of VES, while pretreatment with both aminophylline and vagotomy remarkably depressed the ascending phase at 8 h. In addition, the serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), and aspartate aminotransferase and their isozymes, LDH1 and CK-MB, were elevated at 2 h, and rose continuously at 8 h.CONCLUSION: Acute restraint stress causes biphasic changes of VES. The initial decrease of VES was related to adrenal catecholamine release, whereasthe following increase of VES was ascribed to adaptive decrease of cAMP and vagal activation. The changes of VES did not always parallel the injury of heart.%目的:研究急性制动应激对心脏电稳定性的作用及机制.方法:应激后用icv或ip乌头碱及iv氯化钡或肾上腺素致心律失常反应的改变来评价在体及离体心脏电稳定性,施予预处理初步分析机制.结果:应激2 h促进药物性心律失常;应激8 h反而抑制之.icy乌头碱致心律失常的潜伏期在正常大鼠为4.1±0.9 min,但应激2 h后缩短至2.9±0.9 min,应激8 h后延长至9.3±3.8 min.该双

  13. The Effectiveness of Whole Body Cryotherapy Compared to Cold Water Immersion: Implications for Sport and Exercise Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Holmes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryotherapy is the process of cooling the body, is typically used therapeutically, and is often used as a method of recovery relative to sport and exercise performance.  The purpose of this review is to compare the current literature on WBC to that of CWI and determine whether WBC provides any additional enhancements for sport and exercise recovery. These include tissue temperature reduction, markers of muscle damage, markers of inflammation, and parasympathetic reactivation. Method: Common methods of cryotherapy include cold water immersion (CWI, ice packs, ice massages, and gel or cooling creams. CWI is the most common method among athletes; however, a new form of cryotherapy, known as whole-body cryotherapy (WBC, has recently emerged.  Since its introduction, WBC has grown in popularity among practitioners and athletes. WBC involves short exposures (generally between 2-4 minutes to very cold air (-100o C to -140o C in a controlled room and setting. Furthermore, many of the studies on WBC were observational and did not contain a control group. Conclusion: Despite its growing popularity, the alleged benefits of WBC are largely based on anecdotal evidence as randomized, clinically-controlled studies regarding its efficacy are limited.  Keywords: cryotherapy, cold water immersion, exercise, recovery, muscle damage, inflammation

  14. Social Behavior and Physical Restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmar, Steven; Wilson, Holly

    1989-01-01

    Examined whether physical restraints are related to decreased social behavior among nursing home residents. Data collected from 112 nursing home residents suggest that low social performance puts resident at risk of being restrained, but more frequently use of restraint hampers resident's performance of social behavior. (Author/NB)

  15. Effects of cold water immersion on the recovery of physical performance and muscle damage following a one-off soccer match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascensão, António; Leite, Marco; Rebelo, António N; Magalhäes, Sérgio; Magalhäes, José

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a single session of cold or thermoneutral water immersion after a one-off match on muscular dysfunction and damage in soccer players. Twenty-male soccer players completed one match and were randomly divided into cryotherapy (10 min cold water immersion, 10°C, n = 10) and thermoneutral (10 min thermoneutral water immersion, 35°C, n = 10) groups. Muscle damage (creatine kinase, myoglobin), inflammation (C-reactive protein), neuromuscular function (jump and sprint abilities and maximal isometric quadriceps strength), and delayed-onset muscle soreness were evaluated before, within 30 min of the end, and 24 and 48 h after the match. After the match, the players in both groups showed increased plasma creatine kinase activity (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min) and C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h) concentrations. Peak jump ability and maximal strength were decreased and delayed-onset muscle soreness increased in both groups. However, differential alterations were observed between thermoneutral water and cold water immersion groups in creatine kinase (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min), C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), quadriceps strength (24 h), and quadriceps (24 h), calf (24 h) and adductor (30 min) delayed-onset muscle soreness. The results suggest that cold water immersion immediately after a one-off soccer match reduces muscle damage and discomfort, possibly contributing to a faster recovery of neuromuscular function.

  16. Deaths due to physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzlanovich, Andrea M; Schöpfer, Jutta; Keil, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Physical restraint is used primarily for patients at risk of falling, those with motor unrest and agitated behavior, and those who manifest an intention of doing harm to themselves or are at risk of suicide. The use of freedom-restraining measures (FRM), and, in particular, the use of physical restraints against the patient's will, can be a serious intrusion of basic human rights and, as such, an act of violence against the patient. The improper use of physical restraints can cause injuries of varying severity, which can sometimes be fatal. We analyzed all cases of death under physical restraint that were recorded in the autopsy reports of the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Munich from 1997 to 2010. Among the 27 353 autopsies conducted over the period of the study, there were 26 cases of death while the individual was physically restrained. Three of these cases involved patients who died of natural causes while restrained, and one was a suicide. The remaining 22 deaths were caused solely by physical restraint; all of them occurred in patients under nursing care who were not continuously observed. The immediate cause of death was strangulation (11 cases), chest compression (8 cases), or dangling in the head-down position (3 cases). In 19 of these 22 patients, the restraints were incorrectly fastened, including two cases in which improvised non-standard restraints were used. One nursing-home patient died because of an abdominal restraint even though it had been correctly applied: She was mobile enough to slip through the restraint till it compressed her neck, and then unable to extricate herself from it, so that she died of strangulation. To prevent such deaths, we recommend from a forensic medical standpoint that all possible alternatives to FRM should be used instead. If direct-contact restraints are truly necessary, they must be applied as recommended and the restrained person must be closely observed.

  17. Anxiolytic-like effects of restraint during the dark cycle in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yuki; Ago, Yukio; Tanaka, Tatsunori; Hasebe, Shigeru; Toratani, Yui; Onaka, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Stress during developmental stage may cause psychological morbidities, and then the studies on stress are important in adolescent rodents. Restraint is used as a common stressor in rodents and the effects of restraint during the light cycle have been studied, but those of restraint during the dark cycle have not. The present study examined the effects of restraint during the light and dark cycles on anxiety behaviors in adolescent mice. Restraint for 3h during either the light or dark cycle impaired memory function in the fear conditioning test, but did not affect locomotor activity. In the elevated plus-maze test, restraint during the dark cycle reduced anxiety-like behaviors in mice. Repeated exposure to a 3-h period dark cycle restraint for 2 weeks had a similar anxiolytic-like effect. In contrast, restraint for 3h during the light cycle produced anxiety behavior in adolescent, but not adult, mice. The light cycle stress increased plasma corticosterone levels, and elevated c-Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, basolateral amygdala and dentate gyrus, and enhanced serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and striatum, while the dark cycle stress did not. There was no difference in the stress-mediated reduction in pentobarbital-induced sleeping time between dark and light cycle restraint. These findings suggest that the anxiolytic effect of dark cycle restraint is mediated by corticosterone, serotonin or γ-aminobutyric acid-independent mechanisms, although the anxiogenic effect of light cycle restraint is associated with changes in plasma corticosterone levels and serotonin turnover in specific brain regions.

  18. Sensitization of restraint-induced corticosterone secretion after chronic restraint in rats: Involvement of 5-HT7 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    García-Iglesias, Brenda B.; Mendoza-Garrido, María E; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Noyola-Díaz, Martha; Terrón, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. We examined the effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS; 20 min/day) as compared to control (CTRL) conditions for 14 days, on: 1) restraint-induced ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) secretion in rats pretreated with vehicle or SB-656104 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist); 2) 5-HT7 receptor-like immunoreactivity (5-HT7-LI) and protein in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and adrenal glands (AG); 3...

  19. 32 CFR 636.34 - Restraint systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restraint systems. 636.34 Section 636.34 National... Restraint systems. (a) Restraint systems (seat belts) will be worn by all operators and passengers of U.S. Government vehicles on or off the installations. (b) Restraint systems will be worn by all civilian personnel...

  20. [State of microcirculation and cellular hemostasis in men with borderline arterial hypertension during thermoneutral "dry" water immersion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, L L; Smirnov, V V; Evdokimova, A G

    1985-01-01

    Platelet hemostasis, microcirculation, blood viscosity and lipid metabolism were examined in 18 men with borderline hypertension and 8 healthy men before, during and after 7-day immersion. The exposure to thermoneutral dry water immersion produced hypercoagulopathic changes of platelet hemostasis in the healthy and hypertensive subjects. Platelet hemostasis returned to the pretest level in the healthy subjects 2 days and in the hypertensive subjects only 5 days after exposure. Prior to immersion the hypertensive subjects showed signs of capillarotrophic insufficiency which increased after exposure. On immersion day 3 the hypertensive subjects exhibited a higher blood viscosity and a larger content of total lipids and free fatty acids. All the parameters returned to normal 2 days after immersion.

  1. Influence of prior intense exercise and cold water immersion in recovery for performance and physiological response during subsequent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A) and the......Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A......) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from...

  2. Numerical simulation of a metal diffraction grating-based SPR sensor with a water-immersion lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Kouki; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2017-09-01

    We describe a metal diffraction grating-based surface plasmon resonance sensor (G-SPRS) that operates in a differential mode, the angular sensitivity of which would be 4.8 times that of a conventional G-SPRS and over twice that of a prism-based SPRS. Because the objective is to analyze sample solutions using our G-SPRS, we plan to employ a water-immersion cylindrical lens to obtain simultaneously an angular spectrum of wide range. This G-SPRS enables us to observe two SPR dips corresponding to ±1st-order diffracted light in differential mode and further to generate them symmetrically at relatively large incident angles. We present simulation results and a practical optical design emphasizing its sensitivity in measurement, and thereby the significant advantage of its rigorous design.

  3. Deaths due to physical restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berzlanovich, Andrea M; Schöpfer, Jutta; Keil, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Physical restraint is used primarily for patients at risk of falling, those with motor unrest and agitated behavior, and those who manifest an intention of doing harm to themselves or are at risk of suicide...

  4. 舍曲林对束缚应激大鼠睡眠时相的影响%Effect of sertraline on sleep phase of rats suffering to chronic restraint stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王智; 徐瑞鑫

    2014-01-01

    大鼠正常的睡眠结构,表现为各睡眠时相持续时间的减少以及所占TST比例的变化,而大脑神经突触间隙5-HT神经递质重吸收的抑制剂舍曲林能明显对抗束缚应激对大鼠睡眠造成的影响。%Objective To investigate the effect of sertraline (5-hydroxytryptamine reabsorption inhibitor ) on sleep phases of rats suffering to chronic restraint stress .Methods The EEG and EMG electrodes were implanted to the cortical of rats .The chronic restraint stress method was applied for 14 consecutive days to establish rat psychological stress model .EEG and EMG of rats were monitored by polygraph for 12 consecutive hours in order to analyze the impact of ser-traline on the duration and percentage proportion in total sleep time ( TST ) of each sleep phrase .Results Compared with vehicle , the duration of TST , light sleep ( LS ) and slow wave sleep ( SWS ) of rats in model group decreased markedly ( P0.05 ) .The percentage proportion of SWS in TST significantly decreased ( P 0.05 ) .Compared with model group , the duration of LS, SWS and TST of rats in positive control group were increased markedly ( P0.05 ) .The percentage proportion of LS in TST in administrated group significantly decreased ( P0.05 ) .Conclusion According to the change of sleep phase , the structure of sleep is disturbed by chronic mild restraint stress .Ser-traline could effectively alleviate the effect of chronic restraint stress on rats .

  5. [Pulmonary embolism in an acute manic patient following physical restraint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsoul, S; De Backer, L; Schrijvers, D

    2014-01-01

    Immobilisation is a risk factor for the development of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. We present a case-study in which a patient developed a pulmonary embolism after being immobilised after a short period while subjected to physical restraint. We discuss the risk factors involved and stress the need for research into the prevention of such incidents.

  6. Effect of physical restraint on glucose tolerance in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Naoya; Kanazawa, Kanpei; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Tadahiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    Physiologic stress has been demonstrated to impair glucose tolerance. Glucose tolerance tests were performed using six cynomolgus monkeys. Chair-restrained subjects elicited higher elevations of plasma glucose and cortisol compared with squeezing device-restrained subjects. The responses to a glucose challenge are altered by different restraint procedures.

  7. Differences in prefrontal cortex GABA/glutamate ratio after acute restraint stress in rats are associated with specific behavioral and neurobiological patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouet, J-B; Fauvelle, F; Maunoir-Regimbal, S; Fidier, N; Maury, R; Peinnequin, A; Denis, J; Buguet, A; Canini, F

    2015-01-29

    In patients suffering from stress-related pathologies and depression, frontal cortex GABA and glutamate contents are reported to decrease and increase, respectively. This suggests that the GABA and/or glutamate content may participate in pathological phenotype expression. Whether differences in frontal cortex GABA and glutamate contents would be associated with specific behavioral and neurobiological patterns remains unclear, especially in the event of exposure to moderate stress. We hypothesized that an increase in prefrontal cortex GABA/glutamate ratio would be associated with a blunted prefrontal cortex activation, an enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activation and changes in behavior. Rats being restrained for 1-h were then tested in an open-field test in order to assess their behavior while under stress, and were sacrificed immediately afterward. The GABA/glutamate ratio was assessed by (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-HRMAS-MRS). The neurobiological response was evaluated through prefrontal cortex mRNA expression and plasma corticosterone levels. The stressed rats were distributed into two subgroups according to their high (H-G/g) or low (L-G/g) GABA/glutamate ratio. Compared to the L-G/g rats, the H-G/g rats exhibited a decrease in c-fos, Arc, Npas4, Nr4a2 mRNA expression suggesting blunted prefrontal cortex activation. They also showed a more pronounced stress with an enhanced rise in corticosterone, alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, as well as behavioral disturbances with decreased locomotion speed. These changes were independent from prefrontal cortex energetic status as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway activities were similar in both subpopulations. The differences in GABA/glutamate ratio in the frontal cortex observed

  8. Influence of Prior Intense Exercise and Cold Water Immersion in Recovery for Performance and Physiological Response during Subsequent Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peter M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from the qualifying and final races in 4000-m individual pursuit. In part B, twelve trained cyclists with an average (±SD) ⩒O2-peak of 67 ± 5 mL/min/kg performed a protocol mimicking a qualifying race (QUAL) followed 3 h later by a performance test (PT) with each exercise period encompassing intense exercise for ~4 min preceded by an identical warm-up period in both a control setting (CON) and using cold water immersion in recovery (CWI; 15 min at 15°C). Performance was lowered (P < 0.001) from qualification to finals (259 ± 3 vs. 261 ± 3 s) for the track cyclists during World championships in part A. In part B, mean power in PT was not different in CWI relative to CON (406 ± 43 vs. 405 ± 38 W). Peak ⩒O2 (5.04 ± 0.50 vs. 5.00 ± 0.49 L/min) and blood lactate (13 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 3 mmol/L) did not differ between QUAL and PT and cycling economy and potassium handling was not impaired by prior intense exercise. In conclusion, performance is reduced with repeated maximal exercise in world-class track cyclists during 4000-m individual pursuit lasting ~4 min, however prior intense exercise do not appear to impair peak ⩒O2, peak lactate, cycling economy, or potassium handling in trained cyclists and CWI in recovery does not improve subsequent performance.

  9. Effects of light emitting diode (LED) therapy and cold water immersion therapy on exercise-induced muscle damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana Zingari; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins; Preti, Maria Carla Perozim; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Ramos, Solange de Paula

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effects of LED therapy at 940 nm or cold water immersion therapy (CWI) after an acute bout of exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: animals kept at rest (control), exercised animals (E), exercised + CWI (CWI), and exercised + LED therapy (LED). The animals swam for 100 min, after which blood samples were collected for lactate analysis. Animals in the E group were returned to their cages without treatment, the CWI group was placed in cold water (10°C) for 10 min and the LED group received LED irradiation on both gastrocnemius muscles (4 J/cm(2) each). After 24 h, the animals were killed and the soleus muscles were submitted to histological analysis. Blood samples were used for hematological and CK analyses. The results demonstrated that the LED group presented fewer areas of muscle damage and inflammatory cell infiltration and lower levels of CK activity than the E group. Fewer areas of damaged muscle fiber were observed in the LED group than in CWI. CWI and LED did not reduce edema areas. Hematological analysis showed no significant effect of either treatment on leukocyte counts. The results suggest that LED therapy is more efficient than CWI in preventing muscle damage and local inflammation after exercise.

  10. Observation of skull-guided acoustic waves in a water-immersed murine skull using optoacoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The skull bone, a curved solid multilayered plate protecting the brain, constitutes a big challenge for the use of ultrasound-mediated techniques in neuroscience. Ultrasound waves incident from water or soft biological tissue are mostly reflected when impinging on the skull. To this end, skull properties have been characterized for both high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operating in the narrowband far-field regime and optoacoustic imaging applications. Yet, no study has been conducted to characterize the near-field of water immersed skulls. We used the thermoelastic effect with a 532 nm pulsed laser to trigger a wide range of broad-band ultrasound modes in a mouse skull. In order to capture the waves propagating in the near-field, a thin hydrophone was scanned in close proximity to the skull's surface. While Leaky pseudo-Lamb waves and grazing-angle bulk water waves are clearly visible in the spatio-temporal data, we were only able to identify skull-guided acoustic waves after dispersion analysis in the wavenumber-frequency space. The experimental data was found to be in a reasonable agreement with a flat multilayered plate model.

  11. Effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on hemodynamics and recovery of muscle strength following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Muthalib, Makii; Stanley, Jamie; Lichtwark, Glen; Nosaka, Kazunori; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-08-15

    Cold water immersion (CWI) and active recovery (ACT) are frequently used as postexercise recovery strategies. However, the physiological effects of CWI and ACT after resistance exercise are not well characterized. We examined the effects of CWI and ACT on cardiac output (Q̇), muscle oxygenation (SmO2), blood volume (tHb), muscle temperature (Tmuscle), and isometric strength after resistance exercise. On separate days, 10 men performed resistance exercise, followed by 10 min CWI at 10°C or 10 min ACT (low-intensity cycling). Q̇ (7.9 ± 2.7 l) and Tmuscle (2.2 ± 0.8°C) increased, whereas SmO2 (-21.5 ± 8.8%) and tHb (-10.1 ± 7.7 μM) decreased after exercise (P Muscle deoxygenation time during MVCs increased after ACT (P Muscle reoxygenation time after MVCs tended to increase after CWI (P = 0.052). These findings suggest first that hemodynamics and muscle temperature after resistance exercise are dependent on ambient temperature and metabolic demands with skeletal muscle, and second, that recovery of strength after resistance exercise is independent of changes in hemodynamics and muscle temperature. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Cold-water immersion decreases cerebral oxygenation but improves recovery after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minett, G M; Duffield, R; Billaut, F; Cannon, J; Portus, M R; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of post-exercise cooling on recovery of neuromuscular, physiological, and cerebral hemodynamic responses after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine participants underwent three post-exercise recovery trials, including a control (CONT), mixed-method cooling (MIX), and cold-water immersion (10 °C; CWI). Voluntary force and activation were assessed simultaneously with cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) pre- and post-exercise, post-intervention, and 1-h and 24-h post-exercise. Measures of heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, muscle damage, and inflammation were also collected. Both cooling interventions reduced heart rate, core, and skin temperature post-intervention (P  0.05). CWI reduced cerebral oxygenation compared to MIX and CONT post-intervention (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cooling interventions reduced cortisol 1-h post-exercise (P < 0.01), although only CWI blunted creatine kinase 24-h post-exercise compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Accordingly, improvements in neuromuscular recovery after post-exercise cooling appear to be disassociated with cerebral oxygenation, rather reflecting reductions in thermoregulatory demands to sustain force production. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Passive and post-exercise cold-water immersion augments PGC-1α and VEGF expression in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, C H; Allan, R; Drust, B; Close, G L; Jeong, T S; Bartlett, J D; Mawhinney, C; Louhelainen, J; Morton, J P; Gregson, Warren

    2016-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that both post-exercise and passive cold water immersion (CWI) increases PGC-1α and VEGF mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle. Study 1 Nine males completed an intermittent running protocol (8 × 3-min bouts at 90 % [Formula: see text], interspersed with 3-min active recovery (1.5-min at 25 % and 1.5-min at 50 % [Formula: see text]) before undergoing CWI (10 min at 8 °C) or seated rest (CONT) in a counterbalanced, randomised manner. Study 2 Ten males underwent an identical CWI protocol under passive conditions. Study 1 PGC-1α mRNA increased in CONT (~3.4-fold; P muscle compared to exercise per se. Additionally CWI per se mediates the activation of PGC-1α and VEGF mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle. Cold water may therefore enhance the adaptive response to acute exercise.

  14. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-09-15

    We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10-30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20-50%) increased 24-48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM(+) satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM(+) - and Pax7(+) -positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  15. Effects of 20-week intermittent cold-water-immersion on phenotype and myonuclei in single fibers of rat hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Han, E Y; Kang, M S; Kawano, F; Kim, H J; Ohira, Y; Kim, C K

    2004-08-01

    The effects of 20 weeks of intermittent cold-water-immersion on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression,cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number, and myonuclear domain size in isolated single fiber of soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were studied in male Wistar rats. Cold exposure was accomplished by submerging the rats in shoulder-deep water, maintained at approximately 18 degrees C, for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week and for 20 weeks. Cold exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of body and soleus muscle weight gain. The percent type IIa MHC fibers of EDL muscle was increased, whereas that of type IIa + b MHC fibers was less in cold-exposed group than controls (p muscle in cold-exposed group were significantly less than controls. Myonuclear domain in type IIa fibers of EDL in the cold-exposed group was greater than controls (p cold exposure causes the fiber-type-specific adaptation in rat hindlimb muscles. It is further indicated that cold-exposure-related modulation of myonuclear number was closely related to reduction of fiber CSA, not the shift of fiber phenotype.

  16. Influence of Sous Vide and water immersion processing on polyacetylene content and instrumental color of parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Ashish; Koidis, Anastasios; Rai, Dilip K; Tuohy, Maria; Brunton, Nigel

    2010-07-14

    The effect of blanching (95 +/- 3 degrees C) followed by sous vide (SV) processing (90 degrees C for 10 min) on levels of two polyacetylenes in parsnip disks immediately after processing and during chill storage was studied and compared with the effect of water immersion (WI) processing (70 degrees C for 2 min.). Blanching had the greatest influence on the retention of polyacetylenes in sous vide processed parsnip disks resulting in significant decreases of 24.5 and 24% of falcarinol (1) and falcarindiol (2) respectively (p 0.05). 1 levels in WI processed samples were significantly higher than in SV samples (p

  17. Effect of repeated stress in early childhood on the onset of diabetes mellitus in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookawa, Katumasa; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-02-01

    Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were discovered from SD rats and represent a confirmed spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus model. We investigated the effect of repeated stress in early childhood on SDT rats fed a high-fat diet, on locomotor activity and on the onset of diabetes mellitus. Regarding stress, a water immersion-restraint stress (WIRS) burden was applied 10 times every other day from 4 weeks of age. The results of the study showed, that the locomotor activity of the young SDT rats was clearly lower than that of the SD rats, and their locomotor activity was inferred to be congenitally low. In addition, the stress-burdened SDT rats showed delayed onset of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance compared with the rats not receiving stress burden. The locomotor activity of SDT rats is less than that of SD rats, and they SDT rats are thought to have poor at spontaneous energy expenditure. On the other hand, the feeding efficiency of the WIRS-burdened SDT rats was reduced, and in comparison with the SDT rats with no WIRS burden, energy expenditure was increased; this is suggested to influence the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  18. Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) protects against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-01

    The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800-1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production.

  19. Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) Protects Against Stress-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800–1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23062184

  20. The Arabidopsis KH-Domain RNA-Binding Protein ESR1 Functions in Components of Jasmonate Signalling, Unlinking Growth Restraint and Resistance to Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise F Thatcher

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs play important roles in the protection of cells against toxins and oxidative damage where one Arabidopsis member, GSTF8, has become a commonly used marker gene for early stress and defense responses. A GSTF8 promoter fragment fused to the luciferase reporter gene was used in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants with up-regulated GSTF8 promoter activity. This identified the esr1-1 (enhanced stress response 1 mutant which also conferred increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Through positional cloning, the ESR1 gene was found to encode a KH-domain containing RNA-binding protein (At5g53060. Whole transcriptome sequencing of esr1-1 identified altered expression of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli, hormone signaling pathways and developmental processes. In particular was an overall significant enrichment for jasmonic acid (JA mediated processes in the esr1-1 down-regulated dataset. A subset of these genes were tested for MeJA inducibility and we found the expression of some but not all were reduced in esr1-1. The esr1-1 mutant was not impaired in other aspects of JA-signalling such as JA- sensitivity or development, suggesting ESR1 functions in specific components of the JA-signaling pathway. Examination of salicylic acid (SA regulated marker genes in esr1-1 showed no increase in basal or SA induced expression suggesting repression of JA-regulated genes is not due to antagonistic SA-JA crosstalk. These results define new roles for KH-domain containing proteins with ESR1 unlinking JA-mediated growth and defense responses.

  1. What are the Physiological Mechanisms for Post-Exercise Cold Water Immersion in the Recovery from Prolonged Endurance and Intermittent Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsan, Mohammed; Watson, Greig; Abbiss, Chris R

    2016-08-01

    Intense training results in numerous physiological perturbations such as muscle damage, hyperthermia, dehydration and glycogen depletion. Insufficient/untimely restoration of these physiological alterations might result in sub-optimal performance during subsequent training sessions, while chronic imbalance between training stress and recovery might lead to overreaching or overtraining syndrome. The use of post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI) is gaining considerable popularity among athletes to minimize fatigue and accelerate post-exercise recovery. CWI, through its primary ability to decrease tissue temperature and blood flow, is purported to facilitate recovery by ameliorating hyperthermia and subsequent alterations to the central nervous system (CNS), reducing cardiovascular strain, removing accumulated muscle metabolic by-products, attenuating exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and improving autonomic nervous system function. The current review aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed examination of the mechanisms underpinning acute and longer term recovery of exercise performance following post-exercise CWI. Understanding the mechanisms will aid practitioners in the application and optimisation of CWI strategies to suit specific recovery needs and consequently improve athletic performance. Much of the literature indicates that the dominant mechanism by which CWI facilitates short term recovery is via ameliorating hyperthermia and consequently CNS mediated fatigue and by reducing cardiovascular strain. In contrast, there is limited evidence to support that CWI might improve acute recovery by facilitating the removal of muscle metabolites. CWI has been shown to augment parasympathetic reactivation following exercise. While CWI-mediated parasympathetic reactivation seems detrimental to high-intensity exercise performance when performed shortly after, it has been shown to be associated with improved longer term physiological recovery and day to day

  2. Effects of postexercise ice-water and room-temperature water immersion on the sensory organization of balance control and lower limb proprioception in amateur rugby players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Gary C.C.; Yam, Timothy T.T.; Chung, Joanne W.Y.; Fong, Shirley S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This single-blinded, three-armed randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the effects of postexercise ice-water immersion (IWI), room-temperature water immersion (RWI), and no water immersion on the balance performance and knee joint proprioception of amateur rugby players. Methods: Fifty-three eligible amateur rugby players (mean age ± standard deviation: 21.6 ± 2.9 years) were randomly assigned to the IWI group (5.3 °C), RWI group (25.0 °C), or the no immersion control group. The participants in each group underwent the same fatigue protocol followed by their allocated recovery intervention, which lasted for 1 minute. Measurements were taken before and after the fatigue-recovery intervention. The primary outcomes were the sensory organization test (SOT) composite equilibrium score (ES) and the condition-specific ES, which were measured using a computerized dynamic posturography machine. The secondary outcome was the knee joint repositioning error. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the effect of water immersion on each outcome variable. Results: There were no significant within- and between-group differences in the SOT composite ESs or the condition-specific ESs. However, there was a group-by-time interaction effect on the knee joint repositioning error. It seems that participants in the RWI group had lower errors over time, but those in the IWI and control groups had increased errors over time. The RWI group had significantly lower error score than the IWI group at postintervention. Conclusion: One minute of postexercise IWI or RWI did not impair rugby players’ sensory organization of balance control. RWI had a less detrimental effect on knee joint proprioception to IWI at postintervention. PMID:28207546

  3. Validity of Core Temperature Measurements at 3 Rectal Depths During Rest, Exercise, Cold-Water Immersion, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Hughes, Lexie E; Long, Blaine C; Adams, William M; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

      No evidence-based recommendation exists regarding how far clinicians should insert a rectal thermistor to obtain the most valid estimate of core temperature. Knowing the validity of temperatures at different rectal depths has implications for exertional heat-stroke (EHS) management.   To determine whether rectal temperature (Trec) taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, or 15 cm from the anal sphincter provides the most valid estimate of core temperature (as determined by esophageal temperature [Teso]) during similar stressors an athlete with EHS may experience.   Cross-sectional study.   Laboratory.   Seventeen individuals (14 men, 3 women: age = 23 ± 2 years, mass = 79.7 ± 12.4 kg, height = 177.8 ± 9.8 cm, body fat = 9.4% ± 4.1%, body surface area = 1.97 ± 0.19 m(2)).   Rectal temperatures taken at 4 cm, 10 cm, and 15 cm from the anal sphincter were compared with Teso during a 10-minute rest period; exercise until the participant's Teso reached 39.5°C; cold-water immersion (∼10°C) until all temperatures were ≤38°C; and a 30-minute postimmersion recovery period. The Teso and Trec were compared every minute during rest and recovery. Because exercise and cooling times varied, we compared temperatures at 10% intervals of total exercise and cooling durations for these periods.   The Teso and Trec were used to calculate bias (ie, the difference in temperatures between sites).   Rectal depth affected bias (F2,24 = 6.8, P = .008). Bias at 4 cm (0.85°C ± 0.78°C) was higher than at 15 cm (0.65°C ± 0.68°C, P .05). Bias varied over time (F2,34 = 79.5, P < .001). Bias during rest (0.42°C ± 0.27°C), exercise (0.23°C ± 0.53°C), and recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C) was less than during cooling (1.72°C ± 0.65°C, P < .05). Bias during exercise was less than during postimmersion recovery (0.65°C ± 0.35°C, P < .05).   When EHS is suspected, clinicians should insert the flexible rectal thermistor to 15 cm (6 in) because it is the most valid depth. The low

  4. Effect of cold water immersion after exercise in the heat on muscle function, body temperatures, and vessel diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Nosaka, Kazunori; Peake, Jonathan M; Laursen, Paul B

    2009-01-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) is a popular recovery modality, but actual physiological responses to CWI after exercise in the heat have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of 20-min CWI (14 degrees C) on neuromuscular function, rectal (T(re)) and skin temperature (T(sk)), and femoral venous diameter after exercise in the heat. Ten well-trained male cyclists completed two bouts of exercise consisting of 90-min cycling at a constant power output (216+/-12W) followed by a 16.1km time trial (TT) in the heat (32 degrees C). Twenty-five minutes post-TT, participants were assigned to either CWI or control (CON) recovery conditions in a counterbalanced order. T(re) and T(sk) were recorded continuously, and maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque of the knee extensors (MVIC), MVIC with superimposed electrical stimulation (SMVIC), and femoral venous diameters were measured prior to exercise, 0, 45, and 90min post-TT. T(re) was significantly lower in CWI beginning 50min post-TT compared with CON, and T(sk) was significantly lower in CWI beginning 25min post-TT compared with CON. Decreases in MVIC, and SMVIC torque after the TT were significantly greater for CWI compared with CON; differences persisted 90min post-TT. Femoral vein diameter was approximately 9% smaller for CWI compared with CON at 45min post-TT. These results suggest that CWI decreases T(re), but has a negative effect on neuromuscular function.

  5. 5000 Meter Run Performance is not Enhanced 24 Hrs After an Intense Exercise Bout and Cold Water Immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Stenson, Matthew R. Stenson, Tracey D. Matthews, Vincent J. Paolone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cold water immersion (CWI is used by endurance athletes to speed recovery between exercise bouts, but little evidence is available on the effects of CWI on subsequent endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CWI following an acute bout of interval training on 5000 m run performance 24 hrs after interval training, perceived muscle soreness (PMS, range of motion (ROM, thigh circumference (TC, and perceived exertion (RPE. Nine endurance-trained males completed 2 trials, each consisting of an interval training session of 8 repetitions of 1200 m at a running pace equal to 75% of VO2peak, either a control or CWI treatment, and a timed 5000 m run 24 hrs post interval training session. CWI was performed for 12 min at 12 degrees Celsius on the legs. Recovery treatments were performed in a counterbalanced design. Run time for 5000 m was not different between the CWI and control trials (CWI = 1317.33 ± 128.33 sec, control = 1303.44 ± 105.53 sec; p = 0.48. PMS increased significantly from baseline to immediately post exercise (BL = 1.17 ± 0.22, POST = 2.81 ± 0.52; p = 0.02 and remained elevated from baseline to 24 hrs post exercise (POST24 = 2.19 ± 0.32; p = 0.02, but no difference was observed between the treatments. No differences were observed for the interaction between time and treatment for TC (λ = 0.73, p = 0.15 and ROM (λ = 0.49; p = 0.10. CWI performed immediately following an interval training exercise bout did not enhance subsequent 5000 m run performance or reduce PMS. CWI may not provide a recovery or performance advantage when athletes are accustomed to the demands of the prior exercise bout.

  6. Assessment of atrial natriuretic peptide resistance in cirrhosis with head-out water immersion and atrial natriuretic peptide infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, L; Warner, L C; Leung, W M; Logan, A G; Blendis, L M; Skorecki, K L

    1993-02-01

    The nature of sodium retention in cirrhosis complicated by ascites has been studied for the last 30 years. Resistance to the natriuretic action of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a potential role in this sodium retention. To further evaluate this possibility, we studied 12 patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis and ascites on 2 consecutive days after a 7-day period off diuretics while receiving a 20 mmol/day sodium restricted diet. Following a crossover design, patients underwent head-out water immersion (HWI) for 3 h and were infused with a alpha-human ANP for 2 h on 2 consecutive days. Blood and urine samples were collected hourly. Five patients displayed a natriuretic response to HWI, sufficient to achieve negative sodium balance, and these patients were termed responders. Each of these five patients also displayed a natriuretic response to ANP infusion. In contrast, the other seven patients (nonresponders) consistently failed to develop a natriuretic response to either maneuver. The two groups had similar elevations in plasma ANP concentrations, but at baseline differed in terms of plasma sodium, plasma renin activity, and serum aldosterone. Despite higher serum aldosterone concentrations, nonresponders excreted less potassium than responders during the peak effect of the interventions, suggesting greater sodium delivery to the aldosterone-sensitive nephron segment in responders. We conclude that the inability to mount an adequate sodium excretory response to HWI in patients with cirrhosis may be conveyed through increased antinatriuretic factors that decrease the sodium delivery to the medullary collecting duct and inhibit the natriuretic effect of ANP at that site.

  7. Sensitization of restraint-induced corticosterone secretion after chronic restraint in rats: Involvement of 5-HT7 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iglesias, Brenda B.; Mendoza-Garrido, María E.; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Noyola-Díaz, Martha; Terrón, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. We examined the effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS; 20 min/day) as compared to control (CTRL) conditions for 14 days, on: 1) restraint-induced ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) secretion in rats pretreated with vehicle or SB-656104 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist); 2) 5-HT7 receptor-like immunoreactivity (5-HT7-LI) and protein in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and adrenal glands (AG); 3) baseline levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in PVN and AG; and 4) 5-HT-like immunoreactivity (5-HT-LI) in AG and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) protein in PVN and AG. On day 15, animals were subdivided into Treatment and No treatment groups. Treatment animals received an i.p. injection of vehicle or SB-656104; No Treatment animals received no injection. Sixty min later, Treatment animals were either decapitated with no further stress (0 min) or submitted to acute restraint (10, 30, 60 or 120 min); hormone serum levels were measured. No Treatment animals were employed for the rest of measurements. CRS decreased body weight gain and increased adrenal weight. In CTRL animals, acute restraint increased ACTH and CORT secretion in a time of restraint-dependent manner; both responses were inhibited by SB-656104. Exposure to CRS abolished ACTH but magnified CORT responses to restraint as compared to CTRL conditions; SB-656104 had no effect on ACTH levels but significantly inhibited sensitized CORT responses. In CTRL animals, 5-HT7-LI was detected in magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of PVN and sparsely in adrenal cortex. Exposure to CRS decreased 5-HT7-LI and protein in the PVN, but increased 5-HT7-LI in the adrenal cortex and protein in whole AG. Higher 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were detected in PVN and AG from CRS animals but 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio increased in AG only. Finally, whereas 5-HT-LI was sparsely observed in the adrenal cortex

  8. Cucumis sativus L-type lectin receptor kinase (CsLecRK) gene family response to Phytophthora melonis, Phytophthora capsici and water immersion in disease resistant and susceptible cucumber cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingquan; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xiaomei; He, Xiaoming; Sun, Baojuan; Zhong, Yujuan; Liang, Zhaojuan; Luo, Shaobo; Lin, Yu'e

    2014-10-10

    L-type lectin receptor kinase (LecRK) proteins are an important family involved in diverse biological processes such as pollen development, senescence, wounding, salinity and especially in innate immunity in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco. Till date, LecRK proteins or genes of cucumber have not been reported. In this study, a total of 25 LecRK genes were identified in the cucumber genome, unequally distributed across its seven chromosomes. According to similarity comparison of their encoded proteins, the Cucumis sativus LecRK (CsLecRK) genes were classified into six major clades (from Clade I to CladeVI). Expression of CsLecRK genes were tested using QRT-PCR method and the results showed that 25 CsLecRK genes exhibited different responses to abiotic (water immersion) and biotic (Phytophthora melonis and Phytophthora capsici inoculation) stresses, as well as that between disease resistant cultivar (JSH) and disease susceptible cultivar (B80). Among the 25 CsLecRK genes, we found CsLecRK6.1 was especially induced by P. melonis and P. capsici in JSH plants. All these results suggested that CsLecRK genes may play important roles in biotic and abiotic stresses.

  9. EFFECT OF IMMEDIATE AND DELAYED COLD WATER IMMERSION AFTER A HIGH INTENSITY EXERCISE SESSION ON SUBSEQUENT RUN PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Brophy-Williams

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI performed immediately or 3 h after a high intensity interval exercise session (HIIS on next-day exercise performance. Eight male athletes performed three HIIS at 90%VO2max velocity followed by either a passive recovery (CON, CWI performed immediately post-exercise (CWI(0 or CWI performed 3 h post-exercise (CWI(3. Recovery trials were performed in a counter balanced manner. Participants then returned 24 h later and completed a muscle soreness and a totally quality recovery perception (TQRP questionnaire, which was then followed by the Yoyo Intermittent Recovery Test [level 1] (YRT. Venous blood samples were collected pre-HIIS and pre-YRT to determine C-Reactive Protein (CRP levels. Significantly more shuttles were performed during the YRT following CWI(0 compared to the CON trial (p=0.017, ES = 0. 8, while differences between the CWI(3 and the CON trials approached significance (p = 0.058, ES = 0.5. Performance on the YRT between the CWI(0 and CWI(3 trials were similar (p = 0.147, ES = 0. 3. Qualitative analyses demonstrated a 98% and 92% likely beneficial effect of CWI(0 and CWI(3 on next day performance, compared to CON, respectively, while CWI(0 resulted in a 79% likely benefit when compared to CWI(3. CRP values were significantly lower pre-YRT, compared to baseline, following CWI(0 (p = 0.0.36 and CWI(3 (p = 0.045, but were similar for CON (p = 0.157. Muscle soreness scores were similar between trials (p = 1.10, while TQRP scores were significantly lower for CON compared to CWI(0 (p = 0.002 and CWI(3 (p = 0.024. Immediate CWI resulted in superior next-day YRT performance compared to CON, while delayed (3 h CWI was also likely to be beneficial. Qualitative analyses suggested that CWI(0 resulted in better performance than CWI(3. These results are important for athletes who do not have immediate access to CWI following exercise

  10. Comparison of the effects of electrical stimulation and cold-water immersion on muscle soreness after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajtner, Adam R; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Worts, Phillip R; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-05-01

    Resistance training is a common form of exercise for competitive and recreational athletes. Enhancing recovery from resistance training may improve the muscle-remodeling processes, stimulating a faster return to peak performance. To examine the effects of 2 different recovery modalities, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and cold-water immersion (CWI), on performance and biochemical and ultrasonographic measures. Thirty resistance-trained men (23.1 ± 2.9 y, 175.2 ± 7.1 cm, 82.1 ± 8.4 kg) were randomly assigned to NMES, CWI, or control (CON). All participants completed a high-volume lower-body resistance-training workout on d 1 and returned to the human performance laboratory 24 (24H) and 48 h (48 H) postexercise for follow-up testing. Blood samples were obtained preexercise (PRE) and immediately (IP), 30 min (30 P), 24 h (24H), and 48 h (48 H) post. Subjects were examined for performance changes in the squat exercise (total repetitions and average power per repetition), biomarkers of inflammation, and changes in cross-sectional area and echo intensity (EI) of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis muscles. No differences between groups were observed in the number of repetitions (P = .250; power: P = .663). Inferential-based analysis indicated that increases in C-reactive protein concentrations were likely increased by a greater magnitude after CWI compared with CON, while NMES possibly decreased more than CON from IP to 24H. Increases in interleukin-10 concentrations between IP and 30 P were likely greater in CWI than NMES but not different from CON. Inferential-based analysis of RF EI indicated a likely decrease for CWI between IP and 48 H. No other differences between groups were noted in any other muscle-architecture measures. Results indicated that CWI induced greater increases in pro- and anti-inflammatory markers, while decreasing RF EI, suggesting that CWI may be effective in enhancing short-term muscle recovery after high-volume bouts of

  11. Effects of water immersion on cardiac output of lean and fat male subjects at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffor, A S; Mohler, J G; Harrison, A C

    1991-02-01

    To investigate the combined effect of water immersion (WI) and lean body mass on cardiac output (Q), 12 healthy young men, 6 lean (fat less than 9%) and 6 fat (fat greater than 18%), were studied at rest and during steady state exercise approximating 30-40% Vo2 max under three experimental conditions. There were on land at 24 degrees C (LND), and immersed in water at 33-34 degrees C to hip level (HIP), and to the xiphoid (XIP). Metabolic measures were determined during 30-s periods from the average breath measurements. Mixed venous PCO2 (PVCO2) was estimated using rebreathing equilibration technique. Cardiac output was calculated by the indirect Fick's principle. In the lean individuals the average Q rose from a resting value of 5.43 +/- 0.43 (LND) to an exercise value of 7.25 +/- 0.40 L/min (XIP), and from resting value of 5.62 +/- 0.40 to an exercise 6.47 +/- 0.5 L/min in the fat individuals. During exercise, the associated increase in Q with increasing WI was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher compared with the land experiments. Inspection of the mean profile corresponding to this increase indicated that an increase in the level of immersion results in a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in the average Q for the lean group. For the fat group, the average Q was significantly (p less than 0.05) larger only at XIP level. At rest, heart rate dropped from 67 +/- 3.36 (LND) to 60 +/- 4.13 (XIP), and from 79 +/- 3.73 to 73 +/- 4.10 BPM for the lean and fat group, respectively. MANOVA analysis showed a significant (p less than 0.05) interaction between WI and group membership, indicating that the effect of WI is significantly different between the two groups. These data indicate that the change in central blood volume with WI depends, in part, on the lean mass of the body.

  12. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  13. [Changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under stress conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Li, Zhaoshen; Cui, Zhongmin; Duan, Yimin; Nie, Shinan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Guoming

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under conditions of water immersion restraint stress. METHODS Eighty rats were randomly divided into Group A (20 rats), B (40 rats) and C (20 rats) after being fasted for 24 hours. And then Group A was divided into two subgroups with ten rats in each. The two subgroups in Group A were given normal saline or omeprazole respectively while under the stress condition. The changes of gastric acid or bicarbonate secretion were determined. Group B (40 rats) were randomly divided into four subgroups,which were subgroup control, 1h, 2h and 4h after beginning of the stress. The quantity of glandular mucosal adherent mucus, the thickness of mucus gel layer and ulcer index were measured after stress in Group B. The glandular mucosal samples were labeled by Lanthanum and observed by transmission electromicroscopy. Group C was randomly divided into two subgroups in the same way with Group A. And each subgroup received normal saline or omeprazole respectively H(+) loss in gastric lumen was calculated by determining the difference of acidity between lavage and drainage fluid H(+) concentration. RESULTS It was found that gastric alkaline secretion decreased progressively (P omeprazole subgroup, the amount of H(+) loss (micromol) was 7.46 +/- 1.22, 4.56 +/- 0.35, 3.11 +/- 0.81, 2.32 +/- 1.42 and 2.13 +/- 1.60, which decreased progressively, however still higher than those in normal saline subgroup (P "bicarbonate secretion is inhibited; gastric barrier is damaged; and hydrogen permeability through gastric mucosal barrier increases under stress conditions.

  14. 拘束应激诱发小鼠抗流感病毒能力低下与营养型鸡精的改善作用%Anti-influenza Effect of Essence of Chicken in Mice Loaded with Restraint Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王聪智; 陈邦添; 李怡芳; 于丽伟; 李维熙; 何蓉蓉; 栗原博

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨拘束应激诱发小鼠抗流感病毒能力低下与营养型鸡精(Essence of Chicken,EC)的改善作用.方法 将雄性昆明小鼠随机分为正常对照组、病毒组、模型组(拘束应激+病毒)、阳性药物(利巴韦林,50 mg·kg-1)组、EC低、高剂量组(12,24 mL·kg-1).除正常对照组及病毒组外,其余各组在给药的第2天将小鼠拘束负荷18 h,拘束恢复1 d后,除正常组外其他各组小鼠经鼻黏膜感染流感病毒.从感染病毒当天开始连续21d,记录各组小鼠的死亡数目及小鼠的平均存活时间(MDD);计算病毒感染第4天小鼠肺脏指数;观察EC对拘束应激小鼠免疫功能的影响.结果 利巴韦林及EC能提高因拘束应激负荷降低的小鼠抗病毒感染能力,延长生存时间和改善肺脏指数.EC能增加拘束小鼠的胸腺指数、脾脏指数和脾淋巴细胞数目,改善脾淋巴细胞亚群Th(CD3+CD4+)(辅助性T淋巴细胞)/Ts(CD3+CD8+)(抑制性T淋巴细胞)的比值,提高脾自然杀伤(NK)细胞活性,从而改善拘束应激小鼠的免疫功能.结论 EC可以通过改善免疫功能来提高拘束应激小鼠的抗病毒能力.%Objective To study the anti-influenza virus effect of Essence of chicken(EC) in mice loaded with restraint stress. Methods Male Kunming mice were randomly divided into normal control group, virus group, model group(virus + restraint stress), positive group (ribavirin, 50 mg· kg-1) , low-dosage EC ( 12 mL· kg-1) group and high-dosage EC(24 mL·kg-1) group. Except for normal control and virus groups, all mice were given restraint stress for 18 h on the second day of medication. One day after restraint stress, mice were anesthetized by ether and infected intranasally with influenza virus H9N2 diluted in saline. During the experiment, we recorded the survivor rate and mean day to death (MDD) of mice from the day of virus infection to day 21. On day 4 of virus infection, the lung index was examined. In order to further

  15. The economic cost of using restraint and the value added by restraint reduction or elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Janice; Goldstein, Robert

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate the economic cost of using restraint on one adolescent inpatient service and to examine the effect of an initiative to reduce or eliminate the use of restraint after it was implemented. A detailed process-task analysis of mechanical, physical, and medication-based restraint was conducted in accordance with state and federal restraint requirements. Facility restraint data were collected, verified, and analyzed. A model was developed to determine the cost and duration of an average episode for each type of restraint. Staff time allocated to restraint activities and medication costs were computed. Calculation of the cost of restraint was restricted to staff and medication costs. Aggregate costs of restraint use and staff-related costs for one full year before the restraint reduction initiative (FY 2000) and one full year after the initiative (FY 2003) were calculated. Outcome, discharge, and recidivism data were analyzed. A comparison of the FY 2000 data with the FY 2003 data showed that the adolescent inpatient service's aggregate use of restraint decreased from 3,991 episodes to 373 episodes (91 percent), which was associated with a reduction in the cost of restraint from $1,446,740 to $117,036 (a 92 percent reduction). In addition, sick time, staff turnover and replacement costs, workers' compensation, injuries to adolescents and staff, and recidivism decreased. Adolescent Global Assessment of Functioning scores at discharge significantly improved. Implementation of a restraint reduction initiative was associated with a reduction in the use of restraint, staff time devoted to restraint, and staff-related costs. This shift appears to have contributed to better outcomes for adolescents, fewer injuries to adolescents and staff, and lower staff turnover. The initiative may have enhanced adolescent treatment and work conditions for staff.

  16. The effects of zinc on long-term potentiation in hippocampus and behavior of restraint-stressed rat%束缚应激时锌对大鼠行为及海马突触传递功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪燕; 程义勇; 马强; 王冬兰; 李树田; 钱令嘉

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of zinc on long-term potentiation(LTP) in hippocampus and behavior of restraint rats.Methods A rat stress model was built by restrainting for 6h/d, 21d.The behavior changes were observed in open field test, the LTP was induced in rat hippocampal dentate gyrus(DG) by high-frequency test stimulation. Results Compared with control group, the content of glucocorticoids in plasma of the rats suffered from restraint stress was significiantly increased; the number of crossing in open-field test was significiantly increased; the changes of amplitude of population spike(PS) were significiantly larger, the induction rate of LTP lower. After zinc supplementation in stressed rats, the indices mentioned above were significiantly improved. Conclusion Opportune supplementation of zinc can alleviate stress-induced impairment of the brain function under stress.%目的在应激情况下,观察微量元素锌对大鼠行为及海马突触传递功能变化的影响。方法建立大鼠束缚应激模型,观察大鼠的旷场行为效应,用在体电生理法观察大鼠海马齿状回长时程增强效应。结果与对照组比较,接受应激的大鼠血浆糖皮质激素水平明显升高;在旷场实验中的穿行格数明显增加;LTP诱发率降低,幅度减小,而应激同时补充锌的大鼠未出现上述异常变化。结论在应激情况下摄入适量的锌可减轻应激损伤,改善脑功能,提示锌具有应激保护作用。

  17. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on glucocorticoid receptor expression in the hipopocampus and on the behavior of rats under chronic restraint stress%高压氧处理对慢性束缚大鼠行为学和海马区糖皮质激素受体的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦乃铿; 杨晨; 孙瑞佼; 吕艳; 赵津京; 潘树义

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on chronic stress and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in the hippocampus.Methods A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a restraint group,an HBO (hyperbaric oxygen) group,an HBO-restraint group and a control group using a random number table,each group with 15 animals.All the rats in the restraint and HBO groups were constrained by immobilizing their fore-and hind-limbs on a self-made frame for 3h daily for 21 days,and those in the HBO group received HBO treatment once daily for the same 21 days.The HBO-restraint group was immobilized in the morning and treated with HBO in the afternoon.The control group was reared without any special intervention.On the 1st,11th and 21st day of treatment,rats from the different groups were assessed using the open field test.On the 21st day,all the animals were sacrificed and their brains were harvested to detect GR expression.Results In the open field test on the 11 th day,the restraint group scored (131.0 ± 20.6) in terms of motor level and (26.5 ± 4.6) for exploratory behavior,both significantly higher than before restraint and significantly higher than those in the HBO-restraint group at the same time point.Immunofluorescence assay showed that GR expression in the hippocampus of the restraint group was significantly decreased compared with the control group.There was no significant difference,however,between the HBO-restraint group and the control group.Conclusion Chronic restraint stress induces changes in behavior and GR expression in rats which can be alleviated by hypbaric oxygen treatment.%目的 观察高压氧(HBO)处理和慢性束缚对大鼠行为学及海马区糖皮质激素受体(GR)表达水平的影响,探讨HBO对慢性束缚大鼠的干预作用.方法 将60只雄性Wistar大鼠按随机数字表法分成单纯束缚组、单纯HBO组、HBO联合束缚组和空白对照组,每组15只.单纯束缚组给予行为限制3

  18. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part I. Body fluid balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine men were subjected to four temperature exposures to detect changes in weight, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and relative volumes of plasma. The exposures were: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. All experiments were repeated and ended with recovery at room temperature. The greatest weight loss (mean +/- S.D.) (i.e. sweating) was observed in C, 544 +/- 207 g. The weight losses (mean +/- S.D.) in A and B were equal, 417 +/- 253 g and 437 +/- 221 g. The relative post-exposure plasma volumes decreased 7.2% in A, 8.0% in B, and 5.6% in C; the decrease in D (1.3%) was statistically not significant. Combinations of heat and cold or cool (A and B) reduced the plasma volumes more than mere heat (C), suggesting a disturbance of cutaneous circulation producing transient edema in the skin.

  19. 慢性束缚应激对大鼠体质量、血清皮质酮和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF通路的影响%Effect of chronic restraint stress on body weight,serum corticosterone concentration and cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling activity in prefrontal cortex in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟珊珊; 刘洪文

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性束缚应激对大鼠体质量、血清皮质酮水平和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF通路的影响.方法 将30只雄性SD大鼠随机分为对照组、慢性束缚应激1周组和慢性束缚应激2周组,每组各10只.比较应激前后大鼠体质量和血清皮质酮水平的变化,放免法观察应激前后大鼠前额叶皮质环磷腺苷(cAMP)含量,试剂盒测定cAMP依赖蛋白激酶(protein kinase,PKA)活性和脑源性神经营养因子(brain derived neurophic factor,BDNF)表达水平,用蛋白免疫印迹技术观察cAMP反应元件结合蛋白质(p-CREB)水平变化.结果 慢性束缚应激组大鼠在应激1周和应激2周的体质量增长[分别为(35±11)g和(23±8)g]均低于对照组[分别为(59±16)g和(68±14)g](P<0.05).束缚应激1周组和束缚应激2周组大鼠血清皮质醇浓度分别为(356.78±112.21)ng/ml、(558.49±98.32)ng/ml,均高于对照组(198.21±101.35)ng/ml(P<0.05,P<0.01).束缚应激1周组和束缚应激2周组大鼠前额叶皮质的cAMP含量、PKA活性、p-CREB和BDNF表达水平低于对照组(P<0.01).结论 慢性束缚应激抑制大鼠体质量的增长,引起血清皮质酮水平增高和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF信号通路被抑制.%To observe effect of chronic restraint stress on body weight,scrum corticostcronc concentration and cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling activity in prcfrontai cortex in the rat. Methods Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (n = 10), 1 week and 2 weeks (n= 10) restraint stress groups. Before and after restraint stress, body weight and scrum corticostcronc concentration were examined, radio-immunity method Pep TagR detecting system, and western blotting were used to assess cAMP contcrt. PKA activity and the level of p-CREDB in prcfrontai cortex. Results The body weight gains on the first (35 + ll)g and second stressed weeks (23 I: 8)g were significantly lower in restraint stress groups than in controls group (59 ± 16)g and (68

  20. Imersão em água fria para o manejo da hipertermia severa Cold water immersion to the control of exertional heat illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Paula Viveiros

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A incapacidade de dissipar o calor gerado pela atividade muscular prejudica o desempenho e aumenta a predisposição a lesões do organismo. A hipertermia severa induzida pelo esforço físico (HTE prejudica a saúde e está associada à morbidade e mortalidade de indivíduos em diferentes atividades ocupacionais e atléticas. Estudos sobre a eficiência de métodos de resfriamento corporal têm recomendado a imersão em água fria para o tratamento da HTE. Sua utilização nos minutos iniciais pós-hipertemia parece a melhor recomendação por reduzir o tempo no qual a temperatura central permanece elevada. A manutenção de infraestrutura necessária para a realização desse procedimento deve ser considerada em atividades físicas e condições ambientais nas quais os indivíduos estão mais suscetíveis ao acometimento da HTE. As taxas de resfriamento observadas através da imersão em água a diferentes temperaturas podem servir de referência para o controle da duração do procedimento. Esta revisão analisa a recomendação da imersão em água fria como procedimento de resfriamento corporal para o manejo da HTE.The incapacity of dissipating heat generated by muscular activity hampers performance and increases predisposition to physical injuries. Exertional heat illness (HTE harms health and is associated with morbidity and mortality of individuals in different occupational and athletic activities. Studies on the efficiency of body cooling methods have recommended cold-water immersion for the treatment of HTE. Its use in the initial minutes of post-hyperthermia seems to be the best recommendation to reduce the time central temperature remains high. Maintenance of the infrastructure needed to perform this procedure should be considered in physical activities and environmental conditions in which the individuals are more prone to HTE. The cooling rates observed through water immersion in different water temperatures may serve as reference

  1. Psychiatric patients' perception of physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugger, G; Gleiss, A; Baldinger, P; Strnad, A; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2016-03-01

    To investigate psychiatric patients' subjective perception during and after belt fixation. All patients who were involuntarily admitted and physically restrained at a psychiatric intensive care unit within an 18-month study period were analysed. Ratings were obtained at four visits when questioning was possible. Within a heterogeneous diagnostic sample of 47 patients, only 12 patients were eligible to participate during belt fixation. After cessation of fixation, eight patients lacked any memory of restraint, while 36 could be questioned. Visual analogue scale median scores indicated powerlessness and depressiveness rather than anxiety and aggression. Patients' acceptance of the coercive measure was significantly higher (P = 0.003), while patients' memory was significantly lower than expected (P < 0.001). About 50% of the patients documented high perceived coercion, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could be supposed in a quarter of the restrained individuals. Subjective perceptions concerning fixation showed no significant changes over time. Results showed high interindividual variability. Visual analogue scale revealed that belt fixation seemed to be forgotten or accepted in the majority of patients, probably due to psychiatric intensive care, psychopharmacological treatment and clinical improvements. The responses of a quarter of the patients assessed before discharge may be in accordance with symptoms of PTSD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Further thoughts on the process of restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, G

    2006-02-01

    The physical restraint of a disturbed person is a subject constant of psychiatry and is a challenge that particularly faces nurses working in acute inpatient settings. While other approaches to psychiatric treatment have been discarded (e.g. punishment, blood letting, trepanation, deep insulin therapy and so on) or evolved into new treatments (the use of medication), the act of physical restraint has remained largely unmodified. Given the ubiquity of physical restraint in psychiatry, particularly as a nursing procedure, the absence of a sustained body of research is notable. This essay examines some of the historical underpinnings of the use of restraint in psychiatry brought into sharp focus by the David Bennett Inquiry Report (2003) and the National Institute of Clinical Effective (NICE) guidelines (2005) on the management of violence.

  3. The use of thermal imaging to assess the effectiveness of ice massage and cold-water immersion as methods for supporting post-exercise recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jakub Grzegorz; Krasowska, Ilona; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Reaburn, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) and ice massage (IM) are commonly used treatments to prevent the delay onset of muscle soreness (DOMS); however, little is known on their relative benefits and effectiveness to lower tissue temperature. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of IM and CMI on tissue temperature and potential benefit to preventing DOMS. The research encompassed 36 subjects divided into three groups of twelve depending on the form of recovery: ice massage (IM), cold-water immersion (CWI), or passive recovery (PAS). All the participants were asked to jump as high as possible from a full squat for one minute. Thermal imaging was conducted at rest, immediately following the exercise, immediately after the trial, following the recovery treatment, and after 30min of rest. Their pain levels were assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). After applying the selected method for supporting recovery, the LA level decreased by 4.25mmol/L in the IM group, and by 4.96mmol/L in the CWI group (IM vs. CWI p>0.05). The 2.75mmol/L decrease in lactate concentration in the PAS group was significantly lower than in the other groups (IM vs. PAS p0.05). Seventy-two hours after the exercise, a clear decrease in discomfort was observed in the IM and CWI groups compared to the PAS group. The two applied treatments have proven to be effective both in utilizing lactate and preventing DOMS. Depending on training requirements, we recommend the use of IM when athletes experience localized muscle fatigue. One the other hand, CWI is recommended in situations of global or generalized muscle injury or fatigue.

  4. Effects of Cold Water Immersion and Contrast Water Therapy for Recovery From Team Sport: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Trevor R; Greene, David A; Baker, Michael K

    2017-05-01

    Higgins, TR, Greene, DA, Baker, MK. Effects of cold water immersion and contrast water therapy for recovery from team sport: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1443-1460, 2017-To enhance recovery from sport, cold water immersion (CWI) and contrast water therapy (CWT) have become common practice within high level team sport. Initially, athletes relied solely on anecdotal support. As there has been an increase in the volume of research into recovery including a number of general reviews, an opportunity existed to narrow the focus specifically examining the use of hydrotherapy for recovery in team sport. A Boolean logic [AND] keyword search of databases was conducted: SPORTDiscus; AMED; CINAHL; MEDLINE. Data were extracted and the standardized mean differences were calculated with 95% confidence interval (CI). The analysis of pooled data was conducted using a random-effect model, with heterogeneity assessed using I. Twenty-three peer reviewed articles (n = 606) met the criteria. Meta-analyses results indicated CWI was beneficial for recovery at 24 hours (countermovement jump: p = 0.05, CI: -0.004 to 0.578; All-out sprint: p = 0.02, -0.056 to 0.801) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for recovery at 72 hours (fatigue: p = 0.03, CI: 0.061-1.418) and CWT was beneficial for recovery at 48 hours (fatigue: p = 0.04, CI: 0.013-0.942) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for neuromuscular recovery 24 hours following team sport, whereas CWT was not beneficial for recovery following team sport. In addition, when evaluating accumulated sprinting, CWI was not beneficial for recovery following team sports. In evaluating subjective measures, both CWI (72 hours) and CWT (24 hours) were beneficial for recovery of perceptions of fatigue, following team sport. However neither CWI nor CWT was beneficial for recovery, of perceptions of muscle soreness, following team sport.

  5. 慢性束缚应激小鼠海马神经元5-羟色胺1A受体表达的变化%Change in the expression of hippocampal neuronal 5-hyroxytryptamine1A receptor in a mouse model of chronic restraint stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宛春甫; 刘玉华; 李志华; 薛中会

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the change in expression of hippocampal neuronal 5-hyroxytryptamine1A(5-HT1A) receptor in a mouse model of chronic restraint stress.Methods Forty BALB/c male mice aged 6-9 months weighing 25-35 g were randomly divided into 2 groups ( n =20 each): normal control group (group C) and chronic restraint stress group( group S).In group S,the model of chronic restraint stress was established described by Wood et al.Tail suspension test,light-dark test and Morris water maze test were performed respectively at 1 d after successful establishment of the model.Immobility time,staying time in light compartment,and escape latency and frequency of crossing the original platform were recorded respectively in tail suspension test,light-dark test and Morris water maze test.Then the animals were sacrificed,hippocampi were removed for determination of the expression of 5-HT1A receptor in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampal neurons by immuno-histochemistry.Results Compared with group C,immobility time and escape latency were significantly prolonged,staying time in light compartment was shortened,frequency of crossing the original platform was decreased,and the expression of 5-HT1A receptor in hippocampal neurons was down-regulated in group S ( P < 0.05 or 0.01 ).Conclusion Chronic restraint stress can induce cognitive impairment in mice by down-regulating the expression of 5-HT1A receptor in hippocampal neurons.%目的 探讨慢性束缚应激小鼠海马神经元5-羟色胺1A(5-HT1A)受体表达的变化.方法 BALB/c种系雄性小鼠40只,6~9月龄,体重25~35 g,采用随机数字表法,将其随机分为2组(n=20):正常对照组(C组)和慢性束缚应激组(S组).S组慢性束缚应激模型制备成功后1d,依次进行悬尾实验、明暗穿箱实验和水迷宫实验,悬尾实验中记录静止时间,明暗穿箱实验中记录明亮箱中停留时间,水迷宫实验中记录逃避潜伏期和穿过平台次数.然后处死小鼠,取海马组

  6. Naltrexone does not reverse the inhibitory effect of chronic restraint on gonadotropin secretion in the intact male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Quijano, M I; Ariznavarreta, C; Martín, A I; Treguerres, J A; López-Calderón, A

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that endogenous opioids may play an important role in acute stress-induced decreases in luteinizing hormone (LH) release. Studies were undertaken to analyze the role of endogenous opioids in chronic stress-induced decrease in circulating LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Chronic restraint (6 h daily over 4 days) evoked a decrease in circulating LH and FSH. Naltrexone treatment, (2 mg/kg three times daily) during the 4 days of restraint, caused an increase in plasma concentrations of LH and FSH, and antagonized the LH suppressory effect of morphine (10 mg/kg) administration. Despite this, naltrexone treatment was ineffective in preventing the inhibitory effect of chronic restraint stress on circulating LH and FSH. Chronic restraint also induced a decrease in hypothalamic LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) content in saline-treated rats. On the contrary, in naltrexone-treated rats, chronic restraint evoked an increase in hypothalamic LHRH content. Thus endogenous opioids and chronic stress seem to act by different mechanisms on the hypothalamic LHRH neuron. In unstressed orchidectomized rats, naltrexone administration did not modify circulating LH, but increased plasma concentrations of LH in acutely restrained rats. These data suggest that endogenous opioids may mediate gonadotropin secretion during acute stress, but not during chronic stress.

  7. EFFECT OF PHYSICAL RESTRAINT ON THE LIMITS OF THERMOREGULATION IN TELEMETERED RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical restraint of rodents is needed for nose-only exposure to airborne toxicants and is also used as a means ofpsychological stress. Hyperthermia is often observed in restrained rats, presumably as a result of impairments in heat dissipation. However, such a hyperthermic resp...

  8. International Space Station Crew Restraint Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, M.; Norris, L.; Holden, K.

    2005-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), crews will be living and working in microgravity, dealing with the challenges of a weightless environment. In addition, the confined nature of the spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility and access to the activity areas, as well as prolonged periods of unnatural postures. Without optimum restraints, crewmembers may be handicapped for performing some of the on-orbit tasks. Currently, many of the tasks on ISS are performed with the crew restrained merely by hooking their arms or toes around handrails to steady themselves. This is adequate for some tasks, but not all. There have been some reports of discomfort/calluses on the top of the toes. In addition, this type of restraint is simply insufficient for tasks that require a large degree of stability. Glovebox design is a good example of a confined workstation concept requiring stability for successful use. They are widely used in industry, university, and government laboratories, as well as in the space environment, and are known to cause postural limitations and visual restrictions. Although there are numerous guidelines pertaining to ventilation, seals, and glove attachment, most of the data have been gathered in a 1-g environment, or are from studies that were conducted prior to the early 1980 s. Little is known about how best to restrain a crewmember using a glovebox in microgravity. In 2004, The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center completed development/evaluation of several design concepts for crew restraints to meet the various needs outlined above. Restraints were designed for general purpose use, for teleoperation (Robonaut) and for use with the Life Sciences Glovebox. All design efforts followed a human factors engineering design lifecycle, beginning with identification of requirements followed by an iterative prototype/test cycle. Anthropometric

  9. Urinary excretion of cortisol from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) habituated to restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, C. E.; Ortiz, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Use of monkeys in research has often required that they be restrained in a chair. However, chair restraint can elicit an initial neuroendocrine stress response. Also, inactivity associated with restraint can induce muscular atrophy. We proposed that prior habituation of monkeys to chair restraint would attenuate these neuroendocrine responses without causing substantial muscle wasting. Four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained and habituated to a restraint chair specifically designed for spaceflight. During the study, monkeys were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days (prerestraint, Phase I), placed in a chair restraint for 18 days (Phase II), and then returned to their metabolic cages for 5 days (postrestraint, Phase III). Urine was collected between 0700-1100 daily, and measurements of cortisol, creatinine, and electrolyte concentrations were adjusted for hourly excretion rates. Body weights of the monkeys did not change between start of the prerestraint and postrestraint phases (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.9 kg, respectively). During the 3 phases, mean excretion rate of cortisol did not change (24.1 +/- 10.3, 26.7 +/- 7.7, and 19.3 +/- 5.8 microg/h, respectively). Mean excretion rate of creatinine (37.3 +/- 7.5, 37.5 +/- 12.2, and 36.9 +/- 17.1 mg/h, respectively), Na+ (3.3 +/- 1.2, 3.2 +/- 1.2, 2.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/h, respectively), and K+ (5.3 +/- 1.8, 5.4 +/- 1.6, and 4.3 +/- 2.8 mmol/h, respectively) were also not altered. Lack of an increase in excreted urinary cortisol suggested that prior habituation to chair restraint attenuated neuroendocrine responses reported previously. Also, the chair restraint method used appeared to allow adequate activity, because the monkeys did not have indices of muscle wasting.

  10. Special Purpose Crew Restraints for Teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina; Norris, Lena

    2004-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), and long duration space missions being planned for the moon and Mars, humans will be living and working in microgravity over increasingly long periods of time. In addition to weightlessness, the confined nature of a spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility, and access to the activity area. These challenges can result in prolonged periods of unnatural postures for the crew, ultimately causing pain, injury, and loss of productivity. Determining the right set of human factors requirements and providing an ergonomically designed environment is crucial to mission success. While a number of general purpose restraints have been used on ISS (handrails, foot loops), experience has shown that these general purpose restraints may not be optimal, or even acceptable for some tasks that have unique requirements. For example, some onboard activities require extreme stability (e.g., glovebox microsurgery), and others involve the use of arm, torso and foot movements in order to perform the task (e-g. robotic teleoperation); standard restraint systems will not work in these situations. The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (WAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center began evaluations of crew restraints for these special situations by looking at NASAs Robonaut. Developed by the Robot Systems Technology Branch, Robonaut is a humanoid robot that can be remotely operated through a tetepresence control system by an operator. It was designed to perform work in hazardous environments (e.g., Extra Vehicular Activities). A Robonaut restraint was designed, modeled for the population, and ultimately tested onboard the KC-135 microgravity aircraft. While in microgravity, participants were asked to get in and out of the restraint from different locations, perform maximum reach exercises, and finally to teleoperate Robonaut while in the restraint. The sessions were videotaped

  11. A comparative study on behavior changes and cerebral morphology and function of chronic restraint stress mice and chronic unpredictable mild stress mice%慢性束缚与慢性不可预期温和应激抑郁模型小鼠的行为学比较及其发生机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖莎; 周佳; 平锋锋; 王倩; 郝娣; 尚靖

    2012-01-01

    【Objective】 The aim of this study was to explore the pathogenesis of depression by comparing the effects of chronic restraint stress(CRS) and chronic unpredictable mild stress(CUMS) on behavior and cerebral morphology of C57BL/6 mice.【Method】 Mice were randomly divided into the normal control(NC) group,CRS group,and CUMS group.After 3 weeks of stress exposure,open-field test,tail suspension test,and forced swimming test were taken to evaluate the behavior changes of mice.In addition,the cerebral morphology and function changes were investigated by HE staining and immuno-histochemistry analysis.The MAO activity of mice hippocampus was analyzed by fluorescence spectrophotometry.【Result】 The results showed that compared to the NC group,the crossing frequency,hearing frequency and body weight were all decreased significantly in the CRS group,whereas no significant changes in the CUMS group(P0.05).However,the results of tail suspension test and forced swimming test showed that there was a significant increase in the percent of immobility time in the CUMS group compared to the NC group(P0.01).In addition,except the hippocampus CA1 region in the CRS group,the CA1,CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of hippocampus were all atrophied in both stressed groups.Furthermore,the expression of 5-HT1A receptor in hippocampus was decreased and the MAO activity was up-regulated in both CRS and CUMS group.【Conclusion】 The results showed that both CRS and CUMS can induce depressive-like behaviors in C57BL/6 mice.CRS mainly suppresses the exploratory behavior while CUMS induced typical behavioral despair.This praxiology distinction may be relative to the differences in cerebral morphology and function of treated mice between two stressed groups.%【目的】通过比较慢性束缚应激(Chronic restraint stress,CRS)与慢性不可预期温和应激(Chronic unpredictable mild stress,CUMS)对C57BL/6小鼠行为学指标及大脑海马区相关功能的影响,探讨抑

  12. [Physical restraint of patients: historical notes relating to the nineteenth and twentieth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariña-López, Emilio; Estévez-Guerra, Gabriel J

    2011-03-01

    Physical restraint has been historically considered a necessary procedure to control the behaviour of the mentally ill. In the late eighteenth century moral treatment would pave the way for new initiatives against restraint, such as those instituted by British psychiatrists. They stressed the importance of training and supervision, as well as a minimum staff ratio, as being determining factors in reducing the use of restraint. This philosophy of treatment, despite its benefits, was introduced later and to a lesser extent in the rest of Europe, although, in other countries care was also made more humane through new therapeutic procedures. By contrast, in the United States most psychiatrists disagreed with those who advocated non-restraint, and continued using controversial methods to control the behaviour of patients. In Spain many difficulties hindered the improvement of conditions in institutions, many of which were in a sorry state. The initiatives of a few professionals and some cautious legal advances tried to alleviate the harshness of the treatment methods used. In the early twentieth century professional manuals were already available, which included the care to be given during the application of physical restraints. However it was not until the 1950, when the emergence of new psychotropic drugs and the distribution of important guidelines on the protection of the rights of patients that the widespread use of this procedure would be successfully reduced.

  13. Cognitive dietary restraint is associated with eating behaviors, lifestyle practices, personality characteristics and menstrual irregularity in college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Judy A; Barr, Susan I

    2003-04-01

    This study characterized associations of restraint with selected physical, lifestyle, personality and menstrual cycle characteristics in female university students. The survey instrument, distributed to 1350 women, included standardized questionnaires (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale and Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale), and assessed weight and dieting history, exercise, lifestyle characteristics, menstrual cycle characteristics and whether participants were following vegetarian diets. Among the 596 respondents included in the analysis (44%), women with high (n=145), medium (n=262) or low (n=189) restraint had similar ages, heights and weights. Despite this, compared to women with low scores, those with high scores exercised more (4.6+/-5.3 vs. 3.2+/-3.5 h/wk), were more likely to be vegetarian (14.5 vs. 3.7%), have a history of eating disorders (13.7 vs. 1.2%), be currently trying to lose weight (80.3 vs. 15.3%), report irregular menstrual cycles (34.7 vs. 17.0%), and have scores reflecting lower self-esteem and higher perceived stress. Menstrual irregularity was an independent predictor of restraint score, and restraint score was the only variable to differentiate women with regular and irregular menstrual cycles. We conclude that women with high restraint may use a combination of behavioral strategies for weight control, and differ from women with low restraint scores in personality characteristics and weight history. Some of these behaviors or characteristics may influence menstrual function.

  14. Roadside observation of child passenger restraint use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite legislation and research evidence supporting the use of childhood vehicle restraints, motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of injury, death and disability among Canadian children. Methods: Working in collaboration with trained car seat specialists and police officers, roadside checks were conducted to observe correct use of child restraints. Results: Of the 1323 child vehicle restraints inspected, 99.6% of the children were restrained, 91% were in the correct seat, and 48% of restraints were correctly installed. The seat/restraint types most used incorrectly used were booster seats (31% and seat belts (53%. The majority of incorrectly installed or fitted seats (55% were forward facing. Common errors in installation and fit included the seat not being secured tightly enough to the vehicle, incorrect tether strap use, the harness not being tight enough, and/or the chest clip being in the wrong place. Conclusions: The greatest proportion of incorrect seat use was among those children who transitioned to a seat belt too soon. The greatest proportion of installation and fit errors were among forward facing seats. Researchers recommend: 1 targeting parents with older children (ages 3 and above regarding transitioning too soon from forward facing seats to booster seats, and from booster seats to seat belts; 2 targeting parents with younger children regarding correct installation of rear facing and forward facing seats; 3 collaborating with police officers to review the most common errors and encourage observation at roadside checks; and 4 creating community awareness by way of roadside checks.

  15. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane J. Hayter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI and cold air therapy (CAT on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10 and female (n = 10 participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24, 48 (T48 and 72 (T72 h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05. However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90, T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64 and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76. The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  16. Low-dose gamma irradiation following hot water immersion of papaya (Carica papaya linn.) fruits provides additional control of postharvest fungal infection to extend shelf life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M. H. A.; Grout, B. W. W.; Continella, A.; Mahmud, T. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Low-dose gamma irradiation (0.08 kGy over 10 min), a level significantly below that required to satisfy the majority of international quarantine regulations, has been employed to provide a significant reduction in visible fungal infection on papaya fruit surfaces. This is appropriate for local and national markets in producer countries where levels of commercial acceptability can be retained despite surface lesions due to fungal infection. Irradiation alone and in combination with hot-water immersion (50 °C for 10 min) has been applied to papaya (Carica papaya L.) fruits at both the mature green and 1/3 yellow stages of maturity. The incidence and severity of surface fungal infections, including anthracnose, were significantly reduced by the combined treatment compared to irradiation or hot water treatment alone, extending storage at 11 °C by 13 days and retaining commercial acceptability. The combined treatment had no significant, negative impact on ripening, with quality characteristics such as surface and internal colour change, firmness, soluble solids, acidity and vitamin C maintained at acceptable levels.

  17. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  18. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  19. Plasma cortisol levels in captive wild felines after chemical restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Nogueira

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Eight Panthera onca (Po, 13 Felis concolor (Fc, 7 Felis yagouaroundi (Fy, 7 Felis tigrina (Ft and 5 Felis pardalis (Fp specimens from São Paulo State zoos were used. All animals were restrained with darts containing 10 mg/kg ketamine and 1 mg/kg xylazine. Venous blood samples were collected as soon as possible (within 15-20 min and serum was frozen until the time for cortisol quantification. Cortisol was determined using a solid phase radioimmunoassay with an intra-assay coefficient of 8.51%. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's multiple comparisons test, and the one-sample t-test, with the level of significance set at P<0.05. Data are reported as means ± SEM. Cortisol levels differed among the captive felines: Po = 166 ± 33a, Fc = 670 ± 118b, Fy = 480 ± 83b, Ft = 237 ± 42ab, Fp = 97 ± 12a nmol/l (values followed by different superscript letters were significantly different (P<0.001. Since most of the veterinary procedures on these species involve chemical restraint, these results show the necessity of preventive measures in order to minimize the effect of restraint stress on more susceptible species

  20. Freedom from restraint: consequences of reducing physical restraints in the management of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C; Mitchell-Pedersen, L; Fingerote, E; Edmund, L

    1989-01-01

    Physical restraint is commonly used in the management of elderly people in North American hospitals and nursing homes. Between December 1981 and March 1982 the Department of Geriatric Medicine, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, changed its practice regarding the use of such restraints. In the fiscal year 1980-81 the rate of application of physical restraints was 52 per 1000 patient-days and the frequency of falls 7 per 1000 patient-days. By 1986-87 the figures were 0.3 and 8.7 per 1000 patient-days respectively; the increase in falls was not clinically significant. During the study period there was a 40% reduction in the use of chemical restraints (psychotropic drugs other than hypnotic and antidepressant agents). Here we record how this change in practice occurred and persisted. PMID:2776096

  1. Effects of repeated restraint in Japanese quail genetically selected for contrasting adrenocortical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R B; Satterlee, D G; Waddington, D; Cadd, G G

    2000-05-01

    Behavioral and adrenocortical responses to repeated mechanical restraint were compared in 28-day-old to 31-day-old male Japanese quail from two genetic lines divergently selected for reduced (low stress, LS) or exaggerated (high stress, HS) plasma corticosterone (C) responses to brief immobilization. Restraint in a metal crush cage for 5 min elicited immobility and silence in all the birds. Circulating C levels were considerably higher in quail of both lines following restraint than in the undisturbed controls of either line. As expected, both the behavioral and physiological effects were more pronounced in HS than in LS birds. Struggling increased with repeated restraint in HS and LS quail, thus suggesting behavioral habituation to the stressor in both lines. On the other hand, a line effect on the pattern of adrenocortical responses was revealed upon subtracting the change in plasma C concentrations from Day 1 to Day 4 in the undisturbed controls from the corresponding change in restrained birds. Thus, unlike LS quail, in which there were no detectable effects of repeated restraint, the adrenocortical responses of HS birds showed evidence of experience-dependent sensitization. Our results demonstrate the importance of the background genome in determining the patterns of the behavioral and adrenocortical responses elicited by repeated exposure to stressful stimulation. The present results and those of previous studies could be explained in one or both of two ways: that underlying fearfulness is lower in LS than HS quail or that they adopt active or passive coping strategies, respectively. Our findings may also have important implications for poultry welfare and productivity. @ 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. On Restraint of and Supervision over Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG YUNHU

    2007-01-01

    @@ Power is the nucleus of social and political life. Effective restraint on and supervision over the operation of power is the fundamental way of preventing corruption of power, which at the same time constitutes an important indication to democracy and its development in a given country.

  3. PDBStat: a universal restraint converter and restraint analysis software package for protein NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejero, Roberto [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine (United States); Snyder, David [William Paterson University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Mao, Binchen; Aramini, James M.; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data.

  4. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor rolipram prevents depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress%磷酸二酯酶4抑制剂咯利普兰逆转慢性束缚应激诱导的大鼠抑郁和焦虑样行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊芳; 张忠敏; 赵鑫; 刘爱明; 郭洁洁; 沈璐艳; 王钦文; 王闯

    2012-01-01

    诱导了大鼠海马内PDE4D表达的上调,PKA、p-CREB及p-Ser9-GSK3β的下调.Rolipram显著逆转了上述效应,且H89显著阻断了Rolipram的药物效应.结论:Rolipram抗抑郁及抗焦虑作用不仅通过CREB/BDNF信号通路,而且还有GSK3 抑制性丝氨酸残基磷酸化信号通路的参与,且CREB介导的信号转导通路对GSK3 抑制性丝氨酸残基磷酸化信号通路发挥重要调节作用.%AIM: To discuss the impact of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram on chronic restraint stress - induced depression - and anxiety - like behaviors in rats. METHODS: (1) Forty SD rats were randomly divided into 4 weight -matched groups: unstressed animals injected with vehicle of lithium chloride (LiCl) and rolipram, restraint - stressed animals injected daily with vehicle prior to stress, restraint stress plus 100 mg/kg LiCl group and restraint stress plus 1 mg/kg rolipram group. The open field test was conducted 24 h before the first stress and drug administration, and then the rats received drugs daily 1 h prior to restraint stress (6 h/d) for 25 d. Daily body weight recording, forced swim-ming test, elevated plus - maze and open field test were conducted to determine the changes of depression - and anxiety -like behaviors. The expression of phosphorylated cAMP response element - binding protein (p - CREB) , brain - derived Reurotrophic factor ( BDNF) , p - Ser21 - glycogen synthase kinase ( GSK) 3α, p - Ser9 - GSK3β, p - Tyr279 - GSK3α, p -Tyr216 - GSK3β, total GSK3α and total GSK3β was measured by Western blotting. (2) Thirty SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups and the cannula was surgically placed above the CA1 region in the hippocampus. Seven days after the surgery, the restraint stress was conducted for 21 d after microinjection of protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist H89 and in-traperitoneal injection of LiCl and rolipram everyday. The expression of PDE4D, PKA, p - CREB and p - Ser9 - GSK3β was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: ( 1) No

  5. Physical Restraint in Critical Care Settings: Will They Go Away?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    The critical care setting is perhaps the last major health care setting in which physical restraint remains a common, and oftentimes unquestioned, practice. This is despite the numerous regulations and accrediting standards that have limited or even eliminated practitioners’ use of physical restraints in other health care settings. The decision to use physical restraint in the care of critically ill patients can be complex and is influenced by characteristics of the patient, the practitioner, and the environment. What do we know about physical restraint practice in critical care settings, and what steps must we take if we are, indeed, to become “restraint-free” environments? PMID:19064141

  6. Reenactment of circumstances in deaths related to restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Ronald L

    2004-09-01

    Reenactment of the circumstances in deaths associated with restraint, utilizing participants and witnesses while memories are fresh, may help death investigators more accurately determine the cause of death. Two recent deaths in Ventura County that occurred during restraint are discussed. Within a day of the autopsies the restrainers agreed to participate in reenactments of the restraint process, utilizing live volunteers as subjects. They allowed videotaping. Deaths associated with restraint often have nonspecific autopsy findings. Timely reenactment of the circumstances of deaths associated with restraint can help death investigators more accurately determine the probable cause of death in these difficult cases.

  7. Comparison between cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) in short-term skeletal muscle recovery after high-intensity exercise in athletes—preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Leal Junior,Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Godoi,Vanessa de; Mancalossi, José Luis; Rossi, Rafael Paolo; Marchi, Thiago De; Bjordal,Jan Magnus

    2010-01-01

    There are 13 authors. Only a few of them have been given author entries in addition to the Collaboration. In the last years, phototherapy has becoming a promising tool to improve skeletal muscle recovery after exercise, however, it was not compared with other modalities commonly used with this aim. In the present study we compared the short-term effects of cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) with placebo LEDT on biochemical markers ...

  8. Physical restraint usage at a teaching hospital: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton-Gooden, Antoinette; Dawkins, Pauline E; Bennett, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    This mixed method study examines the prevalence of restraint usage; perception of nurses and doctors about the practice and whether they were trained to apply physical restraints. The physical restraint prevalence tools were used to observe 172 adult patients and conduct 47 chart audits in the medical-surgical wards and a psychiatric unit in November 2011. Focus group discussions with nurses and doctors were conducted. Quantitative data were analyzed using the SPSS and focus group discussions thematically analyzed. The prevalence of physical restraints between the medical-surgical wards was 75%. Nurses and medical doctors were not formally trained to apply restraint, and had learnt from peer observation. They expressed sadness, guilt, and fear when restraints are used and identified that inadequate institutional support existed. Restraint usage was high, and nurses and doctors experienced moral dilemma when they perceived that lack of formal training and inadequate institutional support may contribute to patient injury. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on Rats’ Sleep Phase and Intervention of Suanzaoren Decoction%慢性束缚应激对大鼠睡眠时相的影响及酸枣仁汤的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 张乔; 马英男

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of chronic restraint stress on rats ’ sleep phase and the interven-tion of Suanzaoren decoction .Methods:In this research , chronic restraint stress method was used to establish the model of chronic mild stress in rats .EEG and EMG of rats were monitored by the polygraph for 12h, in or-der to analyze the duration and percentage proportion in total sleep time of each sleep phase .The intervention of Suanzaoren decoction on sleep phase was also investigated .Results: Compared with the blank group , the duration of total sleep time ( TST ) , light sleep ( LS ) , slow wave sleep ( SWS ) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of rats in model group were significantly decreased (P0.05).The percentage proportion of SWS in TST was raised markedly (P0 .05 ) .Conclusion:The sleep structure of rats was disturbed by chronic restraint stress .Suanzaoren decoction;Suanzaoren decoc-tion could effectively alleviate the impact of chronic restraint stress on sleep .%目的:探讨慢性束缚应激对大鼠睡眠结构的影响,以及酸枣仁汤的干预作用。方法:采用经典的慢性束缚应激的造模方法,复制大鼠慢性应激的模型,结合大鼠大脑皮层脑电和肌电描记技术,监测模型复制后大鼠12h脑电图(EEG)和肌电图(EMG)的变化,分析各睡眠时相的持续时间及所占睡眠总时间的比例,并探究中药复方酸枣仁汤对其干预作用。结果:从睡眠持续时间来看,与空白组相比,模型复制后大鼠在睡眠总时间、浅睡眠(LS)、慢波睡眠(SWS)以及快动眼(REM)睡眠的持续时间均显著缩短( P<0.05)。与模型组相比,酸枣仁汤给药组大鼠在睡眠总时间、LS和SWS期睡眠持续时间均显著延长(P<0.05),REM期睡眠虽有延长的趋势,但无统计学意义(P>0.05);从各睡眠时相所占睡眠总时间的比例来看,与空白组相比,模型复制后大鼠LS期

  10. Running performance in the heat is improved by similar magnitude with pre-exercise cold-water immersion and mid-exercise facial water spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Christopher J; Kittel, Aden; Sculley, Dean V; Callister, Robin; Taylor, Lee; Dascombe, Ben J

    2017-04-01

    This investigation compared the effects of external pre-cooling and mid-exercise cooling methods on running time trial performance and associated physiological responses. Nine trained male runners completed familiarisation and three randomised 5 km running time trials on a non-motorised treadmill in the heat (33°C). The trials included pre-cooling by cold-water immersion (CWI), mid-exercise cooling by intermittent facial water spray (SPRAY), and a control of no cooling (CON). Temperature, cardiorespiratory, muscular activation, and perceptual responses were measured as well as blood concentrations of lactate and prolactin. Performance time was significantly faster with CWI (24.5 ± 2.8 min; P = 0.01) and SPRAY (24.6 ± 3.3 min; P = 0.01) compared to CON (25.2 ± 3.2 min). Both cooling strategies significantly (P < 0.05) reduced forehead temperatures and thermal sensation, and increased muscle activation. Only pre-cooling significantly lowered rectal temperature both pre-exercise (by 0.5 ± 0.3°C; P < 0.01) and throughout exercise, and reduced sweat rate (P < 0.05). Both cooling strategies improved performance by a similar magnitude, and are ergogenic for athletes. The observed physiological changes suggest some involvement of central and psychophysiological mechanisms of performance improvement.

  11. Cold-water immersion and iced-slush ingestion are effective at cooling firefighters following a simulated search and rescue task in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony; Driller, Matthew; Brearley, Matt; Argus, Christos; Rattray, Ben

    2014-10-01

    Firefighters are exposed to hot environments, which results in elevated core temperatures. Rapidly reducing core temperatures will likely increase safety as firefighters are redeployed to subsequent operational tasks. This study investigated the effectiveness of cold-water immersion (CWI) and iced-slush ingestion (SLUSH) to cool firefighters post-incident. Seventy-four Australian firefighters (mean ± SD age: 38.9 ± 9.0 years) undertook a simulated search and rescue task in a heat chamber (105 ± 5 °C). Testing involved two 20-min work cycles separated by a 10-min rest period. Ambient temperature during recovery periods was 19.3 ± 2.7 °C. Participants were randomly assigned one of three 15-min cooling protocols: (i) CWI, 15 °C to umbilicus; (ii) SLUSH, 7 g·kg(-1) body weight; or (iii) seated rest (CONT). Core temperature and strength were measured pre- and postsimulation and directly after cooling. Mean temperatures for all groups reached 38.9 ± 0.9 °C at the conclusion of the second work task. Both CWI and SLUSH delivered cooling rates in excess of CONT (0.093 and 0.092 compared with 0.058 °C·min(-1)) and reduced temperatures to baseline measurements within the 15-min cooling period. Grip strength was not negatively impacted by either SLUSH or CONT. CWI and SLUSH provide evidence-based alternatives to passive recovery and forearm immersion protocols currently adopted by many fire services. To maximise the likelihood of adoption, we recommend SLUSH ingestion as a practical and effective cooling strategy for post-incident cooling of firefighters in temperate regions.

  12. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid and cold water immersion on post-exercise markers of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Stout, Jeffrey R; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Pruna, Gabriel J; Mangine, Gerald T; Scanlon, Tyler M; Bohner, Jonathan D; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) with and without the free acid form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB-FA) on markers of muscle damage following acute lower body resistance exercise. Forty recreationally resistance-trained men (22.3 ± 2.4 years) were randomly divided into one of the four groups: (1) Placebo (PL); (2) HMB-FA; (3) HMB-FA-CWI; (4) PL-CWI. HMB-FA groups ingested 3 g day(-1) and CWI groups submersed their lower body into 10-12 °C water for 10-min post-exercise. No differences between groups were observed for CK; however, PL-CWI had significantly greater elevations in myoglobin 30-min post-exercise compared to HMB-FA (p = 0.009) and PL (p = 0.005), and HMB-FA-CWI was significantly greater than HMB-FA (p = 0.046) and PL (p = 0.028). No differences between groups were observed for IL-6 and IL-10, although CRP was significantly greater 24-h post-exercise for PL-CWI compared to HMB-FA-CWI (p = 0.02) and HMB-FA (p = 0.046). Only HMB-FA-CWI showed significantly (p = 0.02) greater improvements in average power per repetition. CWI appeared to elevate myoglobin compared to other groups, while HMB-FA may have attenuated the increase in CRP when combined with CWI. Nevertheless, HMB-FA or CWI treatments did not appear to provide benefit over PL for recovery. Instead, the combination of CWI and HMB-FA improved performance recovery compared to other groups.

  13. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid and cold water immersion on expression of CR3 and MIP-1β following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Fragala, Maren S; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Beyer, Kyle S; Boone, Carleigh H; Pruna, Gabriel J; Mangine, Gerald T; Bohner, Jonathan D; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    The inflammatory response to muscle-damaging exercise requires monocyte mobilization and adhesion. Complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β enables monocyte recruitment, adhesion, and subsequent infiltration into damaged muscle tissue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) and/or β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid (HMB-FA) on CR3 expression and MIP-1β concentration after four sets of up to 10 repetitions of squat, dead lift, and split squat exercises at 70-80% 1-repetition maximum. Thirty-nine resistance-trained men (22.2 ± 2.5 yr) were randomly divided into four groups: 1) placebo (PL), 2) HMB-FA, 3) HMB-FA-CWI, and 4) PL-CWI. The HMB-FA groups ingested 3 g/day, and CWI groups were submersed into 10-12°C water for 10 min after exercise. Blood was sampled at baseline (PRE), immediately post- (IP), 30 min post- (30P), 24 h post- (24P), and 48 h post (48P)-exercise. Circulating MIP-1β was assayed and CR3 expression on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Without treatment, CR3 expression significantly elevated at 30P compared with other time points (P = 0.030-0.047). HMB-FA significantly elevated the percentage of monocytes expressing CR3 between IP and 24P (P = 0.046) and between IP and 48P (P = 0.046). No time effect was observed for MIP-1β concentration. The recovery modalities showed to attenuate the rise in CR3 following exercise. Additionally, supplementation with HMB-FA significantly elevated the percentage of monocytes expressing CR3 during recovery. Although the time course that inflammatory responses are most beneficial remains to be determined, recovery modalities may alter immune cell mobilization and adhesion mechanisms during tissue recovery.

  14. External dose-rate conversion factors of radionuclides for air submersion, ground surface contamination and water immersion based on the new ICRP dosimetric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Song Jae; Jang, Han-Ki; Lee, Jai-Ki; Noh, Siwan; Cho, Gyuseong

    2013-01-01

    For the assessment of external doses due to contaminated environment, the dose-rate conversion factors (DCFs) prescribed in Federal Guidance Report 12 (FGR 12) and FGR 13 have been widely used. Recently, there were significant changes in dosimetric models and parameters, which include the use of the Reference Male and Female Phantoms and the revised tissue weighting factors, as well as the updated decay data of radionuclides. In this study, the DCFs for effective and equivalent doses were calculated for three exposure settings: skyshine, groundshine and water immersion. Doses to the Reference Phantoms were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNPX 2.7.0 radiation transport code for 26 mono-energy photons between 0.01 and 10 MeV. The transport calculations were performed for the source volume within the cut-off distances practically contributing to the dose rates, which were determined by a simplified calculation model. For small tissues for which the reduction of variances are difficult, the equivalent dose ratios to a larger tissue (with lower statistical errors) nearby were employed to make the calculation efficient. Empirical response functions relating photon energies, and the organ equivalent doses or the effective doses were then derived by the use of cubic-spline fitting of the resulting doses for 26 energy points. The DCFs for all radionuclides considered important were evaluated by combining the photon emission data of the radionuclide and the empirical response functions. Finally, contributions of accompanied beta particles to the skin equivalent doses and the effective doses were calculated separately and added to the DCFs. For radionuclides considered in this study, the new DCFs for the three exposure settings were within ±10 % when compared with DCFs in FGR 13.

  15. The effects of cold water immersion with different dosages (duration and temperature variations) on heart rate variability post-exercise recovery: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Aline C; Machado, Aryane F; Albuquerque, Maíra C; Netto, Lara M; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Junior, Jayme Netto; Pastre, Carlos M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cold water immersion during post-exercise recovery, with different durations and temperatures, on heart rate variability indices. Hundred participants performed a protocol of jumps and a Wingate test, and immediately afterwards were immersed in cold water, according to the characteristics of each group (CG: control; G1: 5' at 9±1°C; G2: 5' at 14±1°C; G3: 15' at 9±1°C; G4: 15' at 14±1°C). Analyses were performed at baseline, during the CWI recuperative technique (TRec) and 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60min post-exercise. The average HRV indices of all RR-intervals in each analysis period (MeanRR), standard deviation of normal RR-intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR-intervals (RMSSD), spectral components of very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF), scatter of points perpendicular to the line of identity of the Poincaré Plot (SD1) and scatter points along the line of identity (SD2) were assessed. Mean RR, VLF and LF presented an anticipated return to baseline values at all the intervention groups, but the same was observed for SDNN and SD2 only in the immersion for 15min at 14°C group (G4). In addition, G4 presented higher values when compared to CG. These findings demonstrate that if the purpose of the recovery process is restoration of cardiac autonomic modulation, the technique is recommended, specifically for 15min at 14°C. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Restraint Stress Induced Anxiety-and Depression-like Behaviors in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats%慢性束缚应激诱导自发性高血压大鼠出现抑郁焦虑样行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹爽; 丁建伟; 李炳; 袁丽粉; 杜勤

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨自发性高血压大鼠(SHR)在慢性束缚应激(Chronic Restraint Stress,CRS)时抑郁焦虑样行为学改变. 方法 雄性SHR大鼠16只,随机分为对照组(CON,n=8)和慢性束缚应激组(CRS,n=8).通过旷场试验(Open Field test,OFT)、强迫游泳实验(Forced Swimming test,FST)、高架十字迷宫试验(Elevated Plus Maze,EPM)评价其抑郁焦虑样行为,同时比较SHR血压变化及血清ACTH水平.结果 束缚4周后,与对照组相比,CRS组的SHR在OFT中直立次数及总位移均显著降低(P<0.05),FST中不动时间显著延长(P<0.05),EPM中开臂滞留时间百分比显著下降(P<0.05). 结论 慢性束缚应激可诱导SHR出现抑郁焦虑样行为.

  17. Striving for Balance Between Caring and Restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Julie Y; Larsen, Dorte; Brødsgaard, Anne

    2016-01-01

    with 14 young adults were conducted. RESULTS: The essence of the phenomenon of having a parent with multiple sclerosis was synthesized into 'Striving for balance between caring and restraint' from two themes 'caring' and 'restraint' and eight subthemes. Participants' experiences of caring for parents...... that one of the greatest challenges of having a parent with multiple sclerosis is achieving a balance between caring for others and asserting one's own desires. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Health care professionals can support the family by encouraging family members to participate in consultations...... and to assist the parents in providing information about multiple sclerosis and its symptoms to the children. Parents might need assistance in applying for help with domestic chores or referrals to support groups for their children or other family members. This article is protected by copyright. All rights...

  18. Development and psychometric properties of the Smoking Restraint Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Grant A; Ferguson, Stuart G; Palmer, Matthew A; Shiffman, Saul

    2016-03-01

    Restraint is a component of self-control that focuses on the deliberate reduction of an undesired behavior and is theorized to play a role in smoking reduction and cessation. However, there exists no instrument to assess smoking restraint. This research aimed to develop the Smoking Restraint Questionnaire (SRQ) to meet this need. Participants were 406 smokers (48% female; 52.2% nondaily) with a mean age of 38.83 years (SD = 12.05). They completed a baseline questionnaire designed to assess smoking restraint. They also completed 21 days of ecological momentary assessment (EMA), during which they recorded each cigarette smoked and answered questions related to planned restraint every morning, and restraint attempts every evening. The 4-item questionnaire of smoking restraint was found to fit a single factor (root mean square error of approximation = .038, comparative fit index = .99, Tucker-Lewis index = .99), and the resulting composite was reliable (composite reliability = 0.74). The questionnaire contains items that assess the setting of weekly restraint goals and attempts at not lighting up when tempted to smoke. Participant SRQ scores positively correlated with EMA data on plans to restrain (p < .001) and frequency of restraint attempts (p < .001). These correlations suggest that the SRQ has good predictive validity in relation to the intention and behaviors of smoking reduction. The SRQ is promising as a measure of smoking restraint and may enable further research and insights into smoking reduction and cessation.

  19. Gold Mine or Minefield: Understanding Russian Law on Vertical Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rucker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available While the Russian Federation represents a significant opportunity for growth, that opportunity is coupled with serious risks. As it relates to managing product distribution, Russian vertical restraint law remains significantly more restrictive than that of the U.S. and, since unless a company is fully integrated, it must manage its distribution system by way of vertical agreements, presents a large problem for businesses seeking to conduct business in Russia. While Russia has made significant steps in the right direction, the lack of consistent application of economic analysis to evaluation of vertical restraints leaves companies exposed. Further, the sometimes inconsistent application of the laws also makes it hard to predict how any particular vertical agreement would be evaluated. Neither American nor Russian antitrust laws establish a list of possible vertical restraints. Thus, there is no exhaustive guidance regarding how these restraints should be treated. U.S. antitrust laws, however, generally place all vertical restraints into one of two categories, intrabrand restraints and interbrand restraints. Intrabrand restraints are those that restrain the downstream firm’s freedom with regard to the resale of the product at issue (distribution restrictions. Interbrand restraints are those that restrict a downstream or upstream firm’s freedom to deal with competitors of the firm imposing the restraint (interbrand restrictions. It should be noted that Russian law does not make this distinction.

  20. Gold Mine or Minefield: Understanding Russian Law on Vertical Restraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Rucker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the Russian Federation represents a significant opportunity for growth, that opportunity is coupled with serious risks. As it relates to managing product distribution, Russian vertical restraint law remains significantly more restrictive than that of the U.S. and, since unless a company is fully integrated, it must manage its distribution system by way of vertical agreements, presents a large problem for businesses seeking to conduct business in Russia. While Russia has made significant steps in the right direction, the lack of consistent application of economic analysis to evaluation of vertical restraints leaves companies exposed. Further, the sometimes inconsistent application of the laws also makes it hard to predict how any particular vertical agreement would be evaluated. Neither American nor Russian antitrust laws establish a list of possible vertical restraints. Thus, there is no exhaustive guidance regarding how these restraints should be treated. U.S. antitrust laws, however, generally place all vertical restraints into one of two categories, intrabrand restraints and interbrand restraints. Intrabrand restraints are those that restrain the downstream firm’s freedom with regard to the resale of the product at issue (distribution restrictions. Interbrand restraints are those that restrict a downstream or upstream firm’s freedom to deal with competitors of the firm imposing the restraint (interbrand restrictions. It should be noted that Russian law does not make this distinction.

  1. Plasma catecholamine, corticosterone and glucose responses to repeated stress in rats : Effect of interstressor interval length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Koopmans, S.J.; Slangen, J L; Van der Gugten, J

    1990-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), corticosterone (CS) and glucose concentrations were determined in blood frequently sampled via a cardiac catheter from freely behaving rats exposed to five successive trials of water-immersion stress (WIS) with an interval between successive trials (interst

  2. The Effect of a Restraint Reduction Program on Physical Restraint Rates in Rehabilitation Settings in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia K. Y. Lai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In view of the adverse effects of using restraints, studies examining the use of restraint reduction programs (RRPs are needed. Objectives. To investigate the effect of an RRP on the reduction of physical restraint rates in rehabilitation hospitals. Methods. A prospective quasi-experimental clinical trial was conducted. Demographic data, medical and health-related information on recruited patients from two rehabilitation hospitals, as well as facility data on restraint rates were collected. Results. The increase in the restraint rate in the control site was 4.3 times greater than that in the intervention site. Changes in the restraint mode, from continuous to intermittent, and the type of restraint used were found between the pre- and postintervention periods in both the control site and the intervention site. Discussion. Compared with that in the control site, the RRP in the intervention site helped arrest any increase in the restraint rate although it had no effect on physical restraint reduction. The shift of restraint mode from continuous to intermittent in the intervention site was one of the positive outcomes of the RRP.

  3. Physical Restraint Procedures for Managing Challenging Behaviours Presented by Mentally Retarded Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John

    1996-01-01

    The literature on the use of physical restraint with adults and children with mental retardation is reviewed, including person-to-person restraint, mechanical devices, and voluntary self-restraint. Conclusions regarding outcomes of contingent and noncontingent restraint, maintenance, reinforcing effects of restraint, and risk of injury are…

  4. Staff resistance to restraint reduction: identifying & overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Staci Silver

    2007-05-01

    Professional organizations, regulating agencies, and hospital administrators have taken a strong stance on restraint reduction policies. When implementing a restraint reduction initiative, it is important to identify the barriers to restraint reduction, such as concern for personal safety, lack of knowledge about and practice using alternate de-escalation skills, and fear of disrupting the therapeutic milieu by using a variety of de-escalation methods. Education aimed to reduce the use of restraints needs to do more than simply provide information. It is important to acknowledge the emotional response of the nursing staff and the culture of the current practice. A variety of educational strategies, including role-playing, and case studies will help identify attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are congruent with reducing the use of restraints. If the ultimate goal of restraint reduction is philosophical change, it will eventually lead to a new culture of practice.

  5. Evaluation of passive recovery, cold water immersion, and contrast baths for recovery, as measured by game performances markers, between two simulated games of rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Trevor; Cameron, Melainie; Climstein, Mike

    2012-06-11

    ABSTRACT: In team sports, during the competitive season, peak performance in each game is of utmost importance to coaching staff and players. To enhance recovery from training and games a number of recovery modalities have been adopted across professional sporting teams. To date there is little evidence in the sport science literature identifying the benefit of modalities in promoting recovery between sporting competition games. This research evaluated hydrotherapy as a recovery strategy following a simulated game of rugby union and a week of recovery and training, with dependent variables between two simulated games of rugby union evaluated. Twenty-four male players were randomly divided into three groups: one group (n=8) received cold water immersion therapy (2 X 5min at 10oC, whilst one group (n=8) received contrast bath therapy (5 cycles of 10oC/38oC) and the control group (n=8) underwent passive recovery (15mins, thermo neutral environment). The two forms of hydrotherapy were administered following a simulated rugby union game (8 circuits x 11 stations) and after three training sessions. Dependent variables where generated from five physical stations replicating movement characteristics of rugby union and one skilled based station, as well as sessional RPE values between two simulated games of rugby union. No significant differences were identified between groups across simulated games, across dependent variables. Effect size analysis via Cohen's d and ηp2 did identify medium trends between groups. Overall trends indicated that both treatment groups had performance results in the second simulated game above those of the control group of between 2% and 6% across the physical work stations replicating movement characteristics of rugby union. In conclusion, trends in this study may indicate that ice baths and contrasts baths may be more advantageous to athlete's recovery from team sport than passive rest between successive games of rugby union We are pleased to

  6. Use of Cold-Water Immersion to Reduce Muscle Damage and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Preserve Muscle Power in Jiu-Jitsu Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Líllian Beatriz; Brito, Ciro J; Silva, Roberto Jerônimo S; Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; da Silva, Walderi Monteiro; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-07-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) has been applied widely as a recovery method, but little evidence is available to support its effectiveness. To investigate the effects of CWI on muscle damage, perceived muscle soreness, and muscle power recovery of the upper and lower limbs after jiu-jitsu training. Crossover study. Laboratory and field. A total of 8 highly trained male athletes (age = 24.0 ± 3.6 years, mass = 78.4 ± 2.4 kg, percentage of body fat = 13.1% ± 3.6%) completed all study phases. We randomly selected half of the sample for recovery using CWI (6.0°C ± 0.5°C) for 19 minutes; the other participants were allocated to the control condition (passive recovery). Treatments were reversed in the second session (after 1 week). We measured serum levels of creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase enzymes; perceived muscle soreness; and recovery through visual analogue scales and muscle power of the upper and lower limbs at pretraining, postrecovery, 24 hours, and 48 hours. Athletes who underwent CWI showed better posttraining recovery measures because circulating LDH levels were lower at 24 hours postrecovery in the CWI condition (441.9 ± 81.4 IU/L) than in the control condition (493.6 ± 97.4 IU/L; P = .03). Estimated muscle power was higher in the CWI than in the control condition for both upper limbs (757.9 ± 125.1 W versus 695.9 ± 56.1 W) and lower limbs (53.7 ± 3.7 cm versus 35.5 ± 8.2 cm; both P values = .001). In addition, we observed less perceived muscle soreness (1.5 ± 1.1 arbitrary units [au] versus 3.1 ± 1.0 au; P = .004) and higher perceived recovery (8.8 ± 1.9 au versus 6.9 ± 1.7 au; P = .005) in the CWI than in the control condition at 24 hours postrecovery. Use of CWI can be beneficial to jiu-jitsu athletes because it reduces circulating LDH levels, results in less perceived muscle soreness, and helps muscle power recovery at 24 hours postrecovery.

  7. Effect of electroacupunture on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor gene expression of stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Li; Jie Yan; Shou-Xiang Yi; Xiao-Rong Chang; Ya-Ping Lin; Zong-Bao Yang; Ai Huang; Rong Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate electroacupunture(EA) at the acupoints of Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY),Gallbladder Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY) on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene expression detection in stress-induced rats with gastric mucosal lesion, and to explore the regulatory mechanism and significance of EA-related gastric mucosal protective effect.METHODS: Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Blank group, Model group, Model group+EA at acupoints of SMFY group("SMFY group"), and Model group+EA at acupoints of GMFY group(GMFY group).All rats (except blank group) were made model by water immersion and restraint stress (WRS). Then the gastric mucosa tissue in each rat was taken off after assessment of gastric mucosal lesion index(GUI), and the expression of ITF mRNA of the tissues was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) method.RESULTS: Compared with Model group(54.3 ± 1.34),the GUI value in SMFY group (31±2.21) decreased significantly(P 0.05), in SMFY group(0.76± 0.01)with an extremely obvious difference (P<0.01), furthermore the expression in SMFY group was significantly higher than in GMFY group (P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: The gastric mucosal protective effect by EA at the acupoints of SMFY and GMFY was related to the expression variance of ITF, indicating certain meridian specificity exists. It could be one proof for the TCM theory "Relative particularity between SMFY and stomach".

  8. Psychiatric Nurses' Perceptions about Physical Restraint; A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidooni Moghadam, Malek; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Pazargadi, Mehrnoosh

    2014-01-01

    The use of physical restraint as an intervention in the care of psychiatric patients dates back to the beginning of psychiatry. Although it is a challenging question, it is still one of the common procedures in psychiatry. Considering that very little research has been done in Iran in relation to physical restraint, this qualitative study aimed to investigate the experiences of  nurses working in psychiatric wards regarding physical restraint. This qualitative study was done on 14 nurses working in the psychiatric hospitals of Ahvaz city, southern Iran, during 2011-2012. The participants were selected by purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection, which were continued until data saturation and emergence of themes. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Four categories emerged: (1) Restraint as a multi-purpose procedure, (2) Processing of physical restraint, (3) Restraint as a challenging subject and (4) The effects of restraint on the spectrum. Each category has several different sub-categories. The participants described using physical restraint as one of the main strategies to control psychiatric patients, and despite having negative consequences, it is extensively used. Given the risks and challenges of using physical restraint, nursing education should find alternative methods.

  9. Nurses' perceptions and practice of physical restraint in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Li, Chen; Gu, Yan; He, Yanan

    2015-09-01

    There is controversy concerning the use of physical restraint. Despite this controversy, some nurses still consider the application of physical restraint unavoidable for some of their clients. Identify the perceptions and practice of physical restraint in China. This was a descriptive study that combined qualitative interviews with a quantitative cross-sectional survey. A total of 18 nurses were interviewed and 330 nurses were surveyed. Approval of the study was obtained from the hospital ethics committee. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the director of nursing. Participants were assured that their participation is voluntary. Physical restraint was commonly used to protect patients' safety. Naturally, intensive care unit nurses used physical restraint much more frequently than general medical/surgical ward nurses (p < 0.01). In addition, night shift nurses tended to use physical restraint more frequently. Nursing managers should be aware of the role nurses play in the use of physical restraint. In-service training regarding the proper use of physical restraint should be strengthened and nurse staffing levels should be improved in order to minimize the use of physical restraint in China. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Measuring dietary restraint status: Comparisons between the Dietary Intent Scale and the Restraint Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Boyce

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of young women’s self-reported dietary restraint status is complex. Compared to Herman and Polivy’s commonly utilized Restraint Scale (RS, Stice’s Dietary Intent Scale (DIS is less understood. Because the DIS is becoming a popular research tool, it is important to understand how this scale compares to more traditional measures of restraint. We conducted two correlational studies (Study 1 N = 110; Study 2 N = 216 to ascertain the similarities and the differences between the DIS and - as a comparison measure - the well-researched RS. We explored how the two scales were related to several body image variables (e.g., thin-ideal internalization; with a range of self-regulatory variables (e.g., dispositional self-control; with observed food intake during a taste test; and with 18-month weight change (Study 2 only. Participants were female University students and were not selected for dieting or disordered eating. Unlike RS scores, DIS scores were not significantly correlated with the majority of variables tapping into unsuccessful self-regulation. However, our data also highlighted similarities between the two restraint scales (e.g., association with 18-month weight-loss and demonstrated that not only were participants’ DIS scores un-related to unsuccessful self-regulatory variables, neither were they related to the variables tapping into successful self-regulation.

  11. The restraint bias: how the illusion of self-restraint promotes impulsive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordgren, L.F.; van Harreveld, F.; van der Pligt, J.

    2009-01-01

    Four studies examined how impulse-control beliefs—beliefs regarding one's ability to regulate visceral impulses, such as hunger, drug craving, and sexual arousal—influence the self-control process. The findings provide evidence for a restraint bias: a tendency for people to overestimate their capaci

  12. Effect of Pinaverium Bromide on different layers and segments of colonic smooth muscle strips in wrap restraint stress rats%匹维溴胺对束缚应激大鼠结肠不同部位和肌层平滑肌条的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李翠萍; 刘诗; 徐三平; 钱伟; 侯晓华

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate effects of Pinaverium Bromide on different segments and layers of colonic smooth muscle in wrap restraint stress (WRS) rats and explore its possible therapeutic mechanism on different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Adult SD rats were randomly divided into model group (wrap restraint stress group) and control group. Colonic smooth muscle strips were made from different segments and layers in two groups. The spontaneous contraction activities of colonic longitudinal/circular muscle (LM/CM) strips of rats were observed with organ bath system before and after addition of series concentrations of pinaverium. RESULTS: Pinaverium Bromide caused concentration-dependent inhibition of colonic smooth muscle, the inhibitory effect of pinaverium in model group was significantly stronger than that in control group(proximal colon: 28.54±4.82 vs 7.48±1.65,21.75±1.00 vs 12.56±3.15; distal colon: 15.71±5.27 vs 3.89±1.16, 20.16±3.16 vs 7.56±1.96 )(P0.05). CONCLUSION: Effects of Pinaverium Bromide on different colonic muscle layers and segments in WRS rats is probably related with its therapeutic mechanism on different types of IBS.%目的:评价匹维溴胺对束缚应激大鼠离体结肠平滑肌条的影响并探讨其对各型IBS可能的作用机理.方法:成年SD大鼠随机分为模型组和对照组,模型组用自制硬塑胶模具束缚 2 h.分别制作两组大鼠近端及远端结肠的环行肌和纵行肌条共64条(每组肌条32个,各肌层8个).采用离体平滑肌条器官浴槽实验方法,观察不同浓度匹维溴胺对平滑肌条自发性收缩活动的影响.结果:匹维溴胺对模型组和对照组离体结肠平滑肌条自发性收缩活动均表现为抑制作用,但对模型组效应较对照组显著(近端结肠 28.54±4.82 vs 7.48±1.65,21.75±1.00 vs 12.56±3.15;远端结肠 15.71±5.27 vs 3.89±1.16,20.16±3.16 vs 7.56±1.96)(P0.05).结论:匹维溴胺能抑制束缚应激大鼠离体结肠平滑肌

  13. Effect of altered 'weight' upon animal tolerance to restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.; Beljan, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of altered weight upon animal tolerance to restraint was determined by simulating various accelerative forces with directed lead weights using restrained and nonrestrained domestic fowl (chickens). Weighting (increased weight) and conterweighting (reduced weight) produced a stressed condition - reduced relative lymphocyte counts, loss of body mass, and/or the development of a disorientation syndrome - in both restrained and nonrestrained (caged only) birds. The animal's tolerance to altered weight appeared to be a function of its body weight. Unrestrained birds were stressed by counterweighting (mean plus or minus standard error) 58.3 plus or minus 41% of their body weight, whereas restrained birds tolerated only 32.2 plus or minus 2.6% reduction in body weight. A training regimen for restrained birds was not effective in improving their tolerance to a reduced weight environment. It was concluded that domestic fowl living in a weightless (space) environment should be restrained minimally and supported by ventrally directed tension equivalent to approximately 50% of their body mass (their weight in a 1 G environment).

  14. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  15. The Effects of Physical Restraint on Self-Injurious Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Brief (one minute) response contingent physical restraint was shown in two experiments with a 16-year-old profoundly retarded institutionalized girl to be more effective in controlling self-injurious behavior (SIB) than three minute physical restraint, which in the first study produced an increase in SIB. (CL)

  16. Child restraint system for children in cars - CREST results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, M.; Cassan, F.; Trosseille, X.

    2001-01-01

    Child restraint systems (CRS) for cars are intended to protect children in the case of a car accident. Unfortunately their effectiveness is still too low: in the range 30-50% when it would be expected to be much higher. The low effectiveness of child restraint systems can partly be explained for the

  17. High School Students' Publication Rights and Prior Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, John L.; Trauth, Denise M.

    1981-01-01

    Federal court decisions on high school students' publication rights in the Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Seventh Circuits reveal substantial disagreement about school officials' power of prior restraint over student publications. The courts' opinions range from approval of broad powers of prior restraint to denial of any power. (Author/RW)

  18. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented...

  19. Individualized music--a different approach to the restraint issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelli, Linda M; Kanski, Genevieve W; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill

    2002-01-01

    Rehabilitation nurses who work with geriatric patients are concerned about reliance on physical restraints, as are all nurses. Controversy exists as to the benefits and risks, as well as the ethical and legal consequences, of their use. Nurses are ambivalent about using restraints, believing that they affect patients' freedom, self-respect, and self-reliance; they also often believe that there are no appropriate alternatives. This pilot study explored the use of music as a potential alternative to using physical restraints with hospitalized patients. The research question was: Will patients have more positive behaviors, as measured by the Restraint Music Response Instrument (RMRI), while out of restraints and listening to preferred music compared with the patients not listening to music who are out of restraints while being observed? Forty medical-surgical patients participated in the study and were randomized into either the experimental group (music) or the control group (no music). The mean age of the 21 males and 19 females was 76.6 years (range 56-94). A t test for equality of means was used to determine if there were differences in the number of positive and negative behaviors in the preintervention, intervention, and postintervention phases between the two groups. There was a significant difference (p < .01) in behaviors during the intervention phase. Patients who listened to preferred music had more positive behaviors while out of restraints than patients who were out of restraints but not exposed to music.

  20. Child restraint system for children in cars - CREST results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, M.; Cassan, F.; Trosseille, X.

    2001-01-01

    Child restraint systems (CRS) for cars are intended to protect children in the case of a car accident. Unfortunately their effectiveness is still too low: in the range 30-50% when it would be expected to be much higher. The low effectiveness of child restraint systems can partly be explained for the

  1. 30 CFR 56.9301 - Dump site restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dump site restraints. 56.9301 Section 56.9301 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9301 Dump site restraints. Berms, bumper blocks, safety hooks, or similar impeding devices...

  2. 28 CFR 570.44 - Supervision and restraint requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision and restraint requirements... PROGRAMS AND RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.44 Supervision and restraint requirements. Inmates under escort will be within the constant and immediate visual supervision of escorting staff...

  3. Dietary restraint moderates genetic risk for binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E; Burt, S Alexandra; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt; Klump, Kelly L

    2011-02-01

    Dietary restraint is a prospective risk factor for the development of binge eating and bulimia nervosa. Although many women engage in dietary restraint, relatively few develop binge eating. Dietary restraint may increase susceptibility for binge eating only in individuals who are at genetic risk. Specifically, dietary restraint may be a behavioral exposure factor that activates genetic predispositions for binge eating. We investigated this possibility in 1,678 young adolescent and adult same-sex female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study and the Michigan State University Twin Registry. Twin moderation models were used to examine whether levels of dietary restraint moderate genetic and environmental influences on binge eating. Results indicated that genetic and nonshared environmental factors for binge eating increased at higher levels of dietary restraint. These effects were present after controlling for age, body mass index, and genetic and environmental overlap among dietary restraint and binge eating. Results suggest that dietary restraint may be most important for individuals at genetic risk for binge eating and that the combination of these factors could enhance individual differences in risk for binge eating.

  4. 75 FR 67233 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Head Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Positions b. Leadtime for Small Vehicle Manufacturers c. Static Lockout of Active Head Restraints During.... Petitions for Rulemaking a. Discomfort Metric for Non-Use Position and Relaxation Requirement for Gap b... of Active Head Restraints During Backset Retention Testing 1. NHTSA Agrees To Specify the Fixation...

  5. Effects of Sarcandra glabra extract on immune activity in restraint stress mice%中药九节茶提取物对应激负荷小鼠免疫功能的改善作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何蓉蓉; 王敏; 李怡芳; 戴毅; 段营辉; 姚新生; 粟原博

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究中药九节茶对束缚应激小鼠免疫功能的改善作用.方法:实验将雄性C_(57)BL/6小鼠分为正常对照组,应激对照组,125,500 mg·kg~(-1)九节茶提取物给药组,制备脾脏淋巴细胞悬液,流式细胞术分析T淋巴细胞亚群、NK细胞和NKT细胞比例及数目.结果:与应激对照组相比,中药九节茶可以提高束缚应激小鼠脾脏淋巴细胞总数,改善T淋巴细胞亚群比例,同时增加脾脏NK细胞和NKT细胞比例及数目.结论:中药九节茶可以改善应激负荷小鼠淋巴细胞数目及淋巴细胞亚群比例.%Objective: To study the protective effect of Sarcandra glabra extract (SGE)on immune system in restrained mice. Method: The male C_(57)BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normal control group, stress control group, 125, 500 mg·kg~(-1) SGE group. The spleen lymphocyte suspensions of each group were prepared. The parameters of spleen T cells subsets, NK cell and NKT cell proportion and number was detected by Flow cytometry. Result: SGE regulated the balance of T cell subsets, increased the percent of NK cells and NKT cell proportion and number in restrained mice. Conclusion: SGE has immunologic protective effect in restrained mice probably via the amelioration of immune cells proportion and number.

  6. Physical restraint in a therapeutic setting; a necessary evil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Elizabeth; Prosser, Helen; Riley, David; Whittington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Physical restraint of people experiencing mental health problems is a coercive and traumatic procedure which is only legally permitted if it is proportionate to the risk presented. This study sought to examine the decision-making processes used by mental health staff involved in a series of restraint episodes in an acute care setting. Thirty nurses were interviewed either individually or in focus groups to elicit their views on restraint and experience in specific incidents. Four factors which influenced the decision to restrain were identified: contextual demands; lack of alternatives; the escalatory effects of restraint itself; and perceptions of risk. While some of these factors are amenable to change through improvements in practice, training and organisational culture, nurses viewed restraint as a necessary evil, justified on the basis of the unpredictable nature of mental illness and the environment in which they worked. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multipurpose Crew Restraints for Long Duration Space Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Baggerman, Susan; Ortiz, M. R.; Hua, L.; Sinnott, P.; Webb, L.

    2004-01-01

    With permanent human presence onboard the International Space Station (ISS), a crew will be living and working in microgravity, interfacing with their physical environment. Without optimum restraints and mobility aids (R&MA' s), the crewmembers may be handicapped for perfonning some of the on-orbit tasks. In addition to weightlessness, the confined nature of a spacecraft environment results in ergonomic challenges such as limited visibility and access to the activity area and may cause prolonged periods of unnatural postures. Thus, determining the right set of human factors requirements and providing an ergonomically designed environment are crucial to astronauts' well-being and productivity. The purpose of this project is to develop requirements and guidelines, and conceptual designs, for an ergonomically designed multi-purpose crew restraint. In order to achieve this goal, the project would involve development of functional and human factors requirements, design concept prototype development, analytical and computer modeling evaluations of concepts, two sets of micro gravity evaluations and preparation of an implementation plan. It is anticipated that developing functional and design requirements for a multi-purpose restraint would facilitate development of ergonomically designed restraints to accommodate the off-nominal but repetitive tasks, and minimize the performance degradation due to lack of optimum setup for onboard task performance. In addition, development of an ergonomically designed restraint concept prototype would allow verification and validation of the requirements defined. To date, we have identified "unique" tasks and areas of need, determine characteristics of "ideal" restraints, and solicit ideas for restraint and mobility aid concepts. Focus group meetings with representatives from training, safety, crew, human factors, engineering, payload developers, and analog environment representatives were key to assist in the development of a restraint

  8. Designing and evaluating a persuasive child restraint television commercial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ioni; Ho, Bonnie; Lennon, Alexia

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high rates of child restraint inappropriate use and misuse and faults in the installation of restraints have suggested a crucial need for public education messages to raise parental awareness of the need to use restraints correctly. This project involved the devising and pilot testing of message concepts, filming of a television advertisement (the TVC), and the evaluation of the TVC. This article focuses specifically upon the evaluation of the TVC. The development and evaluation of the TVC were guided by an extended theory of planned behavior that included the standard constructs of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control as well as the additional constructs of group norms and descriptive norms. The study also explored the extent to which parents with low and high intentions to self-check restraints differed on salient beliefs regarding the behavior. An online survey of parents (N = 384) was conducted where parents were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 161), and therefore viewed the advertisement within the survey, or the control group (n = 223), and therefore did not view the advertisement. Following a one-off exposure to the TVC, the results indicated that, although not a significant difference, parents in the intervention group reported stronger intentions (M = 4.43, SD = 0.74) to self-check restraints than parents in the control group (M = 4.18, SD = 0.86). In addition, parents in the intervention group (M = 4.59, SD = 0.47) reported significantly higher levels of perceived behavioral control than parents in the control group (M = 4.40, SD = 0.73). The regression results revealed that, for parents in the intervention group, attitudes and group norms were significant predictors of parental intentions to self-check their child restraint. Finally, the exploratory analyses of parental beliefs suggested that those parents with low intentions to self-check child restraints were significantly more likely than

  9. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitude and Practice toward Physical Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amal Sobhy

    2017-02-01

    This study was to assess psychiatric nurses' attitude and practice toward physical restraint among mentally ill patients. A descriptive research design was used to achieve the study objective. The present study was carried out in three specialized governmental mental hospitals and two psychiatric wards in general hospital. A convenient purposive sample of 96 nurses who were working in the previously mentioned setting was included. The tool used for data collection was the Self-Administered Structured Questionnaire; it included three parts: The first comprised items concerned with demographic characteristics of the nurses, the second comprised 10 item measuring nurses' attitudes toward physical restraint, and the third was used to assess nurses' practices regarding use of physical restraint. There were insignificant differences between attitudes and practices in relation to nurses' sex, level of education, years of experience and work place. Moreover, a positive significant correlation was found between nurses' total attitude scores, and practices regarding use of physical restraint. Psychiatric nurses have positive attitude and adequate practice toward using physical restraints as an alternative management for psychiatric patients. It is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. The study recommended that it is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical restraint in the ICU: does it prevent device removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, A; Corbella, D; Iapichino, E; Di Bernardo, V; Leonardi, A; Di Nicolantonio, R; Buschbeck, C; Boegli, L; Pagnamenta, A; Malacrida, R

    2015-10-01

    Physical restraint is frequently used in the intensive care setting but little is known regarding its clinical scenario and effectiveness in preventing adverse events (AEs), defined as device removal. We carried out a prospective observational study in three Intensive Care Units on 120 adult high-risk patients. The effectiveness of physical restraint was evaluated using the propensity score methodology in order to obtain comparable groups. Physical restraint was applied in 1371 of 3256 (43%) nurse shifts accounting for 120 patients. Substantial agitation, the nurse's judgement of insufficient sedation and sedative drug reduction were positively associated with physical restraint, whereas the presence of analgesics at admission, increased disease gravity and the treating hospital as the most substantial variable showed a negative association. Eighty-six AEs were observed in 44 patients. Quiet (SAS=1-4), unrestrained patients accounted for 40 cases, and agitated (SAS≥5) but physically restrained patients for 17 cases. The presence of any type of physical restraint had a protective effect against any type of AE (OR=0.28; CI 0.16-0.51). The observed AEs showed a limited impact on the patients' course of illness. No physical harm related to physical restraint was reported. Physical restraint efficiently averts AEs. Its application is mainly driven by local habits. Typically, the almost recovered, apparently calm and hence unrestrained patient is at greatest risk for undesirable device removal. The control/interpretation of the patient's analgo-sedation might be inappropriate.

  11. Corticosterone responses to capture and restraint in emperor and Adelie penguins in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrem, John F; Potter, Murray A; Barrett, D Paul; Candy, E Jane

    2008-03-01

    Birds respond to capture, handling and restraint with increased secretion of corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone that helps birds adjust to stressful situations. Hoods are reported to calm birds, but possible effects of hoods on corticosterone responses have not been reported for any bird. Corticosterone responses to restraint in Adelie penguins held by their legs with their head covered by a hood were markedly lower than responses of penguins restrained in a mesh bag inside a cardboard box (corticosterone at 30 min 15.69+/-1.72 cf. 28.32+/-2.75 ng/ml). The birds restrained by the two methods were sampled at the same location but in different years, so the differences in corticosterone responses cannot unequivocally be ascribed to an effect of hoods to reduce corticosterone responses. Corticosterone responses have been measured in some penguins, but not in the largest, the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). The relationship between body mass and corticosterone responses to capture and restraint in penguins was examined in emperor penguins captured on sea ice in McMurdo Sound and Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) captured at Cape Bird, Ross Island, Antarctica. Total integrated corticosterone responses were higher in the emperor than the Adelie penguins, but corrected integrated corticosterone responses, which represent the increase in corticosterone from initial concentrations and hence the corticosterone response to restraint, were the same. The results for the emperor and Adelie penguins, together with data from other penguin species, suggest that there is no relationship between the size of corticosterone responses and body mass in penguins.

  12. Physical Restraint of People with Intellectual Disability: A Review of Implementation Reduction and Elimination Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This review describes procedures to reduce and eliminate physical restraint of people with intellectual disability. One approach is to assess antecedent conditions associated with restraint and change them so that they no longer produce restraint-provoking behaviour. A second approach is to decrease the duration of restraint by…

  13. 78 FR 55629 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation, Model SF50; Inflatable Three-Point Restraint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... restraints are standard in the automotive industry, the use of an inflatable restraint system is novel for... potential for head and torso injury. The inflatable restraint behaves in a manner similar to an automotive... should not increase the risk already associated with fire. Therefore, the inflatable restraint should be...

  14. Efeitos do estresse agudo de contenção, do estresse crônico de natação e da administração de glutamina sobre a liberação de superóxido por macrófagos alveolares de ratos Effects of acute restraint stress, chronic swim stress and glutamine administration on the release of superoxide from alveolar macrophages of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth do Nascimento

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a liberação de ânion superóxido por macrófagos alveolares em ratos submetidos ou não ao estresse agudo, ao exercício físico de natação e à suplementação com glutamina. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e dois ratos machos da linhagem Wistar com idade em torno de 62 (desvio-padrão=3 dias de idade foram divididos em grupos controle, treino, estresse e glutamina. Após a intervenção, macrófagos alveolares foram coletados e estimulados com acetato de formol miristato para a avaliação da liberação de ânion superóxido. RESULTADOS: Em comparação à primeira hora (controle=26,2, desvio-padrão=4,2; treino=28,7, desvio-padrão=5,1; estresse=20,3, desvio-padrão=4,4; glutamina=26,2, desvio-padrão=4,2, houve aumento (pOBJECTIVE: To assess the release of superoxide anion from alveolar macrophages of rats submitted or not to acute restraint stress, forced swimming and glutamine supplementation. METHODS: Forty-two male Wistar rats aging roughly 62 days (standard deviation=3 were randomly divided into four groups: control, training, stress and glutamine. After the intervention, alveolar macrophages were collected and stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate to assess the release of superoxide anion. RESULTS: When compared with the first hour (control=26.2, standard deviation=4.2; training=28.7, standard deviation=5.1; stress=20.3 , standard deviation=4.4; glutamine=26.2, standard deviation=4.2, the release of superoxide increased (p<0.001 in all experimental groups in the second hour (control=38.4, standard deviation=4.9; training=40.7, standard deviation=6.1; stress=30.2, standard deviation=5.6; glutamine=39.2, standard deviation=5.2 of observation. Training and glutamine supplementation did not induce differences in the release of superoxide from alveolar macrophages when compared with the control group. Only the rats submitted to stress showed a reduction in the release of superoxide in both the first (20.3, standard deviation

  15. Self-restraint as positive reinforcement for self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R G; Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    Many individuals who engage in self-injurious behavior (SIB) also exhibit self-restraint. We compared rates of SIB exhibited by a 32-year-old woman diagnosed with profound retardation across conditions in which access to restraint was (a) continuously available, (b) presented as a consequence for SIB, or (c) unavailable. Rates of SIB increased when access to restraint was contingent upon SIB and decreased when restraint was unavailable, suggesting that self-restraint functioned as positive reinforcement for SIB.

  16. Predictors of physical restraint in a psychiatric emergency setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Termeh; Shariat, Seyed Vahid; Jalali Nadoushan, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Considering the negative consequences of using physical restraints, we conducted this study to identify patients who are more frequently restrained in a psychiatric emergency ward as an initial step...

  17. Pilot Hartsfield in sleep restraint tethered to forward middeck lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Hartsfield demonstrates the sleeping accomodations onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The sleep restraint is located in the middeck area of the spacecraft and is tethered to forward middeck lockers.

  18. Dietary restraint and self-regulation in eating behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, F; Pratt, M; Wardle, J

    2012-01-01

    .... This review discusses evidence from the dietary restraint literature and from studies of self-regulation processes to examine how far self-imposed control around food can be seen as beneficial...

  19. Changes in Physiologic Parameters and Effects of Hooding in Red-tailed Hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis ) During Manual Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Grayson A; Mans, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Manual restraint in birds of prey is required for many veterinary and research procedures. To investigate the effects of handling stress on physiologic parameters in raptorial birds, 8 red-tailed hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis ) were manually restrained over a 15-minute period. Respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), and cloacal temperature were monitored over time and recorded at defined intervals during the experiment. The effect of hooding on physiologic variables was also evaluated in a complete crossover design. Both RR and HR decreased significantly during the 15-minute restraint period (HR, -80 ± 101.4 beats/min [bpm], [P hawks, hooding versus nonhooding amplified the decrease in HR and RR but had no effect on stress-induced hyperthermia.

  20. Physical restraint use and older patients' length of hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ip, Isaac N; Woo, Jean; Chui, Maria Y P; Ho, Florence K Y

    2014-01-01

    In both acute care and residential care settings, physical restraints are frequently used in the management of patients, older people in particular. Recently, the negative outcomes of physical restraint use have often been reported, but very limited research effort has been made to examine whether such nursing practice have any adverse effects on patients' length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The aim of this study was to examine the association between physical restraint use on older patients during hospitalization and their LOS. Medical records of 910 older patients aged 60 years and above admitted to one of the Hong Kong public hospitals in 2007 were randomly selected and recorded during July to September 2011. The recorded items included patients' general health status, physical and cognitive function, the use of physical restraints, and patients' LOS. Hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to analyze the data. The results indicated that older patients' general health status, physical, and cognitive function were important factors affecting their LOS. Independent of these factors, the physical restraint use was still significantly predictive of longer LOS, and these two blocks of variables together served as an effective model in predicting older patients' LOS in the hospital. Since physical restraint use has been found to be predictive of longer hospital stay, physical restraints should be used with more caution and the use of it should be reduced on older patients in the hospital caring setting. All relevant health care staff should be aware of the negative effects of physical restraint use and should reduce the use of it in hospital caring and nursing home settings.

  1. Wheelchair integrated occupant restraints: feasibility in frontal impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanRoosmalen, L; Bertocci, G E; Ha, D; Karg, P

    2001-12-01

    Individuals often use their wheelchair as a motor vehicle seat when traveling in motor vehicles. The current use of fixed vehicle-mounted wheelchair occupant restraint systems (FWORSs) often results in poor belt fit and discomfort. Additionally, satisfaction, usability and usage rate of FWORSs during transit use are often low. The automotive industry has shown improved occupant restraint usage, belt fit and injury protection when integrating the upper torso and pelvic restraint in a motor vehicle seat. This study compared occupant injury measures of a FWORS to a concept wheelchair integrated restraint system (WIRS) using a 20g frontal sled impact test with a 30 mph change in velocity. Neck loads, neck moments, head, pelvis and chest acceleration, sternum compression and knee and head excursion data were recorded from the wheelchair seated 50th percentile male hybrid III anthropomorphic test dummy (ATD). The WIRS resulted in a lower head injury criteria (HIC) value, lower sternum compression and a lower upper-torso restraint load than the FWORS. Compared with the FWORS, increased head, knee and wheelchair excursions and higher neck loads and moments were measured in the WIRS test. Both restraint scenario injury parameters were complied with occupant injury criteria based on General Motors Injury Assessment Reference Values (GM-IARVs) and occupant kinematic requirements defined by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) voluntary standard, J2249. A higher motion criteria index was calculated for the WIRS scenario and a comparable combined injury criteria index was calculated for both restraint scenarios. The sled impact test showed WIRS concept feasibility, facilitating further development by industrial manufacturers who might further want to pursue this restraint principle to increase wheelchair occupant safety and comfort during transport in motor vehicles.

  2. Restraint use law enforcement intervention in Latino communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechter, Judy; Uhlhorn, Susan B

    2011-11-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. Latinos aged 1 to 35 years. Restraint use is an effective means of prevention of motor vehicle crash injury. Effective interventions to raise restraint use include the following: legislation, law enforcement, education, and equipment distribution. The effects of law enforcement interventions in Latino immigrant communities are understudied. We measured the community-level effect of a combined intervention that included warnings and citations phase enforcement in Latino communities. We designed and implemented in two of three Latino-majority communities a multicomponent intervention consisting of a community awareness campaign, restraint use education with equipment distribution, and a two-staged law enforcement intervention. Restraint use observations were conducted in all three communities at baseline, after the warnings phase and again after the citations phase of the intervention were completed. The combined intervention of community awareness, education, child passenger restraint distribution, and law enforcement focused on educational traffic stops with incentives and warnings was associated with a significant increase in both driver and child passenger restraint use in one intervention community, but only driver restraint increased to a level of significance in the other intervention community; significant increase was also noted among nonintervention drivers. The citations phase of the intervention did not result in a significant increase in restraint use and was complicated by interruptions due to unlicensed drivers. The combined effort of community awareness, education, equipment distribution and law enforcement intervention that included incentives and warnings may be effective at increasing seat belt use in Latino communities without the need for citations.

  3. Effects of cannabinoid 1 receptor on regulation of visceral sensitivity in rats with acute restraint stress%大麻素1型受体在应激大鼠内脏敏感性调节中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈蕾; 杨小军; 钱伟; 侯晓华

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究大麻素1型受体(CB1R)对急性部分束缚应激大鼠内脏敏感性的调节作用.方法 将30只Sprague-Dawley大鼠均分成空白对照组(假性应激)、应激对照组和激动剂组.于实验第1、2、5、8天以测定结直肠气囊扩张(CRD)后腹壁肌电图(EMG)放电频率表示大鼠内脏感觉功能的变化.通过RT-PCR方法 检测实验第8天各组肠道CBIR mRNA表达水平.结果 实验第1天,三组大鼠腹壁肌电放电频率基础值差异均无统计学意义(P值均>0.05).实验第2天,激动剂组大鼠在40、60、80 mm Hg(1 mm Hg=0.133 kPa)压力下的腹壁肌电放电频率[分别为(22.37±1.49)、(42.24±3.03)、(69.09±5.54)次/min]较应激对照组大鼠[分别为(39.71±1.84)、(84.45±8.85)、(112.56±11.66)次/min]显著降低(P0.05).应激对照组大鼠回盲部、近端结肠和远端结肠CB1R mRNA表达水平(分别为2.53±0.52、2.29±0.42、2.54±0.29)均显著高于空白对照组(分别为0.56±0.15、0.73±0.12、0.82±0.09),差异均有统计学意义(P值均<0.05).CB1R激动剂干预对大鼠肠道CB1RmRNA表达无影响.结论 CB1R在束缚应激所致大鼠内脏高敏感中起重要的保护性调节作用.%Objective To investigate the effects of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) on regulating visceral sensitivity in rats with acute partial restraint stress. Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into blank control (sham stress), acute stress and CB1R groups with 10 each. The frequency of discharge of electromyogram (EMG) was recorded at the 1st, 2nd, 5th and 8th day to evaluate the visceral sensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) in rats. The expression of the CB1R mRNA was determined by means of RT-PCR at day 8. Results There was no significant difference in baseline discharge frequency among three groups at the 1st day. But the discharge frequencies corresponding to CRD at 40,60,80 mm Hg at the 2nd day were significantly lower in CB1R group [(22.37±1.49)/min, (42.24±3

  4. Food craving, dietary restraint and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A J; Weaver, C F; Blundell, J E

    1991-12-01

    A common assumption is that dieting causes food cravings, probably as a result of food energy deprivation. This issue was investigated in a two-phase study. In phase one, 206 women completed the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire, the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and a food craving scale. A correlational analysis showed food craving to be only weakly related to dietary restraint, but highly and significantly correlated with external eating, emotional eating and susceptibility to hunger. In phase two, ten women who regularly experienced food cravings and ten who rarely craved food kept prospective records of their food intake, daily mood and food craving episodes. There were few differences in eating behaviour, although the cravers tended to consume slightly more daily energy than the non-cravers. The cravers had higher ratings of boredom and anxiety during the day, and dysphoric mood was prominent prior to the cravings themselves. Food deprivation does not appear to be a necessary condition for food cravings to occur. Rather, food cravings are closely associated with mood, in particular as an antecedent to craving and also as a consequence of craving.

  5. Restraint increases prolactin and REM sleep in C57BL/6J mice but not in BALB/cJ mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Easton, Amy; Bergmann, Bernard M.; Turek, Fred W.

    2001-01-01

    Sleep is generally considered to be a recovery from prior wakefulness. The architecture of sleep not only depends on the duration of wakefulness but also on its quality in terms of specific experiences. In the present experiment, we studied the effects of restraint stress on sleep architecture and s

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase and chronic restraint induce impaired learning and memory and sickness responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda F; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John F; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and carry the latent virus. The EBV genome codes for several proteins that form an early antigen complex important for viral replication; one of these proteins is deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase). The EBV-encoded dUTPase can induce sickness responses in mice. Because stress can increase latent virus reactivation, we hypothesized that chronic restraint would exacerbate sickness behaviors elicited by EBV-encoded dUTPase. Male Swiss-Webster mice were injected daily for 15 days with either saline or EBV-encoded dUTPase. Additionally, half of the mice from each condition were either restrained for 3h daily or left undisturbed. Restraint stress impaired learning and memory in the passive avoidance chamber; impaired learning and memory was due to EBV-encoded dUTPase injected into restrained mice. EBV-encoded dUTPase induced sickness responses and restraint stress interacts with EBV-encoded dUTPase to exacerbate the sickness response. These data support a role for EBV-encoded dUTPase and restraint stress in altering the pathophysiology of EBV independent of viral replication.

  7. Avaliação do efeito da hipotermia por crioimersão corporal, nos neutrófilos e linfócitos sanguíneos de ratos submetidos ao exercício físico agudo Evaluation of the effect of hypothermia by cold water immersion on blood neutrophils and lymphocytes of rats submitted to acute exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Bachur

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O estresse sistêmico induzido pelo exercício libera substâncias bioativas determinantes da mobilização neutrofílica. A crioterapia diminui a reação inflamatória e atenua a elevação da perfusão sanguínea induzida pelo exercício. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a influência da hipotermia decorrente da crioimersão corporal (CIC imediata ao esforço físico agudo nas concentrações neutrofílicas e linfocíticas no sangue. Os ratos do grupo controle (AI foram mantidos em repouso enquanto os do grupo AII foram submetidos ao protocolo de CIC a 10ºC por 10 minutos. Enquanto os animais dos grupos BI, BII, BIII e BIV realizaram o esforço físico agudo (EFA em água a 31ºC durante 100 minutos com sobrecarga corpórea de 5% do peso corporal, os dos grupos CI, CII, CIII e CIV foram submetidos ao EFA seguido imediatamente de CIC. Nos grupos B e C, os animais foram sacrificados nos períodos de 06 (I, 12 (II, 24 (III e 48 (IV horas posteriores ao EFA. Através da microscopia óptica realizou-se a contagem dos neutrófilos e linfócitos. Utilizou-se do Teste T Student para análise estatística considerando-se nível de significância p Systemic stress induced by exercise increases bioactive substances in plasma which leads to neutrophilic mobilization. Cryotherapy causes a decrease in the inflammatory reaction and attenuates high blood perfusion after exercise. The objective of this work was to analyze the influence of cold water immersion (CWI after acute exercise on neutrophil and lymphocyte mobilization. A control group of rats (AI was kept at rest and a second group (AII was submitted to CWI at 10º C for 10 minutes. The animals of Groups BI, BII, BIII and BIV were submitted to acute exercise which consisted in swimming in water at 31º C for 100 minutes with a load equivalent to 5% of the body weight. Groups CI, CII, CIII and CIV were submitted to CWI immediately after acute exercise. The animals were sacrificed at 6 (I, 12 (II

  8. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. "Physical restraint" is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  9. RESTRAINTS AND PATIENTS WITH MENTAL DISORDERS AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zartaloudi A.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aggression management and means of control in psychiatric settings is an international issue. Many studies in mental health literature are related to the appearance and the causes of violence and the use of control procedures, such as seclusion and restraint, from mental health professionals in order to control and suppress aggressive and violent behavior. AIM: The purpose of this study is to present the restraints used to control the behaviour of mentally ill patients, the relationship between aggressive behavior and mental disorders and the historical background concerning the use of restrictive measures. METHOD: A critical review of this body of literature was carried out. Evidence was collected through Medline database. RESULTS: Two restraint techniques are used in order to cope with patients who could cause harm to themselves or their environment, physical restraint and seclusion. These restrictive measures are used through centuries in order to suppress violent behaviour of mental patients. CONCLUSION: Involuntary treatment and restraint are used when patients loose control of their behavior. In fact it is difficult to achieve a balance between ensuring patients’ rights and needs and preventing them from harming themselves or the others.

  10. [Medical-legal issues of physical and pharmacological restraint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Guija, Julio A; Ortega-Monasterio, Leopoldo

    2014-03-01

    The use of physical and pharmacological restraint is controversial but is currently accepted as inevitable. It is indicated for controlling behavioral disorders and psychomotor agitation that put patients and third parties at risk. Its indication should be medical, and we should opt for the least restrictive measure. Restraints represent a possible infringement of patients' fundamental rights and require understanding and strict respect for the medical-legal precepts by physicians and other practitioners involved in its application. This article reviews the current legal framework, as well as the medical-legal premises and aspects of applying restraints, with the objective of ensuring maximum respect for patients' rights and the appropriate legal safety in the activity of practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. Shopdiabetes.org: Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! - 2017-03-book-oclock-scramble.html Shopdiabetes.org Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent ...

  12. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  13. Clarification of abrasive jet precision finishing with wheel as restraint mechanisms and experimental verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the critical size ratio for the characteristic particle size to film thickness between grinding wheel and work, the machining mechanisms in abrasive jet precision finishing with grinding wheel as restraint can be categorized into four states, namely, two-body lapping, three-body polishing, abrasive jet machining and fluid hydrodynamic shear stress machining. The critical transition condition of two-body lapping to three-body polishing was analyzed. The single abrasive material removal models of two-body lapping, three-body polishing, abrasive jet finishing and fluid hydrodynamic shear stress machining were proposed. Experiments were performed in the refited plane grinding machine for theoretical modes verification. It was found that experimental results agreed with academic modes and the modes validity was verified.

  14. Fatal thromboembolism following physical restraint in a patient with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Rossana; Lazzaro, Antonella; Catanese, Miriam; Mandarelli, Gabriele; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Fatal thromboembolism during physical restraint in patients suffering from psychotic disorders is a very rare occurrence. In the case we present here, the criteria used in forensic pathology for the age determination of venous thrombi are applied to a case of pulmonary embolism in a patient suffering from schizophrenia who died after physical restraint. The possible association between conventional antipsychotic drugs and deep venous thrombosis, followed by pulmonary embolism, in a man with no predisposing risk factors, as well as the question concerning the appropriateness of medical care, are discussed.

  15. Nurses' and physicians' educational needs in seclusion and restraint practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Välimäki, Maritta; Putkonen, Hanna; Cocoman, Angela; Turpeinen, Saija; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Joffe, Grigori

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to explore nurses' (N= 22) and physicians' (N= 5) educational needs in the context of their perceived seclusion and restraint-related mode of action and need for support. The data were collected by focus group (N= 4) interviews and analyzed with inductive content analysis. Participants recognized a need for on-ward and problem-based education and infrastructural and managerial support. The declared high ethical principles were not in accordance with the participants' reliance on manpower and the high seclusion and restraint rates. Future educational programs should bring together written clinical guidelines, education on ethical and legal issues, and the staff's support aspect.

  16. Use of Physical Restraints in Dutch Intensive Care Units: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, A.W. van der; Peelen, L.M.; Raijmakers, R.J.; Vroegop, R.L.; Bakker, D.F.; Tekatli, H.; Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Slooter, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence indicates that harmful effects are associated with the use of physical restraint. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the use of physical restraint in intensive care units. Prevalence, adherence to protocols, and correlates of the use of physical restraint were determined.

  17. Public Policy on Physical Restraint of Children with Disabilities in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, James K.; Schwilk, Christopher; Mitruski, Megan

    2006-01-01

    The US Constitution, federal and state legislatures, courts, and regulations permit physical restraint for both therapeutic (i.e., behavior change) and risk prevention purposes. Although most venues limit restraint as punishment, no government entity prohibits use of physical restraint as a response to imminent danger. This paper provides a…

  18. The Social Validation of Three Physical Restraint Procedures: A Comparison of Young People and Professional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Andrew A.; Sturmey, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Forty-one special education professionals and classroom aides, 47 residential care staff, and 74 high school students rated the treatment acceptability of three forms of physical restraint. A chair method of restraint was rated as more acceptable than other floor restraint methods by all three groups. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  19. A Theoretical Analysis of Potential Extinction Properties of Behavior-Specific Manual Restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipani, Ennio; Thomas, Melvin; Martin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper will examine possible extinction properties of behavior-specific manual restraint. It will analyze the possibility of extinction being produced via restraint with respect to the target behavior's possible environmental functions. The theoretical analysis will involve the analysis of behavioral properties of restraint during two temporal…

  20. An Analysis of the Restraint Event and Its Behavioral Effects on Clients and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert J.; Timbers, Gary D.

    2002-01-01

    Programs serving troubled youth continuously struggle with the issue of using physical restraints and other coercive interventions. This paper revisits the issues and motivations surrounding restraint use. It offers an analytic perspective on the physical restraint cycle and the factors that tend to support its recurrence. (JDM)

  1. Public Policy on Physical Restraint of Children with Disabilities in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, James K.; Schwilk, Christopher; Mitruski, Megan

    2006-01-01

    The US Constitution, federal and state legislatures, courts, and regulations permit physical restraint for both therapeutic (i.e., behavior change) and risk prevention purposes. Although most venues limit restraint as punishment, no government entity prohibits use of physical restraint as a response to imminent danger. This paper provides a…

  2. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Wynn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients’ and staff’s perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  3. The Cost of Prior Restraint: "U. S. v. The Progressive."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloski, John; Dyer, Carolyn Stewart

    Increased litigation and rising litigation costs threaten the future of newspapers and magazines. A case study was conducted to determine the costs and effects of "United States v. 'The Progressive,'" a prior restraint case over the publication in 1979 of an article on the hydrogen bomb. "The Progressive," which operates at a deficit, spent almost…

  4. Safety restraint systems in heavy truck rollover scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaats, P.M.A.; Coo, P.J.A. de

    2003-01-01

    Safety restraint systems have been widely applied in the passenger car industry. The heavy truck industry has followed along, integrating the seat belts in the seat system. The effectiveness of seat belts, in particular in rollover scenarios, was studied for a number of heavy truck rollover scenario

  5. Development of a validated aircraft child restraint model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pipino, M.; Mugnai, A.; DeWeese, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute have shown that when used in aircraft, automotive Child Restraint Devices (CRDs) do not always provide the level of safety desired. Various factors that contribute to poor performance, such as seat belt anchor location, cushion stiffness, and

  6. 76 FR 10637 - Consumer Information; Program for Child Restraint Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... Program (CREP) B. Consumers Union C. EuroNCAP D. Japan NCAP (JNCAP) E. New Program for the Assessment of... restraint's Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. To ensure recommended CRS satisfy the proposed fit... centers, recreation centers, and restaurants in five fast food chains, it determined that 99 percent of...

  7. Restraints in daily care for people with moderate intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A.P.S.; Hermsen, Maaike; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-determination is an important factor in improving the quality of life of people with moderate intellectual disabilities. A focus on self-determination implies that restraints on the freedom of people with intellectual disabilities should be decreased. In addition, according to the D

  8. Restraints in daily care for people with moderate intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A.P.S.; Hermsen, Maaike; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Self-determination is an important factor in improving the quality of life of people with moderate intellectual disabilities. A focus on self-determination implies that restraints on the freedom of people with intellectual disabilities should be decreased. In addition, according to the

  9. Restraint use and seating position among children in motor vehicles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and disability in children in both developed and developing countries and account for ... 100 000 population. This is double the global rate and 26% higher .... and there is no significant variation by gender, 'race', age or grade.5 In an invisible survey (the .... education and advocacy for child passenger and driver restraint in.

  10. Paramagnetism-Based Restraints for Xplor-NIH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano, E-mail: ivanobertini@cerm.unifi.it; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Giachetti, Andrea [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Chemistry (Italy); Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Agricultural Biotechnology (Italy)

    2004-03-15

    Modules that use paramagnetism-based NMR restraints have been developed and integrated in the well known program for solution structure determination Xplor-NIH; the complete set of such modules is called PARArestraints for Xplor-NIH. Paramagnetism-based restraints are paramagnetic relaxation enhancements, pseudocontact shifts, residual dipolar couplings due to metal and overall magnetic anisotropy, and cross correlation between Curie relaxation and nuclear-nuclear dipolar relaxation. The complete program has been tested by back-calculating NOEs and paramagnetism-based restraints from the X-ray structure of cytochrome c{sub 553} from B. pasteurii. Furthermore, the same experimental restraints previously used to determine the solution structure of cytochrome c{sub 553} itself, of cytochrome b{sub 5}, and of calbindin D{sub 9k} with the program PARAMAGNETIC DYANA, have been used for structure calculations by using PARArestraints for Xplor-NIH. The agreement between the two programs is quite satisfactory and validates both protocols.

  11. Lip twitch restraint on rebound tonometry in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Caldart de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of the upper lip twitch restraint on intraocular pressure (IOP of healthy horses. In this study, forty five Criollo horses, aged between two to 20 years (male or female were evaluated with rebound tonometer, with and without upper lip twitch restraint. A previous ophthalmic examination was performed with Schirmer tear test, fluorescein test, slit lamp biomicroscopy and direct ophthalmoscopy in all horses. Only healthy animals with no ocular findings were used. The order of the IOP measurements (with or without twitch and order of the eye (right or left were randomized. Three measurements of each eye were made and the mean was calculated. Head position was kept above the heart level and no pressure was made over eyelids. At least 10 minutes passed between the evaluations of the same horse. Measurements were made between 3:30 and 5:30pm to avoid circadian fluctuation of intraocular pressure. Statistical analysis was performed with SAS 9.2 software. A Split plot factorial design was used where horses were considered blocks. The mean intraocular pressure values obtained with lip twitch restraint (34.68±6.47mmHg were significantly higher (P<0.05 than those obtained without (29.35±4.08mmHg. There was no relevant statistical difference between right and left eyes. The restraint of horses with upper lip twitch increased equine intraocular pressure measured with the rebound tonometry.

  12. [Physical restraint use in critical care units. Perceptions of patients and their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Ciriza Amatriain, A I; Nicolás Olmedo, A; Goñi Viguria, R; Regaira Martínez, E; Margall Coscojuela, M A; Asiain Erro, M C

    2012-01-01

    The use of physical restraints in Intensive Care Units (ICU) is common although little is known about patients' and relatives' perceptions of this use. 1) To analyze the prevalence and use of physical restraints in a general adult ICU; 2) to know the perceptions of patients who experienced use of physical restraints and; 3) to know the perceptions of relatives of patients who used physical restraints. This descriptive study, which used both quantitative and qualitative methods, was carried out in an adult ICU. For the first objective, all the patients (101) who had used any kind of physical restraint were analysed. For the second and third objectives, 30 patients and 30 relatives were interviewed using the guidelines of Strumpf & Evans as modified by Hardin (1993). All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and then submitted to a language content analysis using the method of Hsieh & Shannon. The only physical restraint used was the wrist restraint with a prevalence of 43.47%. Seventy-two percent of patients wore the restraint ≤12h and 28%>12h. Analysis of the patient interviews revealed 4 main themes: acceptance of the restraint conditioned by beliefs and information provided; feelings and sensations caused by the use of the restraint; alternatives proposed and future repercussions. Three themes emerged from the interviews with relatives: impressions caused by the use of the restrictions; reasons for accepting or rejecting them; alternatives to the use of restraints. Most patients used physical restraints for a short period of time and only the wrist restraint was used. Patients using physical restraints and their relatives expressed a wide range of feelings and sensations, with no negative future repercussions. In general, they agreed with the use of restraints although more precise information would lead to greater acceptance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  13. 5-HT7 receptors and tryptophan hydroxylase in lymphocytes of rats: mitogen activation, physical restraint or treatment with reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Mary; Arroyo, Rubén; Lima, Lucimey

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)7 receptors in lymphocytes play a relevant role as modulators of T cell functions and might be modified by stress protocols. The aims of this work were to evaluate: (i) the presence of 5-HT7 receptors in specific lymphocyte populations, (ii) the probable modifications of them by inflammatory stress with mitogen and (iii) the effects of physical and pharmacological stress. Blood lymphocytes were isolated by density gradients and differential adhesion to plastic. Concanavalin A (Con A) was systemically administered (500 μg/kg) or added to lymphocyte cultures (2.5 μg/ml, final volume 200 μl). Physical restraint was performed in Plexiglass boxes for 5 h per day for 5 days. Reserpine administration was 2.5 mg/kg for 3 days. Immunocytochemical labeling of CD4+, CD8+ and 5-HT7 receptors, and also tryptophan hydroxylase cells was performed. mRNA of 5-HT7 receptors was evaluated by RT-PCR. Controls were included for each protocol. Con A treatment or culture exposure increased the number of lymphocytes expressing 5-HT7 receptors or tryptophan hydroxylase, as compared to absence of the mitogen. Receptors were present in 12-16% of total rat lymphocytes, in ∼10% of CD4+ and in ∼5% of CD8+ cells from control rats. CD4+ decreased, and CD8+ and 5-HT7 cells increased after physical restraint. Reserpine treatment elevated CD8+ and 5-HT7 cells. Con A and physical restraint, but not reserpine treatment, significantly augmented 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in lymphocytes. Rat lymphocytes, expressing tryptophan hydroxylase, could synthesize 5-HT, functioning as a direct autocrine modulator. The modifications of CD4+, CD8+ and 5-HT7 receptors in lymphocytes by three stress protocols could have an impact on immune responses. In addition, the differential distribution of 5-HT7 receptors indicates potential specific physiopathological roles. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Changing the Practice of Physical Restraint Use in Acute Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Helen W; Leach, Kathy M; Butcher, Howard K

    2016-02-01

    Physical restraints continue to be used in acute care settings, despite the challenges and calls to reduce this practice. The current guideline on restraint use is updated with evidence that includes critical care settings and issues related to restraint use in acute care units. Nurses play a significant role in the use of restraints. Factors such as nurse's knowledge and patient characteristics combined with the culture and resources in health care facilities influence the practice of physical restraint use. Nurses can identify patients at high risk for restraint use; assess the potential causes of unsafe behaviors; and target interventions in the areas of physiological, psychological, and environmental approaches to address those unsafe behaviors. Members of the interdisciplinary team can provide additional consultation, and institutions can provide resources and education and implement monitoring processes and quality improvement practices to help reduce the practice of physical restraint use. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 17-26.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Effects of dietary restraint and body mass index on the relative reinforcing value of snack food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Gary S; Lumb, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the independent and interactive association between dietary restraint, body mass index (BMI) and the relative reinforcing value of food. Four hundred and three introductory psychology students completed questionnaires assessing age, gender, BMI, hunger, smoking status, nicotine dependence, dietary restraint, hedonic ratings for snack food and fruits and vegetables and the relative reinforcing value of snack food and fruits and vegetables. In the overall sample, results indicated a dietary restraint x BMI interaction after controlling for age, hunger, nicotine dependence, and hedonics. However, when regression models were separated by gender, the BMI x restraint interaction emerged only for females and not for males. Findings suggest that BMI moderates the relationship between dietary restraint and snack food reinforcement in females only, such that restraint and snack food reinforcement are inversely correlated in females with lower BMI, but restraint is positively correlated with snack food reinforcement in females with higher BMI. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. An enriched environment reduces the stress level and locomotor activity induced by acute morphine treatment and by saline after chronic morphine treatment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Sun, Jinling; Xue, Zhaoxia; Li, Xinwang

    2014-06-18

    This study investigated the relationships among an enriched environment, stress levels, and drug addiction. Mice were divided randomly into four treatment groups (n=12 each): enriched environment without restraint stress (EN), standard environment without restraint stress (SN), enriched environment with restraint stress (ES), and standard environment with restraint stress (SS). Mice were reared in the respective environment for 45 days. Then, the ES and SS groups were subjected to restraint stress daily (2 h/day) for 14 days, whereas the EN and SN groups were not subjected to restraint stress during this stage. The stress levels of all mice were tested in the elevated plus maze immediately after exposure to restraint stress. After the 2-week stress testing period, mice were administered acute or chronic morphine (5 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days. Then, after a 7-day withdrawal period, the mice were injected with saline (1 ml/kg) or morphine (5 mg/kg) daily for 2 days to observe locomotor activity. The results indicated that the enriched environment reduced the stress and locomotor activity induced by acute morphine administration or saline after chronic morphine treatment. However, the enriched environment did not significantly inhibit locomotor activity induced by morphine challenge. In addition, the stress level did not mediate the effect of the enriched environment on drug-induced locomotor activity after acute or chronic morphine treatment.

  17. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  18. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  19. Cyclooxygenase 2,pS2,inducible nitric oxide synthase and transforming growth factor alpha in gastric adaptation to stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Nan Nie; Hai-Chen Sun; Xue-Hao Wu; Xiao-Ming Qian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of mucosal gene expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), pS2 (belongs to trefoil peptides),inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) in gastric adaptation to water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) in rats.METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed to single or repeated WRS for 4 h every other day for up to 6 d. Gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) was measured by laser Doppler fiowmeter3. The extent of gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated grossly and histologically and expressions of COX-2, pS2,iNOS and TGFα were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot.RESULTS: The damage to the surface of gastric epithelium with focal areas of deep haemorrhagic necrosis was induced by repeated WRS.The adaptative cytoprotection against stress was developed with activation of cell proliferation in the neck regions of gastric glands. The ulcer index (UI) in groups Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ was markedly reduced as compared with group Ⅰ (Ⅰ: 47.23±1.20; Ⅳ: 10.39±1.18,P<0.01). GMBF significantly decreased after first exposure to WRS with an adaptive increasement of GMBF in experimental groups after repetitive challenges with WRS. After the 4th WRS,the value of GMBF almost restored to normal level (Ⅰ:321.87±8.85; Ⅳ: 455.95±11.81,P<0.01). First WRS significantly decreased the expression of pS2 and significantly increased the expressions of COX-2, iNOS and TGFα. After repeated WRS, pS2 and TGFα expressions gradually increased (pS2: Ⅰ: 0.37±0.02; Ⅳ: 0.77±0.01; TGFα: Ⅰ:0.86±0.01; Ⅳ: 0.93±0.03, P<0.05) with a decrease in the expressions of COX-2 and iNOS (COX-2: Ⅰ: 0.45±0.02; Ⅳ:0.22±0.01; iNOS: Ⅰ: 0.93±0.01; Ⅳ: 0.56±0.01, P<0.01).Expressions of pS2, COX-2, iNOS and TGFα showed regular changes with a good relationship among them.CONCLUSION: Gastric adaptation to WRS injury involves enhanced cell proliferation, increased expression of pS2 and

  20. Líquido amniótico, atividade física e imersão em água na gestação Amniotic fluid, physical activity and water immersion during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia San Juan Dertkigil

    2005-12-01

    recently, several new techniques for volume correction have been tried in an attempt to reduce associated morbidity. A non-invasive method intensively used in Brazil is maternal hyper hydration. Other authors suggest water immersion techniques, static or with physical activity, quite in use these days. Nowadays there are yet few studies on physical exercise in the water for pregnant women related to maternal, fetal and perinatal benefits. This paper aims at a more in-depth study of water immersion aerobic exercises for pregnant women in connection with amniotic liquid volume and fetal well being.

  1. Comparison between cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) in short-term skeletal muscle recovery after high-intensity exercise in athletes--preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar; de Godoi, Vanessa; Mancalossi, José Luis; Rossi, Rafael Paolo; De Marchi, Thiago; Parente, Márcio; Grosselli, Douglas; Generosi, Rafael Abeche; Basso, Maira; Frigo, Lucio; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão

    2011-07-01

    In the last years, phototherapy has becoming a promising tool to improve skeletal muscle recovery after exercise, however, it was not compared with other modalities commonly used with this aim. In the present study we compared the short-term effects of cold water immersion therapy (CWIT) and light emitting diode therapy (LEDT) with placebo LEDT on biochemical markers related to skeletal muscle recovery after high-intensity exercise. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial was performed with six male young futsal athletes. They were treated with CWIT (5°C of temperature [SD ±1°]), active LEDT (69 LEDs with wavelengths 660/850 nm, 10/30 mW of output power, 30 s of irradiation time per point, and 41.7 J of total energy irradiated per point, total of ten points irradiated) or an identical placebo LEDT 5 min after each of three Wingate cycle tests. Pre-exercise, post-exercise, and post-treatment measurements were taken of blood lactate levels, creatine kinase (CK) activity, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. There were no significant differences in the work performed during the three Wingate tests (p > 0.05). All biochemical parameters increased from baseline values (p muscles with LEDT 5 min after the Wingate cycle test seemed to inhibit the expected post-exercise increase in blood lactate levels and CK activity. This suggests that LEDT has better potential than 5 min of CWIT for improving short-term post-exercise recovery.

  2. A national survey of the use of physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yumi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Kawasaki, Maki

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of physical restraints in the long-term care hospitals in Japan and to examine the factors of physical restraint use, including the specific skills/techniques that the staff use to minimise the restraints. Background.  Despite the national efforts to nullify physical restraint, it is still prevalent in long-term care facilities in and out of Japan. More detailed information regarding what affects physical restraint is needed. Cross-sectional mail survey. A questionnaire was sent to a nursing ward manager of the random sample of long-term care facilities in Japan. The average rate of physical restraint was 25·5%. Altogether, 81·0% of the restrained clients were under restraint for more than one month. The most prevalent method of restraint was bilateral bedrails, followed by the use of coveralls and gloves. Factors of restraint were different depending on the type of restraint, suggesting specific approaches are needed for specific type of restraint. Physical restraint is still prevalent in Japanese long-term care hospitals, and nurses need to develop effective intervention approach to redesigning practice related to physical restraints. Specialised intervention approach seems needed depending on the types of restraint. Specific approach should be developed to minimise the physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Physical restraint and near death of a psychiatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Trygve; Rørvik, Per; Haugslett, Laila; Wynn, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Physical restraint is used as a last resort emergency measure to calm and safeguard agitated and/or aggressive psychiatric patients. This can sometimes cause injuries, and rare fatalities have occurred. One mechanism of injury and death while in physical restraint is that of severe asphyxiation. We present the case of a hospitalized man in his mid-30s, suffering from schizophrenia. The patient was obese. He became aggressive and had to be manually restrained with a "takedown." After having been put in the prone position on the floor with a significant weight load on his body, he lost respiration and consciousness. Subsequently, he was given CPR. He regained consciousness and respiration, while the cyanosis receded in 1-2 min. Psychiatrists and pathologists should be aware that physically restraining a patient in the prone position with a significant weight load on the torso can, in rare cases, lead to asphyxiation. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Coping with budget restraint in a Scandinavian welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette Ljungdalh; Holm, Lotte; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different types of households react to experiences of food budget restraint in Denmark. The study applied a mixed method design, based on survey data and on qualitative interviews. The qualitative data source consisted of interviews with 30...... individuals from Danish households with different socio-economic characteristics, who had carried through changes in their everyday food handling practices due to economic restraint. The quantitative data consists of a survey among 1650 members of a household consumer panel provided by the market research...... of strategies are related to different levels of food budget restrictions. Strategies applied to storing and cooking food in more efficient manners were widely practiced across all groups. Strategies which affected eating experiences, such as compromising the tastiness of food and giving up social ties involved...

  5. Poor compliance with child safety restraint use while travelling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fallon, R

    2011-02-01

    Road traffic accidents are a leading cause of death of children. It is the law that all children should be appropriately secured when traveling in vehicles. The aim of this study was to evaluate parental conformity with these regulations and to test if advice given at a Paediatric outpatient clinic could improve compliance. Two groups were assigned, an intervention group (parents given an information leaflet and a clear explanation about appropriate restraints for their children) and a non-intervention group (received no information). They were contacted again after 2 months and asked regarding compliance. A total of 394 children from 186 families were initially given the questionnaire. Nearly one third of children (29.2%) were not using any restraint while travelling rising to 35.3% on follow up. This study concluded that once off parental education made negligible difference to an already inconsistent and haphazard approach to compliance with safety regulations.

  6. Physical restraint produces rapid acquisition of the pigeon's key peck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locurto, C. M.; Travers, Tania; Terrace, H. S.; Gibbon, John

    1980-01-01

    The acquisition and maintenance of autoshaped key pecking in pigeons was studied as a function of intertrial interval. At each of six intervals, which ranged from 12 seconds to 384 seconds, four pigeons were physically restrained during training while four other pigeons were not restrained. Restrained subjects acquired key pecking faster and with less intragroup variability at each interval. The effects of restraint were specific to acquisition and were not evident in maintained responding after five postacquisition sessions. PMID:16812175

  7. Automobile restraints for children: a review for clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Andrew W.

    2002-01-01

    MORE CANADIAN CHILDREN DIE OF ROAD TRAFFIC INJURIES than of any other cause. Nonuse and misuse of child restraints is common and leads to preventable severe injuries or deaths. This article, intended for clinicians interested in injury prevention counselling, advocacy, research, and treatment of child occupants in car crashes, reviews current knowledge about child safety seats and discusses controversies related to their use. Children should sit in the back seat of a vehicle and should be pro...

  8. Mental Health Nursing, Mechanical Restraint Measures and Patients’ Legal Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Søren; Gildberg, Frederik Alkier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Coercive mechanical restraint (MR) in psychiatry constitute the perhaps most important exception from the common health law requirement for involving patients in health care decisions and achieving their informed consent prior to treatment. Coercive measures and particularly MR constitute...... a serious collision with patient autonomy principles, pose a particular challenge to psychiatric patients’ legal rights, and put intensified demands on health professional performance. Legal rights principles require rationale for coercive measure use be thoroughly considered and rigorously documented...

  9. Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Line Skov; Lova, Lotte; Hansen, Zandra Kulikovsky; Schønemann, Emilie; Larsen, Line Lyngby; Colberg Olsen, Maria Sophia; Juhl, Nadja; Magnussen, Bogi Roin

    2012-01-01

    Stress er en tilstand som er meget omdiskuteret i samfundet, og dette besværliggør i en vis grad konkretiseringen af mulige løsningsforslag i bestræbelsen på at forebygge den såkaldte folkesygdom. Hovedkonklusionen er, at selv om der bliver gjort meget for at forebygge, er der ikke meget der aktivt kan sættes i værk for at reducere antallet af stressramte, før en fælles forståelse af stressårsager og effektiv stresshåndtering er fremlagt. Problemformuleringen er besvaret gennem en undersø...

  10. Predictors of physical restraint in a psychiatric emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Termeh; Shariat, Seyed Vahid; Jalali Nadoushan, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Considering the negative consequences of using physical restraints, we conducted this study to identify patients who are more frequently restrained in a psychiatric emergency ward as an initial step to limit the use of restraint to the minimum possible. This was a retrospective case control study conducted in Iran Psychiatric Hospital in Tehran, Iran. We reviewed the files of 607 patients who were admitted during a one year period using convenience sampling; of them, 186 were in the restrained group and 421 in the unrestrained group. Surprisingly, no significant difference was found between the restrained and unrestrained groups in demographic characteristics. The patients who were referred because of violence were diagnosed as having methamphetamine induced psychotic disorder or bipolar I disorder in manic 1episode and had a higher odds of being restrained (OR=2.51, OR=1.61, and OR=1.57 respectively). Being restrained was also associated with a longer duration of hospitalization and duration of staying in the emergency ward. Moreover, patients in their first admission were more frequently restrained. Medical and nursing staff should consider special measures for the patients who are at a higher risk for being restrained. More frequent visits and education for both patients and staff may be effective in reducing the number of physical restraints for these groups of patients.

  11. Modulation of Cortical Interhemispheric Interactions by Motor Facilitation or Restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical interhemispheric interactions in motor control are still poorly understood and it is important to clarify how these depend on inhibitory/facilitatory limb movements and motor expertise, as reflected by limb dominance. Here we addressed this problem using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a task involving dominant/nondominant limb mobilization in the presence/absence of contralateral limb restraint. In this way we could modulate excitation/deactivation of the contralateral hemisphere. Blocks of arm elevation were alternated with absent/present restraint of the contralateral limb in 17 participants. We found the expected activation of contralateral sensorimotor cortex and ipsilateral cerebellum during arm elevation. In addition, only the dominant arm elevation (hold period was accompanied by deactivation of ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, irrespective of presence/absence of contralateral restraint, although the latter increased deactivation. In contrast, the nondominant limb yielded absent deactivation and reduced area of contralateral activation upon restriction. Our results provide evidence for a difference in cortical communication during motor control (action facilitation/inhibition, depending on the “expertise” of the hemisphere that controls action (dominant versus nondominant. These results have relevant implications for the development of facilitation/inhibition strategies in neurorehabilitation, namely, in stroke, given that fMRI deactivations have recently been shown to reflect decreases in neural responses.

  12. Construct Validation of the Portuguese Version of the Restraint Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AimThe main purpose of this study was to adapt the Restraint Scale (RS to Portuguese and examine its psychometric properties, specifically its construct validity.MethodIn this study, 238 normal-weight adults (82% women; Mean age = 36.6, SD = 15.0 participated in an online survey containing measures of Restraint Scale, Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire, and Body Dissatisfaction and Drive for Thinness scales.ResultsExploratory factor analyses corroborated the two-factors structure found in previous studies, in particular when three items without clear factorial assignment and low correlation were excluded. A final two-factors version of the RS containing seven items presented a very good fit to the measurement model and good internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis of the 7-items RS in relation to a three-factor model of overeating, dieting and body dissatisfaction measures revealed that the RS was the only restraint measure loading in all three factors.ConclusionThis suggests that the 7-items Portuguese version of the RS has good psychometric properties and unique features that lend it appropriate to identify and study unsuccessful chronic dieters.

  13. The evolution of reproductive restraint through social communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Justin; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2004-07-27

    The evolution of altruistic behavior through group selection is generally viewed as possible in theory but unlikely in reality, because individual selection favoring selfish strategies should act more rapidly than group selection favoring cooperation. Here we demonstrate the evolution of altruism, in the form of conditional reproductive restraint based on an explicitly social mechanism, modulated by intrapopulation communication comprising signal and evolved response, in a spatially distributed predatory/parasitic/pathogenic model system. The predatory species consistently comes to exploit a signal implying overcrowding, individuals constraining their reproduction in response, with a corresponding increase in equilibrium reproduction rate in the absence of signal. This signaled restraint arises in a robust way for a range of model spatial systems; it outcompetes non-signal-based restraint and is not vulnerable to subversion by noncooperating variants. In these systems, communication is used to evaluate population density and regulate reproduction accordingly, consistent with central ideas of Wynne-Edwards [Wynne-Edwards, V. C. (1962) Animal Dispersion in Relation to Social Behavior (Hafner, New York)], whose claims about the evolutionary importance of group selection helped ignite decades of controversy. This quantitative simulation model shows how the key evolutionary transition from solitary living to sociality can occur. The process described here of cooperation evolving through communication may also help to explain other major evolutionary transitions such as intercellular communication leading to multicellular organisms.

  14. Exploring RNA conformational space under sparse distance restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William R.; Hamilton, Russell S.

    2017-01-01

    We show that the application of a small number of restraints predicted by coevolution analysis can provide a powerful restriction on the conformational freedom of an RNA molecule. The greatest degree of restriction occurs when a contact is predicted between the distal ends of a pair of adjacent stemloops but even with this location additional flexibilities in the molecule can mask the contribution. Multiple cross-links, especially those including a pseudoknot provided the strongest restraint on conformational freedom with the effect being most apparent in topologically simple folds and less so if the fold is more topologically entwined. Little was expected for large structures (over 300 bases) and although a few strong localised restrictions were observed, they contributed little to the restraint of the overall fold. Although contacts predicted using a correlated mutation analysis can provide some powerful restrictions on the conformational freedom of RNA molecules, they are too erratic in their occurrence and distribution to provide a general approach to the problem of RNA 3D structure prediction from sequence. PMID:28281575

  15. Incidence Rate and Patterns of Physical Restraint Use Among Adult Patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Fatemeh; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-11-16

    Incidence rate and patterns of physical restraint use were examined based on a cross-sectional study in 22 wards of a large teaching hospital in Malaysia. Results indicated that the highest rate of physical restraint (19.7%) was reported from neurology-neurosurgery wards. "Un-cooperative for electroconvulsive therapy" and "trying to pull out catheters" were the most commonly reported reasons to use restraint in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards, respectively. There were some relationships between patterns of physical restraint in this study. Exploring the incidence rate and patterns of physical restraint is important so that effective strategies can be formulated to minimize using restraint in hospitals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Ensemble models of proteins and protein domains based on distance distribution restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered peptide chains are not fully determined by experimental observations. Uncertainty due to lack of experimental restraints and due to intrinsic disorder can be distinguished if distance distributions restraints are available. Such restraints can be obtained from pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy applied to pairs of spin labels. Here, we introduce a Monte Carlo approach for generating conformational ensembles that are consistent with a set of distance distribution restraints, backbone dihedral angle statistics in known protein structures, and optionally, secondary structure propensities or membrane immersion depths. The approach is tested with simulated restraints for a terminal and an internal loop and for a protein with 69 residues by using sets of sparse restraints for underlying well-defined conformations and for published ensembles of a premolten globule-like and a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein.

  17. Chronic orthostatic and antiorthostatic restraint induce neuroendocrine, immune and neurophysiological disorders in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenmacher, I.; Mekaouche, M.; Maurel, D.; Barbanel, G.; Givalois, L.; Boissin, J.; Malaval, F.; Ixart, G.

    The tail-cast suspension rat model has been developed in ground laboratories interested in space physiology for extensive study of mechanisms causing the pathophysiological syndrome associated with space flights. We used individually-caged male rats to explore the effects of acute and chronic (7d) orthostatic restraint (OR) and head-down anti-orthostatic restraint (AOR) on a series of physiological variables. The acute restraint study showed that (1) the installation of the OR device induced an acute reaction for 2 days, with a substantial rise in ACTH (x2) and CORT (x6), and that (2) the head-down tilt from OR to AOR induced (i) within 10 min and lasting 60 min a 2-fold rise in the intra-cerebro-ventricular pressure (Picv) monitored with an icv telemetric recording system, which receded to normal between 60 and 120 min; and (ii) within 30 min a short-lived 4-fold rise in plasma ACTH and CORT levels. Chronic OR induced (1) the suppression of the diurnal ACTH/CORT rhythm, with increased mean levels, especially for ACTH, (2) a degraded circadian locomotor activity rhythm manifested by a significant reduction in the spectral power of the 24h periodicity and a concomitant emergence of shorter (ultradian) periodicities, (3) an associated, but less pronounced alteration of the diurnal rhythm in body temperature; and (4) a marked increase in baseline plasma levels of IL-1β and an increased reactivity in cytokine release following an E. coli endotoxin (LPS) challenge. AOR induced (1) a similar obliteration of the circadian ACTH/CORT rhythm, (2) the loss of close correlation between ACTH and CORT, (3) a generalized increase in baseline plasma IL-1β levels and (4) more extensive degradation of the arcadian periodicity for both locomotor activity and, to a lesser extent, body temperature, replaced by dominant spectral powers for ultradian periodicities (3 to 10h). In conclusion, both experimental paradigms — but AOR more than OR — caused a blockade of the arcadian

  18. Anti-oxidative effects of curcumin on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain, liver and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz

    2017-03-01

    Restraint stress has been indicated to induce oxidative damage in tissues. Several investigations have reported that curcumin (CUR) may have a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CUR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver and kidneys. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 1h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CUR daily for 21days. In order to evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities superoxide dismutase (SOD) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) were measured in the brain, liver and kidney of rats after the end of restraint stress. The restraint stress significantly increased MDA level, but decreased the level of GSH and activists of SOD, GPx, GR, and CAT the brain, liver and kidney of rats in comparison to the normal rats (Poxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, prevented apoptosis, and increased antioxidant defense mechanism activity in the tissues versus the control group (Pstress-induced oxidative damage in the brain, liver and kidney of rats and propose that CUR may be useful agents against oxidative stress in the tissues.

  19. Use of physical restraint: Nurses' knowledge, attitude, intention and practice and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Fatemeh; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Wong, Li Ping

    2017-02-23

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude, intention and practice of nurses towards physical restraint and factors influencing these variables. A literature review showed a lack of studies focused on the intention of nurses regarding physical restraint throughout the world. Considering that very little research on physical restraint use has been carried out in Malaysia, assessment of nurses' knowledge, attitude, intention and practice is necessary before developing a minimising programme in hospitals. A cross-sectional study was used. A questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, intention and practice was completed by all nurses (n = 309) in twelve wards of a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur. Moderate knowledge and attitude with strong intention to use physical restraint were found among the nurses. Less than half of nurses considered alternatives to physical restraint and most of them did not understand the reasons for the physical restraint. Nurses' academic qualification, read any information source during past year and nurses' work unit showed a significant association with nurses' knowledge. Multiple linear regression analysis found knowledge, attitude and intention were significantly associated with nurses' practice to use physical restraint. This study showed some important misunderstandings of nurses about using physical restraint and strong intention regarding using physical restraint. Findings of this study serve as a supporting reason for importance of educating nurses about the use of physical restraint. Exploring the knowledge, attitude, intention and current practice of nurses towards physical restraint is important so that an effective strategy can be formulated to minimise the use of physical restraints in hospitals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The detrimental effects of physical restraint as a consequence for inappropriate classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, S K; Ellis, J

    2001-01-01

    Functional analyses produced inconclusive results regarding variables that maintained problem behavior for 2 students with developmental disabilities. Procedures were modified to include a contingent physical restraint condition based on in-class observations. Results indicated that tinder conditions in which physical restraint (i.e., basket-hold timeout) was applied contingent on problem behavior, rates of these behaviors increased across sessions for both subjects. Implications for the use of physical restraint in the classroom are discussed. PMID:11800190

  1. Nursing Staff Views of Barriers to Physical Restraint Reduction in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hi Kong, RN, PhD

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this study provide a valuable basis for developing restraint reduction education programs. Korean national leaders and nursing homes should develop and employ practice guidelines regarding restraints, support nursing staff to follow the guidelines, provide more practical and professional education, employ alternative equipment, use a multidisciplinary team approach, and engage volunteers in care support as well as employ more nursing staff to achieve restraint-free care.

  2. The detrimental effects of physical restraint as a consequence for inappropriate classroom behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, S K; Ellis, J

    2001-01-01

    Functional analyses produced inconclusive results regarding variables that maintained problem behavior for 2 students with developmental disabilities. Procedures were modified to include a contingent physical restraint condition based on in-class observations. Results indicated that tinder conditions in which physical restraint (i.e., basket-hold timeout) was applied contingent on problem behavior, rates of these behaviors increased across sessions for both subjects. Implications for the use of physical restraint in the classroom are discussed.

  3. Keep it together: restraints in crystallographic refinement of macromolecule–ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Roberto A.; Tucker, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    A short introduction is provided to the concept of restraints in macromolecular crystallographic refinement. A typical ligand restraint-generation process is then described, covering types of input, the methodology and the mechanics behind the software in general terms, how this has evolved over recent years and what to look for in the output. Finally, the currently available restraint-generation software is compared, concluding with some thoughts for the future. PMID:28177305

  4. Occupant restraint in the rear seat: ATD responses to standard and pre-tensioning, force-limiting belt restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason; Michaelson, Jarett; Kent, Richard; Kuppa, Shashi; Bostrom, Ola

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that restrained occupants over the age of 50 in frontal crashes have a higher risk of injury in the rear seat than in the front, and have hypothesized that the incorporation of technology such as belt pre-tensioning and force limiting preferentially in the front seat is at least partially responsible for this trend. This study investigates the potential benefits and trade-offs of seat belt pretensioners and force-limiters in the rear seat using a series of frontal impact sled tests at two speeds (48 km/h and 29 km/h DeltaV) with a buck representing the interior of the reat seat occupant compartment of a contemporary mid-sized sedan. Four different dummies were tested: the Hybrid III six year old (in a booster seat, H3 6YO), the Hybrid III 5(th) percentile female (H3 AF05), the Hybrid III 50(th) percentile male (H3 AM50), and the THOR-NT. The restraints consisted of either a standard three point belt, or a 3-point belt with a retractor pretensioner and a progressive force-limiter (FL+PT). Each test condition was repeated in triplicate. The FL+PT restraints (compared to the standard restraints) resulted in a significant (p < or = 0.05) decrease in peak internal chest deflection for each of the Hybrid III dummies at both test speeds (48 km/h: 29% decrease for H3 6YO, 38% decrease for H3 AF05, 30% decrease for H3 AM50), and for the THOR-NT at a DeltaV of 29 km/h. At 48 km/h, the FL+PT restraint qualitatively decreased the average peak internal chest deflection of the THOR-NT, however this decrease was not statistically significant (p=0.06). Furthermore, the FL+PT system allowed little or no increase in forward head excursion, and improved whole-body kinematics for all dummies by restricting pelvic excursion and slightly increasing torso pitch. The results suggest that the FL+PT system studied here may provide injury-reducing benefit to rear seat occupants in moderate to high severity frontal crashes, although more study is needed to evaluate

  5. Occupant Restraint in the Rear Seat: ATD Responses to Standard and Pre-tensioning, Force-Limiting Belt Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason; Michaelson, Jarett; Kent, Richard; Kuppa, Shashi; Bostrom, Ola

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that restrained occupants over the age of 50 in frontal crashes have a higher risk of injury in the rear seat than in the front, and have hypothesized that the incorporation of technology such as belt pre-tensioning and force limiting preferentially in the front seat is at least partially responsible for this trend. This study investigates the potential benefits and trade-offs of seat belt pretensioners and force-limiters in the rear seat using a series of frontal impact sled tests at two speeds (48 km/h and 29 km/h ΔV) with a buck representing the interior of the reat seat occupant compartment of a contemporary mid-sized sedan. Four different dummies were tested: the Hybrid III six year old (in a booster seat, H3 6YO), the Hybrid III 5th percentile female (H3 AF05), the Hybrid III 50th percentile male (H3 AM50), and the THOR-NT. The restraints consisted of either a standard three point belt, or a 3-point belt with a retractor pretensioner and a progressive force-limiter (FL+PT). Each test condition was repeated in triplicate. The FL+PT restraints (compared to the standard restraints) resulted in a significant (p≤0.05) decrease in peak internal chest deflection for each of the Hybrid III dummies at both test speeds (48 km/h: 29% decrease for H3 6YO, 38% decrease for H3 AF05, 30% decrease for H3 AM50), and for the THOR-NT at a ΔV of 29 km/h. At 48 km/h, the FL+PT restraint qualitatively decreased the average peak internal chest deflection of the THOR-NT, however this decrease was not statistically significant (p=0.06). Furthermore, the FL+PT system allowed little or no increase in forward head excursion, and improved whole-body kinematics for all dummies by restricting pelvic excursion and slightly increasing torso pitch. The results suggest that the FL+PT system studied here may provide injury-reducing benefit to rear seat occupants in moderate to high severity frontal crashes, although more study is needed to evaluate these restraints

  6. Physical restraint deaths in a 13-year national cohort of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellenger, Emma; Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Bugeja, Lyndal; Kennedy, Briohny

    2017-07-01

    this paper aims to investigate the nature and extent of physical restraint deaths reported to Coroners in Australia over a 13-year period. the study comprised a retrospective cohort study of residents dwelling in accredited nursing homes in Australia whose deaths were reported to the Coroners between 1 July 2000 and 30 June 2013 and was attributed to physical restraint. five deaths in nursing home residents due to physical restraint were reported in Australia over a 13-year period. The median age of residents was 83 years; all residents had impaired mobility and had restraints applied for falls prevention. Neck compression and entrapment by the restraints was the mechanism of harm in all cases, resulting in restraint asphyxia and mechanical asphyxia, respectively. this national study confirms that the use of physical restraint does cause fatalities, although rare. Further research is still needed to identify which alternatives strategies to restraint are most effective, and to examine the reporting system for physical restraint-related deaths.

  7. 安哥拉本哥拉市膨胀性粉质粘土浸水试验研究%Field Water Immersion Test on Expansive Silty Clay in Benguela, Angola

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖燕宏; 唐国艺; 刘争宏

    2013-01-01

    The alluvial or diluvial silty clay around Benguela GRASA in Angola has the properties of swelling.Because of the very low water content,it is too dry to fetch the undisturbed sample,but the laboratory index from disturbed samples such as free swell and atterberg limits may distort the real fact~ So it is necessary and helpful to adopt field water immersion test for ascertaining the swelling properties.The results of the field test indicated that the laboratory results have limitations and mistakes to determine the swelling properties; the silty clay has a high potential of swelling because of low water content; while increasing the water content,the soil has high swelling deformation and expansive force; the deformation curve of the plate shows subsoil heave is sensitive with small fluctuation of moisture content; but,the strength would fall fast if the water content increase more,the Benguela silty clay has obvious sensitivity to water with the phenomena swelling and weakness during water content increasing.%本哥拉GRASA地区山前冲洪积成因的膨胀性粉质粘土因其含水率很小,难于取得原状土样,通过自由膨胀率、界限含水率等室内试验指标评价为非膨胀性土.但是现场浸水载荷试验结果表明:室内试验结果具有很大的局限性且存在误判的可能;本哥拉粉质粘土常年处于干燥低含水率状态,具有很大的膨胀潜势,浸水饱和后的膨胀量和膨胀力均很强烈;载荷板的变形过程揭示了土体遇水明显膨胀又容易发生地基破坏的性质,承载力在接近或达到饱和后,其强度又迅速大幅降低,粉质粘土具有明显遇水膨胀和增湿软化强烈的水敏特性.本哥拉粉质粘土的室内试验和现场试验具有显著的差异性,现场浸水载荷试验对于正确判定该类膨胀土的工程性质具有不可替代的作用.

  8. Grapefruit-seed extract attenuates ethanol-and stress-induced gastric lesions via activation of prostaglandin, nitric oxide and sensory nerve pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomasz Brzozowski; Peter C Konturek; Danuta Drozdowicz; Stanislaw J Konturek; Oxana Zayachivska; Robert Pajdo; Slawomir Kwiecien; Wieslaw W Pawlik; Eckhart G Hahn

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Grapefruit-seed extract (GSE) containing flavonoids, possesses antibacterial and antioxidative properties but whether it influences the gastric defense mechanism and gastroprotection against ethanol- and stress-induced gastric lesions remains unknown.METHODS: We compared the effects of GSE on gastric mucosal lesions induced in rats by topical application of 100% ethanol or 3.5 h of water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) with or without (A) inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity by indomethacin and rofecoxib, the selective COX-2 inhibitor, (B) suppression of NO-synthase with L-NNA (20 mg/kg ip), and (C) inactivation by capsaicin (125 mg/kg sc) of sensory nerves with or without intragastric (ig) pretreatment with GSE applied 30 min prior to ethanol or WRS. One hour after ethanol and 3.5 h after the end of WRS, the number and area of gastric lesions were measured by planimetry, the gastric bloodflow (GBF) was assessed by H2-gas clearance technique and plasma gastrin levels and the gastric mucosal generation of PGE2, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) concentration, as an index of lipid peroxidation were determined.RESULTS: Ethanol and WRS caused gastric lesions accompanied by the significant fall in the GBF and SOD activity and the rise in the mucosal MDA content.Pretreatment with GSE (8-64 mg/kg i g) dosedependently attenuated gastric lesions induced by 100% ethanol and WRS; the dose reducing these lesions by 50% (ID50) was 25 and 36 mg/kg, respectively, and this protective effect was similar to that obtained with methyl PGE2 analog (5 μg/kg i g). GSE significantly raised the GBF, mucosal generation of PGE2, SOD activity and plasma gastrin levels while attenuating MDA content.Inhibition of PGE2 generation with indomethacin or rofecoxib and suppression of NO synthase by L-NNA or capsaicin denervation reversed the GSE-induced protection and the accompanying hyperemia. Cotreatment of exogenous calcitonine gene

  9. A novel approach for stress-induced gastritis based on paradoxical anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory action of exogenous 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ock, Chan Young; Hong, Kyung Sook; Choi, Ki-Seok; Chung, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yun soo; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack guanine bases in DNA and form 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which has been regarded simply as an oxidative mutagenic by-product. On the other hand, our previous report showed paradoxically ROS attenuating action of generated 8-OHdG. In the current study, both in vitro and in vivo experiments were executed in order to document anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions of 8-OHdG in cell model and to elucidate the therapeutic efficacy against water immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced gastritis animal model. Electron spin resonance measurements showed that 8-OHdG at >5μg/ml completely scavenged OH(-) radicals, which was further confirmed by checking 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) spectroscopy. On molecular assay, 8-OHdG antagonized the action of GTP on Rac, a small GTP binding protein, without affecting Rac-guanosine exchange factor (GEF) or phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) activity. In Raw264.7 cells, 8-OHdG was found to be associated with marked attenuations of NOX1, NOXO1, and NOXA1 accompanied with the decreased expressions of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators including COX-2, iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6. Similarly, 8-OHdG attenuated hypoxia-induced angiogenesis and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), COX-2, iNOS, IL-8, and VEGF expressions in HUVEC cells. At transcriptional level, 8-OHdG inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, inhibitory κB kinase (IKK) β kinase activation, and decreased phospho-IκBα levels. 8-OHdG efficiently ameliorated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal injury as evidenced with improvement of gross lesion index and attenuation of engaging mediators. Taken together, exogenous 8-OHdG can be a functional molecule regulating oxidative stress-induced gastritis through either antagonizing Rac-GTP binding or blocking the signals responsible for gastric inflammatory cascade. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aceh Free Pasung: Releasing the mentally ill from physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puteh, Ibrahim; Marthoenis, M; Minas, Harry

    2011-05-14

    Physical restraint and confinement of the mentally ill (called pasung in Indonesia) is common in Aceh. In early 2010, the local government initiated a program called Aceh Free Pasung 2010. The main goal of the program is to release the mentally ill in the province from restraint and to provide appropriate medical treatment and care. The aim of the paper is to report the findings of a preliminary investigation of the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who have been admitted to the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital, where people who had been restrained or confined in the community are being admitted for psychiatric treatment and, where necessary, physical rehabilitation, as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. Fifty-nine of former ex-pasung patients were examined. The majority (88.1%) of the patients were male, aged 18 to 68 years. The duration of pasung varied from a few days to 20 years, with a mean duration of 4.0 years. The reasons for applying pasung are many, with concerns about dangerousness being most common. The great majority (89.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The development of a community mental health system and the introduction of a health insurance system in Aceh (together with the national health insurance scheme for the poor) has enabled access to free hospital treatment for people with severe mental disorders, including those who have been in pasung. The demographic and clinical characteristics of this group of ex-pasung patients are broadly similar to those reported in previous studies. The Aceh Free Pasung program is an important mental health and human rights initiative that can serve to inform similar efforts in other parts of Indonesia and other low and middle-income countries where restraint and confinement of the mentally ill is receiving insufficient attention.

  11. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  12. Staff perceptions of barriers to physical restraint-reduction in long-term care: a meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eun-Hi; Choi, Heeseung; Evans, Lois K

    2017-01-01

    To critically review the existing qualitative studies to identify, from the perspective of staff, the barriers to physical restraint reduction in long-term geriatric care facilities. Despite the adverse physical and psychosocial effects, physical restraints are still used frequently in many geriatric long-term care facilities around the world. There is, however, no study that synthesises the existing qualitative literature regarding the barriers to the restraint reduction from the perspective of facility staff. The metastudy research process guided this qualitative synthesis. Five electronic databases were searched, and ten studies were included in this metastudy. Five themes were identified through metasynthesis of the findings: concern about and responsibility for safety, unclear and inconsistent definitions of restraint and restraint-free care, difficulties in the transition from acceptance to removal, noninvolvement in decision-making to remove restraint and insufficient resources and education. A concept analysis of physical restraint is sorely needed, and future studies should explore the prevalence of restraint, the effects of education for staff and family on restraint reduction, and success stories related to restraint-free care. More research is needed regarding the restraint reduction effectiveness and cost issues. Physical restraints, commonly used in many geriatric long-term care facilities, result in many negative effects and ethical issues. To achieve success in reducing physical restraint use, governmental policies and long-term care institutions should underpin staff efforts with legal, educational and practical support. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ligamentous and capsular restraints to experimental posterior elbow joint dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Søren R; Olsen, Bo S; Jensen, Steen L

    2003-01-01

    Pathological external forearm rotation (PEFR) relates to posterolateral elbow joint instability, and is considered a possible requisite step in a simple posterior elbow joint dislocation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capsuloligamentous restraint to PEFR. In all, 18 elbow joint...... specimens were examined in a joint analysis system developed for experimental elbow dislocation. Sequential cutting of capsule and ligaments followed by stability testing provided specific data relating to each capsuloligamentous structure. The primary stabilizers against PEFR in the extended elbow were...

  14. Short-term effects of an educational intervention on physical restraint use: a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Anna R; Hamers, Jan PH; Gulpers, Math JM; Berger, Martijn PF

    2006-01-01

    Background Physical restraints are still frequently used in nursing home residents despite growing evidence for the ineffectiveness and negative consequences of these methods. Therefore, reduction in the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents is very important. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of an educational intervention on the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents. Methods A cluster randomized trial was applied to 5 psycho-geriatric nursing home wards (n = 167 residents with dementia). The wards were assigned at random to either educational intervention (3 wards) or control status (2 wards). The restraint status was observed and residents' characteristics, such as cognitive status, were determined by using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) at baseline and 1 month after intervention. Results Restraint use did not change significantly over time in the experimental group (55%–56%), compared to a significant increased use (P < 0.05) in the control group (56%–70%). The mean restraint intensity and mean multiple restraint use in residents increased in the control group but no changes were shown in the experimental group. Logistic regression analysis showed that residents in the control group were more likely to experience increased restraint use than residents in the experimental group. Conclusion An educational programme for nurses combined with consultation with a nurse specialist did not decrease the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents in the short term. However, the residents in the control group experienced more restraint use during the study period compared to the residents in the experimental group. Whether the intervention will reduce restraint use in the long term could not be inferred from these results. Further research is necessary to gain insight into the long-term effects of this educational intervention. PMID:17067376

  15. Nursing Skill Mix, Nurse Staffing Level, and Physical Restraint Use in US Hospitals: a Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S; Olds, Danielle M; Cramer, Emily; Shorr, Ronald I

    2017-01-01

    Although it is plausible that nurse staffing is associated with use of physical restraints in hospitals, this has not been well established. This may be due to limitations in previous cross-sectional analyses lacking adequate control for unmeasured differences in patient-level variables among nursing units. To conduct a longitudinal study, with units serving as their own control, examining whether nurse staffing relative to a unit's long-term average is associated with restraint use. We analyzed 17 quarters of longitudinal data using mixed logistic regression, modeling quarterly odds of unit restraint use as a function of quarterly staffing relative to the unit's average staffing across study quarters. 3101 medical, surgical, and medical-surgical units in US hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators during 2006-2010. Units had to report at least one quarter with restraint use and one quarter without. We studied two nurse staffing variables: staffing level (total nursing hours per patient day) and nursing skill mix (proportion of nursing hours provided by RNs). Outcomes were any use of restraint, regardless of reason, and use of restraint for fall prevention. Nursing skill mix was inversely correlated with restraint use for fall prevention and for any reason. Compared to average quarters, odds of fall prevention restraint and of any restraint were respectively 16 % (95 % CI: 3-29 %) and 18 % (95 % CI: 8-29 %) higher for quarters with very low skill mix. In this longitudinal study there was a strong negative correlation between nursing skill mix and physical restraint use. Ensuring that skill mix is consistently adequate should reduce use of restraint.

  16. Effects of Stress, Corticosterone, and Epinephrine Administration on Learning in Place and Response Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Sadowski, Renee N.; Jackson, Gloria R.; Wieczorek, Lindsay A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of prior stress, corticosterone, or epinephrine on learning in mazes that can be solved efficiently using either place or response strategies. In a repeated stress condition, rats received restraint stress for 6 h/day for 21 days, ending 24 h before food-motivated maze training. In two single-stress conditions, rats received a 1-h episode of restraint stress ending 30 min or 24 h prior to training. Single stress ending 30 min prior to training resulted i...

  17. Thermographic registration of thermal effects in plants exposed to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovchavtcev A.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In present paper the possibility of continuous measurement of thermal effects of plants by thermography was investigated. The problems of measurement precision decreasing and thermograph calibration to cold-restraint stress process temperature region was discussed. The possibility of fast temperature measurement of plants in cold-restraint stress process was investigated. The dead temperature region of winter wheat was find out.

  18. Using Seclusion Timeout and Physical Restraint: An Analysis of State Policy, Research, and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozalski, Michael E.; Yell, Mitchell L.; Boreson, Lynn A.

    2006-01-01

    Seclusion timeout and physical restraint are aversive procedures designed to reduce or eliminate students' serious problem behavior. Using these procedures with students in special education has become commonplace in the last decade. Nevertheless, both seclusion timeout and physical restraint procedures have been, and continue to be, quite…

  19. CCBD's Position Summary on Physical Restraint & Seclusion Procedures in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Reece; Albrecht, Susan; Johns, Bev

    2009-01-01

    This document is a summary of policy recommendations from two longer and more detailed documents available from the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD) regarding the use of physical restraint and seclusion procedures in schools. These recommendations include: (1) CCBD believes that physical restraint or seclusion procedures…

  20. Suppression of Pica by Overcorrection and Physical Restraint: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Bakker, Leon W.

    1984-01-01

    Each occurrence of pica (ingestion of inedible objects) in two profoundly retarded adults was followed by either overcorrection or physical restraint. Although both procedures reduced the occurrence of pica and had a similar effect on collateral behaviors, physical restraint was clinically more effective in terms of immediate response reduction.…