WorldWideScience

Sample records for water-coupled low-frequency modes

  1. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  2. Multiscale low-frequency circulation modes in the global atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, K.-M.; Sheu, P.-J.; Kang, I.-S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, fundamental multiscale circulation modes in the global atmosphere are identified with the objective of providing better understanding of atmospheric low-frequency variabilities over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. With the use of a combination of rotated principal component technique, singular spectrum analysis, and phase space portraits, three categories of basic multiscale modes in the atmosphere are found. The first is the interannual-mode (IAM), which is dominated by time scales longer than a year and can be attributed to heating and circulation anomalies associated with the coupled tropical ocean-atmosphere, in particular the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The second is a set of tropical intraseasonal modes consisting of three separate multiscale patterns (ISO-1, -2, -3) related to tropical heating that can be identified with the different phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), including its teleconnection to the extratropics. The ISO spatial and temporal patterns suggest that the extratropical wave train in the North Pacific and North America is related to heating over the Maritime Continent and that the evolution of the MJO around the equator may require forcing from the extratropics spawning convection over the Indian Ocean. The third category represents extratropical intraseasonal oscillations arising from internal dynamics of the basic-state circulation. In the Northern Hemisphere, there are two distinct circulation modes with multiple frequencies in this category: the Pacific/North America (PNA) and the North Atlantic/Eurasia (NAE). In the Southern Hemisphere, two phase-locked modes (PSA-1 and PSA-2) are found depicting an eastward propagating wave train from eastern Australia, via the Pacific South America to the South Atlantic. The extratropical modes exhibit temporal characteristics such as phase locking and harmonic oscillations possibly associated with quadratically nonlinear dynamical systems. Additionally, the

  3. Power system low frequency oscillation mode estimation using wide area measurement systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Ray

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in power systems are triggered by a wide variety of events. The system damps most of the oscillations, but a few undamped oscillations may remain which may lead to system collapse. Therefore low frequency oscillations inspection is necessary in the context of recent power system operation and control. Ringdown portion of the signal provides rich information of the low frequency oscillatory modes which has been taken into analysis. This paper provides a practical case study in which seven signal processing based techniques i.e. Prony Analysis (PA, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, S-Transform (ST, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD, Estimation of Signal Parameters by Rotational Invariance Technique (ESPRIT, Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT and Matrix Pencil Method (MPM were presented for estimating the low frequency modes in a given ringdown signal. Preprocessing of the signal is done by detrending. The application of the signal processing techniques is illustrated using actual wide area measurement systems (WAMS data collected from four different Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU i.e. Dadri, Vindyachal, Kanpur and Moga which are located near the recent disturbance event at the Northern Grid of India. Simulation results show that the seven signal processing technique (FFT, PA, ST, WVD, ESPRIT, HHT and MPM estimates two common oscillatory frequency modes (0.2, 0.5 from the raw signal. Thus, these seven techniques provide satisfactory performance in determining small frequency modes of the signal without losing its valuable property. Also a comparative study of the seven signal processing techniques has been carried out in order to find the best one. It was found that FFT and ESPRIT gives exact frequency modes as compared to other techniques, so they are recommended for estimation of low frequency modes. Further investigations were also carried out to estimate low frequency oscillatory mode with another case study of Eastern Interconnect Phasor Project

  4. Interaction between a low-frequency electrostatic mode and resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. R.; Hnat, B.; Dura, P.; Kirk, A.; Tamain, P.; the MAST Team

    2012-10-01

    A strong ≈10 kHz mode is detected in both potential and density fluctuations of the edge plasma of the MAST tokamak using a reciprocating probe. The mode is radially localized, with outer limit ≈2 cm inside the separatrix, and is affected on application of resonant magnetic perturbations generated by external coils. A shift in frequency with plasma rotation is found, and a rapid suppression of the mode is observed when it can couple to the imposed n = 3 magnetic perturbations in the rotating frame. Non-linear coupling to high wave number turbulence is evident, and an increase in power of turbulence fluctuations is seen after suppression. These observations are then interpreted in the context of known low-frequency plasma modes present in the toroidal configuration. A possibility that the observed mode is a geodesic acoustic mode is considered and motivated by observations.

  5. Novel Resistorless Mixed-Mode PID Controller with Improved Low-Frequency Performance

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    V. Silaruam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new resistorless mixed-mode proportional-integral-derivative (PID controller. It employs six simple transconductors and only two grounded capacitors. The proposed PID controller offers several advantageous features of resistorless configuration, use of grounded capacitors, independent electronic-tuning characteristic of its parameters, and mixed-mode operation such as current, transimpedance, transadmittance, and voltage modes. The parasitic element effects of the transconductors on the proposed controller are investigated and the improved low-frequency performance of the proposed controller is then discussed. As applications, the proposed controller is demonstrated on two closed-loop systems. The PSPICE simulations with TSMC 0.18µm CMOS process and ±0.9V supply voltage verify the theoretical analysis.

  6. A stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback for the stratospheric northern annular mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Cai, Ming; Ren, Rongcai

    2017-08-01

    We consider three indices to measure the polar stratospheric mass and stratospheric meridional mass circulation variability: anomalies of (1) total mass in the polar stratospheric cap (60-90°N, above the isentropic surface 400 K, PSM), (2) total adiabatic mass transport across 60°N into the polar stratosphere cap (AMT), (3) and total diabetic mass transport across 400 K from the polar stratosphere into the troposphere below (DMT). It is confirmed that the negative stratospheric Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and PSM indices have a nearly indistinguishable temporal evolution and a similar red-noise-like spectrum with a de-correlation timescale of 4 weeks. This enables us to examine the low-frequency nature of the NAM in the framework of mass circulation, namely, d/{dt}{PSM}={AMT} - {DMT} . The DMT index tends to be positively correlated with the PSM with a red-noise-like spectrum, representing slow radiative cooling processes giving rise to a de-correlation timescale of 3-4 weeks. The AMT is nearly perfectly correlated with the day-to-day tendency of PSM, reflecting a robust quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM at all frequency bands. Variations of vertically westward tilting of planetary waves contribute mainly to the high-frequency portion of AMT. It is the wave amplitude's slow vacillation that plays the leading role in the quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM. Based on this, we put forward a linear stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback from low-frequency amplitude vacillations of planetary waves to explain the amplified low-frequency response of PSM/NAM to a stochastic forcing from the westward tilting variability.

  7. Modes of low-frequency circulation variability in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Radan

    2015-04-01

    In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the modes of variability of tropospheric circulation on intra-seasonal timescales (also referred to as teleconnections) were described in detail several decades ago. Somewhat surprisingly, a similar description for the Southern Hemisphere (SH) is lacking, a possible reason for this being that the atmospheric circulation in the SH is more transient and less stationary than in the NH, which may have downplayed the importance of the modes for the description of the SH circulation. The only three exceptions that have been described and discussed in detail, including the temporal changes and effects on surface climate elements, are the Southern Annular Mode and two Pacific-South American modes. In the contribution, we present an overview of all the modes of the low-frequency circulation variabiltiy in the Southern Hemisphere extratropics, in all seasons, detected by rotated principal component analysis of monthly mean values of 500 hPa heights. The modes have different spatial structures: zonally oriented dipoles, annular strctures, wavetrains, and monopoles appear among them. Some of the modes are active throughout the year (e.g., the Southern Annular Mode); some of them are active in parts of year only (e.g., wavenumber-3 pattern in the cold half year and wavenumber-4 pattern in the warm half year); some modes forming circumpolar wavetrains in winter are split into two parts in other seasons. One particular mode, consisting of a bi-annular structure, active in all seasons except summer, carries the response of SH circulation to the climate shift in the late 1970's and/or the introducton of satellites in 1979. We provide evidence of the physical realism of the modes by comparing them with correlation maps.

  8. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

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    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  9. Identification of low-frequency kinetic wave modes in the Earth's ion foreshock

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    X. Blanco-Cano

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we use ion and magnetic field data from the AMPTE-UKS mission to study the characteristics of low frequency (ωr « Ωp waves observed upstream of the Earth's bow shock. We test the application of various plasma-field correlations and magnetic ratios derived from linear Vlasov theory to identify the modes in this region. We evaluate (for a parameter space consistent with the ion foreshock the Alfvén ratio, the parallel compressibility, the cross-helicity, the noncoplanar ratio, the magnetic compression and the polarization for the two kinetic instabilities that can be generated in the foreshock by the interaction of hot diffuse ions with the solar wind: the left-hand resonant and the right-hand resonant ion beam instabilities. Comparison of these quantities with the observed plasma-field correlations and various magnetic properties of the waves observed during 10 intervals on 30 October 1984, where the waves are associated with diffuse ions, allows us to identify regions with Alfvénic waves and regions where the predominant mode is the right-hand resonant instability. In all the cases the waves are transverse, propagating at angles ≤ 33° and are elliptically polarized. Our results suggest that while the observed Alfvén waves are generated locally by hot diffuse ions, the right-handed waves may result from the superposition of waves generated by two different types of beam distribution (i.e. cold beam and diffuse ions. Even when there was good agreement between the values of observed transport ratios and the values given by the theory, some discrepancies were found. This shows that the observed waves are different from the theoretical modes and that mode identification based only on polarization quantities does not give a complete picture of the waves' characteristics and can lead to mode identification of waves whose polarization may agree with theoretical predictions even when other properties can diverge from those of the

  10. Identification of low-frequency kinetic wave modes in the Earth's ion foreshock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Blanco-Cano

    Full Text Available In this work we use ion and magnetic field data from the AMPTE-UKS mission to study the characteristics of low frequencyr « Ωp waves observed upstream of the Earth's bow shock. We test the application of various plasma-field correlations and magnetic ratios derived from linear Vlasov theory to identify the modes in this region. We evaluate (for a parameter space consistent with the ion foreshock the Alfvén ratio, the parallel compressibility, the cross-helicity, the noncoplanar ratio, the magnetic compression and the polarization for the two kinetic instabilities that can be generated in the foreshock by the interaction of hot diffuse ions with the solar wind: the left-hand resonant and the right-hand resonant ion beam instabilities. Comparison of these quantities with the observed plasma-field correlations and various magnetic properties of the waves observed during 10 intervals on 30 October 1984, where the waves are associated with diffuse ions, allows us to identify regions with Alfvénic waves and regions where the predominant mode is the right-hand resonant instability. In all the cases the waves are transverse, propagating at angles ≤ 33° and are elliptically polarized. Our results suggest that while the observed Alfvén waves are generated locally by hot diffuse ions, the right-handed waves may result from the superposition of waves generated by two different types of beam distribution (i.e. cold beam and diffuse ions. Even when there was good agreement between the values of observed transport ratios and the values given by the theory, some discrepancies were found. This shows that the observed waves are different from the theoretical modes and that mode identification based only on polarization quantities does not give a complete picture of the waves' characteristics and can lead to mode identification of waves whose polarization may agree with theoretical predictions even when

  11. Task-related modulations of BOLD low-frequency fluctuations within the default mode network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasin, Silvia; Mascali, Daniele; Gili, Tommaso; Eid Assan, Ibrahim; Moraschi, Marta; Fratini, Michela; Wise, Richard G.; Macaluso, Emiliano; Mangia, Silvia; Giove, Federico

    2017-07-01

    Spontaneous low-frequency Blood-Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals acquired during resting state are characterized by spatial patterns of synchronous fluctuations, ultimately leading to the identification of robust brain networks. The resting-state brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN), are demonstrated to persist during sustained task execution, but the exact features of task-related changes of network properties are still not well characterized. In this work we sought to examine in a group of 20 healthy volunteers (age 33±6 years, 8F/12M) the relationship between changes of spectral and spatiotemporal features of one prominent resting-state network, namely the DMN, during the steady-state execution of a sustained working memory n-back task. We found that the steady state execution of such a task impacted on both functional connectivity and amplitude of BOLD fluctuations within large parts of the DMN, but these changes correlated between each other only in a small area of the posterior cingulate. We conclude that combined analysis of multiple parameters related to connectivity, and their changes during the transition from resting state to steady-state task execution, can contribute to a better understanding of how brain networks rearrange themselves in response of a task.

  12. Task-Related Modulations of BOLD Low-Frequency Fluctuations within the Default Mode Network

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    Silvia Tommasin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous low-frequency Blood-Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD signals acquired during resting state are characterized by spatial patterns of synchronous fluctuations, ultimately leading to the identification of robust brain networks. The resting-state brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, are demonstrated to persist during sustained task execution, but the exact features of task-related changes of network properties are still not well characterized. In this work we sought to examine in a group of 20 healthy volunteers (age 33 ± 6 years, 8 F/12 M the relationship between changes of spectral and spatiotemporal features of one prominent resting-state network, namely the DMN, during the continuous execution of a working memory n-back task. We found that task execution impacted on both functional connectivity and amplitude of BOLD fluctuations within large parts of the DMN, but these changes correlated between each other only in a small area of the posterior cingulate. We conclude that combined analysis of multiple parameters related to connectivity, and their changes during the transition from resting state to continuous task execution, can contribute to a better understanding of how brain networks rearrange themselves in response to a task.

  13. Non-Gaussian Dyadic and Triadic Mutual Information among Atmospheric-Oceanic Low Frequency Variability Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Principal components (PCs) of the low-frequency variability have zero cross correlation by construction but they are not statistically independent. Their degree of dependency is assessed through the Shannon mutual information (MI). PCs were computed here both for: 1) the monthly running means of the stream functions of a one million days run of a T63, 3level, perpetual winter forced, quasi-geostrophic (QG3) model and 2) the annual running means of the SST from GISS 1880-2012 data. One computes both the dyadic MI: I(X,Y) and triadic MI: I(X,Y,Z) among arbitrary PCs X,Y,Z (rotated or not) by using a kernel-based MI estimation method applied to previously Gaussianized marginal variables obtained by Gaussian anamorphosis thus making estimation more resistant to outliers. Non-vanishing MI comes from the non-Gaussianity of the full PDF of the state-vector of retained PCs. Statistically significant non-Gaussian dyadic MI appears between leading PC-pairs, both for the QG3 model run (projecting on planetary-slow scales) and for GISS data where some nonlinear correlations are emphasized between Pacific and Atlantic SST modes. We propose an iterative optimization algorithm looking for uncorrelated variables X, Y, Z, (obtained from orthogonal projections), taken from a multivariate space of N PCs (N≥3), which maximize I(X,Y,Z), i.e. their triadic non-Gaussian interaction. It also maximizes the joint negentropy leading to the presence of relevant non-linear correlations across the three linearly uncorrelated variables. This is solved through an iterative optimization method by maximizing a positive contrast function (e.g. the squared expectation E(XYZ)2 ), vanishing under Gaussian conditions. In order to understand the origin of a statistically significant positive mutual information I(X,Y,Z)>0, one decomposes it into a dyadic term: I2(X,Y,Z)≡I(X,Y)+I(X,Z)+I(Y,Z), vanishing iff X,Y,Z are pair-wised independent and into a triadic term, the so called interactivity term: It(X

  14. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes.

  15. Interactive and Mutual Information among low-frequency variability modes of a quasi-geostrophic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carlos; Perdigão, Rui

    2013-04-01

    We assess the Shannon multivariate mutual information (MI) and interaction information (IT), either on a simultaneous or on a time-lagged (up to 3 months) basis, between low-frequency modes of an atmospheric, T63, 3-level, perpetual winter forced, quasi-geostrophic model. For that purpose, Principal Components (PCs) of the spherical-harmonic components of the monthly-mean stream-functions are used. Every single PC time-series (of 1000 years length) is subjected to a prior Gaussian anamorphosis before computing MI and IT. That allows for unambiguously decomposing MI into the positive Gaussian (depending on the Gaussian correlation) and the non-Gaussian MI terms. We use a kernel-based MI estimator. Since marginal Gaussian PDFs are imposed, that makes MI estimation very robust even when using short data. Statistically significant non-Gaussian bivariate MI appears between the variance-dominating PC-pairs of larger space and time-scales with evidence in the bivariate PDF of the mixing of PDFs centered at different weather regimes. The corresponding residual Gaussian MI is due to PCs being uncorrelated and to the weak non-Gaussianity of monthly-based PCs. The Gaussianized PCs in the tail's variance spectrum (of faster variability) do not much differ from Gaussian independent white noises. Trivariate MI I(A,B,C) (also known as total correlation) is computed among simultaneous and time-lagged PCs: A,B,C as well as the interaction information: IT(A,B,C)=I(A,B|C)-I(A,B)=I(A,C|B)-I(A,C)=I(B,C|A)-I(B,C) along with their Gaussian and non-Gaussian counterparts where conditional MI is used. The corresponding non-Gaussian term allows for quantifying nonlinear predictability and causality. For example, we find interactive variable triads of positive non-Gaussian IT where A=X(t+tau), B=Y(t+tau), C=Z(t) where t is time, tau is time-lag and X,Y,Z are arbitrary PCs. Typically it works when X,Y are nearly independent while Z(t) is a mediator variable taking the role of a precursor

  16. Ultra-low-frequency dust-electromagnetic modes in self-gravitating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... It is also found that in parallel propagating dust-Alfvén mode these effects play no role, but in obliquely propagating dust-Alfvén mode or perpendicular propagating dust-magnetosonic mode the effect of self-gravitational field plays destabilizing role whereas the effect of dust/ion fluid temperature plays ...

  17. Low-frequency variability of Western Boundary Currents in the turbulent ocean: intrinsic modes and atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sérazin, Guillaume; Penduff, Thierry; Terray, Laurent; Grégorio, Sandy; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes are particularly strong in Western Boundary Current (WBC) regions where SST front variations influence basin-scale climate variability. Observed low-frequency fluctuations in latitude and strength of these oceanic jets are classically thought to be essentially atmospherically-driven by wind stress curl variability via the oceanic Rossby wave adjustment. Yet academic eddy-resolving process-oriented models with double-gyre configurations have revealed that an idealized WBC may exhibit low-frequency intrinsic fluctuations without low-frequency external forcing (e.g. Berloff et al., 2007, Dijkstra and Ghil, 2005, etc). Experiments with eddying Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) have also shown that the amount of low-frequency Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) variability is largely intrinsic in WBCs (Penduff et al. 2011; Sérazin et al 2014) and that the frontal-scale (<10°) pattern of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) variability is similar to intrinsic modes (Taguchi et al. 2010). Based on a pair of atmospherically-forced 1/12° OGCM experiments that simulate with accuracy either the intrinsic variability (seasonally-forced) or the observed total variability (forced with the full range of atmospheric timescales), Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis is performed on zonally-averaged SLA fields of four main WBCs (e.g. Gulf Stream, Kuroshio Extension, Agulhas Current and East Australian Current). The first two modes of the KE and GS exhibit a similar spatial structure that is shaped by oceanic intrinsic processes. The frequency content is however different between the intrinsic and total Principal Components, the former containing a wide range of timescales similar to a red noise and the latter being more autocorrelated at interannual-to-decadal timescales. These modes are compared with those obtained from the 20 years of altimetry observation and relationships with low-frequency westward propagative features in the respective oceanic basin are

  18. Influence of solar forcing, climate variability and modes of low-frequency atmospheric variability on summer floods in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, J. C.; Schulte, L.; Badoux, A.; Barriendos, M.; Barrera-Escoda, A.

    2015-09-01

    The higher frequency of severe flood events in Switzerland in recent decades has given fresh impetus to the study of flood patterns and their possible forcing mechanisms, particularly in mountain environments. This paper presents a new index of summer flood damage that considers severe and catastrophic summer floods in Switzerland between 1800 and 2009, and explores the influence of external forcings on flood frequencies. In addition, links between floods and low-frequency atmospheric variability patterns are examined. The flood damage index provides evidence that the 1817-1851, 1881-1927, 1977-1990 and 2005-present flood clusters occur mostly in phase with palaeoclimate proxies. The cross-spectral analysis documents that the periodicities detected in the coherency and phase spectra of 11 (Schwabe cycle) and 104 years (Gleissberg cycle) are related to a high frequency of flooding and solar activity minima, whereas the 22-year cyclicity detected (Hale cycle) is associated with solar activity maxima and a decrease in flood frequency. The analysis of low-frequency atmospheric variability modes shows that Switzerland lies close to the border of the principal summer mode. The Swiss river catchments situated on the centre and southern flank of the Alps are affected by atmospherically unstable areas defined by the positive phase of the pattern, while those basins located in the northern slope of the Alps are predominantly associated with the negative phase of the pattern. Furthermore, a change in the low-frequency atmospheric variability pattern related to the major floods occurred over the period from 1800 to 2009; the summer principal mode persists in the negative phase during the last cool pulses of the Little Ice Age (1817-1851 and 1881-1927 flood clusters), whereas the positive phases of the mode prevail during the warmer climate of the last 4 decades (flood clusters from 1977 to present).

  19. Mixed Stimulus-Induced Mode Selection in Neural Activity Driven by High and Low Frequency Current under Electromagnetic Radiation

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    Lulu Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical activities of neurons are dependent on the complex electrophysiological condition in neuronal system, the three-variable Hindmarsh-Rose (HR neuron model is improved to describe the dynamical behaviors of neuronal activities with electromagnetic induction being considered, and the mode transition of electrical activities in neuron is detected when external electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the neuron. In this paper, different types of electrical stimulus impended with a high-low frequency current are imposed on new HR neuron model, and mixed stimulus-induced mode selection in neural activity is discussed in detail. It is found that mode selection of electrical activities stimulated by high-low frequency current, which also changes the excitability of neuron, can be triggered owing to adding the Gaussian white noise. Meanwhile, the mode selection of the neuron electrical activity is much dependent on the amplitude B of the high frequency current under the same noise intensity, and the high frequency response is selected preferentially by applying appropriate parameters and noise intensity. Our results provide insights into the transmission of complex signals in nerve system, which is valuable in engineering prospective applications such as information encoding.

  20. Oscillation center theory and ponderomotive stabilization of low-frequency plasma modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Similon, Philippe L.; Kaufman, Allan N.; Holm, Darryl D.

    1986-06-01

    Nonlinear, nondissipative ponderomotive theory is developed in relation to recent experimental results showing that externally imposed rf fields can stabilize an axisymmetric mirror plasma. First, the ponderomotive force problem is reexamined, with emphasis on self-consistency of the interaction between the plasma and high-frequency field. The averaged action principle for the antenna-plasma system yields self-consistent plasma and electromagnetic field dynamics on the oscillation-center time scale. The plasma equilibrium condition is expressed as a balance among plasma and magnetic pressure forces, including interchange, ponderomotive, and magnetization forces. Next, the spectral stability of such static equilibria is studied in the low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approximation, with a ΔW principle that incorporates the various ponderomotive contributions: particle effects, magnetization effects, and self-consistent adjustment of the rf field resulting from displacements of the plasma away from equilibrium. The ponderomotive potential energy functional is related to the antenna inductance and antenna current amplitude. Finally, the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation for the system's dynamics is given, in terms of Eulerian fields. It allows the construction of nonlinearly conserved functionals, which yield criteria for linearized Lyapunov stability, for both multifluid and MHD models. The Lyapunov stability conditions are related to the modified ΔW variational principle.

  1. Identification of Some Low Frequency Wave Modes in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Electric fields provide the major coupling between the turbulence of the solar wind and particles. It has been shown, using statistical methods, that a large part of the turbulent spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind is due to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW). In this note, an attempt is made to determine the mode identification of individual waveforms using the three dimensional system of SWaves on the STEREO spacecraft. Samples are chosen, using waveforms with an apparent periodic structure, selected visually. The short antennas of STEREO respond to density fluctuations as well as to electric fields. Measurement of four quantities using only three antennas presents a problem. Methods to overcome, or to ignore, this difficulty will be presented. On the other hand, density measurement can sometimes be useful in mode identification. All of these methods will be used, and results presented

  2. Negative thermal expansion and low-frequency modes in cyanide-bridged framework materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Kepert, Cameron J.

    2005-04-01

    We analyze the intrinsic geometric flexibility of framework structures incorporating linear metal-cyanide-metal (M-CN-M') linkages using a reciprocal-space dynamical matrix approach. We find that this structural motif is capable of imparting a significant negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect upon such materials. In particular, we show that the topologies of a number of simple cyanide-containing framework materials support a very large number of low-energy rigid-unit phonon modes, all of which give rise to NTE behavior. We support our analysis by presenting experimental verification of this behavior in the family of compounds ZnxCd1-x(CN)2 , which we show to exhibit a NTE effect over the temperature range 25-375K more than double that of materials such as ZrW2O8 .

  3. A second, low-frequency mode of vibration in the intact mammalian cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashkin, Andrei N.; Russell, Ian J.

    2003-03-01

    The mammalian cochlea is a structure comprising a number of components connected by elastic elements. A mechanical system of this kind is expected to have multiple normal modes of oscillation and associated resonances. The guinea pig cochlear mechanics was probed using distortion components generated in the cochlea close to the place of overlap between two tones presented simultaneously. Otoacoustic emissions at frequencies of the distortion components were recorded in the ear canal. The phase behavior of the emissions reveals the presence of a nonlinear resonance at a frequency about a half octave below that of the high-frequency primary tone. The location of the resonance is level dependent and the resonance shifts to lower frequencies with increasing stimulus intensity. This resonance is thought to be associated with the tectorial membrane. The resonance tends to minimize input to the cochlear receptor cells at frequencies below the high-frequency primary and increases the dynamic load to the stereocilia of the receptor cells at the primary frequency when the tectorial membrane and reticular lamina move in counterphase.

  4. Observations and transport theory analysis of low frequency, acoustic mode propagation in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K; Colosi, John A; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Howe, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    Second order mode statistics as a function of range and source depth are presented from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX). During LOAPEX, low frequency broadband signals were transmitted from a ship-suspended source to a mode-resolving vertical line array. Over a one-month period, the ship occupied seven stations from 50 km to 3200 km distance from the receiver. At each station broadband transmissions were performed at a near-axial depth of 800 m and an off-axial depth of 350 m. Center frequencies at these two depths were 75 Hz and 68 Hz, respectively. Estimates of observed mean mode energy, cross mode coherence, and temporal coherence are compared with predictions from modal transport theory, utilizing the Garrett-Munk internal wave spectrum. In estimating the acoustic observables, there were challenges including low signal to noise ratio, corrections for source motion, and small sample sizes. The experimental observations agree with theoretical predictions within experimental uncertainty.

  5. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  6. Dynamical transition in proteins and non-Gaussian behavior of low-frequency modes in self-consistent normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianguang; Budarz, Timo; Ward, Joshua M; Prohofsky, Earl W

    2010-10-01

    Self-consistent normal mode analysis (SCNMA) is applied to heme c type cytochrome f to study temperature-dependent protein motion. Classical normal mode analysis assumes harmonic behavior and the protein mean-square displacement has a linear dependence on temperature. This is only consistent with low-temperature experimental results. To connect the protein vibrational motions between low and physiological temperatures, we have incorporated a fitted set of anharmonic potentials into SCNMA. In addition, quantum harmonic-oscillator theory has been used to calculate the displacement distribution for individual vibrational modes. We find that the modes involving soft bonds exhibit significant non-Gaussian dynamics at physiological temperature, which suggests that it may be the cause of the non-Gaussian behavior of the protein motions probed by elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The combined theory displays a dynamical transition caused by the softening of few "torsional" modes in the low-frequency regime ( 0.6 ps). These modes change from Gaussian to a classical distribution upon heating. Our theory provides an alternative way to understand the microscopic origin of the protein dynamical transition.

  7. MHD-model for low-frequency waves in a tokamak with toroidal plasma rotation and problem of existence of global geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Sorokina, E. A., E-mail: sorokina.ekaterina@gmail.com, E-mail: vilkiae@gmail.com; Ilgisonis, V. I. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konovaltseva, L. V. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A set of reduced linear equations for the description of low-frequency perturbations in toroidally rotating plasma in axisymmetric tokamak is derived in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The model suitable for the study of global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) is designed. An example of the use of the developed model for derivation of the integral conditions for GGAM existence and of the corresponding dispersion relation is presented. The paper is dedicated to the memory of academician V.D. Shafranov.

  8. The impact research of control modes in steam turbine control system (digital electric hydraulic to the low-frequency oscillation of grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of the control theory for steam turbine, the transfer function of the steam turbine control modes in the parallel operation was obtained. The frequency domain analysis indicated that different control modes of turbine control system have different influence on the damping characteristics of the power system. The comparative analysis shows the direction and the degree of the influence under the different oscillation frequency range. This can provide the theory for the suppression of the low-frequency oscillation from turbine side and has a guiding significance for the stability of power system. The results of simulation tests are consistent with the theoretic analysis.

  9. Van Allen Probes observations of unusually low frequency whistler mode waves observed in association with moderate magnetic storms: Statistical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, C A; Breneman, A W; Thaller, S A; Wygant, J R; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S

    2015-09-28

    We show the first evidence for locally excited chorus at frequencies below 0.1  f ce (electron cyclotron frequency) in the outer radiation belt. A statistical study of chorus during geomagnetic storms observed by the Van Allen Probes found that frequencies are often dramatically lower than expected. The frequency at peak power suddenly stops tracking the equatorial 0.5  f ce and f / f ce decreases rapidly, often to frequencies well below 0.1  f ce (in situ and mapped to equator). These very low frequency waves are observed both when the satellites are close to the equatorial plane and at higher magnetic latitudes. Poynting flux is consistent with generation at the equator. Wave amplitudes can be up to 20 to 40 mV/m and 2 to 4 nT. We conclude that conditions during moderate to large storms can excite unusually low frequency chorus, which is resonant with more energetic electrons than typical chorus, with critical implications for understanding radiation belt evolution.

  10. Flexoelectric in-plane switching (IPS) mode with ultra-high-transmittance, low-voltage, low-frequency, and a flicker-free image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinSu; Ham, Hyeong Gyun; Choi, Han-Sol; Bos, Philip J; Yang, Deng-Ke; Lee, Joong Hee; Lee, Seung Hee

    2017-03-20

    The demands for a power-saving mode for displaying static images are ubiquitous not only in portable devices but also in price tags and advertising panels. At a low-frequency driving in liquid crystal displays (LCDs) for low-power consumption, the flexoelectric effect arises even in calamitic liquid crystals and the optical appearance of this physical phenomenon is found to be unusually large, being noticed as an image-flickering. Although the inherent integrated optical transmittance of in-plane switching (IPS) mode is relatively lower than that of fringe-field switching (FFS) mode, the IPS mode shows no static image-flickering but an optical spike (the so-called optical bounce), at the transient moment between signal positive and negative frames. Here, we demonstrate an IPS mode using negative dielectric anisotropy of liquid crystals (Δε mode with Δε mode with Δε mode with Δε > 0). We believe the result will contribute not only to the scientific understanding of the optical appearance of flexoelectric effect but also pave the way for engineering of a superior low-power consumption LCD.

  11. Adding more weight to a molecular recognition unit: the low-frequency modes of carboxylic acid dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhifeng; Suhm, Martin A.

    2010-09-01

    By tuning the alkyl substituent of a carboxylic acid, the intermolecular modes in its hydrogen-bonded dimer can be reordered. These modes are detected at low vibrational congestion for formic, acetic, propiolic and pivalic acid using Raman jet spectroscopy. By probing the shock zone between the free jet and the background gas, a continuous evolution of the dimer spectra between cryogenic and ambient temperatures is achieved. Analysis of the dimer stretching mode within a pseudo-diatomic model quantifies substitution effects on the hydrogen-bond force constant. They do not correlate with effects on predicted overall dimer binding energies. The evolution of the spectra with increasing cluster size reveals the stacking structure of supra-dimeric aggregates.

  12. High and low frequency unfolded partial least squares regression based on empirical mode decomposition for quantitative analysis of fuel oil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xihui; Li, Shujuan; Lin, Ligang; Tan, Xiaoyao; Fan, Qingjie; Li, Ming

    2016-06-21

    Accurate prediction of the model is fundamental to the successful analysis of complex samples. To utilize abundant information embedded over frequency and time domains, a novel regression model is presented for quantitative analysis of hydrocarbon contents in the fuel oil samples. The proposed method named as high and low frequency unfolded PLSR (HLUPLSR), which integrates empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and unfolded strategy with partial least squares regression (PLSR). In the proposed method, the original signals are firstly decomposed into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residue by EMD. Secondly, the former high frequency IMFs are summed as a high frequency matrix and the latter IMFs and residue are summed as a low frequency matrix. Finally, the two matrices are unfolded to an extended matrix in variable dimension, and then the PLSR model is built between the extended matrix and the target values. Coupled with Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy, HLUPLSR has been applied to determine hydrocarbon contents of light gas oil and diesel fuels samples. Comparing with single PLSR and other signal processing techniques, the proposed method shows superiority in prediction ability and better model interpretation. Therefore, HLUPLSR method provides a promising tool for quantitative analysis of complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiment-theory comparison for low frequency BAE modes in the strongly shaped H-1NF stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Blackwell, B. D.; Nührenberg, C.; Könies, A.; Bertram, J.; Michael, C.; Hole, M. J.; Howard, J.

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in the modeling, analysis, and measurement of fluctuations have significantly improved the diagnosis and understanding of Alfvén eigenmodes in the strongly shaped H-1NF helical axis stellarator. Experimental measurements, including 3D tomographic inversions of high resolution visible light images, are in close agreement with beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) calculated using the compressible ideal MHD code, CAS3D. This is despite the low β in H-1NF, providing experimental evidence that these modes can exist due to compression that is induced by the strong shaping in stellarators, in addition to high β, as is the case in tokamaks. This is confirmed using the CONTI and CAS3D codes, which show significant gap structures at lower frequencies which contain BAE and beta-acoustic Alfvén eigenmodes (BAAEs). The BAEs are excited in the absence of a well confined energetic particle source, further confirming previous studies that thermal particles, electrons, or even radiation fluctuations can drive these modes. Datamining of magnetic probe data shows the experimentally measured frequency of these modes has a clear dependence on the rotational transform profile, which is consistent with a frequency dependency due to postulated confinement related temperature variations.

  14. A0 mode interaction with a plate free edge: theory and experiments at very low frequency by thickness product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribay, Guillemette; Catheline, Stefan; Clorennec, Dominique; Ing, Ros Kiri; Fink, Mathias

    2007-08-01

    When a plane acoustic wave reaches a medium with an impedance infinite or null, it experiences a phase shift of zero or pi and its amplitude on the edge is maximum or vanishes. The case of a flexion wave (A0 Lamb wave) at a free end is also simple; its amplitude is multiplied by a factor 2 square root 2 and the phase shift is pi/2. The evanescent wave at the origin of these phenomena, perfectly described by the classical flexural plate theory, is identified as the imaginary A1 mode of the exact Rayleigh-Lamb theory. The experiences confirm the theoretical predictions.

  15. Normal mode solution for low-frequency sound propagation in a downward refracting atmosphere above a complex impedance plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, R; Baird, G; Wu, W

    1992-03-01

    The development of the fast field and parabolic equation solutions to the wave equation has made it possible to solve for the combined effects of refraction in a layered atmosphere and the interaction of sound with a complex impedance ground surface. In many respects the numerical methods have advanced beyond our understanding of the basic phenomena. In an earlier study [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 107-114 (1991)], the residue series solution for upward refraction was investigated and provided insight into the nature of the interaction of refraction and ground reflection. In this paper results are presented of a similar normal mode solution for downward refraction above a complex impedance ground surface. This model is used to investigate when the surface wave is excited for downward refraction conditions and to develop criteria for the maximum range of cylindrical decay as a function of phase and magnitude of the ground impedance and the magnitude of the sound velocity gradient.

  16. Digital Low Frequency Radio Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Soula, S.; van der Velde, O.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Gaffet, S.; Pincon, J.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution reports the design, realization and operation of a novel digital low frequency radio camera towards an exploration of the Earth's electromagnetic environment with particular emphasis on lightning discharges and subsequent atmospheric effects such as transient luminous events. The design of the digital low frequency radio camera is based on the idea of radio interferometry with a network of radio receivers which are separated by spatial baselines comparable to the wavelength of the observed radio waves, i.e., ~1-100 km which corresponds to a frequency range from ~3-300 kHz. The key parameter towards the realization of the radio interferometer is the frequency dependent slowness of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere with respect to the speed of light in vacuum. This slowness is measured with the radio interferometer by using well documented radio transmitters. The digital low frequency radio camera can be operated in different modes. In the imaging mode, still photographs show maps of the low frequency radio sky. In the video mode, movies show the dynamics of the low frequency radio sky. The exposure time of the photograhps, the frame rate of the video, and the radio frequency of interest can be adjusted by the observer. Alternatively, the digital radio camera can be used in the monitoring mode, where a particular area of the sky is observed continuously. The first application of the digital low frequency radio camera is to characterize the electromagnetic energy emanating from sprite producing lightning discharges, but it is expected that it can also be used to identify and investigate numerous other radio sources of the Earth's electromagnetic environment.

  17. LOW FREQUENCY DAMPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BOGATEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The low frequency damper is an autonomous equipment for damping vibrations with the 1-20Hz range.Its autonomy enables the equipment to be located in various mechanical systems, without requiring special hydraulic installations.The low frequency damper was designed for damping the low frequency oscillations occurring in the circuit controls of the upgraded IAR-99 Aircraft.The low frequency damper is a novelty in the aerospace field ,with applicability in several areas as it can be built up in an appropriate range of dimensions meeting the requirements of different beneficiaries. On this line an equipment able to damp an extended frequency range was performed for damping oscillations in the pipes of the nuclear power plants.This damper, tested in INCAS laboratories matched the requirements of the beneficiary.The low frequency damper is patented – the patent no. 114583C1/2000 is held by INCAS.

  18. Reduced-order computational model in nonlinear structural dynamics for structures having numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency range. Application to fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Brie, N., E-mail: nicolas.brie@edf.fr [EDF R and D, Département AMA, 1 avenue du général De Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A ROM of a nonlinear dynamical structure is built with a global displacements basis. • The reduced order model of fuel assemblies is accurate and of very small size. • The shocks between grids of a row of seven fuel assemblies are computed. -- Abstract: We are interested in the construction of a reduced-order computational model for nonlinear complex dynamical structures which are characterized by the presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency band. This high modal density makes the use of the classical modal analysis method not suitable. Therefore the reduced-order computational model is constructed using a basis of a space of global displacements, which is constructed a priori and which allows the nonlinear dynamical response of the structure observed on the stiff part to be predicted with a good accuracy. The methodology is applied to a complex industrial structure which is made up of a row of seven fuel assemblies with possibility of collisions between grids and which is submitted to a seismic loading.

  19. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  20. So-called ‘relaxation’ mode located at 0.1 cm−1 in the low-frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol - acetone mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Amo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency Raman spectra of ethylene glycol(EG and acetone mixtures are investigated by high-resolution double monochrometer. A broad peak located at 0.1 cm−1 in susceptibility spectra is compared with the dielectric loss spectra. Both Raman relaxation time(τMRT1 and dielectric relaxation time(τD1 are determined by the model fitting method. The ratio τMRT1/τD1 does not depend on static dielectric constant of mixtures and is almost constant, ≈3.2, from 1.0 (pure EG to 0.3 mole fraction. This result indicates that both τMRT1 and τD1 are determined by the same molecular dynamics.

  1. Shear-Mode-Based Cantilever Driving Low-Frequency Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Using 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhou; Ren, Bo; Gai, Linlin; Zhao, Xiangyong; Luo, Haosu; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Energy harvesting from external mechanical excitation has become a hot interest area, and relaxor piezoelectric single crystal ( 1 - x )Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3- x PbTiO3 (PMN- x PT or PMN-PT) has attracted continuous attention due to the well-known ultrahigh shear-mode electromechanical response. To exploit the low-frequency application of excellent shear-mode performance of the PMN-PT single crystal, we proposed a Shear-mode-based CANtilever Driving Low-frequency Energy harvester. The device is composed of two symmetrically assembled sandwich structures and a cantilever, in which sandwich structures can be driven by the cantilever. An analytical method was used to illustrate the high output mechanism, and a finite-element method model of the device was also established to optimize the generated electric energy in this device. The electrical properties of the device under different excitation frequencies and load resistances were studied systematically. The maximum voltage and power density at resonance frequency (43.8 Hz) were measured to be 60.8 V and 10.8 mW/cm(3) under a proof mass of 13.5 g, respectively. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the considerable potential of the resonance-excited shear-mode energy harvester applied to wireless sensors and low-power portable electronics.

  2. Analysis of mode-hopping effect in Fabry–Pérot multiple-quantum well laser diodes via low frequency noise investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pralgauskaitė, Sandra; Palenskis, Vilius; Matukas, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive investigation of noise characteristics and radiation spectrum with special attention to the mode-hopping effect of Fabry–Pérot (FP) multiple quantum well laser diodes (LDs) have been carried out: laser radiation spectra, optical and electrical fluctuations and cross-correlation factor...... fluctuations are observed. Characteristic time of physical processes that take part in LD structure during mode-hopping is ranged from microseconds to milliseconds. These processes are caused by the carrier generation and recombination in the centers formed by the defects in barrier layer (in the active region)....

  3. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - II. KIC 010139564, a new pulsating subdwarf B (V361 Hya) star with an additional low-frequency mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaler, Stephen; Reed, M.D.; Quint, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of non-radial pulsations in a hot subdwarf B star based on 30.5 d of nearly continuous time series photometry using the Kepler spacecraft. KIC 010139564 is found to be a short-period pulsator of the V361 Hya (EC 14026) class with more than 10 independent pulsation modes...

  4. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  5. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    TeO3 units with a varying number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Emphasis has also been given to the low- frequency modes and particular points related to the low-frequency Raman phenomenology are discussed in view of the experimental findings. Keywords. Tellurites; Raman spectroscopy; alkali tellurite glasses. 1.

  6. Low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    is only heard by a single person in the household. This raises the fundamental question whether the complainants are annoyed by an external physical sound, or if other explanations such as low-frequency tinnitus must be sought. The main aim of this study is to answer this fundamental question...

  7. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Araneda, Jaime A., E-mail: rlopezh@umd.edu, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2017-08-10

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave–particle interactions.

  8. Low Frequency Modulation of Tropical Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibot, C.; Terray, L.; Dewitte, B.; Blanke, B.

    The aim of this work is the study of low frequency modulation of Tropical inter- annual variability, to determine the role of Tropical-extratropical teleconnections. In the Pacific, a few previous studies found evidence for links between SST anoma- lies in the equatorial Pacific and SST anomalies in the North Pacific, via a subsur- face propagation. Waters are subducted along westerns boundaries at mid-latitudes, then reach the tropical regions. Some of them (Gu and Philander, 1997) also sug- gest that SST anomalies of the mid-latitudes could influence the ENSO variability. Observations and model experiments are used to investigate low frequency variabil- ity in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. We use in particular a 300-year simulation, from a global ocean/atmosphere coupled model. The ocean component is ORCA, the LODYC OGCM, with a 2x2 degrees cos(phi) mesh, and an increased meridian res- olution to 0.5 degrees near the equator. The atmosphere component is ARPEGE, the METEO-FRANCE AGCM, with a T63 dynamic resolution. The study of variability modes in the tropical and extratropical (both for atmosphere and ocean) regions is first performed. Statistical analyses (like eof, complex-eof, svd, lagged-svd, combined- eof) are used to determine leading variability patterns for various atmospheric and oceanic fields. Once the statistical signature of a tropical/extratropical connection is established, the physical mechanisms responsible for this connection are investigated (atmospheric bridge, sub-tropical cells structure). A package to calculate particle La- grangian trajectories in the ocean (along isopycnal surfaces) is used, to quantify the water mass exchange and examine the subsurface flow. This tool allows to visualize the trajectories of particles which subduct in the mid-latitudes and travel within the thermocline.

  9. LOFAR: The LOw-Frequency ARray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haarlem, M. P.; Wise, M. W.; Gunst, A. W.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Nijboer, R.; Swinbank, J.; Fallows, R.; Brentjens, M.; Nelles, A.; Beck, R.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Hörandel, J.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mann, G.; Miley, G.; Röttgering, H.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Zaroubi, S.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Braun, R.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Broekema, P. C.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coenen, T.; Conway, J.; Coolen, A.; Corstanje, A.; Damstra, S.; Davies, O.; Deller, A. T.; Dettmar, R.-J.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Dromer, J.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eislöffel, J.; van Enst, J.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasperin, F.; Gerbers, M.; de Geus, E.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H. A.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; van Houwelingen, A.; Huijgen, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Intema, H.; Jackson, N.; Jelic, V.; de Jong, A.; Juette, E.; Kant, D.; Karastergiou, A.; Koers, A.; Kollen, H.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kooistra, E.; Koopman, Y.; Koster, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; Law, C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lemaitre, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; McFadden, R. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Meijering, H.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Middelberg, E.; Millenaar, R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mohan, R. N.; Mol, J. D.; Morawietz, J.; Morganti, R.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M.; Noutsos, A.; Offringa, A. R.; Olofsson, H.; Omar, A.; Orrú, E.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Reitsma, J.; Renting, G. A.; Riemers, P.; Rol, E.; Romein, J. W.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Scaife, A.; van der Schaaf, K.; Scheers, B.; Schellart, P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Serylak, M.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Spreeuw, H.; Steinmetz, M.; Sterks, C. G. M.; Stiepel, H.-J.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thomas, I.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Tol, B.; Usov, O.; van Veelen, M.; van der Veen, A.-J.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Vermeulen, R.; Vermaas, N.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; de Vos, M.; van der Wal, E.; van Weeren, R.; Weggemans, H.; Weltevrede, P.; White, S.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wilhelmsson, T.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.; van Zwieten, J.

    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing

  10. LOFAR : The LOw-Frequency ARray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haarlem, M. P.; Wise, M. W.; Gunst, A. W.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Nijboer, R.; Swinbank, J.; Fallows, R.; Brentjens, M.; Nelles, A.; Beck, R.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Horandel, J.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mann, G.; Miley, G.; Rottgering, H.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Zaroubi, S.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bahren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Boonstra, A. -J.; Braun, R.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Broekema, P. C.; Brouw, W. N.; Brueggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coenen, T.; Conway, J.; Coolen, A.; Corstanje, A.; Damstra, S.; Davies, O.; Deller, A. T.; Dettmar, R. -J.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Dromer, J.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eisloeffel, J.; van Enst, J.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasparin, F.; Gerbers, M.; de Geus, E.; Griessmeier, J. -M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H. A.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; van Houwelingen, A.; Huijgen, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Intema, H.; Jackson, N.; Jelic, V.; de Jong, A.; Kant, D.; Karastergiou, A.; Koers, A.; Kollen, H.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Koopman, Y.; Koster, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; Law, C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lemaitre, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; McFadden, R. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Meijering, H.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Millenaar, R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mohan, R. N.; Mol, J.D.; Morawietz, J.; Morganti, R.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M.; Noutsos, A.; Offringa, A. R.; Olofsson, H.; Omar, A.; Orru, E.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J. -P.; Reitsma, J.; Renting, G. A.; Riemers, P.; Rol, E.; Romein, J. W.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Scaife, A.; van der Schaaf, K.; Scheers, B.; Schellart, P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Serylak, M.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Spreeuw, H.; Steinmetz, M.; Sterks, C. G. M.; Stiepel, H. -J.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thomas, I.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Tol, B.; Usov, O.; van Veelen, M.; van der Veen, A. -J.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Vermeulen, R.; Vermaas, N.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; de Vos, M.; van der Wal, E.; van Weeren, R.; Weggemans, H.; Weltevrede, P.; White, S.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wilhelmsson, T.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.; van Zwieten, J.; Kooistra, E.

    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing

  11. Auditory filters at low-frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Prediction and assessment of low-frequency noise problems requires information about the auditory filter characteristics at low-frequencies. Unfortunately, data at low-frequencies is scarce and practically no results have been published for frequencies below 100 Hz. Extrapolation of ERB results...... from previous studies suggests the filter bandwidth keeps decreasing below 100 Hz, although at a relatively lower rate than at higher frequencies. Main characteristics of the auditory filter were studied from below 100 Hz up to 1000 Hz. Center frequencies evaluated were 50, 63, 125, 250, 500, and 1000...... Hz. The notched-noise method was used, with the noise masker at 40 dB spectral density. A rounded exponential auditory filter model (roex(p,r)) was used to fit the masking data. Preliminary data on 1 subject is discussed. Considering the system as a whole (e.g. without removing the assumed middle...

  12. Low frequency sound field enhancement system for rectangular rooms using multiple low frequency loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2006-01-01

    Rectangular rooms have strong influence on the low frequency performance of loudspeakers. Simulations of three different room sizes have been carried out using finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) in order to predict the behaviour of the sound field at low frequencies. By using an enhancem......Rectangular rooms have strong influence on the low frequency performance of loudspeakers. Simulations of three different room sizes have been carried out using finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) in order to predict the behaviour of the sound field at low frequencies. By using...

  13. Integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Solin, Pavel; Karban, Pavel; Ulrych, Bohus

    2009-01-01

    A modern presentation of integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics This book provides state-of-the-art knowledge on integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics. Blending theory with numerous examples, it introduces key aspects of the integral methods used in engineering as a powerful alternative to PDE-based models. Readers will get complete coverage of: The electromagnetic field and its basic characteristics An overview of solution methods Solutions of electromagnetic fields by integral expressions Integral and integrodifferential methods

  14. Gravity and low-frequency geodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Teisseyre, Roman

    1989-01-01

    This fourth volume in the series Physics and Evolution of the Earth's Interior, provides a comprehensive review of the geophysical and geodetical aspects related to gravity and low-frequency geodynamics. Such aspects include the Earth's gravity field, geoid shape theory, and low-frequency phenomena like rotation, oscillations and tides.Global-scale phenomena are treated as a response to source excitation in spherical Earth models consisting of several shells: lithosphere, mantle, core and sometimes also the inner solid core. The effect of gravitation and rotation on the Earth's shape is anal

  15. TorPeDO: A Low Frequency Gravitational Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, D. J.; Yap, M. J.; Ward, R. L.; Shaddock, D. A.; McClelland, D. E.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors are likely to be limited by Newtonian Noise at low frequencies. A dual torsion pendulum sensor aimed at exploring low- frequency gravitational-force noise is being studied at the ANU. This sensor is designed to measure local gravitational forces to high precision and will be limited by Newtonian noise. We report on a controls prototype which has been constructed and suspended, along with initial characterisation and testing of the two torsion pendulums. Large weights at the end of each bar reposition the centres of mass to the same point in space external to both bars. Since both bars have a common suspension point, resonant frequency (≈33.4 mHz), and centre of mass, mechanical disturbances and other noise will affect both bars in the same manner, providing a large mechanical common mode rejection.

  16. Orbiting low frequency array for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Rai Thilak; Rajan, Raj; Engelen, Steven; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Verhoeven, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Recently new and interesting science drivers have emerged for very low frequency radio astronomy from 0.3 MHz to 30 MHz. However Earth bound radio observations at these wavelengths are severely hampered by ionospheric distortions, man made interference, solar flares and even complete reflection

  17. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low-frequency loudspeakers, a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...

  18. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low frequency loudspeakers a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...

  19. Digital Filters for Low Frequency Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyril, Marni; Abildgaard, J.; Rubak, Per

    2001-01-01

    Digital filters with high resolution in the low-frequency range are studied. Specifically, for a given computational power, traditional IIR filters are compared with warped FIR filters, warped IIR filters, and modified warped FIR filters termed warped individual z FIR filters (WizFIR). The results...

  20. Unusual Low-frequency Magnetic Perturbations in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.S. Chance

    2001-02-12

    Low-frequency magnetic perturbations (less than or equal to 30 kHz) observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak do not always conform to expectations from Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) modes. The discrepancy between observations and expectations arises from the existence of three classes of magnetic perturbations in TFTR: (1) 'Edge Originated Magnetic Perturbations' (EOMP's), (2) 'Kink-like Modes' (KLM's), and (3) Tearing Modes (TM's). The EOMP class has unusual magnetic phenomenon including up/down asymmetry in poloidal intensity variation that MHD modes alone cannot generate. The contributions of MHD modes in plasma edge regions are too small to explain the magnitude of observed EOMP perturbations. At least two-thirds, possibly nearly all, of magnetic perturbations in a typical EOMP originate from sources other than MHD modes. An EOMP has a unity toroidal harmonic number and a poloidal harmonic number close to a discharge's edge q-value. It produces little temperature fluctuations, except possibly in edge regions. The KLM class produces temperature fluctuations, mostly confined within the q=1 surface with an ideal-mode-like structure, but generates little external magnetic perturbations. The TM class conforms generally to expectations from MHD modes. We propose that current flowing in the Scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma is a possible origin of EOMP's.

  1. Low-frequency sonophoresis: pathologic and thermal effects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, A J; Homan, C S; Church, A L; McClain, S A

    1998-01-01

    Low-frequency sonophoresis has recently been shown to significantly facilitate transdermal permeability of various substances (e.g., insulin) in animal models, thus eliminating the need to inject such agents. Prior to human trials, the authors studied the safety profile of low-frequency sonophoresis in dogs by evaluating microscopic and temperature changes in the skin after sonophoresis. An evaluator-blinded canine study of sonophoresis using different energy intensities and probe diameters was performed. Low-frequency ultrasound was applied for 60 seconds to the clipped abdominal skin of 3 anesthetized adult mongrel dogs using a sonicator operating at a frequency of 20 KHz with a maximal energy output of 400 W. The sonicator was immersed in normal saline, and intensities of 4%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50% were applied during 600 msec of every second (pulsed mode). Three probes, 1-cm cylindrical, 5-cm cylindrical, and 10-cm disc-shaped, were evaluated. Each experimental condition was performed twice. Subcutaneous temperatures were measured by temperature probe before and after sonophoresis. At 30 minutes post-sonophoresis, full-thickness skin biopsies were taken for blinded histopathologic evaluation. Minimal urticarial reactions were noted with the 1-cm probe at intensities of heating.

  2. Excitation of low frequency Alfven eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqi; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Huasen; Zhang, Wenlu

    2017-11-01

    Global gyrokinetic simulations find that realistic density gradients of energetic particles can simultaneously excite low frequency Alfven eigenmodes in toroidal geometry, beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmode (BAAE) and beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE), with similar radial mode widths and comparable linear growth rates even though damping rate of BAAE is much larger than BAE in the absence of energetic particles. This surprising result is attributed to non-perturbative effects of energetic particles that modify ideal BAAE mode polarizations and nonlocal geometry effects that invalidate radially local dispersion relation. Dominant mode changes from BAAE in a larger tokamak to BAE in a smaller tokamak due to the dependence of wave-particle resonance condition on the tokamak size.

  3. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  4. Electromagnetic Remote Sensing. Low Frequency Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    however, sinze we have scen thEA it is measurable at low frequencies. The method irvolves measuring the geoelectric field in one horizontal direction...each problem have been noted, although this is by no means an exhaustive compilation. To illustrate the wide spectrum of methods available for QRtS, we...unexploded ordnance. Keeping these traits in mind, one can think of a number of possible methods which could conceivably detect buried ordnance. These are

  5. LOFAR: The LOw-Frequency ARray

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haarlem, M. P.; Wise, M. W.; Gunst, A. W.; Heald, G.; McKean, J. P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Nijboer, R.; Swinbank, J.; Fallows, R.; Brentjens, M.; Nelles, A.; Beck, R.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Hörandel, J.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Mann, G.; Miley, G.; Röttgering, H.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Zaroubi, S.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; van Ardenne, A.; Arts, M.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bell, M. R.; van Bemmel, I.; Bennema, P.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Boonstra, A.-J.; Braun, R.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; van de Brink, R. H.; Broderick, J.; Broekema, P. C.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; van Cappellen, W.; Ciardi, B.; Coenen, T.; Conway, J.; Coolen, A.; Corstanje, A.; Damstra, S.; Davies, O.; Deller, A. T.; Dettmar, R.-J.; van Diepen, G.; Dijkstra, K.; Donker, P.; Doorduin, A.; Dromer, J.; Drost, M.; van Duin, A.; Eislöffel, J.; van Enst, J.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Gankema, H.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasperin, F.; Gerbers, M.; de Geus, E.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Grit, T.; Gruppen, P.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H. A.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; van Houwelingen, A.; Huijgen, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Intema, H.; Jackson, N.; Jelic, V.; de Jong, A.; Juette, E.; Kant, D.; Karastergiou, A.; Koers, A.; Kollen, H.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kooistra, E.; Koopman, Y.; Koster, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kramer, M.; Kuper, G.; Lambropoulos, P.; Law, C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lemaitre, J.; Loose, M.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; McFadden, R. A.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Meijering, H.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Middelberg, E.; Millenaar, R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mohan, R. N.; Mol, J. D.; Morawietz, J.; Morganti, R.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Mulder, E.; Munk, H.; Nieuwenhuis, L.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Noordam, J. E.; Norden, M.; Noutsos, A.; Offringa, A. R.; Olofsson, H.; Omar, A.; Orrú, E.; Overeem, R.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Rafferty, D.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; de Reijer, J.-P.; Reitsma, J.; Renting, G. A.; Riemers, P.; Rol, E.; Romein, J. W.; Roosjen, J.; Ruiter, M.; Scaife, A.; van der Schaaf, K.; Scheers, B.; Schellart, P.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schoonderbeek, G.; Serylak, M.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Spreeuw, H.; Steinmetz, M.; Sterks, C. G. M.; Stiepel, H.-J.; Stuurwold, K.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thomas, I.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Tol, B.; Usov, O.; van Veelen, M.; van der Veen, A.-J.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Vermeulen, R.; Vermaas, N.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; de Vos, M.; van der Wal, E.; van Weeren, R.; Weggemans, H.; Weltevrede, P.; White, S.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wilhelmsson, T.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.; van Zwieten, J.

    2013-08-01

    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing capabilities. Spreading out from a core located near the village of Exloo in the northeast of the Netherlands, a total of 40 LOFAR stations are nearing completion. A further five stations have been deployed throughout Germany, and one station has been built in each of France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR achieves unparalleled sensitivity and angular resolution in the low-frequency radio regime. The LOFAR facilities are jointly operated by the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) foundation, as an observatory open to the global astronomical community. LOFAR is one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. LOFAR's new capabilities, techniques and modus operandi make it an important pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We give an overview of the LOFAR instrument, its major hardware and software components, and the core science objectives that have driven its design. In addition, we present a selection of new results from the commissioning phase of this new radio observatory.

  6. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2005-04-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5-2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still requires a high definition for good sound quality. Ideally, the absorption of the hall should be adjustable in all frequency bands in order to provide good sound quality for all types of performances. The mid and high frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.

  7. The role of low-frequency variation in the manifestation of warming trend and ENSO amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sae-Rim; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Kim, Kwang-Yul; Kim, WonMoo

    2017-08-01

    Despite the increase in greenhouse gas concentration, the sea surface temperature (SST) over the tropical eastern Pacific during the period of 1999-2014 exhibits less warming trend compared to the earlier decades. It has been noted that this warming hiatus is accompanied by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), which represents low-frequency variability over the Pacific. On the other hand, the 2015/2016 El Niño is among the strongest comparable to the 1997/1998 event, which coincides with the recently altered PDO phase from negative to positive. These observational evidences have generated substantial interest in the role of low-frequency variations in modulating El Niño-Southern Oscillation amplitude as well as manifestation of warming signal in the tropical Pacific. Therefore, it is necessary to appropriately separate low-frequency variability and global warming signal from SST records. Here, we present three primary modes of global SST that include secular warming trend, low-frequency variability, and biennial oscillation. Based on the independent behavior of these three modes, global warming is clearly continuing but its manifestation is enhanced (depressed) when the low-frequency variation is in the positive (negative) phase. Further, possibility of strong El Niño increases under the positive phase of the low-frequency mode, which amplifies warming over the tropical eastern Pacific. Indeed, the strong 2015/2016 El Niño is largely attributed to the positive phase of the low-frequency mode. In order to examine the climate models' ability to simulate the three SST modes as obtained in the observational record, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) datasets are also analyzed. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the three modes have been replicated closely by the selected CMIP5 models forced by the historical condition, which provides an analogy of the interplay of three modes in the observed tropical Pacific SST.

  8. Identification of low frequency oscillation modes in large transmission systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Guillermo Calderón-Guizar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Existe un comportamiento dinámico típico asociado a todo sistema. Las oscilaciones son fenómenos inherentes a los sistemas dinámicos, por lo que el análisis de estos resulta fundamental para entender el comportamiento dinámico de un sistema en particular. El conocimiento de la frecuencia de oscilación y su correspondiente razón de amortiguamiento, asociados con los modos naturales del sistema, resulta fundamental para inferir el comportamiento dinámico del sistema después de que ha experimentado un disturbio. En un sistema eléctrico de potencia los cambios topológicos en la red de transmisión son bastante comunes debido a los requerimientos operativos. Esto ocasiona cambios en los valores tanto de la frecuencia de oscilación como el amortiguamiento de los modos naturales del sistema. En el pasado, cambios normales en la condición de operación del sistema mexicano han dado como resultado la aparición de oscilaciones de potencia no amortiguadas, por esta razón el conocer el amortiguamiento asociado con los modos críticos del sistema resulta de vital importancia. Este artículo reporta la aplicación del análisis modal y simulaciones en el dominio del tiempo para el rastreo de las oscilaciones de baja frecuencia dominantes, también conocidas como modos inter-área, en el sistema eléctrico mexicano durante diferentes condiciones de operación. Los resultados obtenidos permiten identificar a las variables del sistema de potencia más importantes sobre las oscilaciones de baja frecuencia.

  9. Impact of low-frequency hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, A; Schüssler, M; Battmer, R D; Stöver, T; Lesinski-Schiedat, A; Lenarz, T

    2009-01-01

    Today, cochlear implantation is the treatment of choice in the case of severe to profound hearing loss, but the speech perception abilities of many recipients in noisy conditions are still poor and the overall sound quality and ease of listening still require improvement. Residual low-frequency hearing has been associated with improved hearing performance in cochlear implant patients, especially in difficult listening environments (i.e. cocktail party effect). It seems that low-frequency information can enhance the segregation of competing voices, which leads to better speech understanding in noise. We investigated the effect of low-frequency hearing on speech perception performance in a group of subjects being implanted with the Nucleus Hybrid-L device. The Hybrid-L device is a modified Nucleus Freedom implant, which instead of the standard electrode carries a very delicate electrode array that allows preservation of residual hearing to a great extent. Sentence test results from 22 subjects are presented here. Additionally, for 8 subjects, the acoustically presented frequency range was limited to 300, 500 and 700 Hz, and speech perception tests with a single competing talker were conducted. The Hybrid-L study group achieved a speech reception threshold of 15.9 dB in the hearing aid alone condition, 10.8 dB in the cochlear implant alone condition, and 3.9 dB when using the combination of cochlear implant and hearing aid. Differences between the 3 conditions are statistically significant. Results from the additional experiment on the acoustically presented frequency range suggest that very limited residual hearing below 500 Hz is already sufficient to produce a significant improvement in speech perception performance in conjunction with a cochlear implant. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both...... the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5–2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still...

  11. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, S. M., E-mail: belyayev@isr.lviv.ua [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine); Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 11428 (Sweden); Dudkin, F. L. [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine)

    2016-03-15

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones.

  12. Suspension for the low frequency facility

    CERN Document Server

    Cella, G; Di Virgilio, A; Gaddi, A; Viceré, A

    2000-01-01

    We introduce the working principles of the VIRGO Low Frequency Facility (LFF), whose main aim is the measurement of the thermal noise in the VIRGO suspension system. We evaluate the displacement thermal noise of a mirror, which is an intermediate element of a double pendulum suspension system. This double pendulum will be suspended to the last stage of a VIRGO Super-Attenuator (SA), the prototype VIRGO suspension system being tested at the Pisa section of INFN. In the proposed configuration, we evaluate the spectrum of the thermal noise for different choices of the parameters: based on this study, we comment on the future directions to be undertaken in the LFF experiment.

  13. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...... close to the L10 target, but, due to a doubtful use of C-weighting in the scanning, it may give too low results in case of complex sounds. The Danish method was found to have a high risk of giving results substantially below the target, unless complainants can precisely appoint measurement positions...

  14. Resonant interactions between cometary ions and low frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions for resonant wave amplification in a plasma with a ring-beam distribution which is intended to model pick-up ions in a cometary environment are investigated. The inclination between the interplanetary field and the solar wind is found to play a crucial role in governing both the resonant frequency and the growth rate of any unstable mode. It is suggested that the low-frequency MHD mode should experience the most rapid amplification for intermediate inclination. In the frame of the solar wind, such waves should propagate along the field in the direction upstream toward the sun with a phase speed lower than the beaming velocity of the pick-up ions. This mechanism may account for the presence of the interior MHD waves noted by satellites over a region surrounding comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley.

  15. Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-10-12

    Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

  16. Compact Polarimetry in a Low Frequency Spaceborne Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, M-L.; Freeman, A.; Dubois-Fernandez, P.; Pottier, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compact polarimetry has been shown to be an interesting alternative mode to full polarimetry when global coverage and revisit time are key issues. It consists on transmitting a single polarization, while receiving on two. Several critical points have been identified, one being the Faraday rotation (FR) correction and the other the calibration. When a low frequency electromagnetic wave travels through the ionosphere, it undergoes a rotation of the polarization plane about the radar line of sight for a linearly polarized wave, and a simple phase shift for a circularly polarized wave. In a low frequency radar, the only possible choice of the transmit polarization is the circular one, in order to guaranty that the scattering element on the ground is illuminated with a constant polarization independently of the ionosphere state. This will allow meaningful time series analysis, interferometry as long as the Faraday rotation effect is corrected for the return path. In full-polarimetric (FP) mode, two techniques allow to estimate the FR: Freeman method using linearly polarized data, and Bickel and Bates theory based on the transformation of the measured scattering matrix to a circular basis. In CP mode, an alternate procedure is presented which relies on the bare surface scattering properties. These bare surfaces are selected by the conformity coefficient, invariant with FR. This coefficient is compared to other published classifications to show its potential in distinguishing three different scattering types: surface, doublebounce and volume. The performances of the bare surfaces selection and FR estimation are evaluated on PALSAR and airborne data. Once the bare surfaces are selected and Faraday angle estimated over them, the correction can be applied over the whole scene. The algorithm is compared with both FP techniques. In the last part of the paper, the calibration of a CP system from the point of view of classical matrix transformation methods in polarimetry is

  17. Amplification of exo-hiss into low-frequency chorus following substorm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z.; Su, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves contribute significantly to the acceleration of radiation belt electrons. Chorus with frequency below 0.1 fce (fce is the equatorial electron gyro-frequency) has been identified as the low-frequency chorus. How such low-frequency chorus waves are generated remains an unanswered question. Here we propose a new candidate generation mechanism that exo-hiss waves can serve as the source of low-frequency chorus. Exo-hiss is usually believed to be the leaked plasmaspheric hiss from the high-density plasmasphere into the low-density plasmatrough. Both Van Allen Probes observations and linear instability analyses support that exo-hiss can be effectively amplified into low-frequency chorus by the substorm-injected anisotropic electrons at energies around 100 keV.

  18. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation and hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Garcia, M; Perez, C; Valverde, J V; Lopez-Sanchez, C; Garcia-Martinez, V; Quesada, J L

    2009-11-01

    To analyse the possible impact of low and extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on the outer hairs cells of the organ of Corti, in a guinea pig model. Electromagnetic fields of 50, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 5000 Hz frequencies and 1.5 microT intensity were generated using a transverse electromagnetic wave guide. Guinea pigs of both sexes, weighing 100-150 g, were used, with no abnormalities on general and otic examination. Total exposure times were: 360 hours for 50, 500 and 1000 Hz; 3300 hours for 2000 Hz; 4820 hours for 4000 Hz; and 6420 hours for 5000 Hz. One control animal was used in each frequency group. The parameters measured by electric response audiometer included: hearing level; waves I-IV latencies; wave I-III interpeak latency; and percentage appearance of waves I-III at 90 and 50 dB sound pressure level intensity. Values for the above parameters did not differ significantly, comparing the control animal and the rest of each group. In addition, no significant differences were found between our findings and those of previous studies of normal guinea pigs. Prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields of 50 Hz to 5 KHz frequencies and 1.5 microT intensity, produced no functional or morphological alteration in the outer hair cells of the guinea pig organ of Corti.

  19. Modeling Low-Frequency Earthquake Recurrence Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunquan; Daub, Eric G.

    2017-11-01

    Tectonic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) have been identified globally, but the physical mechanisms responsible for different types of LFE recurrence patterns are still elusive. Here we use a brittle ductile friction model to study the frictional conditions leading to different LFE recurrence patterns observed in central California. We do a comprehensive search of the friction parameters, including the brittle contact failure length and ductile damping strength to generate synthetic LFE bursts that match three different occurrence patterns of LFE bursts. We find that the output synthetic LFE burst recurrence type varies under different frictional conditions. The chaotic recurrence LFE sources require a higher brittle-to-ductile friction ratio, consistent with the observation that they are mainly at shallower part of the brittle-ductile transition zone. The trimodal recurrence LFE sources require a wide distribution of asperity sizes, indicating that the segment of deep San Andreas Fault between Monarch Peak and Parkfield is likely to be more fragmented and weaker than the surrounding segments.

  20. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.; Ramirez, J. M.; Gatti, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation.

  1. Alternative theories of atmospheric telecommunications and low-frequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Webster, Peter J.

    1988-08-01

    for the formation of quasi-stationary low-frequency fluctuations. One of these is the baroclinic-barotropic dipole instability mechanism in which the formation of quasi-stationary mature anomalies is initiated by the upstream development of mid-latitude eastward propagating dipole wave trains which arise through the combined baroclinic-barotropic instability of the three-dimensional atmospheric flow. The other is the westerly duct mechanism in which the initiation of low-frequency variability is caused by tropical disturbances. According to this hypothesis, the longitudinal variation of the basic state flow near the equator causes a ducting of wave energy generated in the tropics to specific zones in the upper tropospheric westerlies; these zones then act as source regions for the emanation of waves into the extratropics. Furthermore, this duct also acts as a waveguide for extratropical modes propagating into or through the tropics.

  2. Compact and Low-Frequency Vibration Energy Scavenger using the longitudinal excitation of a piezoelectric bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, M.; Mortier, Q.; Basrour, S.; Bencheikh, N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces an innovative architecture of a piezoelectric harvester, which enables harvesting vibration energy at low frequency using the {33}-transduction mode of a piezoelectric element. Unlike cantilevers integrating ferroelectric material combined with interdigitated electrodes, the concept that we propose is based on the elongation/compression excitation of a piezoelectric bar.

  3. Broadband low-frequency sound isolation by lightweight adaptive metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunhong; Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    Blocking broadband low-frequency airborne noises is highly desirable in lots of engineering applications, while it is extremely difficult to be realized with lightweight materials and/or structures. Recently, a new class of lightweight adaptive metamaterials with hybrid shunting circuits has been proposed, demonstrating super broadband structure-borne bandgaps. In this study, we aim at examining their potentials in broadband sound isolation by establishing an analytical model that rigorously combines the piezoelectric dynamic couplings between adaptive metamaterials and acoustics. Sound transmission loss of the adaptive metamaterial is investigated with respect to both the frequency and angular spectrum to demonstrate their sound-insulation effects. We find that efficient sound isolation can indeed be pursued in the broadband bi-spectrum for not only the case of the small resonator's periodicity where only one mode relevant to the mass-spring resonance exists, but also for the large-periodicity scenario, so that the total weight can be even lighter, in which the multiple plate-resonator coupling modes appear. In the latter case, the negative spring stiffness provided by the piezoelectric stack has been utilized to suppress the resonance-induced high acoustic transmission. Such kinds of adaptive metamaterials could open a new approach for broadband noise isolation with extremely lightweight structures.

  4. Low Frequency Plasma Turbulence as a Source of Clutter in Surveillance and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    shear, whereas interchange or flute type oscillations in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density...density irregularities are excited by plasma flows with velocity shear, whereas interchange or flute type oscillations in magnetized plasma are...equations will be used to describe low-frequency interchange modes ( ,i   where  is the frequency of the flute mode and 0zi i ZeB m c  is the

  5. Low-frequency fluctuations in plasma magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cable, S.; Tajima, T.

    1992-02-01

    It is shown that even a non-magnetized plasma with temperature T sustains zero-frequency magnetic fluctuations in thermal equilibrium. Fluctuations in electric and magnetic fields, as well as in densities, are computed. Four cases are studied: a cold, gaseous, isotropic, non-magnetized plasma; a cold, gaseous plasma in a uniform magnetic field; a warm, gaseous plasma described by kinetic theory; and a degenerate electron plasma. For the simple gaseous plasma, the fluctuation strength of the magnetic field as a function of frequency and wavenumber is calculated with the aid of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. This calculation is done for both collisional and collisionless plasmas. The magnetic field fluctuation spectrum of each plasma has a large zero-frequency peak. The peak is a Dirac {delta}-function in the collisionless plasma; it is broadened into a Lorentzian curve in the collisional plasma. The plasma causes a low frequency cutoff in the typical black-body radiation spectrum, and the energy under the discovered peak approximates the energy lost in this cutoff. When the imposed magnetic field is weak, the magnetic field were vector fluctuation spectra of the two lowest modes are independent of the strength of the imposed field. Further, these modes contain finite energy even when the imposed field is zero. It is the energy of these modes which forms the non-magnetized zero-frequency peak of the isotropic plasma. In deriving these results, a simple relationship between the dispersion relation and the fluctuation power spectrum of electromagnetic waves if found. The warm plasma is shown, by kinetic theory, to exhibit a zero-frequency peak in its magnetic field fluctuation spectrum as well. For the degenerate plasma, we find that electric field fluctuations and number density fluctuations vanish at zero frequency; however, the magnetic field power spectrum diverges at zero frequency.

  6. Reduced models of extratropical low-frequency variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strounine, Kirill

    Low-frequency variability (LFV) of the atmosphere refers to its behavior on time scales of 10-100 days, longer than the life cycle of a mid-latitude cyclone but shorter than a season. This behavior is still poorly understood and hard to predict. It has been helpful in gaining understanding that might improve prediction to use various simplified models. The present study compares and contrasts various mode reduction strategies that help derive systematically such simplified models of LFV. Three major strategies have been applied to reduce a fairly realistic, high-dimensional, quasi-geostrophic, 3-level (QG3) atmospheric model to lower dimensions: (i) a purely empirical, multi-level regression procedure, which specifies the functional form of the reduced model and finds the model coefficients by multiple polynomial regression; (ii) an empirical-dynamical method, which retains only a few components in the projection of the full QG3 model equations onto a specified basis (the so-called bare truncation), and finds the linear deterministic and additive stochastic corrections empirically; and (iii) a dynamics-based technique, employing the stochastic mode reduction strategy of Majda et al. (2001; MTV). Subject to the assumption of significant time-scale separation in the physical system under consideration, MTV derives the form of the reduced model and finds its coefficients with minimal statistical fitting. The empirical-dynamical and dynamical reduced models were further improved by sequential parameter estimation and benchmarked against multi-level regression models; the extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used for the parameter estimation. In constructing the reduced models, the choice of basis functions is also important. We considered as basis functions a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These EOFs were computed using (a) an energy norm; and (b) a potential-enstrophy norm. We also devised a method, using singular value decomposition of the full

  7. Low frequency sound field control for loudspeakers in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Rectangular rooms are the most common shape for sound reproduction, but at low frequencies the reflections from the boundaries of the room cause large spatial variations in the sound pressure level.  Variations up to 30 dB are normal, not only at the room modes, but basically at all frequencies....... As sound propagates in time, it seems natural that the problems can best be analyzed and solved in the time domain. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) has been developed for sound reproduction in rectangular listening rooms. It can control the sound...... distribution in the room at low frequencies by using multiple loudspeakers together with an optimal placement of the loudspeakers.  At low frequencies CABS will create a plane wave from the front wall loudspeakers which will be absorbed by additional loudspeakers at the rear wall giving an almost homogeneous...

  8. Low-frequency high-definition power Doppler in visualizing and defining fetal pulmonary venous connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; He, Yihua; Li, Zhian; Gu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The use of low-frequency high-definition power Doppler in assessing and defining pulmonary venous connections was investigated. Study A included 260 fetuses at gestational ages ranging from 18 to 36 weeks. Pulmonary veins were assessed by performing two-dimensional B-mode imaging, color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI), and low-frequency high-definition power Doppler. A score of 1 was assigned if one pulmonary vein was visualized, 2 if two pulmonary veins were visualized, 3 if three pulmonary veins were visualized, and 4 if four pulmonary veins were visualized. The detection rate between Exam-1 and Exam-2 (intra-observer variability) and between Exam-1 and Exam-3 (inter-observer variability) was compared. In study B, five cases with abnormal pulmonary venous connection were diagnosed and compared to their anatomical examination. In study A, there was a significant difference between CDFI and low-frequency high-definition power Doppler for the four pulmonary veins observed (P definition power Doppler was higher than that when employing two-dimensional B-mode imaging or CDFI. There was no significant difference between the intra- and inter-observer variabilities using low-frequency high-definition power Doppler display of pulmonary veins (P > 0.05). The coefficient correlation between Exam-1 and Exam-2 was 0.844, and the coefficient correlation between Exam-1 and Exam-3 was 0.821. In study B, one case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return and four cases of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return were diagnosed by low-frequency high-definition power Doppler and confirmed by autopsy. The assessment of pulmonary venous connections by low-frequency high-definition power Doppler is advantageous. Pulmonary venous anatomy can and should be monitored during fetal heart examination.

  9. OLFAR - Orbiting Low Frequency Antennas for Radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Verhoeven, Chris; Boonstra, Albert Jan

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Huge efforts are currently made to establish low frequency Earthbound

  10. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  11. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard; Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two test subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  12. Synchronization for space based ultra low frequency interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Raj; Rajan, R.T.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there is a renewed interest in space based arrays for low frequency observations. Orbiting Low Frequency Antenna Array (OLFAR) is one such project which investigates the feasibility of a space based array of ≥ 10 satellites, observing the cosmos in the 0.3 - 30 MHz spectrum. The OLFAR

  13. Behavioral estimates of human frequency selectivity at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado

    on physical sound measurements. In this PhD thesis a detailed description of frequency selectivity at low frequencies is given. Different experiments have been performed to determine the properties of human auditory filters. Besides, loudness perception of low-frequency sinusoidal signals has been evaluated...

  14. The use of low frequency AC for offshore wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuette, T.; Stroem, M.; Gustavsson, Bo [Balfour Beatty Rail AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Low frequency AC, that means AC with a frequency well below the usual frequencies 50 or 60 Hz, has today its main use in single phase AC electrified railways in a number of European countries (16 2/3 Hz), USA (25 Hz) and Costa Rica (20 Hz). Offshore wind power is well suited to 'join the club' as low frequency AC has a number of advantages for that use: Low frequency AC better fits the low revolution frequency of wind power rotors. This can either be used for reduction of pole number for direct generation machines or for a reduction of the gear ratio for conventional machines, resulting in simpler, lighter and more reliable gearboxes. Low frequency AC gives rise to lower charging current/reactive power production, which restricts the maximum cable length for 50 - 60 Hz heavily due to the high specific capacitance of power cables. For low frequency AC, cables longer than 100 km are possible, which is necessary for many future offshore wind power sites. Low frequency AC enables for the use of (air insulated) transmission lines at loads well above their characteristic power, often up to their thermal maximum load. This means that weak 50 or 60 Hz lines between the shore and consumers or stronger parts of a national grid can transfer more power when operated with low frequency AC. On all aspects of low frequency AC, profound knowledge has been accumulated the last century in the railway sector and can be made available for wind power.

  15. COMPENSATION LOW-FREQUENCY ERRORS IN TH-1 SATELLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The topographic mapping products at 1:50,000 scale can be realized using satellite photogrammetry without ground control points (GCPs, which requires the high accuracy of exterior orientation elements. Usually, the attitudes of exterior orientation elements are obtained from the attitude determination system on the satellite. Based on the theoretical analysis and practice, the attitude determination system exists not only the high-frequency errors, but also the low-frequency errors related to the latitude of satellite orbit and the time. The low-frequency errors would affect the location accuracy without GCPs, especially to the horizontal accuracy. In SPOT5 satellite, the latitudinal model was proposed to correct attitudes using approximately 20 calibration sites data, and the location accuracy was improved. The low-frequency errors are also found in Tian Hui 1 (TH-1 satellite. Then, the method of compensation low-frequency errors is proposed in ground image processing of TH-1, which can detect and compensate the low-frequency errors automatically without using GCPs. This paper deal with the low-frequency errors in TH-1: First, the analysis about low-frequency errors of the attitude determination system is performed. Second, the compensation models are proposed in bundle adjustment. Finally, the verification is tested using data of TH-1. The testing results show: the low-frequency errors of attitude determination system can be compensated during bundle adjustment, which can improve the location accuracy without GCPs and has played an important role in the consistency of global location accuracy.

  16. On the Low Frequency Noise in Ion Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Da

    2017-01-01

    Ion sensing represents a grand research challenge. It finds a vast variety of applications in, e.g., gas sensing for domestic gases and ion detection in electrolytes for chemical-biological-medical monitoring. Semiconductor genome sequencing exemplifies a revolutionary application of the latter. For such sensing applications, the signal mostly spans in the low frequency regime. Therefore, low-frequency noise (LFN) present in the same frequency domain places a limit on the minimum detectable v...

  17. I. S. Shklovsky and Low-Frequency Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Proving of the high astrophysical significance of the low-frequency radio astronomy (decameter and adjacent hectometer and meter wavelengths), demonstration of the priority results of the Ukrainian low-frequency radio astronomy as well as significant contribution of I. S. Shklovsky to its development. Design/methodology/approach: The requirements to characteristics of high efficiency radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT and to sensitive and interference immune observational methods at low frequencies are formulated by using the theoretical analysis and astrophysical predictions including those I. S. Shklovsky’s. Findings: New generation radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT are created and modernized. New observational methods at low frequencies are introduced. Large-scale investigations of the Solar system, Galaxy and Methagalaxy are carried out. They have allowed to detect new objects and phenomena for the continuum, monochromatic, pulse and sporadic cosmic radio emission. The role of I. S. Shklovsky in the development of many low-frequency radio astronomy directions is noted, too. Conclusions: The unique possibilities of the low-frequency radio astronomy which gives new information about the Universe, inaccessible with the other astrophysical methods, are shown. The progress of the low-frequency radio astronomy opens the impressive possibilities for the future. It includes modernization of the largest radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, NDA and creation of new instruments GURT, NenuFAR, LOFAR, LWA, MWA, SKA as well as making multi-antenna and ground-space experiments. The contribution of outstanding astrophysicist of the XX century I. S. Shklovsky to this part of actual astronomical science is evident, claiming for attention and will never be forgotten.

  18. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-06-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3-3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  19. Low frequency noise from wind turbines and other sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leventhall, Geoff [Ashtead, Surrey (United Kingdom)], email: geoff@activenoise.co.uk

    2011-07-01

    When it comes to low frequency noise and infrasound, many misconceptions can arise with regard to harm to human health and the disturbance threshold. This paper aims to investigate these misconceptions concerning low frequency noise sources, particularly with regard to noise assessment and the impact of wind turbines. Using a review of the literature, the paper first explains what exactly infrasound and low frequency noise are, the important difference between tonal and broad band noise, and how the hearing threshold is related to both frequency and sound pressure levels. It is explains how different people may react to low frequency noise, depending on their hearing sensitivity and, more significantly, their exposure to negative external publicity about wind turbines and noise annoyance. These points highlight the sometimes non-relevant noise assessment regulations in effect and the problem of weighting in assessing noise disturbance. Wind turbines are concluded not to be sources of low frequency noise, only their swish noise can be considered a disturbance, and that is related to individual hearing sensitivity and attitude towards turbines.

  20. Low-frequency shift dispersive Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of respirable dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Boraey, Mohammed A; Williams, Lisa; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Vehring, Reinhard

    2014-07-20

    A high performance Raman system equipped with a CCD (charged coupled device) sensor and recently developed optical filter technology is described. It provides high sensitivity, high resolution, and access to low-frequency vibrations enabling resolution of spectral features due to lattice vibrational modes and internal vibrational modes, greatly improving the ability to detect small changes due to variations in the three dimensional molecular arrangement, e.g., during loss of crystallinity. Applications to solid state analysis, such as solid phase identification and differentiation of glycopyrronium bromide and formoterol fumarate in pharmaceutical powders, and identification of active pharmaceutical ingredients, e.g., salmeterol xinafoate, fluticasone propionate, mometasone furoate, and salbutamol sulphate, as well as excipients, e.g., amino acids, in different formulations, are presented. For the first time, low-frequency shift Raman spectra of mannitol polymorphs were measured and used for solid phase identification. Unambiguous identification of two similar bronchodilator metered dose inhalers, Ventolin(®) HFA and Airomir(®), was accomplished. The low-frequency shift Raman signals can be used for the analysis of crystallinity of small samples (weight of the component of interest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EFFECTS OF LOW FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDON THE HUMAN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRICA POPOV

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available International standardization institutions, which play an important role in assessing the effects o f the field and determining the need to take protective measures for the human factor, developed safety standards on human exposure to electromagnetic field, differentiated for electric and magnetic fields of low frequency ( near fields, as well as to ele ctromagnetic radiation fields (far fields. Until recently, many studies has shown that the main harmful effect on the human body was produced by high frequency electromagnetic field, but in recent years, more and more information also reveals that the serious damage can be caused by low frequency electric and magnetic fields. These low -frequency electromagnetic fields interact with human tissue causing harmful effects, the degree of destruction depending on factors such as: intensity, frequency, energy f ield level and duration of exposure.

  2. Deep subwavelength acoustic metamaterial for low-frequency sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yufan; Xin, Fengxian; Huang, Lixi; Lu, Tianjian

    2017-05-01

    A novel class of low-frequency sound absorbers based on a honeycomb sandwich panel is theoretically designed and numerically demonstrated. The absorber with a remarkably small thickness (e.g., 1/131 of wavelength) is comprised of a perforated facesheet, a perforated honeycomb core and a non-perforated back panel. Built upon the classical microperforated panel absorber (MPPA), the idea of introducing a perforated honeycomb core which creates a double-layer perforated absorber (DLPA) without adding to the total thickness greatly enhances the low-frequency absorption performance. Theoretical predictions of the sound absorption coefficient are obtained and compared with numerical simulations obtained using the finite element method (FEM). A good agreement is achieved. The proposed sound absorber is promising for low-frequency noise absorption especially when limited space and high mechanical stiffness/strength are simultaneously demanded.

  3. DATA ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS OF LOW FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRICA POPOV

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years more and more studies have shown that, the low frequency field strength (particularly magnetic, 50 / 60Hz are a major risk factor; according to some specialists - even more important as the radiation field. As a result, the personnel serving equipment and facilities such as: electric generators, synchronous, the motors, the inverters or power transformers is subjected continually to intense fields, in their vicinity, with possible harmful effects in the long term by affecting metabolism cell, espectively, the biological mechanisms.Therefore, finding new methods and tools for measurement and analysis of low frequency electromagnetic fields may lead to improved standards for exposure limits of the human body.

  4. Mixed Discretization of the Time Domain MFIE at Low Frequencies

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2017-01-10

    Solution of the magnetic field integral equation (MFIE), which is obtained by the classical marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme, becomes inaccurate when the time step is large, i.e., under low-frequency excitation. It is shown here that the inaccuracy stems from the classical MOT scheme’s failure to predict the correct scaling of the current’s Helmholtz components for large time steps. A recently proposed mixed discretization strategy is used to alleviate the inaccuracy problem by restoring the correct scaling of the current’s Helmholtz components under low-frequency excitation.

  5. A Sub-Hertz, Low-Frequency Vibration Isolation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gerardo, G.; Farr, William H.; Sannibale, Virginio

    2011-01-01

    One of the major technical problems deep-space optical communication (DSOC) systems need to solve is the isolation of the optical terminal from vibrations produced by the spacecraft navigational control system and by the moving parts of onboard instruments. Even under these vibration perturbations, the DSOC transceivers (telescopes) need to be pointed l000 fs of times more accurately than an RF communication system (parabolic antennas). Mechanical resonators have been extensively used to provide vibration isolation for groundbased, airborne, and spaceborne payloads. The effectiveness of these isolation systems is determined mainly by the ability of designing a mechanical oscillator with the lowest possible resonant frequency. The Low-Frequency Vibration Isolation Platform (LFVIP), developed during this effort, aims to reduce the resonant frequency of the mechanical oscillators into the sub-Hertz region in order to maximize the passive isolation afforded by the 40 dB/decade roll-off response of the resonator. The LFVIP also provides tip/tilt functionality for acquisition and tracking of a beacon signal. An active control system is used for platform positioning and for dampening of the mechanical oscillator. The basic idea in the design of the isolation platform is to use a passive isolation strut with an approximately equal to 100-mHz resonance frequency. This will extend the isolation range to lower frequencies. The harmonic oscillator is a second-order lowpass filter for mechanical disturbances. The resonance quality depends on the dissipation mechanisms, which are mainly hysteretic because of the low resonant frequency and the absence of any viscous medium. The LFVIP system is configured using the well-established Stewart Platform, which consists of a top platform connected to a base with six extensible struts (see figure). The struts are attached to the base and to the platform via universal joints, which permit the extension and contraction of the struts. The

  6. The oblique behavior of low-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by newborn cometary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy in oxygen or hydrogen ions freshly created in the solar wind stimulates low-frequency electromagnetic waves whose growth does not always maximize at parallel propagation. Exploration of the wave vector plane discloses the frequent occurrence of islets of oblique growth unconnected to the unstable parallel modes. Contour plots of the growth rate, real frequency, polarization, and magnetic compression characterize the oblique wave behavior for large values of the initial pitch angle of the cometary particles. Although wave-particle (Landau and cyclotron) resonances feed most of the surveyed oblique instabilities, some are seemingly fluidlike. The results, obtained from the numerical solution of the kinetic dispersion and wave equations, imply that newborn ions can easily excite significant oblique hydromagnetic wave activity. Cometary environments provide the adopted plasma model, but the study is helpful in the interpretation of other low-frequency wave observations in space.

  7. Low-frequency electromagnetic waves driven by gyrotropic gyrating ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.; Patel, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    The origin of left- and right-hand-polarized low-frequency waves in space plasmas is analyzed. It has been shown that a gyrotropic gyrating ion beam, a ring in velocity space, can excite electromagnetic modes in the plasma near the beam gyrofrequency. It excites left-hand-polarized shear Alfven waves and their harmonics via the coupling of Alfven modes with the beam modes. It can also excite right-hand-polarized fast-mode magnetosonic waves and their harmonics as well. The excitation is possible for beam ions heavier than the plasma ions. The growth rate varies as one-third power of the beam density and decreases with the angle of wave propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field. The nonlocality has a stabilizing effect on the instability. The predicted values of the wave frequencies compare reasonably well with those observed in satellite data.

  8. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a hollow cathode arc discharge - Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, D. B.; Rognlien, T. D.; Self, S. A.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of two low-frequency electrostatic flute instabilities of a low-pressure hollow cathode arc discharge are reported. Mode I has azimuthal mode number m = 1, and occurs when the radial electric field is negative (directed inward), while mode II has m = - 1 and occurs when the field is positive. The radial electric field is controlled by varying the potential of a secondary anode cylinder located close to the outer discharge radius. A linear perturbation analysis, based on the two-fluid equations, is given for a low-beta, collisionless, cylindrical plasma column, immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field, having a Gaussian density profile and an arbitrary radial electric field profile. Reasonable correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated for both modes.

  9. Low frequency observations of millisecond pulsars with the WSRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stappers, B.W.; Karappusamy, R.; Hessels, J.W.T.

    2008-01-01

    With LOFAR beginning operation in 2008 there is huge potential for studying pulsars with high signal to noise at low frequencies. We present results of observations made with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope to revisit, with modern technology, this frequency range. Coherently dedispersed

  10. Low-frequency noise in Josephson junctions for superconducting qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eroms, J.; Van Schaarenburg, L.C.; Driessen, E.F.C.; Plantenberg, J.H.; Huizinga, C.M.; Schouten, R.N.; Verbruggen, A.H.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations in shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Between 300 and 5?K the spectral density follows a 1/f law. Below 5?K, individual defects distort the 1/f shape of the spectrum. The spectral density decreases linearly with temperature

  11. Earless toads sense low frequencies but miss the high notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Womack, Molly C; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Coloma, Luis A

    2017-01-01

    , four earless) within the Neotropical true toad family (Bufonidae). We found that species lacking middle ears are less sensitive to high-frequency sounds, however, low-frequency hearing and vibrational sensitivity are equivalent between eared and earless species. Furthermore, extratympanic hearing...

  12. Indoor measurements of low-frequency noise for annoyance assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    The sound pressure level within a room may vary as much as 20-30 dB at low frequencies. Mainly the highest levels are of concern with regards to annoyance assessment, rather than a room average. The highest levels can however be very difficult to find. Sound fields in rooms were investigated usin...

  13. Low frequency interference between short synchrotron radiation sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Méot

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed analytical formalism describing low frequency far-field synchrotron radiation (SR is applied to the calculation of spectral angular radiation densities from interfering short sources (edge, short magnet. This is illustrated by analytical calculation of synchrotron radiation from various assemblies of short dipoles, including an “isolated” highest density infrared SR source.

  14. A very brief description of LOFAR the Low Frequency Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H.D.; van Haarlem, M.P.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Braun, R.; Röttgering, H.J.A.; Stappers, B.W.; Boland, W.H.W.M.; Butcher, H.R.; de Geus, E.J.; Koopmans, L.V.; Fender, R.P.; Kuijpers, H.J.M.E.; Miley, G.K.; Schilizzi, R.T.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wise, M.; Brouw, W.N.; Hamaker, J.P.; Noordam, J.E.; Oosterloo, T.; Bähren, L.; Brentjens, M.A.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Bregman, J.D.; van Cappellen, W.A.; Gunst, A.W.; Kant, G.W.; Reitsma, J.; van der Schaaf, K.; de Vos, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is an innovative radio telescope optimized for the frequency range 30 240 MHz. The telescope is realized as a phased aperture array without any moving parts. Digital beam forming allows the telescope to point to any part of the sky within a second. Transient buffering

  15. A very brief description of LOFAR - the Low Frequency Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H.; Haarlem, M.P. van; Wijnholds, S.J.; Bregman, J.D.; Cappellen, W.A.; Gunst, A.W.; Kant, G.W.; Reitsma, J.; Schaaf, K. van der; Vos, C.M. de

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is an innovative radio telescope optimized for the frequency range 30-240 MHz. The telescope is realized as a phased aperture array without any moving parts. Digital beam forming allows the telescope to point to any part of the sky within a second. Transient

  16. A very brief description of LOFAR -- the Low Frequency Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H.D.E.; Haarlem, M.P. van; Bruyn, A.G. de; Braun, R.; Röttgering, H.J.A.; Stappers, B.; Boland, W.H.W.M.; Butcher, H.R.; Geus, E.J. de; Koopmans, L.V.; Fender, R.P.; Kuijpers, H.J.M.E.; Miley, G.K.; Schilizzi, R.T.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wise, M.W.; Brouw, W.N.; Hamaker, J.P.; Noordam, J.E.; Oosterloo, T.; Bähren, L.; Brentjens, M.A.; Wijnholds, S.J.; Bregman, J.D.; Cappellen, W.A. van; Gunst, A.W.; Kant, G.W.; Reitsma, J.; Schaaf, K. van der; Vos, C.M. de

    2007-01-01

    LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is an innovative radio telescope optimized for the frequency range 30-240 MHz. The telescope is realized as a phased aperture array without any moving parts. Digital beam forming allows the telescope to point to any part of the sky within a second. Transient buffering

  17. Influences of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) emanating from the generation, distribution, and utilization of electricity is widespread. The major debate in recent years has focused on the possibility that exposure to ELF-MF may result in adverse health consequences. The present study was ...

  18. Low-frequency noise phenomena in switched MOSFETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Kolhatkar, J.S.; Hoekstra, E.; Snoeij, Martijn F.; Salm, Cora; Wallinga, Hans; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    In small-area MOSFETs widely used in analog and RF circuit design, low-frequency (LF) noise behavior is increasingly dominated by single-electron effects. In this paper, we review the limitations of current compact noise models which do not model such single-electron effects. We present measurement

  19. Is Reaction Time Variability in ADHD Mainly at Low Frequencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction times (RT variability) has garnered increasing interest as an indicator of cognitive and neurobiological dysfunction in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent theory and research has emphasized specific low-frequency patterns of RT variability. However, whether…

  20. The role of low-frequency intraseasonal oscillations in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We analyze the dynamical features and responsible factors of the low-frequency intraseasonal time scales which influenced the nature of onset, intensity and duration of active/break phases and withdrawal of the monsoon during the anomalous Indian summer monsoon of 2002 – the most severe drought recorded in recent ...

  1. OLFAR - Orbiting low frequency antennas for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan

    2013-01-01

    One of the last unexplored frequency ranges in radio astronomy is the frequency band below 30 MHz. New interesting astronomical science drivers for low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high

  2. Olfar: orbiting low frequency antenna for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, Albert Jan

    2009-01-01

    New interesting astronomical science drivers for very low frequency radio astronomy have emerged, ranging from studies of the astronomical dark ages, the epoch of reionization, exoplanets, to ultra-high energy cosmic rays. However, astronomical observations with Earth-bound radio telescopes at very

  3. Characteristics of low frequency oscillations of the atmosphere ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The low frequency oscillation of latent heat flux over the tropical oceans has been studied. The NCEP reanalyzed fields of wind and humidity alongwith Reynolds SST are used to compute the instantaneous as well as monthly mean surface latent heat fluxes (LHF) for the year 1999. The procedure of LHF computation is ...

  4. Low-frequency noise in planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders; Bejhedb, R.S.; Bejhed, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of planar Hall effect bridge sensors are investigated as function of the sensor bias current and the applied magnetic field. The noise spectra reveal a Johnson-like spectrum at high frequencies, and a 1/f-like excess noise spectrum at lower frequencies, with a knee...

  5. Excitation of low-frequency electrostatic instability on the auroral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-Frequency Electrostatic Instability That Is Observed By Both Ground Facilities And Satellites Have Been Studied In The Auroral Acceleration Region Consisting Of Hot Precipitating Electron Beam From The Magnetosphere, Cold Background Electron And Ion Beam Moving Upward Away From The Earth Along The ...

  6. Modulation of cochlear tuning by low-frequency sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, J.F.L.; Prijs, V.F.; Latour, J.B.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    An intense, low-frequency tone (about 30 Hz) modulates the sensitivity of the inner ear to high-frequency stimulation. This modulation is correlated with the displacement of the basilar membrane. The findings suggest that the modulation may also affect cochlear tuning. We have investigated

  7. Low-frequency scattering from two-dimensional perfect conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thorkild; Yaghjian, A.D

    1991-01-01

    Exact expressions have been obtained for the leading terms in the low-frequency expansions of the far fields scattered from three different types of two-dimensional perfect conductors: a cylinder with finite cross section, a cylindrical bump on an infinite ground plane, and a cylindrical dent...

  8. Intrinsic low-frequency variability of the Gulf Stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quattrocchi, G.; Pierini, S.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a process study aimed at analyzing the low-frequency variability of intrinsically oceanic origin of the Gulf Stream (GS) and GS extension (GSE) is presented. An eddy-permitting reduced-gravity nonlinear shallow water model is implemented in an idealized North Atlantic Ocean, with

  9. Low Frequency Radio Emission from the 'Quiet' Sun

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astr. (2000) 21, 237 240. Low Frequency Radio Emission from the 'Quiet' Sun. R. Ramesh, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034, India, e mail: ramesh@iiap. ernet. in. Abstract. We present observations of the 'quiet' Sun close to the recent solar minimum (Cycle 22), with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph. Our.

  10. Intrinsic low-frequency variability of the Gulf Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Quattrocchi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a process study aimed at analyzing the low-frequency variability of intrinsically oceanic origin of the Gulf Stream (GS and GS extension (GSE is presented. An eddy-permitting reduced-gravity nonlinear shallow water model is implemented in an idealized North Atlantic Ocean, with schematic boundaries including the essential geometric features of the coastline and a realistic zonal basin width at all latitudes. The forcing is provided by a time-independent climatological surface wind stress obtained from 41 years of monthly ECMWF fields. The model response yields strong intrinsic low-frequency fluctuations on the interannual to decadal time scales. The modelled time-averaged GS/GSE flows are found to exhibit several features that can also be deduced from satellite altimeter data, such as the Florida Current seaward deflection, the GS separation at Cape Hatteras, and the overall structure of the GSE. The intrinsic low-frequency variability yields two preferred states of the GSE differing in latitudinal location that also have their counterpart in the altimeter data. A preliminary analysis of the variability in terms of dynamical systems theory is carried out by using the lateral eddy viscosity as the control parameter. A complex transition sequence from a steady state to irregular low-frequency variability emerges, in which Hopf and global bifurcations can be identified.

  11. Short wave breaking effects on low frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.; Roelvink, J.A.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; McCall, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of short wave breaking on low frequency waves is investigated using two breaker formulations implemented in a time-dependent numerical model (XBeach): (1) an advective-deterministic approach (ADA) and (2) the probabilistic breaker formulation of Roelvink (1993). Previous research has

  12. Effects of very low frequency electromagnetic method (VLFEM) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the impact of livestock dung on ground water status in the study area. To achieve this, a very low frequency EM survey was conducted; the aim and objective was to detect fractures in the subsurface. VLF data were acquired at 5m intervals along two profiles, with maximum length of 60m in the ...

  13. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    design of future cabled or autonomous ocean observatory systems for passive ocean monitoring. WORK COMPLETED Deep oceans play a major role in...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep ...thermometry using Cross-correlation processing of deep water ambient noise. OBJECTIVE Our previous research effort has demonstrated that coherent

  14. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release...... where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed....

  15. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close to the high......Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...

  16. Use of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for the quantification of crystallinity in amorphous griseofulvin tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mah, Pei T.; Fraser, Sara J.; Reish, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which directly probes phonon lattice modes of crystal structures, has much unexplored potential for sensitive qualitative and quantitative analysis of crystallinity in drugs and excipients. In this study, the level of crystallinity in tablets containing amorphous...

  17. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  18. Low-frequency computational electromagnetics for antenna analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Burke, G.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    An overview of low-frequency, computational methods for modeling the electromagnetic characteristics of antennas is presented here. The article presents a brief analytical background, and summarizes the essential ingredients of the method of moments, for numerically solving low-frequency antenna problems. Some extensions to the basic models of perfectly conducting objects in free space are also summarized, followed by a consideration of some of the same computational issues that affect model accuracy, efficiency and utility. A variety of representative computations are then presented to illustrate various modeling aspects and capabilities that are currently available. A fairly extensive bibliography is included to suggest further reference material to the reader. 90 refs., 27 figs.

  19. Fabrication of SU-8 low frequency electrostatic energy harvester

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.

    2011-11-01

    A 1500μm × 1500μm × 150μm out-of-plane, gap closing, electrostatic energy harvester is designed and fabricated to harvest low-frequency ambient vibrations. SU-8 is used to fabricate the proof mass (1200μm × 1200μm × 150μm) and the 5 m springs. Different harvesters were designed to harvest at 50, 75 and 110 Hz. At 110 Hz, Simulations show that with an input vibration of 10 μm amplitude at the frequency of resonance of the structure, the energy harvester should generate an average output power density of 0.032μW/mm3. This is the most area-efficient low-frequency electrostatic harvester to-date. © 2011 IEEE.

  20. Method for sputtering with low frequency alternating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, J.R.

    1996-04-30

    Low frequency alternating current sputtering is provided by connecting a low frequency alternating current source to a high voltage transformer having outer taps and a center tap for stepping up the voltage of the alternating current. The center tap of the transformer is connected to a vacuum vessel containing argon or helium gas. Target electrodes, in close proximity to each other, and containing material with which the substrates will be coated, are connected to the outer taps of the transformer. With an applied potential, the gas will ionize and sputtering from the target electrodes onto the substrate will then result. The target electrodes can be copper or boron, and the substrate can be stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. Copper coatings produced are used in place of nickel and/or copper striking. 6 figs.

  1. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  2. Ramanujan sums for signal processing of low-frequency noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planat, Michel; Rosu, Haret; Perrine, Serge

    2002-11-01

    An aperiodic (low-frequency) spectrum may originate from the error term in the mean value of an arithmetical function such as Möbius function or Mangoldt function, which are coding sequences for prime numbers. In the discrete Fourier transform the analyzing wave is periodic and not well suited to represent the low-frequency regime. In place we introduce a different signal processing tool based on the Ramanujan sums c(q)(n), well adapted to the analysis of arithmetical sequences with many resonances p/q. The sums are quasiperiodic versus the time n and aperiodic versus the order q of the resonance. Different results arise from the use of this Ramanujan-Fourier transform in the context of arithmetical and experimental signals.

  3. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields and health risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Buzdugan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In a world abounding in artificially created electromagnetic fields, we consider that a new approach regarding their possible harmful effects on living beings becomes mandatory. The paper reviews briefly the results of some epidemiological studies, the ICNIRP (International Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection Guidelines and the latest document of the SCENIHR (an organism of the European Commission regarding extremely low frequency (ELF magnetic fields. We are convinced that the best conduct that might be adopted on this matter is the policy of the prudential avoidance. Several examples of possible harmful effects determined by extremely low frequency magnetic fields dedicated to building services engineering in residences are presented, along with several methods of mitigating them.

  4. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter {tau} and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented.

  5. Anomalous low frequency dissipation processes in metal springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSalvo, Riccardo; DiCintio, Arianna [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Marchesoni, Fabio [INFN-VIRGO Project Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, 06100 Perugia (Italy); Bhawal, Abhik, E-mail: riccardo@caltech.ed [Arcadia High School, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The dissipation processes of leaf springs used in seismic isolation chains of Gravitational Wave detectors have been studied. A low frequency phase transition from visco us-like to fractal-like dissipation, controlled by Self Organized Criticality of dislocations, was observed. The new understandings suggest different best practices for the operations of the seismic isolation chains of the second generation of Gravitational Wave observatories and require new techniques and materials for the third generation.

  6. Evaluation of annoyance from low frequency noise under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pawlaczyk-Luszczynska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN at levels normally prevailing at workplaces in control rooms and office-like areas. Two different laboratory experiments were carried out. The first experiment included 55 young volunteers and the second one comprised 70 older volunteers, categorized in terms of sensitivity to noise. The subjects listened to noise samples with different spectra, including LFNs at sound pressure level (SPL of 45-67 dBA, and evaluated annoyance using a 100-score graphical rating scale. The subjective ratings of annoyance were compared to different noise metrics. In both the experiments, there were no differences in annoyance assessments between females and males. A significant influence of individual sensitivity to noise on annoyance rating was observed for some LFNs. Annoyance of LFN was not rated higher than annoyance from broadband noises without or with less prominent low frequencies at similar A-weighted SPLs. In both the experiments, median annoyance rating of LFN highly correlated with A-weighted SPL (L Aeq,T , low frequency A-weighted SPL (L LFAeq,T and C-weighted SPL (L Ceq,T . However, it is only the two latter noise metrics (i.e. L LFAeq,T and L Ceq,T which seem to be reliable predictors of annoyance exclusively from LFN. The young and older participants assessed similar annoyance from LFN at similar L LFAeq,T or L Ceq,T levels. Generally, over half of the subjects were predicted to be highly annoyed by LFN at the low frequency A-weighted SPL or C-weighted SPL above 62 and 83 dB, respectively.

  7. Full waveform inversion with extrapolated low frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yunyue Elita

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI) in the acoustic regime. The low frequencies help determine the kinematically relevant, low-wavenumber components of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid convergence of FWI to spurious local minima. However, acquiring data below 2 or 3 Hz from the field is a challenging and expensive task. In this paper we explore the possibility of synthesizing the low frequencies computationally from high-frequency data, and use the resulting prediction of the missing data to seed the frequency sweep of FWI. As a signal processing problem, bandwidth extension is a very nonlinear and delicate operation. It requires a high-level interpretation of bandlimited seismic records into individual events, each of which is extrapolable to a lower (or higher) frequency band from the non-dispersive nature of the wave propagation model. We propose to use the phase tracking method for the event separation task. The...

  8. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative...... amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3–3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size...... is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low...

  9. A comparison of two methods of assessing low frequency noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patching, Richard [Patching Associates Acoustical Engineering Ltd (Canada)], email: rpatching@patchingassociates.com

    2011-07-01

    Noise levels are usually measured with varying weighting scales to better adjust to human hear sensibility and these scales are assumed to be inherently appropriate. But this can become a problem when assessing low frequency noise from industrial facilities, and for that matter, Alberta provincial regulations and Canadian federal regulations use different criteria. This paper compares the two methods, and their limits relative to low frequency noise assessment. Alberta noise assessment regulations are based on an absolute permissible sound level, incorporating the ambient noise and added noise from industrial facilities. The Health Canada approach uses a day-night sound level and the criterion for noise annoyance is expressed in terms of the percentage of people highly annoyed by this noise level. Both methods assess low frequency noise the same way, by differentiating the measured A and C-weighted noise levels. And both methods are hard to implement in the design stage of a project for lack of noise information from the manufacturers.

  10. Slow earthquakes and low frequency tremor along the Apennines, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tronca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main observations on slow earthquakes and low frequency tremor made along the Apennines, the main seismic active zone of Italy. These observations have been made using a geodetic interferometer system operating since 1994 in the underground tunnel of Gran Sasso, central Italy, and an underground seismic array (UNDERSEIS operating since 2002 in the same environment. The observations made in recent years indicate that both phenomena are quite rare and apparently uncorrelated. Slow earthquakes, mainly recorded in 1997 and occasionally later, have probably been caused by the activity of a shallow fault system located near the interferometers. Until now only one tremor episode characterized by low frequency content and duration of several hours has been detected in January 2004, without any correlations with the occurrence of slow or regular earthquakes. The signal to noise ratio of this event is very low, but the results of our detailed analysis show that its frequency contents and wave field characteristics are compatible with a low frequency non volcanic tremor.

  11. Stabilizing Effect of Sweep on Low-Frequency STBLI Unsteadiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Michael; Gaitonde, Datta

    2017-11-01

    A Large-Eddy Simulation database is generated to examine unsteady shock/turbulent boundary-layer-interaction (STBLI) mechanisms in a Mach 2 swept-compression-corner. Such interactions exhibit open separation, with separation relief from the sweep, and lack the closed mean recirculation found in spanwise-homogeneous STBLIs. We find that the swept interaction lacks the low-frequency coherent shock unsteadiness, two-decades below incoming turbulent boundary layer scales, that is a principal feature of comparable closed separation STBLIs. Rather, the prominent unsteady content is a mid-frequency regime that develops in the separated shear layer and scales weakly with the local separation length. Additionally, a linear perturbation analysis of the unsteady flow indicates that the feedback pathway (associated with an absolute instability in spanwise-homogeneous interactions) is absent in swept-compression-corner interactions. This suggests that 1) the linear oscillator is an essential component of low-frequency unsteadiness in interactions with closed separation. 2) Low-frequency control efforts should be focused on disrupting this oscillator. 3) Introduction of 3D effects constitute one mechanism to disrupt the oscillator.

  12. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  13. Dispersion Relations and Polarizations of Low-frequency Waves in Two-fluid Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) and \\beta (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves, namely the fast and Alfv\\'{e}n modes in the low-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\ll 1\\right)$ plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the \\beta \\sim 1 plasmas, and the Alfv\\'{e}n and slow modes in the high-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\gg 1\\right)$ plasmas, become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-\\beta plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode in the high-\\beta plasmas. It also shown the electric polarization $\\delta E_{z}/\\delta E_{y}$ decreases...

  14. Low Frequency Radio Astronomical Antennas for the Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, J.; ROLSS DALI Teams

    2009-01-01

    Low radio frequencies (∼100 MHz) represent the last of the relatively unexplored wavebands in the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysics. Such observations are very challenging from the surface of the Earth because of an abundance of human-made radio interference (e.g., FM bands, TV channels) and because of ionospheric refraction. The lunar farside presents a unique opportunity to fully open this cosmic window because of the demonstrated radio-quiet environment. The ultimate science goal of a lunar farside low frequency telescope is to explore a new frontier in cosmology, the so-called Dark Ages. This era occurs between Recombination (at z 1100) when the universe first becomes transparent (producing what we observe today as the CMB) and Reionization when the first stars and galaxies form (at z 10-20). During the Dark Ages, the universe was unlit by any star and the only detectable signal is likely to arise from neutral hydrogen absorption against the CMB (from the collapse of the first structures). Observing this absorption signal would be a powerful probe of fundamental cosmology. During the Dark Ages (z 20 - 150), when the 21-cm (1.4 GHz) neutral hydrogen line is redshifted into the low frequency radio band (10-30 MHz, 10-30 m), the absorption signal has the potential to be the richest of all cosmological data sets. In this poster, we will discuss the opportunities and options for low frequency radio antennas in both lunar orbit and on the lunar surface. We are investigating a novel concept to deploy a large number of low-mass antennas deposited on sheets of polyimide film. We will also describe results of laboratory vacuum testing at U. Colorado on polyimide film cycled between -150 C and 100 C, and exposed to far-ultraviolet light, with conditions like those on the lunar surface.

  15. The Current Status of Low Frequency Radio Astronomy from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Weiler, K. W.

    Ground-based radio astronomy is severely limited by the Earth's ionosphere. Below 15 -- 20 MHz, space-based radio observations are superior or even mandatory. Three different areas of astronomical research manifest themselves at low radio frequencies: solar, planetary, and galactic-extragalactic. Space-based observations of solar phenomena at low frequencies are a natural extension of high-frequency ground-based observations that have been carried out since the beginnings of radio astronomy. Measurements of known solar phenomena such as Types II and III bursts have been extended from the few solar radii altitude range reachable by ground-based techniques out to 1 AU and beyond. These space-based solar measurements have become critical in our developing an understanding of ``space weather." In contrast, non-thermal planetary radio emissions are almost exclusively a space radio astronomy phenomenon. With the exception of two components of Jupiter's complex radio spectrum, the magnetospheric and Auroral radio emissions of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have all been discovered by space radio astronomy techniques. For astrophysical applications, the lack of angular resolution from space at low frequencies has thwarted progress such that most areas still remain to be fully exploited. Results to date have only included overall cosmic background spectra and extremely crude (~1 steradian resolution) ``maps." In this overview we will briefly summarize the current status of science in the three areas of research and outline some future concepts for low-frequency, space-based instruments for solar, planetary, and astrophysical problems.

  16. Low frequency acoustic properties of Posidonia oceanica seagrass leaf blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jay R.; Venegas, Gabriel R.; Wilson, Preston S.; Hermand, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The acoustics of seagrass meadows impacts naval and oceanographic sonar applications. To study this environment, a one-dimensional resonator was used to assess the low-frequency (1–5 kHz) acoustic response of the leaf blades of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica in water. Three separate collections of plants from Crete, Greece, and Sicily, Italy were investigated. A high consistency in effective sound speed was observed within each collection while a strong variability was observed between different collections. Average size, mass, and epiphytic coverage within each collection were quantified, and discoloration and stiffness are discussed qualitatively with respect to the observed acoustic variability. PMID:28618796

  17. Receiving antenna array element with extended bandwidth toward low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2017-08-01

    An ultrawideband antenna based on a short dielectric dipole has been developed to sound dielectric layered media and to search objects including those hidden behind a dielectric barrier. In contrast to the previously presented antennas, the new one has an unbalanced output and contains a built-in balanced-to-unbalanced unit. As a result of optimization of the antenna geometry and topology of active elements, the lower frequency boundary was shifted toward low frequencies. The antenna records short nanosecond pulses with the spectrum ranging from 150 MHz to 2 GHz with small waveform distortions.

  18. Review of sensors for low frequency seismic vibration measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, C; Janssens, S; Artoos, K; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this report is to review the main different types of sensors used to measure seismic vibrations at low frequencies. After some basic background preliminaries, the main different types of relative measurements are first reviewed. Then, the following inertial sensors are treated: geophones, accelerometers and broadband seismometers. For each of these sensors, the basic working principle is explained, along with the main performances limitations. Each section ends with a tentative comparison of some commercial products, far from being exhaustive, but hopefully representative of the average characteristics of each family of sensors. The report finishes with a brief discussion on the modelling and measurement of the sensor noise

  19. Preamplifier with ultra low frequency cutoff for infrasonic condenser microphone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnerup, Rasmus Trock; Marbjerg, Kresten; Rasmussen, Per

    2012-01-01

    Measuring infrasonic sound sets high requirements on the instruments used. Typically the measurement chain consists of a microphone and a preamplifier. As the input resistance of the preamplifier forms a high pass filter with the capacitance of the microphone in the picofarad range, measuring ultra......B. Being able to measure down to ultra low frequencies in the infrasonic frequency range will aid actors in the debate on wind turbine noise. Sonic booms from supersonic flights include frequencies down to 10 mHz and the preamplifier proposed in this paper will aid scientists trying to modify the N...

  20. Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2010-09-01

    Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importance of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.

  1. An analysis of low frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged, that the noise emitted by the turbines would move down in frequency, and that the contents of low-frequency noise would be enough to cause significant annoyance for the neighbors. The sound emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power......-third-octave-band spectra shows that the relative noise emission is higher in the 63-250 Hz frequency range from turbines above 2 MW than from smaller turbines. The observations confirm a downward shift of the spectrum....

  2. Low frequency phase signal measurement with high frequency squeezing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Zehui; Gao, Jiangrui

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the utility of high-frequency squeezed-state enhanced two-frequency interferometry for low-frequency phase measurement. To use the high-frequency sidebands of the squeezed light, a two-frequency intense laser is used in the interferometry instead of a single-frequency laser as usual. We find that the readout signal can be contaminated by the high-frequency phase vibration, but this is easy to check and avoid. A proof-of-principle experiment is in the reach of modern quantum optic...

  3. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P.R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places in which our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions on the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  4. Influence of multiple ion species on low-frequency electromagnetic wave instabilities. [in solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of multiple (singly ionized) coexisting newborn ion species on the stability of low-frequency electromagnetic waves was investigated using a plasma model in which solar wind magnetoplasma is made up of isotropic Maxwellian electron and proton populations with a common number density of 4.95/cu cm and temperatures equal to 17.2 eV and 6.9 eV, respectively. It is shown that the effect of multiple ions on wave growth, for given background magnetoplasma conditions and relative densities, depends not only on their mass but also on the physical nature of the wave modes. If the ion masses are disparate, each one of the coexisting ion beams tends to stimulate instabilities without undue influence from the other species. If the masses of newborn ions are similar, they can strongly catalyze wave growth of fluidlike nonresonant modes, but bring about weak growth enhancements in cyclotron resonant instabilities.

  5. Localization of Ultra-Low Frequency Waves in Multi-Ion Plasmas of the Planetary Magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hwa Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available By adopting a 2D time-dependent wave code, we investigate how mode-converted waves at the Ion-Ion Hybrid (IIH resonance and compressional waves propagate in 2D density structures with a wide range of field-aligned wavenumbers to background magnetic fields. The simulation results show that the mode-converted waves have continuous bands across the field line consistent with previous numerical studies. These waves also have harmonic structures in frequency domain and are localized in the field-aligned heavy ion density well. Our results thus emphasize the importance of a field-aligned heavy ion density structure for ultra-low frequency wave propagation, and suggest that IIH waves can be localized in different locations along the field line.

  6. Low Frequency Sloshing Analysis of Cylindrical Containers with Flat and Conical Baffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnitko V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of low-frequency liquid vibrations in rigid partially filled containers with baffles. The liquid is supposed to be an ideal and incompressible one and its flow is irrotational. A compound shell of revolution is considered as the container model. For evaluating the velocity potential the system of singular boundary integral equations has been obtained. The single-domain and multi-domain reduced boundary element methods have been used for its numerical solution. The numerical simulation is performed to validate the proposed method and to estimate the sloshing frequencies and modes of fluid-filled cylindrical shells with baffles in the forms of circular plates and truncated cones. Both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes of liquid vibrations in baffled and un-baffled tanks have been considered. The proposed method makes it possible to determine a suitable place with a proper height for installing baffles in tanks by using the numerical experiment.

  7. A Digital Backend for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartez, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals of LoFASM are the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. LoFASM consists of antennas and front-end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of four stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. In a single station, RF signals from each of the individual LoFASM dipoles are combined in phase in order to synthesize LoFASM's beam. The LoFASM RF signals are phased up so that the resulting beam is sensitive to radio emission that originates from the zenith and RF signals approaching from the horizon are attenuated. Digitally, this is achieved using a full Stokes 100MHz correlating spectrometer constructed using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. In this thesis I will describe the design and usage of the LoFASM Correlator.

  8. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  9. Observed Low Frequency Variability of the Brazil Current Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, G. J.; Bringas Gutierrez, F.; Di Nezio, P. N.

    2012-12-01

    The Brazil Current is a weak western boundary current, the southwest component of the South Atlantic subtropical gyre, which is the main conduit of upper ocean waters in the region. We report her the observed low frequency variability of the Brazil Current front using satellite-derived sea height anomaly and sea surface temperature observations during the 1993-2008 period. The variability of the front is studied in terms of the separation of the Brazil Current front from the continental shelf break. During the study period, estimates of this parameter indicate a shift to the south of approximately 1.5 degrees. Statistically significant changes are not observed in the geostrophic transport of the Brazil and Malvinas currents suggesting that the low-frequency changes of the Brazil Current front are governed by different mechanisms than the seasonal variability of these surface currents. Surface drifter trajectories as well as simulations using synthetic drifters are consistent with the observed shift to the south of the Brazil Current front. Trends of eddy kinetic energy, sea height anomaly, sea surface temperature and wind stress curl are also in agreement with the variability reported here. Wavelet transform analysis revealed an interesting change in the periodicity of the separation of the Brazil Current front from the continental shelf break from annual to bi-annual during 2003. Longer records together with comprehensive numerical experiments will ultimately be needed to determine the origin of these changes.

  10. Mechanically-tunable composite filter at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeland, Sara; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies into the possibility of a plasmonic medium of a coiled conductor array in air have shown promise. This work serves to evaluate the possibility of creating a mechanically-tunable composite filter at low frequencies. Copper springs were created with varying starting pitches using a coil winder. These springs were then embedded into a flexible host polymer. The mechanical and electromagnetic properties of each spring design were predicted and tested. Two horn antennas were used to characterize the overall electromagnetic (EM) properties of the composite. The pitch of each spring was increased mechanically through application of force to the entire polymermetal composite at equal intervals, with an EM test completed at each step. Using an Agilent 8510C Vector Network Analyzer (VNA), the frequency spectrum within the microwave range was scanned. Relative amplitude and phase measurements were taken at equal frequency and pitch steps. With no polymer surrounding the springs, plasmon turn-on frequencies were observed to span the microwave bands as the pitch of the springs were increased. Similar results are expected with the springs embedded in a polymeric matrix. These results suggest a method of creating a mechanically-tunable composite filter for use at low frequencies.

  11. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott

    2017-01-01

    With LIGO detecting stellar mass black holes and (soon) other stellar mass compact objects, and with LISA Pathfinder demonstrating important elements of the technology needed to fly a gravitational-wave antenna in space, the case for a low-frequency, space-based gravitational-wave detector - LISA - is stronger than ever. In this talk, I will survey the landscape of low-frequency gravitational-wave astronomy. The LISA frequency band from afew ×10-5 Hz to about 1 Hz is one which is rich with known sources whose measurement will enable new astronomical and physical measurements of important systems. It is also a band with great potential discovery space. In this talk, I will survey the known knowns and known unknowns in the LISA band, describing the frontiers that we can study in advance of the mission, and the frontiers that LISA measurements will unveil. I will also talk about the possible unknown unknowns where surprising discoveries may lurk.

  12. Passive Super-Low Frequency electromagnetic prospecting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Zhao, Shanshan; Hui, Jian; Qin, Qiming

    2017-03-01

    The Super-Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic prospecting technique, adopted as a non-imaging remote sensing tool for depth sounding, is systematically proposed for subsurface geological survey. In this paper, we propose and theoretically illustrate natural source magnetic amplitudes as SLF responses for the first step. In order to directly calculate multi-dimensional theoretical SLF responses, modeling algorithms were developed and evaluated using the finite difference method. The theoretical results of three-dimensional (3-D) models show that the average normalized SLF magnetic amplitude responses were numerically stable and appropriate for practical interpretation. To explore the depth resolution, three-layer models were configured. The modeling results prove that the SLF technique is more sensitive to conductive objective layers than high resistive ones, with the SLF responses of conductive objective layers obviously showing uprising amplitudes in the low frequency range. Afterwards, we proposed an improved Frequency-Depth transformation based on Bostick inversion to realize the depth sounding by empirically adjusting two parameters. The SLF technique has already been successfully applied in geothermal exploration and coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir interpretation, which demonstrates that the proposed methodology is effective in revealing low resistive distributions. Furthermore, it siginificantly contributes to reservoir identification with electromagnetic radiation anomaly extraction. Meanwhile, the SLF interpretation results are in accordance with dynamic production status of CBM reservoirs, which means it could provide an economical, convenient and promising method for exploring and monitoring subsurface geo-objects.

  13. A new hybrid phononic crystal in low frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z., E-mail: zhangz@dlut.edu.cn; Han, X.K.

    2016-11-25

    A novel hybrid phononic crystal is designed to obtain wider band gaps in low frequency range. The hybrid phononic crystal consists of rubber slab with periodic holes and plumbum stubs. In comparison with the phononic crystal without periodic holes, the new designed phononic crystal can obtain wider band gaps and better vibration damping characteristics. The wider band gap can be attributed to the interaction of local resonance and Bragg scattering. The controlling of the BG is explained by the strain energy of the hybrid PC and the introduced effective mass. The effects of the geometrical parameters and the shapes of the stubs and holes on the controlling of waves are further studied. - Highlights: • A novel hybrid PC structure is proposed in current work. The new designed hybrid PC shows wider BG in low frequency range and better vibration damping characteristics. • Strain energy and effective mass are introduced for the investigations on the mechanism of the controlling of BGs in PC structure. • The effects of the geometrical parameters and the shapes of the stubs and holes on the controlling of waves are further studied for optimal design.

  14. Electrostrictive ceramics for low-frequency active transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, S M

    2000-01-01

    Electrostrictive ceramics based on Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3 ))O(3) have demonstrated promise as low-frequency active materials. They broaden the range of design options by providing a mix of properties unavailable in traditional piezoceramics. Typical properties are: 1000 microstrain on the interval 0-1 MV/m with a k(33) of 0.5; high-field electrical impedance ~5 times that of traditional piezoelectrics; graceful, predictable, and repeatable property variation with temperature, frequency, and prestress; recoverable change of properties with temperature. Unipolar excitation at fields less than 1 MV/m is typical to provide direct frequency conversion and prevent corona discharge and reliability issues within transducers. Although electrostrictive ceramics are not direct replacements for traditional piezoceramics, they have many similarities in physical and chemical properties. The differences are most obvious in the electromechanical response behavior with changes in bias field, drive level, frequency, and prestress. In addition, the "rules-of-thumb" for traditional piezoceramics, both processing and use, do not wholly apply to electrostrictive ceramics. The development and present state of the art in electrostrictive ceramics for low-frequency uses are detailed.

  15. Alternative source models of very low frequency events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Agnew, D.C.; Schwartz, S.Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present alternative source models for very low frequency (VLF) events, previously inferred to be radiation from individual slow earthquakes that partly fill the period range between slow slip events lasting thousands of seconds and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) with durations of tenths of a second. We show that VLF events may emerge from bandpass filtering a sum of clustered, shorter duration, LFE signals, believed to be the components of tectonic tremor. Most published studies show VLF events occurring concurrently with tremor bursts and LFE signals. Our analysis of continuous data from Costa Rica detected VLF events only when tremor was also occurring, which was only 7% of the total time examined. Using analytic and synthetic models, we show that a cluster of LFE signals produces the distinguishing characteristics of VLF events, which may be determined by the cluster envelope. The envelope may be diagnostic of a single, dynamic, slowly slipping event that propagates coherently over kilometers or represents a narrowly band-passed version of nearly simultaneous arrivals of radiation from slip on multiple higher stress drop and/or faster propagating slip patches with dimensions of tens of meters (i.e., LFE sources). Temporally clustered LFE sources may be triggered by single or multiple distinct aseismic slip events or represent the nearly simultaneous chance occurrence of background LFEs. Given the nonuniqueness in possible source durations, we suggest it is premature to draw conclusions about VLF event sources or how they scale.

  16. Current Status of The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartez, Louis; Creighton, Teviet; Jenet, Fredrick; Dolch, Timothy; Boehler, Keith; Bres, Luis; Cole, Brent; Luo, Jing; Miller, Rossina; Murray, James; Reyes, Alex; Rivera, Jesse

    2018-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of cross-dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual- polarization dipole antenna stands. The primary science goals of LoFASM will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council’s ASTRO2010 decadal survey. The data acquisition system for the LoFASM antenna array uses Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to implement a real time full Stokes spectrometer and data recorder. This poster presents an overview of the LoFASM Radio Telescope as well as the status of data analysis of initial commissioning observations.

  17. Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Searches Using Spacecraft Doppler Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses spacecraft Doppler tracking, the current-generation detector technology used in the low-frequency (~millihertz gravitational wave band. In the Doppler method the earth and a distant spacecraft act as free test masses with a ground-based precision Doppler tracking system continuously monitoring the earth-spacecraft relative dimensionless velocity $2 Delta v/c = Delta u/ u_0$, where $Delta u$ is the Doppler shift and $ u_0$ is the radio link carrier frequency. A gravitational wave having strain amplitude $h$ incident on the earth-spacecraft system causes perturbations of order $h$ in the time series of $Delta u/ u_0$. Unlike other detectors, the ~1-10 AU earth-spacecraft separation makes the detector large compared with millihertz-band gravitational wavelengths, and thus times-of-flight of signals and radio waves through the apparatus are important. A burst signal, for example, is time-resolved into a characteristic signature: three discrete events in the Doppler time series. I discuss here the principles of operation of this detector (emphasizing transfer functions of gravitational wave signals and the principal noises to the Doppler time series, some data analysis techniques, experiments to date, and illustrations of sensitivity and current detector performance. I conclude with a discussion of how gravitational wave sensitivity can be improved in the low-frequency band.

  18. Effects of the major sudden stratospheric warming event of 2009 on the subionospheric very low frequency/low frequency radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; Hobara, Y.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Schnoor, P. W.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents effects of the major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event of 2009 on the subionospheric very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) radio signals propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Signal amplitudes from four transmitters received by VLF/LF radio networks of Germany and Japan corresponding to the major SSW event are investigated for possible anomalies and atmospheric influence on the high- to middle-latitude ionosphere. Significant anomalous increase or decrease of nighttime and daytime amplitudes of VLF/LF signals by ˜3-5 dB during the SSW event have been found for all propagation paths associated with stratospheric temperature rise at 10 hPa level. Increase or decrease in VLF/LF amplitudes during daytime and nighttime is actually due to the modification of the lower ionospheric boundary conditions in terms of electron density and electron-neutral collision frequency profiles and associated modal interference effects between the different propagating waveguide modes during the SSW period. TIMED/SABER mission data are also used to investigate the upper mesospheric conditions over the VLF/LF propagation path during the same time period. We observe a decrease in neutral temperature and an increase in pressure at the height of 75-80 km around the peak time of the event. VLF/LF anomalies are correlated and in phase with the stratospheric temperature and mesospheric pressure variation, while minimum of mesospheric cooling shows a 2-3 day delay with maximum VLF/LF anomalies. Simulations of VLF/LF diurnal variation are performed using the well-known Long Wave Propagating Capability (LWPC) code within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to explain the VLF/LF anomalies qualitatively.

  19. A ratchet mechanism for low-frequency hearing in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    The sensitivity and frequency selectivity of hearing result from tuned amplification by an active process in the mechanoreceptive hair cells. The nature of the active process in the mammalian cochlea is intensely debated, for outer hair cells exhibit two forms of mechanical activity, active hair-bundle motility and membrane-based electromotility. Here we show theoretically that active hair-bundle motility and electromotility can together implement an efficient mechanism for amplification that functions like a ratchet: sound-evoked forces acting on the basilar membrane are transmitted to the hair bundles while electromotility decouples the active hair-bundle forces from the basilar membrane. Through a combination of analytical and computational techniques we demonstrate that the ratchet mechanism can naturally account for a variety of unexplained experimental observations from low-frequency hearing.

  20. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falvella, M C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Gaier, T C; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kangaslahti, P; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lindholm, V; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated...

  1. Investigating low-frequency compression using the Grid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about whether the amount of cochlear compression in humans at low frequencies (below 1 kHz) is as high as that at higher frequencies. It is controversial whether the compression affects the slope of the off-frequency forward masking curves at those frequencies. Here......, the Grid method with a 2-interval 1-up 3-down tracking rule was applied to estimate forward masking curves at two characteristic frequencies: 500 Hz and 4000 Hz. The resulting curves and the corresponding basilar membrane input-output (BM I/O) functions were found to be comparable to those reported...... in literature. Moreover, slopes of the low-level portions of the BM I/O functions estimated at 500 Hz were examined, to determine whether the 500-Hz off-frequency forward masking curves were affected by compression. Overall, the collected data showed a trend confirming the compressive behaviour. However...

  2. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blednykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ_{r}. In the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ_{r}→∞, and the case in which the magnets are fully saturated (μ_{r}=1.

  3. Photonic crystal planar lens working at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaolin; Shi, Shouyuan; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Lin, Chunchen; Chen, Caihua; Sharkawy, Ahmed S.; Prather, Dennis W.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a planar lens based on the dispersion property of a photonic crystal. When a photonic crystal is illuminated with a low frequency within its dispersion diagram it behaves very similar to an isotropic material, whose resultant index is kept a constant, and is determined by the ratio of high index material and low index material. To validate our design, we performed the experiment in millimeter regime, where the photonic crystal lens was fabricated using a CNC micro-milling machine, and a millimeter wave imaging system was built based on a vector network analyzer. For the lens, we have observed its ability to collimate an incident point source both in the amplitude and phase.

  4. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  5. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in plant virus suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchenko, E. K.; Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Pershin, S. M.; Savichev, V. I.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-11-01

    The study deals with laser pulse interaction with plant viruses: we investigated tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and two types of potato viruses (PVX and PVA) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water. We used 20 ns ruby laser pulses for excitation. We employed Fabry–Pérot interferometers to record spectra of the light passing through the sample and reflected from it. For TMV and PVX in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer, same as for PVA in water, we observed additional spectral lines corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). We believe we were the first to measure SLFRS frequency shifts, conversion efficiency and threshold. High conversion efficiency of the scattered light is evidence of laser pulses efficiently exciting gigahertz vibrations in viruses. SLFRS can be used to identify and affect biological nanoparticles.

  6. Low-frequency measurement of leakage in enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Max; Modera, Mark

    1986-07-01

    A wide variety of enclosed structures either require or cannot entirely prevent leakage from their interior space to the outside. Existing methods for measuring such leakage have important disadvantages. We have developed a device and technique that permits leakage areas to be measured from within or without the enclosure without causing unacceptable disturbance. The apparatus uses low-frequency (1 Hz) acoustic monopoles to generate an internal pressure signal which is then analyzed synchronously to provide a measurement of leakage area. We have successfully applied this technique to measuring air tightness in residential houses, and believe it can be easily adapted for use in field, laboratory, or classroom applications. We are currently evaluating why the values we obtained were, on average, 14% lower than those obtained through conventional methods and we are investigating the apparent inability of the device, as presently designed, to measure large leaks.

  7. Sound field control for a low-frequency test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The two largest problems in controlling the reproduction of low-frequency sound for psychoacoustic experiments is the effect of the room due to standing waves and the relatively large sound pressure levels needed. Anechoic rooms are limited downward in frequency and distortion may be a problem even...... at moderate levels, while pressure-field playback can give higher sound pressures but is limited upwards in frequency. A new solution that addresses both problems has been implemented in the laboratory of Acoustics, Aalborg University. The solution uses one wall with 20 loudspeakers to generate a plane wave...... that is actively absorbed when it reaches the 20 loudspeakers on the opposing wall. This gives a homogeneous sound field in the majority of the room with a flat frequency response in the frequency range 2-300 Hz. The lowest frequencies are limited to sound pressure levels in the order of 95 dB. If larger levels...

  8. Behavior of radon progeny in low frequency electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, K; Yamamoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Whether the electro-magnetic (EM) fields are carcinogenic or not still remains to be discussed from scientific point of view. Recently a possibility was pointed out that increased deposition of radon progeny in the EM-fields should enhance exposure dose to internal body. We investigated the behavior of charged sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn progeny and aerosols containing them by measuring the pattern and the magnitude of the deposition rate of decay products on both CR-39 track detectors and imaging plates under various conditions. We concluded that the attachment to wire cables should be increased mainly by electric component of low frequency EM-fields and possibly by electric field induced by strong changing magnetic ones.

  9. Offshore windfarm connection with low frequency AC transmission technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Nan; Xu, Zhao; You, Shi

    2009-01-01

    developed, which consists of three parts, the fixed-speed wind turbine representing a wind farm, the transmission line and the frequency converter. Although the transmission capability is greatly improved by the LFAC system, simulation shows it gives negative influences on the wind turbine operation due......This paper investigates the feasibility of using the low frequency AC transmission (LFAC) system, e.g. fraction of 50 Hz or 60 Hz, for connecting the large offshore wind farm to the grid by modelling and simulation. The LFAC system improves the transmission capacity and distance compared...... to the conventional AC solution at the nominal frequency, e.g. 50 Hz or 60 Hz. and reduces the investment cost compared to the HVDC solution. It is estimated that the LFAC system is competitive in the transmission distance of about 30-150 km. The simulation model of the wind integration using the LFAC system has been...

  10. Estimating Lexical Priors for Low-Frequency Syncretic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Baayen, H; Baayen, Harald; Sproat, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Given a previously unseen form that is morphologically n-ways ambiguous, what is the best estimator for the lexical prior probabilities for the various functions of the form? We argue that the best estimator is provided by computing the relative frequencies of the various functions among the hapax legomena --- the forms that occur exactly once in a corpus. This result has important implications for the development of stochastic morphological taggers, especially when some initial hand-tagging of a corpus is required: For predicting lexical priors for very low-frequency morphologically ambiguous types (most of which would not occur in any given corpus) one should concentrate on tagging a good representative sample of the hapax legomena, rather than extensively tagging words of all frequency ranges.

  11. Multimode/Multifrequency Low Frequency Airborne Radar Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design of multimode/multifrequency airborne radar suitable for imaging and subsurface sounding. The system operates at relatively low frequencies in the band ranging from VHF to UHF. It is able to work in two different modalities: (i nadir-looking sounder in the VHF band (163 MHz and (ii side-looking imager (SAR in the UHF band with two channels at 450 MHz and 860 MHz. The radar has been completely designed by CO.Ri.S.T.A. for what concerns the RF and the electronic aspect, and by the University of Calabria for what concerns the design, realization, and test of SAR antennas. The radar has been installed on a civil helicopter and its operation has been validated in flight in both sounder and imager modality. Preliminary surveys have been carried out over different areas of Campania region, South Italy.

  12. Electrodialytic soil remediation enhanced by low frequency pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Mortensen, John

    2013-01-01

    The effect of low frequency pulse current on decreasing the polarization and energy consumption during the process of electrodialytic soil remediation was investigated in the present work. The results indicated that the transportation of cations through the cation exchange membrane was the rate...... current experiment compared to the constant current experiment. At the cation exchange membrane, only the resistance caused by concentration polarization decreased. In the soil compartment, an average of +60. mV overpotential caused by the polarization of the electric double layer of the clay particles...... was obtained from the Nernstian behavior simulation of the relaxation process, which was significantly lower than the ohmic voltage drop induced by pore fluid resistance. Therefore, the ohmic polarization was the major contributor to the energy consumption in the soil compartment and diminished by pulse...

  13. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fufei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range.

  14. Preloaded freeplay wide-bandwidth low-frequency piezoelectric harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpes, N.; Abdelkefi, A.; Hajj, M. R.; Heo, J.; Cho, K.-H.; Priya, S.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a technique for increasing the bandwidth of resonant low-frequency (<100 Hz) piezoelectric energy harvesters based on the modification of the clamped boundary condition of cantilevers, termed here as preloaded freeplay boundary condition. The effects of the preloaded freeplay boundary condition are quantified in terms of the fundamental frequency, frequency response, and power output for two beam configurations, namely, classical cantilevered bimorph piezoelectric energy harvester and zigzag unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester. A comparative analysis was performed between both the harvesters to empirically establish the advantages of the preloaded freeplay boundary condition. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the coupled degree-of-freedom dynamics results in an approximate 4-7 times increase in half-power bandwidth over the fixed boundary condition case.

  15. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  16. Planck early results. V. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Lähteenmäki, A.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of data from the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) used in production of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). In particular, we discuss the steps involved in reducing the data from telemetry packets to cleaned, calibrated, time-ordered data (TOD......) and frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation induced by the motion of the spacecraft. Noise properties are estimated from TOD from which the sky signal has been removed using a generalized least square map......-making algorithm. Measured 1/f noise knee-frequencies range from ~100 mHz at 30 GHz to a few tens of mHz at 70GHz. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices required to compute...

  17. Planck 2013 results. II. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data......, from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other...... than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least squares map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam...

  18. Observation of low frequency electromagnetic activity at 1000 km altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivchenko

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of low frequency fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields, commonly interpreted as Alfvénic activity. The data base consists of six months of electric and magnetic field measurements by the Astrid-2 microsatellite. The occurrence of the events is studied with respect to the location and general activity. Large regions of broadband Alfvénic activity are persistently observed in the cusp/cleft and, during the periods of high geo-magnetic activity, also in the pre-midnight sector of the auroral oval.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere – Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  19. Effects of low frequency vibration of a limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    Low frequency oscillations were applied on the ankle joint in plantarflexion/dorsiflexion rotation using a torque motor. The torque, the angular rotation and the evoked electromyogram from the gastronemius soleus and the anterior tibial muscles were recorded. Significant nonlinearities were observed in the angular rotation from 8 to 12 Hz. The following methods are used for data analysis: (1) Two cycle averaged response; (2) Fourier transform; and (3) Fourier analysis at the driving frequency. Important observations are: (1) resonance near 6 to 8 Hz; (2) slowly increasing amplitudes of oscillation near resonance; (3) self sustaining oscillations after the motor is turned off, particularly in the fatigued limb; and (4) distortion of angular rotation during which there are spontaneous recurrences of oscillation at the driving frequency.

  20. An autocorrelation method to detect low frequency earthquakes within tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Shelly, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep tremor in the Nankai Trough under western Shikoku consists of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as slow shear slip on the down-dip extension of the primary seismogenic zone of the plate interface. The similarity of tremor in other locations suggests a similar mechanism, but the absence of cataloged low frequency earthquakes prevents a similar analysis. In this study, we develop a method for identifying LFEs within tremor. The method employs a matched-filter algorithm, similar to the technique used to infer that tremor in parts of Shikoku is comprised of LFEs; however, in this case we do not assume the origin times or locations of any LFEs a priori. We search for LFEs using the running autocorrelation of tremor waveforms for 6 Hi-Net stations in the vicinity of the tremor source. Time lags showing strong similarity in the autocorrelation represent either repeats, or near repeats, of LFEs within the tremor. We test the method on an hour of Hi-Net recordings of tremor and demonstrates that it extracts both known and previously unidentified LFEs. Once identified, we cross correlate waveforms to measure relative arrival times and locate the LFEs. The results are able to explain most of the tremor as a swarm of LFEs and the locations of newly identified events appear to fill a gap in the spatial distribution of known LFEs. This method should allow us to extend the analysis of Shelly et al. (2007a) to parts of the Nankai Trough in Shikoku that have sparse LFE coverage, and may also allow us to extend our analysis to other regions that experience deep tremor, but where LFEs have not yet been identified. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Toward an adjustable nonlinear low frequency acoustic absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, R.; Bellizzi, S.; Cochelin, B.; Herzog, P.; Mattei, P. O.

    2011-10-01

    A study of the targeted energy transfer (TET) phenomenon between an acoustic resonator and a thin viscoelastic membrane has recently been presented in the paper [R. Bellet et al., Experimental study of targeted energy transfer from an acoustic system to a nonlinear membrane absorber, Journal of Sound and Vibration 329 (2010) 2768-2791], providing a new path to passive sound control in the low frequency domain where no efficient dissipative device exists. This paper presents experimental results showing that a loudspeaker used as a suspended piston working outside its range of linearity can also be used as a nonlinear acoustic absorber. The main advantage of this technology of absorber is the perspective to adjust independently the device parameters (mass, nonlinear stiffness and damping) according to the operational conditions. To achieve this purpose, quasi-static and dynamic tests have been performed on three types of commercial devices (one with structural modifications), in order to define the constructive characteristics that it should present. An experimental setup has been developed using a one-dimensional acoustic linear system coupled through a box (acting as a weak spring) to a loudspeaker used as a suspended piston acting as an essentially nonlinear oscillator. The tests carried out on the whole vibro-acoustic system have showed the occurrence of the acoustic TET from the acoustic media to the suspended piston and demonstrated the efficiency of this new kind of absorber at low frequencies over a wide frequency range. Moreover, the experimental analyses conducted with different NES masses have confirmed that it is possible to optimize the noise absorption with respect to the excitation level of the acoustic resonator.

  2. The effect of the flexibility of hydrogen bonding network on low-frequency motions of amino acids. Evidence from Terahertz spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Lukács, András; Bordács, Sándor; Móczár, János; Nyitrai, Miklós; Hebling, János

    2018-02-01

    Low-frequency modes of L-Asp and L-Asn were studied in the range from 0.1 to 3.0 THz using time-domain Terahertz spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation. The results show that PBE-D2 shows more success than BLYP-D2 in prediction of THz absorption spectra. To compare their low-frequency modes, we adopted ;vibrational character ID strips; proposed by Schmuttenmaer and coworkers [Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 117, 10444(2013)]. We found that the most intense THz absorption peaks of two compounds both involve severe distortion of their hydrogen bonding networks. Due to less rigid hydrogen bonding network in L-Asp, the side chain (carboxyl group) of L-Asp exhibits larger motions than that (carboxamide group) of L-Asn in low-frequency modes.

  3. Composite 3D-printed metastructures for low-frequency and broadband vibration absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Bauhofer, Anton; Krödel, Sebastian; Palermo, Antonio; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Architected materials that control elastic wave propagation are essential in vibration mitigation and sound attenuation. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials use band-gap engineering to forbid certain frequencies from propagating through a material. However, existing solutions are limited in the low-frequency regimes and in their bandwidth of operation because they require impractical sizes and masses. Here, we present a class of materials (labeled elastic metastructures) that supports the formation of wide and low-frequency band gaps, while simultaneously reducing their global mass. To achieve these properties, the metastructures combine local resonances with structural modes of a periodic architected lattice. Whereas the band gaps in these metastructures are induced by Bragg scattering mechanisms, their key feature is that the band-gap size and frequency range can be controlled and broadened through local resonances, which are linked to changes in the lattice geometry. We demonstrate these principles experimentally, using advanced additive manufacturing methods, and inform our designs using finite-element simulations. This design strategy has a broad range of applications, including control of structural vibrations, noise, and shock mitigation.

  4. The Engineering Development Array: A Low Frequency Radio Telescope Utilising SKA Precursor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayth, Randall; Sokolowski, Marcin; Booler, Tom; Crosse, Brian; Emrich, David; Grootjans, Robert; Hall, Peter J.; Horsley, Luke; Juswardy, Budi; Kenney, David; Steele, Kim; Sutinjo, Adrian; Tingay, Steven J.; Ung, Daniel; Walker, Mia; Williams, Andrew; Beardsley, A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Pallot, D.; Trott, C. M.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Engineering Development Array, which is a low-frequency radio telescope comprising 256 dual-polarisation dipole antennas working as a phased array. The Engineering Development Array was conceived of, developed, and deployed in just 18 months via re-use of Square Kilometre Array precursor technology and expertise, specifically from the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope. Using drift scans and a model for the sky brightness temperature at low frequencies, we have derived the Engineering Development Array's receiver temperature as a function of frequency. The Engineering Development Array is shown to be sky-noise limited over most of the frequency range measured between 60 and 240 MHz. By using the Engineering Development Array in interferometric mode with the Murchison Widefield Array, we used calibrated visibilities to measure the absolute sensitivity of the array. The measured array sensitivity matches very well with a model based on the array layout and measured receiver temperature. The results demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of using Murchison Widefield Array-style precursor technology for Square Kilometre Array-scale stations. The modular architecture of the Engineering Development Array allows upgrades to the array to be rolled out in a staged approach. Future improvements to the Engineering Development Array include replacing the second stage beamformer with a fully digital system, and to transition to using RF-over-fibre for the signal output from first stage beamformers.

  5. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  6. Commensal low frequency observing on the NRAO VLA: VLITE status and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy E.; Kassim, Namir E.; Brisken, Walter; Helmboldt, Joseph; Peters, Wendy; Ray, Paul S.; Polisensky, Emil; Giacintucci, Simona

    2016-08-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's 27 antenna Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (NRAO VLA) has been successfully transitioned to a broadband system. As part of this transition, the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) worked with NRAO to develop, install, and commission a new commensal low frequency system on the VLA. The VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) has dedicated samplers and uses spare NRAO optical fibers to transmit the signal from 10 low band receivers on VLA antennas to a dedicated real-time DiFX correlator. For these 10 antennas, this observing mode provides simultaneous data from both the low frequency receivers through the VLITE correlator and from the VLA higher frequencies receivers (1-50 GHz) through the NRAO WIDAR correlator. During the first 1.5 years of operation, VLITE recorded data at roughly 70% wall-time, providing 64 MHz of bandwidth centered at 352 MHz with 2s sample time and 100 kHz spectral resolution. VLITE operations require no additional resources from the VLA system and greatly expand the capabilities of the VLA through value-added PI science, stand-alone astrophysics, the opening of a new window on transient searches, and serendipity. We present an overview of the VLITE program, discuss the sky coverage and depth obtained during the first 1.5 years of operation, and brie y outline a possible path forward to a full 27 antenna LOw Band Observatory (LOBO) which could run commensally with all VLA operations.

  7. Experimental Study and Engineering Practice of Pressured Water Coupling Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overburden strata movement in large space stope is the major reason that induces the appearance of strong mining pressure. Presplitting blasting for hard coal rocks is crucial for the prevention and control of strong pressure in stope. In this study, pressured water coupling blasting technique was proposed. The process and effect of blasting were analyzed by orthogonal test and field practice. Results showed that the presence of pressure-bearing water and explosive cartridges in the drill are the main influence factors of the blasting effect of cement test block. The high load-transmitting performance of pore water and energy accumulation in explosive cartridges were analyzed. Noxious substances produced during the blasting process were properly controlled because of the moistening, cooling, and diluting effect of pore water. Not only the goal of safe and static rock fragmentation by high-explosive detonation but also a combination of superdynamic blast loading and static loading effect of the pressured water was achieved. Then the practice of blasting control of hard coal rocks in Datong coal mine was analyzed to determine reasonable parameters of pressured water coupling blasting. A good presplitting blasting control effect was achieved for the hard coal rocks.

  8. Mechanical characterisation of the TorPeDO: a low frequency gravitational force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, D. J.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Yap, M. J.; Ward, R. L.; Shaddock, D. A.; McClelland, D. E.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.

    2017-07-01

    Newtonian noise is likely to be a future challenge at low frequencies for Advanced LIGO and other second generation gravitational wave detectors. We present the TorPeDO system: a dual torsion pendulum sensor designed to measure local gravitational forces to high precision. Gravitational forces induce a differential rotation between the two torsion beams, which is measured with an optical read-out. Both torsion pendulums have a common suspension point, tunable centre of mass, and resonant frequency. This produces a high level of mechanical common mode noise cancellation. We report on a controls prototype of the TorPeDO system, presenting the frequency response and tuning range of both pendulums. A noise budget and mechanical cross-coupling model for this system are also presented. We demonstrate frequency tuning of the two torsion pendulums to a difference of 4.3 μHz.

  9. Controlling low frequency noise using a passive silencer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGagne, D.C.; Faszer, A.C. [Noise Solutions Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Nearly 85 per cent of all the oil and natural gas recovered in Canada comes from Alberta where noise emissions from energy facilities are regulated by the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) and the Alberta Utilities Commission (AUC) through Noise Control Directive D-038. Operators of energy facilities in Alberta must meet the Permissible Sound Level (PSL) established for industrial facilities that are established for receptor locations such as nearby residences. Despite efforts to manage noise, complaints from nearby residents continue to occur even if the facility is in compliance. This is because high and mid frequency components can decay or be absorbed by air and ground conditions leaving mostly low frequency noise (LFN) at the residence. This paper explored the significance of LFN and how some facility operators are dealing with this problem. The impacts of LFN can range from creating a sensation of pressure in the ear, disturbing normal conversation, to creating secondary vibrating effects within homes. If severe enough, it can also result in potential behavioural dysfunction such as task performance deterioration, sleep disturbance and headaches. In 2006, Noise Solutions Inc. was approached by Hunt Oil Company regarding the installation of a new compressor at their Caroline site. The proposal posed a serious noise problem for the community which requested that the new compressor unit be developed without any additional noise impact on the area. Noise Solutions Inc. used a multi-phased approach to develop the most effective LFN silencer using best practical technology and materials. In an effort to fully attenuate both the high frequency noise (dBA) and the low frequency noise (dBC) of the new compressor unit, Noise Solutions and Hunt Oil agreed that a significant level of sound-suppression would be necessary. The entire noise-suppression unit was specially designed to compensate for the sheer size of the compressor building. The first step to

  10. Infrasound and low frequency noise assessment at workplaces and environment – review of criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pawlas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infrasound and low frequency noise assessment at workplaces and environment - review of criteria Number of anthropogenic sources of infrasounds and low frequency noise is increasing, therefore it is followed by both increasing exposure level and number of persons exposed to this noise. Criteria of low frequency noise assessment is one of the problem needed to be solved. The paper presents existing polish and international criteria of assessment low frequency noise at workplaces and human settings

  11. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a bounded plasma column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of exact solutions for unstable waves (called flute waves) which occur in a radially bounded plasma column at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. Both analytical and numerical solutions are presented for the m = 1 and m = 2 azimuthal modes for a variety of radial electric field profiles. It is shown that the behavior of the flute waves can depend sensitively on the radial extent of the plasma column. Moreover, it is found that the m = 1 mode and the m = 2 mode do not respond in the same way to changes in the radial boundary position or in the electric field profile.

  12. Resting-state low-frequency fluctuations reflect individual differences in spoken language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhizhou; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Wang, Suiping; Wong, Patrick C M

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in language learning studies is to identify objective, pre-training predictors of success. Variation in the low-frequency fluctuations (LFFs) of spontaneous brain activity measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) has been found to reflect individual differences in cognitive measures. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the extent to which initial spontaneous brain activity is related to individual differences in spoken language learning. We acquired RS-fMRI data and subsequently trained participants on a sound-to-word learning paradigm in which they learned to use foreign pitch patterns (from Mandarin Chinese) to signal word meaning. We performed amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) analysis, graph theory-based analysis, and independent component analysis (ICA) to identify functional components of the LFFs in the resting-state. First, we examined the ALFF as a regional measure and showed that regional ALFFs in the left superior temporal gyrus were positively correlated with learning performance, whereas ALFFs in the default mode network (DMN) regions were negatively correlated with learning performance. Furthermore, the graph theory-based analysis indicated that the degree and local efficiency of the left superior temporal gyrus were positively correlated with learning performance. Finally, the default mode network and several task-positive resting-state networks (RSNs) were identified via the ICA. The "competition" (i.e., negative correlation) between the DMN and the dorsal attention network was negatively correlated with learning performance. Our results demonstrate that a) spontaneous brain activity can predict future language learning outcome without prior hypotheses (e.g., selection of regions of interest--ROIs) and b) both regional dynamics and network-level interactions in the resting brain can account for individual differences in future spoken language learning success

  13. Low frequency axisymmetric longitudinal guided waves in eccentric annular cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Roson Kumar; Manogharan, Prabhakaran; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of axially uniform eccentricity on the modal structures and velocities of the lower order axisymmetric guided wave mode L(0,2) in circular tubes or pipes. The semi-analytical finite element method is mainly used, supported by fully three-dimensional finite element models and validated using experiments. The studies show that even a small eccentricity in the pipe can cause a loss in the L(0,2) mode axisymmetry, leading to its confinement in the thinned side of the pipe cross-section and also a reduction in mode velocities. The physics of this phenomenon is related to the feature-guiding and mode confinement effects noted in recent years in the literature, particularly studies on waveguides with local cross-section variations and curvature.

  14. Low-frequency electromyostimulation and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, J-M; Gremeaux, V; Labrunee, M; Troigros, O; Laurent, Y; Deley, G; Eicher, J-C

    2008-07-01

    Low-frequency electromyostimulation (EMS) acts on the skeletal muscle abnormalities that aggravate intolerance to effort in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). It improves the oxidative capacity of muscles and thus enhances aerobic performance and physical capacity to almost the same degree, as does conventional physical training. No local or hemodynamic intolerance has been reported, even in cases of severe CHF. However, the presence of a pacemaker is one of the relative contra-indications (prior evaluation of tolerance is required), while that of an implanted defibrillator is one of the absolute contra-indications. EMS is an alternative to physical effort training when the latter is impossible due to a high degree of deconditioning or because there is a contra-indication, which may be temporary, due to the risk of acute decompensation and/or rhythm troubles. EMS can also be used in patients waiting for a heart transplant or in CHF patients who are unwilling to engage in physical activities. As EMS is not expensive and easy to set up, its use is likely to develop in the future.

  15. WFC3 Low-Frequency Flat Field Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jennifer

    2010-07-01

    Multiple dithered observations of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) have been used to measure inflight corrections to the WFC3 UVIS and IR ground flat fields for a subset of key filters. To obtain an adequate characterization of the flat field over the detector field of view (FOV), 9 pointings were obtained for each filter using a 3x3 box dither pattern with steps of approximately 25% of the FOV. By measuring relative changes in the brightness of a star over different portions of the detector, low-frequency spatial variations in the detector response (L-flats) have been used to correct the flat fields obtained during ground testing. The broad wavelength range covered by these observations allow an interpolation of the L-flat correction for the remaining wide, medium and narrow-band filters, assuming a simple linear dependence with pivot wavelength. Initial results indicate that the required L-flat corrections are ±1.5% (standard deviation) in the IR and ±1.0% in the UVIS, and that the photometric response for a given star after applying the L-flat correction is now stable to better than 1% for any position in the field of view. Followup observations of the same field at multiple orientations will be used to verify the accuracy of the L-flat solutions and to quantify any temporal changes in the detector response while in orbit.

  16. Correcting low-frequency phase distortion in electroglottograph waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic high-pass filtering with a -3 dB frequency that is a factor of ten or more below the voice fundamental frequency has a negligible effect on the amplitudes of the Fourier components of an EGG waveform. However, such a filter can significantly distort the waveform due to distortion in the phase or time alignment of these Fourier components. Such high-pass filtering can be introduced purposefully to stabilize the waveform by attenuating low-frequency noise, or may be an undesired effect of using an amplification or data acquisition system designed for acoustic signals. For a given voice fundamental frequency, the amount of distortion depends greatly on the order or attenuation characteristics of the filter and on the type of EGG waveform. Both a high-order filter and a breathy voice tend to increase the amount of distortion. If the characteristics of the high-pass filter are known, there are a number of digital filter techniques that can be used to reduce the phase distortion. However, it is shown that a relatively simple analogue network can also be used to obtain a correction that suffices for most applications. If the precise characteristics of the filter are not known, the response to a square wave can be used to adjust the compensator parameters for an optimal correction.

  17. Energy harvesting from low frequency applications using piezoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Deng, Z. Daniel, E-mail: zhiqun.deng@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    In an effort to eliminate the replacement of the batteries of electronic devices that are difficult or impractical to service once deployed, harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations or impacts using piezoelectric materials has been researched over the last several decades. However, a majority of these applications have very low input frequencies. This presents a challenge for the researchers to optimize the energy output of piezoelectric energy harvesters, due to the relatively high elastic moduli of piezoelectric materials used to date. This paper reviews the current state of research on piezoelectric energy harvesting devices for low frequency (0–100 Hz) applications and the methods that have been developed to improve the power outputs of the piezoelectric energy harvesters. Various key aspects that contribute to the overall performance of a piezoelectric energy harvester are discussed, including geometries of the piezoelectric element, types of piezoelectric material used, techniques employed to match the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric element to input frequency of the host structure, and electronic circuits specifically designed for energy harvesters.

  18. Technical issues in quantifying low-frequency fatigue in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, Jonathon R

    2006-06-01

    A recent review by Cairns and colleagues published in Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews (2005:33[1]:9-16)1 described experimental models used to study neuromuscular fatigue and explained the inherent strengths and weaknesses of applied versus reductionist approaches. This technical report addresses some of the recommendations made in that review, from the perspective of the applied sport scientist or practitioner in evaluating fatigue in elite athletes. The goal here is to highlight the inherent difficulties in assessing fatigue in the applied sport setting and to provide practitioners with future directions for fatigue research. A particular type of fatigue, called low-frequency fatigue (LFF), is of particular interest to the applied sport scientist or practitioner and could be the focus of future work. This report identifies some of the technical challenges faced in developing a practical test of LFF for use in the field setting. The outcome of further work in this area will lead to a better understanding of athlete monitoring, training, and performance.

  19. Low-frequency envelope sensitivity produces asymmetric binaural tuning curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, John P; McAlpine, David

    2008-10-01

    Neurons in the auditory midbrain are sensitive to differences in the timing of sounds at the two ears--an important sound localization cue. We used broadband noise stimuli to investigate the interaural-delay sensitivity of low-frequency neurons in two midbrain nuclei: the inferior colliculus (IC) and the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. Noise-delay functions showed asymmetries not predicted from a linear dependence on interaural correlation: a stretching along the firing-rate dimension (rate asymmetry), and a skewing along the interaural-delay dimension (delay asymmetry). These asymmetries were produced by an envelope-sensitive component to the response that could not entirely be accounted for by monaural or binaural nonlinearities, instead indicating an enhancement of envelope sensitivity at or after the level of the superior olivary complex. In IC, the skew-like asymmetry was consistent with intermediate-type responses produced by the convergence of ipsilateral peak-type inputs and contralateral trough-type inputs. This suggests a stereotyped pattern of input to the IC. In the course of this analysis, we were also able to determine the contribution of time and phase components to neurons' internal delays. These findings have important consequences for the neural representation of interaural timing differences and interaural correlation-cues critical to the perception of acoustic space.

  20. Planck 2013 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44, and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least squares map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices, required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products, are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the ≈- 20 dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for the geometrical calibration of the focal plane.

  1. Electromagnetic Field Detector Circuit for Low- Frequency Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Bait-Suwailam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study details an electromagnetic (EM field radiation detector system that was developed for near-field low-frequency energy applications. The prototype constitutes the use of a dual-band monopole antenna system as a probe along with a detecting circuit. Furthermore, the prototype was equipped with a qualitative EM radiation strength display unit at its output stage. For proof of concept, the detecting probe was implemented on a printed-circuit board. Both numerical simulations were based on PSpice software (Cadence Design Systems, Inc., San Jose, California, USA and measurements are presented and discussed. The EM field detector aimed to sense any potential sources of EM radiation from mobile phone units as well as WiFi access points, simultaneously, which is accomplished with the use of the dual-band antenna system. Such a sensitive detector has useful application as a stand-alone monitoring probe for troubleshooting as well as to identify sources of EM radiation interference threats for industrial high-speed electronic devices. Additionally, such a sensor is a potentially useful tool for site testing and scanning for optimal locations of base station masks for telecommunication service providers.  Other prototypes are also presented to illustrate the usefulness of such detectors in some of the aforementioned applications.

  2. HERA Broadband Feed Design for Low-Frequency Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sierra; Trung, Vincent; Ewall-Wice, Aaron Michael; Li, Jianshu; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Riley, Daniel; Bradley, Richard F.; Makhija, Krishna

    2018-01-01

    As part of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) project, we are designing a broadband low-frequency radio feed to extend the bandwidth from 100-200 MHz to 50-220 MHz. By extending the lower-limit to 50 MHz, we hope to detect the signatures of the first black holes heating the hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium.The isolation of a very faint signal from vastly brighter foregrounds sets strict requirements on antenna spectral smoothness, polarization purity, forward gain, and internal reflections. We are currently working to meet these requirements with a broad-band sinuous antenna feed suspended over the 14-m parabolic HERA dish, using a combination of measurements and simulations to verify the performance of our design.A sinuous feed has been designed and simulated with Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. We will present the construction of a prototype sinuous antenna and measurements of its reflection coefficient, S11, including laboratory characterization of baluns. Our measurements agree well with the CST simulations of the antenna’s performance, giving us confidence in our ability to model the feed and ensure that it meets the requirements of a 21cm cosmology measurement.

  3. Cellular effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Maria T; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Indovina, Pietro L

    2009-04-01

    The major areas of research that have characterised investigation of the impact of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields on living systems in the past 50 years are discussed. In particular, selected studies examining the role of these fields in cancer, their effects on immune and nerve cells, and the positive influence of these ELF fields on bone and nerve cells, wound healing and ischemia/reperfusion injury are explored. The literature indicates that there is still no general agreement on the exact biological detrimental effects of ELF fields, on the physical mechanisms that may be behind these effects or on the extent to which these effects may be harmful to humans. Nonetheless, the majority of the in vitro experimental results indicate that ELF fields induce numerous types of changes in cells. Whether or not the perturbations observed at the cellular level can be directly extrapolated to negative effects in humans is still unknown. However, the myriad of effects that ELF fields have on biological systems should not be ignored when evaluating risk to humans from these fields and, consequently, in passing appropriate legislation to safeguard both the general public and professionally-exposed workers. With regard to the positive effects of these fields, the possibility of testing further their efficacy in therapeutic protocols should also not be overlooked.

  4. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on bacterial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncul, Sule; Cuce, Esra M; Aksu, Burak; Inhan Garip, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    The effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on bacteria has attracted attention due to its potential for beneficial uses. This research aimed to determine the effect of ELF-EMF on bacterial membrane namely the membrane potential, surface potential, hydrophobicity, respiratory activity and growth. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were subjected to ELF-EMF, 50 Hz, 1 mT for 2 h. Membrane potential was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy with or without EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) with DisC3(5) (3,3-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide), zeta potential measurements were performed by electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity of the membrane was measured with MATH (Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons) test, respiratory activity was determined with CTC (5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride), colony forming unit (CFU) and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dihydrochloride) was used for growth determinations. ELF-EMF caused changes in physicochemical properties of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hyperpolarization was seen in S. aureus and EDTA-treated E. coli. Surface potential showed a positive shift in S. aureus contrariwise to the negative shift seen in EDTA-untreated E. coli. Respiratory activity increased in both bacteria. A slight decrease in growth was observed. These results show that ELF-EMF affects the crucial physicochemical processes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria which need further research.

  5. Low frequency seabed scattering at low grazing angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) seabed scattering at low grazing angles (LGA) is almost impossible to directly measure in shallow water (SW), except through inversion from reverberation. The energy flux method for SW reverberation is briefly introduced in this paper. The closed-form expressions of reverberation in an isovelocity waveguide, derived from this method, indicate that in the three-halves law range interval multimode/ray sea bottom scattering with different incident and scattering angles in forming the reverberation may equivalently be represented by the bottom backscattering at a single range-dependent angle. This equivalent relationship is used to derive the bottom backscattering strength (BBS) as a function of angle and frequency. The LF&LGA BBS is derived in a frequency band of 200-2500 Hz and in a grazing angle range of 1.1°-14.0° from reverberation measurements at three sites with sandy bottoms. This is based on three previous works: (1) The closed-form expressions of SW reverberation [Zhou, (Chinese) Acta Acustica 5, 86-99 (1980)]; (2) the effective geo-acoustic model of sandy bottoms that follows the Biot model [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)] and (3) A quality database of wideband reverberation level normalized to source level [Zhou and Zhang, IEEE J. Oceanic Eng. 30, 832-842 (2005)].

  6. Low frequency sound and infrasound from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neal, R.D.; Hellweg, R.D.; Lampeter, R.M. [Epsilon Associates, Maynard, MA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Low frequency noise (LFN) has a range between 12.5 Hz and 200 Hz. Infrasound is any noise below 20 Hz. Permitting processes often question the acceptability of LFN and infrasound from wind turbines, and there are currently no nation-wide regulations on LFN in Canada or the United States. This PowerPoint presentation discussed the results of a study conducted to determine the effects of LFN and infrasound on the environment surrounding a wind power facility. Objective criteria for the study included the threshold of hearing; annoyance; perceptible vibration and rattle; disturbance; and acceptability. The study was conducted at a large wind farm with different types of turbines sited on a generally flat terrain with minimal vegetation. Multiple participating residences were located at close proximity to the turbines. Data were collected at different heights over a period of 5 days in a variety of wind conditions. Sound levels at 4 houses located near the turbines were also measured. Data were compared with ambient noise measurements and assessed in relation to the determined criteria. Results of the study showed that the wind turbines at the site did not pose LFN or infrasound problems at a distance of 305 meters or more. Recent developments in acoustic standards were reviewed. tabs., figs.

  7. Mechanical monolithic sensor for low-frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a new low-frequency seismic sensor for geophysical applications. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum with an interferometric readout system, that can be configured as seismometer or as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of a laser interferometric technique for the readout implementation make it a very sensitive and compact instrument with a very good immunity to environmental noises. The theoretical sensitivity curve is calculated considering the brownian noise, the readout noise and the data acquisition noise. Preliminary tests on the mechanical performances of the monolithic structure and on the optical readout have been performed. Interesting result is the measured resonant frequency of the instrument of ~ 150mHz obtained with a rough tuning, demonstrating the feasibility of a resonant frequency of the order of 5mHz with a more refined tuning. The transfer function of the folded pendulum in open loop configuration is calculated measuring the resonant frequency and the quality factor for several step responses. Then a PID controller is added to implement the closed loop configuration. The mechanics of the seismic sensor, the optical scheme of the readout system, the theoretical predictions and the preliminary experimental performances as accelerometer are discussed in detail, together with the foreseen further improvements.

  8. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  9. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  10. High Sensitivity Very Low Frequency Receiver for Earthquake Data Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, A.; Najmurrokhman, A.

    2017-03-01

    high sensitivity very low frequency (VLF) receiver is developed based on AD744 monolithic operational amplifier (Op-Amp) for earthquake data acquisition. In research related natural phenomena such as atmospheric noise, lightning and earthquake, a VLF receiver particularly with high sensitivity is utterly required due to the low power of VLF wave signals received by the antenna. The developed receiver is intended to have high sensitivity reception for the signals in frequency range of 10-30kHz allocated for earthquake observation. The VLF receiver which is portably designed is also equipped with an output port connectable to the soundcard of personal computer for further data acquisition. After obtaining the optimum design, the hardware realization is implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB) for experimental characterization. It shows that the sensitivity of realized VLF receiver is almost linear in the predefined frequency range for the input signals lower than -12dBm and to be quadratic for the higher level input signals.

  11. Nonlinear low-frequency wave aspect of foreshock density holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have uncovered short-duration density holes in the Earth's foreshock region. There is evidence that the formation of density holes involves non-linear growth of fluctuations in the magnetic field and plasma density, which results in shock-like boundaries followed by a decrease in both density and magnetic field. In this study we examine in detail a few such events focusing on their low frequency wave characteristics. The propagation properties of the waves are studied using Cluster's four point observations. We found that while these density hole-structures were convected with the solar wind, in the plasma rest frame they propagated obliquely and mostly sunward. The wave amplitude grows non-linearly in the process, and the waves are circularly or elliptically polarized in the left hand sense. The phase velocities calculated from four spacecraft timing analysis are compared with the velocity estimated from δE/δB. Their agreement justifies the plane electromagnetic wave nature of the structures. Plasma conditions are found to favor firehose instabilities. Oblique Alfvén firehose instability is suggested as a possible energy source for the wave growth. Resonant interaction between ions at certain energy and the waves could reduce the ion temperature anisotropy and thus the free energy, thereby playing a stabilizing role.

  12. Nonlinear low-frequency wave aspect of foreshock density holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have uncovered short-duration density holes in the Earth's foreshock region. There is evidence that the formation of density holes involves non-linear growth of fluctuations in the magnetic field and plasma density, which results in shock-like boundaries followed by a decrease in both density and magnetic field. In this study we examine in detail a few such events focusing on their low frequency wave characteristics. The propagation properties of the waves are studied using Cluster's four point observations. We found that while these density hole-structures were convected with the solar wind, in the plasma rest frame they propagated obliquely and mostly sunward. The wave amplitude grows non-linearly in the process, and the waves are circularly or elliptically polarized in the left hand sense. The phase velocities calculated from four spacecraft timing analysis are compared with the velocity estimated from δEB. Their agreement justifies the plane electromagnetic wave nature of the structures. Plasma conditions are found to favor firehose instabilities. Oblique Alfvén firehose instability is suggested as a possible energy source for the wave growth. Resonant interaction between ions at certain energy and the waves could reduce the ion temperature anisotropy and thus the free energy, thereby playing a stabilizing role.

  13. Borehole strain observations of very low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Ghosh, A.; Hutchinson, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the signals of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in PBO borehole strain data in central Cascadia. These MW 3.3 - 4.1 earthquakes are best observed in seismograms at periods of 20 to 50 seconds. We look for the strain they produce on timescales from about 1 to 30 minutes. First, we stack the strain produced by 13 VLFEs identified by a grid search moment tensor inversion algorithm by Ghosh et. al. (2015) and Hutchinson and Ghosh (2016), as well as several thousand VLFEs detected through template matching these events. The VLFEs are located beneath southernmost Vancouver Island and the eastern Olympic Peninsula, and are best recorded at co-located stations B005 and B007. However, even at these stations, the signal to noise in the stack is often low, and the records are difficult to interpret. Therefore we also combine data from multiple stations and VLFE locations, and simply look for increases in the strain rate at the VLFE times, as increases in strain rate would suggest an increase in the moment rate. We compare the background strain rate in the 12 hours centered on the VLFEs with the strain rate in the 10 minutes centered on the VLFEs. The 10-minute duration is chosen as a compromise that averages out some instrumental noise without introducing too much longer-period random walk noise. Our results suggest a factor of 2 increase in strain rate--and thus moment rate--during the 10-minute VLFE intervals. The increase gives an average VLFE magnitude around M 3.5, within the range of magnitudes obtained with seismology. Further analyses are currently being carried out to better understand the evolution of moment release before, during, and after the VLFEs.

  14. A Wire Grid Paraboloid for Large Low Frequency Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Tom

    2017-05-01

    Planetary magnetic fields are usually studied remotely through their electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission from electrons trapped in their magnetic fields. Jupiter has been well studied since the 1960's because its strong magnetic field allows emissions up to about 40 MHz to be observed. The emission from Earth and other outer planets is mostly below 1 MHz and can only be observed from space. It is reasonable to assume that most exoplanets with ECM must be observed at low frequencies from space. Even optimistic assumptions about the strength of such emission leads one to conclude that very large filled aperture telescopes, with a diameters of a kilometer or more, will be needed.This paper reports on a study of a copper wire reflector with a diameter of 1 km operating between 100 kHz and 3.75 MHz. It would require 200 kg of 0.5 mm diameter copper wire (AWG 24)) to be lifted to and deployed in space. For aluminum, the mass would be about 100 kg. By optimizing the wire spacing the mass can be reduced to 80% of a simple radial-azimuthal arrangement. A relatively flat reflector (0.6 ≤ f/D ≤ 1.0) needs to be anchored at about 5 points from center to ring along 24 radii. Station-keeping CubeSats could serve as anchors. A total of about 100-120 anchors would be needed for an f/D = 1 reflector, adding 200-300 kg. to the mass of the reflector. It would be possible to carry several such reflectors into space in a single payload.The Deep Space Network is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. Constraints on Subduction Zone Processes from Low Frequency Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of tectonic tremor and constituent low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) offers seismologists new opportunities to study both deformational processes and structure within the subduction zone forearc. This assertion is especially true for northern Cascadia where i) regular seismicity is sparse, and ii) a relatively transparent overriding plate inflicts minimal distortion upon direct P and S wave arrivals from LFEs. Despite low signal-to-noise ratios, LFEs are highly repetitive and signal can be enhanced through construction of stacked templates. Studies in both Cascadia and Nankai reveal an association between LFE hypocenters and a high Vp/Vs, low-velocity zone (LVZ) that is inferred to represent overpressured upper oceanic crust. Scattered signals within Vancouver Island templates, interpreted to originate at boundaries of the LVZ, place LFEs within the LVZ and suggest that this structure may define a distributed (several km) zone of deformation. A recent analysis of LFE magnitudes indicates that LFEs exhibit scaling relations distinct from both regular earthquakes and longer period (10's of seconds to days) phenomena associated with slow slip. Regular earthquakes generally obey a scaling of moment proportional to duration cubed consistent with self similarity, whereas long period slow slip phenomena exhibit a linear scaling between moment and duration that can be accommodated through constant slip or constant stress drop models. In contrast, LFE durations are nearly constant suggesting that moment is governed by slip alone and that asperity size remains approximately constant. The implied dimensions (~1 km2), the persistance of LFEs in time and their stationarity in space point to structural heterogeneity, perhaps related to pockets of upper oceanic crust impervious to hydrothermal circulation, as a fundamental control.

  16. Low frequency noise sources and mechanisms in semiconductor nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Collin James

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive candidates for use in future high-speed electronics, transparent/flexible devices, and chemical sensors. Among other materials, III-V semiconductors have gained considerable interest for their high bulk mobility and low band gap, making them promising for high-speed nanoscale devices. However, nanowire devices also exhibit high levels of low-frequency noise due to their low band gap and high surface-to-volume ratio. The sources and mechanisms of this noise must be understood and controlled in order to realize practical applications of nanowire electronics. This work seeks to understand the underlying noise mechanisms of nanowire transistors in order discover ways to reduce noise levels. It also demonstrates how noise can provide a spectroscopy for analyzing device quality. Most traditional noise studies tend to apply standard MOSFET models to nanowire noise and transport, which lump together all possible independent noise sources in a nanowire, ignoring effects of the contacts or multiple gates, and could lead to misestimation of the noise figures for a device. This work demonstrates how noise in a nanowire transistor can stem from the channel, ungated access regions, metal- semiconductor contacts, and tunnel barriers, all independently adding to the total noise. Each source of noise can contribute and may dominate the overall noise behavior under certain bias regimes and temperatures, as demonstrated in this work through various device structures and measurements. For example, the contacts can influence noise even below the threshold voltage under certain conditions, emphasizing the need for high-quality metal-semiconductor interface technology.

  17. Formation mechanism of the low-frequency locally resonant band gap in the two-dimensional ternary phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Liu, Yao-Zong; Wen, Ji-Hong; Yu, Dian-Long

    2006-02-01

    The low-frequency band gap and the corresponding vibration modes in two-dimensional ternary locally resonant phononic crystals are restudied successfully with the lumped-mass method. Compared with the work of C. Goffaux and J. Sánchez-Dehesa (Phys. Rev. B 67 14 4301(2003)), it is shown that there exists an error of about 50% in their calculated results of the band structure and one band is missing in their results. Moreover, the in-plane modes shown in their paper are improper, which results in the wrong conclusion on the mechanism of the ternary locally resonant phononic crystals. Based on the lumped-mass method and better description of the vibration modes according to the band gaps, the locally resonant mechanism in forming the subfrequency gaps is thoroughly analysed. The rule used to judge whether a resonant mode in the phononic crystals can result in a corresponding subfrequency gap is also verified in this ternary case.

  18. Simple model for low-frequency guitar function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove; Vistisen, Bo B.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency response of sound pressure and top plate mobility is studied around the two first resonances of the guitar. These resonances are shown to result from a coupling between the fundamental top plate mode and the Helmholtz resonance of the cavity. A simple model is proposed for low...

  19. Low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. S S Duha1 S K Paul1 2 A K Banerjee1 A A Mamun1. Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Department of Mathematics, The University of Asia Pacific, Road No. 3/A, House No. 52/1, Dhanmondi, Dhaka-1209, Bangladesh ...

  20. Low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The manuscript is organised as follows: The basic equations and the general dispersion relation are provided in §2. The .... equation yields εφ = 0, where ε =1+ χe + χi + χd is the dielectric constant for the non-uniform, magnetized dusty plasma .... The solution of this quadratic equation for ω is given by ω = 1. 2 −ω ci ( kL.

  1. PageRank for low frequency earthquake detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A. C.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed Hi-Net seismic waveform data during the April 2006 tremor episode in the Nankai Trough in SW Japan using the autocorrelation approach of Brown et al. (2008), which detects low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) based on pair-wise waveform matching. We have generalized this to exploit the fact that waveforms may repeat multiple times, on more than just a pair-wise basis. We are working towards developing a sound statistical basis for event detection, but that is complicated by two factors. First, the statistical behavior of the autocorrelations varies between stations. Analyzing one station at a time assures that the detection threshold will only depend on the station being analyzed. Second, the positive detections do not satisfy "closure." That is, if window A correlates with window B, and window B correlates with window C, then window A and window C do not necessarily correlate with one another. We want to evaluate whether or not a linked set of windows are correlated due to chance. To do this, we map our problem on to one that has previously been solved for web search, and apply Google's PageRank algorithm. PageRank is the probability of a 'random surfer' to visit a particular web page; it assigns a ranking for a webpage based on the amount of links associated with that page. For windows of seismic data instead of webpages, the windows with high probabilities suggest likely LFE signals. Once identified, we stack the matched windows to improve the snr and use these stacks as template signals to find other LFEs within continuous data. We compare the results among stations and declare a detection if they are found in a statistically significant number of stations, based on multinomial statistics. We compare our detections using the single-station method to detections found by Shelly et al. (2007) for the April 2006 tremor sequence in Shikoku, Japan. We find strong similarity between the results, as well as many new detections that were not found using

  2. Tunable Digital Metamaterial for Broadband Vibration Isolation at Low Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziwei; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-11-01

    A 3D-printed digital metamaterial embedded with electromagnets is fabricated. Switching electromagnets between the attaching (1 bit) and detaching (0 bit) modes activates different waveguides in the metamaterial. The underlying mechanism is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The hierarchical assemblies of unit cells, mimicking digital bits, allow programmable broadening of the bandgap of the metamaterial. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Low frequency Raman spectroscopy of few-atomic-layer thick hBN crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, I.; Schué, L.; Boukhicha, M.; Berini, B.; Plaçais, B.; Loiseau, A.; Barjon, J.

    2017-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has recently gained a strong interest as a strategic component in engineering van der Waals heterostructures built with 2D crystals such as graphene. This work reports micro-Raman measurements on hBN flakes made of a few atomic layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation. The temperature dependence of the Raman scattering in hBN is investigated first such as to define appropriate measurements conditions suitable for thin layers avoiding undesirable heating induced effects. We further focus on the low frequency Raman mode corresponding to the rigid shearing oscillation between adjacent layers, found to be equal to 52.5 cm-1 in bulk hBN. For hBN sheets with thicknesses below typically 4 nm, the frequency of this mode presents discrete values, which are found to decrease down to 46.0(5) cm-1 for a three-layer hBN, in good agreement with the linear-chain model. This makes Raman spectroscopy a relevant tool to quantitatively determine in a non destructive way the number of layers in ultra thin hBN sheets, below 8 L, prior to their integration in van der Waals heterostructures.

  4. Low frequency sound scattering from spherical assemblages of bubbles using effective medium theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Thomas R

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the acoustic field scattered by an underwater assembly of gas bubbles or similar resonant monopole scatterers is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. This problem is addressed from a theoretical point of view within the framework of the effective medium theory for the case of spherically shaped assemblages. Although being valid more generally, the effective medium theory is an ideal instrument to study multiple scattering effects such as low frequency collective resonances, acoustically coupled breathing modes of the entire assembly. Explicit expressions for the scattering amplitude and cross sections are derived, as well as closed form expressions for the resonance frequency and spectral shape of the fundamental collective mode utilizing analytical S-matrix methods. This approach allows, in principle, a simultaneous inversion for the assembly radius and void fraction directly from the scattering cross sections. To demonstrate the validity of the approach, the theory is applied to the example of idealized, spherically shaped schools of swim bladder bearing fish. The analytic results of the theory are compared to numerical first-principle benchmark computations and excellent agreement is found, even for densely packed schools and frequencies across the bladder resonance.

  5. Mind-Body Practice Changes Fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations in Intrinsic Control Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gao-Xia; Gong, Zhu-Qing; Yang, Zhi; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive control impairment is a typical symptom largely reported in populations with neurological disorders. Previous studies have provided evidence about the changes in cognitive control induced by mind-body training. However, the neural correlates underlying the effect of extensive mind-body practice on cognitive control remain largely unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized dynamic fluctuations in large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks associated with mind-body practice, and examined their differences between healthy controls and Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practitioners. Compared with a control group, the TCC group revealed significantly decreased fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) in the bilateral frontoparietal network, default mode network and dorsal prefrontal-angular gyri network. Furthermore, we detected a significant association between mind-body practice experience and fALFF in the default mode network, as well as an association between cognitive control performance and fALFF of the frontoparietal network. This provides the first evidence of large-scale functional connectivity in brain networks associated with mind-body practice, shedding light on the neural network changes that accompany intensive mind-body training. It also highlights the functionally plastic role of the frontoparietal network in the context of the "immune system" of mental health recently developed in relation to flexible hub theory.

  6. Low-frequency dynamics of CO/Cu breakdown of Born--Oppenheimer approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmugl, C.J. (Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States) NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)); Chabal, Y.J. (AT T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)); Hoffmann, F.M. (EXXON Research and Engineering, Annandale, New Jersey 08801 (United States)); Williams, G.P. (NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Synchrotron infrared studies of adsorbates on surfaces offer the possibility of probing low-frequency vibrational modes and dynamics at high resolution (1 cm[sup [minus]1], 125 [mu]eV). Extensive experiments have been performed for ordered submonolayers of CO on low index Cu surfaces [([radical]3[times][radical]3)[ital R]30[degree] CO/Cu(111), [ital c](2[times]2) CO/Cu(100) and (1[times]2) CO/Cu(110)], in the 100--2500 cm[sup [minus]1] ([similar to]12.5--312.5 meV) range. These are the first IR experiments to directly probe the adsorbate-substrate vibrations for this system. In addition, however, several surprising features are observed including the dipole-forbidden hindered rotation and an unexpected broadband absorption. Two theories have been motivated by this work, and will be compared to our experimental results. The first theory is a cluster calculation by Tully, Gomez, and Head-Gordon, which takes into account the breakdown of the Born--Oppenheimer approximation and predicts lifetimes and frequencies of the vibrational modes for CO/Cu(100). Another Drude-based theory, proposed by Persson, considers the coupling of the conduction electron current to the vibrations of the adsorbates, accounting for the observation of both the broadband absorption and dipole-forbidden peak.

  7. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, regulators, scientists and engineers, and, importantly, an increasing number of individuals in the general public are interested in this health issue. The goal of research at the cellular level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E) or the magnetic (B) field, or if combinations of static B and time-varying B fields represent an exposure

  8. Low-frequency Errors Compensation of Attitude Determination System in Satellite Photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Renxiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the attitude determination system exists not only the high-frequency errors, but also the low-frequency errors related to the satellite orbit latitude and time. The low-frequency errors would affect the location accuracy without GCPs, especially to the horizontal accuracy. In this paper, firstly, the factors that produce low-frequency errors and the solutions are analyzed. Secondly, the low-frequency errors are detected and compensated automatically during bundle adjustment in TH-1 satellite, thus the influence of location accuracy by low-frequency error is eliminated. At last, the verification is tested using data of TH-1. The experimental results show: low-frequency errors compensation can resolve the system error of position without GCP, and has played an important role in the consistency of global location accuracy for TH-1.

  9. Low-frequency centroid-moment-tensor inversion from superconducting-gravimeter data: The effect of seismic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zábranová, Eliška; Matyska, Ctirad

    2014-10-01

    After the 2010 Maule and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes the spheroidal modes up to 1 mHz were clearly registered by the Global Geodynamic Project (GGP) network of superconducting gravimeters (SG). Fundamental parameters in synthetic calculations of the signals are the quality factors of the modes. We study the role of their uncertainties in the centroid-moment-tensor (CMT) inversions. First, we have inverted the SG data from selected GGP stations to jointly determine the quality factors of these normal modes and the three low-frequency CMT components, Mrr,(Mϑϑ-Mφφ)/2 and Mϑφ, that generate the observed SG signal. We have used several-days-long records to minimize the trade-off between the quality factors and the CMT but it was not eliminated completely. We have also inverted each record separately to get error estimates of the obtained parameters. Consequently, we have employed the GGP records of 60-h lengths for several published modal-quality-factor sets and inverted only the same three CMT components. The obtained CMT tensors are close to the solution from the joint Q-CMT inversion of longer records and resulting variability of the CMT components is smaller than differences among routine agency solutions. Reliable low-frequency CMT components can thus be obtained for any quality factors from the studied sets.

  10. Collective excitations in liquid dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO): FIR spectrum, low frequency vibrational density of states, and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Milan K.; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-01-01

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through a study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work, we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infrared spectrum obtained through the Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto-time correlation function, (ii) from the Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions, and (iii) a quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300 K. The three spectra, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. The study of participation ratio of the density of states obtained from the normal mode analysis shows that the broad spectrum around 100 cm-1 involves collective oscillations of 300-400 molecules. Dipolar solvation dynamics exhibit ultrafast energy relaxation with an initial time constant around 157 fs which can be attributed to the coupling to the collective excitations. We compare the properties of DMSO with those of water vis-a-vis the existence of the low frequency collective modes. Last, we find that the collective excitation spectrum exhibits strong temperature dependence.

  11. Collective excitations in liquid dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO): FIR spectrum, low frequency vibrational density of states, and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Milan K; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-01-14

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through a study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work, we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infrared spectrum obtained through the Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto-time correlation function, (ii) from the Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions, and (iii) a quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300 K. The three spectra, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. The study of participation ratio of the density of states obtained from the normal mode analysis shows that the broad spectrum around 100 cm -1 involves collective oscillations of 300-400 molecules. Dipolar solvation dynamics exhibit ultrafast energy relaxation with an initial time constant around 157 fs which can be attributed to the coupling to the collective excitations. We compare the properties of DMSO with those of water vis-a-vis the existence of the low frequency collective modes. Last, we find that the collective excitation spectrum exhibits strong temperature dependence.

  12. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of collective oscillations in magnetized Maxwellian equal mass plasmas for low-frequency waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- & Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Scholl of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Recently, the general electromagnetic fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas has been used to study the steady-state fluctuation spectra and the total intensity of low-frequency collective weakly damped modes for parallel wave vectors in Maxwellian plasmas. Now, we address the same question with respect to an arbitrary direction of the wave-vector. Here, we analyze this problem for equal mass plasmas. These plasmas are a very good tool to study various plasma phenomena, as they considerably facilitate the theoretical consideration and at the same time provide with their clear physical picture. Finally, we compare our results in the limiting case of parallel wave vectors with the previous study.

  13. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.

    1991-01-01

    to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where......The noise in the resonant soliton mode of long and narrow Josephson tunnel junctions (Josephson transmission lines or JTLs) have been measured in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 25 kHz by means of a DC SQUID. The measured white noise was found, to within a factor of two, to be equal...... RS is the static resistance. The origin of the different behavior is not known...

  14. GoAmazon – Scaling Amazon Carbon Water Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Manvendra Krishna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Forests soak up 25% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by anthropogenic fossil energy use (10 Gt C y-1) moderating its atmospheric accumulation. How this terrestrial CO2 uptake will evolve with climate change in the 21st century is largely unknown. Rainforests are the most active ecosystems with the Amazon basin storing 120 Gt C as biomass and exchanging 18 Gt C y-1 of CO2 via photosynthesis and respiration and fixing carbon at 2-3 kg C m-2 y-1. Furthermore, the intense hydrologic and carbon cycles are tightly coupled in the Amazon where about half of the water is recycled by evapotranspiration and the other half imported from the ocean by Northeasterly trade winds. Climate models predict a drying in the Amazon with reduced carbon uptake while observationally guided assessments indicate sustained uptake. We will resolve this huge discrepancy in the size and sign of the future Amazon carbon cycle by performing the first simultaneous regional scale high frequency measurements of atmospheric CO2, H2O, HOD, CH4, N2O and CO at the T3 site in Manacupuru, Brazil as part of DOE's GoAmazon project. Our data will be used to inform and develop DOE's CLM on the tropical carbon-water couplings at the appropriate grid scale (10-50km). Our measurements will also validate the CO2 data from Japan's GOSAT and NASA's imminent OCO-2 satellite (launch date July 2014).

  15. Active low frequency sound field control in a listening room using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce the sound transmitted to neighbour rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    is possible at modal frequencies. For that reason the modal frequencies in the source room will also have big impact on the transmission to neighbour rooms. These low frequency resonance frequencies are very audible in the source room but also in neighbour rooms as a booming bass. CABS (Controlled Acoustic......Sound in rooms and transmission of sound between rooms gives the biggest problems at low frequencies. Rooms with rectangular boundaries have strong resonance frequencies and will give big spatial variations in sound pressure level (SPL) in the source room, and an increase in SPL of 20 dB at a wall...... Bass System) is a time based room correction system for reproduced sound using loudspeakers. The system can remove room modes at low frequencies, by active cancelling the reflection from at the rear wall to a normal stereo setup. Measurements in a source room using CABS and in two neighbour rooms have...

  16. An investigation of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints were thoroughly investigated with the aim of answering the question whether it is real physical sound or low-frequency tinnitus that causes the annoyance. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants taking the spatial variation of...

  17. Development of a rating procedure for low frequency noise : Results of measurements near runways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, E.; Vercammen, M.; Ploeg, F. van der; Granneman, J.; Vos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent issues concerning low frequency aircraft noise around airports (groundnoise) and a legal verdict about the application of low frequency noise criteria in the Netherlands have been the motivation to start a research commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the

  18. The Effect of Low-Frequency Sound Stimulation on Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Naghdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have hypothesized that thalamocortical dysfunction plays a role in fibromyalgia. The use of low-frequency sound stimulation to ameliorate thalamocortical dysfunction has also been investigated, and has shown promise in treating certain pain conditions. Accordingly, the authors of this study aimed to assess the effects of treatment with low-frequency sound stimulation among patients with fibromyalgia.

  19. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain geographical...

  20. Detection of Water Binding to the Oxygen Evolving Complex Using Low Frequency Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II (PSII) is a hallmark catalyst for efficiently splitting water to generate molecular oxygen. Much of what is known about the structure of the OEC has been provided by X-ray analysis of PSII at low temperatures, from which the mechanism of water splitting has been inferred. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) offers an opportunity to build on our current understanding of this catalytic system as it can provide time-resolved, molecular vibrational information in a physiological environment. With low frequency SERS, we are able to separate the manganese oxide vibrational modes of the OEC from those in a complex, biological environment. With isotopically labelled water, we use SERS to identify water binding to the OEC. Raman spectra calculated by density functional theory support the assignment of water binding to a manganese atom outside of the cuboidal OEC. Detection of water binding sites on the OEC with SERS can not only compliment previous structural studies, but can also provide a powerful platform for in operando mechanistic studies.

  1. Low frequency energy scavenging using sub-wave length scale acousto-elastic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz U. Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM at low frequencies (<∼3KHz. It is proposed to use the AEMM in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester, simultaneously. AEMM’s are typically reported for filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this letter shows that the dynamic energy trapped inside the soft constituent (matrix of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell AEMM model, we experimentally asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies (< ∼3 KHz, maximum power in the micro Watts (∼35µW range can be generated, whereas, recently reported phononic crystal based metamaterials harvested only nano Watt (∼30nW power against 10KΩ resistive load. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. Here we report sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a multi-frequency energy scavenger (ES with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties capable of scavenging energy (power output from ∼10µW – ∼90µW between 0.2 KHz and 1.5 KHz acoustic frequencies.

  2. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas J. Kazys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer −11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space.

  3. Generation of extremely low frequency chorus in Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Liu, Si; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Gao, Zhonglei; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that chorus can efficiently accelerate the outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies. Chorus, previously often observed above 0.1 equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce, was generated by energetic electrons originating from Earth's plasma sheet. Chorus below 0.1 fce has seldom been reported until the recent data from Van Allen Probes, but its origin has not been revealed so far. Because electron resonant energy can approach the relativistic level at extremely low frequency, relativistic effects should be considered in the formula for whistler mode wave growth rate. Here we report high-resolution observations during the 14 October 2014 small storm and firstly demonstrate, using a fully relativistic simulation, that electrons with the high-energy tail population and relativistic pitch angle anisotropy can provide free energy sufficient for generating chorus below 0.1 fce. The simulated wave growth displays a very similar pattern to the observations. The current results can be applied to Jupiter, Saturn, and other magnetized planets.

  4. Specific frequency bands of amplitude low-frequency oscillation encodes personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luqing; Duan, Xujun; Zheng, Chunyan; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Qing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Huafu

    2014-01-01

    The biological model of extraversion and neuroticism identified by Eysenck has stimulated increasing interest in uncovering neurobiological substrate of the two fundamental dimensions. Here we aim to explore brain disturbances underlying extraversion and neuroticism in 87 healthy individuals using fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (LFF) on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two different frequency bands, Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) exhibiting higher power and involving larger brain regions, and Slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) exhibiting less power and emerging locally, were analyzed. Our results showed a positive correlation between LFF amplitude at Slow-5 and extraversion in medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, important portions of the default mode network, thus suggesting a link between default network activity and personality traits. LFF amplitude at Slow-5 was correlated positively with neuroticism in right posterior portion of the frontal lobe, further validating neuroticism with frontal lateralization. In addition, LFF amplitude at Slow-4 was negatively associated with extraversion and neuroticism in left hippocampus (HIP) and bilateral superior temporal cortex (STC) respectively, supporting the hypothesized (inverse) relationship between extraversion and resting arousal, also implying neural circuit underlying emotional process influencing on personality. Overall, these findings suggest the important relationships, between personality and LFF amplitude dynamic, depend on specific frequency bands. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spider web-structured labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials for low-frequency sound control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krushynska, A. O.; Bosia, F.; Miniaci, M.; Pugno, N. M.

    2017-10-01

    Attenuating low-frequency sound remains a challenge, despite many advances in this field. Recently-developed acoustic metamaterials are characterized by unusual wave manipulation abilities that make them ideal candidates for efficient subwavelength sound control. In particular, labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials exhibit extremely high wave reflectivity, conical dispersion, and multiple artificial resonant modes originating from the specifically-designed topological architectures. These features enable broadband sound attenuation, negative refraction, acoustic cloaking and other peculiar effects. However, hybrid and/or tunable metamaterial performance implying enhanced wave reflection and simultaneous presence of conical dispersion at desired frequencies has not been reported so far. In this paper, we propose a new type of labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials (LAMMs) with hybrid dispersion characteristics by exploiting spider web-structured configurations. The developed design approach consists in adding a square surrounding frame to sectorial circular-shaped labyrinthine channels described in previous publications (e.g. (11)). Despite its simplicity, this approach provides tunability in the metamaterial functionality, such as the activation/elimination of subwavelength band gaps and negative group-velocity modes by increasing/decreasing the edge cavity dimensions. Since these cavities can be treated as extensions of variable-width internal channels, it becomes possible to exploit geometrical features, such as channel width, to shift the band gap position and size to desired frequencies. Time transient simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed metastructures for wave manipulation in terms of transmission or reflection coefficients, amplitude attenuation and time delay at subwavelength frequencies. The obtained results can be important for practical applications of LAMMs such as lightweight acoustic barriers with enhanced broadband wave

  6. Ultra low frequency waves at Venus: Observations by the Venus Express spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Echer, E.; Marques de Souza, A.; Dubinin, E.; Zhang, T. L.

    2017-10-01

    The generation of waves with low frequencies (below 100 mHz) has been observed in the environment of most bodies in the solar system and well studied at Earth. These waves can be generated either upstream of the body in the solar wind by ionization of planetary exospheres or ions reflected from a bow shock or in the magnetosheath closer to the magnetic barrier. For Mars and Venus the waves may have special importance since they can contribute to the erosion of the ionopause and by that enhance atmospheric escape. While over the past years many case studies on wave phenomena observed at Venus have been published most statistical studies have been based on magnetic observations only. On the other hand the generation mechanisms and transport of these waves through the magnetosphere can only be quantified using both magnetic and particle observations. We use the long time observations of Venus Express (2006-2014) to determine the predominant processes and transport parameters. First we demonstrate the analysis methods in four case studies, then we present a statistical analysis by determining transport ratios from the complete Venus Express dataset. We find that Alfvenic waves are very dominant (>80%) in the solar wind and in the core magnetosheath. Fast waves are observed mainly at the bow shock (around 40%) but also at the magnetic barrier where they may be most important for the energy transfer into the ionosphere. Their occurrence in the magnetotail may be an artifact of the detection of individual plasma jets in this region. Slow mode waves are rarely dominating but occur with probability of about 10% at the bow shock and in the pile-up-region. Mirror mode waves have probability <20% in the magnetosheath slightly increasing towards the pile-up-boundary.

  7. Modeling of low-frequency seismic waves in a shallow sea using the staggered grid difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zaihua; Zhang, Zhihong; Gu, Jiannong

    2017-09-01

    Elastic waves in the seabed generated by low-frequency noise radiating from ships are known as ship seismic waves and can be used to detect and identify ships. To obtain the propagation characteristics of ship seismic waves, an algorithm for calculating seismic waves at the seafloor is presented based on the staggered-grid finite difference method. The accuracy of the algorithm was tested by comparison with analytical solutions. Numerical simulation of seismic waves generated by a low-frequency point sound source in a typical shallow sea environment was carried out. Using various source frequencies and locations in the numerical simulation, we show that the seismic waves in the near field are composed mostly of transmitted S-waves and interface waves while transmitted P-waves are weak near the seafloor. However, in the far field, the wave components of the seismic wave are mainly normal modes and interface waves, with the latter being relatively strong in the waveforms. As the source frequency decreases, the normal modes become smaller and the interface waves dominate the time series of the seismic waves.

  8. Towards assessing cortical bone porosity using low-frequency quantitative acoustics: A phantom-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vogl

    shown the capability of low-frequency quantitative acoustics to reflect changes in porosity and individual pore characteristics and demonstrated that additive manufacturing is an appropriate method that allows the influence of individual bone properties on the wave propagation to be systematically assessed. The results of this work opens perspectives for the efficient development of a multi-frequency, multi-mode approach to screen, diagnose, and monitor bone pathologies in individuals.

  9. Towards assessing cortical bone porosity using low-frequency quantitative acoustics: A phantom-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Florian; Bernet, Benjamin; Bolognesi, Daniele; Taylor, William R

    2017-01-01

    capability of low-frequency quantitative acoustics to reflect changes in porosity and individual pore characteristics and demonstrated that additive manufacturing is an appropriate method that allows the influence of individual bone properties on the wave propagation to be systematically assessed. The results of this work opens perspectives for the efficient development of a multi-frequency, multi-mode approach to screen, diagnose, and monitor bone pathologies in individuals.

  10. Study on The Extended Range Weather Forecast of Low Frequency Signal Based on Period Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.

    2016-12-01

    Although many studies have explored the MJO and its application for weather forecasting, low-frequency oscillation has been insufficiently studied for the extend range weather forecasting over middle and high latitudes. In China, low-frequency synoptic map is a useful tool for meteorological operation department to forecast extend range weather. It is therefore necessary to develop objective methods to serve the need for finding low-frequency signal, interpretation and application of this signal in the extend range weather forecasting. In this paper, method of Butterworth band pass filter was applied to get low-frequency height field at 500hPa from 1980 to 2014 by using NCEP/NCAR daily grid data. Then period analysis and optimal subset regression methods were used to process the low frequency data of 150 days before the first forecast day and extend the low frequency signal of 500hPa low-frequency high field to future 30 days in the global from June to August during 2011-2014. Finally, the results were test. The main results are as follows: (1) In general, the fitting effect of low frequency signals of 500hPa low-frequency height field by period analysis in the northern hemisphere was better than that in the southern hemisphere, and was better in the low latitudes than that in the high latitudes. The fitting accuracy gradually reduced with the increase of forecast time length, which tended to be stable during the late forecasting period. (2) The fitting effects over the 6 key regions in China showed that except filtering result over Xinjiang area in the first 10 days and 30 days, filtering results over the other 5 key regions throughout the whole period have passed reliability test with level more than 95%. (3) The center and scope of low and high low frequency systems can be fitted well by using the methods mentioned above, which is consist with the corresponding use of the low-frequency synoptic map for the prediction of the extended period. Application of the

  11. Intramuscular Contributions to Low-Frequency Force Potentiation Induced by a High-Frequency Conditioning Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J. Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrically-evoked low-frequency (submaximal force is increased immediately following high-frequency stimulation in human skeletal muscle. Although central mechanisms have been suggested to be the major cause of this low-frequency force potentiation, intramuscular factors might contribute. Thus, we hypothesized that two intramuscular Ca2+-dependent mechanisms can contribute to the low-frequency force potentiation: increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and increased myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Experiments in humans were performed on the plantar flexor muscles at a shortened, intermediate, and long muscle length and electrically evoked contractile force and membrane excitability (i.e., M-wave amplitude were recorded during a stimulation protocol. Low-frequency force potentiation was assessed by stimulating with a low-frequency tetanus (25 Hz, 2 s duration, followed by a high-frequency tetanus (100 Hz, 2 s duration, and finally followed by another low-frequency (25 Hz, 2 s duration tetanus. Similar stimulation protocols were performed on intact mouse single fibers from flexor digitorum brevis muscle, whereby force and myoplasmic free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i were assessed. Our data show a low-frequency force potentiation that was not muscle length-dependent in human muscle and it was not accompanied by any increase in M-wave amplitude. A length-independent low-frequency force potentiation could be replicated in mouse single fibers, supporting an intramuscular mechanism. We show that at physiological temperature (31°C this low-frequency force potentiation in mouse fibers corresponded with an increase in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ release. When mimicking the slower contractile properties of human muscle by cooling mouse single fibers to 18°C, the low-frequency force potentiation was accompanied by minimally increased SR Ca2+ release and hence it could be explained by increased myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Finally, introducing a brief 200

  12. Intramuscular Contributions to Low-Frequency Force Potentiation Induced by a High-Frequency Conditioning Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Arthur J; Neyroud, Daria; Kayser, Bengt; Westerblad, Håkan; Place, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Electrically-evoked low-frequency (submaximal) force is increased immediately following high-frequency stimulation in human skeletal muscle. Although central mechanisms have been suggested to be the major cause of this low-frequency force potentiation, intramuscular factors might contribute. Thus, we hypothesized that two intramuscular Ca2+-dependent mechanisms can contribute to the low-frequency force potentiation: increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and increased myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Experiments in humans were performed on the plantar flexor muscles at a shortened, intermediate, and long muscle length and electrically evoked contractile force and membrane excitability (i.e., M-wave amplitude) were recorded during a stimulation protocol. Low-frequency force potentiation was assessed by stimulating with a low-frequency tetanus (25 Hz, 2 s duration), followed by a high-frequency tetanus (100 Hz, 2 s duration), and finally followed by another low-frequency (25 Hz, 2 s duration) tetanus. Similar stimulation protocols were performed on intact mouse single fibers from flexor digitorum brevis muscle, whereby force and myoplasmic free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) were assessed. Our data show a low-frequency force potentiation that was not muscle length-dependent in human muscle and it was not accompanied by any increase in M-wave amplitude. A length-independent low-frequency force potentiation could be replicated in mouse single fibers, supporting an intramuscular mechanism. We show that at physiological temperature (31°C) this low-frequency force potentiation in mouse fibers corresponded with an increase in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release. When mimicking the slower contractile properties of human muscle by cooling mouse single fibers to 18°C, the low-frequency force potentiation was accompanied by minimally increased SR Ca2+ release and hence it could be explained by increased myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. Finally, introducing a brief 200 ms pause

  13. Evaluation of low-frequency operational limit of proposed ITER low-field-side reflectometer waveguide run including miter bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Peebles, W. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Crocker, N. A.; Wannberg, C.; Lau, C.; Hanson, G. R.; Doane, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    The present design concept for the ITER low-field-side reflectometer transmission line (TL) consists of an ˜40 m long, 6.35 cm diameter helically corrugated waveguide (WG) together with ten 90° miter bends. This paper presents an evaluation of the TL performance at low frequencies (33-50 GHz) where the predicted HE11 mode ohmic and mode conversion losses start to increase significantly. Quasi-optical techniques were used to form a near Gaussian beam to efficiently couple radiation in this frequency range into the WG. It was observed that the output beams from the guide remained linearly polarized with cross-polarization power levels of ˜1.5%-3%. The polarization rotation due to the helical corrugations was in the range ˜1°-3°. The radiated beam power profiles typically show excellent Gaussian propagation characteristics at distances >20 cm from the final exit aperture. The round trip propagation loss was found to be ˜2.5 dB at 50 GHz and ˜6.5 dB at 35 GHz, showing an inverse increase with frequency. This was consistent with updated calculations of miter bend and ohmic losses. At low frequencies (33-50 GHz), the mode purity remained very good at the exit of the waveguide, and the losses are perfectly acceptable for operation in ITER. The primary challenge may come from the future addition of a Gaussian telescope and other filter components within the corrugated guide, which will likely introduce additional perturbations to the beam profile and an increase in mode-conversion loss.

  14. Low-frequency fluctuation in continuous real-time feedback of finger force: a new paradigm for sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhang-Ye; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Wang, Jue; Qing, Zhao; Zang, Zhen-Xiang; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2012-08-01

    Behavioral studies have suggested a low-frequency (0.05 Hz) fluctuation of sustained attention on the basis of the intra-individual variability of reaction-time. Conventional task designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies are not appropriate for frequency analysis. The present study aimed to propose a new paradigm, real-time finger force feedback (RT-FFF), to study the brain mechanisms of sustained attention and neurofeedback. We compared the low-frequency fluctuations in both behavioral and fMRI data from 38 healthy adults (19 males; mean age, 22.3 years). Two fMRI sessions, in RT-FFF and sham finger force feedback (S-FFF) states, were acquired (TR 2 s, Siemens Trio 3-Tesla scanner, 8 min each, counter-balanced). Behavioral data of finger force were obtained simultaneously at a sampling rate of 250 Hz. Frequency analysis of the behavioral data showed lower amplitude in the low-frequency band (0.004-0.104 Hz) but higher amplitude in the high-frequency band (27.02-125 Hz) in the RT-FFF than the S-FFF states. The mean finger force was not significantly different between the two states. fMRI data analysis showed higher fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) in the S-FFF than in the RT-FFF state in the visual cortex, but higher fALFF in RT-FFF than S-FFF in the middle frontal gyrus, the superior frontal gyrus, and the default mode network. The behavioral results suggest that the proposed paradigm may provide a new approach to studies of sustained attention. The fMRI results suggest that a distributed network including visual, motor, attentional, and default mode networks may be involved in sustained attention and/or real-time feedback. This paradigm may be helpful for future studies on deficits of attention, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and mild traumatic brain injury.

  15. Effects of Low-frequency Current Sacral Dermatome Stimulation on Idiopathic Slow Transit Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Seop; Yi, Seung-Ju

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine whether low-frequency current therapy can be used to reduce the symptoms of idiopathic slow transit constipation (ISTC). [Subjects] Fifteen patients (ten male and five female) with idiopathic slow transit constipation were enrolled in the present study. [Results] Bowel movements per day, bowel movements per week, and constipation assessment scale scores significantly improved after low-frequency current simulation of S2-S3. [Conclusion] Our results show that stimulation with low-frequency current of the sacral dermatomes may offer therapeutic benefits for a subject of patients with ISTC. PMID:25013277

  16. Annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN) in the laboratory assessed by LFN-sufferers and non-sufferers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    , for the first time in one set of covers, over thirty papers on the effects of low frequency noise and vibration on people. The papers are arranged under five headings: • Perception thresholds for low frequency noise • Effect of low frequency noise on people in terms of annoyance and sleep deprivation......The effect of low frequency noise and vibration on people is an important issue for communities around many industrial facilities and an transportation systems. There are a number of research groups throughout the world which have been actively researching these effects. This book brings together...... • Physiological effects of low frequency noise • Perception thresholds for low frequency vibration and the effect of low frequency vibration on people in terms of comfort and annoyance • Physiological and health effects of low frequency vibration Interest in the powerful effects of low frequency noise...

  17. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  18. Low-frequency connectivity is associated with mild traumatic brain injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunkley, B.T; Da Costa, L; Bethune, A; Jetly, R; Pang, E.W; Taylor, M.J; Doesburg, S.M

    2015-01-01

    .... Changes in local spectral power, particularly low-frequency amplitude increases and/or peak alpha slowing have been reported in mTBI, but large-scale connectivity metrics based on inter-regional...

  19. Impact to Space Shuttle Vehicle Trajectory on Day of Launch from change in Low Frequency Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Puperi, Daniel; Leach, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle utilizes atmospheric winds on day of launch to develop throttle and steering commands to best optimize vehicle performance while keeping structural loading on the vehicle within limits. The steering commands and resultant trajectory are influenced by both the high and low frequency component of the wind. However, the low frequency component has a greater effect on the ascent design. Change in the low frequency wind content from the time of trajectory design until launch can induce excessive loading on the vehicle. Wind change limits have been derived to protect from launching in an environment where these temporal changes occur. Process of developing wind change limits are discussed followed by an observational study of temporal wind change in low frequency wind profiles at the NASA's Kennedy Space Center area are presented.

  20. Science and Antenna Array Trade Studies for Low Frequency Radio Observatories on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Burns, J. O.

    2017-10-01

    A "low-frequency" radio astronomy observatory on the lunar surface would serve to address science goals that cannot be achieved by ground-based observatories. We describe status and plans for such an observatory.

  1. A study of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    -frequency tinnitus. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants, and the complainants were exposed to these in blind test listening experiments. Furthermore, the low-frequency hearing function of the complainants was investigated, and characteristics of the annoying sound was matched. The results...... showed that some of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated...... cases, and none of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while lowfrequency tinnitus is responsible in another...

  2. Low-Frequency, All Digital Radar (ADR) for Biomass and Ice-sheet Investigations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low-Frequency, All Digital Radar (ADR) can be a key component for NASA Phased-array and tomographic Radar systems spanning multiple earth-science measurement...

  3. Low Frequency Activity of Cortical Networks on Microelectrode Arrays is Differentially Altered by Bicuculline and Carbaryl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals need to be characterized for their neurotoxicity potential. Neurons grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are an in vitro model used to screen chemicals for functional effects on neuronal networks. Typically, after removal of low frequency components, effec...

  4. Numerical modelling of complex resistivity effects on a homogeneous half-space at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Baumgartner, François

    2006-01-01

    The many different existing models describing the spectral behavior of the resistivity of geological materials at low frequency, combined with the lack of available field data, render the interpretation of complex resistivity (CR) data very difficult. With a recent interest in CR measurements...... that the use of a second Cole-Cole model to describe EM coupling may corrupt the interpretation of the low frequency dispersion, even when only the normal range of frequencies (...

  5. Low-frequency vibration measurement by a dual-frequency DBR fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Cheng, Linghao; Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-09-01

    A dual-frequency distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser based sensor is demonstrated for low-frequency vibration measurement through the Doppler effect. The response of the proposed sensor is quite linear and is much higher than that of a conventional accelerometer. The proposed sensor can work down to 1 Hz with high sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed sensor is very efficient in low-frequency vibration measurement.

  6. Bistability and low-frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback: a theoretical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Tromborg, Bjarne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1988-01-01

    Near-threshold operation of a semiconductor laser exposed to moderate optical feedback may lead to low-frequency fluctuations. In the same region, a kink is observed in the light-current characteristic. Here it is demonstrated that these nonlinear phenomena are predicted by a noise driven multimode...... traveling-wave model. The dynamics of the low-frequency fluctuations are explained qualitatively in terms of bistability through an iterative description...

  7. Computational Electromagnetic Studies for Low-Frequency Compensation of the Reflector Impulse-radiating Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    realized as constant- angular structures, such as biconical and bowtie antennas . Inevitably, the ge- ometry must be truncated at some point, so physical...COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETIC STUDIES FOR LOW-FREQUENCY COMPENSATION OF THE REFLECTOR IMPULSE-RADIATING ANTENNA THESIS Casey E. Fillmore, Capt, USAF...ELECTROMAGNETIC STUDIES FOR LOW-FREQUENCY COMPENSATION OF THE REFLECTOR IMPULSE-RADIATING ANTENNA THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and

  8. Subjective evaluation of noise from neighbours with focus on low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing tendency to use lightweight constructions in the building industry. One unwanted side effect of this tendency is poor sound insulation at low frequencies. The purpose of this investigation has been to examine the subjective effects of the resulting increase of low frequency noise...... from neighbours in dwellings using listening tests. The results of the experiments confirm that noise from neighbours transmitted through light constructions is indeed rated more annoying than noise transmitted through heavier constructions....

  9. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y.-X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance ha...

  10. SCINTILLATION ARCS IN LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TIMING-ARRAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0437–4715

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia)

    2016-02-10

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ{sup 2}) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437–4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  11. Probing molecular interaction in ionic liquids by low frequency spectroscopy: Coulomb energy, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumino, Koichi; Reimann, Sebastian; Ludwig, Ralf

    2014-10-28

    Ionic liquids are defined as salts composed solely of ions with melting points below 100 °C. These remarkable liquids have unique and fascinating properties and offer new opportunities for science and technology. New combinations of ions provide changing physical properties and thus novel potential applications for this class of liquid materials. To a large extent, the structure and properties of ionic liquids are determined by the intermolecular interaction between anions and cations. In this perspective we show that far infrared and terahertz spectroscopy are suitable methods for studying the cation-anion interaction in these Coulomb fluids. The interpretation of the measured low frequency spectra is supported by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We present results for selected aprotic and protic ionic liquids and their mixtures with molecular solvents. In particular, we focus on the strength and type of intermolecular interaction and how both parameters are influenced by the character of the ions and their combinations. We show that the total interaction between cations and anions is a result of a subtle balance between Coulomb forces, hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. For protic ionic liquids we could measure distinct vibrational modes in the low frequency spectra indicating clearly the cation-anion interaction characterized by linear and medium to strong hydrogen bonds. Using isotopic substitution we have been able to dissect frequency shifts related to pure interaction strength between cations and anions and to different reduced masses only. In this context we also show how these different types of interaction may influence the physical properties of ionic liquids such as the melting point, viscosity or enthalpy of vaporization. Furthermore we demonstrate that low frequency spectroscopy can also be used for studying ion speciation. Low vibrational features can be assigned to contact ion pairs and solvent separated

  12. Simulating low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 during the last 740 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores shows a natural variability of 80 to 100 ppmv during the last four glacial cycles and variations of approximately 60 ppmv in the two cycles between 410 and 650 kyr BP. We here use various paleo-climatic records from the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core and from oceanic sediment cores covering the last 740 kyr to force the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE in a forward mode over this time in order to interpret the natural variability of CO2. Our approach is based on the previous interpretation of carbon cycle variations during Termination I (Köhler et al., 2005a. In the absense of a process-based sediment module one main simplification of BICYCLE is that carbonate compensation is approximated by the temporally delayed restoration of deep ocean [CO32−]. Our results match the low frequency changes in CO2 measured in the Vostok and the EPICA Dome C ice core for the last 650 kyr BP (r2≈0.75. During these transient simulations the carbon cycle reaches never a steady state due to the ongoing variability of the overall carbon budget caused by the time delayed response of the carbonate compensation to other processes. The average contributions of different processes to the rise in CO2 during Terminations I to V and during earlier terminations are: the rise in Southern Ocean vertical mixing: 36/22 ppmv, the rise in ocean temperature: 26/11 ppmv, iron limitation of the marine biota in the Southern Ocean: 20/14 ppmv, carbonate compensation: 15/7 ppmv, the rise in North Atlantic deep water formation: 13/0 ppmv, the rise in gas exchange due to a decreasing sea ice cover: −8/−7 ppmv, sea level rise: −12/−4 ppmv, and rising terrestrial carbon storage: −13/−6 ppmv. According to our model the smaller interglacial CO2 values in the pre-Vostok period prior to Termination V are mainly caused by smaller interglacial Southern Ocean SST and an Atlantic THC which stayed

  13. Low frequency noise from large wind turbines - updated 2011; Lavfrekvent stoej fra store vindmoeller - opdateret 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.; Sejer Pedersen, C.; Pedersen, Steffen

    2011-07-01

    The study analyzed measurements of noise from 65 wind turbines, 25 large turbines (2.3 to 3.6 MW) and 40 small ones (up to 2 MW). The large mills (2.3 to 3.6 MW) emit relatively more low frequency noise than the small ones (up to 2 MW). The difference is statistically significant for the frequency range 63-250 Hz, regardless of whether calculations are performed on all the large mills or only on new wind turbines. There are no significant differences between prototype turbines and the new mills. Because of wind noise in the measurements of the small mills, it is not possible to determine whether the difference between small and large turbines continues further down in frequency. Looking at the A-weighted sound pressure in relevant neighbor distances, the lower frequencies constitute an essential part of the noise from the large mills, and there is no doubt that the low frequency noise is both audible and annoying. When the total A-weighted sound pressure level is the same, there will on average be about 3 dB more low frequency noise from large turbines than from small ones. At large distances the noise character becomes yet more low frequency because atmospheric absorption reduces the high frequencies more than the low frequencies. Depending on the sound insulation the low frequency noise can also be annoying indoors. If the total A-weighted sound pressure level outdoors is 44 dB, the low frequency noise can be heard indoors in all the houses and for all the large turbines. The sound pressure level will in many cases exceed the indoor limit for evening night at 20 dB. (ln)

  14. A novel in vitro wound biofilm model used to evaluate low-frequency ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, S.; Garde, Christian; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2015-01-01

    disrupts the biofilm leaving bacteria more vulnerable to antiseptic or antibiotic treatment. The objective of this study is to develop a realistic model to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on biofilms. Method: A novel in vitro wound biofilm model was developed. Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus were......Objective: Bacterial biofilms remain difficult to treat. The biofilm mode of growth enables bacteria to survive antibiotic treatment and the inflammatory reaction. Low-frequency ultrasound has recently been shown to improve healing in a variety of settings. It is hypothesised that ultrasound...... casted in a semi-solid agar gel composed of either tryptic soy broth (TSB) or a wound simulating media (WSM; composed of Bolton broth with blood and plasma), to resemble the non-surface attached aggregates. The model was used to evaluate the antibiofilm effect of an ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement...

  15. Collective excitations in liquid DMSO : FIR spectrum, Low frequency vibrational density of states and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infra red spectrum obtained through Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto time correlation function, (ii) from Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions and a (iii) quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300K. The three spectrum, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. Study of participation ratio of the density...

  16. Intrinsic low-frequency variability of the Argentine Basin flow, and its interaction with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgubin, G.; Pierini, S.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamics of the Argentine Basin flow is of climatic relevance, as it yields strong mixing between Antarctic water masses (carried by the Malvinas Current) and subtropical water masses (carried by the Brazil Current). Such mixing is regulated by the Zapiola Anticyclone, a counterclockwise current that encircles the Zapiola Rise, the main topographic feature of the Argentine Basin. Recent observations have evidenced a clear variability of the Zapiola Anticyclone over periods that range from a 25-day oscillation (associated with topographic Rossby normal modes) to an interannual signal controlled by the local topography. We investigate the intrinsic variability of the Argentine Basin flow by using the sigma-coordinate Princeton Ocean Model. The periodic domain of integration includes the Pacific/Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, so that the Antarctic Circumpolar Current is also simulated; moreover, the forcing is provided by steady climatological surface heat and momentum fluxes. Results show several phenomena of both high and low-frequency variability which are found to be particularly sensitive to background stratification and the degree of smoothing of the bottom topography. The high-frequency variability is characterized by an anticyclonic wave around the Zapiola Rise: this is interpreted as a superposition of topographic Rossby normal modes which appear to be triggered by the intrinsic low-frequency variability. The latter evidences two distinct regimes of the flow with very different variance, that are connected by rapid transitions. A relatively low variable regime is characterized by a permanent Zapiola Anticyclone located over the Zapiola Rise; a more variable regime is characterized by strong eddy activity, mostly concentrated in the southern part of the basin, where the Sub-Antarctic Front is located. In general, the Argentine Basin circulation is found to be strictly related to fluctuations of the position of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

  17. Gimme the beat: assessment of low frequency beat noise for drilling rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilawchuk, Steven; Froment, Patrick [aci Acoustical Consultants Inc. (Canada)], email: stevenb@aciacoustical.com, email: patrickf@aciacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    The concern of an Alberta resident over the noise level from a drilling rig led to a low frequency noise impact assessment being done by an acoustic consulting firm. This paper describes the investigation that was conducted to determine the low frequency noise source, evaluate its sound emission levels and spectra, and propose mitigation options. Noise measurements were made over several days, with a sound level meter and additionally, a weather monitoring station was also used. Analysis showed low frequency tonal noise at the residential location, resulting in an overall sound level exceeding the permissible sound level imposed by the Alberta noise regulating bodies. Moreover, a beat phenomenon was observed, and after detailed investigation of possible sources, it was established that shale shakers were responsible for the low frequency noise and the beat phenomenon, a fact verified by beat theory. Due to the temporary nature of the drilling rig's operation, no thorough mitigation options could be proposed but a simple stop gap solution for the shale shakers allowed the reduction of low frequency tonal noise.

  18. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplified. To measure autonomic response, we calculated the high-frequency normalized unit (HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, and the LF/HF ratio from the heart rate using electrocardiography. We defined the stress recovery ratio as the value obtained after participants listened to music following scratching noise, normalized by the value obtained after participants listened to white noise after the stress noise, in terms of the HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, LF/HF ratio, and heart rate. Results indicated that high-frequency amplified music had the highest HFnu of the three versions. The stress recovery ratio of HFnu under the high-frequency amplified stimulus was significantly larger than that under the low-frequency stimulus. Our results suggest that the high-frequency component of music plays a greater role in stress relief than low-frequency components.

  19. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yoshie; Tanaka, Naofumi; Mima, Tatsuya; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplified. To measure autonomic response, we calculated the high-frequency normalized unit (HFnu), low-frequency normalized unit, and the LF/HF ratio from the heart rate using electrocardiography. We defined the stress recovery ratio as the value obtained after participants listened to music following scratching noise, normalized by the value obtained after participants listened to white noise after the stress noise, in terms of the HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, LF/HF ratio, and heart rate. Results indicated that high-frequency amplified music had the highest HFnu of the three versions. The stress recovery ratio of HFnu under the high-frequency amplified stimulus was significantly larger than that under the low-frequency stimulus. Our results suggest that the high-frequency component of music plays a greater role in stress relief than low-frequency components.

  20. How Far Is Quasar UV/Optical Variability from a Damped Random Walk at Low Frequency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hengxiao; Wang, Junxian; Cai, Zhenyi; Sun, Mouyuan

    2017-10-01

    Studies have shown that UV/optical light curves of quasars can be described using the prevalent damped random walk (DRW) model, also known as the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. A white noise power spectral density (PSD) is expected at low frequency in this model; however, a direct observational constraint to the low-frequency PSD slope is difficult due to the limited lengths of the light curves available. Meanwhile, quasars show scatter in their DRW parameters that is too large to be attributed to uncertainties in the measurements and dependence on the variation of known physical factors. In this work we present simulations showing that, if the low-frequency PSD deviates from the DRW, the red noise leakage can naturally produce large scatter in the variation parameters measured from simulated light curves. The steeper the low-frequency PSD slope, the larger scatter we expect. Based on observations of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, we find that the low-frequency PSD slope should be no steeper than -1.3. The actual slope could be flatter, which consequently requires that the quasar variabilities should be influenced by other unknown factors. We speculate that the magnetic field and/or metallicity could be such additional factors.

  1. Phonons in models for icosahedral quasicrystals : low frequency behaviour and inelastic scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, J.; Janssen, T.; Gähler, F.

    1993-06-01

    A detailed study of the low frequency behaviour of the phonon spectrum for 3-dimensional tiling models of icosahedral quasicrystals is presented, in commensurate approximations with up to 10 336 atoms per unit cell. The scaling behaviour of the lowest phonon branches shows that the widths of the gaps relative to the bandwidths vanish in the low frequency limit. The density of states at low frequencies is calculated by Brillouin zone integration, using either local linear or local quadratic interpolation of the branch surface. For perfect approximants it appears that there is a deviation from the normal ω^2-behaviour already at relatively low frequencies, in the form of pseudogaps. Also randomized approximants are considered, and it turns out that the pseudogaps in the density of states are flattened by randomization. When approaching the quasiperiodic limit, the dispersion of the acoustic branches becomes more and more isotropic, and the two transversal sound velocities tend to the same value. The dynamical structure factor is determined for several approximants, and it is shown that the linearity and the isotropy of the dispersion are extended far beyond the range of the acoustic branches inside the Brillouin zone. A sharply peaked response is observed at low frequencies, and broadening at higher frequencies. To obtain these results, an efficient algorithm based on Lanczos tridiagonalisation is used.

  2. Effects of damping on the low-frequency acoustics of listening rooms based on an analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Stephen M.; Van Buuren, Gil

    2013-12-01

    A study of the effects of damping on the low-frequency acoustics of listening rooms has been undertaken. The study was carried out using a new numerical implementation of an analytical solution based on a model developed by Bistafa and Morrissey. The model was designed to simulate the sound field in rectangular enclosures below the Schroeder cut-off frequency. Four hypothetical rooms were studied, a lightly damped room, a well damped room, a statistically compliant European Broadcast Union control room and a compliant European Broadcast Union control room. The most important result from the study using the proposed model was the influence of modes above the Schroeder cut-off frequency on reverberation time. This was caused by the variations in damping between mode types and variations in the modal coupling between the source and receiver. The research suggests that Schroeder's 1954 cut-off frequency for the influence of modes was more correct for highly damped rooms, in comparison with the Schroeder's 1964 relation.

  3. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Seol

    2010-01-01

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. © 2009 The Combustion Institute.

  4. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Toole, A., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Peña Arellano, F. E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M. [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street Pasadena, California 91105 (United States); Sobacchi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bhawal, A. [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States); Gong, P. [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lottarini, A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Minenkov, Y. [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientfica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Murphy, C. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  5. Low frequency sound field enhancement system for rectangular rooms, using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    to the multiple reflection of sound at the rigid walls of the room. This may cause level differences of up to 20 dB in the room. Some of these deviations are associated with the standing waves, resonances or anti resonances of the room. The understanding of the problem is accomplished by analyzing the behavior......The scope of this PhD dissertation is within the performance of loudspeakers in rooms at low frequencies. The research concentrates on the improvement of the sound level distribution in rooms produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies. The work focuses on seeing the problem acoustically...... and solving it in the time domain. Loudspeakers are the last link in the sound reproduction chain, and they are typically placed in small or medium size rooms. When low frequency sound is radiated by a loudspeaker the sound level distribution along the room presents large deviations. This is due...

  6. Reduction of low frequency error for SED36 and APS based HYDRA star trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaknine, Julien; Blarre, Ludovic; Oddos-Marcel, Lionel; Montel, Johan; Julio, Jean-Marc

    2017-11-01

    In the frame of the CNES Pleiades satellite, a reduction of the star tracker low frequency error, which is the most penalizing error for the satellite attitude control, was performed. For that purpose, the SED36 star tracker was developed, with a design based on the flight qualified SED16/26. In this paper, the SED36 main features will be first presented. Then, the reduction process of the low frequency error will be developed, particularly the optimization of the optical distortion calibration. The result is an attitude low frequency error of 1.1" at 3 sigma along transverse axes. The implementation of these improvements to HYDRA, the new multi-head APS star tracker developed by SODERN, will finally be presented.

  7. Elastic Metamaterial Insulator for Broadband Low-Frequency Flexural Vibration Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo Hwan; Qi, Shuibao; Kim, Yoon Young; Assouar, Badreddine

    2017-11-01

    Achieving stop band over broadband at low-frequency range has remained a great scientific challenge in spite of various efforts made using metamaterials or other technologies. In this work, we propose an idea that creates a stop band for broadband at low-frequency range. The dual mechanism of shear stiffening and rotation softening is initiated here to achieve a broad stop band at low-frequency range. Through analytical, numerical, and experimental studies, we reveal the underlying physical mechanism and confirm the effectiveness of this metamaterial on vibration shielding for flexural elastic wave covering 235 to 4520 Hz. This work opens an avenue for the development of elastic metamaterials with performance and functionalities that are highly desirable in many fields such as vibration shielding.

  8. Observational study of generation conditions of substorm-associated low-frequency AKR emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has lately been shown that low-frequency bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR are nearly exclusively associated with substorm expansion phases. Here we study low-frequency AKR using Polar PWI and Interball POLRAD instruments to constrain its possible generation mechanisms. We find that there are more low-frequency AKR emission events during wintertime and equinoxes than during summertime. The dot-AKR emission radial distance range coincides well with the region where the deepest density cavities are seen statistically during Kp>2. We suggest that the dot-AKR emissions originate in the deepest density cavities during substorm onsets. The mechanism for generating dot-AKR is possibly strong Alfvén waves entering the cavity from the magnetosphere and changing their character to more inertial, which causes the Alfvén wave associated parallel electric field to increase. This field may locally accelerate electrons inside the cavity enough to produce low-frequency AKR emission. We use Interball IESP low-frequency wave data to verify that in about half of the cases the dot-AKR is accompanied by low-frequency wave activity containing a magnetic component, i.e. probably inertial Alfvén waves. Because of the observational geometry, this result is consistent with the idea that inertial Alfvén waves might always be present in the source region when dot-AKR is generated. The paper illustrates once more the importance of radio emissions as a powerful remote diagnostic tool of auroral processes, which is not only relevant for the Earth's magnetosphere but may be relevant in the future in studying extrasolar planets.

  9. Voluntary reduction of force variability via modulation of low-frequency oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Casamento-Moran, Agostina; Yacoubi, Basma; Christou, Evangelos A

    2017-09-01

    Visual feedback can influence the force output by changing the power in frequencies below 1 Hz. However, it remains unknown whether visual guidance can help an individual reduce force variability voluntarily. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether an individual can voluntarily reduce force variability during constant contractions with visual guidance, and whether this reduction is associated with a decrease in the power of low-frequency oscillations (0-1 Hz) in force and muscle activity. Twenty young adults (27.6 ± 3.4 years) matched a force target of 15% MVC (maximal voluntary contraction) with ankle dorsiflexion. Participants performed six visually unrestricted contractions, from which we selected the trial with the least variability. Following, participants performed six visually guided contractions and were encouraged to reduce their force variability within two guidelines (±1 SD of the least variable unrestricted trial). Participants decreased the SD of force by 45% (P force (P > 0.2). The decrease in force variability was associated with decreased low-frequency oscillations (0-1 Hz) in force (R 2  = 0.59), which was associated with decreased low-frequency oscillations in EMG bursts (R 2  = 0.35). The reduction in low-frequency oscillations in EMG burst was positively associated with power in the interference EMG from 35 to 60 Hz (R 2  = 0.47). In conclusion, voluntary reduction of force variability is associated with decreased low-frequency oscillations in EMG bursts and consequently force output. We provide novel evidence that visual guidance allows healthy young adults to reduce force variability voluntarily likely by adjusting the low-frequency oscillations in the neural drive.

  10. The assessment and evaluation of low-frequency noise near the region of infrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Ziaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to present recent knowledge about the assessment and evaluation of low-frequency sounds (noise and infrasound, close to the threshold of hearing, and identify their potential effect on human health and annoyance. Low-frequency noise generated by air flowing over a moving car with an open window was chosen as a typical scenario which can be subjectively assessed by people traveling by automobile. The principle of noise generated within the interior of the car and its effects on the comfort of the driver and passengers are analyzed at different velocities. An open window of a car at high velocity behaves as a source of specifically strong tonal low-frequency noise which is generally perceived as annoying. The interior noise generated by an open window of a passenger car was measured under different conditions: Driving on a highway and driving on a typical roadway. First, an octave-band analysis was used to assess the noise level and its impact on the driver′s comfort. Second, a fast Fourier transform (FFT analysis and one-third octave-band analysis were used for the detection of tonal low-frequency noise. Comparison between two different car makers was also done. Finally, the paper suggests some possibilities for scientifically assessing and evaluating low-frequency sounds in general, and some recommendations are introduced for scientific discussion, since sounds with strong low-frequency content (but not only strong engender greater annoyance than is predicted by an A-weighted sound pressure level.

  11. The assessment and evaluation of low-frequency noise near the region of infrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaran, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to present recent knowledge about the assessment and evaluation of low-frequency sounds (noise) and infrasound, close to the threshold of hearing, and identify their potential effect on human health and annoyance. Low-frequency noise generated by air flowing over a moving car with an open window was chosen as a typical scenario which can be subjectively assessed by people traveling by automobile. The principle of noise generated within the interior of the car and its effects on the comfort of the driver and passengers are analyzed at different velocities. An open window of a car at high velocity behaves as a source of specifically strong tonal low-frequency noise which is generally perceived as annoying. The interior noise generated by an open window of a passenger car was measured under different conditions: Driving on a highway and driving on a typical roadway. First, an octave-band analysis was used to assess the noise level and its impact on the driver's comfort. Second, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis and one-third octave-band analysis were used for the detection of tonal low-frequency noise. Comparison between two different car makers was also done. Finally, the paper suggests some possibilities for scientifically assessing and evaluating low-frequency sounds in general, and some recommendations are introduced for scientific discussion, since sounds with strong low-frequency content (but not only strong) engender greater annoyance than is predicted by an A-weighted sound pressure level.

  12. The Impact of Low Frequency Noise on Mental Performance during Math Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hatami

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims  The influences of Low Frequency Noise (LFN on mental performance have been the objectives of many papers in recent years. Many researchers believe that the LFN even at low pressure levels has impacts on mental performance. In the present work the influences of LFN and Reference Noise (RN at two different sound pressure levels (45 & 65 dBA on mental performances of college students during solving math problems were studied. Other factors such as annoyance and sensitivity to LFN and hearing status of the participants were also determined.   Material and MethodsLow Frequency and Reference Noise were generated and verified using Cool Edit software program. The number of participants was calculated using data gathered from a pilot study conducted in advance. The mental performance of the students was evaluated while they were exposed to LFN and RN at 45 & 65 dBA sound pressure levels. For this purpose, standard psychological tests were applied. Standard measuring instrumentation including sound level meters, psychological tests, acoustic room and etc were calibrated prior to their application based on standard methods.   Results The results revealed that, Low frequency noise annoyance and sensitivity have no significant differences between different studied ages and sexes. The results also revealed that, a significant correlations exists between sensitivity to low frequency noise and deep mental process (r=0.33, p=0.01. It was recognized that low frequency noise at 65 dBA can decrease accuracy (pvalue=0.005 and performance (pvalue=0.001 in comparison with reference noise at the same level.   Conclusion Low frequency noise, have impact on mental performance during performing math calculations

  13. Observational study of generation conditions of substorm-associated low-frequency AKR emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has lately been shown that low-frequency bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR are nearly exclusively associated with substorm expansion phases. Here we study low-frequency AKR using Polar PWI and Interball POLRAD instruments to constrain its possible generation mechanisms. We find that there are more low-frequency AKR emission events during wintertime and equinoxes than during summertime. The dot-AKR emission radial distance range coincides well with the region where the deepest density cavities are seen statistically during Kp>2. We suggest that the dot-AKR emissions originate in the deepest density cavities during substorm onsets. The mechanism for generating dot-AKR is possibly strong Alfvén waves entering the cavity from the magnetosphere and changing their character to more inertial, which causes the Alfvén wave associated parallel electric field to increase. This field may locally accelerate electrons inside the cavity enough to produce low-frequency AKR emission. We use Interball IESP low-frequency wave data to verify that in about half of the cases the dot-AKR is accompanied by low-frequency wave activity containing a magnetic component, i.e. probably inertial Alfvén waves. Because of the observational geometry, this result is consistent with the idea that inertial Alfvén waves might always be present in the source region when dot-AKR is generated. The paper illustrates once more the importance of radio emissions as a powerful remote diagnostic tool of auroral processes, which is not only relevant for the Earth's magnetosphere but may be relevant in the future in studying extrasolar planets.

  14. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  15. Detection and Analysis of Low-Frequency Sperm Whale Vocalizations with a Towed Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Alexander

    Sperm whale vocalizations recorded during a sea test and calibration experiment in the Gulf of Maine on a single towed, horizontal, densely sampled, low-frequency (whales. Comparison of the vocalizations and background noise levels and the estimated transmission loss suggests the sperm whale detection range after coherent array processing exceeds 60 km in low-to-moderate sea states. Low-frequency source levels of vocalizations are estimated using the received levels and the estimated transmission loss, and applications of both this estimate and the receiver-side statistics are discussed.

  16. Alternative low frequency magnetic field theranostics: recent advances, safety and hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Y.; Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Golovin, D.; Gribanovsky, S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents a brief review and comparative analysis of low frequency (nonheating) and radio-frequency electromagnetic nanomedicine technologies. The former are shown to have a considerable advantage over the latter ones: a higher flexibility and penetrating ability, easier to dose and control, easier to localize, as well as safer and less costly. This makes their employment promising for building a new technological platform for low frequency magnetic theranostics with a wider range of options, i.e. possessing a wider multimodality than traditional radio-frequency methods.

  17. Synchronization of low-frequency oscillations in the human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavaev, A. S.; Prokhorov, M. D.; Ponomarenko, V. I.; Kiselev, A. R.; Gridnev, V. I.; Ruban, E. I.; Bezruchko, B. P.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations of heart rate and blood pressure having in humans a basic frequency close to 0.1 Hz. A method is proposed for quantitative estimation of synchronization between these oscillating processes based on calculation of relative time of phase synchronization of oscillations. It is shown that healthy subjects exhibit on average substantially longer epochs of internal synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations in heart rate and blood pressure than patients after acute myocardial infarction.

  18. Impact of LISA's Low Frequency Sensitivity on Observations of Massive Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J.; Centrella, J.

    2005-01-01

    LISA will be able to detect gravitational waves from inspiralling massive black hole (MBH) binaries out to redshifts z > 10. If the binary masses and luminosity distances can be extracted from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) data stream, this information can be used to reveal the merger history of MBH binaries and their host galaxies in the evolving universe. Since this parameter extraction generally requires that LISA observe the inspiral for a significant fraction of its yearly orbit, carrying out this program requires adequate sensitivity at low frequencies, f low frequency sensitivities, we examine LISA's potential for characterizing MBH binary coalescences at redshifts z > 1.

  19. Development of a low-frequency physiotherapeutic device for diabetes manipulated by microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Song; Gong, Jian

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a physiotherapeutic device for diabetes that generates special low-frequency waveform manipulated by a microcontroller. METHODS: A microcontoller and a digital-to-analog converter were utilized along with a keyboard and LED display circuit, to generate desired low-frequecy waveform with the assistance of a software. RESULTS: The complex waveform generated by this device met the demands for diabetes physiotherapy, and the frequency and amplitude could be freely adjusted. CONCLUSIONS: The utilization of a digital-to-analog converter controlled by a microcontroller can very well serve the purpose of a low-frequency physiotherapy for diabetes.

  20. Low-frequency signals produced by Northeast Atlantic killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    OpenAIRE

    Samarra, Filipa I.P.; Deecke, Volker B.; Miller, Patrick J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Killer whale acoustic behavior has been extensively investigated, however most studies have focused on pulsed calls and whistles. This study reports the production of low-frequency signals by killer whales at frequencies below 300 Hz. Recordings of killer whales were made in Iceland and Norway when whales were observed feeding on herring, and no other cetacean species were nearby. Low-frequency sounds were identified in Iceland and ranged in duration between 0.14 and 2.77 seconds and in frequ...

  1. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  2. Vibration isolation performance of an ultra-low frequency folded pendulum resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangfeng; Ju, Li; Blair, David G.

    1997-02-01

    We present an analysis of the transfer function of a very low frequency folded pendulum resonator. It is shown that performance depends critically on centre of percussion tuning of the pendulum arms. Experimental measurements of the transfer function are shown to agree well with theory. The isolator achieves 90 dB isolation at 7 Hz.

  3. Equivalent circuit modeling of the dielectric properties of rubber wood at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan M. Daud; Kaida B. Khalid; Aziz H.A. Sidek

    2000-01-01

    Dielectric properties of rubber wood were studied at various moisture contents and grain directions at low frequencies from 10-2 to 105 Hz. Results showed that the moisture content of wood affected the dielectric properties considerably. Dielectric data at different anisotropic directions, i.e., longitudinal, radial, and...

  4. Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Lähteenmäki, A.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main...

  5. Low-frequency electromagnetic plasma waves at comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup: Analysis and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Fritz M.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Coates, A. J.; Johnstone, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation and polarization characteristic of low-frequency electromagnetic wave fields near comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup (P/GS) are analyzed using magnetic field and plasma observations obtained by the Giotto magnetometer experiment and the Johnstone plasma analyzer during the encounter at the comet on July 10, 1992. The results have been physically interpreted.

  6. Measurement of the Low Frequency Noise of MOSFETs under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    A measurement technique [1] is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET low frequency (LF) noise under large signal RF (Radio Frequency) excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does

  7. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, J; Grell, K; Kinsey, S

    2012-01-01

    A previous US study reported poorer survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) above 0.3 μT, but based on small numbers. Data from 3073 cases of childhood ALL were pooled from prospective studies conducted in Canada...

  8. Tuning Range Optimization of a Planar Inverted F Antenna for LTE Low Frequency Bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Pelosi, Mauro; Franek, Ondrej

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a Planar Inverted F Antenna (PIFA) tuned with a fixed capacitor to the low frequency bands supported by the Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology. The tuning range is investigated and optimized with respect to the bandwidth and the efficiency of the resulting antenna. Simulations...

  9. The Great Salt Lake: A Barometer of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Lall, Upmanu; Mann, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Low frequency (interannual or longer period) climatic variability is of interest bacause of its sugnificance for the understanding and prediction of protracted climatic anomalies. Closed basin lakes are sensitive to long term climatic fluctuations and integrate out high frequency variability. It is thus natural to examine the records of such lakes to better understand long term climate dynamics. Here we use Singul...

  10. Thin-film ZnO as micromechanical actuator at low frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, F.R.; Blom, F.R.; IJntema, D.J.; Ijntema, D.J.; van de Pol, F.C.M.; van de Pol, F.C.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.; Popma, T.J.A.

    A new model is proposed for the low-frequency piezoelectric activity of ZnO films grown on CVD SiO2. In this MOS structure, with ZnO as the semiconductor, a depletion layer is induced by means of a d.c. bias voltage. Using standard semiconductor theory, an expression is derived relating the electric

  11. Low-frequency variability of sea level along the coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shankar, D.

    Coastal sea level is one of the better documented oceanic variables, there being several tide-gauge records of hourly sea level that stretch back to the last century. This, together with the fact that geostrophic, low-frequency coastal currents...

  12. Daris, a low-frequency distributed aperture array for radio astronomy in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.J.; Saks, N.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; van 't Klooster, K.; Falcke, H.

    2010-01-01

    DARIS (Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space) is a radio astronomy space mission concept aimed at observing the low-frequency radio sky in the range 1-10 MHz. Because of the Earth's ionospheric disturbances and opaqueness, this frequency range can only be observed from space. The

  13. Voice acoustic profi le of males exposed to occupational infrasound and low-frequency noise

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Ana; Bonança, Íris; Jorge, Ana; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo-Branco, Nuno A. A.; Caetano, Marlene; Oliveira, Nádia; Graça, Andreia; Santos, Carolina; Ferraria, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a systematic pathology characterized by the abnormal growth of extra-cellular matrices in the absence of infl ammatory processes, namely collagen and elastin, both of which are abundant in the basement membrane zone of the vocal folds. VAD can develop due to long-term exposure to infrasound and low-frequency noise (ILFN,

  14. On the influence of heat transport on low- frequency paramagnetic spin-Lattice relaxation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra, Jakob; Gerritsma, G.J.; Hartemink, G.A.; van der Marel, L.C.

    1974-01-01

    In low-frequency relaxation experiments on paramagnetic crystals, placed in liquid helium, often dispersion- and absorption curves are found, strongly deviating from those following from the thermodynamic theory of Casimir and Du Pré. For the relaxation time τabs, related to the maximum in the

  15. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  16. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklas Schneider

    2009-06-17

    The report summarized recent findings with respect to Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, with focus on the dynamics of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, oceanic adjustments and the coupled feedback in the western boundary current of the North and South Pacific, decadal dynamics of oceanic salinity, and tropical processes with emphasis on the Indonesian Throughflow.

  17. On the small-signal capacitance of RF MEMS switches at very low frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Bielen, Jeroen; Salm, Cora; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents on-wafer capacitance measurements of silicon-based RF MEMS capacitive switches down to frequencies below 1 Hz. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve measured at very-low frequency (0.01-10 Hz) deviates from the commonly measured and well-understood high-frequency C-V curve,

  18. Orbiting low frequency antennas for radio astronomy(OLFAR): Distributing signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Raj; Rajan, R.T.; Budianu, A.; Engelen, Steven; van der Veen, Alle-Jan; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, Albert Jan; Verhoeven, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Recently, new and interesting science drivers have emerged in the ultra low frequency range of 0.3-30 MHz ranging from the epoch of re-ionization, exo-planets, ultra-high energy cosmic rays and studies of the astronomical dark ages. However at these wavelengths, ground based observations are

  19. Extremely low-frequency magnetic field exposure, electrical shocks and risk of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Kromhout, Hans; Huss, Anke

    PURPOSE: Previous studies did not provide strong evidence for an increased Parkinson's disease (PD) risk after exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), but were limited in their scope to address other exposures related to the use of electricity such as electrical shocks. We

  20. Extremely low-frequency magnetic field exposure, electrical shocks and risk of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C. G.; Mulleners, Wim M.; Sas, Antonetta M. G.; van Laar, Teus; Kromhout, Hans; Huss, Anke

    Previous studies did not provide strong evidence for an increased Parkinson's disease (PD) risk after exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), but were limited in their scope to address other exposures related to the use of electricity such as electrical shocks. We evaluated the

  1. LOFAR detections of low-frequency radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Asgekar; J.B. Oonk; S. Yatawatta; R.J. van Weeren; J.P. McKean; G. White; N. Jackson; J. Anderson; I.M. Avruch; F. Batejat; R. Beck; M.E. Bell; M.R. Bell; I. van Bemmel; M.J. Bentum; G. Bernardi; P. Best; L. Birzan; A. Bonafede; R. Braun; F. Breitling; R.H. van de Brink; J.W. Broderick; W.N. Brouw; M. Brüggen; H.R. Butcher; W. van Cappellen; B. Ciardi; J.E. Conway; F. De Gasperin; E. de Geus; A. de Jong; M. de Vos; S. Duscha; J. Eislöffel; H. Falcke; R.A. Fellows; C. Ferrari; W. Frieswijk; M.A. Garrett; J.-M. Grießmeier; T. Grit; A.W. Gunst; T.E. Hassall; G. Heald; J.W.T. Hessels; M. Hoeft; M. Iacobelli; H. Intema; E. Juette; A. Karastergiou; J. Kohler; V.I. Kondratiev; M. Kuniyoshi; G. Kuper; C. Law; J. van Leeuwen; P. Maat; G. Macario; G. Mann; S. Markoff; D. McKay-Bukowski; M. Mevins; J.C.A. Miller-Jones; J.D. Mol; R. Morganti; D.D. Mulcahy; H. Munk; M.J. Norden; E. Orru; H. Paas; M. Pandey-Pommier; V.N. Pandey; R. Pizzo; A.G. Polatidis; W. Reich; H.J.A. Röttgering; L.H.A. Scheers (Bart); A. Schoenmakers; J. Sluman; O. Smirnov; C.A. Sobey; M. Steinmetz; M. Tagger; Y. Tang; C. Tasse; R. Vermeulen; C. Vocks; R.A.M.J. Wijers (Ralph); M.W. Wise (Michael); O. Wucknitz; P. Zarka; J. van Leeuwen (Joeri)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractCassiopeia A was observed using the low-band antennas of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) with high spectral resolution. This allowed a search for radio recombination lines (RRLs) along the line-of-sight to this source. Five carbon alpha RRLs were detected in absorption between 40 and 50

  2. A lightweight low-frequency sound insulation membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Lu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL at low frequencies (⩽500Hz was designed and the mechanisms were investigated by using negative mass density theory. This metamaterial’s structure is like a sandwich with a thin (thickness=0.25mm lightweight flexible rubber material within two layers of honeycomb cell plates. Negative mass density was demonstrated at frequencies below the first natural frequency, which results in the excellent low-frequency sound insulation. The effects of different structural parameters of the membrane on the sound-proofed performance at low frequencies were investigated by using finite element method (FEM. The numerical results show that, the STL can be modulated to higher value by changing the structural parameters, such as the membrane surface density, the unite cell film shape, and the membrane tension. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  3. Waves in a short cable at low frequencies, or just hand-waving?

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, L B; Granqvist, C G; Smulko, J M

    2015-01-01

    We address the question of low-frequency signals in a short cable, which are often considered as waves in engineering calculations. Such an assumption violates several laws of physics, but exact calculations can be carried out via linear network theory.

  4. Variability of the autoregulation index decreases after removing the effect of the very low frequency band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, J. W.; Maurits, N. M.; Aries, M. J. H.

    Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) estimates show large between and within subject variability. Sources of variability include low coherence and influence of CO2 in the very low frequency (VLF) band, where dCA is active. This may lead to unreliable transfer function and autoregulation index (ARI)

  5. Exome genotyping arrays to identify rare and low frequency variants associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Pirie, Ailith; Ann Chen, Y

    2016-01-01

    Rare and low frequency variants are not well covered in most germline genotyping arrays and are understudied in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. To address this gap, we used genotyping arrays targeting rarer protein-coding variation in 8,165 EOC cases and 11,619 controls from the...

  6. Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy enhances neovascularization and wound healing in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Januszyk, Michael; Rennert, Robert C; Duscher, Dominik; Rodrigues, Melanie; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Ho, Natalie; Whitmore, Arnetha; Hu, Michael S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2014-09-01

    Chronic wounds are a major source of morbidity for patients and represent a significant health burden. Implementing noninvasive techniques that accelerate healing of these wounds would provide great benefit. Ultrasound appears to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic wounds in humans. MIST Therapy is a noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment delivered through a saline mist. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the efficacy of ultrasound therapy, but the underlying molecular and cellular pathways impacted by this technique remain unclear. The in vivo effect of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound was therefore examined in a humanized excisional wound model. The treatment group received noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy three times per week, whereas the control group received a standard dressing change. Wounds were photographed at regular intervals to calculate healing kinetics. Wound tissue was harvested and processed for histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MIST group demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing, with 17.3 days to wound closure compared with 24 days in the controls (p healing evidenced by significantly decreased mean wound area relative to original size (68 percent versus 80 percent; p frequency ultrasound-treated mice compared with controls. Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment improves neovascularization and wound closure rates in excisional wounds for diabetic mice, likely because of the stimulated release of angiogenic factors.

  7. The relevance of low-frequency sound properties for performance and pleasantness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, Kerstin; Bengtsson, Johanna

    2004-05-01

    The sound environment in the workplace has been found to influence performance, stress, mood, and well-being after work. However few studies can provide dose-response relationships and little is known of the importance of sound-quality aspects for adverse effects on critical tasks or task requirements. We have, during the last 8 years, been engaged in studies investigating the critical performance effects due to the presence of low frequencies (20-200 Hz) in sounds. The main hypotheses on critical effects derived from studies in the general environment were that low-frequency noise induced great annoyance, concentration difficulties, and was difficult to filter out or habituate to. On the other hand, results from truck drivers indicated that low-frequency sounds may lead to reduced alertness and increased sleepiness. In total, three studies were designed with regard to these hypotheses, all of them with the intention to be applicable to office and control room environment, using equivalent A-weighted sound-pressure levels of 40 and 45 dB. The fourth study investigated the importance of sound properties in low-frequency sounds for the perception of pleasantness. The results will be presented and discussed in relation to noise assessment aspects. [Work supported by Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research.

  8. Low-Frequency Noise Reduction by Earmuffs with Flax Fibre-Reinforced Polypropylene Ear Cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Yinn Leng Ang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Soldiers and supporting engineers are frequently exposed to high low-frequency (<500 Hz cabin noise in military vehicles. Despite the use of commercial hearing protection devices, the risk of auditory damage is still imminent because the devices may not be optimally customised for such applications. This study considers flax fibre-reinforced polypropylene (Flax-PP as an alternative to the material selection for the ear cups of commercial earmuffs, which are typically made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS. Different weaving configurations (woven and nonwoven and various noise environments (pink noise, cabin booming noise, and firing noise were considered to investigate the feasibility of the proposed composite earmuffs for low-frequency noise reduction. The remaining assembly components of the earmuff were kept consistent with those of a commercial earmuff, which served as a benchmark for results comparison. In contrast to the commercial earmuff, the composite earmuffs were shown to be better in mitigating low-frequency noise by up to 16.6 dB, while compromising midfrequency acoustical performance. Consequently, the proposed composite earmuffs may be an alternative for low-frequency noise reduction in vehicle cabins, at airports, and at construction sites involving heavy machineries.

  9. Effects of Removing Low-Frequency Electric Information on Speech Perception with Bimodal Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jennifer R.; Eggleston, Jessica L.; Reavis, Kelly M.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Reiss, Lina A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to determine whether speech perception could be improved for bimodal listeners (those using a cochlear implant [CI] in one ear and hearing aid in the contralateral ear) by removing low-frequency information provided by the CI, thereby reducing acoustic-electric overlap. Method: Subjects were adult CI subjects with at…

  10. Simulation of Low frequency Noise from a Downwind Wind Turbine Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helge Aa.; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of a wind turbine with a downwind rotor is the generation of considerable low frequency noise (so-called thumping noise) which can cause annoyance of people at a considerable distance. This was experienced on a number of full-scale turbines in e.g. US and Sweden in the ...

  11. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  12. Harmonic Analysis and Mitigation of Low- Frequency Switching Voltage Source Inverter with Auxiliary VSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, Haofeng; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    The output currents of high-power Voltage Source Inverters (VSIs) are distorted by the switching harmonics and the background harmonics in the grid voltage. This paper presents an active harmonic filtering scheme for high-power, low-frequency switching VSIs with an additional auxiliary VSI...

  13. Effects of low-frequency magnetic fields on the viability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jan; Strašák, Luděk; Fojt, Lukáš; Slaninová, I.; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2007), s. 115-121 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4004404; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : low-frequency electromagnetic field * yeast * Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2007

  14. Low-frequency signals produced by Northeast Atlantic killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-03-01

    Killer whale acoustic behavior has been extensively investigated; however, most studies have focused on pulsed calls and whistles. This study reports the production of low-frequency signals by killer whales at frequencies below 300 Hz. Recordings were made in Iceland and Norway when killer whales were observed feeding on herring and no other marine mammal species were nearby. Low-frequency sounds were identified in Iceland and ranged in duration between 0.14 and 2.77 s and in frequency between 50 and 270 Hz, well below the previously reported lower limit for killer whale tonal sounds of 500 Hz. Low-frequency sounds appeared to be produced close in time to tail slaps, which are indicative of feeding attempts, suggesting that these sounds may be related to a feeding context. However, their precise function is unknown, and they could be the by-product of a non-vocal behavior rather than a vocal signal deliberately produced by the whales. Although killer whales in Norway exhibit similar feeding behavior, this sound has not been detected in recordings from Norway to date. This study suggests that, like other delphinids, killer whales produce low-frequency sounds, but further studies will be required to understand whether similar sounds exist in other killer whale populations.

  15. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music

  16. The Event-Related Low-Frequency Activity of Highly and Average Intelligent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongran; Shi, Jiannong; Zhao, Daheng; Yang, Jie

    2008-01-01

    Using time-frequency analysis techniques to investigate the event-related low-frequency (delta: 0.5-4 Hz; theta: 4-8 Hz) activity of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) data of highly and average intelligent children, 18 intellectually gifted children, and 18 intellectually average children participated the present study. Present findings…

  17. The Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) and EoR Key-Science Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentjens, Michiel; Koopmans, L. V. E.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Zaroubi, S.

    The Low-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a novel radio-telescope facility with its core and operation center in the Netherlands. LOFAR is one of several current pathfinders toward SKA. One of LOFAR's key science projects is the detection and characterization of the redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral

  18. Wind Turbine Infra and Low-Frequency Sound: Warning Signs that Were Not Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines are frequently thought of as benign. However, the literature is reporting adverse health effects associated with the implementation of industrial-scale wind developments. This article explores the historical evidence about what was known regarding infra and low-frequency sound from wind turbines and other noise sources…

  19. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  20. Coordinated observations using the world largest low-frequency radio telescopes and space misiions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Zarka, Ph.; Kolyadin, V. L.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Stepkin, S. V.; Panchenko, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Fischer, G.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Melnik, V. N.; Litvinenko, G. V.; Sidorchuk, M. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Vasilyeva, Ya. Yu.; Bojko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Mann, G.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Falkovich, I. S.; Koval, A. A.; Mylostna, K.; Pylaev, O. S.; Shepelev, V. A.; Reznik, A. P.

    2013-09-01

    The positive possibilities of astrophysical objects studies(including the Solar system investigations) using coordinated observations with the largest existing and coming low frequency radio telescopes are shown. The observations of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, ant others with UTR-2, URAN, NDA radio telescopes, and WIND, Cassini and STEREO space missions at frequencies lower than 40 MHz have been carried out.

  1. Low-frequency characteristics in the wake of a circular disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianzhi; Liu, Minghou; Wu, Guang; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xintai

    2015-06-01

    Numerical simulations of flow over a circular disk have been performed in this study at Re = 250, 300, 3000, and 104. The Fourier spectra analysis of the velocity at different positions suggests that together with the natural vortex-shedding frequency and the shear-layer Kelvin-Helmholtz instability frequency, several much lower frequencies are also detected when the Reynolds number (Re) increases to 300: one is fp ≈ 0.03, another one is fr ≈ 0.02, and its second harmonic is at about 0.04 and a low frequency of about 0.05. Considering the limited time length of the data, time-frequency analysis based on wavelet transform is then performed. It is found that the local frequencies of the amplitude peaks for the large-scale vortex shedding and shear-layer Kelvin-Helmholtz instability vary irregularly with time, indicating that the traditional Fourier analysis of the numerical signals would not be representative. Nevertheless, the low frequencies fp ≈ 0.03 and fr ≈ 0.02 are clearly confirmed. The frequencies of about 0.04 and 0.05 are observed to occur in some time periods but with much weaker magnitude. It is found that the low-frequency signals keep nearly invariant as Reynolds number increases. The physical origins of the low frequencies fp ≈ 0.03 and fr ≈ 0.02 are then investigated. The physical origin of fp ≈ 0.03 is due to a low-frequency pumping motion of the recirculation bubble, and the fr ≈ 0.02 signal is due to a low-frequency modulation in the rotation of the azimuthal location of large-scale vortex shedding (i.e., the changing of the rotation direction). To characterize the low-frequency unsteadiness of the recirculation bubble, the temporal evolution of the low-pass filtered flow field is investigated. It is observed that the pumping motion of the recirculation bubble is associated with the growing and shedding of the large toroidal vortices formed in the bubble, which is closely related to the behavior of the separated shear layer. The

  2. Plasma filamentation and shock wave enhancement in microwave rockets by combining low-frequency microwaves with external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Masayuki, E-mail: m.takahashi@al.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku 113-8656 (Japan); Ohnishi, Naofumi [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-08-14

    A filamentary plasma is reproduced based on a fully kinetic model of electron and ion transports coupled with electromagnetic wave propagation. The discharge plasma transits from discrete to diffusive patterns at a 110-GHz breakdown, with decrease in the ambient pressure, because of the rapid electron diffusion that occurs during an increase in the propagation speed of the ionization front. A discrete plasma is obtained at low pressures when a low-frequency microwave is irradiated because the ionization process becomes more dominant than the electron diffusion, when the electrons are effectively heated by the low-frequency microwave. The propagation speed of the plasma increases with decrease in the incident microwave frequency because of the higher ionization frequency and faster plasma diffusion resulting from the increase in the energy-absorption rate. An external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume, which induces plasma filamentation at lower pressures because the electron diffusion is suppressed by the magnetic field. The thrust performance of a microwave rocket is improved by the magnetic fields corresponding to the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and its higher-harmonic heating, because slower propagation of the ionization front and larger energy-absorption rates are obtained at lower pressures. It would be advantageous if the fundamental mode of ECR heating is coupled with a lower frequency microwave instead of combining the higher-harmonic ECR heating with the higher frequency microwave. This can improve the thrust performance with smaller magnetic fields even if the propagation speed increases because of the decrease in the incident microwave frequency.

  3. Impact of visual repetition rate on intrinsic properties of low frequency fluctuations in the visual network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chia Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual processing network is one of the functional networks which have been reliably identified to consistently exist in human resting brains. In our work, we focused on this network and investigated the intrinsic properties of low frequency (0.01-0.08 Hz fluctuations (LFFs during changes of visual stimuli. There were two main questions to be discussed in this study: intrinsic properties of LFFs regarding (1 interactions between visual stimuli and resting-state; (2 impact of repetition rate of visual stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed scanning sessions that contained rest and visual stimuli in various repetition rates with a novel method. The method included three numerical approaches involving ICA (Independent Component Analyses, fALFF (fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuation, and Coherence, to respectively investigate the modulations of visual network pattern, low frequency fluctuation power, and interregional functional connectivity during changes of visual stimuli. We discovered when resting-state was replaced by visual stimuli, more areas were involved in visual processing, and both stronger low frequency fluctuations and higher interregional functional connectivity occurred in visual network. With changes of visual repetition rate, the number of areas which were involved in visual processing, low frequency fluctuation power, and interregional functional connectivity in this network were also modulated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To combine the results of prior literatures and our discoveries, intrinsic properties of LFFs in visual network are altered not only by modulations of endogenous factors (eye-open or eye-closed condition; alcohol administration and disordered behaviors (early blind, but also exogenous sensory stimuli (visual stimuli with various repetition rates. It demonstrates that the intrinsic properties of LFFs are valuable to represent physiological states of human brains.

  4. Adiabatic perturbation theory for atoms and molecules in the low-frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiskainen, Hanna; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in the photoinduced dynamics in the low frequency, ω, regime. The multiphoton absorptions by molecules in strong laser fields depend on the polarization of the laser and on the molecular structure. The unique properties of the interaction of atoms and molecules with lasers in the low-frequency regime imply new concepts and directions in strong-field light-matter interactions. Here we represent a perturbational approach for the calculations of the quasi-energy spectrum in the low-frequency regime, which avoids the construction of the Floquet operator with extremely large number of Floquet channels. The zero-order Hamiltonian in our perturbational approach is the adiabatic Hamiltonian where the atoms/molecules are exposed to a dc electric field rather than to ac-field. This is in the spirit of the first step in the Corkum three-step model. The second-order perturbation correction terms are obtained when i ℏ ω ∂/∂ τ serves as a perturbation and τ is a dimensionless variable. The second-order adiabatic perturbation scheme is found to be an excellent approach for calculating the ac-field Floquet solutions in our test case studies of a simple one-dimensional time-periodic model Hamiltonian. It is straightforward to implement the perturbation approach presented here for calculating atomic and molecular energy shifts (positions) due to the interaction with low-frequency ac-fields using high-level electronic structure methods. This is enabled since standard quantum chemistry packages allow the calculations of atomic and molecular energy shifts due to the interaction with dc-fields. In addition to the shift of the energy positions, the energy widths (inverse lifetimes) can be obtained at the same level of theory. These energy shifts are functions of the laser parameters (low frequency, intensity, and polarization).

  5. Effects of density fluctuations on nonlinear evolution of low-frequency Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariyuki, Y.; Seough, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that low-frequency Alfven waves are unstable to parametric instabilities, in which these waves are nonlinearly coupled with density fluctuations [e.g, Nariyuki+Hada, JGR, 2007 and references therein]. In solar wind plasmas, low-frequency fluctuations with non-zero cross-helicity are frequently observed [e.g., Bruno+Carbone, Living Rev. Solar Phys. (2013) and references therein]. When the absolute values of normalized cross helicities are close to the unity, the fluctuations may be composed of uni-directionally (anti-sunward) propagating Alfven waves. The derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation (DNLS) has been known as the mode of modulational instabilities of unidirectional Alfven waves [Mio et al, JPSJ, 1976; Mjolhus, JPP, 1976]. In the DNLS, the density fluctuations are assumed to be the quasi-static state, which is determined according to the ponderomotive force of envelope-modulated Alfven waves. The DNLS was extended to include the obliquely propagating, compressional component of magnetic field by Mjolhus and Wyller (JPP, 1988). The kinetically modified DNLS (KDNLS) has also been discussed by many authors [Rogister, POF, 1971; Mjolhus and Wyller, Phys. Scr, 1986; JPP, 1988; Spangler, POF B, 1989; 1990; Medvedev+Diamond, POP, 1996; Nariyuki et al, POP, 2013]. On the other hand, ion acoustic modes [Hada, 1993], large scale inhomogeneity of plasmas [Buti et al, APJ, 1999; Nariyuki, POP, 2015] and random density fluctuations [Ruderman, POP, 2002] can also affect nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves. At the present time, combined effects of these effects are not fully understood. In this presentation, we discuss two models: one of them is the model including both ion kinetic effects and ion acoustic mode and another is the model including finite thermal effects and random density fluctuations. In the former case, ion kinetic effects on both longitudinal [Nariyuki+Hada, JPSJ, 2007] and transverse modulational instabilities are discussed, while the

  6. On energetic-particle excitations of low-frequency Alfvén eigenmodes in toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2017-07-01

    It is well-known that, within the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, there exist two low-frequency Alfvén continuous spectra in toroidal plasma devices, such as tokamaks. The corresponding three accumulation frequencies are the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) frequency, the ion-sound wave (ISW) frequency, and the zero frequency accumulation point at vanishing parallel wave number, k∥ = 0. To form localized discrete eigenmodes, the plasma with a normal magnetic shear must be ideal MHD unstable. The zero-frequency branch then corresponds to the ideal MHD unstable discrete mode, while the BAE and ISW discrete eigenmode frequencies could be significantly shifted away from the respective accumulation frequencies. Energetic-particle (EP) effects can be analyzed and understood as an effective potential well via the generalized fishbone linear dispersion relation. In particular, it is demonstrated that, for an ideal MHD stable plasma, EPs could play the roles of both discretization and destabilization, and their effect is generally non-perturbative. The theoretical results further predict that EPs preferentially excite the BAE branch over the ISW branch. The zero-frequency branch, meanwhile, becomes the well-known fishbone dispersion relation, giving rise to energetic-particle modes. Extensions to the case of reversed magnetic shear as well as the kinetic effects will also be discussed.

  7. The double-resonance enhancement of stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in silver-capped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. N.; Butsen, A. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ivanova, A. K.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Levchenko, A. O.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric nano- and (sub)microparticles exhibit magnetic and electrical dipolar Mie-resonances, which makes them useful as efficient basic elements in surface-enhanced spectroscopy, non-linear light conversion and nanoscale light control. We report the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) of a nanosecond ruby laser radiation (central wavelength λ = 694.3 nm (full-width at half-maximum ≈ 0.015 cm-1), gaussian 1/e-intensity pulsewidth τ ≈ 20 ns, TEM00-mode pulse energy Emax ≈ 0.3 J) in nanodiamond (R ≈ 120 nm) hydrosols, induced via optomechanical coherent excitation of fundamental breathing eigen-modes, and the two-fold enhancement of SLFRS in Ag-decorated nanodiamonds, characterized by hybrid dipolar resonances of electrical (silver) and magnetic (diamond) nature. Hybrid metal-dielectric particles were prepared by means of nanosecond IR-laser ablation of solid silver target in diamond hydrosols with consecutive Ag-capping of diamonds, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis, photoluminescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Intensities of the SLFR-scattered components and their size-dependent spectral shifts were measured in the highly sensitive stimulated scattering regime, indicating the high (≈ 30%) SLFRS conversion efficiency and the resonant character of the scattering species.

  8. Dynamical feedback between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow as simulated by BCC_CSM1.1(m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Ren, Hong-Li

    2017-11-01

    Since the interaction between atmospheric synoptic eddy (SE) (2-8 days) activity and low-frequency (LF) (monthly) flow (referred to as SELF) plays an essential role in generating and maintaining dominant climate modes, an evaluation of the performance of BCC_CSM1.1(m) in simulating the SE feedback onto the LF flow is given in this paper. The model captures well the major spatial features of climatological eddy vorticity forcing, eddy-induced growth rate, and patterns of SELF feedback for the climate modes with large magnitudes in cold seasons and small magnitudes in warm seasons for both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. As in observations, the eddy-induced growth rate and SELF feedback patterns in the model also show positive SE feedback. Overall, the relationships between SE and LF flow show that BCC_CSM1.1(m) satisfactorily captures the basic features of positive SE feedback, which demonstrates the simulation skill of the model for LF variability. Specifically, such an evaluation can help to find model biases of BCC_CSM1.1(m) in simulating SE feedback, which will provide a reference for the model's application.

  9. Characterization the microstructure of pulsed Nd:YAG welding method in low frequencies; correlation with tensile and fracture behavior in laser-welded nitinol joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei Zoeram, Ali; Rahmani, Aida; Asghar Akbari Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2017-05-01

    The precise controllability of heat input in pulsed Nd:YAG welding method provided by two additional parameters, frequency and pulse duration, has made this method very promising for welding of alloys sensitive to heat input. The poor weldability of Ti-rich nitinol as a result of the formation of Ti2Ni IMC has deprived us of the unique properties of this alloy. In this study, to intensify solidification rate during welding of Ti-rich nitinol, pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam in low frequency was employed in addition to the employment of a copper substrate. Specific microstructure produced in this condition was characterized and the effects of this microstructure on tensile and fracture behavior of samples welded by two different procedures, full penetration and double-sided method with halved penetration depth for each side were investigated. The investigations revealed although the combination of low frequencies, the use of a high thermal conductor substrate and double-sided method eliminated intergranular fracture and increased tensile strength, the particular microstructure, built in the pulsed welding method in low frequencies, results to the formation of the longitudinal cracks during the first stages of tensile test at weld centerline. This degrades tensile strength of welded samples compared to base metal. The results showed samples welded in double-sided method performed much better than samples welded in full penetration mode.

  10. Evaluation of Freshness of Soft Tissue Samples with Optical Coherence Tomography Assisted by Low Frequency Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    A. Pena; A. Sadovoy; A. Doronin; A. Bykov; I. Meglinski

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical coherence tomography based methodology to determine freshness of soft tissue samples by evaluation of their interaction with low frequency electric field. Various biological tissues samples of different stages of freshness were exposed by low frequency electric current. The influence of the low frequency electric field on tissues was observed and quantified by the double correlation optical coherence tomography (dcOCT) approach developed in house. The quantitative evalua...

  11. Power Control of Low Frequency AC Transmission Systems Using Cycloconverters with Virtual Synchronous Generator Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Pichetjamroen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the application of a multi-terminal line-commutated converter-type low frequency AC transmission system (MTLF using a cycloconverter by applying a new power control scheme for multi-terminal operation. With the virtual synchronous generator (VSG control scheme, the transmitting power among the multi-terminal system can be accomplished without a communication link for frequency synchronization in each terminal. The details of the proposed control scheme are explained in order to understand the advantages of this method. The configuration of a two-phase low frequency AC transmission system (LFAC is adopted to examine with the proposed control scheme. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the proposed control scheme with respect to the LFAC system’s performance.

  12. Low frequency acoustic properties of bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial with magnetic oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansha Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial was proposed to overcome the influence of the mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure that can effectively isolate low frequency noise. The finite element analysis (FEA results agree well with the experimental results. It is proved that the sound transmission losses (STLs of the proposed structures are higher than those of same surface density acoustic materials. The introduction of the magnetic mass block is different from the traditional design method, in which only a passive mass block is fixed on the membrane. The magnetic force will cause tension in the membrane, increase membrane prestress, and improve overall structural stiffness. The effects of the geometry size on the STLs are discussed in detail. The kind of method presented in this paper can provide a new means for engineering noise control. Keywords: Bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial, Low frequency sound insulation, Sound transmission loss, Magnet oscillator

  13. Multichannel Recorder for Low Frequency Signals: Application of Oscilloscope as Integrated Mobile Service for a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kochlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data acquisition and processing are well known for some time. Many applications use powerful hardware to acquire, process, and visualize signal waveforms. But there are some applications that do not have to perform high resolution signal acquisition and process large amount of data, for example, low frequency applications of embedded design and applications for remote power grid monitoring. The paper describes special system for low frequency signal data sample acquisition, processing, and visualization implemented as a service on Android-based smart device. The service makes smart device functioning as an oscilloscope or arbitrary waveform generator which is accessible remotely through Bluetooth. The design respects low power consumption requirements, simplicity, and user friendliness in application design. Application scenario was implemented as wireless data acquisition system for power grid monitoring.

  14. Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bravin, Enrico; Bruce, Roderik; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hofle, Wolfgang; Gasior, Marek; Jaussi, Michael; Jacquet, Delphine; Kotzian, Gerd; Olexa, Jakub; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Stancari, Giulio; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion.

  15. Classification of the Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field Radiation Measurement from the Laptop Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodić Darko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the level of the extremely low-frequency magnetic field, which is produced by laptop computers. The magnetic field, which is characterized by extremely low frequencies up to 300 Hz is measured due to its hazardous effects to the laptop user's health. The experiment consists of testing 13 different laptop computers in normal operation conditions. The measuring of the magnetic field is performed in the adjacent neighborhood of the laptop computers. The measured data are presented and then classified. The classification is performed by the K-Medians method in order to determine the critical positions of the laptop. At the end, the measured magnetic field values are compared with the critical values suggested by different safety standards. It is shown that some of the laptop computers emit a very strong magnetic field. Hence, they must be used with extreme caution.

  16. Polaron-mediated low-frequency dielectric anomaly in reduced LiNbO3:Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, Torsten

    2017-07-01

    Measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity of reduced Ti-doped lithium niobate reveal a low-frequency dielectric relaxation as well as a strong increase in the conductivity compared to undoped samples. The low-frequency permittivity is increased by about an order of magnitude due to the relaxation. The analysis of the temperature-dependence of the relaxation frequency reveals a thermally activated behavior with an activation energy of Ea = 0.65 eV, which is in agreement with a transition between NbLi4 + small bound polarons and NbNb4 + free polarons. Both low-field ac conductivity and high-field dc conductivity indicate a Poole-Frenkel-type electron hopping mechanism between NbLi4 + sites at low temperature, turning into similar hopping between NbNb4 + at high temperatures.

  17. Low-frequency electric and magnetic fields evaluation of power lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, B.; Catania, P.J. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Brown, D. [Government of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    This article reports the outcome of a study commissioned by the Radiation Safety Unit, Government of Saskatchewan, which addressed the public concern on exposure to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) surrounding power lines. Measurements of EMF are reported for 14.4 to 230 kV power lines utilizing a model HI-3600-02 extreme low frequency (ELF) power frequency EMF survey meter. Field intensities were within the Canadian standards, with the recorded value for a 230 kV/230 kV line voltage yielding a maximum electric field of 1,790 V/m at 15 feet from the center and a maximum magnetic field intensity of 2,376 mA/m at 25 feet from the center. Continued research and analysis are required in determining the mechanism of interaction between EMFs and the human body and to determine if there exists a correlation between EMF exposure and health.

  18. An Ultra-low Frequency Modal Testing Suspension System for High Precision Air Pressure Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling YUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a resolution for air pressure control challenges in ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension systems, an incremental PID control algorithm with dead band is applied to achieve high-precision pressure control. We also develop a set of independent hardware and software systems for high-precision pressure control solutions. Taking control system versatility, scalability, reliability, and other aspects into considerations, a two-level communication employing Ethernet and CAN bus, is adopted to complete such tasks as data exchange between the IPC, the main board and the control board ,and the pressure control. Furthermore, we build a single set of ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension system and complete pressure control experiments, which achieve the desired results and thus confirm that the high-precision pressure control subsystem is reasonable and reliable.

  19. The origin of low-frequency negative transconductance dispersion in a pseudomorphic HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, V. R.; Kumar, Vikram; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of low-frequency transconductance dispersion at different temperatures and conductance deep level transient spectroscopic (CDLTS) studies of an AlGaAs/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (p-HEMT) were carried out. The experimental results show the presence of defect states at the AlGaAs/InGaAs hetero-interface. A mobility degradation model was developed to explain the low-frequency negative transconductance dispersion as well as the apparent 'hole' like peaks observed in the CDLTS spectra. This model incorporates a time-dependent change in the two-dimensional electron gas mobility due to ionized impurity scattering by the remaining charge states at the adjoining AlGaAs/InGaAs hetero-interface.

  20. Synchronization of low-frequency oscillations in the cardiovascular system: Application to medical diagnostics and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, V. I.; Prokhorov, M. D.; Karavaev, A. S.; Kiselev, A. R.; Gridnev, V. I.; Bezruchko, B. P.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations of heart rate and blood pressure having in humans a basic frequency close to 0.1 Hz. A quantitative estimation of this synchronization based on calculation of relative time of phase synchronization of oscillations is proposed. We show that assessment of synchronization between the considered oscillations can be useful for selecting an optimal dose of beta-blocker treatment in patients after acute myocardial infarction. It is found out that low value of synchronization between the low-frequency rhythms in heart rate and blood pressure at the first week after acute myocardial infarction is a sensitive marker of high risk of mortality during the subsequent 5 years.

  1. Infrasound and low frequency noise from wind turbines: exposure and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Karl; Bluhm, Gösta; Eriksson, Gabriella; Nilsson, Mats E.

    2011-07-01

    Wind turbines emit low frequency noise (LFN) and large turbines generally generate more LFN than small turbines. The dominant source of LFN is the interaction between incoming turbulence and the blades. Measurements suggest that indoor levels of LFN in dwellings typically are within recommended guideline values, provided that the outdoor level does not exceed corresponding guidelines for facade exposure. Three cross-sectional questionnaire studies show that annoyance from wind turbine noise is related to the immission level, but several explanations other than low frequency noise are probable. A statistically significant association between noise levels and self-reported sleep disturbance was found in two of the three studies. It has been suggested that LFN from wind turbines causes other, and more serious, health problems, but empirical support for these claims is lacking.

  2. Infrasound and low frequency noise from wind turbines: exposure and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, Karl [Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan (Sweden); Bluhm, Goesta; Nilsson, Mats E [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Eriksson, Gabriella, E-mail: kbolin@kth.se [Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute and Linkoeping University (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Wind turbines emit low frequency noise (LFN) and large turbines generally generate more LFN than small turbines. The dominant source of LFN is the interaction between incoming turbulence and the blades. Measurements suggest that indoor levels of LFN in dwellings typically are within recommended guideline values, provided that the outdoor level does not exceed corresponding guidelines for facade exposure. Three cross-sectional questionnaire studies show that annoyance from wind turbine noise is related to the immission level, but several explanations other than low frequency noise are probable. A statistically significant association between noise levels and self-reported sleep disturbance was found in two of the three studies. It has been suggested that LFN from wind turbines causes other, and more serious, health problems, but empirical support for these claims is lacking.

  3. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    loudspeakers well positioned at the end of the room a virtual array is formed propagating plane waves along the length of the room in one direction. This will correct the sound field distribution in the room. When plane wave arrives to the end wall two more loudspeakers have to be placed connected......Early investigations on low frequency sound reproduction in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) have shown good results on simulations and measurements in real rooms. CABS takes the advantage of having a rectangular room with parallel walls. By using two low frequency...... with the same signal in counter phase and with a delay corresponding to approximately the length of the room. This is to cancel the reflection and maintain the plane wave propagating along the room. Real life rooms are not necessary rectangular and can be of different shapes. In this paper simulations...

  4. Geometrical dependence of the low-frequency noise in superconducting flux qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, T.; Berkley, A. J.; Bumble, B.; Bunyk, P.; Fung, A.; Johansson, J.; Kaul, A.; Kleinsasser, A.; Ladizinsky, E.; Maibaum, F.; Harris, R.; Johnson, M. W.; Tolkacheva, E.; Amin, M. H. S.

    2009-02-01

    A general method for directly measuring the low-frequency flux noise (below 10 Hz) in compound Josephson-junction superconducting flux qubits has been used to study a series of 85 devices of varying design. The variation in flux noise across sets of qubits with identical designs was observed to be small. However, the levels of flux noise systematically varied between qubit designs with strong dependence upon qubit wiring length and wiring width. Furthermore, qubits fabricated above a superconducting ground plane yielded lower noise than qubits without such a layer. These results support the hypothesis that local impurities in the vicinity of the qubit wiring are a key source of low-frequency flux noise in superconducting devices.

  5. Low-Frequency Volatility in China’s Gold Futures Market and Its Macroeconomic Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We extract low- and high-frequency volatility from China’s Shanghai gold futures market using an asymmetric Spline-GARCH (ASP-GARCH model. We then regress monthly low-frequency volatility on selected monthly macroeconomic indicators to study the impact of macroeconomy on gold futures market and to test for excess volatility. Our main result is volatility in China’s Shanghai gold futures market resulting from both macroeconomic fluctuations and investor behaviour. Chinese Consumer Price Index Volatility and US dollar volatility are the two main determinants of low-frequency gold volatility. We also find significant evidence of excess volatility, which can in part be explained in terms of loss-aversive investor behaviour.

  6. Low frequency noise characterization in n-channel FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmat, R.; Achour, H.; Cretu, B.; Routoure, J.-M.; Benfdila, A.; Carin, R.; Collaert, N.; Mercha, A.; Simoen, E.; Claeys, C.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the low frequency noise was studied from 100 K up to room temperature in n-channel triple-gate FinFET transistors fabricated on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates. It was found that the noise spectra contain 1/f and Lorentzian components, which can be analyzed using the standpoint of the number fluctuation by generation-recombination of carriers due to traps that can be located either at the gate oxide/Si film interface or in the silicon depletion film. The variations of the low frequency noise versus temperature allow to evaluate the quality of the gate oxide interface, to identify traps in the silicon film and to make a correlation between the observed traps and some technological steps. Moreover, some additional process steps used to boost the device performances seem to increase the trap densities in the film with no significant impact at the gate oxide/Si film interface.

  7. Low-Frequency Ultrasound Debridement in Chronic Wound Healing: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Ju Ruby; Perry, Julie; Cross, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Chronic wounds are painful and debilitating to patients, pose a clinical challenge to physicians, and impose financial burden on the health-care system. New treatment options are therefore highly sought after. Ultrasound debridement is a promising technology that functions to disperse bacterial biofilms and stimulate wound healing. In this review, we focus on low-frequency ultrasound (20-60 kHz) and summarize the findings of 25 recent studies examining ultrasound efficacy. Ultrasound debridement appears to be most effective when used 3 times a week and has the potential to decrease exudate and slough, decrease patient pain, disperse biofilms, and increase healing in wounds of various etiology. Although current studies are generally of smaller size, the results are promising and we recommend the testing of low-frequency ultrasound therapy in clinical practice on a larger scale.

  8. Experimental investigation on low-frequency vibration assisted micro-WEDM of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Rajendra Unune

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The micro-wire electric discharge machining (micro-WEDM has emerged as the popular micromachining processes for fabrication of micro-features. However, the low machining rate and poor surface finish are restricting wide applications of this process. Therefore, in this study, an attempt was made to improve machining rate of micro-WEDM with low-frequency workpiece vibration assistance. The gap voltage, capacitance, feed rate and vibrational frequency were chosen as control factors, whereas, the material removal rate (MRR and kerf width were selected as performance measures while fabricating microchannels in Inconel 718. It was observed that in micro-WEDM, the capacitance is the most significant factor affecting both MRR and kerf width. It was witnessed that the low-frequency workpiece vibration improves the performance of micro-WEDM by improving the MRR due to enhanced flushing conditions and reduced electrode-workpiece adhesion.

  9. Investigation of low-frequency chatter during machining with ball end mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtehin O.O.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the investigations of low-frequency oscillations of technological system during machining with ball-end mill of inclined surface were made. An influence of non-linear components of cutting process on change of dynamic state of the system was analyzed. An influence of low-frequency chatter at the beginning of the cutting process on technological system transition to steady state of oscillations with frequencies close to the natural frequency was shown. Explanation of mechanics of transition process from one state to another was proposed. Multiple-factor experiments that included inclined surface machining with different values of spindle speed, allowance, direction of feed motion (upward and downward, cutting patterns (conventional and climb were carried out. Analysis of experimental research showed that downward conventional machining process loses dynamic stability with cutting conditions, for which upward climb machining stays dynamic stable.

  10. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q-G; Zhou, X-Z; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y-X; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Blake, J B; Wygant, J R

    2015-12-22

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  11. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons by unusual low-frequency hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Lunjin; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Bernard Blake, J.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Claudepierre, Seth G.

    2014-03-01

    We quantify the resonant scattering effects of the unusual low-frequency dawnside plasmaspheric hiss observed on 30 September 2012 by the Van Allen Probes. In contrast to normal (~100-2000 Hz) hiss emissions, this unusual hiss event contained most of its wave power at ~20-200 Hz. Compared to the scattering by normal hiss, the unusual hiss scattering speeds up the loss of ~50-200 keV electrons and produces more pronounced pancake distributions of ~50-100 keV electrons. It is demonstrated that such unusual low-frequency hiss, even with a duration of a couple of hours, plays a particularly important role in the decay and loss process of energetic electrons, resulting in shorter electron lifetimes for ~50-400 keV electrons than normal hiss, and should be carefully incorporated into global modeling of radiation belt electron dynamics during periods of intense injections.

  12. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10-5 - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  13. MD1271: Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Hofle, Wolfgang; Hostettler, Michi; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Cai, Xu; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion. This MD conducted on 24.08.2016 follows a previous MD on 05.11.2015/06.11.2015

  14. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  15. Time based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2007-01-01

      Improving sound from loudspeakers in a room is a big issue. We are facing a rather complicated and serious problem, as one can experience very big variations in sound pressure level - up to 30 dB - in a room, especially at low frequencies. An innovative way of looking at the problem in the time......-domain by the construction of a finite-difference time-domain approximation program (FDTD) has lead to a novel and simple solution also working in the time-domain called Controlled Acoustically Bass System (CABS). Working in the time-domain CABS includes additional cancelling loudspeakers at the back wall in order to remove...... the back wall reflection. The system has first been simulated with surprisingly good results and later implemented maintaining good performance. CABS is able to give a homogeneous sound pressure level in the whole room at low frequencies. A DSP system consisting of both hardware and software has been made...

  16. Applications of a plane wave based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    When low frequency sound is radiated inside small listening spaces by loudspeakers, large uniformities occur over the sound field. This is due to the multiple reflection and diffraction of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A developed system named Controlled Acoustically Bass...... System (CABS) produces uniform sound field at low frequencies. This is performed by utilizing loudspeakers at the front wall and extra loudspeakers at the opposite wall, processed to remove the rear-wall reflection of a rectangular room. Effectiveness of CABS on different room scenarios has been...... evaluated by using a computer simulation program based on the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). CABS has been simulated in a small car cabin and in an irregular room. Non-ideal placement of loudspeakers in CABS have been evaluated. The influence of utilizing CABS with different types...

  17. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia; Storlazzi, Curt; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04–0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004–0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  18. Interannual and low-frequency variability of Upper Indus Basin winter/spring precipitation in observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Arthur M.; Robertson, Andrew W.

    2017-12-01

    An assessment is made of the ability of general circulation models in the CMIP5 ensemble to reproduce observed modes of low-frequency winter/spring precipitation variability in the region of the Upper Indus basin (UIB) in south-central Asia. This season accounts for about two thirds of annual precipitation totals in the UIB and is characterized by "western disturbances" propagating along the eastward extension of the Mediterranean storm track. Observational data are utilized for for spatiotemporal characterization of the precipitation seasonal cycle, to compute seasonalized spectra and finally, to examine teleconnections, in terms of large-scale patterns in sea-surface temperature (SST) and atmospheric circulation. Annual and lowpassed variations are found to be associated primarily with SST modes in the tropical and extratropical Pacific. A more obscure link to North Atlantic SST, possibly related to the North Atlantic Oscillation, is also noted. An ensemble of 31 CMIP5 models is then similarly assessed, using unforced preindustrial multi-century control runs. Of these models, eight are found to reproduce well the two leading modes of the observed seasonal cycle. This model subset is then assessed in the spectral domain and with respect to teleconnection patterns, where a range of behaviors is noted. Two model families each account for three members of this subset. The degree of within-family similarity in behavior is shown to reflect underlying model differences. The results provide estimates of unforced regional hydroclimate variability over the UIB on interannual and decadal scales and the corresponding far-field influences, and are of potential relevance for the estimation of uncertainties in future water availability.

  19. Low-frequency surface waves on semi-bounded magnetized quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The propagation of low-frequency electrostatic surface waves on the interface between a vacuum and an electron-ion quantum plasma is studied in the direction perpendicular to an external static magnetic field which is parallel to the interface. A new dispersion equation is derived by employing both the quantum magnetohydrodynamic and Poisson equations. It is shown that the dispersion equations for forward and backward-going surface waves are different from each other.

  20. A Proposal on Low Frequency AC Transmission as a Multi-Terminal Transmission System

    OpenAIRE

    Achara Pichetjamroen; Toshifumi Ise

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the discussion and comparison of characteristics and behavior of three low frequency ac (LFAC) transmission system configurations operating under the same control scheme and conditions to identify the most promising operation system for LFAC. Merits of LFAC over high voltage direct current (HVDC) are mentioned first. By changing power flow direction without auxiliary switches in multi-terminal application and easiness of short circuit protection are explained. The thr...

  1. Power Control of Low Frequency AC Transmission Systems Using Cycloconverters with Virtual Synchronous Generator Control

    OpenAIRE

    Achara Pichetjamroen; Toshifumi Ise

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the application of a multi-terminal line-commutated converter-type low frequency AC transmission system (MTLF) using a cycloconverter by applying a new power control scheme for multi-terminal operation. With the virtual synchronous generator (VSG) control scheme, the transmitting power among the multi-terminal system can be accomplished without a communication link for frequency synchronization in each terminal. The details of the proposed control scheme are explained...

  2. Modelling of tuning of an ultra low frequency Roberts Linkage vibration isolator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jcdumas@physics.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ju Li; Blair, David G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2010-08-09

    We present an analytical model for a Roberts Linkage used as an ultra low frequency vibration isolator. The Roberts Linkage is a structure that simulates a very long radius conical pendulum, at a relatively small height. We show through an analytical solution that it is possible to independently tune the centre of percussion and the resonant frequency for arbitrary geometrical configurations. The result is shown to provide a practical tuning solution, which achieves near ideal vibration isolation.

  3. Modelling of tuning of an ultra low frequency Roberts Linkage vibration isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jean-Charles; Ju, Li; Blair, David G.

    2010-08-01

    We present an analytical model for a Roberts Linkage used as an ultra low frequency vibration isolator. The Roberts Linkage is a structure that simulates a very long radius conical pendulum, at a relatively small height. We show through an analytical solution that it is possible to independently tune the centre of percussion and the resonant frequency for arbitrary geometrical configurations. The result is shown to provide a practical tuning solution, which achieves near ideal vibration isolation.

  4. Parametric Modeling of Nerve Cell under the Sinusoidal Environmental 50 Hz Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Homayoun Ebrahimian; Seyied Mohammad Firoozabadi; Mahyar Janahmadi; Mehri Kaviani Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objectives: The development of technology has naturally given rise to an increase in environmental low-frequency electromagnetic fields and consequently has attracted scholars' attention. Most of the studies have focused on transmission lines and power system distribution with 50 Hz. This research is an attempt to show the effect of 50 Hz magnetic fields on bioelectric parameters and indicates the possible influence of this change in F1 cells of Helix aspersa .   Methods: The pre...

  5. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50?Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3?mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal meta...

  6. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshie Nakajima; Naofumi Tanaka; Tatsuya Mima; Shin-Ichi Izumi

    2016-01-01

    Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplifi...

  7. Topology Optimization of Distributed Mass Dampers for Low-frequency Vibration Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the method of topology optimization is used to find optimized parameter distributions for a multiple mass damper system with the purpose of minimizing the low-frequency steady-state response of a carrier structure. An effective density model that describes the steady-state effect...... of the dampers is derived based on a continuous approximation of the damper distribution. The dampers are optimized with respect to the point-wise distribution of mass ratio, natural frequency, and damping ratio....

  8. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, Alec N.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence t...

  9. Natural and man-made low-frequency magnetic fields as a potential health hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyna, N G; Tyasto, Marta I [St. Petersburg Branch of the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences (SPbF IZMIRAN) (Russian Federation); Villoresi, G [Dipartamento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Institut di Fisica Spacio Interplanetario, Consiglio Nazionall delle Ricerche (IFSI/CNR), Universita' degli Studi ' Roma Tre' , Rome (Italy); Dorman, L I [Institute of Earth Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Iucci, N [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Universita degli Studi ' Roma Tre' , Rome (Italy)

    1998-07-31

    Is human health affected by low-frequency low-intensity environmental magnetic fields? There is much diehard evidence that it is. For this reason irregular, spectrally complex ULF (0-10 Hz) magnetic fields have recently come under scrutiny, typical of natural geomagnetic perturbations or electric transportation. Recent work shows that such fields do affect the nervous system and may even cause heart attacks. (reviews of topical problems)

  10. Low-frequency noise used as a lifetime test of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursutiu, Doru; Jones, Brian K.

    1996-08-01

    Low-frequency noise (1/f noise) has been measured in light emitting diodes (LEDs) which have been subjected to an accelerated life test by means of large forward bias current pulses. Over a large range of stress pulses the electrical and functional LED properties remain unaltered but an increase in the 1/f noise level was seen and this was correlated with the device reliability. The product `initial noise X initial rate of noise increase' correlated best with the LED lifetime.

  11. Low-frequency dielectric dispersion of brain tissue due to electrically long neurites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monai, Hiromu; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Aonishi, Toru

    2012-12-01

    The dielectric properties of brain tissue are important for understanding how neural activity is related to local field potentials and electroencephalograms. It is known that the permittivity of brain tissue exhibits strong frequency dependence (dispersion) and that the permittivity is very large in the low-frequency region. However, little is known with regard to the cause of the large permittivity in the low-frequency region. Here, we postulate that the dielectric properties of brain tissue can be partially accounted for by assuming that neurites are of sufficient length to be “electrically long.” To test this idea, we consider a model in which a neurite is treated as a long, narrow body, and it is subjected to a stimulus created by electrodes situated in the region external to it. With regard to this electric stimulus, the neurite can be treated as a passive cable. Assuming adequate symmetry so that the tissue packed with multiple cables is equivalent to an isolated system consisting of a single cable and a surrounding extracellular resistive medium, we analytically calculate the extracellular potential of the tissue in response to such an externally created alternating-current electric field using a Green's function that we obtained previously. Our results show that brain tissue modeled by such a cable existing within a purely resistive extracellular medium exhibits a large effective permittivity in the low-frequency region. Moreover, we obtain results suggesting that an extremely large low-frequency permittivity can coexist with weak low-pass filter characteristics in brain tissue.

  12. Low-frequency sheath instability in a non-Maxwellian plasma with energetic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubtsev, Mikhail; Kamal-Al-Hassan, Md; Ito, Hiroaki; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    2004-01-30

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations have been observed in the circuit of a positively biased electrode when the ambient nonuniform plasma is irradiated by a microwave pulse of short duration, which is approximately equal to the ion-plasma period. The instability with its characteristic frequency below the ion-plasma frequency is driven by an accelerated ion component interacting with the sheath of the electrode. A qualitative model of the instability is suggested.

  13. LISA and LISA PathFinder, the endeavour to detect low frequency GWs

    OpenAIRE

    Ara?jo, H; Boatella, C; Chmeissani, M; Conchillo, A; Garc?a-Berro, E; Grimani, C; Hajdas, W; Lobo, A; Mart?nez, L; Nofrarias, M; Ortega, JA; Puigdengoles, C; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanju?n, J; Wass, P

    2007-01-01

    This is a review about LISA and its technology demonstrator, LISA PathFinder. We first describe the conceptual problems which need to be overcome in order to set up a working interferometric detector of low frequency Gravitational Waves (GW), then summarise the solutions to them as currently conceived by the LISA mission team. This will show that some of these solutions require new technological abilities which are still under development, and which need proper test before being fully impleme...

  14. Gender & High Frequency vs. Low Frequency tasks in a context of Joint-Liability Incentives.

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne Bernatzky; José María Cabrera; Alejandro Cid

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of high and low frequency incentives in a joint-liability framework on six academic outcomes of undergraduate students using a randomized field experiment. As recently documented in health literature, incentives to exercise are effective in developing healthy habits. Therefore, we design groups of three students and provide a premium to the homework’s grade if all the members of the group (three) meet some requirements. We investigate how the frequency of these take home t...

  15. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast a...

  16. Study of the low-frequency Raman scattering in NaNbO sub 3 crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bouziane, E; Ayadi, M

    2003-01-01

    The Raman scattering spectrum of the sodium niobate crystal, in both P and R phases, has been investigated from room temperature up to 440 sup d eg C. The dependence of the low-frequency (LF) spectrum clearly reveals, for the first time, over a wide temperature range, the presence of a strong quasi-elastic scattering below a LF zone centre phonon. The phase transition mechanism is discussed, considering an order-disorder process induced by the relaxation of the Nb ions.

  17. Effects of electromagnetic fields of low frequency and low intensity on rat metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardi, Gabriele; De Ninno, Antonella; Prosdocimi, Marco; Ferrari, Vanni; Barbaro, Filippo; Mazzariol, Sandro; Bernardini, Daniele; Talpo, Getullio

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments on rats have been performed, to study the effects of long time (50 days) exposure to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency (ELF, i.e. less than 100 Hz) and amplitude (non thermal), testing whether the metabolic processes would be affected. The background lies on recent observations on the behaviour of isolated enzymes in vitro exposed to EFL fields. In these experiments, the cyclotron (or Larmor) frequency of the metallic ion has been used to "stimulate" th...

  18. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (ELF-EMF) and childhood leukemia near transmission lines: a review

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Kokate; A. K. Mishra; S. K. Lokhande; G. L. Bodhe

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of most cited studies from developed countries those shed light on the potential relation between childhood leukemia and extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF). All the findings of articles critically segregated as per some neglected parameters like number of samples, exposure duration, frequency range, distance from the radiation sources, and location during measurement of magnetic field density near power lines. Literature of major ...

  19. ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program: Summary of 1987 Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Clasification ) Extrerely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System--Ecological Monitoring Program: Summary of 1907 Progress 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...between-site comparisons. Estimates of changes that are detectable range from 15 to 28 percent in density or mass of adults . Although researchers did not...lIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 28 IITRI E06595-3 1 ICocoon weights are closely related to adult body mass and generally can be used as indicators-of the

  20. Cancer risk assessment of extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields: a critical review of methodology.

    OpenAIRE

    McCann, J.

    1998-01-01

    This review provides a discussion of cancer risk assessment methodology pertinent to developing a strategy for extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF). Approaches taken for chemical agents or ionizing radiation in six key topic areas are briefly reviewed, and then those areas are examined from the perspective of EMF, identifying issues to be addressed in developing a risk assessment strategy. The following recommendations are offered: 1) risk assessment should be viewed as ...

  1. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and brain cancer in adults and children: review and comment.

    OpenAIRE

    Gurney, J G; van Wijngaarden, E

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental research on the potential carcinogenic effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has now been conducted for over two decades. Cancer epidemiology studies in relation to EMF have focused primarily on brain cancer and leukemia, both from residential sources of exposure in children and adults and from occupational exposure in adult men. Because genotoxic effects of EMF have not been shown, most recent laboratory research has attempted to show ...

  2. A New Gate Drive Circuit for MOSFETs Switching at Low Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Narayana SR; Iyengar, BSR; Mohan, Ananda PV

    1991-01-01

    A new gate drive circuit, with ferrite core transformer isolation, for power MOSFETs switching at low frequency in the macro Hertz range has been presented . The technique involves periodic refreshing of charge on the effective gate source capacitance of the MOSFET in order to ensure low ON-state resistance,,$R_{DS}$ (ON ), by maintaining its gate source voltage above the threshold level.The simulation of the drive circuit using circuit analysis program PSPICE is described with results ...

  3. [Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Long-yu; Song, Chun-xiao; Yu, Duo; Liu, Xiao-liang; Guo, Jian-qiu; Wang, Chuan; Ding, Yuan-wei; Zhou, Hong-xia; Ma, Shu-mei; Liu, Xiao-dong; Liu, Xin

    2012-03-01

    To observe the exposure levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in workplaces and to analyze the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of occupationally exposed people. Intensity of electromagnetic fields in two workplaces (control and exposure groups) was detected with EFA-300 frequency electromagnetic field strength tester, and intensity of the noise was detected with AWA5610D integral sound level. The information of health physical indicators of 188 controls and 642 occupationally exposed workers was collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS17.0 statistic software. The intensity of electric fields and the magnetic fields in exposure groups was significantly higher than that in control group (P 0.05). The results of physical examination showed that the abnormal rates of HCY, ALT, AST, GGT, ECG in the exposure group were significantly higher than those in control group (P 0.05). Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation may have some effects on the cardiovascular system of workers.

  4. Low-frequency interaural cross correlation discrimination in stereophonic reproduction of musical tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungyoung; Martens, William L.

    2005-04-01

    By industry standard (ITU-R. Recommendation BS.775-1), multichannel stereophonic signals within the frequency range of up to 80 or 120 Hz may be mixed and delivered via a single driver (e.g., a subwoofer) without significant impairment of stereophonic sound quality. The assumption that stereophonic information within such low-frequency content is not significant was tested by measuring discrimination thresholds for changes in interaural cross-correlation (IACC) within spectral bands containing the lowest frequency components of low-pitch musical tones. Performances were recorded for three different musical instruments playing single notes ranging in fundamental frequency from 41 Hz to 110 Hz. The recordings, made using a multichannel microphone array composed of five DPA 4006 pressure microphones, were processed to produce a set of stimuli that varied in interaural cross-correlation (IACC) within a low-frequency band, but were otherwise identical in a higher-frequency band. This correlation processing was designed to have minimal effect upon other psychoacoustic variables such as loudness and timbre. The results show that changes in interaural cross correlation (IACC) within low-frequency bands of low-pitch musical tones are most easily discriminated when decorrelated signals are presented via subwoofers positioned at extreme lateral angles (far from the median plane). [Work supported by VRQ.

  5. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce spermatogenic germ cell apoptosis: possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kon; Park, Sungman; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2014-01-01

    The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010) for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz), overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  6. Inverted pendulum as low-frequency pre-isolation for advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamori, A. [University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Raffai, P. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest 1117 (Hungary)], E-mail: praffai@bolyai.elte.hu; Marka, S. [Columbia University in the City of New York, New York, NY 10027 (United States); DeSalvo, R.; Sannibale, V.; Tariq, H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bertolini, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg 22607 (Germany); Cella, G. [Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Viboud, N. [Institut National des Sciences Apliquee at Lyon, Lyon (France); Numata, K. [University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takahashi, R.; Fukushima, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2007-11-21

    We have developed advanced seismic attenuation systems for Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors. The design consists of an Inverted Pendulum (IP) holding stages of Geometrical Anti-Spring Filters (GASF) and pendula, which isolate the test mass suspension from ground noise. The ultra-low-frequency IP suppresses the horizontal seismic noise, while the GASF suppresses the vertical ground vibrations. The three legs of the IP are supported by cylindrical maraging steel flexural joints. The IP can be tuned to very low frequencies by carefully adjusting its load. As a best result, we have achieved an ultra low, {approx}12 mHz pendulum frequency for the system prototype made for Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory). The measured quality factor, Q, of this IP, ranging from Q{approx}2500 (at 0.45 Hz) to Q{approx}2 (at 12 mHz), is compatible with structural damping, and is proportional to the square of the pendulum frequency. Tunable counterweights allow for precise center-of-percussion tuning to achieve the required attenuation up to the first leg internal resonance ({approx}60 Hz for advanced LIGO prototype). All measurements are in good agreement with our analytical models. We therefore expect good attenuation in the low-frequency region, from {approx}0.1to {approx}50 Hz, covering the micro-seismic peak. The extremely soft IP requires minimal control force, which simplifies any needed actuation.

  7. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  8. A forward model and conjugate gradient inversion technique for low-frequency ultrasonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Koen W A; Wright, William M D

    2006-10-01

    Emerging methods of hyperthermia cancer treatment require noninvasive temperature monitoring, and ultrasonic techniques show promise in this regard. Various tomographic algorithms are available that reconstruct sound speed or contrast profiles, which can be related to temperature distribution. The requirement of a high enough frequency for adequate spatial resolution and a low enough frequency for adequate tissue penetration is a difficult compromise. In this study, the feasibility of using low frequency ultrasound for imaging and temperature monitoring was investigated. The transient probing wave field had a bandwidth spanning the frequency range 2.5-320.5 kHz. The results from a forward model which computed the propagation and scattering of low-frequency acoustic pressure and velocity wave fields were used to compare three imaging methods formulated within the Born approximation, representing two main types of reconstruction. The first uses Fourier techniques to reconstruct sound-speed profiles from projection or Radon data based on optical ray theory, seen as an asymptotical limit for comparison. The second uses backpropagation and conjugate gradient inversion methods based on acoustical wave theory. The results show that the accuracy in localization was 2.5 mm or better when using low frequencies and the conjugate gradient inversion scheme, which could be used for temperature monitoring.

  9. Skin permeability enhancement by low frequency sonophoresis: lipid extraction and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Román, R; Merino, G; Kalia, Y N; Naik, A; Guy, R H

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study was to shed light on the mechanism(s) by which low-frequency ultrasound (20 KHz) enhances the permeability of the skin. The physical effects on the barrier and the transport pathway, in particular, were examined. The amount of lipid removed from the intercellular domains of the stratum corneum following sonophoresis was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Transport of the fluorescent probes nile red and calcein, under the influence of ultrasound, was evaluated by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The results were compared with the appropriate passive control data and with data obtained from experiments in which the skin was exposed simply to the thermal effects induced by ultrasound treatment. A significant fraction ( approximately 30%) of the intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum, which are principally responsible for skin barrier function, were removed during the application of low-frequency sonophoresis. Although the confocal images from the nile red experiments were not particularly informative, ultrasound clearly and significantly (again, relative to the corresponding controls) facilitated transport of the hydrophilic calcein via discrete permeabilized regions, whereas other areas of the barrier were apparently unaffected. Lipid removal from the stratum corneum is implicated as a factor contributing the observed permeation enhancement effects of low-frequency ultrasound. However, microscopic observations imply that sonophoresis induces localized (aqueous?) permeation pathways at discrete sites. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Estimation of frequency-dependent electrokinetic forces on tin oxide nanobelts in low frequency electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surajit; Hesketh, Peter J

    2010-08-13

    A novel experimental approach is used for studying the response of ethanol-suspended SnO(2) nanobelts under the influence of low frequency ac electric fields. The electrically generated forces are estimated by analyzing the angular motion of the nanobelt, induced by repulsive forces originating predominantly from negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) on planar microelectrodes. The nanobelt motion is experimentally recorded in real time in the low frequency range (drag for long nano-objects is developed and used to deduce estimates of the frequency-dependent DEP force and torque magnitudes from the angular velocity data. Additional experiments, performed in a parallel plate electrode configuration in a fluidic channel to investigate the effect of dc and very low frequency ac (approximately Hz) electric fields, indicate the presence of electrophoresis in the ethanol-suspended SnO(2) nanobelts. The experimentally observed nanobelt motion is analyzed using the equation of motion, and an order-of-magnitude estimate of the nanobelt surface charge density is obtained.

  11. Hybrid acoustic metamaterial as super absorber for broadband low-frequency sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yufan; Ren, Shuwei; Meng, Han; Xin, Fengxian; Huang, Lixi; Chen, Tianning; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lu, Tian Jain

    2017-02-27

    A hybrid acoustic metamaterial is proposed as a new class of sound absorber, which exhibits superior broadband low-frequency sound absorption as well as excellent mechanical stiffness/strength. Based on the honeycomb-corrugation hybrid core (H-C hybrid core), we introduce perforations on both top facesheet and corrugation, forming perforated honeycomb-corrugation hybrid (PHCH) to gain super broadband low-frequency sound absorption. Applying the theory of micro-perforated panel (MPP), we establish a theoretical method to calculate the sound absorption coefficient of this new kind of metamaterial. Perfect sound absorption is found at just a few hundreds hertz with two-octave 0.5 absorption bandwidth. To verify this model, a finite element model is developed to calculate the absorption coefficient and analyze the viscous-thermal energy dissipation. It is found that viscous energy dissipation at perforation regions dominates the total energy consumed. This new kind of acoustic metamaterials show promising engineering applications, which can serve as multiple functional materials with extraordinary low-frequency sound absorption, excellent stiffness/strength and impact energy absorption.

  12. Plate-type metamaterials for extremely broadband low-frequency sound insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Guo, Xinwei; Chen, Tianning; Yao, Ge

    2018-01-01

    A novel plate-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL) in the low-frequency range ( ≤1000 Hz) is designed, theoretically proven and then experimentally verified. The thin plates with large modulus used in this paper mean that we do not need to apply tension to the plates, which is more applicable to practical engineering, the achievement of noise reduction is better and the installation of plates is more user-friendly than that of the membranes. The effects of different structural parameters of the plates on the sound-proofed performance at low-frequencies were also investigated by experiment and finite element method (FEM). The results showed that the STL can be modulated effectively and predictably using vibration theory by changing the structural parameters, such as the radius and thickness of the plate. Furthermore, using unit cells of different geometric sizes which are responsible for different frequency regions, the stacked panels with thickness ≤16 mm and weight ≤5 kg/m2 showed high STL below 2000 Hz. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  13. Low frequency noise elimination technique for 24-bit Σ-Δ data acquisition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Robert, Olivier; Lognonné, Philippe; Zhou, Ze-Bing; Yang, Shan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is one of the key limiting factors of high precision measurement instruments. In this paper, digital correlated double sampling is implemented to reduce the offset and low frequency 1/f noise of a data acquisition system with 24-bit sigma delta (Σ-Δ) analog to digital converter (ADC). The input voltage is modulated by cross-coupled switches, which are synchronized to the sampling clock, and converted into digital signal by ADC. By using a proper switch frequency, the unwanted parasitic signal frequencies generated by the switches are avoided. The noise elimination processing is made through the principle of digital correlated double sampling, which is equivalent to a time shifted subtraction for the sampled voltage. The low frequency 1/f noise spectrum density of the data acquisition system is reduced to be flat down to the measurement frequency lower limit, which is about 0.0001 Hz in this paper. The noise spectrum density is eliminated by more than 60 dB at 0.0001 Hz, with a residual noise floor of (9 ± 2) nV/Hz(1/2) which is limited by the intrinsic white noise floor of the ADC above its corner frequency.

  14. Enhanced electroporation in plant tissues via low frequency pulsed electric fields: influence of cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M; Jernstedt, Judith A; Ristenpart, William D

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are known to be effective at permeabilizing plant tissues. Prior research has demonstrated that lower pulse frequencies induce higher rates of permeabilization, but the underlying reason for this response is unclear. Intriguingly, recent microscopic observations with onion tissues have also revealed a correlation between PEF frequency and the subsequent speed of intracellular convective motion, i.e., cytoplasmic streaming. In this paper, we investigate the effect of cytoplasmic streaming on the efficacy of plant tissue permeabilization via PEF. Onion tissue samples were treated with Cytochalasin B, a known inhibitor of cytoplasmic streaming, and changes in cellular integrity and viability were measured over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths. We find that at low frequencies (f streaming results in a 19% decrease in the conductivity disintegration index compared with control samples. Qualitatively, similar results were observed using a microscopic cell viability assay. The results suggest that at low frequencies convection plays a statistically significant role in distributing more conductive fluid throughout the tissue, making subsequent pulses more efficacious. The key practical implication is that PEF pretreatment at low frequency can increase the rate of tissue permeabilization in dehydration or extraction processes, and that the treatment will be most effective when cytoplasmic streaming is most active, i.e., with freshly prepared plant tissues. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  15. Adaptation of the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex in cats during low-frequency vertical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Motoyoshi; Shojaku, Hideo

    2017-04-27

    We examined plastic changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during low-frequency vertical head rotation, a condition under which otolith inputs from the vestibular system are essential for VOR generation. For adaptive conditioning of the vertical VOR, 0.02Hz sinusoidal pitch rotation for one hour about the earth's horizontal axis was synchronized with out-of-phase vertical visual stimulation from a random dot pattern. A vertical VOR was well evoked when the upright animal rotated around the earth-horizontal axis (EHA) at low frequency due to the changing gravity stimulus and dynamic stimulation of the otoliths. After adaptive conditioning, the amplitude of the vertical VOR increased by an average of 32.1%. Our observations showing plasticity in the otolithic contribution to the VOR may provide a new strategy for visual-vestibular mismatch training in patients with otolithic disorders. This low-frequency vertical head rotation protocol also provides a model for investigating the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of VORs mediated by otolith activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological and clinical effects of low-frequency magnetic and electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llaurado, J.G.; Sances, A. Jr.; Battocletti, J. (eds.)

    1974-01-01

    The blurb on this book states that it has been written for physicians, biologists, psychologists, engineers and those persons interested in the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields upon animals and man. Certainly, the content of this book--which comprises papers presented by specialists at a symposium on The Effects of Low Frequency Magnetic Fields on Biological Communication Processes held in Aspen, Colorado--does not make simple reading and those lacking the necessary background are unlikely to make much progress. This said, however, the book can be recommended to those with the necessary interest, knowledge and perseverance. The book provides a great deal of information in a convenient manner and all those concerned with its production are to be congratulated on their work. Articles are well set out, illustrated and supported by abstracts, extensive references and discussions. As indicated above, the range of the subjects covered is large and includes such varied items as acupuncture, bird communication and some details of the U.S.A. Navy's extra low frequency communication system known as Project Sanguine. Finally, it is a pleasure to say that the book has been attractively produced and contains an excellent index.

  17. Distinguishing low frequency oscillations within the 1/f spectral behaviour of electromagnetic brain signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonuga-Barke Edmund JS

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been acknowledged that the frequency spectrum of measured electromagnetic (EM brain signals shows a decrease in power with increasing frequency. This spectral behaviour may lead to difficulty in distinguishing event-related peaks from ongoing brain activity in the electro- and magnetoencephalographic (EEG and MEG signal spectra. This can become an issue especially in the analysis of low frequency oscillations (LFOs – below 0.5 Hz – which are currently being observed in signal recordings linked with specific pathologies such as epileptic seizures or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, in sleep studies, etc. Methods In this work we propose a simple method that can be used to compensate for this 1/f trend hence achieving spectral normalisation. This method involves filtering the raw measured EM signal through a differentiator prior to further data analysis. Results Applying the proposed method to various exemplary datasets including very low frequency EEG recordings, epileptic seizure recordings, MEG data and Evoked Response data showed that this compensating procedure provides a flat spectral base onto which event related peaks can be clearly observed. Conclusion Findings suggest that the proposed filter is a useful tool for the analysis of physiological data especially in revealing very low frequency peaks which may otherwise be obscured by the 1/f spectral activity inherent in EEG/MEG recordings.

  18. Hybrid acoustic metamaterial as super absorber for broadband low-frequency sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yufan; Ren, Shuwei; Meng, Han; Xin, Fengxian; Huang, Lixi; Chen, Tianning; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lu, Tian Jain

    2017-02-01

    A hybrid acoustic metamaterial is proposed as a new class of sound absorber, which exhibits superior broadband low-frequency sound absorption as well as excellent mechanical stiffness/strength. Based on the honeycomb-corrugation hybrid core (H-C hybrid core), we introduce perforations on both top facesheet and corrugation, forming perforated honeycomb-corrugation hybrid (PHCH) to gain super broadband low-frequency sound absorption. Applying the theory of micro-perforated panel (MPP), we establish a theoretical method to calculate the sound absorption coefficient of this new kind of metamaterial. Perfect sound absorption is found at just a few hundreds hertz with two-octave 0.5 absorption bandwidth. To verify this model, a finite element model is developed to calculate the absorption coefficient and analyze the viscous-thermal energy dissipation. It is found that viscous energy dissipation at perforation regions dominates the total energy consumed. This new kind of acoustic metamaterials show promising engineering applications, which can serve as multiple functional materials with extraordinary low-frequency sound absorption, excellent stiffness/strength and impact energy absorption.

  19. Low-Frequency Ultrasound Therapy in Combination Treatment of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE.E. LAVRINENKO

    2013-04-01

    Results. The beginning of therapeutic effect was observed after 2 procedures of the ultrasound exposure. The maximum effect is appeared after 8–10 treatment sessions. The positive dynamics of complex treatment is improving the general state of health, a disappearance of asthenization, and a decrease in the symptoms of cardiovascular disorders, achieving faster compensation of carbohydrate metabolism. The course of treatment contributed to the hyperglycemia reduction in patients with newly detected type 2 DM. After ultrasound treatment, the authors noted a positive dynamics of clinical symptoms: an improvement of the general health status, a decrease in fatigue, an improvement of psycho-emotional indices, disappearance of pain in the right upper quadrant, and a decrease in liver size in all the patients under study. Conclusions. The use of low-frequency ultrasound therapy on cutaneous projection of the liver in patients with type 2 DM promotes the normalization both fasting and postprandial glycemia. The effect of low-frequency ultrasound on cutaneous projection of the liver is significantly decreasing parameters that characterize the pancreatic insulin synthesizing function (immunoreactive insulin, C-peptide in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM and a BMI > 25 kg/m2. Low-frequency ultrasound reduces the glucagon secretion and thereby positively affects the hepatic gluconeogenesis. Ultrasound therapy can be used in the complex treatment of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM.

  20. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010 for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz, overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  1. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Rare and Low-Frequency Coding Variants Associated with LDL Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Leslie A.; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A.; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A.; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L.; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Crosslin, David R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y. Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tracy, Russell P.; Willer, Cristen J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Altshuler, David M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Allayee, Hooman; Cresci, Sharon; Daly, Mark J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; DePristo, Mark A.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Peter; Farlow, Deborah N.; Fennell, Tim; Garimella, Kiran; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hu, Youna; Jordan, Daniel M.; Jun, Goo; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kang, Hyun Min; Kiezun, Adam; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Bingshan; Li, Mingyao; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peloso, Gina; Pulit, Sara; Rader, Daniel J.; Reich, David; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Schwartz, Steve; Scott, Laura; Siscovick, David S.; Spertus, John A.; Stitziel, Nathaniel O.; Stoletzki, Nina; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willer, Cristen J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Atwood, Larry D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barbalic, Maja; Barr, R. Graham; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Brody, Jennifer; Budoff, Matthew; Burke, Greg; Buxbaum, Sarah; Carr, Jeff; Chen, Donna T.; Chen, Ida Y.; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Pat; Crosby, Jacy; Cupples, L. Adrienne; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dreisbach, Albert; Dupuis, Josée; Durda, J. Peter; Ellis, Jaclyn; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Caroline S.; Fox, Ervin; Funari, Vincent; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gardin, Julius; Goff, David; Gordon, Ora; Grody, Wayne; Gross, Myron; Guo, Xiuqing; Hall, Ira M.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heintz, Nicholas; Herrington, David M.; Hickson, DeMarc; Huang, Jie; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jacobs, David R.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Johnson, Craig W.; Kawut, Steven; Kronmal, Richard; Kurz, Raluca; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Larson, Martin G.; Lawson, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Dalin; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Jiankang; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Yongmei; Longstreth, William T.; Loria, Cay; Lumley, Thomas; Lunetta, Kathryn; Mackey, Aaron J.; Mackey, Rachel; Manichaikul, Ani; Maxwell, Taylor; McKnight, Barbara; Meigs, James B.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; North, Kari; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Leary, Daniel; Ong, Frank; Palmas, Walter; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan D.; Paul, Shom; Perez, Marco; Person, Sharina D.; Polak, Joseph; Post, Wendy S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sanders, Jill P.; Schreiner, Pamela; Seshadri, Sudha; Shea, Steve; Sidney, Stephen; Silverstein, Kevin; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Srinivasan, Asoke; Taylor, Herman A.; Taylor, Kent; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tracy, Russell P.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Wassel, Chrstina L.; Watson, Karol; Wei, Gina; White, Wendy; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Wilson, Gregory; Wilson, James G.; Wolf, Phillip; Zakai, Neil A.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Worrall, Brad; Bamshad, Michael J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Accurso, Frank; Anbar, Ran; Beaty, Terri; Bigham, Abigail; Black, Phillip; Bleecker, Eugene; Buckingham, Kati; Cairns, Anne Marie; Caplan, Daniel; Chatfield, Barbara; Chidekel, Aaron; Cho, Michael; Christiani, David C.; Crapo, James D.; Crouch, Julia; Daley, Denise; Dang, Anthony; Dang, Hong; De Paula, Alicia; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Drumm, Allen DozorMitch; Dyson, Maynard; Emerson, Julia; Emond, Mary J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Fink, Robert; Foster, Cassandra; Froh, Deborah; Gao, Li; Gershan, William; Gibson, Ronald L.; Godwin, Elizabeth; Gondor, Magdalen; Gutierrez, Hector; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hiatt, Peter; Hokanson, John E.; Howenstine, Michelle; Hummer, Laura K.; Kanga, Jamshed; Kim, Yoonhee; Knowles, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael; Lahiri, Thomas; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Lin, Lin; Lin, Xihong; Louie, Tin L.; Lynch, David; Make, Barry; Martin, Thomas R.; Mathai, Steve C.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNamara, John; McNamara, Sharon; Meyers, Deborah; Millard, Susan; Mogayzel, Peter; Moss, Richard; Murray, Tanda; Nielson, Dennis; Noyes, Blakeslee; O’Neal, Wanda; Orenstein, David; O’Sullivan, Brian; Pace, Rhonda; Pare, Peter; Parker, H. Worth; Passero, Mary Ann; Perkett, Elizabeth; Prestridge, Adrienne; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Regan, Elizabeth; Ren, Clement; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rock, Michael; Rosen, Antony; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ruczinski, Ingo; Sanford, Andrew; Schaeffer, David; Sell, Cindy; Sheehan, Daniel; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sin, Don; Spencer, Terry; Stonebraker, Jackie; Tabor, Holly K.; Varlotta, Laurie; Vergara, Candelaria I.; Weiss, Robert; Wigley, Fred; Wise, Robert A.; Wright, Fred A.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Zanni, Robert; Zou, Fei; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Green, Phil; Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Crosslin, David R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Fox, P. Keolu; Fu, Wenqing; Gordon, Adam; Gravel, Simon; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Kan, Mengyuan; Kenny, Eimear E.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Lara-Garduno, Fremiet; Leal, Suzanne M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; McGee, Sean; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Paeper, Bryan; Robertson, Peggy D.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Turner, Emily H.; Wang, Gao; Yi, Qian; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Carlson, Christopher S.; Anderson, Garnet; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Beresford, Shirley; Bizon, Chris; Black, Henry; Brunner, Robert; Brzyski, Robert; Burwen, Dale; Caan, Bette; Carty, Cara L.; Chlebowski, Rowan; Cummings, Steven; Curb, J. David; Eaton, Charles B.; Ford, Leslie; Franceschini, Nora; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gass, Margery; Geller, Nancy; Heiss, Gerardo; Howard, Barbara V.; Hsu, Li; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ioannidis, John; Jiao, Shuo; Johnson, Karen C.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuller, Lewis; LaCroix, Andrea; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lane, Dorothy; Lasser, Norman; LeBlanc, Erin; Li, Kuo-Ping; Limacher, Marian; Lin, Dan-Yu; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Ludlam, Shari; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolis, Karen; Martin, Lisa; McGowan, Joan; Monda, Keri L.; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Nathan, Lauren; Ockene, Judith; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Robbins, John; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sarto, Gloria E.; Shumaker, Sally; Simon, Michael S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Stein, Evan; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kira C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zeng, Donglin; Applebaum-Bowden, Deborah; Feolo, Michael; Gan, Weiniu; Paltoo, Dina N.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Sturcke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98th or <2nd percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments. PMID:24507775

  2. Effect of Intermittent Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation on the Rat Gastrocnemius Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arata Tsutaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES has been used as an endurance exercise model. This study aimed to test whether low-frequency NMES increases the phosphorylation of anabolic signaling molecules and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy, as seen with high-frequency NMES. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, 1 bout of exercise (with dissection done immediately (Post0 and 3 h (Post3 after exercise and another 6 sessions of training were performed. All experimental groups consisted of high- and low-frequency stimulation (HFS: 100 Hz; LFS: 10 Hz. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining was conducted to investigate type II fiber activation, and western blot analysis (WB was conducted to examine whether NMES leads to anabolic intracellular signaling. At first, we examined the acute effect of exercise. PAS staining revealed that glycogen depletion occurred in both type I and type II fibers. WB results demonstrated that p70S6K phosphorylation was significantly increased by HFS, but there was no significant difference with LFS. In contrast, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was increased by LFS at Post0. In the 6-session training, the wet weight and myofibrillar protein were significantly increased by both HFS and LFS. In conclusion, LFS has a similar anabolic effect for skeletal muscle hypertrophy as HFS, but the mediating signaling pathway might differ.

  3. The geometrical effect of single walled carbon nanotube network transistors on low frequency noise characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kil, Joon Pyo; Park, Wanjun

    2011-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with field effect transistor. Geometrical complexity due to the large number of tube-tube junctions in the nanotube network is expected to be one of the key factors for the noise power of 1/f dependence. We investigated low frequency noise as a function of channel length (2-10 microm) and found that increased with longer channel length. Percolational behaviors of nanotube network that differs from ordinary semiconducting and metallic materials can be characterized by a geometrical picture with electrical homo- and hetero-junctions. Fixed nanotube density provides a test conditions to evaluate the contributions of junctions as a noise center. Hooge's empirical law is applied to investigate the low frequency noise characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube random network transistors. The noise power shows the dependence of the transistor channel length. It is understood that nanotube/nanotube junctions act as a noise center. However, the differences induced by channel length in the noise power are observed as not so significant. We conclude that tolerance of low frequency noise is important property for SWNT networks as an electronic device application.

  4. Powering autonomous sensors with miniaturized piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices operating at very low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferin, G.; Bantignies, C.; Le Khanh, H.; Flesch, E.; Nguyen-Dinh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Harvesting energy from ambient mechanical vibrations is a smart and efficient way to power autonomous sensors and support innovative developments in IoT (Internet of Things), WSN (Wireless Sensor Network) and even implantable medical devices. Beyond the environmental operating conditions, efficiency of such devices is mainly related to energy source properties like the amplitude of vibrations and its spectral contain and some of these applications exhibit a quite low frequency spectrum where harvesting surrounding mechanical energy make sense, typically 5-50Hz for implantable medical devices or 50Hz-150Hz for industrial machines. Harvesting such low frequency vibrations is a challenge since it leads to adapt the resonator geometries to the targeted frequency or to use out-off band indirect harvesting strategies. In this paper we present a piezoelectric based vibrational energy harvesting device (PEH) which could be integrated into a biocompatible package to power implantable sensor or therapeutic medical devices. The presented architecture is a serial bimorph laminated with ultra-thinned (ranging from 15μm to 100μm) outer PZT “skins” that could operate at a “very low frequency”, below 25Hz typically. The core process flow is disclosed and performances highlighted with regards to other low frequency demonstrations.

  5. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  6. Role of Low Frequency Sea Surface Temperature Modes with a Changing Climate in Modulating Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRow, Timothy [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-08-03

    The SSTs used in our study come from the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) (Gent et al 2011) and from the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis (CanESM2) (Chylek et al20ll) climate models from the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) (Taylor et al2012). We've examined the tropical cyclones using both the historical simulation that employs volcanic and aerosol forcing as well as the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5). In addition, we've compared the present day North Atlantic tropical cyclone metrics from a previous study (LaRow, 2013) to these climate change experiments. The experimental setup is shown in Table 1. We considered the CMIP5 experiment number '3.2 historical' (Taylor et al,201l), which provides simulations of the recent past (1850-2005). The second set of CMIP5 SSTs is the RCp4.5 experiment where the radiative forcing stabilizes at 45W m-2 after 2100 (experiment number 4.1 in Taylor etal2}ll).

  7. Van Allen Probes observations of unusually low frequency whistler mode waves observed in association with moderate magnetic storms: Statistical study

    OpenAIRE

    Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We show the first evidence for locally excited chorus at frequencies below 0.1?f ce (electron cyclotron frequency) in the outer radiation belt. A statistical study of chorus during geomagnetic storms observed by the Van Allen Probes found that frequencies are often dramatically lower than expected. The frequency at peak power suddenly stops tracking the equatorial 0.5?f ce and f/f ce decreases rapidly, often to frequencies well below 0.1?f ce (in situ and mapped to equator). These ve...

  8. A Novel Application for Low Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as an Online Process Monitoring Tool for Viable Cell Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Slouka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available New approaches in process monitoring during industrial fermentations are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and offgas analysis, but use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine biomass, product quality, lysis and far more. One of the very important approaches is the in situ accessibility of viable cell concentration (VCC. This knowledge provides increased efficiency in monitoring and controlling strategies during cultivations. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy—EIS—is used to monitor biomass in a fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3, producing a recombinant protein using a fed batch-based approach. Increases in the double layer capacitance (Cdl, determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, are proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch and fed batch phase, monitored in offline and online modes for different cultivations. A good correlation of Cdl with cell density is found and in order to get an appropriate verification of this method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements are performed and compared. Since measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration, stirring are to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is a powerful tool for cultivation monitoring.

  9. Transdermal delivery of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans using the combination of microneedles and low-frequency sonophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonnada Pamornpathomkul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the patient-friendly methods that are used in the delivery of hydrophilic macromolecules into deep skin layers, in particular, the combination of microneedles patch (MNs patch and low-frequency sonophoresis (SN. The hydrophilic macromolecule drug fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextrans (FD-4: MW 4.4 kDa was used as the model drug in our experimental design. In this study, excised porcine skin was used to investigate and optimize the key parameters that determine effective MNs- and SN-facilitated FD-4 delivery. In vitro skin permeation experiments revealed that the combination of MNs patch with SN had a superior enhancing effect of skin permeation for FD-4 compared to MNs alone, SN alone or untreated skin, respectively. The optimal parameters for the combination of MNs and SN included the following: 10 N insertion force of MNs, 4 W/cm2 SN intensity, 6 mm radiation diameter of the SN probe, 2 min application time, and the continuous mode duty cycle of SN. In addition, vertical sections of skin, clearly observed under a confocal microscope, confirmed that the combination of MNs and SN enhanced permeation of FD-4 into the deep skin layers. These studies suggest that the combination of MNs and SN techniques could have great potential in the delivery of hydrophilic macromolecules into deep skin.

  10. Software Toolbox for Low-Frequency Conductivity and Current Density Imaging Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Katoch, Nitish; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), diffusion tensor MREIT (DT-MREIT), conductivity tensor imaging (CTI), and magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI). MRCDI and MREIT provide current density and isotropic conductivity images, respectively, using current-injection phase MRI techniques. DT-MREIT produces anisotropic conductivity tensor images by incorporating diffusion weighted MRI into MREIT. These current-injection techniques are finding clinical applications in diagnostic imaging and also in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and electroporation where treatment currents can function as imaging currents. To avoid adverse effects of nerve and muscle stimulations due to injected currents, conductivity tensor imaging (CTI) utilizes B1 mapping and multi-b diffusion weighted MRI to produce low-frequency anisotropic conductivity tensor images without injecting current. This paper describes numerical implementations of several key mathematical functions for conductivity and current density image reconstructions in MRCDI, MREIT, DT-MREIT, and CTI. To facilitate experimental studies of clinical applications, we developed a software toolbox for these low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging methods. This MR-based conductivity imaging (MRCI) toolbox includes 11 toolbox functions which can be used in the MATLAB environment. The MRCI toolbox is available at http://iirc.khu.ac.kr/software.html . Its functions were tested by using several experimental datasets, which are provided together with the toolbox. Users of the toolbox can focus on experimental designs and interpretations of reconstructed images instead of developing their own image reconstruction softwares. We expect more toolbox functions to be added from future research outcomes. Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes

  11. Spots of Seismic Danger Extracted by Properties of Low-Frequency Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    A new method of seismic danger estimate is presented which is based on using properties of low-frequency seismic noise from broadband networks. Two statistics of noise waveforms are considered: multi-fractal singularity spectrum support width D and minimum normalized entropy En of squared orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The maps of D and En are plotted in the moving time window. Let us call the regions extracted by low values of D and high values of En as "spots of seismic danger" - SSD. Mean values of D and En are strongly anti-correlated - that is why statistics D and En extract the same SSD. Nevertheless their mutual considering is expedient because these parameters are based on different approaches. The physical mechanism which underlies the method is consolidation of small blocks of the Earth's crust into the large one before the strong earthquake. This effect has a consequence that seismic noise does not include spikes which are connected with mutual movements of small blocks. The absence of irregular spikes in the noise follows the decreasing of D and increasing of entropy En. The stability in space and size of the SSD provides estimates of the place and energy of the probable future earthquake. The increasing or decreasing of SSD size and minimum or maximum values of D and En within SSD allows estimate the trend of seismic danger. The method is illustrating by the analysis of seismic noise from broadband seismic network F-net in Japan [1-5]. Statistically significant decreasing of D allowed a hypothesis about approaching Japan to a future seismic catastrophe to be formulated at the middle of 2008. The peculiarities of correlation coefficient estimate within 1 year time window between median values of D and generalized Hurst exponent allowed to make a decision that starting from July of 2010 Japan come to the state of waiting strong earthquake [3]. The method extracted a huge SSD near Japan which includes the region of future Tohoku mega-earthquake and the

  12. The role of localised Ultra-Low Frequency waves in energetic electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, J.; Murphy, K. R.; Watt, C.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L.; Halford, A. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rodger, C. J.; Degeling, A. W.; Singer, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic waves play pivotal roles in radiation belt dynamics through a variety of different means. Typically, Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves have historically been invoked for radial diffusive transport leading to both acceleration and loss of outer radiation belt electrons. Very-Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely-Low Frequency (ELF) waves are generally thought to provide a mechanism for localized acceleration and loss through precipitation into the ionosphere. In this study we present a new mechanism for electron loss through precipitation into the ionosphere due to direct modulation of the loss cone via localized compressional ULF waves. Observational evidence is presented demonstrating that modulation of the equatorial loss cone can occur via localized compressional wave activity. We then perform statistical computations of the probability distribution to determine how likely a given magnetic perturbation would produce a given percentage change in the bounce loss-cone (BLC). We discuss the ramifications of the action of coherent, localized compressional ULF waves on drifting electron populations; their precipitation response can be a complex interplay between electron energy, the shape of the phase space density profile at pitch angles close to the loss cone, ionospheric decay timescales, and the time-dependence of the electron source. We present a case study of compressional wave activity in tandem with riometer and balloon-borne electron precipitation across keV-MeV energies to demonstrate that the experimental measurements can be explained by our new enhanced loss cone mechanism. We determine that the two pivotal components not usually considered are localized ULF wave fields and ionospheric decay timescales. We conclude that ULF wave modulation of the loss cone is a viable candidate for direct precipitation of radiation belt electrons without any additional requirement for gyroresonant wave-particle interaction. Additional mechanisms would be

  13. Evaluation and characterization of fetal exposures to low frequency magnetic fields generated by laptop computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppetti, Nicola; Andreuccetti, Daniele; Bellieni, Carlo; Bogi, Andrea; Pinto, Iole

    2011-12-01

    Portable - or "laptop" - computers (LCs) are widely and increasingly used all over the world. Since LCs are often used in tight contact with the body even by pregnant women, fetal exposures to low frequency magnetic fields generated by these units can occur. LC emissions are usually characterized by complex waveforms and are often generated by the main AC power supply (when connected) and by the display power supply sub-system. In the present study, low frequency magnetic field emissions were measured for a set of five models of portable computers. For each of them, the magnetic flux density was characterized in terms not just of field amplitude, but also of the so called "weighted peak" (WP) index, introduced in the 2003 ICNIRP Statement on complex waveforms and confirmed in the 2010 ICNIRP Guidelines for low frequency fields. For the model of LC presenting the higher emission, a deeper analysis was also carried out, using numerical dosimetry techniques to calculate internal quantities (current density and in-situ electric field) with reference to a digital body model of a pregnant woman. Since internal quantities have complex waveforms too, the concept of WP index was extended to them, considering the ICNIRP basic restrictions defined in the 1998 Guidelines for the current density and in the 2010 Guidelines for the in-situ electric field. Induced quantities and WP indexes were computed using an appropriate original formulation of the well known Scalar Potential Finite Difference (SPFD) numerical method for electromagnetic dosimetry in quasi-static conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  15. Low-frequency electroacupuncture suppresses focal epilepsy and improves epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Pei-Lu; Lu, Chin-Yu; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2015-07-07

    The positive effects of acupuncture at Feng-Chi acupoints on treating epilepsy and insomnia have been well-documented in ancient Chinese literature. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind these effects. Our previous study demonstrated that high-frequency (100 Hz) electroacupuncture (EA) at Feng-Chi acupoints deteriorates both pilocarpine-induced focal epilepsy and sleep disruptions. This study investigated the effects of low-frequency (10 Hz) EA on epileptic activities and epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions. In rats, the Feng-Chi acupoint is located 3 mm away from the center of a line between the two ears. Rats received 30 min of 10 Hz EA stimuli per day before each day's dark period for three consecutive days. Our results indicated that administration of pilocarpine into the left CeA at the beginning of the dark period induced focal epilepsy and decreased both rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep during the consequent light period. Low-frequency (10 Hz) EA at Feng-Chi acupoints suppressed pilocarpine-induced epileptiform EEGs, and this effect was in turn blocked by naloxone (a broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist), but not by naloxonazine (a μ-receptor antagonist), naltrindole (a δ-receptor antagonist) and nor-binaltorphimine (a κ-receptor antagonist). Ten Hz EA enhanced NREM sleep during the dark period, and this enhancement was blocked by all of the opioid receptor antagonists. On the other hand, 10 Hz EA reversed pilocarpine-induced NREM suppression during the light period, and the EA's effect on the sleep disruption was only blocked by naloxonazine. These results indicate that low-frequency EA stimulation of Feng-Chi acupoints is beneficial in improving epilepsy and epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions, and that opioid receptors in the CeA mediate EA's therapeutic effects.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigation into structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Liu, Yuyou

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational energy is transmitted in buried fluid-filled pipes in a variety of wave types. Axisymmetric (n = 0) waves are of practical interest in the application of acoustic techniques for the detection of leaks in underground pipelines. At low frequencies n = 0 waves propagate longitudinally as fluid-dominated (s = 1) and shell-dominated (s = 2) waves. Whilst sensors such as hydrophones and accelerometers are commonly used to detect leaks in water distribution pipes, the mechanism governing the structural and fluid motions is not well documented. In this paper, the low-frequency behaviour of the pipe wall and the contained fluid is investigated. For most practical pipework systems, these two waves are strongly coupled; in this circumstance the ratios of the radial pipe wall displacements along with the internal pressures associated with these two wave types are obtained. Numerical examples show the relative insensitivity of the structural and fluid motions to the s = 2 wave for both metallic and plastic pipes buried in two typical soils. It is also demonstrated that although both acoustic and vibration sensors at the same location provide the identical phase information of the transmitted signals, pressure responses have significantly higher levels than acceleration responses, and thus hydrophones are better suited in a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environment. This is supported by experimental work carried out at a leak detection facility. Additional pressure measurements involved excitation of the fluid and the pipe fitting (hydrant) on a dedicated water pipe. This work demonstrates that the s = 1 wave is mainly responsible for the structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes as a result of water leakage and direct pipe excitation.

  17. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  18. Realization of acoustic wave directivity at low frequencies with a subwavelength Mie resonant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gengxi; Ding, Erliang; Wang, Yangyang; Peng, Xiuyuan; Cui, Jun; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    We realized high-efficiency acoustic directivity at low frequencies based on monopolar Mie resonance. This is caused by micro structures that have a high refractive index relative to the background medium. The structures can strongly control the radiation pattern though the acoustic wavelength is much larger than its dimensions. We herein discuss how to enhance the directivity through modifying the structure's parameters. Furthermore, our structure is proposed for use in obtaining an acoustic collimated beam without sidelobes. The structure characteristics and applications are demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. Potential applications of our structures include acoustic device miniaturization, noise control, and medical ultrasonics.

  19. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field (ELF-EMF and childhood leukemia near transmission lines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kokate

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a systematic review of most cited studies from developed countries those shed light on the potential relation between childhood leukemia and extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF. All the findings of articles critically segregated as per some neglected parameters like number of samples, exposure duration, frequency range, distance from the radiation sources, and location during measurement of magnetic field density near power lines. Literature of major 50 studies are divided according to pooled analysis / meta-analysis, residential zone assessment and case-control studies.

  20. Dual resonant structure for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a design with dual resonant structure which can harvest energy from random vibration sources at low frequency range. The dual resonant structure consists of two spring-mass subsystems with different frequency responses, which exhibit strong coupling and broad bandwidth when the two masses collide with each other. Experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure can generate higher power output than the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources.

  1. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sánchez; Pérez, Javiér; García, M. N. Jiménez; López, M. A. Jiménez; Espíndola, M. E. Sánchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernández, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez

    2008-08-01

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-β) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  2. Interpretation of electromagnetic extra-low-frequency soundings in the Randsburg, California, Known Geothermal Resource Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    An electromagnetic (EM) controlled source survey was made during the period November 30, 1977, to December 13, 1977, in the Randsburg, California, Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The observed extra-low-frequency (ELF) data and least squares interpretation using a computer program developed by Anderson (1977) are summarized. The results are given in tabular form along with observed and calculated amplitude and phase plots. In addition, one vertical electrical sounding (VES) was obtained and a graphical solution is included via a Schlumberger inversion program developed by Zohdy (1973).

  3. Ultra-wide sensor arcs for low frequency sonar detection with a baffled cylindrical array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilone, Derek C; Bao, Chaoying; Travaglione, Ben C; Killeen, Damien S

    2009-11-01

    Passive detection with a baffled cylindrical array can potentially be improved at low frequencies by exploiting signal diffraction around the baffle. A model based on infinite rigid cylinder scattering suggests that large gains in signal-to-noise ratio are potentially available to adaptive beamformers if the sensor arc is widened to include sensors in the acoustic shadow. However, elastic scatter effects become increasingly important as frequency decreases, so the gains obtained in practice are unknown. The gains in detection performance are examined in this letter by analyzing data recorded at sea from a platform-mounted sonar array.

  4. Low Frequency Loss in Regional Scale Flux Observations from a Tall Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, F. C.; Schalkwijk, J.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2010-09-01

    Direct measurements of surface fluxes are nowadays often performed with the eddy-correlation technique. The method is well established for observations in the lowest few meters of the atmosphere which gives flux estimates with a footprint of typically 100 m. Models and satellite products often give results on the kilometer scale or larger and benefit for their evaluation from flux estimates with larger horizontal scales. Until now only a limited number of techniques are available for direct flux observation at larger scale, e.g. airborne eddy correlation, tall tower based observations and scintillometers. Elevated observations "see" a larger footprint. We focus on tall tower flux observations. Specific problems arise when estimating surface fluxes from these elevated observations related to storage below the observation level and advection. A third concern and the focus of this presentation is the increase of length scale of the transporting turbulent eddies when going to higher levels in the atmospheric boundary layer and the related issue of low frequency loss. With the Cabauw 200 m meteorological tower in the Netherlands a unique platform is available to perform tall tower flux observations. The tower has been equipped with eddy correlation systems at 5, 60, 100 and 180 m height which measures fluxes of momentum, temperature, humidity and CO2. In addition wind speed, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentration are measured at a number of intermediate levels. This set of instruments has been augmented with an extra large aperture scintillometer which operates at the 60 m level over the 10 km path between a TV-tower and the Cabauw meteorological tower. Typically turbulence flux data is calculated on a 10 to 30 minute time basis. For atmospheric surface layer observation well established similarity relations exist to estimate low-frequency flux contributions. Low frequency contributions above the surface layer are less well established. We have analysed a large

  5. Ferromagnetic resonance of a YIG film in the low frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterson, John; Grudichak, Scott; Sklenar, Joseph; Tsai, C. C.; Jang, Moongyu; Yang, Qinghui; Zhang, Huaiwu; Lee, Seongjae

    An improved method for characterizing the magnetic anisotropy of films with cubic symmetry is described and is applied to an yttrium iron garnet (111) film. Analysis of the FMR spectra performed both in-plane and out-of-plane from 0.7 to 8 GHz yielded the magnetic anisotropy constants as well as the saturation magnetization. The field at which FMR occurs is sensitive to anisotropy constants in the low frequency (Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division under Grant Number DE-SC0014424. The film growth was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grants 51272036 and 51002021 and 51472046.

  6. Relationship between transducer type and low-frequency hearing loss for patients with ventilation tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar-Prejna, S; Meinzen-Derr, J

    2006-06-01

    To determine the relationship between the type of transducer used to perform pure-tone audiometry and the appearance of low-frequency hearing loss at 250Hz and 500Hz for patients with ventilation tubes. Air conduction thresholds at 250Hz and 500Hz were measured using Telephonics TDH-49 supra-aural headphones and EARTONE 3-A insert earphones for patients with normal ears (N=16) and patients with ventilation tubes (N=114). Tympanometry was performed on each patient prior to audiometric testing. Audiometric test results obtained in normal ears were compared to results for patients with ventilation tubes. For analysis, the ventilation tube patients were separated into two groups, representative of ventilation tube type. Audiometric results obtained using the two transducer types at 250Hz and 500Hz revealed significant differences in threshold for patients with ventilation tubes. Thresholds obtained using insert earphones were generally worse than thresholds obtained using supra-aural headphones for this group. On average, difference in threshold was 14.15dB worse with insert earphones at 250Hz and 9.75dB worse with insert earphones at 500Hz for patients with Sheehy tubes. Average difference in threshold for patients with Donaldson tubes was 13.93dB worse with insert earphones at 250Hz and 8.93dB worse with insert earphones at 500Hz. In addition, thresholds were more variable for patients with ventilation tubes than normal ears at 500Hz. There were no significant differences in threshold for normal ears using both transducers. When performing pure-tone audiometry, choice of transducer can influence the accurate identification of a low-frequency hearing loss in patients with ventilation tubes. Low-frequency thresholds were generally worse using insert-style earphones to test subjects with tubes, resulting in the apparent identification of a hearing loss. However, with supra-aural headphones, no low-frequency hearing loss existed. There were no significant differences in

  7. Universal low-frequency asymptotes of dynamic conic nanopore rectification: An ionic nanofluidic inductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Yossifon, Gilad; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2015-12-01

    We report the first nanofluidic inductor (L) to complement the known nanofluidic capacitors (C), resistors (R), and diodes for ion currents. Under negative bias, the nanopore behaves like a parallel RC circuit at low frequencies; however, under positive bias, the asymptotic dynamics is that of a serial RL circuit. This new ionic circuit element can lead to nanofluidic RLC or diode-inductor oscillator circuits and new intrapore biosensing/rapid sequencing strategies. A universal theory, with explicit estimates for the capacitance and inductance at opposite biases, is derived to collapse the rectified dynamics of all conic nanopores to facilitate design of this new nanofluidic circuit.

  8. Low-frequency electrical dosimetry: research agenda of the IEEE International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J Patrick; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-06-21

    This article treats unsettled issues in the use of numerical models of electrical dosimetry as applied to international limits on human exposure to low-frequency (typically  IEEE-ICES (International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety) Technical Committee 95. The paper discusses 25 issues needing attention, fitting into three general categories: induction models; electrostimulation models; and human exposure limits. Of these, 9 were voted as 'high priority' by members of Subcommittee 6. The list is presented as a research agenda for refinements in numerical modeling with applications to human exposure limits. It is likely that such issues are also important in medical and electrical product safety design applications.

  9. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  10. Note: A novel cantilever beam for low-frequency high performance piezoelectric geophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Sun, Hongshuai; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yang; Lin, Tingting; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2017-06-01

    A multilayer spiral-corrugated cantilever beam was developed as an improvement for a conventional single-layer flat cantilever beam to improve the performance of a piezoelectric geophone adopting polyvinylidene fluoride film for low frequency seismic vibration measurement. The proposed structure is longer and has less stiffness compared with the conventional beam, so the piezoelectric geophone adopting the developed cantilever beam has a lower natural frequency. To confirm the validity of the design, the finite element analysis was conducted and the results showed that the natural frequency of the geophone with the multilayer spiral-corrugated cantilever beam is much lower and the corrugated structure can improve the sensitivity of the geophone.

  11. On the small-signal capacitance of RF MEMS switches at very low frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Bielen, Jeroen; Salm, Cora; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents on-wafer capacitance measurements of silicon-based RF MEMS capacitive switches down to frequencies below 1 Hz. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve measured at very-low frequency (0.01-10 Hz) deviates from the commonly measured and well-understood high-frequency C-V curve, especially near the pull-in and pull-out voltages. This behavior is explained from the mechanical action of the top electrode. An electrostatic transducer model is used to express the coupling between mec...

  12. Effects of low-frequency ultrasound on microcirculation in venous leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic low-frequency ultrasound (US has been used for many years to improve wound healing in chronic wounds like venous leg ulcers. No human data are available for the possible effects of single US applications on microcirculation and their frequency-dependency. Aims: To investigated the role of therapeutic low-frequency US on microcirculation of venous leg ulcers in vivo. Patients and Methods: This is a pilot study on an inpatient basis. We use a newly developed low-frequency continuous-wave US-equipment composed of a US transducer based on piezo-fiber composites that allow the change of frequency. In this study, we apply US of 34 kHz, 53.5 kHz, and 75 kHz respectively. Twelve patients with chronic venous leg ulcers are analyzed. As an adjunct to good ulcer care, therapeutic US is applied, non-contacting, once a day, in a subaqual position for 10 minutes. Microcirculation is assessed in the ulcers adjacent to skin before US-therapy, immediately after the treatment and 30 minutes later. We use a micro-light guide spectrophotometer (O2C, LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Gieίen, Germany for calculation of blood flow velocity, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SCO 2 and relative hemoglobin concentration (rHb in 2 and 8 mm depth. Contact-free remission spectroscopy (SkinREM3, Color Control Chemnitz GmbH, Chemnitz, Germany allows contact free measurements in the VIS-NIR range of the spectrum (400 ± 1600 nm. Results: It is seen that therapeutic US is well tolerated. One patient dropped out from a treatment series since he developed erysipelas responding to standard antibiotic. Effects were seen at 34 kHz only. The SO 2 values increased after single US application. The values for rHb were higher in the superficial layer of the wound bed (depth 2 mm compared to deeper parts (8 mm depth. US treatment did not result in significant changes of rHb and blood cell velocity. The data obtained by remission spectroscopy disclose an increase of oxygenized

  13. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation from gravitational waves generated by neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Preston; Gretarsson, Andri; Singleton, Douglas

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of observing very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic radiation produced from the vacuum by gravitational waves. We review the calculations leading to the possibility of vacuum conversion of gravitational waves into electromagnetic waves and show how this process evades the well-known prohibition against particle production from gravitational waves. Using Newman-Penrose scalars, we estimate the luminosity of this proposed electromagnetic counterpart radiation coming from gravitational waves produced by neutron star oscillations. The detection of electromagnetic counterpart radiation would provide an indirect way of observing gravitational radiation with future spacecraft missions, especially lunar orbiting probes.

  14. Vital functions of organisms in infra-low frequency magnetic fields 1. The bacteriostatic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khizhenkov, P.K.; Bilobrov, V.M.; Chugai, A.V.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of infra-low frequency variable magnetic fields H on a culture of Staph. aureus was studied experimentally. Dependencies of the bacteria number growth on the field action duration and on the frequency f were obtained. It was shown that the maximum bacteriostatic effect of H occurs in the f {approx} 0.1-10.0 Hz interval. It was noted that the action of H does not result in the death of the bacteria, and that in the absence of a field, the bacterial fission exceeds the control case.

  15. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    competitive designs compared with the upwind threebladed rotor. The simulation package comprises an aeroelastic time simulation code HAWC2 and an acoustic low frequency noise (LFN) prediction model. Computed time traces of rotor thrust and rotor torque from the aeroelastic model are input to the acoustic....... For an upwind rotor the LFN levels are so low that it should not cause annoyance of neighbouring people. Important turbine design parameters with strong influence on LFN are the blade tip speed and the distance between rotor and tower....

  16. Interaction of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields with living systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1991-11-01

    The sources and physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are described in this paper. Biological effects and mechanisms through which ELF fields interact with humans and other organisms are discussed, including several aspects of this subject that are presently under active laboratory investigation. Studies on the potential health effects of ELF fields present in the home and workplace are also summarized, including a critical evaluation of evidence for a possible linkage between exposure to ELF fields and cancer risk. 53 refs.

  17. Damping of Inter-Area Low Frequency Oscillation Using an Adaptive Wide-Area Damping Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wei; Jiang, L.; Fang, Jiakun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive wide-area damping controller (WADC) based on generalized predictive control (GPC) and model identification for damping the inter-area low frequency oscillations in large-scale inter-connected power system. A recursive least-squares algorithm (RLSA) with a varying...... in each sampling interval. Case studies are undertaken on a two-area fourmachine power system and the New England 10-machine 39-bus power system, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive WADC not only can damp the inter-area oscillations effectively under a wide range of operation...

  18. Optical diagnostics of a low frequency instability rotating around a magnetized plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escarguel, A. [Universite de Provence, Centre de Saint Jerome, Lab. PIIM, UMR 6633 CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-01-15

    An argon magnetized plasma column is created with primary energetic electrons in the Mistral device. Low frequency instabilities regularly rotating around this column are observed with an ultra-fast camera and a spectroscopic device. Experimental results coupled to a coronal code show the presence of a few percents of fast (hot) electrons inside the ejected plasma. It also shows that ultra-fast camera analysis of the ejected plasma can only give information on the primary electron population. Finally, these results suggest that the radial decrease of the light emitted by the ejected plasma is essentially due to the radial decrease of the mean energy of the hot electrons. (author)

  19. Note: A novel cantilever beam for low-frequency high performance piezoelectric geophone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Sun, Hongshuai; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Xu, Yang; Lin, Tingting; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2017-06-01

    A multilayer spiral-corrugated cantilever beam was developed as an improvement for a conventional single-layer flat cantilever beam to improve the performance of a piezoelectric geophone adopting polyvinylidene fluoride film for low frequency seismic vibration measurement. The proposed structure is longer and has less stiffness compared with the conventional beam, so the piezoelectric geophone adopting the developed cantilever beam has a lower natural frequency. To confirm the validity of the design, the finite element analysis was conducted and the results showed that the natural frequency of the geophone with the multilayer spiral-corrugated cantilever beam is much lower and the corrugated structure can improve the sensitivity of the geophone.

  20. Conformational energetics and low-frequency vibrations of cyclohexene and its oxygen analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, Esther J.; Brito, Teresa; McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

    2010-08-01

    Ab initio and DFT calculations with MP2/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ basis sets have been carried out for cyclohexene and four of its oxygen analogs. All of the molecules possess a twisted structure while the bent forms represent saddle points in two-dimensional surfaces. The structures, relative energies, and frequencies for the lowest energy vibrations of the twisted, bent, and planar forms were calculated and compared to experimental results. The calculated results agree very well with the microwave data but the computed barriers are somewhat less than those based on low-frequency infrared data.

  1. Low frequency events at Mt. Etna: some problems and open questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gresta

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A short period seismic array setting at Mt. Etna symmetrically in regard to the fracture of the 1991-1993 eruption allowed an analysis of low frequency events which occurred in the first phase of the mentioned eruption. We recorded about 50 events, 19 of them belong to a family. They show very low amplitude values and spectral peaks ranging 0.5-4.5 Hz. The evidence of this family of events shows how the process driving the dynamics of the fluid in the volcano is often the same.

  2. Electromagnetic Pollution Assessment in Different Environments with Measurements and Modellings at Very Low Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya ÇALLIALP KUNTER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A major factor of anxiety and speculation come from electromagnetic fields which represent one of the most common and fastest increasing environmental issues. The purpose of this work is to examine existing electric and magnetic fields’ levels in a typical house and an office at very low frequency, and comparing the measurement results with the prior studies and also with the ICNIRP standard limits. This study also comprises the three phase conductors’ electromagnetic fields analysis at a point. As a result, it is observed that the measured values are approaching to the calculated ones.

  3. Mitigation of extremely low frequency magnetic fields from electrical installations in high-rise buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, John; Duyaping, Patrick [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Building Services Engineering, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2002-09-01

    The health impacts on people exposed to power line generated magnetic fields remains somewhat controversial. Under certain circumstances, such extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields also arise in high-rise buildings in Hong Kong, causing interference with sensitive equipment, and with it concerns about the potential health impacts on affected persons. Due to a general lack of awareness electrical design and installation engineers rarely consider the issue. This paper discusses the problem of ELF fields generated by a building's electrical distribution system, and provides simplified analytical techniques that lead to practical solutions for eliminating interference problems as well as reducing concerns about health impacts. (Author)

  4. Medium Band Least Squares Estimation of Fractional Cointegration in the Presence of Low-Frequency Contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Varneskov, Rasmus T.

    This paper introduces a new estimator of the fractional cointegrating vector between stationary long memory processes that is robust to low-frequency contamination such as level shifts, i.e., structural changes in the means of the series, and deterministic trends. In particular, the proposed medium...... the cointegration strength and testing MBLS against the existing narrow band least squares estimator are developed. Finally, the asymptotic framework for the MBLS estimator is used to provide new perspectives on volatility factors in an empirical application to long-span realized variance series for S&P 500...

  5. The effects of low-frequency vibrations on hepatic profile of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damijan, Z.

    2008-02-01

    Body vibrations training has become popular in sports training, fitness activity, it is still a rare form of physical rehabilitation.. Vibrations are transmitted onto the whole body or some body parts of an exercising person via a vibration platform subjected to mechanical vertical vibrations. During the training session a participant has to maintain his body position or do exercises that engage specific muscles whilst vibrations of the platform are transmitted onto the person's body. This paper is the continuation of the earlier study covering the effects of low-frequency vibrations on selected physiological parameters of the human body. The experiments were conducted to find the answer to the question if vibration exposure (total duration of training sessions 6 hours 20 min) should produce any changes in hepatic profile of blood. Therefore a research program was undertaken at the University of Science and Technology AGH UST to investigate the effects of low-frequency vibration on selected parameters of hepatic profile of human blood. Cyclic fluctuations of bone loading were induced by the applied harmonic vibration 3.5 Hz and amplitude 0.004 m. The experiments utilizing two vibrating platforms were performed in the Laboratory of Structural Acoustics and Biomedical Engineering AGH-UST. The applied vibrations were harmless and not annoying, in accordance with the standard PN-EN ISO 130901-1, 1998. 23 women volunteers had 19 sessions on subsequent working days, at the same time of day. during the tests the participants remained in the standing position, passive. The main hypothesis has it that short-term low-frequency vibration exposure might bring about the changes of the hepatic profile of blood, including: bilirubin (BILIRUBIN), alkaline phosphatase (Alp), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and albumin (ALBUMIN) levels. Research data indicate the low-frequency vibrations exposure produces statistically significant decrease of

  6. Short cavity DFB fiber laser based vector hydrophone for low frequency signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Faxiang; Jiang, Shaodong; Min, Li; Li, Ming; Peng, Gangding; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang

    2017-12-01

    A short cavity distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser is used for low frequency acoustic signal detection. Three DFB fiber lasers with different central wavelengths are chained together to make three-element vector hydrophone with proper sensitivity enhancement design, which has extensive and significant applications to underwater acoustic monitoring for the national defense, oil, gas exploration, and so on. By wavelength-phase demodulation, the lasing wavelength changes under different frequency signals can be interpreted, and the sensitivity is tested about 33 dB re pm/g. The frequency response range is rather flat from 5 Hz to 300 Hz.

  7. A piezoelectric pulse generator for low frequency non-harmonic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a new piezoelectric prototype for pulse generation by energy harvesting from low frequency non-harmonic vibration. The pulse generator presented here consists of two parts: the electromechanical part and the load circuit. A metal rolling rod is used as the proof mass, moving along the substrate to achieve both actuating of the piezoelectric cantilever by magnetic coupling and self-synchronous switching of the circuit. By using this new approach, the energy from the piezoelectric transduction mechanism is regulated simultaneously when it is extracted. This allows a series of tuneable pulses to be generated, which can be applied to self-powered RF wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes.

  8. TOOLS AND METHODS OF LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO RECOMBINATION LINES INVESTIGATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stepkin, S. V.; Mukha, D. V.; Vasilkovskiy, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the report the tools and methods of observations of radio recombination lines which are carried out atInstituteofRadio Astronomyof theNationalAcademy of Sciences ofUkraineusing the world’s largest decameter radio telescope UTR-2 (arrays “South – North” and “East – West”) are described. The low-frequency radio recombination lines can be used as effective means of the low-density partially ionized interstellar medium diagnostic. However, low intensities of the lines and high level of interfe...

  9. Impact of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure on the Candida Albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malíková, Ivona; Janoušek, Ladislav; Fantova, Vladyslava; Jíra, Jaroslav; Kříha, Vítĕzslav

    2015-03-01

    Effect of low frequency electromagnetic field on growth of selected microorganism is studied in the article. The diploid fungus that grows both as yeast and filamentous cell was chosen for this research. The theory of ion parametric resonance was taken as the base for studying the influence of electromagnetic field on biological structures. We tested the hypothesis, whether it is possible to observe the change in growth properties of Candida albicans with an AC electromagnetic field tuned to resonance with calcium ions cyclotron frequency.

  10. Digital Receivers for Low-Frequency Radio Telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Ulyanov, O.; Sidorchuk, M.; Stepkin, S.; Koliadin, V.; Kalinichenko, N.; Stanislavsky, A.; Dorovskyy, V.; Shepelev, V.; Bubnov, I.; Yerin, S.; Melnik, V.; Koval, A.; Shevchuk, N.; Vasylieva, I.; Mylostna, K.; Shevtsova, A.; Skoryk, A.; Kravtsov, I.; Volvach, Y.; Plakhov, M.; Vasilenko, N.; Vasylkivskyi, Y.; Vavriv, D.; Vinogradov, V.; Kozhin, R.; Kravtsov, A.; Bulakh, E.; Kuzin, A.; Vasilyev, A.; Ryabov, V.; Reznichenko, A.; Bortsov, V.; Lisachenko, V.; Kvasov, G.; Mukha, D.; Litvinenko, G.; Brazhenko, A.; Vashchishin, R.; Pylaev, O.; Koshovyy, V.; Lozinsky, A.; Ivantyshyn, O.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.; Fischer, G.; Lecacheux, A.; Denis, L.; Coffre, A.; Grießmeier, J.-M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes digital radio astronomical receivers used for decameter and meter wavelength observations. Since 1998, digital receivers performing on-the-fly dynamic spectrum calculations or waveform data recording without data loss have been used at the UTR-2 radio telescope, the URAN VLBI system, and the GURT new generation radio telescope. Here, we detail these receivers developed for operation in the strong interference environment that prevails in the decameter wavelength range. Data collected with these receivers allowed us to discover numerous radio astronomical objects and phenomena at low frequencies, a summary of which is also presented.

  11. Optical coherence tomography and low-frequency mechanics: A moderated discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Dennis M. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Ruggero, Mario A. [Knowles Hearing Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topics of “Optical Coherence Tomography” and “Low-Frequency Mechanics”. The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12{sup th} International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  12. LOW FREQUENCY ERROR ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION FOR HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL SATELLITE’S UNCONTROLLED GEOMETRIC POSITIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low frequency error is a key factor which has affected uncontrolled geometry processing accuracy of the high-resolution optical image. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit calibration method for the low frequency error based on geometric calibration field. Firstly, we introduce the overall flow of low frequency error on-orbit analysis and calibration, which includes optical axis angle variation detection of star sensor, relative calibration among star sensors, multi-star sensor information fusion, low frequency error model construction and verification. Secondly, we use optical axis angle change detection method to analyze the law of low frequency error variation. Thirdly, we respectively use the method of relative calibration and information fusion among star sensors to realize the datum unity and high precision attitude output. Finally, we realize the low frequency error model construction and optimal estimation of model parameters based on DEM/DOM of geometric calibration field. To evaluate the performance of the proposed calibration method, a certain type satellite’s real data is used. Test results demonstrate that the calibration model in this paper can well describe the law of the low frequency error variation. The uncontrolled geometric positioning accuracy of the high-resolution optical image in the WGS-84 Coordinate Systems is obviously improved after the step-wise calibration.

  13. A proposed metric for assessing the potential of community annoyance from wind turbine low-frequency noise emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1987-11-01

    Given our initial experience with the low frequency, impulsive noise emissions from the MOD-1 wind turbine and their impact on the surrounding community, the ability to assess the potential of interior low frequency annoyance in homes located near wind turbine installations may be important. Since there are currently no universally accepted metrics or descriptors for low frequency community annoyance, we performed a limited program using volunteers to see if we could identify a method suitable for wind turbine noise applications. We electronically simulated three interior environments resulting from low frequency acoustical loads radiated from both individual turbines and groups of upwind and downwind turbines. The written comments of the volunteers exposed to these interior stimuli were correlated with a number of descriptors which have been proposed for predicting low frequency annoyance. The results are presented in this paper. We discuss our modification of the highest correlated predictor to include the internal dynamic pressure effects associated with the response of residential structures to low frequency acoustic loads. Finally, we outline a proposed procedure for establishing both a low frequency figure of merit for a particular wind turbine design and, using actual measurements, estimate the potential for annoyance to nearby communities.

  14. Prediction of the shielding effectiveness at low frequency in near magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, Amin; Bensetti, Mohamed; Duval, Fabrice; Lafon, Frédéric; Pichon, Lionel

    2014-04-01

    Equipment used in hybrid or electric vehicles (HEVs) must meet certain requirements. Beyond issues of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC), it's necessary to assess the risks related to the exposure of the passengers to electromagnetic field inside an HEV. At low frequencies, using the electromagnetic shielding as protection is inefficient. The compliance can be achieved done by defining the harness's architecture or by the use of permeable materials. In this paper, we will focus on the prediction of the shielding effectiveness of materials subjected to a near magnetic field source at low frequency (9 kHz-10 MHz).We will focus our study on two cases. In the first case, we will work on the numerical modeling of an enclosure with and without opening. The result from the model is compared to the measurement's results obtained with a test bench developed in our laboratory. In the second case, the impact of the slot in the enclosure will be studied. An analytical method based on magnetic moments approximation is developed to predict the shielding effectiveness for infinite plane with slot. The results obtained with the latter are compared with the numerical results.

  15. A Proposal on Low Frequency AC Transmission as a Multi-Terminal Transmission System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Pichetjamroen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the discussion and comparison of characteristics and behavior of three low frequency ac (LFAC transmission system configurations operating under the same control scheme and conditions to identify the most promising operation system for LFAC. Merits of LFAC over high voltage direct current (HVDC are mentioned first. By changing power flow direction without auxiliary switches in multi-terminal application and easiness of short circuit protection are explained. The three configurations of LFACs are described and applied by the control scheme with the aid of the tool of the PSCAD/EMTDC software to consider the behavior of each LFAC system on line frequency and low frequency sides. For two-phase system, no fluctuation occurs on the line frequency side, which is the advantage over single-phase system. Furthermore, current rating on thyristor devices during operation and number of devices that used in each type of LFAC are calculated and compared. These results can lead to determine the most suitable transmission system for the LFAC system operation.

  16. Ultra-thin Low-Frequency Broadband Microwave Absorber Based on Magnetic Medium and Metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongzhi; He, Bo; Zhao, Jingcheng; Gong, Rongzhou

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-thin low-frequency broadband microwave absorber (MWA) based on a magnetic rubber plate (MRP) and cross-shaped structure (CSS) metamaterial (MM) was presented numerically and experimentally. The designed composite MWA is consisted of the MRP, CSS resonator, dielectric substrate and metallic background plane. The low-frequency absorption can be easily adjusted by tuning the geometric parameter of the CSS MM and the thickness of MPR. A bandwidth (i.e. the reflectance is below -10 dB) from 2.5 GHz to 5 GHz can be achieved with the total thickness of about 2 mm in experiments. The broadband absorption is attributed to the overlap of two resonant absorption peaks originated from MRP and CSS MM, respectively. More importantly, the thickness of the composite WMA is much thinner ( λ/40; λ is the operation center frequency), which could operate well at wide incidence angles for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves. Thus, it can be expected that our design will be applicable in the area of eliminating microwave energy and electromagnetic stealth.

  17. Low-frequency and broadband metamaterial absorber based on lumped elements: design, characterization and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenshan; Cheng, Yongzhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally validate a low-frequency metamaterial absorber (MMA) based on lumped elements with broadband stronger absorptivity in the microwave regime. Compared with the electric resonator structure MMA, the composite MMA (CMMA) loaded with lumped elements has stronger absorptivity and nearly impedance-matched to the free space in a broadband frequency range. The simulated voltage in lumped elements and the absorbance under different substrate loss conditions indicate that incident electromagnetic wave energy is mainly transformed to electric energy in the absorption band with high efficiency and subsequently consumed by lumped resistors. Simulated surface current and power loss density distributions further clarify the mechanism underlying observed absorption. The CMMA also shows a polarization-insensitive and wide-angle strong absorption. Finally, we fabricate and measure the MMA and CMMA samples. The CMMA yields below -10 dB reflectance from 2.85 to 5.31 GHz in the experiment, and the relative bandwidth is about 60.3 %. This low-frequency microwave absorber has potential applications in many martial fields.

  18. First results of low frequency electromagnetic wave detector of TC-2/Double Star program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Cao

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available LFEW is a low frequency electromagnetic wave detector mounted on TC-2, which can measure the magnetic fluctuation of low frequency electromagnetic waves. The frequency range is 8 Hz to 10 kHz. LFEW comprises a boom-mounted, three-axis search coil magnetometer, a preamplifier and an electronics box that houses a Digital Spectrum Analyzer. LFEW was calibrated at Chambon-la-Forêt in France. The ground calibration results show that the performance of LFEW is similar to that of STAFF on TC-1. The first results of LFEW show that it works normally on board, and that the AC magnetic interference of the satellite platform is very small. In the plasmasphere, LFEW observed the ion cyclotron waves. During the geomagnetic storm on 8 November 2004, LFEW observed a wave burst associated with the oxygen ion cyclotron waves. This observation shows that during geomagnetic storms, the oxygen ions are very active in the inner magnetosphere. Outside the plasmasphere, LFEW observed the chorus on 3 November 2004. LFEW also observed the plasmaspheric hiss and mid-latitude hiss both in the Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere on 8 November 2004. The hiss in the Southern Hemisphere may be the reflected waves of the hiss in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Active noise reduction systems: Their interaction with very low frequency acoustical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, R. Brian

    1994-08-01

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is used for reducing noise at the ears of an observer through the action of interfering sound waves. Noise sensed by a microphone built into the observer's headset or helmet is processed and reintroduced into the ear cup cavity out of phase with the original sound, thus cancelling the noise at the ear. Recent field experience has shown that system exposure to very high amplitude low-frequency sound, such as during the operation of helicopters, can lead to saturation or overload of the ANR electronics. Experiments using acoustical maniquins were conducted to assess the low-frequency behavior of ANR equipment. Results of measurement of the threshold of overload indicated large differences in the saturation thresholds among systems tested. Performance strongly depended on the integrity of the ear seal. Those systems offering active attenuation into the infrasound region tended to saturate most easily, but did create the best listening condition for the user when operated below the saturation threshold.

  20. Low frequency aeration of pig slurry affects slurry characteristics and emissions of greenhouse gases and ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Salvador; Hunt, John; Misselbrook, Tom H

    2017-07-01

    Low frequency aeration of slurries may reduce ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) emissions without increasing nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The aim of this study was to quantify this potential reduction and to establish the underlying mechanisms. A batch experiment was designed with 6 tanks with 1 m3 of pig slurry each. After an initial phase of 7 days when none of the tanks were aerated, a second phase of 4 weeks subjected three of the tanks to aeration (2 min every 6 h, airflow 10 m3 h-1), whereas the other three tanks remained as a control. A final phase of 9 days was established with no aeration in any tank. Emissions of NH3, CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2) and N2O were measured. In the initial phase no differences in emissions were detected, but during the second phase aeration increased NH3 emissions by 20% with respect to the controls (8.48 vs. 7.07 g m-3 [slurry] d-1, P effect was detected for CO2, and no relevant N2O emissions were detected during the experiment. Our results demonstrate that low frequency aeration of stored pig slurry increases slurry pH and increases NH3 emissions.