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Sample records for water reactor feedwater

  1. Feedwater processing method in a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumitani, M; Tanno, K

    1976-09-06

    The purpose of the invention is to decrease a quantity of corrosion products moving from the feedwater system to the core. Water formed into vapor after heated in a reactor is fed to the turbine through a main steam line to drive a generator to return it to liquid-state water in a condenser. The water is then again cycled into the reactor via the condensate pump, desalting unit, low pressure feedwater heater, medium pressure feedwater heater, and high pressure feedwater heater. The reactor water is recycled by a recycling pump. At this time, the reactor water recycled by the recycling pump is partially poured into a middle point between the desalting unit and the low pressure feedwater heater through a reducing valve or the like. With the structure described above, the quantity of the corrosion products from the feedwater system may be decreased by the function of a large quantity of active oxygen contained in the reactor water.

  2. Pressurized water-reactor feedwater piping response to water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1978-03-01

    The nuclear power industry is interested in steam-generator water hammer because it has damaged the piping and components at pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water hammer arises when rapid steam condensation in the steam-generator feedwater inlet of a PWR causes depressurization, water-slug acceleration, and slug impact at the nearest pipe elbow. The resulting pressure pulse causes the pipe system to shake, sometimes violently. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential structural effects of steam-generator water hammer on feedwater piping. This was accomplished by finite-element computation of the response of two sections of a typical feedwater pipe system to four representative water-hammer pulses. All four pulses produced high shear and bending stresses in both sections of pipe. Maximum calculated pipe stresses varied because the sections had different characteristics and were sensitive to boundary-condition modeling

  3. Reactor feedwater device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress soluble radioactive corrosion products in a feedwater device. Method: In a light water cooled nuclear reactor, an iron injection system is connected to feedwater pipeways and the iron concentration in the feedwater or reactor coolant is adjusted between twice and ten times of the nickel concentration. When the nickel/iron ratio in the reactor coolant or feedwater goes nearer to 1/2, iron ions are injected together with iron particles to the reactor coolant to suppress the leaching of stainless steels, decrease the nickel in water and increase the iron concentration. As a result, it is possible to suppress the intrusion of nickel as one of parent nuclide of radioactive nuclides. Further, since the iron particles intruded into the reactor constitute nuclei for capturing the radioactive nuclides to reduce the soluble radioactive corrosion products, the radioactive nuclides deposited uniformly to the inside of the pipeways in each of the coolant circuits can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagaya, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1993-01-01

    In a simplified water type reactor using a gravitationally dropping emergency core cooling system (ECCS), the present invention effectively prevents remaining high temperature water in feedwater pipelines from flowing into the reactor upon occurrence of abnormal events. That is, (1) upon LOCA, if a feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed, boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water occurs in the feedwater pipelines, generated steams prevent the remaining high temperature water from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is depressurized rapidly. (2) The feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed and a bypassing valve is opened. Steams generated by boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water in the feedwater pipelines are released to a condensator or a suppression pool passing through bypass pipelines. As a result, the remaining high temperature water is prevented from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is rapidly depressurized and cooled. It is possible to accelerate the depressurization of the reactor by the method described above. Further, load on the depressurization valve disposed to a main steam pipe can be reduced. (I.S.)

  5. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Reactor feedwater facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Akatsu, Jun-ichi

    1996-04-30

    In a reactor feedwater facility in which one stand-by system and at least three ordinary systems are disposed in parallel, each of the feedwater pumps is driven by an electromotor, and has substantially the same capacity. At least two systems among the ordinary systems have a pump rotation number variable means. Since the volume of each of the feedwater pump of each system is determined substantially equal, standardization is enabled to facilitate the production. While the number of electromotors is increased, since they are driven by electromotors, turbines, steam pipelines and valves for driving feed water pumps can be eliminated. Therefore, the feedwater pumps can be disposed to a region of low radiation dose being separated from a main turbine and a main condensator, to improve the degree of freedom in view of the installation. In addition, accessibility to equipments during operation is improved to improve the maintenance of feed water facilities. The number of parts for equipments can be reduced compared with that in a turbine-driving system thereby capable of reducing the operation amount for the maintenance and inspection. (N.H.)

  7. Reactor feedwater pump control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    An amount of feedwater necessary for ensuring reactor inventory after scram is ensured automatically based on the reactor output before scram of a BWR type reactor. That is, if scram should occur, a feedwater flow rate just before the scram is stored by reactor output signals. Further, the amount of feedwater required after the scram is determined based on the output of the memory. The reactor power after the scram based on a feedwater flow rate and a main steam flow rate is inputted to an integrator, to calculate and output the amount of the feedwater flow rate (1) injected after the scram for the inventory. A coast down flowrate (2) in a case of pump trip is forecast by the output signals. Automatic trip is outputted to all turbine driving feedwater pumps when the sum of (1) and (2) exceeds a necessary and sufficient amount of feedwater required for ensuring inventory. For motor driving feedwater pumps, only a portion, for example, one of the pumps is automatically started while other pumps are stopped their operation, only in this case, to prevent excess water feeding. (I.S.)

  8. 77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265 is proposed revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.68.1... Plants,'' dated January 1977. This regulatory guide is being revised to: (1) expand the scope of the...

  9. Dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, J.; Omori, T.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code, CONFAC, has been developed for dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants. This code simulates the hydrodynamics in the piping system, the pump dynamics, and the feedwater controller in order to clarify the system transient characteristics in such cases as pump trip incidents. Code verification was performed by comparison between analytical results and actual plant operational data. Satisfactory agreement was obtained. With the code, appropriate pump start/stop interlocks were estimated for preventing pump cavitation in pump trip incidents

  10. Feedwater recycling system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety by preventing thermal stresses and cracks generated in structural materials due to the fluctuations in the temperature for high temperature water - low temperature water mixture near the feedwater nozzle. Method: Feedwater pipes are connected to a pressure vessel not directly but by way of a flow control valve. While the recycled water is circulated from an inlet nozzle to an outlet nozzle through a recycle pump, flow control valve and recycling pipeways, feedwater is fed from the feedwater pipes to the recycling pipeways by way of the flow control valve. More specifically, since the high temperature recycle water and the low temperature recycle water are mixed within the pipeways, the temperature fluctuations resulted from the temperature difference between the recycle water and the feedwater is reduced to prevent thermal fatigue and generation of cracks thereby securing the reactor safety. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Collector feedwater supply and stability of the power distribution in a pressurized-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnikov, V.I.; Kosolapov, S.V.; Kramerov, A.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    It is necessary to determine how the collector feedwater supply affects the disposition of the stability limits and the instability period for the power distribution in such a reactor. The main reason for the fluctuations in feedwater flow rate were shown by additional calculations with the general power regulator switched out to be due to instability on the fundamental in the neutron distribution. The power-level fluctuations are due to oscillation of the feed valve in the level regulator, and consequently to oscillations in the feedwater flow rate. If collector feed is to be employed, it is desirable to improve the response of the pressure control system for the separator drum, because under certain emergency conditions there will be a considerable fall in pressure in the separator drum. The deviation from saturation for the water in the separator drum tube is less in the second method than it is in the first, so the cavitation margin in the principal pumps may be reduced somewhat. Calculations show that this reduction will not occur if the time constant of the turbine synchronizer is about 10 sec. Also, the dynamic characteristics of the nuclear power station in these modes of feedwater supply are appreciably influenced by the parameters of the pressure-control system and the water-level control for the separator drum

  12. Monitor for reactor feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji; Tomizawa, Teruaki

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of operator's procedures upon occurrence of the feedwater system abnormality in a BWR type reactor by presenting the operation with effective information to avoid such abnormality. Constitution: A feedwater temperature at the reactor inlet of a reactor feedwater system measured by a temperature detector and a predetermined value for the feedwater temperature at the reactor inlet determined depending on the reactor conditions are inputted to a start-up system. The start-up system outputs a start-up signal when the difference between the inputted values exceeds a predetermined value. Then, the start-up signal is inputted to a display device where information required for the operator is displayed in the device. Thus, the information required for the operator is rapidly provided upon abnormality of the feedwater system to thereby improve the reliability of the operator's procedures. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikabe, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to prevent thermal stresses of a core of PWR type reactor, described has been a method for feeding heated recirculating water to the core in the case of the reactor start-up or shut-down. Constitution: A recirculating water is degassed, cleaned up and heated in the steam condensers, and then feeds the water to the reactor, characterized in that heaters are provided in the bypasses of the turbine, so that heated water is constantly supplied to the reactor. (Nakamura, S.)

  14. Reactor feedwater control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji.

    1993-01-01

    In the device of the present invention, an excess response is not caused in a reactor feed water system even when voids are fluctuated by using an actual water level signal as a reactor water level signal. That is, a standard water level signal and a reactor water level signal are inputted to a comparator. An adder adds water level difference signal outputted from the comparator and mismatch flow rate signal prepared by multiplying the difference between a main steam flow rate signal and a feed water flow rate signal by a mismatch gain. A feed water controller integrates the added signal and outputs flow rate demand signal. A feed water system receives the flow rate demand signal as input. A water level calculation means is disposed to such a device for calculating an actual water level based on the change of coolant possessing amount of the reactor, and the output thereof is defined as a reactor water level signal. With such procedures, excessive elevation of water level of the reactor can be prevented even upon occurrence of void fluctuation phenomenon or the like in the reactor such as upon sole scram operation. Accordingly, plant shut down caused thereby can be avoided safely. (I.S.)

  15. Ethanolamine properties and use for feedwater pH control: A pressurized water reactor case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, D.L.; Polidoroff, C.T.; Cortese, S.; Cushner, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Ethanolamine (ETA) as a feedwater pH control additive has been recently used to minimize corrosion of secondary water components in the nuclear power industry pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The use of ETA is compared with ammonia. Relative volatility effects on various parts of the system are analyzed and chemistry changes are presented. Materials of construction and the use of existing plant equipment for ETA service are discussed. Properties of ETA as well as safety, storage and handling issues are compared with ammonia. Health d aquatic toxicity are reviewed. warnings, safety, handling guidelines, biodegradability an Diablo Canyon Power Plant used ammonia for pH control from 1985 until a change over to ETA in 1993/1994. Full flow condensate polishers that are required to protect the plant from saltwater cooling incursions limit the amount of pH additive. Iron levels in the secondary water systems are compared before and after changing to ETA and replacement of corrosion-susceptible piping. Iron reduction benefits are assessed along with other effects on the feedwater nozzles, low pressure turbine, polisher resin capacity and polisher regeneration system

  16. Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads

  17. Device for detecting the water leak within a feedwater nozzle in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Tsunekazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable exact recognition and detection for the state of water leak. Constitution: The detection device comprises a thermocouple disposed to the outer surface of a feedwater nozzle, a distortion meter for detecting the change in the outer diameter of a nozzle and an acoustic emission generator disposed to the inside of the nozzle for generating a signal upon temperature change. These sensors previously monitor the states during normal operation, and thus detect the change in each of the states upon occurrence of water leakage to issue an alarm. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Influence of the loop design of the feedwater- and steam quality in a power plant with pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennert, J.; Becher, L.

    1977-01-01

    At nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, condensate occurs on the high pressure part of the water-steam circuit, caused by the operation with low steam parameters. The behaviour of the electrolytes which entered into the circuit (solubility, distribution in water and/or steam) shows that these electrolytes (salts) are to be found mainly in the condensate. The insinuated electrolytes are reconcentrated during the common arrangements with 'Small Circuit' - consisting of steam generator, high pressure turbine, water separator, feedwater vessel, and have a negative influence on the feedwater - boiler water - and the steam quality. Remedy is possible by modified arrangements, during which these electrolyte-containing condensates will be treated and traced back into the main circuit. Nevertheless that the efficiency decrease is insignificant and additional efforts are necessary, a change over to these arrangements is recommendable, due to the fact that the feedwater quality, the boiler water quality, the steam quality in front of the turbine, and finally also the operational safety, as well as the availability will be improved. (orig.) [de

  19. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

  20. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage

  1. Reliability study of the auxiliary feed-water system of a pressurized water reactor by faults tree and Bayesian Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Guimarães, Antonio Cesar Ferreira; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to present a study of the reliability of the Auxiliary Feed-water System (AFWS) through the methods of Fault Tree and Bayesian Network. Therefore, the paper consists of a literature review of the history of nuclear energy and the methodologies used. The AFWS is responsible for providing water system to cool the secondary circuit of nuclear reactors of the PWR type when normal feeding water system failure. How this system operates only when the primary system fails, it is expected that the AFWS failure probability is very low. The AFWS failure probability is divided into two cases: the first is the probability of failure in the first eight hours of operation and the second is the probability of failure after eight hours of operation, considering that the system has not failed within the first eight hours. The calculation of the probability of failure of the second case was made through the use of Fault Tree and Bayesian Network, that it was constructed from the Fault Tree. The results of the failure probability obtained were very close, on the order of 10 -3 . (author)

  2. Reliability study of the auxiliary feed-water system of a pressurized water reactor by faults tree and Bayesian Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Guimarães, Antonio Cesar Ferreira; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: deise_dy@hotmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to present a study of the reliability of the Auxiliary Feed-water System (AFWS) through the methods of Fault Tree and Bayesian Network. Therefore, the paper consists of a literature review of the history of nuclear energy and the methodologies used. The AFWS is responsible for providing water system to cool the secondary circuit of nuclear reactors of the PWR type when normal feeding water system failure. How this system operates only when the primary system fails, it is expected that the AFWS failure probability is very low. The AFWS failure probability is divided into two cases: the first is the probability of failure in the first eight hours of operation and the second is the probability of failure after eight hours of operation, considering that the system has not failed within the first eight hours. The calculation of the probability of failure of the second case was made through the use of Fault Tree and Bayesian Network, that it was constructed from the Fault Tree. The results of the failure probability obtained were very close, on the order of 10{sup -3}. (author)

  3. Application of fuzzy logic control system for reactor feed-water control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, T.; Nakajima, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The successful actual application of a fuzzy logic control system to the a nuclear Fugen nuclear power reactor is described. Fugen is a heavy-water moderated, light-water cooled reactor. The introduction of fuzzy logic control system has enabled operators to control the steam drum water level more effectively in comparison to a conventional proportional-integral (PI) control system

  4. Simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller in a Boiling water reactor with the Ramona-3B code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, J.L.; Ortiz V, J.

    2005-01-01

    The obtained results when carrying out the simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller (FCAA) with the Ramona-3B code, happened in the Unit 2 of the Laguna Verde power plant (CNLV), in September of the year 2000 are presented. The transitory originates as consequence of the controller's fault of speed of a turbo pump of feedwater. The work includes a short description of the event, the suppositions considered for the simulation and the obtained results. Also, a discussion of the impact of the transitory event is presented on aspects of reactor safety. Although the carried out simulation is limited by the capacities of the code and for the lack of available information, it was found that even in a conservative situation, the power was incremented only in 12% above the nominal value, while that the thermal limit determined by the minimum reason of the critical power, MCPR, always stayed above the limit values of operation and safety. (Author)

  5. A fuzzy logic controller for feedwater regulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eryuerek, E.E.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Alguindigue, I.E.

    1994-01-01

    Fuzzy control refers to the application of fuzzy logic theory to control systems. In this paper fuzzy controllers for steam generator water level control and pump speed control are presented, and their performance in the presence of perturbations is discussed. In order to test the robustness of the controllers, their performance is compared with the performance of model based adaptive controllers and traditional PID controllers. The control actions calculated by the fuzzy controllers is have the characteristic of quick and smooth control compared to the others

  6. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Comparison of finite element and influence function methods for three-dimensional elastic analysis of boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle cracks. Phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Caughey, W.R.

    1976-11-01

    The finite element (FE) and influence function (IF) methods are compared for a three-dimensional elastic analysis of postulated circular-shaped surface cracks in the feedwater nozzle of a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). These are two of the possible methods for determining stress intensity factors for nozzle corner cracks. The FE method is incorporated in a direct manner. The IF method is used to compute stress intensity factors only when the uncracked stress field (i.e., the stress in the uncracked solid at the locus of the crack to be eventually considered) has been computed previously. Both the IF and FE methods are described in detail and are applied to several test cases chosen for their similarity to the nozzle crack problem and for the availablility of an accurate published result obtained from some recognized third method of solution

  8. Condensate and feedwater systems, pumps, and water chemistry. Volume seven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes condensate and feedwater systems (general features of condensate and feedwater systems, condenser hotwell level control, condensate flow, feedwater flow), pumps (principles of fluid flow, types of pumps, centrifugal pumps, positive displacement pumps, jet pumps, pump operating characteristics) and water chemistry (water chemistry fundamentals, corrosion, scaling, radiochemistry, water chemistry control processes, water pretreatment, PWR water chemistry, BWR water chemistry, condenser circulating water chemistry

  9. Comparison of finite element and influence function methods for three-dimensional elastic analysis of boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Caughey, W.R.

    1976-11-01

    The paper compares the finite element (FE) and influence function (IF) methods for a three-dimensional elastic analysis of postulated circular-shaped surface cracks in the feedwater nozzle of a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The FE method is incorporated in a direct manner. The nozzle and crack geometry and the complex loading are all included in the model which simulates the structural crack problem. The IF method is used to compute stress intensity factors only when the uncracked stress field (that is, the stress in the uncracked solid at the locus of the crack to be eventually considered) has been computed previously. The IF method evaluates correctly the disturbance of this uncracked stress field caused by the crack by utilizing a method of elastic superposition. Both the IF and FE methods are described in detail in the paper and are applied to several test cases chosen for their similarity to the nozzle crack problem and for the availability of an accurate published result obtained from some recognized third method of solution. Results are given which summarize both the accuracy and the direct computer costs of the two methods

  10. An interface redesign for the feed-water system of the advanced boiling water reactor in a nuclear power plant in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Minchih; Chiu Mingchuan; Hwang Sheueling

    2014-01-01

    A well-designed human-computer interface for the visual display unit in the control room of a complex environment can enhance operator efficiency and, thus, environmental safety. In fact, a cognitive gap often exists between an interface designer and an interface user. Therefore, the issue of the cognitive gap of interface design needs more improvement and investigation. This is an empirical study that presents the application of an ecological interface design (EID) using three cases and demonstrates that an EID framework can support operators in various complex situations. Specifically, it analyzes different levels of automation and emergency condition response at the Lungmen Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan. A simulated feed-water system was developed involving two interface styles. This study uses the NASA Task Load Index to objectively evaluate the mental workload of the human operators and the Situation Awareness Rating Technique to subjectively assess operator understanding and response, and is a pilot study investigating EID display format use at nuclear power plants in Taiwan. Results suggest the EID-based interface has a remarkable advantage over the original interface in supporting operator performance in the areas of response time and accuracy rate under both normal and emergency situations and provide supporting evidence that an EID-based interface can effectively enhance monitoring tasks in a complex environment. (author)

  11. An estimation of reactor thermal power uncertainty using UFM-based feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Ryul Jung; Ho Cheol Jang; Byung Jin Lee; Se Jin Baik; Woo Hyun Jang

    2005-01-01

    Most of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) utilize the venturi meters (VMs) to measure the feedwater (FW) flow rate to the steam generator in the calorimetric measurement, which is used in the reactor thermal power (RTP) estimation. However, measurement drifts have been experienced due to some anomalies on the venturi meter (generally called the venturi meter fouling). The VM's fouling tends to increase the measured pressure drop across the meter, which results in indication of increased feedwater flow rate. Finally, the reactor thermal power is overestimated and the actual reactor power is to be reduced to remain within the regulatory limits. To overcome this VM's fouling problem, the Ultrasonic Flow Meter (UFM) has recently been gaining attention in the measurement of the feedwater flow rate. This paper presents the applicability of a UFM based feedwater flow rate in the estimation of reactor thermal power uncertainty. The FW and RTP uncertainties are compared in terms of sensitivities between the VM- and UFM-based feedwater flow rates. Data from typical Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR1000) plants are used to estimate the uncertainty. (authors)

  12. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  13. Feedwater control system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuyama, Hideo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable switching operation for feedwater systems in a short time and with no fluctuations in the reactor water level by increasing or decreasing the flow rate in the feedwater systems during automatic operation by the amount of the fluctuations in the flow rate in the feedwater system during manual operation. Constitution: In a BWR type nuclear power plant having a plurality of feedwater systems to a nuclear reactor, a feedwater control system is constituted with a reactor water level controller, a M/A switcher for switching either of automatic flow rate demand signals or manual flow rate set signals from the reactor level controller to apply flow rate demand signals for each of the feedwater systems, a calculation device for calculating the flow rate set signals in the feedwater systems during manual operation and an adder for subtracting the flow rate set signals in the manual feedwater system calculated in the calculating device from the automatic flow rate demand signals for the feedwater systems during automatic operation. This enables rapid switching for the feedwater systems with no fluctuations in the reactor water level by increasing or decreasing the flow rate in the feedwater systems during automatic operation by the amount of fluctuations in the flow rate in the feedwater systems during manual operation and compensating the effects in upon manual and automatic switching by the M/A switcher. (Seki, T.)

  14. Feedwater system in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Tadayuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To improve the control property of a steam turbine for a feedwater pump and plant operation characteristics where water is supplied at a low rate. Structure: In a nuclear power plant where feedwater pumps of the reactor are driven by a steam turbine, the main feedwater duct on the discharge side of the feedwater pumps is provided with a cut-off valve and is connected parallel with a bypass duct having a pressure compensated flow control valve. With this arrangement, at the time when the rate of feedwater is high the cut-off valve is open so that water supplied from the feedwater pumps driven by the steam turbine is supplied through the main feedwater duct to the reactor while in case when the rate of feedwater is low the flow control valve is opened to let the water be supplied through the bypass duct. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utagawa, Kazuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    A device of the present invention can effectively control fluctuation of a reactor water level upon power change by reactor core flow rate control operation. That is, (1) a feedback control section calculates a feedwater flow rate control amount based on a deviation between a set value of a reactor water level and a reactor water level signal. (2) a feed forward control section forecasts steam flow rate change based on a reactor core flow rate signal or a signal determining the reactor core flow rate, to calculate a feedwater flow rate control amount which off sets the steam flow rate change. Then, the sum of the output signal from the process (1) and the output signal from the process (2) is determined as a final feedwater flow rate control signal. With such procedures, it is possible to forecast the steam flow rate change accompanying the reactor core flow rate control operation, thereby enabling to conduct preceding feedwater flow rate control operation which off sets the reactor water level fluctuation based on the steam flow rate change. Further, a reactor water level deviated from the forecast can be controlled by feedback control. Accordingly, reactor water level fluctuation upon power exchange due to the reactor core flow rate control operation can rapidly be suppressed. (I.S.)

  16. Analysis of steam-generator tube-rupture events combined with auxiliary-feedwater control-system failure for Three Mile Island-Unit 1 and Zion-Unit 1 pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassersharif, B.

    1986-01-01

    A steam-generator tube-rupture (SGTR) event combined with loss of all offsite alternating-current power and failure of the auxiliary-feedwater (AFW) control system has been investigated for the Three Mile Island-Unit 1 (TMI-1) and Zion-Unit 1 (Zion-1) pressurized water reactors. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code was used to simulate the accident sequence for each plant. The objectives of the study were to predict the plant transient response with respect to tube-rupture flow termination, extent of steam generator overfill, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the steam lines. Two transient cases were calculated: (1) a TMI-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient, and (2) a Zion-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient. Operator actions terminated the tube-rupture flow by 1342 s (22.4 min) and 1440 s (24.0 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively, but AFW injection was continued. The damaged steam generator (DSG) overfilled by 1273 s (21.2 min) for the TMI-1 calculation and by 1604 s (26.7 min) for the Zion-1 calculation. The DSG steam lines were completely filled by 1500 s (25 min) and 2000 s (33.3 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively. The maximum subcooling in the steam lines was approx.63 K (approx.113 0 F) for TMI-1 and approx.44 K (approx.80 0 F) for Zion-1

  17. Feedwater control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Excessive swing of the feedwater in nuclear reactor power supply apparatus on the occurrence of a transient is suppressed by injecting an anticipatory compensating signal (δWsub(fw)) into the control for the feedwater. Typical overshoot occurs on removal of a large part of the load, the steam flow is reduced so that the conventional control system reduces the flow of feedwater. At the same time there is a reduction of feedwater level in the steam generator because of the collapse of the bubbles under increased steam pressure. By the time the control responds to the drop in level, the apparatus has begun to stabilize so that there is overshoot. The anticipatory signal is derived from the boiling power (BP) which is a function of the nuclear power (Qsub(N)) developed, the enthalpy of saturated water (hsub(s)) and the enthalpy of the feedwater injected into the steam generator (hsub(fw)). From the boiling power (BP) and the increment in steam pressure resulting from the transient an anticipatory increment of feedwater flow is derived. This increment is added to the other parameters controlling the feedwater. (author)

  18. Feedwater control method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Mitsugu; Ichikawa, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Mizuki, Fumio.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for easily changing the constitution of feedwater systems without causing change in the water level of a reactor even when a plurality of feedwater systems have imbalance points. Namely, a feedwater control device comprises at least two feedwater systems capable of feeding water to tanks independently respectively and a controller capable of controlling water level in the tanks by controlling these feedwater systems. There is disposed a means for outputting gradually increasing driving signals to other feedwater systems, when the water level controller automatically controls one of the feedwater systems. There is also disposed a means for switching from automatic control for one of the feedwater systems to automatic control for the other feedwater system by a water level controller when the other feedwater system is in a stable operation region. As a result, entire feedwater flow rate is not temporarily changed and the water level in the tanks can be maintained constant. (N.H.)

  19. Feedwater heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Shigeto; Minato, Akihiko; Yokomizo, Osamu; Masuhara, Yasuhiro.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a feedwater heater for a BWR type reactor. A cylinder is fit into the lower portion of a drain inlet pipe, to which drain water inflows from a turbine, and a disk is disposed to the lower end of the cylinder vertically to the axis of the cylinder, to constitute a drain water dispersing mechanism. Drain water inflown from the drain inlet pipe is fallen in the cylinder and collides against the disk. The collided drain water is splashed horizontally by its kinetic energy to reach the heat transfer pipe and conducts heat exchange. In this case, the drain water is converted into fine droplets by the collision against the disk and scattered in a wide range in the heater. As a result, sensible heat in the drain water can be transferred to feedwater effectively. Then, even the heat energy of the drain water can be utilized effectively for heat exchange, to improve the heat exchange efficiency. (I.N.)

  20. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Kotaro; Ishida, Masayoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To connect a feedwater pipe to a recycling pipe line, the recycling pipe line being made smaller in diameter, thereby minimizing loss of coolant resulting from rupture of the pipe and improving safety against trouble of coolant loss. Structure: A feedwater pipe is directly connected to a recycling pipe line before a booster pump, and a mixture of recycling water and feedwater is increased in pressure by the booster pump, after which it is introduced into a jet pump in the form of water for driving the jet pump to suck surrounding water causing it to be flown into the core. In accordance with the abovementioned structure, since the flow of feedwater can be used as a part of water for driving the jet pump, the flow within the recycling pipe line may be decreased so that the recycling pipe line can be made smaller in diameter to reduce the flow of coolant in the reactor, which flows out when the pipe is ruptured. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Assessment of a potential rapid condensation induced water hammer in a passive auxiliary feedwater system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Shin, Byung Soo; Do, Kyu Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moody, Frederick J. [General Electric (Retired), CA (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) which is incorporated in the APR+ system is a kind of closed natural circulation loop. The PAFS has no operating functions during normal plant operation, but it has a dedicated safety function of the residual heat removal following initiating events, including the unlikely event of the most limiting single failure occurring coincident with a loss of offsite power, when the feedwater system becomes inoperable or unavailable. Even in the unlikely event of a station blackout, the isolation valves can be opened either by DC power or manual operation and then the PAFS can also provide adequate condensate to the steam generator (SG). The PAFS piping in the vicinity of each of the two SGs is designed to minimize the potential for destructive water hammer during start up operation by setting the stroke time for full close or full open of the condensate isolation valves upon receipt of a passive auxiliary feedwater actuation signal. The temperature of the stagnant condensate water and its surrounding tubes and piping during the reactor normal operation modes may fall to the ambient temperature. A possible concern is the introduction of saturated steam into the PAFS recirculation pipe downstream of the PCHX in the beginning of the PAFS operation. Although the steam introduction rate is expected to be slow, a rapid condensation rate is expected due to the initial cold surrounding temperature in the pipe, which could result in a localized pressure reduction and the propagation of decompression and velocity disturbances into the condensate water leg, which might cause the sudden closure of check valves and associated water hammer. Thus, it is requisite for the licensing review of the PAFS design to confirm if destructive water hammers will not be produced due to such rapid condensation induced decompressions in the system. This paper addresses an assessment of the potential local decompressions which could result from the steam

  2. Cleaning the feed-water pipeline internal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkopaev, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    The procedure of cleaning the feed-water pipeline internal surfaces at the Chernobylsk-4 power unit is described. Cleaning was conducted in five stages. Pipelines were cleaned from mechanical impurities at the first stage. At the second stage the pipelines were washing by water heated up to 80 deg C. At the third stage nitric acid was added to 95-100 deg C water the acid concentration in the circuit = 60 mg/l, purification period = 14 h. At the fourth stage hydrogen peroxide was added to the circuit at 95-100 deg C (the solution concentration was equal to 5-6 mg/l, the solution stayed in the circuit for 1 h 20 min). At the fifth stage sodium nitrite concentrated to 20 mg/l was introduced to the circuit in 75 minutes; this promoted strengthening of the oxide layer in the circuit on the base of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Data on the water acidity in the circuit, water electric conductivity and iron concentration after the fourth stage and on completion of the circuit cleaning are presented. The described method of cleaning enables to save scarce reagents and use cheaper ones

  3. Cleaning the feed-water pipeline internal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podkopaev, V.A.

    1984-12-01

    The procedure of cleaning the feed-water pipeline internal surfaces at the Chernobylsk-4 power unit is described. Cleaning was conducted in five stages. Pipelines were cleaned from mechanical impurities at the first stage. At the second stage the pipelines were washed by water heated up to 80 deg C. At the third stage nitric acid was added to 95-100 deg C water with the acid concentration in the circuit = 60 mg/l, purification period = 14 h. At the fourth stage hydrogen peroxide was added to the circuit at 95-100 deg C (the solution concentration was equal to 5-6 mg/l, the solution stayed in the circuit for 1 h 20 min). At the fifth stage sodium nitrite concentrated to 20 mg/l was introduced to the circuit in 75 minutes; this promoted strengthening of the oxide layer in the circuit on the base of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. Data on the water acidity in the circuit, water electric conductivity and iron concentration after the fourth stage and on completion of the circuit cleaning are presented. The described method of cleaning enables to save scarce reagents and use cheaper ones.

  4. Factors analysis of water hammer in FLOWMASTER for main feedwater systems of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Han Weishi

    2010-01-01

    The main feedwater system of a nuclear power plant (NPP) is an important part in ensuring the cooling of a steam generator. It is the main pipe section where water hammers frequently occur. Studying the regulator patterns of water hammers in the main feedwater systems is significant to the stable operation of the system. This article focuses on a parametric study to avoid the consequences of water hammer effect in PWR by employing a general purpose fluid dynamic simulation software-FLOWMASTER. Through FLOWMASTER's transient calculating functions, a mathematical model is established with boundary conditions such as feedwater pumps, control valves, etc., calculations of water hammer pressure when feedwater pumps and control valves shut down, and simulations during instantaneous changes in water hammer pressure. Combining a plethora of engineering practical examples, this research verified the viability of calculating water hammer pressure through FLOWMASTER's transient functions and we found out that, increasing the periods of closure of control valves and feedwater pumps control water hammers effectively. We also found out that changing the intervals of closing signals to feedwater pumps and control valves aid to relieve hydraulic impact. This could be a guideline for practical engineering design and system optimization. (author)

  5. Water hammer calculation and analysis in main feedwater system of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Han Weishi

    2010-01-01

    The main feedwater system of a nuclear power plant is an important part in ensuring the cooling of the steam generator. Moreover, it is the main pipe section where water hammers frequently occur. Studying the regular patterns of water hammers to the main feedwater system is significant to the stable operation of the system. The paper focuses on the study of water hammers through Flowmaster's transient calculating function to establish a mathematical model with boundary conditions such as a feedwater pump, control valves, etc.; calculation of the water hammers pressure when feedwater pumps and control valves shut down; exporting the instantaneous change in solution of pressure. Combined with engineering practical examples, the conclusions verify the viability of calculating the water hammers pressure through Flowmaster's transient function, increasing the periods of closure of control valves and feedwater pumps control water hammers effectively, changing the intervals of closing signals to feedwater pumps and control valves to relieve hydraulic impact. This could be a guideline for practical engineering design and system optimization. (authors)

  6. Water-hammer in the feed-water pipes for PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonnet, Bernard; Leroy, Claude; Oullion, Jean; Yazidjian, J.-C.

    1979-01-01

    PWR boiler water feed pipes have been known for several years to be affected by violent water-hammer during start-ups and operation of the plant. In view of the varying results of corrective design modifications in America and Europe, FRAMATOME undertook an experimental research programme which resulted in the adoption of cruciform tubes on the feed-water distributor as the most reliable solution. Subsequent tests at Fessenheim I confirmed the effectiveness of this device [fr

  7. A Smart Soft Sensor Predicting Feedwater Flow Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Heon Young; Na, Man Gyun

    2009-01-01

    Since we evaluate thermal nuclear reactor power with secondary system calorimetric calculations based on feedwater flow rate measurements, we need to measure the feedwater flow rate accurately. The Venturi flow meters that are being used to measure the feedwater flow rate in most pressurized water reactors (PWRs) measure the flow rate by developing a differential pressure across a physical flow restriction. The differential pressure is then multiplied by a calibration factor that depends on various flow conditions in order to calculate the feedwater flow rate. The calibration factor is determined by the feedwater temperature and pressure. However, Venturi meters cause a buildup of corrosion products near the orifice of the meter. This fouling increases the measured pressure drop across the meter, thereby causing an overestimation of the feedwater flow rate

  8. Resolution of concerns in auxiliary feedwater piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, R.A.; Testa, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Auxiliary feedwater piping systems at pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced unanticipated operating conditions during plant operation. These unanticipated conditions have included plant events involving backleakage through check valves, temperatures in portions of the auxiliary feedwater piping system that exceed design conditions, and the occurrence of unanticipated severe fluid transients. The impact of these events has had an adverse effect at some nuclear stations on plant operation, installed plant components and hardware, and design basis calculations. Beaver Valley Unit 2, a three loop pressurized water reactor nuclear plant, has observed anomalies with the auxiliary feedwater system since the unit went operational in 1987. The consequences of these anomalies and plant events have been addressed and resolved for Beaver Valley Unit 2 by performing engineering and construction activities. These activities included pipe stress, pipe support and pipe rupture analysis, the monitoring of auxiliary feedwater system temperature and pressure, and the modification to plant piping, supports, valves, structures and operating procedures

  9. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  10. Operational challenges to feedwater/steam generator water level control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.M.; Whaley, S.D.; Federico, P.A. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Feedwater control and turbine control have historically been at the top of the list of contributors to unplanned outages and forced curtailments in the nuclear industry, and they remain so according to recent industry data. Much has been done and is available by way of measures to improve this area and, in spite of much progress, opportunities remain to extend implementation. Toward this end, this paper aims to focus upon feedwater control and provide background on associated characteristics and attributes as a context for identifying the issues which are key challenges that lie at the root of this concern. Primary groupings of these issues will be discussed in order to better define their nature and to establish a basis for a presentation of the range of solutions which have been implemented and remain available to address them. The need for a systems engineering approach, and the role of I&C and field-mounted equipment to application of these solutions will be discussed. (author)

  11. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, S.; Katajala, S.; Elsing, B.; Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J.; Pullinen, J.; Logvinov, S.A.; Trunov, N.B.; Sitnik, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.)

  12. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S.; Katajala, S.; Elsing, B.; Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Pullinen, J. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Logvinov, S.A.; Trunov, N.B.; Sitnik, J.K. [EDO Gidropress (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.).

  13. Condensation driven water hammer studies for feedwater distribution pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S; Katajala, S; Elsing, B; Nurkkala, P; Hoikkanen, J [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Pullinen, J [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Logvinov, S A; Trunov, N B; Sitnik, J K [EDO Gidropress (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy, IVO, operates two VVER 440 reactors. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damages of the feed water distribution (FWD) pipes were observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection turned out to suffer from severe erosion corrosion damages. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER 440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first new FWD-pipe was replaced and in 1996 extensive water hammer experiments were carried out together with EDO Gidropress in Podolsk. After the first phase of the experiments some fundamental changes were made to the construction of the FWD-pipe. The object of this paper is to give short insight to the design of the new FWD-pipe concentrating on water hammer experiments. (orig.).

  14. Experience feedback of an operation event during the experiment of feed-water pump switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shuhai; Li Huasheng; Zhang Hao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an event is summarized and analyzed, which caused the quit of the high-pressure heaters and the nuclear power rising, during the experiment of the driven feed-water pump switch. The good experience feedback on this event is brought out through gathering related information of domestic nuclear plants. (authors)

  15. Feedwater device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikekita, Iwao.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct water feeding without using high pressure steam of the reactor and with no radiation exposure by the provision of each feedwater pump driven by each motor controlled from variable frequency thyristor-inverter to a feedwater pipe connecting a condensate pump and the reactor. Constitution: High pressure steams resulted from heat exchange in the reactor core are transferred by way of a main steam check valve in a main steam pipe to a high pressure turbine, drive the high pressure turbine, flow out of the turbine and then drive a low pressure turbine by way of a moisture separator. The steams thus used for the turbine driving are condensed in a condensator and then sent under pressure by way of each condensating pump to a feedwater pipe. Since each of the feedwater pumps provided in the route of the feedwater pipe is driven by each of the motors under the control of the variable frequency thyristor-inverter in starting, shut down and normal operation, water is fed to the reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of a supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.

    2007-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed for a hypothetical design of a Supercritical Water Reactor, with emphasis on Canadian design criteria. The model solves for cycle efficiency, mass flows and physical conditions throughout the plant based on input parameters of operating pressures and efficiencies of components. The model includes eight feedwater heaters, three feedwater pumps, a deaerator, a condenser, the core, three turbines and two reheaters. To perform the calculations, Microsoft Excel was used in conjunction with FLUIDCAL-IAPWS95 and VBA code. The calculations show that a thermal efficiency of 47.5% can be achieved with a core outlet temperature of 625 o C. (author)

  17. Reactor water quality degradation suppressing method upon reactor start up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuharu.

    1993-01-01

    Preceding to reactor start-up, vacuum degree in a condenser is increased, and after the vacuum degree has been increased sufficiently, a desalting tower is inserted. Then, water feed to the reactor is started and the reactor is operated so that water is supplied gradually. Thus, dissolved oxygen in the feedwater and condensates is kept low and an entire organic carbon leaching rate from resins in the condensate desalting tower is reduced. Further, since feedwater is gradually supplied after the start-up, the entire organic carbon brought into the reactor is decomposed by heat and radiation and efficiently removed by a reactor coolant cleanup system. As a result, corrosion of stainless steel or the like is suppressed, as well as integrity of fuels can be maintained. Further, degradation of water quality can be suppressed effectively not by additionally putting the condensate desalting towers to in-service in accordance with the increase of the feedwater flow rate accompanying the power up but by previously putting the condensate desalting towers to in-service. (N.H.)

  18. Developing the optimum boiler water and feedwater treatment for fossil plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, B [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Over the last two years a new set of cycle chemistry guidelines has been developed for each of the treatments used in fossil plants. These revisions have been based on research conducted over the last ten years, much at the international collaborative level. By careful selection and optimization of the boiler water and feedwater treatments, it will be possible to accrue large financial, maintenance, availability and performance improvements. (au) 14 refs.

  19. Simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller in a Boiling water reactor with the Ramona-3B code; Simulacion del transitorio de falla del controlador de agua de alimentacion en un reactor de agua en ebullicion con el codigo RAMONA-3B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez M, J.L.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The obtained results when carrying out the simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller (FCAA) with the Ramona-3B code, happened in the Unit 2 of the Laguna Verde power plant (CNLV), in September of the year 2000 are presented. The transitory originates as consequence of the controller's fault of speed of a turbo pump of feedwater. The work includes a short description of the event, the suppositions considered for the simulation and the obtained results. Also, a discussion of the impact of the transitory event is presented on aspects of reactor safety. Although the carried out simulation is limited by the capacities of the code and for the lack of available information, it was found that even in a conservative situation, the power was incremented only in 12% above the nominal value, while that the thermal limit determined by the minimum reason of the critical power, MCPR, always stayed above the limit values of operation and safety. (Author)

  20. Influence of reactor vessel nodalization in the coupled code analysis of Asymmetric Main Feedwater Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Feretic, D.; Grgic, D.

    2001-01-01

    Asymmetric Main Feedwater Isolation (AMFWI) transient in one Steam Generator (SG) for NPP Krsko using RELAP5 standalone code and coupled code RELAP5- QUABOX/CUBBOX (R5QC) was analyzed. In the RELAP5 standalone calculation, a point kinetics model was used, while in the coupled code a three-dimensional (3D) neutronics model of QUABOX with different RELAP5 nodalization schemes of reactor vessel was used. Both code versions use best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code for all components in the plant and include realistic description of plant protection and control systems. Two different types of calculations were performed: with and without automatic control rod system available. The AMFWI transient causes the great asymmetry of the transferred heat in the SGs and subsequently the asymmetry of the power produced across the core due to different reactivity feedback resulting from the thermal-hydraulic channels assigned to different loops. The work presented in the paper is a part of validation of the 3D coupled code R5QC in the analysis of asymmetric transients.(author)

  1. Aging assessment of auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) Systems has been conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The study has reviewed historical failure experience and current monitoring practices for the AFW System. This paper provides an overview of the study approach and results. 7 figs

  2. Hydrogen water chemistry for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Cowan, R.L.; Kass, J.N.; Law, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) is now a practical countermeasure for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of reactor structural materials in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The concept, which involves adding hydrogen to the feedwater to suppress the formation of oxidizing species in the reactor, has been extensively studied in both the laboratory and in several operating plants. The Dresden-2 Unit of Commonwealth Edison Company has completed operation for one full 18-month fuel cycle under HWC conditions. The specifications, procedures, equipment, instrumentation and surveillance programs needed for commercial application of the technology are available now. This paper provides a review of the benefits to be obtained, the side affects, and the special operational considerations needed for commercial implementation of HWC. Technological and management ''Lessons Learned'' from work conducted to date are also described

  3. Smart Soft-Sensing for the Feedwater Flowrate at PWRs Using a GMDH Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Sung Han; Na, Man Gyun

    2010-02-01

    The thermal reactor power in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is typically assessed using secondary system calorimetric calculations based on accurate measurements of the feedwater flowrate. Therefore, precise measurements of the feedwater flowrate are essential. In most PWRs, Venturi meters are used to measure the feedwater flowrate. However, the fouling phenomena of the Venturi meter deteriorate the accuracy of the existing hardware sensors. Consequently, it is essential to resolve the inaccurate measurements of the feedwater flowrate. In this study, in order to estimate the feedwater flowrate online with high precision, a smart soft sensing model for monitoring the feedwater flowrate was developed using a group method of data handling (GMDH) algorithm combined with a sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). The uncertainty of the GMDH model was also analyzed. The proposed sensing and monitoring algorithm was verified using the acquired real plant data from Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3.

  4. ESBWR power maneuvering via feedwater temperature control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Marquino, W.; Tucker, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    The ESBWR is a Generation III+ Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) driven by natural circulation. For a given geometry/hardware, system pressure, downcomer water level and feedwater temperature, the core flow rate in the ESBWR is only a function of reactor power, controlled through the control blade movement. In order to provide operational flexibility, another method of core-wide or global power maneuvering via feedwater temperature control has been developed. This is independent of power maneuvering via control blade movement, and it lowers the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) changes near the tip of control blades, which improves fuel reliability. All required stability, anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), infrequent events, special events including anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses have been performed for the 4500 MWt ESBWR. Based on the results of these analyses at 'high', nominal and 'low' feedwater temperatures, a safe Power - Feedwater Temperature operating domain has been developed. This paper summarizes the results of these analyses and presents the ESBWR Power - Feedwater Temperature operating domain or map. (authors)

  5. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  6. Feed-water heaters alternative design comparison; Comparacion de disenos alternativos de calentadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Toledano, Gerardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1988-12-31

    A procedure is presented for the alternative design comparison of feed water heaters, based in the failure records of damaged tubes during operation. The procedure is used for cases in which non-continuous or random inspections are made to the feed-water heaters. [Espanol] Se presenta un procedimiento para comparar disenos alternativos de calentadores, basandose en los registros de fallas de los tubos rotos acumuladas durante su operacion. El procedimiento se emplea para casos en los que se realizan inspecciones a los calentadores no continuas, ya sea periodicas o al azar.

  7. Operating experiences and degradation detection for auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.; Farmer, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    A study of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) Systems has been conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The results of the study are documented in NUREG/CR-5404, Vol. 1, Auxiliary Feedwater System Aging Study. The study reviewed historical failure experience and current monitoring practices for the AFW System. This paper provides an overview of the study approach and results

  8. Heating water. Specifications for feedwater; Heizungswasser. Eine Standortbestimmung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, M. [Hannemann Wassertechnik (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Water is indispensable for life and for engineering. It is so universal that we seem to have lost respect for it. In heating systems, it is recommended to know about its technical properties and to account for them by appropriate measures. (orig.) [German] Wasser ist fuer Leben und Technik unverzichtbar. Vielleicht ist es auf die enormen Vorkommen und die Selbstverstaendlichkeit der Nutzung zurueckzufuehren, dass wir ein Stueck Achtung vor diesem Gut verloren haben. Wer bei der technischen Verwendung als Waermetraeger in Heizungsanlagen die speziellen Eigenschaften und die Wechselwirkungen mit Werkstoffen missachtet, kann schnell in unruhiges Fahrwasser geraten, mithin bis zum Schiffbruch. Wer die Wechselwirkungen kennt, beachtet und mit speziellen Behandlungsverfahren gegensteuert, ist daher gut beraten. (orig.)

  9. Dynamic model for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscettola, M.

    1963-07-01

    A theoretical formulation is derived for the dynamics of a boiling water reactor of the pressure tube and forced circulation type. Attention is concentrated on neutron kinetics, fuel element heat transfer dynamics, and the primary circuit - that is the boiling channel, riser, steam drum, downcomer and recirculating pump of a conventional La Mont loop. Models for the steam and feedwater plant are not derived. (author)

  10. Steam generation: fossil-fired systems: utility boilers; industrial boilers; boiler auxillaries; nuclear systems: boiling water; pressurized water; in-core fuel management; steam-cycle systems: condensate/feedwater; circulating water; water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of development in steam generation is presented. First, fossil-fired systems are described. Progress in the design of utility and industrial boilers as well as in boiler auxiliaries is traced. Improvements in coal pulverizers, burners that cut pollution and improve efficiency, fans, air heaters and economisers are noted. Nuclear systems are then described, including the BWR and PWR reactors, in-core fuel management techniques are described. Finally, steam-cycle systems for fossil-fired and nuclear power plants are reviewed. Condensate/feedwater systems, circulating water systems, cooling towers, and water treatment systems are discussed

  11. Evaluation method for two-phase flow and heat transfer in a feed-water heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, Kazuhide; Minato, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    A multidimensional analysis code for two-phase flow using a two-fluid model was improved by taking into consideration the condensation heat transfer, film thickness, and film velocity, in order to develop an evaluation method for two-phase flow and heat transfer in a feed-water heater. The following results were obtained by a two-dimensional analysis of a feed-water heater for a power plant. (1) In the model, the film flowed downward in laminar flow due to gravity, with droplet entrainment and deposition. For evaluation of the film thickness, Fujii's equation was used in order to account for forced convection of steam flow. (2) Based on the former experimental data, the droplet deposition coefficient and droplet entrainment rate of liquid film were determined. When the ratio at which the liquid film directly flowed from an upper heat transfer tube to a lower heat transfer tube was 0.7, the calculated total heat transfer rate agreed with the measured value of 130 MW. (3) At the upper region of a heat transfer tube bundle where film thickness was thin, and at the outer region of a heat transfer tube bundle where steam velocity was high, the heat transfer rate was large. (author)

  12. Condensation heat transfer of a feed-water heater and improvement of its performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, Kazuhide; Murase, Michio; Baba, Yoshikazu; Aihara, Tsuyoshi

    1995-01-01

    In this study, a condensation heat transfer model, coupled with a three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis, was developed. In the heat transfer model, the liquid film flow rate on the heat transfer tubes was calculated by a mass balance equation and the liquid film thickness was calculated from the liquid film flow rate using Nusselt's laminar flow model and Fujii's equation for the steam velocity effect. The model was verified by condensation heat transfer experiments. In the experiments, 112 horizontal, staggered tubes with an outer diameter of 16mm and length of 0.55m were used. The calculated over-all heat transfer coefficients agreed with the data within ±5% under the inlet quality conditions of 13-100%. Based on a three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis, an improved feed-water heater with support plates, which have flow holes between the upper and lower tube bundles, was designed. The total heat exchange capacity of the improved feed-water heater increased about 6%. (author)

  13. Feedwater temperature control methods and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Noonan, Jack Patrick; Saha, Pradip

    2014-04-22

    A system for controlling the power level of a natural circulation boiling water nuclear reactor (NCBWR) is disclosed. The system, in accordance with an example embodiment of the present invention, may include a controller configured to control a power output level of the NCBWR by controlling a heating subsystem to adjust a temperature of feedwater flowing into an annulus of the NCBWR. The heating subsystem may include a steam diversion line configured to receive steam generated by a core of the NCBWR and a steam bypass valve configured to receive commands from the controller to control a flow of the steam in the steam diversion line, wherein the steam received by the steam diversion line has not passed through a turbine. Additional embodiments of the invention may include a feedwater bypass valve for controlling an amount of flow of the feedwater through a heater bypass line to the annulus.

  14. Ultrasonic meters in the feedwater flow to recover thermal power in the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde U1 and U2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.

    2008-01-01

    The engineers in nuclear power plants BWRs and PWRs based on the development of the ultrasonic technology for the measurement of the mass, volumetric flow, density and temperature in fluids, have applied this technology in two primary targets approved by the NRC: the use for the recovery of thermal power in the reactor and/or to be able to realize an increase of thermal power licensed in a 2% (MUR) by 1OCFR50 Appendix K. The present article mentions the current problem in the measurement of the feedwater flow with Venturi meters, which affects that the thermal balance of reactor BWRs or PWRs this underestimated. One in broad strokes describes the application of the ultrasonic technology for the ultrasonic measurement in the flow of the feedwater system of the reactor and power to recover thermal power of the reactor. One is to the methodology developed in CFE for a calibration of the temperature transmitters of RTD's and the methodology for a calibration of the venturi flow transmitters using ultrasonic measurement. Are show the measurements in the feedwater of reactor of the temperature with RTD's and ultrasonic measurement, as well as the flow with the venturi and the ultrasonic measurement operating the reactor to the 100% of nominal thermal power, before and after the calibration of the temperature transmitters and flow. Finally, is a plan to be able to realize a recovery of thermal power of the reactor, showing as carrying out their estimations. As a result of the application of ultrasonic technology in the feedwater of reactor BWR-5 in Laguna Verde, in the Unit 1 cycle 13 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 25 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 6 M We in the turbogenerator. Also in the Unit 2 cycle 10 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 40 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 16 M We in the turbogenerator. (Author)

  15. Device for preventing cooling water from flowing out of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinen, Masanori; Kotani, Koichi; Murase, Michio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide emergency cooling system, which can prevent cooling water bearing radioactivity from flowing to the outside of the reactor at the time of breakage of feedwater pipe, thus eliminating the possibility of exposure of the fuel rod to provide high reliability and also reducing the possibility of causing radioactive pollution. Structure: The device for preventing cooling water from flowing out from the reactor features a jet nozzle inserted in a feedwater pipe adjacent to the inlet or outlet thereof immediately before the reactor container. The nozzle outlet is provided in the vicinity of the reactor wall and in a direction opposite to the direction of out-flow, and water supplied from a high pressure pump is jetted from it. (Nakamura, S.)

  16. Probabilistic analysis of reactor safety - The auxiliary feedwater system of Angra I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.C.R. da L.C. de.

    1981-09-01

    The unavailability of the auxiliary feedwater system (AFWS) of Angra-1, was calculated. The fault tree analysis technique was used, considering two diferent types of contribution to system unavailability: The one due to hard-ware failure and the contribution due to test and maintenance which was separately analysed. The COMBO-and SAMPLE computer codes were used. The results have shown that the AFWS of Angra-1 contains enough redundancy to guarantee a safe operation under the conditions analysed, best values having been obtained for the unavailability of AFWS of Angra 1 with those codes than with the WASH-1400. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Development of advanced boiling water reactor for medium capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuo Hisajima; Yutaka Asanuma

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a result of development of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor for medium capacity. 1000 MWe was selected as the reference. The features of the current Advanced Boiling Water Reactors, such as a Reactor Internal Pump, a Fine Motion Control Rod Drive, a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel, and three-divisionalized Emergency Core Cooling System are maintained. In addition, optimization for 1000 MWe has been investigated. Reduction in thermal power and application of the latest fuel reduced the number of fuel assemblies, Control Rods and Control Rod Drives, Reactor Internal Pumps, and Safety Relief Valves. The number of Main Steam lines was reduced from four to two. As for the engineered safety features, the Flammability Control System was removed. Special efforts were made to realize a compact Turbine Building, such as application of an in line Moisture Separator, reduction in the number of pumps in the Condensate and Feedwater System, and change from a Turbine-Driven Reactor Feedwater Pump to a Motor-Driven Reactor Feedwater Pump. 31% reduction in the volume of the Turbine Building is expected in comparison with the current Advanced Boiling Water Reactors. (authors)

  18. Design and transient analyses of passive emergency feedwater system of CPR1000. Part 1. Air cooling condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yapei; Qiu Suizheng; Su Guanghui; Tian Wenxi; Cao Jianhua; Lu Donghua; Fu Xiangang

    2011-01-01

    The steam generator secondary passive emergency feedwater system is a new design for traditional generation Ⅱ + reactor CPR1000. The passive emergency feedwater system is designed to supply water to the SG shell side and improve the safety and reliability of CPR1000 by completely or partially replacing traditional emergency water cooling system in the event of the feed line break (FLB) or loss of heat sink accident. The passive emergency feedwater system consists of steam generator (SG), heat exchanger (HX), air cooling tower, emergency makeup tank (EMT), and corresponding pipes and valves for air cooling condition. In order to improve the safety and reliability of CPR1000, the model of the primary loop system and the passive emergency feedwater system was developed to investigate residual heat removal capability of the passive emergency feedwater system and the transient characteristics of the primary loop system affected by the passive emergency feedwater system using RELAP5/MOD3.4. The transient characteristics of the primary loop system and the passive emergency feedwater system were calculated in the event of feed line break accident. Sensitivity studies of the passive emergency feedwater system were also conducted to investigate the response of the primary loop and the passive emergency feedwater system on the main parameters of the passive emergency feedwater system. The passive emergency feedwater system could supply water to the SG shell side from the EMT successfully. The calculation results showed that the passive emergency feedwater system could take away the decay heat from the primary loop effectively for air cooling condition, and that the single-phase and two-phase natural circulations were established in the primary loop and passive emergency feedwater system loop, respectively. (author)

  19. Removal of Iron Oxide Scale from Feed-water in Thermal Power Plant by Using Magnetic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Motohiro; Shibatani, Saori; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    One of the factors of deterioration in thermal power generation efficiency is adhesion of the scale to inner wall in feed-water system. Though thermal power plants have employed All Volatile Treatment (AVT) or Oxygen Treatment (OT) to prevent scale formation, these treatments cannot prevent it completely. In order to remove iron oxide scale, we proposed magnetic separation system using solenoidal superconducting magnet. Magnetic separation efficiency is influenced by component and morphology of scale which changes their property depending on the type of water treatment and temperature. In this study, we estimated component and morphology of iron oxide scale at each equipment in the feed-water system by analyzing simulated scale generated in the pressure vessel at 320 K to 550 K. Based on the results, we considered installation sites of the magnetic separation system.

  20. Numerical simulation of a 374 tons/h water-tube steam boiler following a feedwater line break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deghal Cheridi, Amina Lyria; Chaker, Abla; Loubar, Ahcène

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We simulate the behavior of a steam boiler during feed-water line break accident. • To perform accident analysis of the steam boiler, Relap5/Mod3.2 system code is used. • A Relap5 model of the boiler is developed and qualified at the steady state level. • A good agreement between Relap5 results and available experimental data. • The Relap5 model predicts well the main transient features of the boiler. - Abstract: To ensure the operational safety of an industrial water-tube steam boiler it is very important to assess various accident scenarios in real plant working conditions. One of the most challenging scenarios is the loss of feedwater to the steam boiler. In this paper, a simulation of the behavior of an industrial water-tube radiant steam boiler during feedwater line break accident is discussed. The simulation is carried out using the RELAP5 system code. The steam boiler is installed in an Algerian natural gas liquefaction complex. The simulation shows the capabilities of RELAP5 system code in predicting the behavior of the steam boiler at both steady state and transient working conditions. From another side, the behavior of the steam boiler following the accident shows how the control system can successfully mitigate the effects and consequences of such accident and how the evaporator tubes can undergo a severe damage due to an uncontrolled increase of the wall temperature in case of failure of this system.

  1. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a) Water.... Injectors and feedwater pumps must be kept in good condition, free from scale, and must be tested at the...

  2. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  3. Thermal-hydraulics of PGV-4 water volume during damage of the feedwater collector nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logvinov, S.A.; Titov, V.F. [OKB Gidropress (Russian Federation); Notaros, U.; Lenkei, I. [NPP Paks (Hungary)

    1995-12-31

    A number of VVER-440 plants has experienced the distributing nozzles of feedwater collector being damaged due to corrosion-erosion wearing. Such phenomenon could result in feedwater redistribution within the SG inventory with undesirable consequences. The collector with damaged nozzles has to be replaced but a certain time is needed for the preparatory works. The main objective of the investigation conducted is to assess if the safe operation of SG is possible before collector replacement. It was shown that the nozzle damage as observed did not result in the dangerous disturbances of thermobydraulics as compared with the conditions existing at the initial period of operation. (orig.).

  4. Thermal-hydraulics of PGV-4 water volume during damage of the feedwater collector nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logvinov, S A; Titov, V F [OKB Gidropress (Russian Federation); Notaros, U; Lenkei, I [NPP Paks (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    A number of VVER-440 plants has experienced the distributing nozzles of feedwater collector being damaged due to corrosion-erosion wearing. Such phenomenon could result in feedwater redistribution within the SG inventory with undesirable consequences. The collector with damaged nozzles has to be replaced but a certain time is needed for the preparatory works. The main objective of the investigation conducted is to assess if the safe operation of SG is possible before collector replacement. It was shown that the nozzle damage as observed did not result in the dangerous disturbances of thermobydraulics as compared with the conditions existing at the initial period of operation. (orig.).

  5. Safety design of Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Uchida, Shoji; Yamada, Yumi; Koyama, Kazuya

    2008-01-01

    In Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR), steam is generated by direct contact of feedwater with primary Pb-Bi coolant above the core, and Pb-Bi coolant is circulated by steam lift pump in chimneys. Safety design has been developed to show safety features of PBWFR. Negative void reactivity is inserted even if whole of the core and upper plenum are voided hypothetically by steam intrusion from above. The control rod ejection due to coolant pressure is prevented using in-vessel type control rod driving mechanism. At coolant leak from reactor vessel and feedwater pipes, Pb-Bi coolant level in the reactor vessel required for decay heat removal is kept using closed guard vessel. Dual pipes for feedwater are employed to avoid leak of water. Although there is no concern of loss of flow accident due to primary pump trip, feedwater pump trip initiates loss of coolant flow (LOF). Injection of high pressure water slows down the flow coast down of feedwater at the LOF event. The unprotected loss of flow and heat sink (ATWS) has been evaluated, which shows that the fuel temperatures are kept lower than the safety limits. (author)

  6. The Concept of Steam Pressure Control by Changing the Feedwater Flow during Heatup Operation for an Integral Reactor with a Once-Through Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jae Kwang; Choi, Ki Yong; Kang, Han Ok; Kim, Young In; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    The design features of a once-through steam generator (OTSG) for an integral reactor are significantly different from the commercial U-tube type steam generator from several aspects such as the general arrangement, size, operation conditions, and so on. Therefore a sufficient understanding of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the OTSG is essential for the design of the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and the power conversion system (PCS). It is also necessary to develop operation procedures complying to the unique design features of the OTSG of interest. The OTSG is sized to produce a sufficiently superheated steam during a normal power operation and therefore the secondary system can be simple relative to that of the other types of steam generators. For the plant adopting the OTSG, the steam pressure in the secondary circuit (tube side of the OTSG) is controlled to be constant during a normal power operation. Constant steam pressure is realized by regulating the control valve on the main steam line dedicated for this purpose. However during a heatup operation, at which the fluid state at the exit of the OTSG is a single phase hot water or two phases, it is not proper to use the control valve on the main steam line due to a control problem at low and multi-phase flow conditions and possibly an erosion problem. For these reasons, another dedicated line called a startup cooling line is used during a heatup condition. There may be several operational conditions for the secondary fluid required to pass through during heatup operation, depending on the design of the PCS. In general, there are two conditions: One is a condition for a vacuum operation for the condenser and another is an entry condition for a steam pressure control operation for an auxiliary power system. In this study, the concept of using a simple startup cooling line with a fixed flow resistance and changing the feedwater flow for the pressure control of the PCS during a heatup period are

  7. Replacement of the feedwater pipe system in reactor building outside containment at the nuclear power plant Philippsburg; Austausch der Speisewasserleitung im Reaktorgebaeude ausserhalb SHB im Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, A. [Energie-Versorgung Schwaben AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Labes, M. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Schwenk, B. [Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg GmbH (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    After full replacement of the feedwater pipe system during the inspection period in 1997, combined with a modern materials, manufacturing and analysis concept, the entire pipe system of the water/steam cycle in the reactor building of KKP 1 now consists of high-toughness materials. The safety level of the entire plant has been increased by leaving aside postulation of F2 breaks in the reactor building and providing for protection against 0.1 leaks. Based on fluid-dynamic calculations for the cases of pump failure and pipe break, as well as pipe system calculations in 5 extensive calculation cycles, about 130 documents were filed for inspection and approval (excluding preliminary test documents on restraints). Points of main interest for safety analysis in this context were the optimised closing performance of the 3rd check valves and the integrity of the nozzle region at the RPV. (oirg./CB) [Deutsch] Durch den Restaustausch der Speisewasserleitungen in der Revision 1997, verbunden mit einem modernen Werkstoff-, Fertigungs- und Nachweiskonzept, sind im Reaktorgebaeude von KKP 1 in den Hauptleitungen des Wasser-Dampf-Kreislaufes nur noch hochzaehe Werkstoffe eingesetzt. Durch den Verzicht auf das Postulat von 2F-Bruechen im Reaktorgebaeude und durch die Auslegung gegen 0,1F-Lecks wird das Sicherheitsniveau der Anlage insgesamt gesteigert. Ausgehend von fluiddynamischen Berechnungen fuer Pumpenausfall und Rohrbruch sowie Rohrsystem-Berechnungen in 5 umfangreichen Berechnungskreisen wurden fuer die Genehmigung und Begutachtung ca. 130 Unterlagen (ohne Halterungs-Vorpruefunterlagen) eingereicht und vom Gutachter geprueft. Schwerpunkte der Nachweisfuehrung waren die Optimierung des Schliessverhaltens der 3. Rueckschlagarmaturen sowie der Integritaetsnachweis des RDB-Anschlusses. (orig./MM)

  8. Operation of the main feedwater system turbopump following plant trip with total failure of the auxiliary feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas Alvaro, A.M. de; Rosa Martinez, B. de la; Alcaide, F.; Toledano Camara, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Auxiliary Feedwater System (AF) is a safeguard system which has been designed to supply feedwater to the steam generators, cool the primary system and remove decay heat from the reactor when the main feedwater pumps fail due to loss of power or any other reason. Thus, when plant trip occurs, the AF system pumps start up automatically, allowing removal of decay heat from the reactor. However, even though this system (2 motor-driven pumps and 1 turbopump) is highly reliable, injection of water to the steam generators must be ensured when it fails completely. To do this, if plant trip has not been caused by loss of off site power or failure of the Main Feedwater System (FW) turbopumps, one of these turbopumps can be used to achieve removal of decay heat. Since a large amount of steam is consumed by these turbopumps, an analysis has been performed to determine whether one of these pumps can be used and what actions are necessary to inject water into the steam generators. Results show that, for the case in question, a FW turbopump can be used to remove decay heat from the reactor. (author)

  9. Analysis of a postulated pipe rupture and subsequent check valve slam of a PWR feedwater line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.C.; Adams, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    System designs criteria employed in the design of pressurized water reactors (PWR) requires that, for a postulated instantaneous guillotine rupture anywhere in the steam generator feedwater system, no more than one steam generator can be allowed to blowdown. Feedwater systems in many PWR's consist of pipe lines running from the feedwater pumps into a common feedwater header then branching into each steam generator from the header. The feedwater piping to each steam generator contains swing check valves to prevent reverse flow from the steam generator. This activation of some or all of these check valves significantly complicates the system structural analysis in that not only the blowdown forces resulting from the postulated pipe rupture, but also the water hammer loads resulting from closure of the check valve at high reverse flow velocities must be considered. The loads resulting from system blowdown and check valve closure are axial in nature. Peak loads ranging from 130000 lbs. to 180000 lbs. are not uncommon and are layout dependent. The analysis and design to withstand this transient loading deviates from the usual feedwater line design in that supports are required along the piping axis in the direction normal to the usual seismic supports. A brief and general discussion of the methods employed in the generation of the thermal-hydraulic loadings is presented. However, the discussion emphasizes the piping and piping support structural design and analysis method and approaches used in evaluating a selected portion of such a feedwater system. (orig./RW)

  10. Dominant accident sequences in Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.; Henninger, R.J.; Nassersharif, B.

    1985-04-01

    A set of dominant accident sequences in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor was selected using probabilistic risk analysis methods. Because some accident scenarios were similar, a subset of four accident sequences was selected to be analyzed with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to further our insights into similar types of accidents. The sequences selected were loss-of-feedwater, small-small break loss-of-coolant, loss-of-feedwater-initiated transient without scram, and interfacing systems loss-of-coolant accidents. The normal plant response and the impact of equipment availability and potential operator actions were also examined. Strategies were developed for operator actions not covered in existing emergency operator guidelines and were tested using TRAC simulations to evaluate their effectiveness in preventing core uncovery and maintaining core cooling

  11. Trace analysis of loss of feedwater flow event in Lungmen ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jongrong; Lin Haotzu; Wang Weichen; Yang Shuming; Shih Chunkuan

    2009-01-01

    TRACE (TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine) model of Lungmen Nuclear Power Plant was used to analyze the Loss of Feedwater Flow transient as defined in Lungmen FSAR Chapter 15. The results were compared with those from FSAR and RETRAN02. Lungmen TRACE model will have two models: In model A, vessel is divided into 11 axial levels, 4 radial rings and 1 azimuthal sectors; In model B, vessel is divided into 11 axial levels, 4 radial rings, and 6 azimuthal sectors. The above models include feedwater control system, narrow range water level control system, and wide range water level control system. The loss of feedwater flow (LOFW) transient began with the trip of two operating feedwater pumps either from the pump mechanical/electric failure, or the operator human error, or high water level signal. Feedwater flow was assumed to descend to 0 in 5 seconds and led to the decrease of reactor water level. At L3 low water level setpoint, the system actuated reactor scram signal and RIP trip signal for RIPs not connected to the M/G set. At L2 low-low water level setpoint, the system would trip the other six RIPs. This paper compares those important thermal parameters at steady state, such as the dome pressure and temperature of reactor vessel, steam flow, feedwater flow, core flow, and RIP flow, etc.. It also compares system parameters under transient conditions, such as core thermal power, core flow, steam flow, feedwater flow, Narrow Range Water Level (NRWL), Wide Range Water Level (WRWL) and RIP flow, etc.. It was concluded that the steady state and transient results of TRACE calculations are in good agreement with those from RETRAN02. In summary, our studies concluded that Lungmen TRACE model is correct and accurate enough for future safety analysis applications. (author)

  12. Analysis of ultrasound propagation in high-temperature nuclear reactor feedwater to investigate a clamp-on ultrasonic pulse doppler flowmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Kenichi; Mori, Michitsugu; Wada, Sanehiro; Aritomi, Masanori; Kikura, Hiroshige; Sakai, Yukihiro

    2008-01-01

    The flow rate of nuclear reactor feedwater is an important factor in the operation of a nuclear power reactor. Venturi nozzles are widely used to measure the flow rate. Other types of flowmeters have been proposed to improve measurement accuracy and permit the flow rate and reactor power to be increased. The ultrasonic pulse Doppler system is expected to be a candidate method because it can measure the flow profile across the pipe cross section, which changes with time. For accurate estimation of the flow velocity, the incidence angle of ultrasound entering the fluid should be estimated using Snell's law. However, evaluation of the ultrasound propagation is not straightforward, especially for a high-temperature pipe with a clamp-on ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. The ultrasound beam path may differ from what is expected from Snell's law due to the temperature gradient in the wedge and variation in the acoustic impedance between interfaces. Recently, simulation code for ultrasound propagation has come into use in the nuclear field for nondestructive testing. This article analyzes and discusses ultrasound propagation, using 3D-FEM simulation code plus the Kirchhoff method, as it relates to flow profile measurement in nuclear reactor feedwater with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler system. (author)

  13. Water feeding/condensating device and operation method in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention overcomes a problem in reactor water level control occurring upon operation of a water feeding/condensating system in a nuclear power plant. That is, the water feed system to a nuclear reactor is constituted with parallel circuit comprising a reactor feedwater pump driven by a steam turbine and a serial circuit composed of a reactor feedwater pump driven by an electrical motor and a pump adjusting valve for controlling the amount of feedwater at the exit of the motor driven feedwater pump. Further, a reactor feedwater control valve having a function of controlling the feedwater to the reactor is disposed to the bypass pipeway for bypassing the parallel circuit of feedwater pumps. In this constitution, water can be fed to the nuclear reactor by way of the reactor feedwater pump bypass control valve upon starting and stopping of a nuclear feedwater pump driven by electric motor upon starting and shutdown of the nuclear reactor. Accordingly, stable water level control can be conducted for the reactor core with no effect of rapid pressure fluctuation due to the starting and the stopping of the reactor feedwater pump driven by electric motor. (I.S.)

  14. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  15. Control systems for the dissolved oxygen concentration in condensate- and feed-water systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikajiri, Motohiko; Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To surely prevent the generation of corrosion products and contaminations in the systems thereby decreasing the exposure dose to operators in BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: Dissolved oxygen concentration in condensates is measured by a dissolved oxygen concentration meter disposed to the pipeway down stream of the condensator and the measured value is sent to an injection amount control mechanism for heater drain water. The control mechanism controls the injection amount from the injection mechanism that injection heater drain water from a feed-water heater to the liquid phase in the hot wall of the condensator. Thus, heater drawin water at high dissolved oxygen is injected to the condensates in the condensator which is de-airated and reduced with dissolved oxygen concentration, to maintain the dissolved oxygen concentration at a predetermined level, whereby stable oxide films are formed to the inner surface of the pipeways to prevent the generation of corrosion products such as rusts. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Effect of water impurities on stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungbery, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D

    1985-01-01

    A series of stress corrosion tests, including corrosion potential and water chemistry measurements, has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor. Tests have been run under reactor start-up and reactor power operation with normal reactor water conditions and with alternate water chemistry in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater to suppress stress corrosion cracking. During one alternate water chemistry test, there was significant intergranular corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless specimens. It is shown that nitrate and sulfate, arising from an accidental resin intrusion, are likely causes. Nitrate increases the oxidizing power of the water, and sulfate enhances cracking under oxidizing conditions. During another test under start-up conditions, enhanced transgranular stress corrosion cracking in low alloy steels and possibly initiation of cracking in a nickel base alloy was observed as a result of resin intrusion into the reactor water. The intrusion produced acid and sulfate, which are believed to enhance hydrogen cracking conditions

  17. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor assembly consists of the reactor vessel, its internal components of the core, shroud, steam separator, dryer assemblies, feedwater spargers, internal recirculation pumps and control rod drive housings. Connected to the steam lines are the pressure relief valves which protect the pressure boundary from damage due to overpressure. (orig./TK) [de

  18. Water quality monitoring device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention measures quality of feedwater after heated in a regenerative heat exchanger device of a coolant cleanup system in a BWR type reactor, to detect ions generated from organic materials decomposed at high temperature and specify the position where impurities are formed. Namely, in a power plant having a reactor coolant cleanup pipeline connected to a feedwater pipeline, a water quality measuring portion is disposed to the feedwater system at the downstream of the junction to the feedwater system pipeline. A water quality sample is taken to measure the water quality in a state where the feedwater heated by a feedwater heater and flowing to the reactor, and the cleanup coolants heated by the regenerative heat exchanger are mixed. Thus, the impurities formed at the down stream of the feedwater system pipeline, as well as the water quality including impurities decomposed in a high temperature state can be measured. (I.S.)

  19. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems

  20. Some aspects of primary and secondary water chemistry in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1978-09-01

    A brief review of the water chemistry in various circuits of CANDU reactors is given. Then, five particular aspects of recent work are highlighted: (i) Radiation Field Growth: in-reactor and out-reactor studies have related water chemistry to corrosion product deposition on fuel sheaths and subsequent contamination of out-core surfaces. (ii) Metal Oxide Solubility: novel techniques are being used to measure the solubilities of metal oxides at primary circuit conditions. (iii) Decontamination: the use of heavy water as coolant in CANDU reactors led to the development of a unique decontamination strategy and technique, called CAN-DECON, which has attracted the attention of operators of light-water reactors. (iv) Steam Generator Corrosion: mathematical modelling of the water chemistry in the bulk and crevice regions of nuclear steam generators, supported by chemical experiments, has shown why sea water ingress from leaking condensers can be damaging, and has provided a rapid way to evaluate alternative boiler water chemistries. (v) Automatic Control of Feedwater Chemistry: on-line automatic chemical analysis and computer control of feedwater chemistry provides All Volatile Treatment for normal operation with pure feedwater, and carefully controlled sodium phosphate addition when there is detectable sea-water ingress from leaking condensers. (author)

  1. Online monitoring of steam/water chemistry of a fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.G.; Suriyanarayanan, A.; Thirunavukarasu, N.; Naganathan, V.R.; Panigrahi, B.S.; Jambunathan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Operating experience with the once-through steam generator of a fast breeder test reactor (FBTR) has shown that an efficient water chemistry control played a major role in minimizing corrosion related failures of steam generator tubes and ensuring steam generator tube integrity. In order to meet the stringent feedwater and steam quality specifications, use of fast and sensitive online monitors to detect impurity levels is highly desirable. Online monitoring techniques have helped in achieving feedwater of an exceptional degree of purity. Experience in operating the online monitors in the steam/water system of a FBTR is discussed in detail in this paper. In addition, the effect of excess hydrazine in the feedwater on the steam generator leak detection system and the need for a hydrazine online meter are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-01-01

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency (ge)20%; Steam turbine outlet quality (ge)90%; and Pumping power (le)2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  3. Getting the most out of your new plant with a chordal ultrasonic feedwater flow measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, Herb; Hauser, Ernie

    2007-01-01

    The economic advantages of a chordal ultrasonic feedwater flow measurement system over conventional (flow nozzle-based) feedwater instrumentation are analyzed for new plants having ratings ranging from 1100 MWe to 1600 MWe. Specifically, each of the following topics is considered: The value of a 1.7% increase in the rating of the new plant, made possible by the reduced uncertainty in the determination of thermal power. The value of reduced startup time owing to enhanced steam supply water level control. The value of the reduced feedwater pumping power brought about by the elimination of flow nozzles. The value of the reduced calibration burden owing to the elimination of the feedwater flow differential pressure transmitters and resistance thermometers. The net difference in the acquisition costs of the ultrasonic system versus conventional feedwater flow instrumentation. The net savings in installation costs of the ultrasonic system vis-a-vis conventional feedwater flow instrumentation. The potential savings in outage time due to the reduced frequency of low steam supply water level trips (scrams) of the reactor. (author)

  4. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  5. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  6. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  7. Water chemistry in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, V.A.; Mamet, V.A.; Shestakov, Yu.M.; Amosov, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper ''Water Chemistry in WWER Reactors'', are briefly described the 30 WWERs in Russian and the Ukraine, and are pointed out the essential differences between the 440s and 1000s. The primary coolant in the six loops of the former type operates at 270-290 deg. C, while the four loops of the latter type are at 290-320 deg. C. Performance of the fuel has been generally good with some fission product activities emanating from tramp uranium. Incidents causing unusually high fission product levels were overheating of the 16th fuel load at Kola NPP in 1990 by a reduced coolant flow, and fuel defects at Novovoronezh NPP resulting from deposits of carbon and corrosion products. Organic carbon, depositing from the coolant in regions of high turbulence (i.e. at the spacer grids), provokes corrosion product deposition. The source of the organic is not known. New chemistry guidelines have been implemented since 1992-93 for Russian and Ukrainian WWERs. These include higher pH T values (7.0-7.1 as opposed to 6.6-6.9) and tighter controls on oxygen and impurities. Lower dose rates in steam generator channels are reported. Significant reduction in operator doses are achieved by these methods coupled with a ''soft decontamination'' involving changing the KOH concentration and, hence, the pH T before shutdown. The benefits of hydrazine treatment for deoxygenating feedwater and coolant prior to start up, for injecting before shutdown and for general chemistry control on radiation fields are described. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs, 8 tabs

  8. Water chemistry in WWER reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurmanov, V A; Mamet, V A; Shestakov, Yu M; Amosov, M M [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. for Nuclear Power Plants Operation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-02-01

    In this paper ``Water Chemistry in WWER Reactors``, are briefly described the 30 WWERs in Russian and the Ukraine, and are pointed out the essential differences between the 440s and 1000s. The primary coolant in the six loops of the former type operates at 270-290 deg. C, while the four loops of the latter type are at 290-320 deg. C. Performance of the fuel has been generally good with some fission product activities emanating from tramp uranium. Incidents causing unusually high fission product levels were overheating of the 16th fuel load at Kola NPP in 1990 by a reduced coolant flow, and fuel defects at Novovoronezh NPP resulting from deposits of carbon and corrosion products. Organic carbon, depositing from the coolant in regions of high turbulence (i.e. at the spacer grids), provokes corrosion product deposition. The source of the organic is not known. New chemistry guidelines have been implemented since 1992-93 for Russian and Ukrainian WWERs. These include higher pH{sub T} values (7.0-7.1 as opposed to 6.6-6.9) and tighter controls on oxygen and impurities. Lower dose rates in steam generator channels are reported. Significant reduction in operator doses are achieved by these methods coupled with a ``soft decontamination`` involving changing the KOH concentration and, hence, the pH{sub T} before shutdown. The benefits of hydrazine treatment for deoxygenating feedwater and coolant prior to start up, for injecting before shutdown and for general chemistry control on radiation fields are described. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs, 8 tabs.

  9. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  10. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ''modified'' B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs

  11. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ``modified`` B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs.

  12. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  13. Optimization of the pumping ring in a mechanical seal with an integrated cooler for feed-water pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchdahl, D.; Martin, R.; Gueret, G.; Blanc, M.

    1994-07-01

    To simplify maintenance, E.D.F. along with its collaborators undertook the study of mechanical seal with integrated cooler used in feed-water pumps in the nuclear power plants. The cooler, integrated to the pump acts as a thermal barrier as well as a cooler of the mechanical seal. The water circulation in the cooler is assumed by an integrated pumping ring in the rotary part of the mechanical seal, with a matching screw thread in the pumping case. This assembly of mechanical seal/integrated cooler is tested in a test loop at the EDF/DER Laboratory. All working conditions are similar to that at site. Tests with different configurations of the rotor/stator profiles are performed, i.e.; different lengths and types of threading. Hydraulic performances and the global thermal balance of this assembly are studied. Our basic aim during these tests is to optimize the hydraulic performance of the pumping ring so as to best cool the mechanical seal faces. The different results obtained and the conclusions drawn during these tests are presented. (authors). 7 figs., 3 refs

  14. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for changing feedwater check valve leakage rate testing methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, R.; Harrell, J.

    1996-12-01

    The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. This degraded performance was exhibited by frequent seal failures and subsequent valve repairs. The original requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leak path exists through the feedwater lines during the reactor blowdown phase and that sufficient subcooled water remains in various portions of the feedwater piping to form liquid water loop seals that effectively isolate this leak path. These results provided the bases for changing the leak testing requirements of the FWCVs from air to water. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves.

  15. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for changing feedwater check valve leakage rate testing methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, R.; Harrell, J.

    1996-01-01

    The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. This degraded performance was exhibited by frequent seal failures and subsequent valve repairs. The original requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leak path exists through the feedwater lines during the reactor blowdown phase and that sufficient subcooled water remains in various portions of the feedwater piping to form liquid water loop seals that effectively isolate this leak path. These results provided the bases for changing the leak testing requirements of the FWCVs from air to water. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves

  16. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. 'grounded' and 'with goose neck'). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.)

  17. Power-feedwater temperature operating domain for Sbwr applying Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar M, L. A.; Quezada G, S.; Espinosa M, E. G.; Vazquez R, A.; Varela H, J. R.; Cazares R, R. I.; Espinosa P, G., E-mail: sequega@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work the analyses of the feedwater temperature effects on reactor power in a simplified boiling water reactor (Sbwr) applying a methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation is presented. The Monte Carlo methodology was applied systematically to establish operating domain, due that the Sbwr are not yet in operation, the analysis of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic processes must rely on numerical modeling, with the purpose of developing or confirming the design basis and qualifying the existing or new computer codes to enable reliable analyses. The results show that the reactor power is inversely proportional to the temperature of the feedwater, reactor power changes at 8% when the feed water temperature changes in 8%. (Author)

  18. Power-feedwater temperature operating domain for Sbwr applying Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar M, L. A.; Quezada G, S.; Espinosa M, E. G.; Vazquez R, A.; Varela H, J. R.; Cazares R, R. I.; Espinosa P, G.

    2014-10-01

    In this work the analyses of the feedwater temperature effects on reactor power in a simplified boiling water reactor (Sbwr) applying a methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation is presented. The Monte Carlo methodology was applied systematically to establish operating domain, due that the Sbwr are not yet in operation, the analysis of the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic processes must rely on numerical modeling, with the purpose of developing or confirming the design basis and qualifying the existing or new computer codes to enable reliable analyses. The results show that the reactor power is inversely proportional to the temperature of the feedwater, reactor power changes at 8% when the feed water temperature changes in 8%. (Author)

  19. Trace analysis of auxiliary feedwater capacity for Maanshan PWR loss-of-normal-feedwater transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Che-Hao; Shih, Chunkuan [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science; Wang, Jong-Rong; Lin, Hao-Tzu [Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research

    2013-07-01

    Maanshan nuclear power plant is a Westinghouse PWR of Taiwan Power Company (Taipower, TPC). A few years ago, TPC has made many assessments in order to uprate the power of Maanshan NPP. The assessments include NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) parameters calculation, uncertainty acceptance, integrity of pressure vessel, reliability of auxiliary systems, and transient analyses, etc. Since the Fukushima Daiichi accident happened, it is necessary to consider transients with multiple-failure. Base on the analysis, we further study the auxiliary feedwater capability for Loss-of-Normal-Feedwater (LONF) transient. LONF is the limiting transient of non-turbine trip initiated event for ATWS (Anticipated Transient Without Scram) which results in a reduction in capability of the secondary system to remove the heat generated in the reactor core. If the turbine fails to trip immediately, the secondary water inventory will decrease significantly before the actuation of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. The heat removal from the primary side decreases, and this leads to increases of primary coolant temperature and pressure. The water level of pressurizer also increases subsequently. The heat removal through the relief valves and the auxiliary feedwater is not sufficient to fully cope with the heat generation from primary side. The pressurizer will be filled with water finally, and the RCS pressure might rise above the set point of relief valves for water discharge. RCS pressure depends on steam generator inventory, primary coolant temperature, negative reactivity feedback, and core power, etc. The RCS pressure may reach its peak after core power reduction. According to ASME Code Level C service limit criteria, the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) pressure must be under 22.06 MPa. The USNRC is developing an advanced thermal hydraulic code named TRACE for nuclear power plant safety analysis. The development of TRACE is based on TRAC and integrating with RELAP5 and other programs. SNAP

  20. Trace analysis of auxiliary feedwater capacity for Maanshan PWR loss-of-normal-feedwater transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Che-Hao; Shih, Chunkuan; Wang, Jong-Rong; Lin, Hao-Tzu

    2013-01-01

    Maanshan nuclear power plant is a Westinghouse PWR of Taiwan Power Company (Taipower, TPC). A few years ago, TPC has made many assessments in order to uprate the power of Maanshan NPP. The assessments include NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) parameters calculation, uncertainty acceptance, integrity of pressure vessel, reliability of auxiliary systems, and transient analyses, etc. Since the Fukushima Daiichi accident happened, it is necessary to consider transients with multiple-failure. Base on the analysis, we further study the auxiliary feedwater capability for Loss-of-Normal-Feedwater (LONF) transient. LONF is the limiting transient of non-turbine trip initiated event for ATWS (Anticipated Transient Without Scram) which results in a reduction in capability of the secondary system to remove the heat generated in the reactor core. If the turbine fails to trip immediately, the secondary water inventory will decrease significantly before the actuation of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system. The heat removal from the primary side decreases, and this leads to increases of primary coolant temperature and pressure. The water level of pressurizer also increases subsequently. The heat removal through the relief valves and the auxiliary feedwater is not sufficient to fully cope with the heat generation from primary side. The pressurizer will be filled with water finally, and the RCS pressure might rise above the set point of relief valves for water discharge. RCS pressure depends on steam generator inventory, primary coolant temperature, negative reactivity feedback, and core power, etc. The RCS pressure may reach its peak after core power reduction. According to ASME Code Level C service limit criteria, the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) pressure must be under 22.06 MPa. The USNRC is developing an advanced thermal hydraulic code named TRACE for nuclear power plant safety analysis. The development of TRACE is based on TRAC and integrating with RELAP5 and other programs. SNAP

  1. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  2. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  3. Preliminary design of RDE feedwater pump impeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Sudadiyo

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, pumps are being widely used in the thermal power generation including nuclear power plants. Reaktor Daya Experimental (RDE) is a proposed nuclear reactor concept for the type of nuclear power plant in Indonesia. This RDE has thermal power 10 MW th , and uses a feedwater pump within its steam cycle. The performance of feedwater pump depends on size and geometry of impeller model, such as the number of blades and the blade angle. The purpose of this study is to perform a preliminary design on an impeller of feedwater pump for RDE and to simulate its performance characteristics. The Fortran code is used as an aid in data calculation in order to rapidly compute the blade shape of feedwater pump impeller, particularly for a RDE case. The calculations analyses is solved by utilizing empirical correlations, which are related to size and geometry of a pump impeller model, while performance characteristics analysis is done based on velocity triangle diagram. The effect of leakage, pass through the impeller due to the required clearances between the feedwater pump impeller and the volute channel, is also considered. Comparison between the feedwater pump of HTR-10 and of RDE shows similarity in the trend line of curve shape. These characteristics curves will be very useful for the values prediction of performance of a RDE feedwater pump. Preliminary design of feedwater pump provides the size and geometry of impeller blade model with 5-blades, inlet angle 14.5 degrees, exit angle 25 degrees, inside diameter 81.3 mm, exit diameter 275.2 mm, thickness 4.7 mm, and height 14.1 mm. In addition, the optimal values of performance characteristics were obtained when flow capacity was 4.8 kg/s, fluid head was 29.1 m, shaft mechanical power was 2.64 kW, and efficiency was 52 % at rotational speed 1750 rpm. (author)

  4. Oxygen suppression in boiling water reactors. Phase 2. Annual report 1981, December 2, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, E.L.

    1982-07-01

    A hydrogen addition test will be performed in the Dresden-2 reactor of Commonwealth Edison Company during 1982. Up to 2 ppM hydrogen will be added to and dissolved in the reactor feedwater to reverse the radiolysis reaction in the reactor core and suppress oxgen concentration in the primary coolant. At low oxygen levels the propensity of stressed and sensitized 304 stainless steel toward intergranular stress corrosion cracking is greatly reduced. The test will answer outstanding questions and uncertainties in the areas of water chemistry, equipment design and materials performance. Nine special sample facilities will be prepared in the primary coolant, main stream, feedwater/condensate, and offgas systems. Instrumentation will be available to measure hydrogen, oxygen, conductivity, pH, soluble and insoluble corrosion products, and electrochemical potentials. In addition, an autoclave in which confirming constant extension rate tests can be conducted in reactor water will be provided

  5. Analysis of the origin of Aufeis feed-water on the arctic slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D. K.; Roswell, C. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The origin of water feeding large aufeis fields (overflow river ice) on the Arctic Slope of Alaska is analyzed. Field measurements of two large aufeis fields on the eastern Arctic Slope were taken during July of 1978 and 1979. Measurements of aufeis extent and distribution were made using LANDSAT Multispectral Scanner Subsystem (MSS) satellite data from 1973 through 1979. In addition, ice cores were analyzed in the laboratory. Results of the field and laboratory studies indicate that the water derived from aufeis melt water has a chemical composition different from the adjacent upstream river water. Large aufeis fields are found in association with springs and faults thus indicating a subterranean origin of the feed water. In addition, the maximum extent of large aufeis fields was not found to follow meteorological patterns which would only be expected if the origin of the feed water were local. It is concluded that extent of large aufeis in a given river channel on the Arctic Slope is controlled by discharge from reservoirs of groundwater. It seems probable that precipitation passes into limestone aquifers in the Brooks Range, through an interconnecting system of subterranean fractures in calcareous rocks and ultimately discharges into alluvial sediments on the coastal plain to form aufeis. It is speculated that only small aufeis patches are affected by local meteorological parameters in the months just prior to aufeis formation.

  6. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  7. Variation of the effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry in a boiling water reactor during power coastdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Wang Meiya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model was adapted to evaluate the impact of power coastdown on the water chemistry of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) in this work. In principle, the power density of a nuclear reactor upon a power level decrease would immediately be lowered, followed by water chemistry variations due to reduced radiolysis of water and extended coolant residence times in the core and near-core regions. It is currently a common practice for a commercial BWR to adopt hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for corrosion mitigation. The optimal feedwater hydrogen concentration may be different after a power coastdown is implemented in a BWR. A computer code DEMACE was used in the current study to investigate the impact of various power coastdown levels on major radiolytic species concentrations and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) behavior of components in the primary coolant circuit of a domestic reactor operating under either normal water chemistry or HWC. Our analyses indicated that under a rated core flow rate the chemical species concentrations and the ECP did not vary monotonously with decreases in reactor power level at a fixed feedwater hydrogen concentration. In particular, ECP variations basically followed the patterns of hydrogen peroxide in the select regions and exhibited high values at power level of 90% for Reactor X. (author)

  8. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  9. Reactor water level control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Yohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the rapid response of the waterlevel control converting a reactor water level signal into a non-linear type, when the water level is near to a set value, to stabilize the water level reducting correlatively the reactor water level variation signal to stabilize greatly from the set value, and increasing the variation signal. Constitution: A main vapor flow quality transmitter detects the vapor flow generated in a reactor and introduced into a turbine. A feed water flow transmitter detects the quantity of a feed water flow from the turbine to the reactor, this detected value is sent to an addition operating apparatus. On the other hand, the power signal of the reactor water level transmitter is sent to the addition operating apparatus through a non-linear water level signal converter. The addition operation apparatus generates a signal for requesting the feed water flow quantity from both signals. Upon this occasion, the reactor water level signal converter makes small the reactor water level variation when the reactor level is close the set value, and when the water level deviates greatly from the set value, the reactor water level variation is made large thereby to improve the rapid response of the reactor coater level control. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Analysis of water hammer phenomena - Application to deaerator-feedwater pump node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, Melania; Tenescu, Mircea; Nita, Iulian Pavel

    2008-01-01

    The hydraulic hammer adverse effects are extensively presented in the literature available to those who operate and design installations in which this phenomenon occurs. There are specialized computational programs which evaluate diverse technical aspects which occur in this phenomenon. One must be noticed that not all the technical characteristics and not all effective operating modes which are treated in this paper are covered by existing computational programs. Moreover, even specialized developers of such programs recommend insistently that computational results offered by specialized programs to be verified by specialized technologists with experience in alternative theoretical computations in order to avoid any misinterpretation of results obtained by computational codes. After selective exposures of theoretical fundamentals of the problem there are presented a computational calculation obtained using the specialized calculation code PIPENET (Sunrise System Limited, Cambridge, Great Britain). The PIPENET calculation is compared with a standard computational calculation using theoretical correlations. An evaluation of the differences between those two computational methods is made in order to reveal the capabilities of the computational codes in solving the hydraulic hammering problems. In the first stage we obtained the elastic characteristics of the pipe where the phenomena of hydraulic hammering takes place. There are derivative descriptions of differential equations which describe the physical phenomena. In the second part we carried out a complete system analysis of water hammer effect due to a faulty closing of the four level control valves in steam generators. We compared the highest attended pressure with design pressure of the system. We observed that the design pressure is not overpassed. The analysis concluded that pumps' head protection is a very important parameter against overpressure in the feed water system. (authors)

  11. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  12. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Ross, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  13. Reactor water injection facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1997-05-02

    A steam turbine and an electric generator are connected by way of a speed convertor. The speed convertor is controlled so that the number of rotation of the electric generator is constant irrespective of the speed change of the steam turbine. A shaft coupler is disposed between the turbine and the electric generator or between the turbine and a water injection pump. With such a constitution, the steam turbine and the electric generator are connected by way of the speed convertor, and since the number of revolution of the electric generator is controlled to be constant, the change of the number of rotation of the turbine can be controlled irrespective of the change of the number of rotation of the electric generator. Accordingly, the flow rate of the injection water from the water injection pump to a reactor pressure vessel can be controlled freely thereby enabling to supply stable electric power. (T.M.)

  14. Integrated TRAC/MELPROG analysis of core damage from a severe feedwater transient in the Oconee-1 PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, R.J.; Boyack, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    A postulated complete loss-of-feedwater event in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor has been analyzed. With an initial version of the lonked TRAC and MELPROG codes, we have modeled the loss-of-feedwater event from initiation to the time of complete disruption of the core, which was calculated to occur by 6800 s. The highest structure temperatures otuside the vessel are on the flow path from the vessel to the pressurizer relief valve. Temperatures in excess of 1200 K could result in failure and depressurization of the primary system before vessel failure

  15. Safety analysis of high temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes 'Safety' of a high temperature supercritical light water cooled and moderated reactor (SCRLWR-H) with descending flow water rods. The safety system of the SCLWR-H is similar to that of a BWR. It consists of reactor scram, high pressure auxiliary feedwater system (AFS), low pressure core injection system (LPCI), safety relief valves (SRV), automatic depressurization system (ADS), and main steam isolation valves (MSIV). Ten types of transients and five types of accidents are analyzed using a plant transient analysis code SPRAT-DOWN. The sequences are determined referring to LWRs. At the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' transient, the coolant density and the core power are increased by the over-pressurization, and at the same time the core flow rate is decreased by the closure of the turbine control valves. The peak cladding temperature increases to 727degC. The high temperature at this type of transient is one of the characteristics of the SCLWR-H. Conversely at 'feedwater-loss' events, the core power decrease to some extend by density feedback before the reactor scram. The peak cladding temperatures at the 'Partial loss of feedwater' transient and the 'Total loss of feedwater' accident are only 702degC and 833degC, respectively. The cladding temperature does not increase so much at the transients 'Loss of feedwater heating' and 'CR withdrawal' because of the operation of the plant control system. All the transients and accidents satisfy the satisfy criteria with good margins. The highest cladding temperatures of the transients and the accidents are 727degC and 833degC at the 'Loss of load without turbine bypass' and 'Total loss of feedwater', respectively. The duration of the high cladding temperature is very short at the transients. According to the parametric survey, the peak cladding temperature are sensitive to the parameters such as the pump coast-down time, delay of pump trip, AFS capacity, AFS delay, CR worth, and SRV setpoint

  16. Loss-of-feedwater transients in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.D. III.

    1980-01-01

    Recent severe accident sequence analysis (SASA) work in LASL's Multifault Accident Analysis Section has focused on loss-of-feedwater (LOFW) transients at a 4-loop Westinghouse nuclear power reactor. In all transients studied, the initiator was loss of main feedwater and reactor coolant pump (RCP) trip, caused by temporary loss of off-site power. Subsequent automatic actions included reactor scram, closure of the main steam isolation valves, and initiation of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) flow. TRAC-PD2 calculations were designed to study the consequences of AFW delivery rates below the minimum specified in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) for the reference 4-loop plant. Six types of LOFW scenarios have been studied, including (1) zero AFW availability (nominal case), (2) initially zero AFW but full recovery after 2 h, (3) zero AFW with steam generator (SG) atmospheric relief valve (ARV) malfunction, (4) zero AFW with high pressure charging flow initiated after 2 h, and (5) zero AFW with delay in reactor scram. Additional cases were considered to study the effects of uncertainties in pressurizer heater/spray operation, operator manual initiation of high pressure charging flow, reactor initial conditions, and RCP and power coastdown characteristics. Nominal case results, rationale for selections of other cases, and lessons learned are summarized

  17. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1970-04-01

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  18. Pressurized water reactor flow arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; Knapp, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A flow path is provided for cooling the control rods of a pressurized water reactor. According to this scheme, a small amount of cooling water enters the control rod guide tubes from the top and passes downwards through the tubes before rejoining the main coolant flow and passing through the reactor core. (LL)

  19. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  20. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  1. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P; Hoikkanen, J [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  2. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  3. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Norring, K.

    1994-01-01

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  4. The heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudermueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    This is a survey of the development so far of this reactor line which is in operation all over the world in various types (e.g. BHWR, PHWR). MZFR and the CANDU-type reactors are discussed in more detail. (UA) [de

  5. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  6. Fundamentals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, L.

    1982-01-01

    In many countries, the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is the most widely used, even though it requires enrichment of the uranium to about 3% in U-235 and the moderator-coolant must be maintained at a high pressure, about 2200 pounds per square inch. Our objective in this series of seven lectures is to describe the design and operating characteristics of the PWR system, discuss the reactor physics methods used to evaluate performance, examine the way fuel is consumed and produced, study the instrumentation system, review the physics measurements made during initial startup of the reactor, and outline the administrative aspects of starting up a reactor and operating it safely and effectively

  7. Secondary coolant circuit operation tests: steam generator feedwater supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beroux, M.

    1985-01-01

    No one important accident occurred during the start-up tests of the 1300MWe P4 series, concerning the feedwater system of steam generators (SG). This communication comments on some incidents, that the tests allowed to detect very soon and which had no consequences on the operation of units: 1) Water hammer in feedwater tubes, and incidents met in the emergency steam generator water supply circuit. The technological differences between SG 900 and 1300 are pointed out, and the measures taken to prevent this problem are presented. 2) Incidents met on the emergency feedwater supply circuit of steam generators; mechanical or functional modifications involved by these incidents [fr

  8. Enhancing load-following and/or spectral shift capability in single-sparger natural circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for obtaining load-following capability in a coiling water reactor (BWR) wherein housed within a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a nuclear core disposed within a shroud having a shroud head and which with the RPV defines an annulus region disposed beneath the nuclear core, an upper steam dome connected to a steam outlet in the RPV, a core upper plenum formed within the shroud head and disposed atop the nuclear core, a chimney mounted atop the shroud head and in fluid communication with the core upper plenum and with a steam separator having a skirt which is in fluid communication with the steam dome, the region outside of the chimney defining a downcomer region, there being a water level established therein under normal operation of the BWR, and the RPV containing a feedwater inlet. It comprises: disposing a single sparger connected to the feedwater inlet above the steam separator skirt bottom about the interior circumference of the RPV at an elevation at approximately the water level established during normal operation of the BWR; and adjusting the feedwater flow through the inlet and into the sparger to vary the water level to be above, at or below the elevational location of the sparger in response to load-following need

  9. European supercritical water cooled reactor (HPLWR Phase 2 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg; Marsault, Philippe; Bittermann, Dietmar; Maraczy, Czaba; Laurien, Eckart; Lycklama, Jan Aiso; Anglart, Henryk; Andreani, Michele; Ruzickova, Mariana; Heikinheimo, Liisa

    2010-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 deg C maximum core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 13 partners from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small, housed fuel assemblies with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The innovative core design with upward and downward flow through its assemblies has been studied with neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and stress analyses and has been reviewed carefully in a mid-term assessment. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. An overview of results achieved up to now, given in this paper, is illustrating the latest scientific and technological advances. (author)

  10. Simulation of a passive auxiliary feedwater system with TRACE5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorduy, María; Gallardo, Sergio; Verdú, Gumersindo, E-mail: maloral@upv.es, E-mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Instituto Universitario de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental (ISIRYM), València (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The study of the nuclear power plant accidents occurred in recent decades, as well as the probabilistic risk assessment carried out for this type of facility, present human error as one of the main contingency factors. For this reason, the design and development of generation III, III+ and IV reactors, which include inherent and passive safety systems, have been promoted. In this work, a TRACE5 model of ATLAS (Advanced Thermal- Hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) is used to reproduce an accidental scenario consisting in a prolonged Station BlackOut (SBO). In particular, the A1.2 test of the OECD-ATLAS project is analyzed, whose purpose is to study the primary system cooling by means of the water supply to one of the steam generators from a Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS). This safety feature prevents the loss of secondary system inventory by means of the steam condensation and its recirculation. Thus, the conservation of a heat sink allows the natural circulation flow rate until restoring stable conditions. For the reproduction of the test, an ATLAS model has been adapted to the experiment conditions, and a PAFS has been incorporated. >From the simulation test results, the main thermal-hydraulic variables (pressure, flow rates, collapsed water level and temperature) are analyzed in the different circuits, contrasting them with experimental data series. As a conclusion, the work shows the TRACE5 code capability to correctly simulate the behavior of a passive feedwater system. (author)

  11. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  12. Safety system consideration of a supercritical-water cooled fast reactor with simplified PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1999-01-01

    The probabilistic safety of the supercritical-water cooled fast reactor (SCFR) is evaluated with the simplified probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology. SCFR has a once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure. There are no recirculation loops in the once-through direct cycle system, which is the most important difference from the current light water reactor (LWR). The main objective of the present study is to assess the effect of this difference on the safety in the stage of conceptual design study. A safety system configuration similar to the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is employed. At loss of flow events, no natural recirculation occurs. Thus, emergency core flow should be quickly supplied before the completion of the feedwater pump coastdown at a loss of flow accident. The motor-driven high pressure coolant injection (MD-HPCI) system cannot be used for the quick core cooling due to the delay of the emergency diesel generator (D/G) start-up. Accordingly, an MD-HPCI system in an ABWR is substituted by a turbine-driven (TD-) HPCI system for the SCFR. The calculated core damage frequency (CDF) is a little higher than that of the Japanese ABWR and a little lower than that of the Japanese BWR when Japanese data are employed for initiating event frequencies. Four alternatives to the safety system configurations are also examined as a sensitivity analysis. This shows that the balance of the safety systems designed here is adequate. Consequently, though the SCFR has a once-through coolant system, the CDF is not high due to the diversity of feedwater systems as the direct cycle characteristics

  13. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III.

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented

  14. Power-feedwater enthalpy operating domain for SBWR applying Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quezada-Garcia, S.; Espinosa-Martinez, E.-G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Varela-Ham, J.R.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work the analyses of the feedwater enthalpy effects on reactor power in a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) applying a methodology based on Monte Carlo's simulation (MCS), is presented. The MCS methodology was applied systematically to establish operating domain, due that the SBWR are not yet in operation, the analysis of the nuclear and thermalhydraulic processes must rely on numerical modeling, with the purpose of developing or confirming the design basis and qualifying the existing or new computer codes to enable reliable analyses. (author)

  15. Water simulation of sodium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system

  16. 77 FR 55877 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... backfitting as defined in 10 CFR 50.109 (the Backfit Rule) and is not otherwise inconsistent with the issue... licenses or combined licenses. This regulatory guide may be applied to applications for operating licenses... may access information related to this document, which the NRC possesses and are publicly available...

  17. Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Dong Yujie; Scherer, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was 3 s). The water vaporization in the steam generator and characteristics of water transport from the steam generator to the reactor core would reduce the rate of water ingress into the reactor core. The analysis of a full cavitation of the feedwater pump showed that if the secondary circuit could be depressurized, the feedwater pump would be stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water transported from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to ∼3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged

  18. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR

  19. Results and analysis of a loss-of-feedwater induced ATWS experiment in the LOFT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grush, W.H.; Koizumi, Y.; Woerth, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    An anticipated transient without scram (ATWS), initiated by a loss of feedwater, was experimentally simulated in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). Primary system pressure was controlled using a two-position actuator relief valve to simulate a scaled power-operated relief valve (PORV) and safety relief valve (SRV) representative of those in a commercial PWR. Auxiliary feedwater injection was delayed during the experiment until the plant recovery phase where long-term shutdown was achieved by an operator-controlled plant recovery procedure without inserting the control rods. The system transient response predicted by the RELAP5/MOD1 computer code showed good agreement with the experimental data

  20. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  1. Ultrasonic meters in the feedwater flow to recover thermal power in the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde U1 and U2; Medidores ultrasonicos en el flujo de agua de alimentacion para recuperar potencia termica en el reactor de la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde U1 and U2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F. [CFE, Central Laguna Verde, Km. 42.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx

    2008-07-01

    The engineers in nuclear power plants BWRs and PWRs based on the development of the ultrasonic technology for the measurement of the mass, volumetric flow, density and temperature in fluids, have applied this technology in two primary targets approved by the NRC: the use for the recovery of thermal power in the reactor and/or to be able to realize an increase of thermal power licensed in a 2% (MUR) by 1OCFR50 Appendix K. The present article mentions the current problem in the measurement of the feedwater flow with Venturi meters, which affects that the thermal balance of reactor BWRs or PWRs this underestimated. One in broad strokes describes the application of the ultrasonic technology for the ultrasonic measurement in the flow of the feedwater system of the reactor and power to recover thermal power of the reactor. One is to the methodology developed in CFE for a calibration of the temperature transmitters of RTD's and the methodology for a calibration of the venturi flow transmitters using ultrasonic measurement. Are show the measurements in the feedwater of reactor of the temperature with RTD's and ultrasonic measurement, as well as the flow with the venturi and the ultrasonic measurement operating the reactor to the 100% of nominal thermal power, before and after the calibration of the temperature transmitters and flow. Finally, is a plan to be able to realize a recovery of thermal power of the reactor, showing as carrying out their estimations. As a result of the application of ultrasonic technology in the feedwater of reactor BWR-5 in Laguna Verde, in the Unit 1 cycle 13 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 25 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 6 M We in the turbogenerator. Also in the Unit 2 cycle 10 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 40 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 16 M We in the turbogenerator. (Author)

  2. Inferential smart sensing for feedwater flowrate in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, M. G.; Hwang, I. J.; Lee, Y. J.

    2006-01-01

    The feedwater flowrate that is measured by Venturi flow meters in most pressurized water reactors can be over-measured because of the fouling phenomena that make corrosion products accumulate in the Venturi meters. Therefore, in this work, two kinds of methods, a support vector regression method and a fuzzy modeling method, combined with a sequential probability ratio test, are used in order to accurately estimate online the feedwater flowrate, and also to monitor the status of the existing hardware sensors. Also, the data for training the support vector machines and the fuzzy model are selected by using a subtractive clustering scheme to use informative data from among all acquired data. The proposed inferential sensing and monitoring algorithm is verified by using the acquired real plant data of Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3. In the simulations, it was known that the root mean squared error and the relative maximum error are so small and the proposed method early detects the degradation of an existing hardware sensor. (authors)

  3. Loss-of-normal-feedwater sensitivity studies for AP600 behavior characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Activity concerning the development of a RELAP5/MOD3 model to simulate the Westinghouse Electric Corporation AP600 is summarized. The aim is to gain initial insight into the capability of RELAP5 to simulate the behavior of AP600 safety features. A-loss-of-normal-feedwater event is studied. Of the transients that must be investigated, this transient has been chosen to be one of the most relevant because the response of the AP600 to a loss-of-normal-feedwater event differs significantly from that of current pressurized water reactors in the extensive use of passive safety features peculiar to the AP600. Also, strong interactions among the AP600 safety systems, which should be further analyzed to permit full optimization of the system actuation logic and operation, are shown. Finally, a loss of normal feedwater without reactor scram, performed to investigate short-term plant behavior, shows that the pressure peak is affected by critical discharge flow coefficients applied to the pressurizer safety valves, while a relatively small reduction of the pressure peak is observed when both heat exchangers of the passive heat removal system are operating as opposed to the case in which only one is available. The data used for this study are derived from the Standard Safety Analysis Report configuration of the Westinghouse AP600 as of 1992

  4. A decision theoretic approach to an accident sequence: when feedwater and auxiliary feedwater fail in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenson, Ola

    1998-01-01

    This study applies a decision theoretic perspective on a severe accident management sequence in a processing industry. The sequence contains loss of feedwater and auxiliary feedwater in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR), which necessitates manual depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel to enable low pressure cooling of the core. The sequence is fast and is a major contributor to core damage in probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs) of this kind of plant. The management of the sequence also includes important, difficult and fast human decision making. The decision theoretic perspective, which is applied to a Swedish ABB-type reactor, stresses the roles played by uncertainties about plant state, consequences of different actions and goals during the management of a severe accident sequence. Based on a theoretical analysis and empirical simulator data the human error probabilities in the PRA for the plant are considered to be too small. Recommendations for how to improve safety are given and they include full automation of the sequence, improved operator training, and/or actions to assist the operators' decision making through reduction of uncertainties, for example, concerning water/steam level for sufficient cooling, time remaining before insufficient cooling level in the tank is reached and organizational cost-benefit evaluations of the events following a false alarm depressurization as well as the events following a successful depressurization at different points in time. Finally, it is pointed out that the approach exemplified in this study is applicable to any accident scenario which includes difficult human decision making with conflicting goals, uncertain information and with very serious consequences

  5. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  6. Tracer test method and process data reconciliation based on VDI 2048. Comparison of two methods for highly accurate determination of feedwater massflow at NPP Beznau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungerbuehler, T.; Langenstein, M.

    2007-01-01

    The feedwater mass flow is the key measured variable used to determine the thermal reactor output in a nuclear power plant. Usually this parameter is recorded via venturi nozzles of orifice plates. The problem with both principles of measurement, however, is that an accuracy of below 1% cannot be reached. In order to make more accurate statements about the feedwater amounts recirculated in the water-steam cycle, tracer measurements that offer an accuracy of up to 0.2% are used. In the NPP Beznau both methods have been used in parallel to determine the feedwater flow rates in 2004 (unit 1) and 2005 (unit 2). Comparison of the results shows that a high level of agreement is obtained between the results of the reconciliation and the results of the tracer measurements. As a result of the findings of this comparison, a high level of acceptance of process data reconciliation based on VDI 2048 was achieved. (orig.)

  7. Smart Sensing of the Aux. Feed-water Pump Performance in NPP Severe Accidents Using Advanced GMDH Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, Young Gyu; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In order to develop and verify the models, a number of data obtained by simulating station black out (SBO) scenario for the optimized power reactor 1000 (OPR1000) using MARS code were used. Most of monitoring systems for component have been suggested by using the directly measured data. However, it is very difficult to acquire data related to safety-critical component' status. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the new method that combines the data-based equipped with learning system and data miming technique. Many data-based modeling methods have been applied successfully to nuclear engineering area, such as signal validation, plant diagnostics and event identification. Also, the data miming is the process of analyzing data from different perspectives and summarizing it into useful information. In this study, the smart sensing technique was developed using advanced group method of data handing (GMDH) model. The original GMDH is an inductive self organizing algebraic model. The advanced GMDH model is equipped with a fuzzy concept. The proposed advanced GMDH model enhances the original GMDH model by reducing the effect of outliers and noise. The advanced GMDH uses different weightings according to their importance which is specified by the fuzzy membership grade. The developed model was verified using SBO accident simulation data for the OPR1000 nuclear power plant acquired with MARS code. Also, the advanced GMDH model was trained using the simulated development data and verified with simulated test data. The development and test data sets were independent. The simulation results show that the performance of the developed advanced GMDH model was very satisfactory, as shown in Table 1. Therefore, if the developed model can be optimized using diverse and specific data, it will be possible to predict the performance of Aux. feed water pump accurately.

  8. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, it has been attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build-up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: The origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters; the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pins deposits (activation); the release and transport of cobalt-60; the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarized. 90 refs, figs and tabs

  9. Gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable direct cooling of reactor cores thereby improving the cooling efficiency upon accidents. Constitution: A plurality sets of heat exchange pipe groups are disposed around the reactor core, which are connected by way of communication pipes with a feedwater recycling device comprising gas/liquid separation device, recycling pump, feedwater pump and emergency water tank. Upon occurrence of loss of primary coolants accidents, the heat exchange pipe groups directly absorb the heat from the reactor core through radiation and convection. Although the water in the heat exchange pipe groups are boiled to evaporate if the forcive circulation is interrupted by the loss of electric power source, water in the emergency tank is supplied due to the head to the heat exchange pipe groups to continue the cooling. Furthermore, since the heat exchange pipe groups surround the entire circumference of the reactor core, cooling is carried out uniformly without resulting deformation or stresses due to the thermal imbalance. (Sekiya, K.)

  10. Thorium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.

    1984-12-01

    Advanced heavy water reactors can provide energy on a global scale beyond the foreseeable future. Their economic and safety features are promising: 1. The theoretical feasibility of the Self Sufficient Equilibrium Thorium (SSET) concept is confirmed by new calculations. Calculations show that the adjuster rod geometry used in natural uranium CANDU reactors is adequate also for SSET if the absorption in the rods is graded. 2. New fuel bundle designs can permit substantially higher power output from a CANDU reactor. The capital cost for fuel, heavy water and mechanical equipment can thereby be greatly reduced. Progress is possible with the traditional fuel material oxide, but the use of thorium metal gives much larger effects. 3. A promising long range possibility is to use pressure tanks instead of pressure tubes. Heat removal from the core is facilitated. Negative temperature and void coefficients provide inherent safety features. Refuelling under power is no longer needed if control by moderator displacement is used. Reduced quality demand on the fuel permits lower fuel costs. The neutron economy is improved by the absence of pressure and clandria tubes and also by the use of radial and axial blankets. A modular seed blanket design can reduce the Pa losses. The experience from construction of tank designs is good e.g. AAgesta, Attucha. It is now also possible to utilize technology from LWR reactors and the implementation of advanced heavy water reactors would thus be easier than HTR or LMFBR systems. (Author)

  11. Analysis of Total Loss of Feedwater for APR1400 using SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Min; Park, Seok Jeong; Park, Chan Eok; Choi, Jong Ho; Lee, Gyu Cheon [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Total Loss of FeedWater (TLOFW) event is an accident that main feedwater and auxiliary feedwater of secondary side are not supplied to steam generators. APR1400 uses the Safety Depressurization and Vent System (SDVS) for the F and B operation and SDVS is designed to perform the rapid depressurization function of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) through the remote manual operation when TLOFW is occurred. If RCS pressure falls below a Safety Injection Pump (SIP) working pressure, it can be possible to start the F and B operation which injects SIP flow to RCS and releases the RCS vapor and two-phase flow through Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valves (POSRVs) by opening the POSRVs, and then it can be possible to remove the decay heat. The design requirement of SDVS is that the core water level should be maintained at higher than 2 feet from the top of active core during the F and B operation. The TLOFW analysis was carried out to evaluate the capability of decay heat removal for APR1400 using newly developed SPACE code. The analysis results show that the F and B operation with 2 POSRVs and 2 SIPs and the F and B operation with 4 POSRVs and 4 SIPs meet the SDVS design requirement for the fuel cladding temperature. The comparison with RELAP5 shows good agreement and it validates the applicability of SPACE code for this type of accident analysis.

  12. Modeling and simulation of pressurized water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Two kinds of balance of plant (BOP) models of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system are developed in this work - the detailed BOP model and the simple BOP model. The detailed model is used to simulate the normal operational performance of a whole BOP system. The simple model is used to combine with the NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The trends of the steady state values of the detailed model are correct and the dynamic responses are reasonable. The simple BOP model approach starts the modelling work from the overall point of view. The response of the normalized turbine power and the feedwater inlet temperature to the steam generator of the simple model are compared with those of the detailed model. Both the steady state values and the dynamic responses are close to those of the detailed model. The simple BOP model is found adequate to represent the main performance of the BOP system. The simple balance of plant model was coupled with a NSSS model for a whole plant simulation. The NSSS model consists of the reactor core model, the steam generator model, and the coolant temperature control system. A closed loop whole plant simulation for an electric load perturbation was performed. The results are plausible. The coupling effect between the NSSS system and the BOP system was analyzed. The feedback of the BOP system has little effect on the steam generator performance, while the performance of the BOP system is strongly affected by the steam flow rate from the NSSS

  13. The European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leny, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The present state of development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) is outlined. During the so-called harmonization phase, the French and German utilities drew up their common requirements and evaluated the reactor concept developed until then with respect to these requirements. A main result of the harmonization phase was the issue, in September 1993, of the 'EPR Conceptual Safety Feature Review File' to be jointly assessed by the safety authorities in France and Germany. The safety objectives to be met by the EPR are specified in the second part of the paper, and some details of the primary and secondary side safety systems are given. (orig.) [de

  14. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Osamu.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cavitations in a recycling pump, as well as improve the safety and a reliability of a pressure vessel. Constitution: A feedwater pipeway is connected to the route between the pressure vessel and the recycling pipe and feedwater from the feedwater pipeway is directly introduced to the recycling pump. The temperature of water flowing into the recycling pump is lowered by the feedwater from the feedwater pipeway to prevent the cavitations. (Yoshino, Y.)

  15. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  16. Excessive heat removal due to feedwater system malfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beader, D.; Peterlin, G.

    1986-01-01

    Excessive heat removal transient of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant, caused by steam generators feedwater system malfunctions was simulated by RELAP5/MOD1 computer code. The results are increase of power and reactor scram caused by high-high steam generator level. (author)

  17. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  18. Pressurized water reactor inspection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, D.; Mueller, G.; Otte, H.J.; Roth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Inspections of the reactor pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors (PWR) so far used to be carried out with different central mast manipulators. For technical reasons, parallel inspections of two manipulators alongside work on the refueling cavity, so as to reduce the time spent on the critical path in a revision outage, are not possible. Efforts made to minimize the inspection time required with one manipulator have been successful, but their effects are limited. Major reductions in inspection time can be achieved only if inspections are run with two manipulators in parallel. The decentralized manipulator built by GEC Alsthom Energie and so far emmployed in boiling water reactors in the USA, Spain, Switzerland and Japan allows two systems to be used in parallel, thus reducing the time required for standard inspection of a pressure vessel from some six days to three days. These savings of approximately three days are made possible without any compromises in terms of positioning by rail-bound systems. During inspection, the reactor refueling cavity is available for other revision work without any restrictions. The manipulator can be used equally well for inspecting standard PWR, PWR with a thermal shield, for inspecting the land between in-core instrumentation nozzles, BWR with and without jet pumps (complementary inspection), and for inspecting core support shrouds. (orig.) [de

  19. Outline of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.; Imaoka, T.; Minematsu, A.; Takashima, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental design of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) was completed in December 1985. This design represents the next generation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990s. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies and many new improvements based on an extensive accumulation of world-wide experience through design, construction and operation of BWRs. The ABWR development program was initiated in 1978, with subsequent design and test and development programs started in 1981. Most of the development and verification tests of the new features have been completed. The ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. The ABWR objectives were specific improvements such as operating and safety margins, enhanced availability and capacity factor, and reduced occupational exposure while at the same time achieving significant cost reduction in both capital and operating costs. The ABWR is characterized by an improved NSSS including ten internal recirculation pumps, fine motion electric-hydraulic control rod drives, optimized safety and auxiliary systems, advanced control and instrumentation systems, improved turbine-generator with moisture/separator reheater with plant output increased to 1350 MWe, and an integrated reinforced concrete containment vessel and compact Reactor and Turbine Building design. The turbine system also included improvements in the Turbine-Generator, feedwater/heater system, and condensate treatment systems. The radwaste system was also optimized taking advantage of the plant design improvements and advances in radwaste technology. The ABWR is a truly optimal design which utilizes advanced technologies, capabilities, performance improvements, and yet provides an economic advantage. (author)

  20. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  1. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Considerations for surviving the loss of a main feedwater pump at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaydos, K.A.; Calvo, R.; Conroy, P.W.; Klein, C.M.; Mellers, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Today's economics dictate that nuclear power operational costs be contained by addressing frequently-occurring trips that might be minimized or avoided via specific upgrades. Much recent attention has focused on the significant percentage of plant trips related to feedwater flow regulation; however, another frequent feedwater-related trip stems from the loss of a single main feedwater pump while operating at high power levels, causing a plant trip on low steam generator water-level. This paper summarizes the results of several plant-specific studies that evaluate a unit's capabilities to consistently survive the loss of a main feedwater pump from full power, and outlines a methodology for analyzing this capability

  3. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  4. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  5. Iron concentration controller in feedwater in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present invention is to prevent chlorine ions from flowing into a reactor when sea water leakage accident should occur in a condenser upon control of Fe concentration in feedwater. That is, a sensor is disposed for detecting the leakage of the sea water at the exit of the condenser. The controller receives a detection signal as the input and delivers a control signal as the output. A control system receives the control signal and actuates valves in bypass systems. In view of the above, the electroconductivity or chlorine ion concentration of the condensate, which varies upon occurrence of sea water leakages in the condenser, is detected by the sensor, and then the controller closes a valve dispposed in the bypass systems in a processing device for filtering and desalting the condensates. Accordingly, the chlorine ions mixed into the condensates are removed by a desalting device without flowing into the reactor. In view of the above, an effect capable of keeping integrity of the plant is obtainable. (I.S.)

  6. Startup of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Tin Tin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The startup schemes of high-temperature reactors cooled and moderated by supercritical pressure light water (SCLWR-H) with square lattice and descending flow type water rods are studied by thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study, two kinds of startup systems are investigated. In the constant pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a supercritical pressure. A flash tank and pressure reducing valves are necessary. The flash tank is designed so that the moisture content in the steam is less than 0.1%. In sliding pressure startup system, the reactor starts at a subcritical pressure. A steam-water separator and a drain tank are required for two-phase flow at startup. The separator is designed by referring to the water separator used in supercritical fossil-fired power plants. The maximum cladding surface temperature during the power-raising phase of startup is restricted not to exceed the rated value of 620degC. The minimum feedwater flow rate is 25% for constant pressure startup and 35% for sliding pressure startup system. It is found that both constant pressure startup system and sliding pressure startup system are feasible in SCLWR-H from the thermal hydraulic point of view. The core outlet temperature as high as 500degC can be achieved in the present design of SCLWR-H. Since the feedwater flow rate of SCLWR-H (1190 kg/s) is lower than that of the previous SCR designs the weight of the component required for startup is reduced. The sliding pressure startup system is better than constant pressure startup system in order to reduce the required component weight (and hence material expenditure) and to simplify the startup plant system. (author)

  7. Activity buildup in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1987-05-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel irradiation dose rates during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to Co-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, the author has attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of Co-59 in the reactor feedwater; - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel element crud deposits (activation); - the release and transport of the Co-60; - the build up of Co-60 in the corrosion products of the primary circuit. Existing models for the build up of cirquit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experience from selected reactors are summarized. Finally the state of the art of knowledge concerning the individual stages in the development of the activation build up is depicted. This highlights the existing gaps and thus identifies areas for possible R+D activities. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobald build up in the primary cirquit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of austenitic steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with an understanding of the activation processes of the cobalt deposited on the fuel elements and in the mass transfer of Co-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. In this respect there is ample room for new and original research contributions. It is recommended that sections 8 and 9 of this report should be read as an 'Executive Summary'. (author)

  8. U.S. experience with hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Ruiz, C.P.; Simpson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors is currently being adopted by many utilities in the U.S., with eleven units having completed preimplementation test programs, four units operating permanently with hydrogen water chemistry, and six other units in the process of installing permanent equipment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection is required for the recirculation piping system and other regions of the BWR systems. The present paper explores progress in predicting and monitoring hydrogen water chemistry response in these areas. Testing has shown that impurities can play an important role in hydrogen water chemistry. Evaluation of their effects are also performed. Both computer modeling and in plant measurements show that each plant will respond uniquely to feedwater hydrogen addition. Thus, each plant has its own unique hydrogen requirement for recirculation system protecion. Furthermore, the modeling, and plant measurements show that different regions of the BWR respond differently to hydrogen injection. Thus, to insure protection of components other than the recirculation systems may require more (or less) hydrogen demand than indicated by the recirculation system measurements. In addition, impurities such as copper can play a significant role in establishing hydrogen demand. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  11. On-line validation of feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, M.; Ipakchi, A.; Alexandro, F.J.; Colley, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    On-line calibration of feedwater flow rate measurement in nuclear power plants provides a continuous realistic value of feedwater flow rate. It also reduces the manpower required for periodic calibration needed due to the fouling and defouling of the venturi meter surface condition. This paper presents a method for on-line validation of feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants. The method is an improvement of the previously developed method which is based on the use of a set of process variables dynamically related to the feedwater flow rate. The online measurements of this set of variables are used as inputs to a neural network to obtain an estimate of the feedwater flow rate reading. The difference between the on-line feedwater flow rate reading, and the neural network estimate establishes whether there is a need to apply a correction factor to the feedwater flow rate measurement for calculation of the actual reactor power. The method was applied to the feedwater flow meters in the two feedwater flow loops of the TMI-1 nuclear power plant. The venturi meters used for flow measurements are susceptible to frequent fouling that degrades their measurement accuracy. The fouling effects can cause an inaccuracy of up to 3% relative error in feedwater flow rate reading. A neural network, whose inputs were the readings of a set of reference instruments, was designed to predict both feedwater flow rates simultaneously. A multi-layer feedforward neural network employing the backpropagation algorithm was used. A number of neural network training tests were performed to obtain an optimum filtering technique of the input/output data of the neural networks. The result of the selection of the filtering technique was confirmed by numerous Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) tests. Training and testing were done on data from TMI-1 nuclear power plant. The results show that the neural network can predict the correct flow rates with an absolute relative error of less than 2%

  12. Pipe rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Szyslowski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.; Quinones, D.; Server, W.

    1987-01-01

    For much of the high energy piping in light water reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but the overall safety and integrity of the plant are improved since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied at Beaver Valley Power Station - Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferritic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in (152 mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel lines as small as 3-in (76 mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elimination

  13. Attachment of iron corrosion products on steam generator tube and feed-water pump in PWRs secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Y.; Ishihara, N.; Miyata, H.; Ohira, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Nonaka, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Operating experience of the secondary systems in PWRs indicates that scale attachment distinctly have an effect on the performance of water-steam cycle. Attached scale on outer surface of steam generator (SG) tube could induce many problems such as decrease heat efficiency of plant, corrosion of tube by intergranular attack (IGA), and choke of flow channel. Scale attached on rotor blade of feed water pump increases the driving steam consumption to keep the constant flow rate, and results in the thermal efficiency decrease of the plant. In this study, two types of test about scale deposition on equipment were executed in the conditions simulating the secondary system of PWR. One is SG model test, which simulated the circulating boiler composed of single SG tube and blow down line. The deposition rate under AVT condition was equivalent to plants revealed with extended period. High-AVT test provided useful reference, because the deposition rate of power plant is too small to measure in a short period after the beginning of High-AVT operation in Japan. The other is feed water pump model test. The mock-up pump is composed of a rotating stainless steel disk. As a result, it is confirmed that the deposition rate depends mostly on iron concentration in water and the exfoliation rate depends mainly on pH. Applying this information, the scale deposition-growth behavior on the equipment is quantitatively expressed by the model combined of scale deposition behavior and exfoliation behavior couples with the former. These results bring effective estimation for suppressing deposition-growth by the selection of water chemistry management and/or equipment improvement in the PWR secondary system. (author)

  14. Thermal and stability considerations for a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor during power-raising phase of plant startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes thermal analyses and linear stability analyses of the Supercritical Water-cooled Fast Reactor with 'two-path' flow scheme during the power-raising phase of plant startup. For thermal consideration, the same criterion of the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) as applied to the normal operating condition is used. For thermal-hydraulic stability consideration, the decay ratio of 0.5 is applied, which is taken from BWRs. Firstly, we calculated the flow rate distribution among the parallel flow paths from the reactor vessel inlet nozzles to the mixing plenum below the core using a system analysis code. The parallel flow paths consist of the seed fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow, the blanket fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow and the downcomer. Then, the MCSTs are estimated for various reactor powers and feedwater flow rates with system analyses. The decay ratios are estimated with linear stability analyses. The available range of the reactor power and feedwater flow rate to satisfy the thermal and stability criteria is obtained. (author)

  15. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  16. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of reflooding effects on an overheated boiling water reactor core in a small steam-line break accident using MAAP, MELCOR, and SCDAP/RELAP5 computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Pekkarinen, E.; Sjoevall, H.

    1995-01-01

    Selected core reflooding situations were investigated in the case of a Finnish boiling water reactor with three severe accident analysis computer codes (MAAP, MELCOR, and SCDAP/RELAP5). The unmitigated base case accident scenario was a 10% steam-line break without water makeup to the reactor pressure vessel initially. The pumping of water to the core was started with the auxiliary feed water system when the maximum fuel cladding temperature reached 1,500 K. The auxiliary feedwater system pumps water (temperature 303 K) through the core spray spargers (core spray) on the top of the core and through feedwater nozzles to the downcomer (downcomer injection). The scope of the study was restricted to cases where the overheated core was still geometrically intact at the start of the reflooding. The following different core reflooding situations were investigated: (1) auxiliary feedwater injection to core spray (45 kg/s); (2) auxiliary feedwater injection to downcomer (45 kg/s); (3) auxiliary feedwater injection to downcomer (45 kg/s) and to core spray (45 kg/s); (4) no reflooding of the core. All the three codes predicted debris formation after the water addition, and in all MAAP and MELCOR reflooding results the core was quenched. The major difference between the code predictions was in the amount of H 2 produced, though the trends in H 2 production were similar. Additional steam production during the quenching process accelerated the oxidation in the unquenched parts of the core. This result is in accordance with several experimental observations

  18. Study on primary coolant system depressurization effect factor in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Duan; Cao Xuewu

    2006-01-01

    The progression of high-pressure core melting severe accident induced by very small break loss of coolant accident plus the loss of main feed water and auxiliary feed water failure is studied, and the entry condition and modes of primary cooling system depressurization during the severe accident are also estimated. The results show that the temperature below 650 degree C is preferable depressurization input temperature allowing recovery of core cooling, and the available and effective way to depressurize reactor cooling system and to arrest very small break loss of coolant accident sequences is activating pressurizer relief valves initially, then restoring the auxiliary feedwater and opening the steam generator relief valves. It can adequately reduce the primary pressure and keep the capacity loop of long-term core cooling. (authors)

  19. Reactor water level measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Reiji; Asano, Tamotsu.

    1996-01-01

    A condensation vessel is connected to the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The lower portion of the condensation vessel is connected to a low pressure side of a differential pressure transmission device by way of a reference leg pipeline. The high pressure side of the differential pressure transmission device is connected to the lower portion of the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The condensation vessel is equipped with a temperature sensor. When a temperature of a gas phase portion in the condensation vessel is lowered below a predetermined level, and incondensible gases in the condensation vessel starts to be dissolved in water, signals are sent from the temperature sensor to a control device and a control valve is opened. With such a constitution, CRD driving water flows into the condensation vessel, and water in which gases at the upper portion of the condensation vessel is dissolved flows into the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. Then, gases dissolved in a reference water column in the reference leg pipeline are eliminated and the value of a reference water pressure does not change even upon abrupt lowering of pressure. (I.N.)

  20. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  1. Model based control and optimization of a feed-water heater train; Modellbaserad reglering och optimering av en foervaermarekedja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velut, Stephane; Raaberg, Martin; Wendel, Hans (Grontmij AB (SE))

    2007-12-15

    Thermal power plants are complex processes in which many variables must be monitored and controlled in real-time for a safe and economic operation. The complex interactions between actuators and controlled variables as well as the load dependent dynamics make the design and tuning of all controllers a challenging task. A mathematical model of the process that describes critical characteristics such as dynamics, interactions, and nonlinearities might greatly facilitate the task of the control engineer. Such controllers can be designed in a rather systematic way to achieve good performance in terms of response time and robustness. This enables the operator to run the process closer to its limits while minimizing damage risks. The goal of the project was threefold. The first objective was to describe the available methods to compute process models directly from experimental data and illustrate how those models can be used for control design. The second objective was to apply some of the fore mentioned methods on a specific process, namely a feed water heater train to control the level in each preheater. The third objective was to analyze how the level in each preheater affects the thermal efficiency of the plant and derive adequate set-points for the model-based controllers. The project started at the end of the production season, which resulted in a tight schedule for the planning and the realization of experiments. Informative data could however be collected and models could be derived for some specific loads. Unfortunately the effect of the changes in the level set point could not be verified because of the limited length of the experiments. The project results can be summarized as follows: The way the condensate level should be chosen in every preheater has been formulated as a simple optimization problem that aims as maximizing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Even though the model used in the optimization was simple, the results were pretty intuitive. The

  2. To the analysis of reactor noise in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1972-01-01

    The paper contains some basic thoughts on the problem of neutron flux oscillations in power reactors. The advantages of self-powered detectors and their function are explained. In addition, noise measurements of the boiling water reactors at Lingen and Holden are described, and the possibilities of an employment of vanadium detectors for the analysis of reactor noise are discussed. The final pages of the paper contain a complete list of the author's publications in the field of reactor noise analysis. (RW/AK) [de

  3. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  4. Dependence of steam generator vibrations on feedwater pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadilek, J.

    1989-01-01

    Vibration sensors are attached to the bottom of the steam generator jacket between the input and output primary circuit collectors. The effective vibration value is recorded daily. Several times higher vibrations were observed at irregular intervals; their causes were sought, and the relation between the steam generator vibrations measured at the bottom of its vessel and the feedwater pressure was established. The source of the vibrations was found to be in the feedwater tract of the steam generator. The feedwater tract is described and its hydraulic characteristics are given. Vibrations were measured on the S02 valve. It is concluded that vibrations can be eliminated by reducing the water pressure before the control valves and by replacing the control valves with ones with more suitable control characteristics. (E.J.). 3 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  5. A floating cogeneration system using the Russian KLT-40 reactor and Canadian reverse osmosis water purification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, J.R.; Davies, K.

    1997-01-01

    As the global consumption of water increases with growing populations and rising levels of industrialization, major new sources of potable water production must be developed. To address this issue efficiently and economically, a new approach has been developed in Canada for the integration of reverse osmosis (RO) desalination systems with nuclear reactors as an energy source. The use of waste heat from the electrical generation process to preheat the RO feedwater, advanced feedwater pre-treatment and sophisticated system design integration and optimization techniques have led to improved water production efficiency, lower water production costs and reduced environmental impacts. CANDESAL Inc., has studied the use of its approach to the application of RO technology in the Russian APWS-80 floating nuclear desalination plant. Case studies show that water production efficiently improvements up to about 16% can be achieved. The energy consumed for the CANDESAL optimized APWS-80 design configuration is 4.2 kW·h/m 3 compared to the base APWS-80 design value of 4.9 kW·h/m 3 . Although only a preliminary study, these results suggest that significant improvements in the cost of water production can be achieved. The potential benefits warrant further detailed evaluation followed by a demonstration project. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Egashira, Yasuo; Shimada, Fumie; Igarashi, Noboru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To save a low temperature reactor water clean-up system indispensable so far and significantly simplify the system by carrying out the reactor water clean-up solely in a high temperature reactor water clean-up system. Constitution: The reactor water clean-up device comprises a high temperature clean-up pump and a high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. The high temperature adsorption device is filled with amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents, or amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents and anionic adsorbing inorganic adsorbents. The reactor water clean-up device introduces reactor water by the high temperature clean-up pump through a recycling system to the high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. Since cations such as cobalt ions and anions such as chlorine ions in the reactor water are simultaneously removed in the device, a low temperature reactor water clean-up system which has been indispensable so far can be saved to realize the significant simplification for the entire system. (Seki, T.)

  8. Investigation and evaluation of cracking incidents in piping in pressurized water reactors. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of known cracking incidents in pressurized water reactor plants. Several instances of cracking in feedwater piping in 1979, together with reported cases of stress corrosion cracking at Three Mile Island Unit 1, led to the establishment of the third Pipe Crack Study Group. Major differences between the scope of the third PCSG and the previous two are: (1) the emphasis given to systems safety implications of cracking, and (2) the consideration given all cracking mechanisms known to affect PWR piping, including the failure of small lines in secondary safety systems. The present PCSG reviewed existing information on cracking of PWR pipe systems, either contained in written records of collected from meetings in the United States, and made recommendations in response to the PCSG charter questions and to othe major items that may be considered to either reduce the potential for cracking or to improve licensing bases

  9. Ultrasonic pattern recognition study of feedwater nozzle inner radius indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, H.; Takama, S.; Kishigami, M.; Sasahara, T.; Ando, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made to distinguish defects on feed-water nozzle inner radius from noise echo caused by stainless steel cladding by using ultrasonic pattern recognition method with frequency analysis technique. Experiment has been successfully performed on flat clad plates and nozzle mock-up containing fatigue cracks and the following results which shows the high capability of frequency analysis technique are obtained

  10. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  11. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  12. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, M.E.; Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m 3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m 3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Predicted effect of power uprating on the water chemistry of commercial boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    The approach of power uprating has been adopted by operators of light water reactors in the past few decades in order to increase the power generation efficiency of nuclear reactors. The power uprate strategy is apparently applicable to the three nuclear reactors in Taiwan as well. When choosing among the three types of power uprating, measurement uncertainty, stretch power uprating, and extended power uprating, a deliberate and thorough evaluation is required before a final decision and an optimal selection can be made. One practical way of increasing the reactor power is to deliberately adjust the fuel loading pattern and the control rod pattern and thus to avoid replacing the primary coolant pump with a new one of larger capacity. The power density of the reactor will increase with increasing power, but the mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a light water reactor will slightly increase (usually by less than 5 %) or even remain unchanged. Accordingly, an uprated power would induce higher neutron and gamma photon dose rates in the reactor coolant but have a minor or no effect on the mass flow rate of the primary coolant. The radiolysis product concentrations and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) values differ largely in the PCC of a boiling water reactor (BWR). It is very difficult to measure the water chemistry data directly at various locations of an actual reactor. Thus the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry of a BWR operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, the DEMACE computer code was modified to investigate the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry under a fixed mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit of a BWR/6 type plant. Simulations were carried out for hydrogen concentrations in feedwater ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 mg . kg -1 and for power levels ranging from 100 % to 120 %. The responses of water chemistry and ECP

  14. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  15. Reactor vessel pressure transient protection for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, G.

    1978-09-01

    During the past few years the NRC has been studying the issue of protection of the reactor pressure vessels at Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) from transients when the vessels are at a relatively low temperature. This effort was prompted by concerns related to the safety margins available to vessel damage as a result of such events. Nuclear Reactor Regulation Category A Technical Activity No. A-26 was established to set forth the NRC plan for resolution of the generic aspects of this safety issue. The purpose of the report is to document the completion of this generic technical activity

  16. A connection of the steam generator feedwater section of WWER type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Sadilek, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the feedwater piping of each steam generator, a plate for additional water pressure reduction is inserted before the first closing valve. During a steady water flow, the plate gives rise to a constant hydraulic resistance, bringing about steady reduction of the feedwater pressure; this also contributes to a stabilization of the feedwater flow rate into the steam generator. The control valve thus is stressed by minimal hydrodynamic forces. In this manner its load is decreased, its vibrations are damped, and the frequency of failures - and thereby the frequency of the nuclear power plant unit outages -is reduced. (J.P.). 1 fig

  17. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  18. Method of operating heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stabilized reactor control, and improve the working rate and the safety of the reactor by removing liquid poison in heavy water while maintaining the power level constant to thereby render the void coefficient of the coolants negative in the low power operation. Method: The operation device for a heavy water moderated reactor comprises a power detector for the reactor, a void coefficient calculator for coolants, control rods inserted into the reactor, a poison regulator for dissolving poisons into or removing them out of heavy water and a device for removing the poisons by the poison regulator device while maintaining the predetermined power level or inserting the control rods by the signals from the power detector and the void coefficient calculator in the high temperature stand-by conditions of the reactor. Then, the heavy water moderated reactor is operated so that liquid poisons in the heavy water are eliminated in the high temperature stand-by condition prior to the start for the power up while maintaining the power level constant and the plurality of control rods are inserted into the reactor core and the void coefficient of the coolants is rendered negative in the low power operation. (Seki, T.)

  19. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  20. Fuzzy logic control of water level in advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chaung; Lee, Chi-Szu; Raghavan, R.; Fahrner, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The feedwater control system in the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is more challenging to design compared to other control systems in the plant, due to the possible change in level from void collapses and swells during transient events. A basic fuzzy logic controller is developed using a simplified ABWR mathematical model to demonstrate and compare the performance of this controller with a simplified conventional controller. To reduce the design effort, methods are developed to automatically tune the scaling factors and control rules. As a first step in developing the fuzzy controller, a fuzzy controller with a limited number of rules is developed to respond to normal plant transients such as setpoint changes of plant parameters and load demand changes. Various simulations for setpoint and load demand changes of plant performances were conducted to evaluate the modeled fuzzy logic design against the simplified ABWR model control system. The simulation results show that the performance of the fuzzy logic controller is comparable to that of the Proportional-Integral (PI) controller, However, the fuzzy logic controller produced shorter settling time for step setpoint changes compared to the simplified conventional controller

  1. Pressure tube reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natori, Hisahide.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the electrical power generation efficiency in a pressure tube reactor in which coolants and moderators are separated by feedwater heating with heat generated in heavy water and by decreasing the amount of steams to be extracted from the turbine. Constitution: A heat exchanger and a heavy water cooler are additionally provided to a conventional pressure tube reactor. The heat exchanger is disposed at the pre-stage of a low pressure feedwater heater series. High temperature heavy water heated in the core is passed through the primary side of the exchanger, while feedwater is passed through the secondary side. The cooler is disposed on the downstream of the heat exchanger in the flowing direction of the heavy water, in which heavy water from the heat exchanger is passed through the primary side and the auxiliary equipment cooling water is sent to the secondary side thereof. Accordingly, since extraction of heating steams is no more necessary, the steam can be used for the rotation of the turbine, and the electrical power generation efficiency can be improved. (Seki, T.)

  2. Early hydrogen water chemistry in the boiling water reactor: industry-first demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen injection into the BWR feedwater during power operation has resulted in significant IGSCC reductions. Further, noble metal application (NMCA) during shutdown or On-line NobleChem TM (OLNC) during power operation has greatly reduced the required hydrogen injection rate by catalyzing the hydrogen-oxygen reaction on the metal surfaces, reducing the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at operating temperature to well below the mitigation ECP of -230 mV (SHE) at reactor water hydrogen to oxidant (O 2 + H 2 O 2 ) molar ratios of ≥2. Since IGSCC rates increase markedly at reduced temperature, and the potential for crack initiation exists, additional crack mitigation was desired. To close this gap in mitigation, the EPRI BWR Startup ECP Reduction research and development program commenced in 2008 to undertake laboratory and feasibility studies for adding a reductant to the reactor water system during start-ups. Under this program, ECP reductions of noble metal treated stainless steel sufficient to mitigate IGSCC at startup temperatures were achieved in the laboratory in the absence of radiation at hydrogen, hydrazine and carbohydrazide to oxygen molar ratios of ≥ 2, ≥1.5 and ≥0.7, respectively. Based on the familiarity of operating BWRs with using hydrogen, a demonstration of hydrogen injection during the startup of an actual BWR using noble metals was planned. This process, named EHWC (Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry), differs from the HDS (Hydrogen During Startup) approach that has been successful in Japan in that HDS injects sufficient hydrogen for bulk oxidant reduction whereas EHWC injects a smaller amount of hydrogen, sufficient to achieve a hydrogen:oxidant molar ratio of at least two at noble metal treated surfaces. The industry-first EHWC demonstration was performed at Exelon's Peach Bottom 3 nuclear power plant in October 2011. Prior to EHWC, Peach Bottom 3 had one NMCA (October 1999) and five annual OLNC applications (starting in 2007

  3. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  4. Boiling water reactor fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of compensating, without the use of control rods or burnable poisons for power shaping, for reduced moderation of neutrons in an uppermost section of the active core of a boiling water nuclear reactor containing a plurality of elongated fuel rods vertically oriented therein, the fuel rods having nuclear fuel therein, the fuel rods being cooled by water pressurized such that boiling thereof occurs. The method consists of: replacing all of the nuclear fuel in a portion of only the upper half of first predetermined ones of the fuel rods with a solid moderator material of zirconium hydride so that the fuel and the moderator material are axially distributed in the predetermined ones of the fuel rods in an asymmetrical manner relative to a plane through the axial midpoint of each rod and perpendicular to the axis of the rod; placing the moderator material in the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods in respective sealed internal cladding tubes, which are separate from respective external cladding tubes of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods, to prevent interaction between the moderator material and the external cladding tube of each of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods; and wherein the number of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods is at least thirty, and further comprising the steps of: replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the upper quarter of each of the at least thirty rods; and also replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the adjacent lower quarter of at least sixteen of the at least thirty rods

  5. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  6. Feedwater heater performance evaluation using the heat exchanger workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, K.M.; Singh, G.P.; Tsou, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    A Heat Exchanger Workstation (HEW) has been developed to monitor the condition of heat exchanging equipment power plants. HEW enables engineers to analyze thermal performance and failure events for power plant feedwater heaters. The software provides tools for heat balance calculation and performance analysis. It also contains an expert system that enables performance enhancement. The Operation and Maintenance (O ampersand M) reference module on CD-ROM for HEW will be available by the end of 1995. Future developments of HEW would result in Condenser Expert System (CONES) and Balance of Plant Expert System (BOPES). HEW consists of five tightly integrated applications: A Database system for heat exchanger data storage, a Diagrammer system for creating plant heat exchanger schematics and data display, a Performance Analyst system for analyzing and predicting heat exchanger performance, a Performance Advisor expert system for expertise on improving heat exchanger performance and a Water Calculator system for computing properties of steam and water. In this paper an analysis of a feedwater heater which has been off-line is used to demonstrate how HEW can analyze the performance of the feedwater heater train and provide an economic justification for either replacing or repairing the feedwater heater

  7. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  8. Localized corrosion problems in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, Henri.

    1977-01-01

    Main localized etching on the structure materials of water reactors are studied: stress corrosion on stainless steel 304 (B.W.R), stress corrosion, 'wall thinning' and denting of Inconel 600 vapor generator tubes (P.W.R.). Some mechanisms are examined and practical exemples in reactors are described. Various possible cures are presented [fr

  9. Study of thermohydraulic characteristics of upgraded feedwater collector in PGV-440 steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarankov, G.A.; Trunov, N.B.; Titov, V.F. [OKB Gidropress (Russian Federation); Urbansky, V.V. [Rovno NPP (Ukraine); Lenkei, I.; Notarosh, M. [Paks NPP (Hungary)

    1995-12-31

    Reconstruction of feedwater distribution collector was performed at unit 1 of Rowno NPP. Main results of measurements of temperatures in water volume, reparation characteristics and impurities distribution are presented. Analysis of tests results and design criteria is given. (orig.).

  10. Study of thermohydraulic characteristics of upgraded feedwater collector in PGV-440 steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarankov, G A; Trunov, N B; Titov, V F [OKB Gidropress (Russian Federation); Urbansky, V V [Rovno NPP (Ukraine); Lenkei, I; Notarosh, M [Paks NPP (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Reconstruction of feedwater distribution collector was performed at unit 1 of Rowno NPP. Main results of measurements of temperatures in water volume, reparation characteristics and impurities distribution are presented. Analysis of tests results and design criteria is given. (orig.).

  11. Control-rod, pressure and flow-induced accident and transient analysis of a direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitoh, Kazuaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1996-01-01

    The features of the direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled fast breeder reactor (SCFBR) are high thermal efficiency and simple reactor system. The safety principle is basically the same as that of an LWR since it is a water-cooled reactor. Maintaining the core flow is the basic safety requirement of the reactor, since its coolant system is the one through type. The transient behaviors at control rod, pressure and flow-induced abnormalities are analyzed and presented in this paper. The results of flow-induced transients of SCFBR were reported at ICONE-3, though pressure change was neglected. The change of fuel temperature distribution is also considered for the analysis of the rapid reactivity-induced transients such as control rod withdrawal. Total loss of flow and pump seizure are analyzed as the accidents. Loss of load, control rod withdrawal from the normal operation, loss of feedwater heating, inadvertent start of an auxiliary feedwater pump, partial loss of coolant flow and loss of external power are analyzed as the transients. The behavior of the flow-induced transients is not so much different from the analyses assuming constant pressure. Fly wheels should be equipped with the feedwater pumps to prolong the coast-down time more than 10s and to cope with the total loss of flow accident. The coolant density coefficient of the SCFBR is less than one tenth of a BWR in which the recirculation flow is used for the power control. The over pressurization transients at the loss of load is not so severe as that of a BWR. The power reaches 120%. The minimum deterioration heat flux ratio (MDHFR) and the maximum pressure are sufficiently lower than the criteria; MDHFR above 1.0 and pressure ratio below 1.10 of 27.5 MPa, maximum pressure for operation. Among the reactivity abnormalities, the control rod withdrawal transient from the normal operation is analyzed

  12. Implementation of automated, on-line fatigue monitoring in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Katsumi; Stevens, G.L.; Ranganath, S.

    1993-01-01

    A workstation-based, on-line fatigue monitoring system for tracking fatigue usage applied to a Japanese operating boiling water reactor (BWR), Tsuruga Unit 1, is described. The system uses the influence function approach and rainflow cycle counting methodology, operates on a workstation computer, and determines component stresses using temperature, pressure, and flow rate data that are made available via signal taps from previously existing plant sensors. Using plant-unique influence functions developed specifically for the feedwater nozzle location, the system calculates stresses as a function of time and computes the fatigue usage. The analysis method used to compute fatigue usage complies with MITI Code Notification number-sign 501. Fatigue values are saved automatically on files at times defined by the user for use at a later time. Of particular note, this paper describes some of the details involved with implementing such a system from the utility perspective. Utility installation details, as well as why such a system was chosen for implementation are presented. Fatigue results for an entire fuel cycle are presented and compared to assumed design basis events to confirm that actual plant thermal duty is significantly less severe than originally estimated in the design basis stress report. Although the system is specifically set up to address fatigue duty for the feedwater nozzle location, a generic shell structure was implemented so that any other components could be added at a future time without software modifications. As a result, the system provides the technical basis to more accurately evaluate actual reactor conditions as well as the justification for plant life extension

  13. Water pressure control device for control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hideyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To minimize the fluctuations in the reactor water level upon occurrence of abnormality by inputting the level signal of the reactor to an arithmetic unit for controlling the pressure of control rod drive water to thereby enable effective reactor level control. Constitution: Signal from a flow rate transmitter is inputted into an arithmetic unit to perform constant flow rate control upon normal operation. While on the other hand, if abnormality occurs such as feedwater pump trips, the arithmetic unit is switched from the constant flow rate control to the reactor water level control. Reactor water level signal is inputted into the arithmetic unit and the control valve is most suitably controlled, whereby water is fed from CST to the reactor by way of control rod drive water system to secure the reactor water level if feedwater to the reactor is interrupted by loss of coolants on the feedwater system. Since this enables to minimize the fluctuations in the reactor water level upon abnormality, the reactor water level can be controlled most suitably by the reactor water level signal. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Water feeding method upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Takahara, Kuniaki; Hamamura, Kenji; Arakawa, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of feeding water upon reactor isolation in a plural loop type reactor having a plurality of reactor cooling systems. Water can be injected to a plurality of pools even if the pressure between the pools is not balanced and the water level in the reactor cooling system is optimally controlled. That is, water can be injected in accordance with the amount required for each of the pools by setting the opening of a turbine inlet steam control valve to somewhat higher than the cooling system pressure of the highest pressure loop. Water feeding devices upon reactor isolation were required by the same number as that for the reactor cooling systems. Whereas since pumps and turbines are used in common without worsening the water injection controllability to each of the loops according to the method of this invention and, accordingly, the cost performance can be improved. Further, since the opening degree of the turbine inlet steam control valve is controlled while making the difference pressure constant between the turbine inlet pressure and the pump exhaust pressure, the amount of the turbine exhausted steams can be reduced and, further, water injection controllability of the flow rate control valve in the injection line is improved. (I.S.)

  15. Boiler feedwater treatment using reverse osmosis at Suncor OSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.

    1997-01-01

    The installation of a new 1000 cu m/hr reverse osmosis water treatment system for boiler feedwater at a Suncor plant was discussed. The selection process began in 1993 when Suncor identified a need to increase its boiler feedwater capacity. The company reviewed many options available to increase the treated water capacity. These included: contracting the supply of treated water, adding additional capacity, replacing the entire plant, reverse osmosis, and demineralization. The eventual decision was to build a new 1000 cu m/hr reverse osmosis water treatment plant with the following key components: a Degremont Infilco Ultra Pulsator Clarifier and a Glegg Water Conditioning multimedia filter, Amberpack softeners and reverse osmosis arrays. The reverse osmosis plant was environmentally favourable over an equivalent demineralization plant. A technical comparison was provided between demineralization and reverse osmosis. The system has proven to be successful and economical in meeting the plants needs. 5 figs

  16. Nuclear fuel performance in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, R.B.; Baily, W.E.; Proebstle, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major development program is described to improve the performance of Boiling Water Reactor fuel. This sustained program is described in four parts: 1) performance monitoring, 2) fuel design changes, 3) plant operating recommendations, and 4) advanced fuel programs

  17. Seismic qualification of PWR plant auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Tsai, N.C.

    1983-08-01

    The NRC Standard Review Plan specifies that the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a safeguard system that functions in the event of a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) to remove the decay heat via the steam generator. Only recently licensed PWR plants have an AFW system designed to the current Standard Review Plan specifications. The NRC devised the Multiplant Action Plan C-14 in order to make a survey of the seismic capability of the AFW systems of operating PWR plants. The purpose of this survey is to enable the NRC to make decisions regarding the need of requiring the licensees to upgrade the AFW systems to an SSE level of seismic capability. To implement the first phase of the C-14 plan, the NRC issued a Generic Letter (GL) 81-14 to all operating PWR licensees requesting information on the seismic capability of their AFW systems. This report summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's efforts to assist the NRC in evaluating the status of seismic qualification of the AFW systems in 40 PWR plants, by reviewing the licensees' responses to GL 81-14

  18. Physics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to demonstrate typical problems and solutions encountered in the design and operation of PWR power plants. The examples selected for illustration refer to PWR's of KWU design and to results of KWU design methods. In order to understand the physics of a power reactor it is necessary to have some knowledge of the structure and design of the power plant system of which the reactor is a part. It is therefore assumed that the reader is familiar with the design of the more important components and systems of a PWR, such as fuel assemblies, control assemblies, core lay-out, reactor coolant system, instrumentation. (author)

  19. Secondary cycle water chemistry for 500 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) plant: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandakkar, A.; Subbarao, A.; Agarwal, N.K.

    1995-01-01

    In turbine and secondary cycle system of 500 MWe PHWR, chemistry of steam and water is controlled in secondary cycle for prevention of corrosion in steam generators (SGs), feedwater system and steam system, scale and deposit formation on heat transfer surfaces and carry-over of solids by steam and deposition on steam turbine blades. Water chemistry of secondary side of SGs and turbine cycle is discussed. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Water-immersion type ship reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Hiroki; Yamamura, Toshio.

    1996-01-01

    In a water immersion-type ship reactor in which a water-tight wall is formed around a pressure vessel by way of an air permeable heat insulation layer and immersing the wall under water in a reactor container, a pressure equalizing means equipped with a back flow check valve and introducing a gas in a gas phase portion above the water level of the container into a water tight wall and a relief valve for releasing the gas in the water tight wall to the reactor container are disposed on the water tight wall. When the pressure in the water tight wall exceeds the pressure in the container, the gas in the water tight wall is released from the relief valve to the reactor container. On the contrary, when the pressure in the container exceeds the pressure in the water tight wall, the gas in the gas phase portion is flown from the pressure equalizing means equipped with a back flow check valve to the inside of the water tight wall. Thus, a differential pressure between both of them is kept around 0kg/cm 2 . A large differential pressure is not exerted on the water tight wall thereby capable of preventing rupture of them to improve reliability, as well as the thickness of the plate can be decreased thereby enabling to moderate the design for the pressure resistance and reduce the weight. (N.H.)

  1. Emergency cooling of presurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1981-01-01

    The method described of emergency core cooling in the pressurized water reactor is characterized by the fact that water is transported to the disturbed primary circuit or direct to the reactor by the action of the energy and mass of the steam and/or liquid phase of the secondary circuit coolant, which during emergency core cooling becomes an emergency cooling medium. (B.S.)

  2. Pressurized water reactors: the EPR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.; Yvon, M.

    2007-01-01

    EPR (originally 'European pressurized water reactor', and now 'evolutionary power reactor') is a model of reactor initially jointly developed by French and German engineers which fulfills the particular safety specifications of both countries but also the European utility requirements jointly elaborated by the main European power companies under the initiative of Electricite de France (EdF). Today, two EPR-based reactors are under development: one is under construction in Finland and the other, Flamanville 3 (France), received its creation permit decree on April 10, 2007. This article presents, first, the main objectives of the EPR, and then, describes the Flamanville 3 reactor: reactor type and general conditions, core and conditions of operation, primary and secondary circuits with their components, main auxiliary and recovery systems, man-machine interface and instrumentation and control system, confinement and serious accidents, arrangement of buildings. (J.S.)

  3. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  4. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Pressurised water reactor in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Since the Three Mile Island accident there has been much debate about the safety considerations of Pressurised Water Reactors. Their development will continue throughout the world but it will be based upon the lessons learned from that unfortunate accident. In the United Kingdom there is a public enquiry discussing all aspects of the reactor. The papers given in this book provide an informed addition to the literature. The design, safety and licensing and construction of a pressurised water reactor system are discussed in detail. Considerations stemming from the Three Mile Island accident are presented

  6. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  7. Water injection device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, Isao.

    1996-01-01

    A pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core is placed and secured on a pedestal in a dry well of a reactor container. A pedestal water injection line is disposed opened at one end in a pedestal cavity passing through the side wall of the pedestal and led at the other end to the outside of the reactor container. A substitution dry well spray line is connected to a spray header disposed at the upper portion of the dry well. When the pressure vessel should be damaged by a molten reactor core and the molten reactor core should drop to the dry well upon occurrence of an accident, the molten reactor core on the floor of the pedestal is cooled by water injection from the pedestal water injection line. At the same time, the elevation of the pressure and the temperature in the reactor container is suppressed by the water injection of the substitution dry well spray line. This can avoid large scaled release of radioactive materials to the environmental circumference. (I.N.)

  8. Emergency water supply facility for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Water is stored previously in an equipment storage pit disposed on an operator floor of a reactor building instead of a condensate storage vessel. Upon occurrence of an emergency, water is supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a sucking pipeline to a pump of a high pressure reactor core water injection circuit and a pump of a reactor-isolation cooling circuit to supply water to a reactor. The equipment storage pit is arranged in a building so that the depth thereof is determined to keep the required amount of water by storing water at a level lower than the lower end of a pool gate during normal operation. Water is also supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a supply pipeline to a spent fuel storage pool on the operation floor of the reactor building. Namely, water is supplied to the spent fuel storage pool by a pump of a fuel pool cooling and cleaning circuit. This can eliminate a suppression pool cleaning circuit. (I.N.)

  9. Investigation of accident management procedures related to loss of feedwater and station blackout in PSB-VVER integral test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucalossi, A. [EC JRC, (JRC F.5) PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Del Nevo, A., E-mail: alessandro.delnevo@enea.it [ENEA, C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano (Italy); Moretti, F.; D' Auria, F. [GRNSPG, Universita di Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Elkin, I.V.; Melikhov, O.I. [Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Centre, Electrogorsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four integral test facility experiments related to VVER-1000 reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TH response of the VVER-1000 primary system following total loss of feedwater and station blackout scenarios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accident management procedures in case of total loss of feedwater and station blackout. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental data represent an improvement of existing database for TH code validation. - Abstract: VVER 1000 reactors have some unique and specific features (e.g. large primary and secondary side fluid inventory, horizontal steam generators, core design) that require dedicated experimental and analytical analyses in order to assess the performance of safety systems and the effectiveness of possible accident management strategies. The European Commission funded project 'TACIS 2.03/97', Part A, provided valuable experimental data from the large-scale (1:300) PSB-VVER test facility, investigating accident management procedures in VVER-1000 reactor. A test matrix was developed at University of Pisa (responsible of the project) with the objective of obtaining the experimental data not covered by the OECD VVER validation matrix and with main focus on accident management procedures. Scenarios related to total loss of feed water and station blackout are investigated by means of four experiments accounting for different countermeasures, based on secondary cooling strategies and primary feed and bleed procedures. The transients are analyzed thoroughly focusing on the identification of phenomena that will challenge the code models during the simulations.

  10. Water desalination using different capacity reactors options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, G.; Vargas, S.; Del Valle, E.; Ramirez, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Northwest region of Mexico has a deficit of potable water, along this necessity is the region growth, which requires of additional energy capacity, cogeneration of potable water production and nuclear electricity is an option to be assessed. In this paper we will perform an economical comparison for cogeneration using a big reactor, the AP1000, and a medium size reactor, the IRIS, both of them are PWR type reactors and will be coupled to the desalination plant using the same method. For this cogeneration case we will assess the best reactor option that can cover both needs using the maximum potable water production for two different desalination methods: Multistage Flash Distillation and Multi-effect Distillation. (authors)

  11. New lineup of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Koichiro; Kitsukawa, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    Toshiba is promoting technical studies for upcoming nuclear power plants based on its large accumulation of experience in boiling water reactor (BWR) design, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. Our goal is to achieve higher reliability, lower life-cycle costs, and better competitiveness for nuclear power plants compared with other energy sources. In addition, we are developing a new light water reactor (LWR) lineup featuring the safest and most economical LWRs in the world as next-generation reactors almost at new construction and replacement in the Japanese and international markets expected to start from the 2020s. We are committed not only to developing BWRs with the world's highest performance but also to participating in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) market, taking advantage of the synergistic effect of both Toshiba's and Westinghouse's experience. (author)

  12. Investigation of noble metal deposition behaviour in boiling water reactors. The NORA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Stefan; Karastoyanov, Vasil; Abolhassani-Dadras, Sousan; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kivel, Niko

    2010-01-01

    NobleChem trademark is a technology developed by General Electric to reduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in reactor internals and recirculation pipes of boiling water reactors (BWRs) while preventing the negative side effects of classic hydrogen water chemistry. Noble metals (Pt, Rh) acting as electrocatalysts for the recombination of O 2 and H 2 O 2 with H 2 to H 2 O and thus reducing the corrosion potential more efficiently are injected into the feedwater during reactor shutdown (classic method) or on-line during power operation. They are claimed to deposit as very fine metallic particles on all water-wetted surfaces, including the most critical regions inside existing cracks, and to stay electrocatalytic over long periods of time. The effectiveness of this technology in plants still remains to be demonstrated. Based on highly credible laboratory experiments down to the sub-μg . kg -1 Pt concentration range, SCC mitigation may be expected, provided that a stoichiometric excess of H 2 and a sufficient surface coverage with very fine Pt particles exist simultaneously at the critical locations [1]. Very little is known about the deposition and (re-)distribution behaviour of the Pt in the reactor. For the validation of this technique the research project NORA (noble metal deposition behaviour in BWRs) has been started at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with two main objectives: (i) to gain phenomenological insights and a better basic understanding of the Pt distribution and deposition behaviour in BWRs; (ii) to develop and qualify a non-destructive technique to characterise the size and distribution of the Pt particles and the local concentration of Pt on reactor components. This paper presents the objectives of the project, the planned work and a brief description of the status of the project. (orig.)

  13. Inherently safe light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu

    1987-01-01

    Today's large nuclear power reactors of world-wise use have been designed based on the philosophy. It seems that recent less electricity demand rates, higher capital cost and the TMI accident let us acknowledge relative small and simplified nuclear plants with safer features, and that Chernobyl accident in 1983 underlines the needs of intrinsic and passive safety characteristics. In such background, several inherently safe reactor concepts have been presented abroad and domestically. First describing 'Can inherently safe reactors be designed,' then I introduce representative reactor concepts of inherently safe LWRs advocated abroad so far. All of these innovative reactors employ intrinsic and passive features in their design, as follows: (1) PIUS, an acronym for Process Inherent Ultimate Safety, or an integral PWR with passive heat sink and passive shutdown mechanism, advocated by ASEA-ATOM of Sweden. (2) MAP(Minimum Attention Plant), or a self-pressurized, natural circulation integral PWR, promoted by CE Inc. of the U.S. (3) TPS(TRIGA Power System), or a compact PWR with passive heat sink and inherent fuel characteristics of large prompt temperature coefficient, prompted by GA Technologies Inc. of the U.S. (4) PIUS-BWR, or an inherently safe BWR employing passively actuated fluid valves, in competition with PIUS, prompted by ORNL of the U.S. Then, I will describe the domestic trends in Japan and the innovative inherently safe LWRs presented domestically so far. (author)

  14. Design of an additional heat sink based on natural circulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischengruber, Kurt; Solanilla, Roberto; Fernandez, Ricardo; Blumenkrantz, Arnaldo; Castano, Jorge

    1989-01-01

    Residual heat removal through the steam generators in Nuclear Power Plant with pressurized water reactors (PWR) or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR in pressured vessel or pressured tube types) requires the maintenance of the steam generator inventory and the availability of and appropriate heat sink, which are based on the operability of the steam generators feedwater system. This paper describes the conceptual design of an assured heat removal system which includes only passive elements and is based on natural circulation. The system can supplement the original systems of the plant. The new system includes a condenser/boiler heat exchanger to condense the steam produced in the steam generator, transferring the heat to the water of an open pool at atmospheric pressure. The condensed steam flows back to the steam generators by natural circulation effects. The performance of an Atucha type PHWR nuclear power station with and without the proposed system is calculated in an emergency power case for the first 5000 seconds after the incident. The analysis shows that the proposed system offers the possibility to cool-down the plant to a low energy state during several hours and avoids the repeated actuation of the primary and secondary system safety valves. (Author) [es

  15. Method of measuring reactor water level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kaoru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a water level measuring system so that a reactor water level detecting signal can be corrected in correspondence to a recirculation flow, thereby to carry out a correct water level detection in a wide range of the reactor. Method: According to the operation record of a precursor reactor, the ratio Δh of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow is lowered in proportion to the ratiowith respect to the rated differential pressure of the recirculation flow. Accordingly, the flow of recirculation pump is measured by an elbow differential pressure generator utilizing an elbow of a pipe, and the measured value is multiplied by a gain by a ratio setter, and therefter, an addition computation is carried out by an adder for correcting the signal from a water level detector. When the signal from the water level detector is corrected in this manner, the influence of the lowering of the water level due to the recirculation flow can be removed, and an interlocker predetermined in the defined water level can be actuated, thus the influence of the dynamic pressure due to the recirculation flow acting on the instrumental pipe line detecting the reactor water level can be removed effectively. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  17. Development of hot water supply system for a small district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Toshihiko; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2007-01-01

    On the earth, there are many environmental problems. For example, rapid increase of world population causes the enormous consumption of fossil fuel and emission of CO 2 into the global air. Now, mankaind faced to deal with these serious problems. One solution for these problems is utilization of nuclear reactors. Currently, about 65% of thermal output of a nuclear reactor is thrown away to the sea or the atmosphere through a turbine condenser. When a hot-water pipeline from a nuclear plant will be constructed, the exhaust heat from nuclear reactor will able to be utilized. Therefore, authors began to study nuclear power plant system for district heating. This reactor is based on a PWR plant. Its thermal output is 10 MWth and its electrical output is 3.4 MW. The nuclear plant supply electricity and heat for 2000 to 3000 houses. The plant aim to supply all the energy for the adjacent pepole's life, for example, heat, electricity and hydrogen for fuel battery car. This total-energy supply system assumed to be built in Northern area such as Hokkaido in Japan. In order to develop an optimum thermal design method for the system, heat transport experiments and thermal-hydraulic calculations were carried out. Using a metal pipe covered with foam-polyurethane thermal insulator, feed-water temperature and return-water temperature was measured to evaluate heat loss. As the result, the heat loss from the hot-water temperature was very little. The thermal-hydraulic calculation method was verified and applied to actual pipeline size calculation. The result of heat loss calculation will be 0.2degC/5 km. considering these results, the best pipe specification was obtained. (author)

  18. Requirements for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, F.

    2009-01-01

    The EUR (European Utilities Requirements) is an organization founded in 1991 whose aim was to write down the European specifications and requirements for the future reactors of third generation. EUR gathers most of the nuclear power producers of Europe. The EUR document has been built on the large and varied experience of EUR members and can be used to elaborate invitations to tender for nuclear projects. 4000 requirements only for the nuclear part of the plant are listed, among which we have: -) the probability of core meltdown for a reactor must be less than 10 -6 per year, -) the service life of every component that is not replaceable must be 60 years, -) the capacity of the spent fuel pool must be sufficient to store 10-15 years of production without clearing out. The EUR document is both open and complete: every topic has been considered, it does not favor any type of reactor but can ban any technology that is too risky or has an unfavourable feedback experience. The assessment of the conformity with the EUR document of 7 reactor projects (BWR 90/, EPR, EP1000, SWR1000, ABWR, AP1000 and VVER-AES-92) has already be made. (A.C.)

  19. Tritium issues in commercial pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium has become an important radionuclide in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors because of its mobility and tendency to concentrate in plant systems as tritiated water during the recycling of reactor coolant. Small quantities of tritium are released in routine regulated effluents as liquid water and as water vapor. Tritium has become a focus of attention at commercial nuclear power plants in recent years due to inadvertent, low-level, chronic releases arising from routine maintenance operations and from component failures. Tritium has been observed in groundwater in the vicinity of stations. The nuclear industry has undertaken strong proactive corrective measures to prevent recurrence, and continues to eliminate emission sources through its singular focus on public safety and environmental stewardship. This paper will discuss: production mechanisms for tritium, transport mechanisms from the reactor through plant, systems to the environment, examples of routine effluent releases, offsite doses, basic groundwater transport and geological issues, and recent nuclear industry environmental and legal ramifications. (authors)

  20. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  1. Reliability of reactor plant water cleanup pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carolina Power and Light Company's Brunswick 2 nuclear plant experienced a high reactor water cleanup pump-failure rate until inlet temperature and flow were reduced and mechanical modifications were implemented. Failures have been zero for about one year, and water cleanup efficiency has increased

  2. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  3. Utility requirements for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, A.; Gray, S.; Mulford, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is actively engaged in developing advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs for the next century. The new designs take advantage of the thousands of reactor-years of experience that have been accumulated by operating over 400 plants worldwide. The EPRI effort began in the early 1980's, when a survey of utility executives was conducted to determine their prerequisites for ordering nuclear power plants. The results were clear: new plants had to be simpler and safer, and have greater design margins, i.e., be more forgiving. The utility executives also supported making improvements to the established light water reactor technology, rather than trying to develop new reactor concepts. Finally, they wanted the option to build mid-size plants (∼600 MWe) in addition to full-size plants of more than 1200 MWe. 4 refs

  4. Safety aspects of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This submission to the Health and Safety Executive has been prepared by the Institution of Professional Civil Servants (IPCS) as a contribution to the debate on safety aspects associated with Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Although supporting an energy policy which includes the development of nuclear power, assurances are sought on a number of safety issues if it is decided that this should be generated by a PWR-type reactor. These issues are listed. In particular the following are mentioned: the wider publication of design information, the use of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics as the basis for determining pressure vessel integrity, the failure rate of steam generating units, water coolant quality control, greater investigation of two-phase flow accident conditions, the components of the reactor cooling system and training of reactor personnel in the understanding of LOCA effects. (U.K.)

  5. Detection of a regulating valve closure failure during review of recorded data after an automatic reactor shut down. Incident at the NPP Beznau-1, 27 April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutschmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    After recognizing a leak in the oil system of the running main feedwater pump 1 during rated power operation of the plant the operator changed feedwater supply manually to the stand-by pump 2. A short time later pump 2 was automatically tripped by the signal ''low oil pressure''. Immediate reduction of the reactor power by the operator was not successful because the scram signal ''low steam generator level and mismatch of steam/feedwater flow'' occurred and scram was actuated. In this plant a special operating feature, actuated by the scram signal, is implemented to reduce steam release to atmosphere in case of scram. The signal ''scram and average primary Temperature >287 deg. C opens the feedwater regulating valves, and later, if the average primary temperature decreases to <287 deg. C, they reclose by a redundant signal. In the experienced event, after the scram actuation, in the steam generator A a feedwater overfill occurred. The overfill protection tripped the operating feedwater pumps (main feedwater pump 3 and two auxiliary feedwater pumps). The large injection of water produced an overcooling of the primary with isolation of the volume control system outlet of the primary. The operator repaired the defective oil coolers of the feedwater pumps and restarted the plant. At that time, he had not recognized, that the plant response, which caused the steam generator overfill, was wrong. One day later, as all the recorded data were reviewed in more detail, it was found that the closure time of the feedwater regulating valve to steam generator A was much longer than designed (19 s instead 7 s). The operator requested an LCO for continued operation in spite of the fact, that the closure time was not fixed in the Technical specification. 3 figs

  6. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Jayasree; Vijayan, K.; Kain, Vivekanad; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent stability tests in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have indicated that these reactors can exhibit the special nonlinear behavior of following a closed trajectory called limit cycle. The existence of a limit cycle corresponds to an oscillation of fixed amplitude and period. During these tests, such oscillations had their amplitudes limited to about +- 15% of the operating power. Since limit cycles are fairly insensitive to parameter variations, it is possible to operate a BWR under conditions that sustain a limit cycle (of fixed amplitude and period) over a finite range of reactor parameters

  8. Thermohydraulic analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    The computer program PANTERA is applied in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Cores (PWR). It is a version of COBRA-IIIC in which a new thermal conduction model for fuel rods was introduced. The results calculated by this program are compared with experimental data obtained from bundles of fuel rods, simulating reactor conditions. The validity of the new thermal model is checked too. The PANTERA code, through a simplified procedure of calculation, is used in the thermo-hydraulic analysis of Indian Point, Unit 2, reactor core, in stationary conditions. The results are discussed and compared with design data. (Autor) [pt

  9. Steam explosions in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report deals with a postulated accident caused by molten fuel falling into the lower plenum of the containment of a reactor. The analysis which is presented in the report shows that the thermal energy released in the resulting steam explosion is not enough to destroy the pressure vessel or the containment. The report was prepared for the Swedish Governmental Committee on steam explosion in light water reactors. It includes statements issued by internationally well-known specialists. (G.B.)

  10. Implementation of a digital feedwater control system at Dresden Nuclear Power Plant, Units 2 and 3: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapotocky, A.; Popovic, J.R.; Fournier, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the Digital Feedwater Control System Implementation at the Dresden 2 or 3 Units of the BWR Nuclear Power Plant owned by the Commonwealth Edison Company. The digital system has been operational in Unit 3 since August 1986, and in Unit 2 since April 1987. The Bailey Control's Network 90 based digital control system replaced the obsolete GE/MAC 5000 analog control system in the reactor feedwater control loop as a ''like-for-like'' replacement. Operational experience from the Digital Feedwater Control installations has been good and the system demonstrated better performance than the old analog systems. 14 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs

  11. Auxiliary feedwater system aging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueck, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Phase 1 Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) System Aging Study, NUREG/CR-5404 V1, focused on how and to what extent the various AFW system component types fail, how the failures have been and can be detected, and on the value of current testing requirements and practices. This follow-on study, which will be provided in full in NUREG/CR-5404 V2, provides a closure to the Phase 1 Study. For each of the component types and for the various sources of component failure identified in the Phase 1 Study, the methods of failure detection were designated and tabulated and the following findings became evident: Instrumentation and Control (I and C) related failures dominated the group of failures that were detected during demand conditions; many of the potential failure sources not detectable by the current monitoring practices were related to the I and C portion of the system; some component failure modes are actually aggravated by conventional test methods; and several important system functions did not undergo any function verification test. The goal of this follow-on study was to categorize and evaluate the deficiencies in testing identified by Phase 1 and to make specific recommendations for corrective action. In addition, this study presents discussions of alternate, state-of-the-art test methods, and provides a proposed Auxiliary Feedwater Pump test at normal operating pressure which should do much to verify system operability while eliminating degradation

  12. Feedwater flow measurements: challenges, current solutions, and 'soft' developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, D.; Roverso, D.; Fantoni, P.F.; Sanabrias, J.I.; Carrasco, J.A.; Fernandez, L.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents an early progress of a feasibility study of a computational intelligence approach to the enhancement of the accuracy of feedwater flow measurements in the framework of an ongoing cooperation between Tecnatom s.a. in Madrid and the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Halden. The aim of this research project is to contribute to the development and validation of a flow sensor in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The basic idea is to combine the use of applied computational intelligence approaches (noise analysis, neural networks, fuzzy systems, wavelets etc.) with existing traditional flow measurements, and in particular with cross correlation flow meter concepts. In this report, Section 2 outlines relevant aspects of thermal power calculations on electrical power plants. Section 3 reviews from the available literature possible approaches and solutions for feedwater flow measurement, including ultrasonic flow meters, cross-correlation flow meters, and 'Virtural' flow meters with artificial neural networks. Section 4 reports typical experimental measurements at the Tecnatom's facility. Section 5 presents an integration approach and preliminary experimental tests. Section 6 discusses the role of soft computing techniques in the context of feedwater flow measurements related nuclear fields, and Section 7 highlights the future research direction. (Author)

  13. A novel feedwater system for the RETRAN model of the Palo Verde nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secker, P.A.; Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a feedwater system model which supplies realistic boundary conditions to the RETRAN model of a Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station reactor plant. The RETRAN thermal hydraulic code is used to analyze nuclear reactor system transients through a generalized thermal hydraulic volume/junction network. The feedwater system model is implemented using the control block modeling option available in the RETRAN code. The output of the control block model is coupled to the thermal hydraulic network by a fill junction. A forward Euler integration scheme is used by RETRAN for control block variables. The feedwater system model is formulated to allow implicit integration within the existing code framework. The potential need for small integration time steps is, therefore, alleviated. The model results are compared with test data

  14. Heat structure coupling of CUPID and MARS for the multi-scale simulation of the passive auxiliary feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyu Cho, Hyoung; Cho, Yun Je; Yoon, Han Young

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PAFS is designed to replace a conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. • Multi-D T/H analysis code, CUPID was coupled with the 1-D system analysis code MARS. • The coupled CUPID and MARS was applied for the multi-scale analysis of the PAFS test facility. • The simulation result showed that the coupled code can reproduce important phenomena in PAFS. - Abstract: For the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components, a three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code, named CUPID, has been developed. In the present study, the CUPID code was coupled with a system analysis code MARS in order to apply it for the multi-scale thermal-hydraulic analysis of the passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS). The PAFS is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR+), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. For verification of the coupling and validation of the coupled code, the PASCAL test facility was simulated, which was constructed with an aim of validating the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS. The two-phase flow phenomena of the steam supply system including the condensation inside the heat exchanger tube were calculated by MARS while the natural circulation and the boil-off in the large water pool that contains the heat exchanger tube were simulated by CUPID. This paper presents the description of the PASCAL facility, the coupling method and the simulation results using the coupled code

  15. Heavy water cycle in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanis, R.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen atom has two isotopes: deuterium 1 H 2 and tritium 1 H 3 . The deuterium oxide D 2 O is called heavy water due to its density of 1105.2 Kg/m 3 . Another important physical property of the heavy water is the low neutron capture section, suitable to moderate the neutrons into natural uranium fission reactor as CANDU. Due to the fact that into this reactor the fuel is cooled into the pressure tubes surrounded by a moderator, the usage of D 2 O as primary heat transport (PHT) agent is mandatory. Therefore a large amount of heavy water (approx. 500 tons) is used in a CANDU reactor. Being a costly resource - it represents 20% of the initial plant capital cost, D 2 O management is required to preserve it. (author)

  16. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Sankichi; Takashima, Yoshie.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently eliminate radioactive materials such as iron oxide and cobalt ions with less heat loss by the use of an electrode assembly applied with a direct current. Constitution: In a reactor water clean-up device adapted to pass reactor water through an electrode assembly comprising at least a pair of anode and cathode applied with a direct current to eliminate various types of ions contained in the reactor water by way of the electrolysis or charge neutralization at the anode, the cathode is constituted with a corrosion resistant grid-like or porous metal plate and a layer to the upper portion of the metal plate filled with a plurality of metal spheres of about 1 - 5 mm diameter, and the anode is made of insoluble porous or spirally wound metal material. (Seki, T.)

  17. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  19. ULTRA SCWR+: Practical advanced water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, Romney; Khartabil, Hussam; Kuran, Sermet; Zhou, Tracy; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Modern thermal power plants now utilize supercritical steam cycles with thermal efficiencies of over 45%. Recent developments have lead to Ultra-SuperCritical (USC) systems, which adopt reheat turbines that can attain efficiencies of over 50%. Because these turbines are already developed, demonstrated and deployed worldwide, and use existing and traditional steam cycle technology, the simplest nuclear advance is to utilize these proven thermal cycle conditions by coupling this turbine type to a reactor. This development direction is fundamentally counter to the usual approach of adopting high-temperature gas-cooled (helium-cooled) reactor cycles, for which turbines have yet to be demonstrated on commercial scale unlike the supercritical steam turbines. The ULTRA (Ultra-supercritical Light water Thermal ReActor) SCWR+ concept adopts the fundamental design approach of matching a water and steam-cooled reactor to the ultra-supercritical steam cycle, adopting the existing and planned thermal power plant turbines. The HP and IP sections are fed with conditions of 25 MPa/625degC and 7 MPa/700degC, respectively, to achieve operating plant thermal efficiencies in excess of 50%, with a direct turbine cycle. By using such low-pressure reheated steam, this concept also adopts technology that was explored and used many years ago in existing water reactors, with the potential to produce large quantities of low cost heat, which can be used for other industrial and district processes. Pressure-Tube (PT) reactors are suitable for adoption of this design approach and, in addition, have other advantages that will significantly improve water-cooled reactor technology. These additional advantages include enhanced safety and improved resource utilization and proliferation resistance. This paper describes the PT-SCWR+ concept and its potential enhancements. (author)

  20. Beyond the light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    One of the strong interests in examining alternative nuclear fuel cycles is to search for schemes that are more efficient than LWRs in their use of uranium, but that do not carry the additional proliferation hazard associated with widespread plutonium utilization. One possibility is to improve the uranium efficiency of current reactor types by other means than recycling. A second possibility, offering greater potential for improvement, is to utilize thorium-uranium fuel cycles in which uranium-233 is denatured by the addition of uranium-238, making enrichment necessary to yield weapons-usable material. The bulk of the reactor's fuel material would be thorium-232, so that most of the fissile material produced would be uranium-233. It is important to recognize that these two possibilities - once through improvements and denatured thorium-uranium - could be introduced sequentially in reactor types that are currently in use. Fuel cycles may change over time, but it is equally significant from the point of view of non-proliferation that they will also vary from place to place and, most importantly, from country to country. The author argues that alternative nuclear power systems and a slower growth may affect the diversion of nuclear materials to weapons. A real question, though, is whether we have time to explore the possibilities. It has become apparent that predictions made of the growth rate for nuclear power were too high. The 1000 large power plants the US was to have by the year 2000 have been reduced to fewer than 300. This reduces the pressure, resulting from our limited uranium resources, to push the LMFBR. Extra time gives us a chance to examine the possibilities

  1. EPRI program in water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.; Gelhaus, F.; Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The basis for EPRI's water reactor safety program is twofold. First is compilation and development of fundamental background data necessary for quantified light-water reactor (LWR) safety assurance appraisals. Second is development of realistic and experimentally bench-marked analytical procedures. The results are expected either to confirm the safety margins in current operating parameters, and to identify overly conservative controls, or, in some cases, to provide a basis for improvements to further minimize uncertainties in expected performance. Achievement of these objectives requires the synthesis of related current and projected experimental-analytical projects toward establishment of an experimentally-based analysis for the assurance of safety for LWRs

  2. Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This meeting contains articles of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008 of Korean Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Chinese Nuclear Society, European Nuclear Society and American Nuclear Society. It was held on Oct. 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea and subject of Meeting is 'New Clear' Fuel - A green energy solution. This proceedings is comprised of 5 tracks. The main topic titles of track are as follows: Advances in water reactor fuel technology, Fuel performance and operational experience, Transient fuel behavior and safety-related issues, Fuel cycle, spent fuel storage and transportations and Fuel modeling and analysis. (Yi, J. H.)

  3. The water chemistry of CANDU PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This review will discuss the chemistry of the three major water circuits in a CANDU-PHW reactor, viz., the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) water, the moderator and the boiler water. An important consideration for the PHT chemistry is the control of corrosion and of the transport of corrosion products to minimize the growth of radiation fields. In new reactors the PHT will be allowed to boil, requiring reconsideration of the methods used to radiolytic oxygen and elevate the pH. Separation of the moderator from the PHT in the pressure-tubed CANDU design permits better optimization of the chemistry of each system, avoiding the compromises necessary when the same water serves both functions. Major objectives in moderator chemistry are to control (a) the radiolytic decomposition of D 2 0; (b) the concentration of soluble neutron poisons added to adjust reactivity; and (c) the chemistry of shutdown systems. The boiler water and its feed water are treated to avoid boiler tube corrosion, both during normal operation and when perturbations are caused to the feed by, for example, leaks in the condenser tubes which permit ingress of untreated condenser cooling water. Development of a system for automatic analysis and control of feed water to give rapid, reliable response to abnormal conditions is a novel feature which has been developed for incorporation in future CANDU-PHW reactors. (author)

  4. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  5. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  6. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 code manual: MATPRO, A library of materials properties for Light-Water-Reactor accident analysis. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light -- water-reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, the core, fission products released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume, Volume IV, describes the material properties correlations and computer subroutines (MATPRO) used by SCDAP/RELAP5. formulation of the materials properties are generally semi-empirical in nature. The materials property subroutines contained in this document are for uranium, uranium dioxide, mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, zirconium dioxide, stainless steel, stainless steel oxide, silver-indium-cadmium alloy, cadmium, boron carbide, Inconel 718, zirconium-uranium-oxygen melts, fill gas mixtures, carbon steel, and tungsten. This document also contains descriptions of the reaction and solution rate models needed to analyze a reactor accident

  7. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Soppet, W.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  8. Historical perspective of thermal reactor safety in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief history of thermal reactor safety in U.S. light water reactors is provided in this paper. Important shortcomings in safety philosophy evolution versus time are identified and potential corrective actions are suggested. It should be recognized, that this analysis represents only one person's opinion and that most historical accountings reflect the author's biases and specific areas of knowledge. In that sense, many of the examples used in this paper are related to heat transfer and fluid flow safety issues, which explains why it has been included in a Thermal Hydraulics session. One additional note of caution: the value of hindsight and the selective nature of human memory when looking at the past cannot be overemphasized in any historical perspective

  9. Auxiliary feedwater system aging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueck, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I follow-on study of the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) System that has been conducted for the US Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging research Program. The Phase I study found a number of significant AFW System functions that are not being adequately tested by conventional test methods and some that are actually being degraded by conventional testing. Thus, it was decided that this follow-on study would focus on these testing omissions nd equipment degradation. The deficiencies in current monitoring and operating practice are categorized and evaluated. Areas of component degradation caused by current practice are discussed. Recommendations are made for improved diagnostic methods and test procedures

  10. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  11. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  12. AFRRI TRIGA Reactor water quality monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Mark; George, Robert; Spence, Harry; Nguyen, John

    1992-01-01

    AFRRI has started a water quality monitoring program to provide base line data for early detection of tank leaks. This program revealed problems with growth of algae and bacteria in the pool as a result of contamination with nitrogenous matter. Steps have been taken to reduce the nitrogen levels and to kill and remove algae and bacteria from the reactor pool. (author)

  13. Quality assurance plan, Westinghouse Water Reactor Divisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The Quality Assurance Program used by Westinghouse Nuclear Energy Systems Water Reactor Divisions is described. The purpose of the program is to assure that the design, materials, and workmanship on Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) equipment meet applicable safety requirements, fulfill the requirements of the contracts with the applicants, and satisfy the applicable codes, standards, and regulatory requirements.

  14. Light-water reactor accident classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art

  15. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  16. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability

  17. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability.

  18. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.; Sinha, R.K.; Dhawan, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U 233 )O 2 and (Th-Pu)O 2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m 3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m 3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  19. Pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Esteves, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    The fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 and the structural finite element program SAP-IV are applied in a pressurized water reactor fuel rod design methodology. The applied calculation procedure allows to dimension the fuel rod components and characterize its internal pressure. (author) [pt

  20. Light water reactor safeguards system evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.; Daniel, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for assessing the effectiveness of safeguards systems was developed in this study and was applied to a typical light water reactor plant. The relative importance of detection systems, barriers, response forces and other safeguards system components was examined in extensive parameter variation studies. (author)

  1. Development of a MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, C.S.; Wang, S.J.; Cheng, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is suitable for calculating source terms and simulating severe accident phenomena of nuclear power plants. Prior to simulating a severe accident transient with MELCOR, the initial steady-state conditions must be generated in advance. The current MELCOR users' manuals do not provide a self-initialization procedure; this is the reason users have to adjust the initial conditions by themselves through a trial-and-error approach. A MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactor plants has been developed, which eliminates the tedious trial-and-error procedures and improves the simulation accuracy. This algorithm adjusts the important plant variable such as the dome pressure, downcomer level, and core flow rate to the desired conditions automatically. It is implemented through input with control functions provided in MELCOR. The reactor power and feedwater temperature are fed as input data. The initialization work of full-power conditions of the Kuosheng nuclear power station is cited as an example. These initial conditions are generated successfully with the developed algorithm. The generated initial conditions can be stored in a restart file and used for transient analysis. The methodology in this study improves the accuracy and consistency of transient calculations. Meanwhile, the algorithm provides all MELCOR users an easy and correct method for establishing the initial conditions

  2. Operating data monitoring and fatigue evaluation systems and findings for boiling water reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, O.; Kanazawa, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Tani, M.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the most critical components of a boiling water reactor (BWR) when utilities think about plant life extension (PLEX). Design stress analysis sometimes reports very high fatigue usage factors for such portions of RPVs as stud bolt, feedwater nozzle and support skirt.In order to evaluate design margin and to eliminate excessive conservatism in this design analysis to pave the way for PLEX, Japanese BWR utilities jointly with BWR manufacturers in Japan established a programme (1) to acquire plant operational data on line for specific parameters used in stress analysis, (2) to evaluate margin in the design using measured plant data best estimate boundary conditions for stress analysis, and (3) to establish a simplified fatigue analysis method for BWR RPV.A plant data acquisition system, named OPEDAS, has been developed and installed in Tokyo Electric Power Company's 1100MWe BWR at its Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant. Best estimate stress analysis using measured in-plant data has been carried out and the results show considerable margin in fatigue usage factor over the design. A simplified fatigue analysis method using in-plant data has been developed with the Green's function, although some limitations have been identified for its use. ((orig.))

  3. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  4. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  5. Analisis Termal High Pressure Feedwater Heater di PLTU PT. XYZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ulfa Damayanti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak- PT. XYZ mengoperasikan tiga unit Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Uap (PLTU unit 3, 7 dan 8 berkapasitas 2.030 MegaWatt. Pada PLTU Paiton unit 7 dan 8 terdapat delapan buah feedwater heater yaitu empat buah Low Pressure Water Heater (LPWH, tiga buah High Pressure Water Heater (HPWH, dan sebuah dearator. Pada PLTU Paiton unit 7 dan 8 terdapat kerusakan pada HPWH 6 yang menyebabkan penurunan efisiensi dari siklus secara keseluruhan. Penurunan efisiensi dapat terjadi karena temperatur feedwater sebelum masuk ke boiler terlalu rendah, sehingga kalor yang dibutuhkan oleh boiler untuk memanaskan feedwater meningkat. Oleh karena itu konsumsi batubara akan meningkat dan menyebabkan terjadi kenaikan biaya operasional harian dalam sistem pembangkit. Dari data Divisi Produksi PT. XYZ Unit 7 dan 8 diperoleh spesifikasi HPWH 6, 7, dan 8 dan propertis fluida dalam HPWH 6, 7, dan 8. Data tersebut digunakan sebagai dasar analisis termal yang meliputi performa masing-masing HPH. Tahap selanjutnya dalam analisis termal adalah memvariasikan beban 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, dan 105%. Tahap terakhir analisis adalah menghitung performa dengan variasi sumbatan (plug 5%, 10%, 15%, dan 20% sesuai dengan variasi beban. Hasil yang didapatkan dari penelitian tugas akhir ini adalah nilai effectiveness tertinggi tercapai pada pembebanan 100% serta menghasilkan pressure drop tertinggi pada pembebanan 105%, nilai effectiveness terbesar serta nilai pressure drop terkecil terjadi pada zona Condensing, serta sumbatan (plugging pada HPH akan menyebabkan penurunan nilai effectiveness dan kenaikan pressure drop sisi tube.

  6. Protection method and protection device for liquid supply channel for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masanori; Fujimoto, Sachiko

    1998-01-01

    In the present invention, thermal stresses exerted on feedwater pipelines and a feedwater nozzle portion in a LBR type reactor are reduced to improve integrity of a reactor, suppress addition of facilities and reliably reduce thermal stresses by a simple structure. A connection pipe channel is formed between the upper side of a horizontal portion of a pipeline for feeding water to a reactor pressure vessel and a vertical portion of the feedwater pipeline. A transferring pump is disposed in the midway of the connection pipe channel for sucking supernatant water in the horizontal portion and rendering it to join with water in the vertical portion. When supply of water is stagnated, high temperature water in the horizontal portion is transferred by the action of the transfer pump to the low temperature water in the vertical portion to join them. With such procedures, the water supplied to the horizontal portion in the feedwater pipeline is flown to suppress occurrence of heat-stratification phenomenon thereby enabling to reduce the temperature difference. (T.M.)

  7. Feedwater connection repair and modification at GKN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witteman, C; Klees, J E

    1985-03-01

    From January to March 1983 the feedwater connection of GKN was repaired using a boring lathe, spark machining and semi-automatic welding. Nondestructive examination was performed by ultrasonic and eddy-current testing.

  8. Feedwater connection repair and modification at GKN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witteman, C.; Klees, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    From Jan. to March 1983 the feedwater connection of GKN was repaired using a boring lathe, spark machining and semi-automatic welding. Nondestructive examination was performed by ultrasonic and eddy-current testing

  9. Trends in light water reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.; Serpan, C.Z.; Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Grundl, J.A.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dosimetry programs and techniques play an essential role in the continued assurance of the safety and reliability of components of light water reactors. Primary concern focuses on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels and methods by which the integrity of a pressure vessel can be predicted and monitored throughout its service life. Research in these areas requires a closely coordinated program which integrates the elements of the calculational and material sciences, the development of advanced dosimetric techniques and the use of benchmarks and validation of these methods. The paper reviews the status of the various international efforts in the dosimetry area

  10. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase

  11. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.; Smith, K.A.; Edwards, R.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Schultz, M.A.; Klevans, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  12. Evolution of carbon steel corrosion in feedwater conditions reproduce by the Fortrand loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaunay, Sophie; Bescond, Aurelien; Mansour, Carine; Bretelle, Jean-Luc

    2012-09-01

    Fouling and tubes support plate blockage of steam generators (SG) are major problems in the secondary circuit of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. Corrosion products (CP) responsible of these phenomena are mainly constituted of magnetite. Limit the amount of these CP, generated in the feedwater system and transported to SG, constitutes one way to limit fouling and blockage of SGs. This work requires the understanding of CP behaviour in the feedwater system conditions. A specific experimental circulating water loop, FORTRAND, was built at EDF to follow the formation, the transport and the deposition of iron oxides in representative conditions of the secondary circuit feedwater system. The test section operating at high temperature (up to 250 deg. C) is made in carbon steel and includes three removable segments while all the other parts of the loop are made in stainless steel. First results confirm the formation of iron oxides on carbon steel and stainless steel surface in the conditions of PWR secondary circuits. The surface characterizations show that magnetite is the corrosion product formed on carbon steel and stainless steel at 220 deg. C and goethite is formed at room temperature on stainless steel. The aim of the most recent tests performed in FORTRAND loop was to follow the evolution of corrosion in the feedwater conditions. Tests were performed in one-phase flow conditions at 150 L.h -1 with a linear velocity of 0.82 m/s at 220 deg. C in morpholine/ammonia/hydrazine medium, at pH 25C equal to 9.2. To conduct this study, a removable segment constituted by ten tubes was added to the loop. Several tests were performed to follow the deposit thickness, the iron lost in solution and the oxide morphology with time from two to nine hundred sixty hours. Chemical conditions were controlled and the reproducibility of the results was confirmed by the observation of three tubes at each test. SEM pictures present kinetics with three steps: after the first hours the

  13. Analysis of KNU1 loss of normal feedwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hho-Jung; Chung, Bub-Dong; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo

    1986-01-01

    Simulation of the system thermal-hydraulic parameters was carried out following the KNU1 (Korea Nuclear Unit-1) loss of normal feedwater transient sequence occurred on November 14, 1984. Results were compared with the plant transient data, and good agreements were obtained. Some deviations were found in the parameters such as the steam flowrate and the RCS (Reactor Coolant system) average temperature, around the time of reactor trip. It can be expected since the thermal-hydraulic parameters encounter rapid transitions due to the large reduction of the reactor thermal power in a short period of time and, thereby, the plant data involve transient uncertainties. The analysis was performed using the RELAP5/MOD1/NSC developed through some modifications of the interphase drag and the wall heat transfer modeling routines of the RELAP5/MOD1/CY018. (author)

  14. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy; Amit Jain Han Sang Kim; Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

    2006-01-01

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  16. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannerz, K

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification.

  17. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification

  18. The safety of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panossian, J.; Tanguy, P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of the status of the safety level of modern pressurized water reactors, that is to say those that meet the safety criteria accepted today by the international nuclear community. We will mainly rely on the operating experience and the Probabilistic Safety Assessments concerning French reactors. We will not back over the basic safety concepts of these reactors, which are well known. We begin with a brief review of some of the lessons learned from the two main accidents discussed in the present meeting. Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, without entering into details presented in previous papers. The presentation ends with a rather lengthy conclusion, aimed more at those not directly involved in the technical details of nuclear safety matters

  19. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giedraityte, Zivile

    2008-01-01

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  20. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  1. Heavy water upgrading system in the Fugen heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Susaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The heavy water upgrading system, which is installed in the Fugen heavy water reactor (HWR) was designed to reuse degraded heavy water generated from the deuteration-dedeuteration of resin in the ion exchange column of the moderator purification system. The electrolysis method has been applied in this system on the basis of the predicted generation rate and concentration of degraded heavy water. The structural feature of the electrolytic cell is that it consists of dual cylindrical electrodes, instead of a diaphragm as in the case of conventional water electrolysis. 2 refs

  2. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaruoka, Hiromitsu.

    1994-01-01

    A high pressure water injection recycling system comprising injection pipelines of a high pressure water injection system and a flow rate control means in communication with a pool of a pressure control chamber is disposed to a feedwater system of a BWR type reactor. In addition, the flow rate control means is controlled by a power control device comprising a scram impossible transient event judging section, a required injection flow rate calculation section for high pressure water injection system and a control signal calculation section. Feed water flow rate to be supplied to the reactor is controlled upon occurrence of a scram impossible transient event of the reactor. The scram impossible transient event is judged based on reactor output signals and scram operation demand signals and injection flow rate is calculated based on a predetermined reactor water level, and condensate storage tank water or pressure control chamber pool water is injected to the reactor. With such procedures, water level can be ensured and power can be suppressed. Further, condensate storage tank water of low enthalpy is introduced to the pressure suppression chamber pool to directly control elevation of water temperature and ensure integrity of the pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  3. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  4. The chemistry of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss features of the changes in chemical constitution which occur in fuel and fuel rods for water reactors during operation and in fault conditions. The fuel for water reactors consists of pellets of urania (UO 2 ) clad in Zircaloy. An essential step in the prediction of the fate of all the radionuclides in a fault or accident is to possess a detailed knowledge of their chemical behavior at all stages of the development of such incidents. In this paper, the authors consider: the chemical constitution of fuel during operation at temperatures corresponding to rather low ratings, together with a quite detailed discussion of the chemistry within the fuel-clad gap; the behavior of fuel subjected to higher temperatures and ratings than those of contemporary fuel; and the changes in constitution on failure of fuel rods in fault or accident conditions

  5. Pumps for German pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dernedde, R.

    1984-01-01

    The article describes the development of a selection of pumps which are used in the primary coolant system and the high-pressure safety injection system and feed water system during the past 2 decades. The modifications were caused by the step-wise increasing power output of the plants from 300 MW up to 1300 MW. Additional important influences were given be the increased requirements for quality assurance and final-documentation. The good operating results of the delivered pumps proved that the reliability is independent of the volume of the software-package. The outlook expects that consolidation will be followed by additional steps for the order processing of components for the convoy pumps. KW: main coolant pump; primary system; boiler feed pump; reactor pump; secondary system; barrel insert pump; pressure water reactor; convoy pump; state of the art.

  6. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  7. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  8. WRAP: a water reactor analysis package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.M.

    1977-06-01

    The modular computational system known as the Water Reactor Analysis Package (WRAP) has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory. WRAP is essentially a reprogrammed version of the RELAP4 computer code with an extensively restructured input format, a dynamic dimensioning capability and additional computational capabilities such as an automatic steady-state option for pressurized water reactors and an automatic restart capability with provision for renodalization. The report describes the capabilities of WRAP at its current stage of development. The addition of new capabilities (e.g., a BWR steady-state capability), the inclusion of improved models (e.g., models in RELAP4/M0D8) and the development of improved numerical techniques to reduce execution time are being planned at this time

  9. Advanced light water reactors for the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, F.A.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The EPRI/Industry advanced light water reactor (ALWR) program and the US Department of Energy ALWR program are closely coordinated to meet the common objective which is the availability of improved and simplified light water reactor plants that may be ordered in the next decade to meet new or replacement capacity requirements. The EPRI/Industry objectives, program participants, and foreign participants, utility requirements document, its organization and content, small plant conceptual design program, the DOE ALWR program, design verification program, General Electric ABWR design features, Combustion Engineering system design, mid-size plant development, General Electric SBWR objectives, Westinghouse/Burns and Roe design objectives, construction improvement, and improved instrumentation and control are discussed in the paper

  10. Audit calculation of the limiting CESSAR feedwater-line-break transient with RELAP5/MOD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.S.; Kennedy, M.F.; Guttmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) performed a series of audit calculations of the limiting FLB transient presented in Appendix 15B to the CESSAR FSAR, supported by a limited number of additional calculations to investigate the sensitivity of the results (in terms of peak primary reactor system pressure) to break area and reactor trip time. The latter calculations were performed to quantify potential benefits in crediting reactor tip on low steam generator downcomer water level, which occurs earlier than the trip shown in the limiting FSAR transient, which tripped on high pressurizer pressure. These calculations were performed to verify the break spectrum results presented by C-E and to insure that C-E did indeed analyze the limiting transient. All of the ANL calculations were performed with RELAP5/MOD1 (cycle 18) using an input deck developed at ANL from CESSAR plant data provided by C-E. In this paper we compare the results and provide insight into the generic behavior of a Feedwater Line Break transient

  11. High conversion heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Wakabayashi, Toshio.

    1989-01-01

    In the present invention, fuel rods using uranium-plutonium oxide mixture fuels are arranged in a square lattice at the same pitch as that in light water cooled reactor and heavy water moderators are used. Accordingly, the volume ratio (Vm/Vf) between the moderator and the fuel can be, for example, of about 2. When heavy water is used for the moderator (coolant), since the moderating effect of heavy water is lower than that of light water, a high conversion ratio of not less than 0.8 can be obtained even if the fuel rod arrangement is equal to that of PWR (Vm/Vf about 2). Accordingly, it is possible to avoid problems caused by dense arrangement of fuel rods as in high conversion rate light water cooled reactors. That is, there are no more troubles in view of thermal hydrodynamic characteristics, re-flooding upon loss of coolant accident, etc., as well as the fuel production cost is not increased. (K.M.)

  12. Integral Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides detailed explanations of the theoretical concepts that the simulator users have to know to gain a comprehensive understanding of the physics and technology of integral pressurized water reactors. It provides explanations of each of the simulator screens and various controls that a user can monitor and modify. A complete description of all the simulator features is also provided. A detailed set of exercises is provided in the Exercise Handbook accompanying this publication.

  13. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Ransom, V.H.; Ybarrondo, L.J.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented

  14. Thermal calculations for water cooled research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrega, S.

    1979-01-01

    The formulae and the more important numerical data necessary for thermic calculations on the core of a research reactor, cooled with low pressure water, are presented. Most of the problems met by the designer and the operator are dealt with (calculations margins, cooling after shut-down). Particular cases are considered (gas release, rough walls, asymmetric cooling slabs etc.), which are not generally envisaged in works on general thermics

  15. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Multi-unit shutdown due to boiler feedwater chemical excursion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebel, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'B' consists of four 935 W CANDU units located on the east shore of Lake Huron in the province of Ontario, Canada. On July 25 and 26, 1989 three of the four operating units were shutdown due to boiler feedwater chemical excursions initiated by a process upset in the Water Treatment Plant that provides demineralized make-up water to all four units. The chemicals that escaped from an ion exchange vessel during a routine regeneration very quickly spread through the condensate make-up system and into the boiler feedwater systems. This resulted in boiler sulfate levels exceeding shutdown limits. A total of 260 GWH of electrical generation was unexpectedly made unavailable to the grid at a time of peak seasonal demand. This event exposed several unforeseen deficiencies and vulnerabilities in the automatic demineralized water make-up quality protection scheme, system designs, operating procedures and the ability of operating personnel to recognize and appropriately respond to such an event. The combination of these factors contributed towards turning a minor system upset into a major multi-unit shutdown. This paper provides the details of the actual event initiation in the Water Treatment Plant and describes the sequence of events that led to the eventual shutdown of three units and near shutdown of the fourth. The design inadequacies, procedural deficiencies and operating personnel responses and difficulties are described. The process of recovering from this event, the flushing out of system piping, boilers and the feedwater train is covered as well as our experiences with setting up supplemental demineralized water supplies including trucking in water and the use of rental trailer mounted demineralizing systems. System design, procedural and operational changes that have been made and that are still being worked on in response to this event are described. The latest evidence of the effect of this event on boiler tube

  17. Boiling water reactor life extension monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 the average age of GE-supplied Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) reached 15 years. The distribution of BWR ages range from three years to 31 years. Several of these plants have active life extension programmes, the most notable of which is the Monticello plant in Minnesota which is the leading BWR plant for license renewal in the United States. The reactor pressure vessel and its internals form the heart of the boiling water reactor (BWR) power plant. Monitoring the condition of the vessel as it operates provides a continuous report on the structural integrity of the vessel and internals. Monitors for fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron effects can confirm safety margins and predict residual life. Every BWR already incorporates facilities to track the key aging mechanisms of fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron embrittlement. Fatigue is measured by counting the cycles experienced by the pressure vessel. Stress corrosion is gauged by periodic measurements of primary water conductivity and neutron embrittlement is tracked by testing surveillance samples. The drawbacks of these historical procedures are that they are time consuming, they lag the current operation, and they give no overall picture of structural integrity. GE has developed an integrated vessel fitness monitoring system to fill the gaps in the historical, piecemetal monitoring of the BWR vessel and internals and to support plant life extension. (author)

  18. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-02-01

    The reactor-safety issue is one of the principal problems threatening the future of the nuclear option, at least in participatory democracies. It has contributed to widespread public distrust and is the direct cause of the escalation in design complexity and quality assurance requirements that are rapidly eroding the competitive advantage of nuclear power. Redesign of the light-water reactor can eliminate those features that leave it open to public distrust and obstructive intervention. This redesign appears feasible within the realm of proven technology in those fields (fuels, materials, water chemistry, waste technology, etc.) in which extended operating experience is essential for confidence in system performance. A pressurized water reactor outline design developed to achieve the above goal is presented. The key feature is the design of the primary system extracting heat from the core so that the latter is protected from damage caused by any credible system failure or any destructive intervention from the outside by either violent means (up to and including nonnuclear warfare) or by mistaken or malicious use of the plant control systems. Such a design objective can be achieved by placing the entire primary circulation system in a large pressurized pool of cold water with a high boric acid content. Enough water is provided in the pool to allow core-decay-heat removal by evaporation for at least one week following any incident with no cooling systems operating. Subsequently it is assumed that a supply of further water (a few cubic meters per hour) from the outside can be arranged, even without the presence of the plant operating personnel

  19. Integral effect test and code analysis on the cooling performance of the PAFS (passive auxiliary feedwater system) during an FLB (feedwater line break) accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Kim, Seok; Park, Yu-Sun; Kang, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This study focuses on the experimental validation of the operational performance of the PAFS (passive auxiliary feedwater system). • A transient simulation of the FLB (feedwater line break) in the integral effect test facility, ATLAS-PAFS, was performed to investigate thermal hydraulic behavior during the PAFS actuation. • The test result confirmed that the APR+ has the capability of coping with the FLB scenario by adopting the PAFS and proper set-points for its operation. • The experimental result was utilized to evaluate the prediction capability of a thermal hydraulic system analysis code, MARS-KS. - Abstract: APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus), which is a GEN-III+ nuclear power plant developed in Korea, adopts PAFS (passive auxiliary feedwater system) as an advanced safety feature. The PAFS can completely replace an active auxiliary feedwater system by cooling down the secondary side of steam generators with a natural convection mechanism. This study focuses on experimental and analytical investigation for cooling and operational performance of the PAFS during an FLB (feedwater line break) transient with an integral effect test facility, ATLAS-PAFS. To realistically simulate the FLB accident of the APR+, the three-level scaling methodology was taken into account to design the test facility and determine the test condition. From the test result, the PAFS was actuated to successfully cool down the decay heat of the reactor core by the condensation heat transfer at the PCHX (passive condensation heat exchanger), and thus it could be confirmed that the APR+ has the capability of coping with a FLB scenario by adopting the PAFS and proper set-points for its operation. This integral effect test data were used to evaluate the prediction capability of a thermal hydraulic system analysis code, MARS-KS. The code analysis result proved that it could reasonably predict the FLB transient including the actuation of the PAFS and the natural convection

  20. Application of the integrated analysis of safety (ISA) to sequences of Total loss of feed water in a PWR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno Chamorro, P.; Gallego Diaz, C.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to show the current status of the implementation of integrated analysis of safety (ISA) methodology and its SCAIS associated tool (system of simulation codes for ISA) to the sequence analysis of total loss of feedwater in a PWR reactor model Westinghouse of three loops with large, dry containment.

  1. Reactor core of light water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor core of a light water cooled reactor, the center of the fuel rods or moderating rods situated at the outermost circumference among control rods or moderating rods are connected to divide a lattice region into an inner fuel region and an outer moderator region. In this case, the area ratio of the moderating region to the fuel region is determined to greater than 0.81 for every cross section of the fuel region. The moderating region at the outer side is increased relative to the fuel rod region at the inner side while keeping the lattice pitch of the fuel assembly constant, thereby suppressing the increase of an absolute value of a void reactivity coefficient which tends to be caused when using MOX fuels as a fuel material, by utilizing neutron moderation due to a large quantity of coolants at the outer side of the fuel region. The void reactivity coefficient can be made substantially equal with that of uranium fuel assembly without greatly reducing a plutonium loading amount or without greatly increasing linear power density. (N.H.)

  2. Neutron disadvantage factors in heavy water and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1966-01-01

    A number od heavy water and light water reactor cells are analyzed in this paper by applying analytical methods of neutron thermalization. Calculations done according to the one-group Amouyal-Benoist method are included in addition. Computer codes for ZUSE Z-23 computer were written by applying both methods. The obtained results of disadvantage factors are then compared to results obtained by one-group P 3 approximation and by multigroup K7-THERMOS code [sr

  3. Evolution of Framatome pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Bitsch, D.; Millot, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    FRAMATOME's PWR experience covers a total of 63 units, 36 of which are operating by end of 1984. More than 10 units were operated in load follow mode. Progress features, resulting from the feedback of construction and operating experience, and from the returns of a vast research and development program, were incorporated in their design through subsequent series of standard units. The last four loop standard, the N4 model, integrates in a rational way all those progress features, together with a significant design effort. The core design is based on the new Advanced Fuel Assemblies. The reactor control implements the ''Reactor Maximum Flexibility Package'' (R-MAX) which provides a high level of automatic reactor control. The steam generator incorporates an axial-mixed flow economizer design. The triangular-pitch tube bundle, together with modular steam/water separators and a rearrangement of the dryers resulted in a compact design. The reactor coolant pump benefits of higher performances over that of previous models due to an optimal hydraulic design, and of mechanical features which increase margins and facilitate the maintenance work. Following the N4 project, design work on advanced concepts is pursued by FRAMATOME. A main way of research is focused on the optimal use of fissile materials. These concepts are based on tight pitch fuel arrays, associated with a mechanical spectral shift device

  4. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  5. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  6. Good practices in heavy water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The value and importance of organizations in the nuclear industry engaged in the collection and analysis of operating experience and best practices has been clearly identified in various IAEA publications and exercises. Both facility safety and operational efficiency can benefit from such information sharing. Such sharing also benefits organizations engaged in the development of new nuclear power plants, as it provides information to assist in optimizing designs to deliver improved safety and power generation performance. In cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd, the IAEA organized the workshop on best practices in Heavy Water Reactor Operation in Toronto, Canada from 16 to 19 September 2008, to assist interested Member States in sharing best practices and to provide a forum for the exchange of information among participating nuclear professionals. This workshop was organized under Technical Cooperation Project INT/4/141, on Status and Prospects of Development for and Applications of Innovative Reactor Concepts for Developing Countries. The workshop participants were experts actively engaged in various aspects of heavy water reactor operation. Participants presented information on activities and practices deemed by them to be best practices in a particular area for consideration by the workshop participants. Presentations by the participants covered a broad range of operational practices, including regulatory aspects, the reduction of occupational dose, performance improvements, and reducing operating and maintenance costs. This publication summarizes the material presented at the workshop, and includes session summaries prepared by the chair of each session and papers submitted by the presenters

  7. Light-water reactor research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This report on the national program of research and development on light water reactors is the second of two reports requested in 1982 by W. Kenneth Davis, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy. A first report, published in September 1983, treated the needs for safety-related R and D. In this second report, the Energy Research Advisory Board finds that, although many light water reactors are providing reliable and economic electricity, it appears unlikely that U.S. utilities will order additional reactors until the currently unacceptable economic risk, created by the regulatory climate and uncertain demand, is reduced. Thus it is unlikely that the private sector alone will fund major LWR design improvements. However, nuclear power will continue on its current course of expansion overseas. DOE participation is vitally needed to support the national interest in LWR technology. The report outlines R and D needs for a program to improve the safety, reliability, and economics of the present generation of plants; to develop evolutionary improved designs to be ready when needed; and to explore innovative longer-term concepts for deployment after the year 2000. The respective roles of government and the private sector are discussed

  8. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  9. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  10. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  11. Status of advanced small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Zhou Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to expand the nuclear power in energy and desalination, increase competitiveness in global nuclear power market, many developed countries with strong nuclear energy technology have realized the importance of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) and initiated heavy R and D programs in SMR. The Advanced Small Pressurized Water Reactor (ASPWR) is characterized by great advantages in safety and economy and can be used in remote power grid and replace mid/small size fossil plant economically. This paper reviews the history and current status of SMR and ASPWR, and also discusses the design concept, safety features and other advantages of ASPWR. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall review of ASPWR technology in western countries, and to promote the R and D in ASPWR in China. (authors)

  12. Data Reconciliation in the Steam-Turbine Cycle of a Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Berg, Oivind; Dahlberg, Lennart; Fridqvist, Nils-Olof

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model for a boiling water reactor steam-turbine cycle was assembled by means of a configurable, steady-state modeling tool TEMPO. The model was connected to live plant data and intermittently fitted to these by minimization of a weighted least-squares object function. The improvement in precision achieved by this reconciliation was assessed from quantities calculated from the model equations linearized around the minimum and from Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that the inclusion of the flow-passing characteristics of the turbines in the model equations significantly improved the precision as compared to simple mass and energy balances, whereas heat transfer calculations in feedwater heaters did not. Under the assumption of linear model equations, the quality of the fit can also be expressed as a goodness-of-fit Q. Typical values for Q were in the order of 0.9. For a validated model Q may be used as a fault detection indicator, and Q dropped to very low values in known cases of disagreement between the model and the plant state. The sensitivity of Q toward measurement faults is discussed in relation to redundancy. The results of the linearized theory and Monte Carlo simulations differed somewhat, and if a more accurate analysis is required, this is better based on the latter. In practical application of the presently employed techniques, however, assessment of uncertainties in raw data is an important prerequisite

  13. Development of Abnormal Operating Strategies for Station Blackout in Shutdown Operating Mode in Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Su-Hyun [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Loss of all AC power is classified as one of multiple failure accident by regulatory guide of Korean accident management program. Therefore we need develop strategies for the abnormal operating procedure both of power operating and shutdown mode. This paper developed abnormal operating guideline for loss of all AC power by analysis of accident scenario in pressurized water reactor. This paper analyzed the loss of ultimate heat sink (LOUHS) in shutdown operating mode and developed the operating strategy of the abnormal procedure. Also we performed the analysis of limiting scenarios that operator actions are not taken in shutdown LOUHS. Therefore, we verified the plant behavior and decided operator action to taken in time in order to protect the fuel of core with safety. From the analysis results of LOUHS, the fuel of core maintained without core uncovery for 73 minutes respectively for opened RCS states after the SBO occurred. Therefore, operator action for the emergency are required to take in 73 minutes for opened RCS state. Strategy is to cooldown by using spent fuel pool cooling system. This method required to change the plant design in some plant. In RCS boundary closed state, first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is first abnormal operating strategy in shutdown LOUHS is to remove the residual heat of core by steam dump flow and auxiliary feedwater of SG.

  14. Signal validation and failure correction algorithms for PWR steam generator feedwater control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrallah, C.N.; Graham, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    A critical contributor to the reliability of a nuclear power plant is the reliability of the control systems which maintain plant operating parameters within desired limits. The most difficult system to control in a PWR nuclear power plant and the one which causes the most reactor trips is the control of the feedwater flow to the steam generators. The level in the steam generator must be held within relatively narrow limits, with reactor trips set for both too high and too low a level. The steam generator level is inherently unstable in that it is an open integrator of feedwater flow steam flow mismatch. The steam generator feedwater control system relies on sensed variables in order to generate the appropriate feedwater valve control signal. In current systems, each of these sensed variables comes from a single sensor which may be a separate control sensor or one of the redundant protection sensors that is manually selected by the operator. In case this single signal is false, either due to sensor malfunction or due to a test signal being substituted during periodic test and maintenance, the control system will generate a wrong control signal to the feedwater control valve. This will initiate a steam generator level upset. The solution to this problem is for the control system to sense a given variable with more than one redundant sensor. Normally there are three or four sensors for each variable monitored by the reactor protection system. The techniques discussed allow the control system to compare these redundant sensor signals and generate a validated signal for each measured variable that is insensitive to false signals

  15. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  16. Safety design/analysis and scenario for prevention of CDA with ECCS in lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoru, Takahashi; Vaclav, Dostal; Abu Khalid, Rivai; Novitrian; Yumi, Yamada

    2007-01-01

    Safety design has been developed to show safety feature of Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR). The core is designed to have negative void reactivity even if the entire core and upper plenum are voided by steam intrusion from above. In-vessel type control rod driving mechanisms are used to prevent control rods from accidental ejection due to high pressure in the reactor vessel. In cases of coolant leakage from reactor vessel and feed water pipes, Pb-Bi coolant level in the reactor vessel is kept at the required level for decay heat removal by means of closed type guard vessel. Dual pipes are adopted to avoid leak of water in the feedwater system. Pump trip in feedwater systems initiates loss of coolant flow (LOF) event, although there is no concern of loss of flow accident due to primary pump trip. Injection of high pressure water slows down the flow-coast-down of feedwater at the LOF event. It has been evaluated that the fuel temperature is kept lower than safety limits at the unprotected loss of flow and heat sink (ATWS). A scenario for prevention of the core disruptive accident (CDA) with the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) is examined. The reactor becomes super-critical when the reactor vessel is filled with water. It is necessary to use water with boric acid for the ECC system, and additional backup rods for sub-critical core in water injection. (authors)

  17. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  18. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Qiaolin; Qiu, Suizheng; Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Xiao, Zejun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions

  19. Water hammer characteristics of integral pressurized water reactor primary loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Qiaolin [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Lu, Wei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049 (China); Xiao, Zejun [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Water hammer models developed for IPWR primary loop using MOC. • Good agreement between the developed code and the experiment. • The good agreement between WAHAP and Flowmaster can validate the equations in WAHAP. • The primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact. -- Abstract: The present work discussed the single-phase water hammer phenomenon, which was caused by the four-pump-alternate startup in an integral pressurized water reactor (IPWR). A new code named water hammer program (WAHAP) was developed independently based on the method of characteristic to simulate hydraulic transients in the primary system of IPWR and its components such as reactor core, once-through steam generators (OTSG), the main coolant pumps and so on. Experimental validation for the correctness of the equations and models in WAHAP was carried out and the models fit the experimental data well. Some important variables were monitored including transient volume flow rates, opening angle of valve disc and pressure drop in valves. The water hammer commercial software Flowmaster V7 was also employed to compare with WAHAP and the good agreement can validate the equations in WAHAP. The transient results indicated that the primary loop of IPWR suffers from slight water hammer impact under pump switching conditions.

  20. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  1. Startup and commissioning of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, L.J.; Gilbert, C.F.

    1983-05-01

    A critical phase of plant development is the test, startup, and commissioning period. The effort expended prior to commissioning has a definite effect on the reliability and continuing availability of the plant during its life. This paper describes a test, startup, and commissioning program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. This program commences with the completion of construction and continues through the turnover of equipment/systems to the owner's startup/ commissioning group. The paper addresses the organization of the test/startup group, planning and scheduling, test procedures and initial testing, staffing and certification of the test group, training of operators, and turnover to the owner

  2. Westinghouse Water Reactor Divisions quality assurance plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The Quality Assurance Program used by Westinghouse Water Reactor Divisions is described. The purpose of the program is to assure that the design, materials, and workmanship on Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) equipment meet applicable safety requirements, fulfill the requirements of the contracts with the applicants, and satisfy the applicable codes, standards, and regulatory requirements. This program satisfies the NRC Quality Assurance Criteria, 10CFR50 Appendix B, to the extent that these criteria apply to safety related NSSS equipment. Also, it follows the regulatory position provided in NRC regulatory guides and the requirements of ANSI Standard N45.2.12 as identified in this Topical Report

  3. Instrument lance for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proell, N.; Bertz, S.; Graebener, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The instrument lance contains in the lance cover pipe a thimble as part of the drive chamber system. Other thimbles serve to carry neutron detectors. Detectors can be exchanged without opening the reactor pressure vessel and without removing the fuel elements. Furthermore the detector exchange is independent from the fuel element cycle. The measurement lance passes from the bottom of the pressure vessel over the total hight of the core in the water ducts between the fuel elements and can thus determine the neutron flux distribution. (DG) [de

  4. Light-water-reactor hydrogen manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Cummings, J.C.; Sherman, M.P.; Kupiec, C.F.; Healy, R.J.; Caplan, J.S.; Sandhop, J.R.; Saunders, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    A manual concerning the behavior of hydrogen in light water reactors has been prepared. Both normal operations and accident situations are addressed. Topics considered include hydrogen generation, transport and mixing, detection, and combustion, and mitigation. Basic physical and chemical phenomena are described, and plant-specific examples are provided where appropriate. A wide variety of readers, including operators, designers, and NRC staff, will find parts of this manual useful. Different sections are written at different levels, according to the most likely audience. The manual is not intended to provide specific plant procedures, but rather, to provide general guidance that may assist in the development of such procedures

  5. Development trends in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelstroem, L.; Simon, M.

    1988-01-01

    The present market for new nuclear power plants is weak, but is expected to pick up again, which is why great efforts are being made to further develop the light water reactor line for future applications. There is both a potential and a need for further improvement, for instance with respect to even higher cost efficiency, a simplified operating permit procedure, shorter construction periods, and increased operational flexibility to meet rising demands in load following behavior and in better cycle data of fuel elements. However, also public acceptance must not be forgotten when deciding about the line to be followed in the development of LWR technology. (orig.) [de

  6. Decay ratio estimation in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.; Runkel, J.

    1990-11-01

    The well known decay ratio (DR) from stability analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR) is estimated from the impulse response function which was evaluated using a simplified univariate autoregression method. This simplified DR called modified DR (mDR) was applied on neutron noise measurements carried out during five fuel cycles of a 1300 MWe PWR. Results show that this fast evaluation method can be used for monitoring of the growing oscillation of the neutron flux during the fuel cycles which is a major concern of utilities in PWRs, thus it can be used for estimating safety margins. (author) 17 refs.; 10 figs

  7. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshio Matsuo

    1987-01-01

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  8. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G. [Stanford Univ., Dept. of Economics, CA (United States); Van der Zwaan, B. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam, Inst. for Environmental Studies (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  9. Screening reactor steam/water piping systems for water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, P.

    1997-09-01

    A steam/water system possessing a certain combination of thermal, hydraulic and operational states, can, in certain geometries, lead to a steam bubble collapse induced water hammer. These states, operations, and geometries are identified. A procedure that can be used for identifying whether an unbuilt reactor system is prone to water hammer is proposed. For the most common water hammer, steam bubble collapse induced water hammer, six conditions must be met in order for one to occur. These are: (1) the pipe must be almost horizontal; (2) the subcooling must be greater than 20 C; (3) the L/D must be greater than 24; (4) the velocity must be low enough so that the pipe does not run full, i.e., the Froude number must be less than one; (5) there should be void nearby; (6) the pressure must be high enough so that significant damage occurs, that is the pressure should be above 10 atmospheres. Recommendations on how to avoid this kind of water hammer in both the design and the operation of the reactor system are made

  10. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  11. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A thorium-fueled water-cooled reactor core design approach that features a radially uniform composition of fuel rods in stationary fuel assembly and is fuel-self-sustaining is described. This core design concept is similar to the Reduced moderation Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR proposed by Hitachi to fit within an ABWR pressure vessel, with the following exceptions: use of thorium instead of depleted uranium for the fertile fuel; elimination of the internal blanket; and elimination of absorbers from the axial reflectors, while increasing the length of the fissile zone. The preliminary analysis indicates that it is feasible to design such cores to be fuel-self-sustaining and to have a comfortably low peak linear heat generation rate when operating at the nominal ABWR power level of nearly 4000 MWth. However, the void reactivity feedback tends to be too negative, making it difficult to have sufficient shutdown reactivity margin at cold zero power condition. An addition of a small amount of plutonium from LWR used nuclear fuel was found effective in reducing the magnitude of the negative void reactivity effect and enables attaining adequate shutdown reactivity margin; it also flattens the axial power distribution. The resulting design concept offers an efficient incineration of the LWR generated plutonium in addition to effective utilization of thorium. Additional R&D is required in order to arrive at a reliable practical and safe design.

  12. Carbon-14 in reactor plant water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, G.K.

    1979-01-01

    The method for the analysis of 14 C in reactor plant water and various waste streams previously used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has been shown to be ineffective for samples which contain organic compounds. The previous method consisted of acidification and refluxing of the sample, precipitation of the liberated CO 2 , and subsequent analysis by the liquid scintillation method. The method was simple but it did not convert all compounds containing 14 C in the sample to CO 2 . The new method, while it is based on the previous method, has been improved by employing a strong oxidant, potassium persulfate and silver nitrate, for more complete oxidation of the organics to CO 2 . The new method yields 14 C values that have typically been one to two orders of magnitude higher than the values obtained using the former method. This indicates that most of the 14 C present in the current reactor water samples being analyzed is associated with trace amounts of organics

  13. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs

  14. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L. [Inst. of Material Engineering, Ostrava (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed.

  15. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappx, L.

    1994-01-01

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified steam generator. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators, has focused this attention on the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed. (Author)

  16. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L [Inst. of Material Engineering, Ostrava (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed.

  17. Influence of feedwater and blowdown systems on the mineral distribution in WWER steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, L.

    1995-01-01

    After modification of Dukovany NPP steam generator (SG) feedwater system, the increased concentration of minerals was measured in the cold leg of modified SG. Some modifications were performed on operating WWER 1000 steam generators with aim to optimize the water chemistry in the collectors area. Since the distribution of minerals can substantially affect on corrosion processes in steam generators, VITKOVICE, as a producer of WWER steam generators has focused the attention to the optimizing of these systems. To predict the mineral distribution on the secondary side of steam generators for considered feedwater/blowdown systems, the simple model of the flow distribution in the secondary side of SG was developed

  18. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light-water reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Kanevoky, A.; Reuss, P.

    1975-01-01

    A complete modular system of light water reactor calculations has been designed. It includes basic nuclear data processing, the APOLLO phase: transport calculations for cells, multicells, fuel assemblies or reactors, the NEPTUNE phase: reactor calculations. A fuel management module, devoted to the automatic determination of the best shuffling strategy is included in NEPTUNE [fr

  19. Light and heavy water replacing system in reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to determine the strength of a reactor container while neglecting the outer atmospheric pressure upon evacuation, by evacuating the gap between the reactor container and a biological thermal shield, as well as the container simultaneously upon light water - heavy water replacement. Method: Upon replacing light water with heavy water by vacuum evaporation system in a nuclear reactor having a biological thermal shield surrounding the reactor container incorporating therein a reactor core by way of a heat expansion absorbing gap, the reactor container and the havy water recycling system, as well as the inside of heat expansion absorbing gap are evacuated simultaneously. This enables to neglect the outer atmospheric outer pressure upon evacuation in the determination of the container strength, and the thickness of the container can be decreased by so much as the external pressure neglected. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  1. Procedure for operating a heavy water cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.; Kumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactors cooled by heavy water usually have equipment for fuel element exchange during operation, with the primary circuit remaining contained. This fuel element exchange equipment is expensive and complicated in many respects. According to the invention, the heavy water is therefore replaced by light water after a certain time of operation in such way that light water is led in and heavy water is led off. After the replacement, at least a quarter of the fuel elements of the reactor core is exchanged with the reactor pressure vessel being open. Then the light water serving as a shielding is replaced by heavy water, with the reactor pressure vessel being closed. The invention is of interest particularly for high-conversion reactors. (orig.) [de

  2. Severe transient analysis of the Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For this reason the modeling has been performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS). The basic design and normal transients have been performed successfully with MMS. However, the true test of an inherently safe concept lies in its response to more brutal transients. Therefore, such a demonstrative transient is chosen for the PSU ALWR: a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total loss of offsite ac power. Diesel generators are likewise unavailable. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. The low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The results of the transient analyses indicate excellent performance by the PSU ALWR in terms of inherently safe operation. The primary coolant enters full natural circulation, and removes all decay heat through the steam generators. Further, the steam generators continually supply sufficient steam to the shutdown power system, despite the abrupt changeover to the auxiliary feedwater system. Finally, even with coincident failures in the pressurization system, the primary repressurizes to near-normal values, without overpressurization. No core boiling or uncovery is predicted, and consequently fuel damage is avoided. 17 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Reducing scram frequency by modifying/eliminating steam generator low-low level reactor trip setpoint for Maanshan nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuann, R.Y.; Chiang, S.C.; Hsiue, J.K.; Chen, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of modification/elimination of steam generator low-low level reactor trip setpoint is evaluated by using RETRAN-02 code for the purpose of reducing scram frequency in Maanshan 3-loop pressurized water reactor. The ANS Condition II event loss of normal feedwater and condition IV event feedwater system line break are the basis for steam generator low-low level reactor trip setpoint sensitivity analysis, including various initial reactor power levels, reactivity feedback coefficients, and system functions assumptions etc., have been performed for the two basis events with steam generator low-low level reactor trip setpoint at 0% narrow range and without this trip respectively. The feasibility of modifying/eliminating current steam generator low-low level reactor trip setpoint is then determined based on whether the analysis results meet with the ANS Condition II and IV acceptance criteria or not

  4. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  5. Development of supercritical water reactors in Russia and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, A.P.; Klushin, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    The results of Russian and foreign studies on the water-cooled high critical parameters reactors are analyzed. Developments on this subject are conducted in more than 15 countries. The advantages of WWER- SCP and characteristics of experimental reactor of WWER-SCP-30 are discussed. It is noted that priority task is to develop a reactor with thermal neutron spectrum with a subsequent transition to the reactor with a fast neutron spectrum [ru

  6. VGB conference 'Chemistry in the power plant 1984' - VGB feedwater conditioning conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference bears various aspects of feedwater conditioning for power plant cooling systems and steam generators as well as on the analytical assessment of water quality and its translation into operational method approaches. 5 out of the total 14 papers were entered separately in the database. (RB) [de

  7. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, A.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the present speech is to point out some of the now-a-day existing problems related to the fuel cycle of light water reactors and to foresee their present and future solutions. Economical aspects of nuclear power generation have been considerably improving, partly through technological advancements and partly due to the enlargement of unit capacity. The fuel cycle, defined in the course of this talk, discusses the exploration, mining, ore concentration, purification, conversion, enrichment, manufacturing of fuel elements, their utilization in a reactor, their discharge and subsequent storage, reprocessing, and their re-use or disposal. Uranium market in the world and the general policy of several uranium owning countries are described. The western world requirement for uranium until the year 2000, uranium resources and the nuclear power programs in the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa, France, India, Spain, and Argentina are discussed. The participation of Iran in a large uranium enrichment plant based on French diffusion technology is mentioned

  8. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  9. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  10. Development of an ultrasonic flow and temperature measurement system for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.W.; Lubnow, T.; Baumgart, G.; Ravetti, D.

    1996-01-01

    In U.S. nuclear plants, primary coolant flow and reactor thermal power are calculated from a measurement of feedwater flow to the steam generator combined with knowledge of steam generator heat transfer characteristics nd measurement of hot leg temperature by resistance temperature detectors (RTDs). The calculation of plant thermal output is complicated by an indirect measurement of primary coolant mass flow rate and thermal streaming in the region where hot leg temperature is typically measured. Uncertainty in the thermal output calculation results from uncertainties in steam generator characteristics, in the hot leg temperature due to thermal streaming, and in fouling of venturi nozzles used for feedwater flow measurement. This in turn leads to operation of power plants ar lower levels of efficiency. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has on ongoing project to develop a prototype system to directly measure primary coolant flow rate and bulk average temperature using ultrasonic transducers externally mounted on the pipe. The topic of this paper is a summary of the project experience in developing this system. The technology being developed in this project is based in part upon previously existing ultrasonic feedwater flow measurement technology developed by MPR Associates and Caldon, Inc EPRI is a non-profit company performing research for U.S. and international electric power utilities. (authors)

  11. Water cooled reactor technology: Safety research abstracts no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD publish these Nuclear Safety Research Abstracts within the framework of their efforts to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants and to promote the exchange of research information. The abstracts are of nuclear safety related research projects for: pressurized light water cooled and moderated reactors (PWRs); boiling light water cooled and moderated reactors (BWRs); light water cooled and graphite moderated reactors (LWGRs); pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactors (PHWRs); gas cooled graphite moderated reactors (GCRs). Abstracts of nuclear safety research projects for fast breeder reactors are published independently by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and are not included in this joint publication. The intention of the collaborating international organizations is to publish such a document biannually. Work has been undertaken to develop a common computerized system with on-line access to the stored information

  12. Rupture hardware minimization in pressurized water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Ski, J.J.; Chexal, V.; Norris, D.M.; Goldstein, N.A.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Quinones, D.F.; Server, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    For much of the high-energy piping in light reactor systems, fracture mechanics calculations can be used to assure pipe failure resistance, thus allowing the elimination of excessive rupture restraint hardware both inside and outside containment. These calculations use the concept of leak-before-break (LBB) and include part-through-wall flaw fatigue crack propagation, through-wall flaw detectable leakage, and through-wall flaw stability analyses. Performing these analyses not only reduces initial construction, future maintenance, and radiation exposure costs, but also improves the overall safety and integrity of the plant since much more is known about the piping and its capabilities than would be the case had the analyses not been performed. This paper presents the LBB methodology applied a Beaver Valley Power Station- Unit 2 (BVPS-2); the application for two specific lines, one inside containment (stainless steel) and the other outside containment (ferrutic steel), is shown in a generic sense using a simple parametric matrix. The overall results for BVPS-2 indicate that pipe rupture hardware is not necessary for stainless steel lines inside containment greater than or equal to 6-in. (152-mm) nominal pipe size that have passed a screening criteria designed to eliminate potential problem systems (such as the feedwater system). Similarly, some ferritic steel line as small as 3-in. (76-mm) diameter (outside containment) can qualify for pipe rupture hardware elemination

  13. The heavy water accountancy for research reactors in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshijima, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sumitoshi; Nemoto, Denjirou

    1998-11-01

    The three research reactors have been operated by the Department of Research Reactor and used about 41 tons heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector of research reactors. The JRR-2 is a tank type research reactor of 10MW in thermal power and its is used as moderator, coolant and reflector about 16 tons heavy water. The JRR-3M is a light water cooled and moderated pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 20MW and its is used as reflector about 7.3 tons heavy water. In the JRR-4, which is a light water cooled swimming pool type research reactor with the maximum thermal power of 3.5MW, about 1 ton heavy water is used to supply fully thermalized neutrons with a neutron beam experiment of facility. The heavy water was imported from U.S.A., CANADA and Norway. Parts of heavy water is internationally controlled materials, therefore management of heavy water is necessary for materials accountancy. This report described the change of heavy water inventories in each research reactors, law and regulations for accounting of heavy water in JAERI. (author)

  14. Technological readiness of evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has evolved to a mature industry that supplies over 16% of the world's electricity, and it represents an important option for meeting the global energy demands of the coming century in an environmentally acceptable manner. New, evolutionary water cooled reactor designs that build on successful performance of predecessors have been developed; these designs have generally been guided by wishes to reduce cost, to improve availability and reliability, and to meet increasingly stringent safety objectives. These three aspects are important factors in what has been called technological readiness for an expanded deployment of nuclear power; a major increase in utilization of nuclear power will only occur if it is economically competitive, and meets safety expectations. To this end, the industry will also have to maintain or improve the public perception of nuclear power as a benign, economical and reliable energy source. (author)

  15. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  16. Pressurized-water-reactor station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbe, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program was to investigate accident scenarios beyond the design basis. The primary objective of SASA was to analyze nuclear plant transients that could lead to partial or total core melt and evaluate potential mitigating actions. The following summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) SASA effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is presently evaluating Unresolved Safety Issue A-44 - Station Blackout from initiation of the transient to core uncovery. The balance of the analysis from core uncovery until fission product release is being performed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The current analyses involve the Bellefonte Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS), a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) 205 Fuel Assembly (205-FA) raised loop design to be operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority

  17. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  18. Reprocessing technology for present water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    The basic Purex solvent extraction technology developed and applied in the U.S. in the 1950's provides a well-demonstrated and efficient process for recovering uranium and plutonium for fuel recycle and separating the wastes for further treatment and packaging. The technologies for confinement of radioactive effluents have been developed but have had limited utilization in the processing of commercial light water reactor fuels. Technologies for solidification and packaging of radioactive wastes have not yet been demonstrated but significant experience has been gained in laboratory and engineering scale experiments with simulated commercial reprocessing wastes and intermediate level wastes. Commercial scale experience with combined operations of all the required processes and equipment are needed to demonstrate reliable reprocessing centers

  19. Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Shen Shifei

    1996-01-01

    Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor (OSSPWR) has been developed under the sponsorship of IAEA from August 1994. The project is being carried out by the Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Design concepts of the operator support functions have been established. The prototype systems of OSSPWR has been developed as well. The primary goal of the project is to create an advanced operator support system by applying new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, advanced communication technologies, etc. Recently, the advanced man-machine interface for nuclear power plant operators has been developed. It is connected to the modern computer systems and utilizes new high performance graphic displays. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  20. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  1. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  2. Fuzzy Logic Approach to Diagnosis of Feedwater Heater Performance Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeon Kwan; Kim, Hyeon Min; Heo, Gyun Young; Sang, Seok Yoon

    2014-01-01

    failure mode of feedwater heater such as high drain level, low shell-side pressure, tube-side plugging and water box plate defect based on fuzzy logic approach and simulation model

  3. Fuzzy Logic Approach to Diagnosis of Feedwater Heater Performance Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Kwan; Kim, Hyeon Min; Heo, Gyun Young [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Sang, Seok Yoon [Engineering and Technical Center, Korea Hydro, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    failure mode of feedwater heater such as high drain level, low shell-side pressure, tube-side plugging and water box plate defect based on fuzzy logic approach and simulation model.

  4. A review of the UKAEA interest in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symes, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The chapter commences with a brief account of the history of heavy water production and then begins the story of the British use of this moderator in power reactors. This is equated with the introduction and development of the tube reactor as a distinct and important form of reactor construction in contrast with the perhaps better known vessel design that has tended to dominate reactor engineering to date. The account thus includes a succession of reactor designs including the gas and steam cooled heavy water systems in addition to the steam-generating heavy water reactor. The SGHWR was demonstrated by the construction of a substantial prototype, which continues in operation as a flexible and reliable electricity-generating plant. It was also, for a time, identified as the system to be used for Britain's third reactor programme. Today the successful Canadian CANDU power reactors represent the only penetration of heavy water reactor technology into large scale electricity generation. The range of research and experimental reactors using heavy water in their cores is reviewed. (author)

  5. Fuel behavior in advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolme, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel rod behavior of advanced pressurized water reactors under steady state conditions has been investigated in this study. System-80+ and Westinghouse Vantage-5 fuels have been considered as advanced pressurized water reactor fuels to be analyzed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of ditferent models and the effect of selected design parameters on the overall fuel behavior. FRAPCON-II computer code has been used for the analyses. Different modelling options of FRAPCON-II have also been considered in these analyses. Analyses have been performed in two main parts. In the first part, effects of operating conditions on fuel behavior have been investigated. First, fuel rod response under normal operating conditions has been analyzed. Then, fuel rod response to different fuel ratings has been calculated. In the second part, in order to estimate the effect of design parameters on fuel behavior, parametric analyses have been performed. In this part, the effects of initial gap thickness, as fabricated fuel density, and initial fill gas pressure on fuel behavior have been analyzed. The computations showed that both of the fuel rods used in this study operate within the safety limits. However, FRAPCON-II modelling options have been resulted in different behavior due to their modelling characteristics. Hence, with the absence of experimental data, it is difficult to make assesment for the best fuel parameters. It is also difficult to estimate error associated with the results. To improve the performance of the code, it is necessary to develop better experimental correlations for material properties in order to analyze the eftect ot considerably different design parameters rather than nominal rod parameters

  6. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneley, D.A.; Olmstead, R.A.; Yu, A.M.; Dastur, A.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  7. Single-tube condensation experiment in Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System of APR1400+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Wook; No, Hee Cheon; Yun, Bong Yo; Jeon, Byong Guk [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Conventional Korean nuclear power plants, Advanced Power Reactors (APR), are characterized by an active cooling system. However, Active cooling system may not prevent significant damage without any AC power source available for its operation as vividly illustrated through the recent Fukushima incident. In the APR1400+ to be designed, an independent passive cooling system was added in order to overcome the aforementioned shortcomings. In the Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS), gravity force and density difference between steam and water are used. The system comprises of 240 condensation tubes to efficiently remove decay heat. Before applying the PAFS to APR1400+, the system's safety and heat removal performance must be verified. The present study experimentally evaluates the heat removal performance of a single tube in the PAFS. The objectives of SCOP (Single-tube Condensation experiment facility of PAFS) are the evaluation of the heat removal performance in the tube of the PAFS and database construction under various tube designs and test conditions. Reaching these objectives, we developed advanced measurement techniques for the amount of moisture, heat flux, and water film thickness.

  8. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  9. On the slimeless water operation in the RBMK type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Kh.; Mamet, V.A.; Nikitina, I.S.; Karakhanyan, L.N.

    1988-01-01

    Water chemistry conditions of the operating RBMK-1000 and RBMK-1500 units are analysed. Inevitability of iron oxide deposits in RBMK-1000 and particularly in RBMK-1500 reactors is demonstrated. Organization of a new slimeless correcting water chemistry for RBMK-1000 and RBMK-1500 reactors is recommended

  10. Development of light water reactors and subjects for hereafter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    As for light water reactors, the structure is relatively simple, and the power plants of large capacity can be realized easily, therefore, they have been used for long period as main nuclear reactors. During that period, the accumulation of experiences on the design, manufacture, operation, maintenance and regulation of light water has become enormous, and in Japan, the social base for maintaining and developing light water reactor technologies has been prepared sufficiently. If the nuclear power generation using seawater uranium is considered, the utilization of uranium for light water reactor technologies can become the method of producing the own energy for Japan. As the factors that threaten the social base of light water reactor technologies, there are a the lowering of the desire to promote light water reactors, the effect of secular deterioration, the price rise of uranium resources, the effect of plutonium accumulation, the effect of the circumstances in developing countries and the sure recruiting of engineers. The construction and the principle of working of light water reactors and the development of light water reactors hereafter, for example, the improvement on small scale and the addition of new technology resulting in cost reduction and the lowering of the quality requirement for engineers, the improvement of core design, the countermeasures by design to serious accidents and others are described. (K.I.)

  11. Radioactive waste management practices with KWU-boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiser, H.

    1976-01-01

    A Kraftwerk Union boiling water reactor is used to demonstrate the reactor auxiliary systems which are applied to minimize the radioactive discharge. Based on the most important design criteria the philosophy and function of the various systems for handling the off-gas, ventilation air, waste water and concentrated waste are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Analysis of containment parameters during the main steam line break with the failure of the feedwater control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, L.; Petelin, S.; Mavko, B.; Gortnar, O.; Tiselj, I.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) information notice 91-69: 'Errors in Main Steam Line Break Analyses for Determining Containment Parameters' shows the possibility of an accident which could lead to beyond design containment pressure and temperature. Such accident would be caused by the continuation of feedwater flow following a main stream line break (MSLB) inside the containment. Krsko power plant already experienced problems with main feedwater control valves. For that reason, analysis of MSLB has been performed taking into account continuous feedwater addition scenario and different containment safety systems capabilities availability. Steam and water released into the containment during MSLB was calculated using RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. The containment response to MSLB was calculated using CONTEMPT-LT/028 computer code. The results indicated that the continuous feedwater flow following a MSLB could lead to beyond design containment pressure. The peak pressure and temperature depend on isolation time for main- and auxiliary-feedwater supply. In the case of low boron concentration injection, the core recriticality is characteristic for this type of accidents. It was concluded that the presented analysis of MSLB with continuous feedwater addition scenario is the worst case for containment design

  13. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  14. Suppression device for the reactor water level lowering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Hajime; Kasuga, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the lowering in the reactor water level so as to avoid unnecessary actuation of ECCS upon generation of transient changes which forecasts the lowering of the reactor water level in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: There are provided a water level suppression signal generator for generating a water level suppression signal upon generation of a transient change signal which forecasts the water level lowering in a nuclear reactor and a recycling flow rate controller that applies a recycling flow rate control signal to a recycling pump drive motor by the water level lowering suppression signal. The velocity of the recycling pump is controlled by a reactor scram signal by way of the water level lowering suppresion signal generator and a recycling flow rate controller. Then, the recycling reactor core flow rate is decreased and the void amount in the reactor is transiently increased where the water level tends to increase. Accordingly, the water level lowering by the scram is moderated by the increasing tendency of the water level. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. Loss of main and auxiliary feedwater event at the Davis-Besse Plant on June 9, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    On June 9, 1985, Toledo Edison Company's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Plant, located in Ottawa County, Ohio, experienced a partial loss of feedwater while the plant was operating at 90% power. Following a reactor trip, a loss of all feedwater occurred. The event involved a number of equipment malfunctions and extensive operator actions, including operator actions outside the control room. Several operator errors also occurred during the event. This report documents the findings of an NRC Team sent to Davis-Besse by the NRC Executive Director for Operations in conformance with the staff-proposed Incident Investigation Program

  16. Accident sequences evaluation using SFATs for low power and shutdown operation of pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chansoo; Chung, Chang-Hyun; Yang, Huichang

    2004-01-01

    To maintain the level of defense-in-depth safety of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) during LP/SD operation, the qualitative risk evaluation methods such as Safety Function Assessment Trees (SFATs) are required. Therefore SFATs are suggested to assess and manage the PHWR safety in LP/SD. Before this study, safety functions of PHWR were classified into 7 groups; Reactivity Control, Core Cooling, Secondary Heat Removal, Primary Heat Transport Inventory, Essential Electrical Power, Cooling Water, and Containment Integrity. The SFATs for PHWR LP/SD operations were developed along with the Plant Outage Status (POS) variation, and totally 38 SFATs were developed for Wolsung Unit 2. For the verification of SFATs logics developed, top 5 accident sequences those contribute the CDF of PHWR were selected, and plant safety status were evaluated for those accident sequences. Accident sequences such as DCC-4 (Dual Control Computer Failure), CL4-16 (Total Loss of Class IV Power), and FWPV-11 (Loss of Feedwater Supply to SG due to Failure of Pumps/Values) were included. In this research the evaluation of plant safety status by accident sequences using SFATs and the verification of the SFATs were performed. Through the verification of SFAT logics, the enhancements to the internal logics of the SFATs were made, and the dependencies between safety systems and support systems were considered. It is expected the defense-in-depth evaluation model of PHW just as SFATs can be utilized in the configuration risk management program (CRMP) development and improve technical specifications development for Korean PHWRs. (author)

  17. The steam generating heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented on the evolution of the SGHWR concept by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and the production of early commercial designs, together with later development by the Design and Construction Companies. This is followed by a description of the current commercial design. Possible future developments are suggested. The many advantageous features of the concept are mentioned with a view to supporting optimism for the future of the system. Headings include the following: safety criteria and risk assessment; emergency core cooling system design and development; protective systems; reactor coolant system; reactivity control; off-load refuelling; pressure containment; 'fence' header coolant circuit design; feed water injection; continuous spray cooling; low pressure cooling systems for residual heat removal during refuelling; high pressure cooling system for guaranteed feed water supply; auxiliary systems; structural materials; calandria and neutron shields; fuel element development; alternative loop circuit design; future developments (use of hydraulic diodes to provide a substantial reverse flow resistance by the generation of a vortex; multi-drum and multi-pump schemes; refuelling alternatives; coolant circuit inversion; use of superheat channels). (U.K.)

  18. Graphite-water steam-generating reactor in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollezhal, N A [AN SSSR, Moscow

    1981-10-01

    One of the types of power reactor used in the USSR is the graphite-water steam-generating reactor RBMK. This produces saturated steam at a pressure of 7MPa. Reactors giving 1GWe each have been installed at the Leningrad, Kursk, Chernobyl and other power stations. Further stations using reactors of this type are being built. A description is given of the fuel element design, and of the layout of the plant. The main characteristics of RBMK reactors using fuel of rated and higher enrichment are listed.

  19. Application of the integrated analysis of safety (IAS) to sequences of Total loss of feed water in a PWR Reactor; Aplicacion del Analisis Integrado de Seguridad (ISA) a Secuencias de Perdidas Total de Agua de Alimentacion en un Reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Chamorro, P.; Gallego Diaz, C.

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to show the current status of the implementation of integrated analysis of safety (IAS) methodology and its SCAIS associated tool (system of simulation codes for IAS) to the sequence analysis of total loss of feedwater in a PWR reactor model Westinghouse of three loops with large, dry containment.

  20. Future directions in boiling water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.R.; Hucik, S.A.; Duncan, J.D.; Sweeney, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is being developed by an international team of BWR manufacturers to respond to worldwide utility needs in the 1990's. Major objectives of the ABWR program are design simplification; improved safety and reliability; reduced construction, fuel and operating costs; improved maneuver-ability; and reduced occupational exposure and radwaste. The ABWR incorporates the best proven features from BWR designs in Europe, Japan and the United States and application of leading edge technology. Key features of the ABWR are internal recirculation pumps; fine-motion, electrohydraulic control rod drives; digital control and instrumentation; multiplexed, fiber optic cabling netwoek; pressure suppression containment with horizontal vents; cylindrical reinforced concrete containment; structural integration of the containment and reactor building; severe accident capability; state-of-the-art fuel; advanced trubine/generator with 52'' last stage buckets; and advanced radwaste technology. The ABWR is ready for lead plant application in Japan, where it is being developed as the next generation Japan standard BWR under the guidance and leadership of The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. and a group of Japanese BWR utilities. In the United States it is being adapted to the needs of US utilities through the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced LWR Requirements Program, and is being reviewed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for certification as a preapproved US standard BWR under the US Department of Energy's ALWR Design Verification Program. These cooperative Japanese and US programs are expected to establish the ABWR as a world class BWR for the 1990's...... (author)

  1. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  2. Research and development of super light water reactors and super fast reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Morooka, S.; Yamakawa, M.; Ishiwatari, Y.; Ikejiri, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Muroya, Y.; Terai, T.; Sasaki, K.; Mori, H.; Hamamoto, Y.; Okumura, K.; Kugo, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ezato, K.; Akasaka, N.; Hotta, A.

    2011-01-01

    Super Light Water Reactors (Super LWR) and Super Fast Reactors (Super FR) are the supercritical- pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWR) that are developed by the research group of University of Tokyo since 1989 and now jointly under development with the researchers of Waseda University, University of Tokyo and other organizations in Japan. The principle of the reactor concept development, the results of the past Super LWR and Super FR R&D as well as the R&D program of the Super FR second phase project are described. (author)

  3. Uranium utilization of light water cooled reactors and fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, Timm

    1991-08-01

    The better uranium utilization of fast breeder reactors as compared with water cooled reactors is one argument in favour of the breeder introduction. This report tries to quantify this difference. It gives a generally valid formalism for the uranium utilization as a function of the fuel burnup, the conversion rate, fuel cycle losses and the fuel enrichment. On the basis of realistic assumptions, the ratio between the utilizations of breeder reactors to that of light water cooled reactors (LWR) amounts to 180 for the open LWR cycle and 100 in case of plutonium recycling in LWRs

  4. Auxiliary water supply device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In the device of the present invention, a cooling condensation means is disposed to a steam discharge channel of a turbine for driving pumps to directly return condensates to the reactor, so that the temperature of the suppression pool water is not elevated. Namely, the cooling condensation means for discharged steams is disposed to the discharge channel of the turbine. The condensate channel from the cooling condensation means is connected to a sucking side of the turbine driving pump. With such a constitution, when the reactor is isolated from a main steam system, reactor scram is conducted. Although the reactor water level is lowered by the reactor scram, the lowering of the reactor water level is prevented by supplementing cooling water by the turbine driving pump using steams generated in the reactor as a power source. The discharged steams after driving the turbine are cooled and condensated by the cooling condensation means by way of the discharge channel and returned to the reactor again by way of the condensate channel. With such procedures, since the temperature of suppression pool water is not elevated, there is no need to operate other cooling systems. In addition, auxiliary water can be supplied for a long period of time. (I.S.)

  5. The effect of heavy water reactors and liquid fuel reactors on the long-term development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.; Wiechers, W.K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the rates at which various combinations of power reactor types are installed on the long-range (to the year 2040) uranium and plutonium inventory requirements are examined. Consideration is given to light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heavy water reactors, and thermal breeder reactors, in various combinations, and assuming alternatively a 3% and a 5% growth in energy demand

  6. Transmutation of Americium in Light and Heavy Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee (Knoxville)/ORNL, Tennessee (United States)

    2009-06-15

    There is interest worldwide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In most disposal scenarios the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the capacity of these sites. On the long term, this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, and a major contributor 100 to 1000 years after discharge from the reactor is {sup 241}Am. One possible approach to reducing the decay-heat burden is to reprocess spent reactor fuel and use thermal spectrum reactors to 'burn' the Am nuclides. The viability of this approach is dependent upon the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic composition of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The currently available thermal spectrum reactor options include light water-reactors (LWRs) and heavy-water reactors (HWRs) such as the CANDU{sup R} designs. In addition, as a result of the recycle of spent LWR fuel, there would be a considerable amount of potential recycled uranium (RU). One proposed solution for the recycled uranium is to use it as fuel in Candu reactors. This paper investigates the possibilities of transmuting americium in 'spiked' bundles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Transmutation of Am in Candu reactors is also examined. One scenario studies a full core fuelled with homogeneous bundles of Am mixed with recycled uranium, while a second scenario places Am in an inert matrix in target channels in a Candu reactor, with the rest of the reactor fuelled with RU. A comparison of the transmutation in LWRs and HWRs is made, in terms of the fraction of Am that is transmuted and the impact on the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel. CANDU{sup R} is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (authors)

  7. Some local dilution transient in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity accidents are important in the safety analysis of a pressurized water reactor. In this anlysis ejected control rod, steam line break, start of in-active loop and boron dilution accidents are usually dealt with. However, in the analysis is not included what reactivity excursions might happen when a zone,depleted of boron passes the reactor core. This thesis investigates during what operation and emergency conditions diluted zones might exist in a pressurized water reactor and what should be the maximum volumes for then. The limiting transport means are also established in terms of reactivty addition, for the depleted zones. In order to describe the complicated mixing process in the reactor vessel during such a transportation, a typical 3-loop reactor vessel has been modulated by means of TRAC-PF1's VESSEL component. Three cases have been analysed. In the first case the reactor is in a cold condition and the ractor coolant has boron concentration of 2000 ppm. To the reactor vessel is injected an clean water colume of 14 m 3 . In the two other cases the reactor is close to hot shutdown and borated to 850 ppm. To the reactor vessel is added 41 and 13 m 3 clean water, respectively. In the thesis is shown what spatial distribution the depleted zone gets when passing through the reactor vessel in the three cases. The boron concentration in the first case did not decrease the values which would bring the reactor to critical condition. For case two was shown by means of TRAC's point kinetics model that the reactor reaches prompt criticality after 16.03 seconds after starting of the reactor coolant pump. Another prompt criticality occured two seconds later. The total energy developed during the two power escalations were about 55 GJ. A comparision with the criteria used to evaluate the ejected control rod reactivity transient showed that none of these criteria were exceeded. (64 figs.)

  8. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material. 2. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development. And the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21, 2nd edition, 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2005). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23, 2nd edition, 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2005). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  9. Alternative water injection device to reactor equipment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masahiro.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention injects water to the reactor and the reactor container continuously for a long period of time for preventing occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR type reactor and maintaining the integrity of the reactor container even if the accident should occur. Namely, diesel-driven pumps disposed near heat exchangers of a reactor after-heat removing system (RHR) are operated before the reactor is damaged by the after heat to cause reactor melting. A sucking valve disposed to a pump sucking pipeline connecting a secondary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and the diesel driving pump is opened. A discharge valve disposed to a pump discharge pipeline connecting a primary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and the diesel driving pump is opened. With such procedures, sea water is introduced from a sea water taking port through the top end of the secondary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger and water is injected into the inside of the pressure vessel or the reactor container by way of the primary pipeline of the RHR heat exchanger. As a result, the reactor core is prevented from melting even upon occurrence of a severe accident. (I.S.)

  10. Calculation of photon dose for Dalat research reactor in case of loss of reactor tank water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2007-01-01

    Photon sources of actinides and fission products were estimated by ORIGEN2 code with the modified cross-section library for Dalat research reactor (DRR) using new cross-section generated by WIMS-ANL code. Photon sources of reactor tank water calculated from the experimental data. MCNP4C2 with available non-analog Monte Carlo model and ANSI/ANL-6.1.1-1977 flux-to-dose factors were used for dose estimation. The agreement between calculation results and those of measurements showed that the methods and models used to get photon sources and dose were acceptable. In case the reactor water totally leaks out from the reactor tank, the calculated dose is very high at the top of reactor tank while still low in control room. In the reactor hall, the operation staffs can access for emergency works but with time limits. (author)

  11. Transient simulation of feedwater vaporization during a DBA LOP/LOCA using RELAP5/MOD3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrell, J.R.; Fuller, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (GGNS) are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. The original design and testing requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. Given this condition, the appropriate testing criteria would be based on air with a relatively tight allowable limit. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leakage flow exists from the reactor vessel to the condenser through the feedwater piping during the reactor vessel blowdown phase. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves

  12. Grey water treatment in UASB reactor at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmitwalli, T A; Shalabi, M; Wendland, C; Otterpohl, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of grey water treatment in a UASB reactor was investigated. The batch recirculation experiments showed that a maximum total-COD removal of 79% can be obtained in grey-water treatment in the UASB reactor. The continuous operational results of a UASB reactor treating grey water at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20, 12 and 8 hours at ambient temperature (14-24 degrees C) showed that 31-41% of total COD was removed. These results were significantly higher than that achieved by a septic tank (11-14%), the most common system for grey water pre-treatment, at HRT of 2-3 days. The relatively lower removal of total COD in the UASB reactor was mainly due to a higher amount of colloidal COD in the grey water, as compared to that reported in domestic wastewater. The grey water had a limited amount of nitrogen, which was mainly in particulate form (80-90%). The UASB reactor removed 24-36% and 10-24% of total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively, in the grey water, due to particulate nutrients removal by physical entrapment and sedimentation. The sludge characteristics of the UASB reactor showed that the system had stable performance and the recommended HRT for the reactor is 12 hours.

  13. 'Better feedwater quality through heat exchange equipment renovation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouzenc, C.

    2002-01-01

    In a fossil-fired or nuclear steam power plant, the water secondary circuit is a critical part of its thermodynamic cycle, as it achieves conditioning, pressurizing and heating of the condensate to match the conditions required at the steam generator inlet. Furthermore, the power plant electrical output and efficiency depend on availability and performances of each component of this secondary circuit from the condenser to the steam generator. Erosion and corrosion phenomena are at the origin of most significant failures in these components and related interconnecting systems. Feedwater chemistry is, together with the selection of materials and optimization of fluid velocities, one of the key levers to protect, as efficiently as possible, the components of the water secondary. (authors)

  14. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Organic Impurities in Feedwater of a Heat-Recovery Steam Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichirov, A. A.; Chichirova, N. D.; Filimonova, A. A.; Gafiatullina, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, combined-cycle units with heat-recovery steam generators have been constructed and commissioned extensively in the European part of Russia. By the example of the Kazan Cogeneration Power Station no. 3 (TETs-3), an affiliate of JSC TGK-16, the specific problems for most power stations with combined-cycle power units that stem from an elevated content of organic impurities in the feedwater of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) are examined. The HRSG is fed with highly demineralized water in which the content of organic carbon is also standardized. It is assumed that the demineralized water coming from the chemical water treatment department of TETs-3 will be used. Natural water from the Volga River is treated to produce demineralized water. The results of a preliminary analysis of the feedwater demonstrate that certain quality indices, principally, the total organic carbon, are above the standard values. Hence, a comprehensive investigation of the feedwater for organic impurities was performed, which included determination of their structure using IR and UV spectroscopy techniques, potentiometric measurements, and element analysis; determination of physical and chemical properties of organic impurities; and prediction of their behavior in the HRSG. The estimation of the total organic carbon revealed that it exceeded the standard values in all sources of water comprising the feedwater for the HRSG. The extracted impurities were humic substances, namely, a mixture of humic and fulvic acids in a 20 : 80 ratio, respectively. In addition, an analysis was performed of water samples taken at all intermediate stages of water treatment to study the behavior of organic substances in different water treatment processes. An analysis of removal of the humus substances in sections of the water treatment plant yielded the concentration of organic substances on the HRSG condensate. This was from 100 to 150 μg/dm3. Organic impurities in boiler water can induce

  15. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the North Anna nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-10-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. North Anna was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the North Anna plant

  16. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Sloan, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Palo Verde was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Palo Verde plants

  17. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the McGuire nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1994-05-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. McGuire was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the McGuire plant

  18. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant

  19. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E.; Bumgardner, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. The information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Maine Yankee was selected as one of a series of plants for study. ne product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Maine Yankee plant

  20. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Byron and Braidwood nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-07-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Byron and Braidwood were selected for the fourth study in this program. The produce of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plants and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Byron/Braidwood plants. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, N.E.; Lloyd, R.C.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Garner, L.W.

    1993-08-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. H. B. Robinson was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the H. B. Robinson plant

  2. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Point Beach nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Vehec, T.A.

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Point Beach was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRS. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Point Beach plant

  3. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, R.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E.

    1991-09-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Ginna was selected as the eighth plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Ginna plant. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  5. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,

  6. Pressurized water reactor with a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1979-01-01

    The core barrel is suspended from a flange by means of a grid. The coolant enters the barrel from below through the grid. In order to get a uniform flow over the reactor core there is provided for a guiding device below the grid. It consists of a cylindrical shell with borings uniformly distributed around the shell as well as fins on the inner surface of the shell and slots at the bottom facing the pressure vessel. (GL) [de

  7. Auxiliary equipment for cooling water in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Yasuhiro; Sakairi, Toshiaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effectively make use of pressure energy of reactor water, which has heretofore been discarded, to enable supply of emergency power supply of high reliability and to prevent spreading of environmental contamination. Structure: Sea water pumped by a sea water supply pump is fed to a heat exchanger. Reactor water carried through piping on the side to be cooled is removed in heat by the heat exchanger to be cooled and returned, and then again returned to the reactor. On the other hand, sea water heated by the heat exchanger is fed to a water wheel to drive the water wheel, after which it is discharged into a discharging path. A generator may be directly connected to the water wheel to use the electricity generated by the generator as the emergency power source. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Computerized cost model for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneely, T.K.; Tabata, Hiroaki; Labourey, P.

    1999-01-01

    A computerized cost model has been developed in order to allow utility users to improve their familiarity with pressurized water reactor overnight capital costs and the various factors which influence them. This model organizes its cost data in the standard format of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB), and encapsulates simplified relationships between physical plant design information and capital cost information in a computer code. Model calculations are initiated from a base case, which was established using traditional cost calculation techniques. The user enters a set of plant design parameters, selected to allow consideration of plant models throughout the typical three- and four-loop PWR power range, and for plant sites in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Calculation of the new capital cost is then performed in a very brief time. The presentation of the program's output allows comparison of various cases with each other or with separately calculated baseline data. The user can start at a high level summary, and by selecting values of interest on a display grid show progressively more and more detailed information, including links to background information such as individual cost driver accounts and physical plant variables for each case. Graphical presentation of the comparison summaries is provided, and the numerical results may be exported to a spreadsheet for further processing. (author)

  9. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  10. Material and water chemistry for a ferritic reactor coolant system in pressure water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieding, L.

    1979-04-01

    The use of unplated, low-alloy steels in a boric acid controlled PWR is not considered possible without changing the water conditions during the start-up and shut-down periods of the reactor. The significant pH reduction of the water due to boric acid during these periods most probably leads to damage of the magnetite protective layers followed by selective corrosion. As this highly important process has not been sufficiently evaluated with respect to our specific application problem, more detailed information will be necessary. KWU test facilities provide a means of performing such tests. In order to avoid corrosion attack during the above operating conditions, an inhibition of the water with 7 Li-borate is recommended which, however, will amount to approx. DM 60.000,-- per period of use. (orig.) [de

  11. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Topics that have been investigated during this year include (1) SCC of A533-Gr B steel used in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of Type 347 and CF-3 cast duplex stainless steels in simulated BWR water. Crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests were performed on a composite A533-Gr B/Inconel-182 specimen in which the stress corrosion crack in the Inconel-182 weld metal penetrated and grew into the A533-Gr B steel. CGR tests were also conducted on conventional (unplated) and nickel- or gold-plated A533-Gr B specimens to provide insight into whether the nature of the surface layer on the low-alloy steel, either oxide corrosion products or a noble metal, influences the overall SCC process. CGR data on the A533-Gr B specimens were compared with the fatigue crack reference curves in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix A. Fatigue tests were conducted on Type 316NG SS in air and simulated BWR water at low strain ranges and frequencies to better establish margins in the ASME Code Section III Fatigue Design Curves. CGR tests were also conducted on specimens of Type 347 SS with different heat-treatment conditions, and a specimen of CF-3 cast stainless steel with a ferrite content of 15.6%. The results were compared with previous data on another heat of Type 347 SS, which was very resistant to SCC, and a CF-3M steel with a ferrite content of 5%. 37 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs

  12. RETRAN sensitivity studies of light water reactor transients. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, N.S.; Gose, G.C.; Harrison, J.F.; Sawtelle, G.R.

    1977-06-01

    This report presents the results of sensitivity studies performed using the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient analysis code to identify critical parameters and models which influence light water reactor transient predictions. Various plant transients for both boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors are examined. These studies represent the first detailed evaluation of the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient code capability in predicting a variety of plant transient responses. The wide range of transients analyzed in conjunction with the parameter and modeling studies performed identify several sensitive areas as well as areas requiring future study and model development

  13. Reactivity requirements and safety systems for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kati, S.L.; Rustagi, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The natural uranium fuelled pressurised heavy water reactors are currently being installed in India. In the design of nuclear reactors, adequate attention has to be given to the safety systems. In recent years, several design modifications having bearing on safety, in the reactor processes, protective and containment systems have been made. These have resulted either from new trends in safety and reliability standards or as a result of feed-back from operating reactors of this type. The significant areas of modifications that have been introduced in the design of Indian PHWR's are: sophisticated theoretical modelling of reactor accidents, reactivity control, two independent fast acting systems, full double containment and improved post-accident depressurisation and building clean-up. This paper brings out the evolution of design of safety systems for heavy water reactors. A short review of safety systems which have been used in different heavy water reactors, of varying sizes, has been made. In particular, the safety systems selected for the latest 235 MWe twin reactor unit station in Narora, in Northern India, have been discussed in detail. Research and Development efforts made in this connection are discussed. The experience of design and operation of the systems in Rajasthan and Kalpakkam reactors has also been outlined

  14. Steam drum level dynamics in a multiple loop natural circulation system of a pressure-tube type boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vikas; Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We have highlighted the problem of drum level dynamics in a multiple loop type NC system using RELAP5 code. → The need of interconnections in steam and liquid spaces close to drum is established. → The steam space interconnections equalize pressure and liquid space interconnections equalize level. → With this scheme, the system can withstand anomalous conditions. → However, the controller is found to be inevitable for inventory balance. - Abstract: Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a pressure tube type boiling water reactor employing natural circulation as the mode of heat removal under all the operating conditions. Main heat transport system (MHTS) of AHWR is essentially a multi-loop natural circulation system with all the loops connected to each other. Each loop of MHTS has a steam drum that provides for gravity based steam-water separation. Steam drum level is a very critical parameter especially in multi-loop natural circulation systems as large departures from the set point may lead to ineffective separation of steam-water or may affect the driving head. However, such a system is susceptible to steam drum level anomalies under postulated asymmetrical operating conditions among the different quadrants of the core like feedwater flow distribution anomaly among the steam drums or power anomaly among the core quadrants. Analyses were carried out to probe such scenarios and unravel the underlying dynamics of steam drum level using system code RELAP5/Mod3.2. In addition, a scheme to obviate such problem in a passive manner without dependence on level controller was examined. It was concluded that steam drums need to be connected in the liquid as well as steam space to make the system tolerant to asymmetrical operating conditions.

  15. Study of deposited crud composition on fuel surfaces in the environment of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) of a Boiling Water Reactor at Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Su, Te-Yen; Wen, Tung-Jen; Men, Lee-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper aimed at the characterization of metallic composition and surface analysis on the crud of fuel rods for unit-1 of BWR-4 at Nuclear Power Plant. The inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and the gamma spectrometry were carried out to analyze the corrosion product distributions and to determine the elemental compositions along the fuel rod under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) switched from normal water chemistry (NWC) of reactor coolant in this study. Most of the crud consisted of the flakes and irregular shapes via SEM morphology. The loosely adherent oxide layer was mostly composed of hematite (α- Fe 2 O 3 ) with amorphous iron oxides by XRD results. The average deposited amounts of crud was the order of 0.5 mg/cm 2 , indicating that the fuel surface of this plant under HWC environment appeared to be one with the lower crud deposition in terms of low iron level of feedwater. It also showed no significant difference in comparison with NWC condition. (authors)

  16. Possibility of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, B.; Mihajlovic, A.; Drobnjak, Dj.

    1965-01-01

    The review of metal uranium properties including irradiation in the reactor core lead to the following conclusions. Using metal uranium in the heavy water reactors would be favourable from economic point of view for ita high density, i.e. high conversion factor and low cost of fuel elements fabrication. Most important constraint is swelling during burnup and corrosion

  17. Calculations for accidents in water reactors during operation at power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, H.; Dutraive, P.; Fabrega, S.; Millot, J.P.

    1976-07-01

    The behaviour of a water reactor on an accident occurring as the reactor is normally operated at power may be calculated through the computer code detailed in this article. Reactivity accidents, loss of coolant ones and power over-running ones are reviewed. (author)

  18. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Wu, P.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  19. Core design concepts for high performance light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Light water reactors operated under supercritical pressure conditions have been selected as one of the promising future reactor concepts to be studied by the Generation IV International Forum. Whereas the steam cycle of such reactors can be derived from modern fossil fired power plants, the reactor itself, and in particular the reactor core, still need to be developed. Different core design concepts shall be described here to outline the strategy. A first option for near future applications is a pressurized water reactor with 380 .deg. C core exit temperature, having a closed primary loop and achieving 2% pts. higher net efficiency and 24% higher specific turbine power than latest pressurized water reactors. More efficiency and turbine power can be gained from core exit temperatures around 500 .deg. C, which require a multi step heat up process in the core with intermediate coolant mixing, achieving up to 44% net efficiency. The paper summarizes different core and assembly design approaches which have been studied recently for such High Performance Light Water Reactors

  20. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  1. Status of control assembly materials in Indian water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, V.G.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    India's present operating water cooled power reactors comprise boiling water reactors of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) and pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) at Kota (RAPS), Kalpakkam (MAPS), Narora (NAPS) and Kakrapara (KAPS). Boiling water reactors of TAPS use boron carbide control blades for control of power as well as for shut down (scram). PHWRs use boron steel and cobalt absorber rods for power control and Cd sandwiched shut off rods (primary shut down system) and liquid poison rods (secondary shut down system) for shut down. In TAPS, Gadolinium rods (burnable poison rods) are also incorporated in fuel assembly for flux flattening. Boron carbide control blades and Gadolinium rods for TAPS, cobalt absorber rods and shut down assemblies for PHWRs are fabricated indigenously. Considerable development work was carried out for evolving material specifications, component and assembly drawings, and fabrication processes. Details of various control and shut off assemblies being fabricated currently are highlighted in the paper. (author)

  2. Brief summary of water reactor fuel activities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongyue, Zhang [China Inst. of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Beijing (China)

    1997-12-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the water reactor fuel activities in China describing: nuclear power development program and growth forecast; fuel performance;fuel performance code improvement; research and development plans. 1 ref., 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  3. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  4. Control of feedwater composition of BWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturla, P.; D'Anna, A.; Borgese, D.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion behaviour of fuel element cladding, cycle structural materials and dose rate increase are relevant to physico-chemical characteristics of process coolants and to adopted operational conditions. A careful control of cycle chemistry, during loading and shutdown periods, is necessary to verify material choices, the polishing system and chemistry specifications. For this purpose ENEL carried out some preliminary experimental tests employing continuous control system and samples for specific analytical determinations. The cycle points checked during about two months were: main condensate; condensate after polishing system; outlet of low pressure heathers; final feedwater; inlet and outlet of clean-up system; drains to condenser. The physico-chemical analysis were related to corrosion product levels (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co) and water chemistry (pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen etc.). The preliminary results allow to express some considerations about sampling procedures, detection limits and reliability of analytical employed methods. The acquisition data time and some morphological oxide pictures are also showed. (author)

  5. Leak Detection of High Pressure Feedwater Heater Using Empirical Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Song Kyu; Kim, Eun Kee; Heo, Gyun Young; An, Sang Ha

    2009-01-01

    Even small leak from tube side or pass partition within the high pressure feedwater heater (HPFWH) causes a significant deficiency in its performance. Plant operation under the HPFWH leak condition for long time will result in cost increase. Tube side leak within HPFWH can produce the high velocity jet of water and it can cause neighboring tube failures. However, most of plants are being operated without any information for internal leaks of HPFWH, even though it is prone to be damaged under high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. Leaks from tubes and/or pass partition of HPFWH occurred in many nuclear power plants, for example, Mihama PS-2, Takahama PS-2 and Point Beach Nuclear Plant Unit 1. If the internal leaks of HPFWH are monitored, the cost can be reduced by inexpensive repairs relative to loss in performance and moreover plant shutdown as well as further tube damages can be prevented

  6. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David I.; Ade, Brian J.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Leichliter, Katrina J.; Dixon, David D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  7. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density

  8. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  9. Measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products in nuclear reactor coolant water during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the detection and measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products contained in nuclear reactor coolant water while the reactor is operating. The method is limited to the measurement of the delayed neutron-emitting bromine isotope of mass 87 and the delayed neutron-emitting iodine isotope of mass 137. The other delayed neutron-emitting fission products cannot be accurately distinguished from nitrogen 17, which is formed under some reactor conditions by neutron irradiation of the coolant water molecules. The method includes a description of significance, measurement variables, interferences, apparatus, sampling, calibration, standardization, sample measurement procedures, system efficiency determination, calculations, and precision

  10. Analysis of an accelerator-driven subcritical light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Wakker, P.H.; Wetering, T.F.H. van de; Verkooijen, A.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the basic characteristics of an accelerator-driven light water reactor has been made. The waste in the nuclear fuel cycle is considerably less than in the light water reactor open fuel cycle. This is mainly caused by the use of equilibrium nuclear fuel in the reactor. The accelerator enables the use of a fuel composition with infinite multiplication factor k ∞ < 1. The main problem of the use of this type of fuel is the strongly peaked flux distribution in the reactor core. A simple analytical model shows that a large core is needed with a high peak power factor in order to generate net electric energy. The fuel in the outer regions of the reactor core is used very poorly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. The Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    An account is given of the SGHWR, the prototype of which was built by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at Winfrith, under the following headings: Introduction; origin of the SGHWR concept; conceptual design (choice of reactor type, steam cycle, reactor coolant system, nuclear behaviour, fuel design, core design, and protective, auxiliary and containment systems); operation and control (integrity of core cooling, reactivity control, power trimming, long term reactivity control, xenon override, load following, power shaping, spatial stability control, void coefficient); protective systems (breached coolant circuit trip, intact coolant circuits trip, power set-back trip); dynamic characteristics; reactor control; station control (decoupled control system, coupled control system, rate of response); Winfrith prototype (design and safety philosophy, conceptual features and parameters, reactor coolant system, protective systems, emergency core cooling, core structure, fuel design, vented containment). (U.K.)

  12. Pressurised water reactor fuel management using PANTHER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.; Knight, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the integration of Nuclear Electric's reactor physics code PANTHER with an automatic optimisation procedure designed to search for optimal PWR reload cores and assesses its performance. (Author)

  13. Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgilio, M.J.

    1980-09-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (W-STS) is a generic document prepared by the U.S. NRC for use in the licensing process of current Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors. The W-STS sets forth the Limits, Operating Conditions and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth in by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. This document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  14. Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vito, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors (CE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current Combustion Engineering Pressurized Water Reactors. The CE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  15. The future 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor has been developed. The design is based on the twin 540 MWe reactors at Tarapur of which the first unit has been made critical in less than 5 years from construction commencement. In the 700 MWe design boiling of the coolant, to a limited extent, has been allowed near the channel exit. While making the plant layout more compact, emphasis has been on constructability. Saving in capital cost of about 15%, over the present units, is expected. The paper describes salient design features of 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

  16. Lessons learned from the SONGS Unit 1 water hammer event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1987-01-01

    On November 21, 1985, a water hammer event occurred in horizontal feedwater line B at San Onofre Nuclear Generation Site (SONGS) Unit 1. The SONGS Unit 1 is a three-loop pressurized water reactor designed by Westinghouse Electric Corp. The event was initiated by a differential current trip on the bus of auxiliary transformer C. The root cause of the event was a simultaneous failure of five check valves in the feedwater system. Two of them are located downstream of the feedwater pump, and three of them are located further downstream and on the lines to the steam generators. The failure mechanism was determined to be flow-induced vibration, which caused repeated impact between the disk stud and the disk stop. The water hammer occurred in feedwater line B during the refilling of feedwater lines A, B, and C with auxiliary feedwater. The thermal-hydraulic process to initiate the water hammer and the reason that the water hammer only happened in line B have been fully investigated and explained. A root cause analysis after the event was prompted to answer the following two questions: (1) why did these five check valves fail at that time and not in the preceding 15 yr? (2) why did only these five check valves fail? The scope of the root cause analysis involves an investigation of the valve vibration characteristics, plant operation history, and the maintenance history of the valves. The paper answers these two questions, after a brief study of the vibration characteristics of a check valve

  17. System Study: Auxiliary Feedwater 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the AFW results.

  18. Device for controlling water supply to nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshio.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To smoothly control automatic water supply for realizing stable operation of a nuclear reactor by providing a flow rate limiting signal selection circuit and a preferential circuit in a water supply control device for a nuclear reactor wherein the speed of a recirculation pump may be changed in two-steps. Structure: Opening angle signals for a water supply regulating valve are controlled by a nuclear reactor water level signal, a vapor flow rate signal and a supplied water flow rate signal through an adder and an adjuster in response to a predetermined water level setting signal. When the water in the reactor is maintained at a predetermined level, a selection circuit receives a water pump condition signal for selecting one of the signals from a supplied water rate limiting signal generator generating signals for indicating whether one or two water supply pumps are operated. A low value preferential circuit passes the lower of the values generated from the selection circuit and the adder. The selection circuit receives a recirculation pump condition signal and selects either one of the signals from the supplied water flow rate limiting signal generator operated at high speed or low speed. A high value preferential circuit passes the higher value

  19. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Analysis of thermal fatigue events in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Thermal fatigue events, which may cause shutdown of nuclear power stations by wall-through-crack of pipes of RCRB (Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary), are reported by licensees in foreign countries as well as in Japan. In this paper, thermal fatigue events reported in anomalies reports of light water reactors inside and outside of Japan are investigated. As a result, it is clarified that the thermal fatigue events can be classified in seven patterns by their characteristics, and the trend of the occurrence of the events in PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors) has stronger co-relation to operation hours than that in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors). Also, it is concluded that precise identification of locations where thermal fatigue occurs and its monitoring are important to prevent the thermal fatigue events by aging or miss modification. (author)

  1. Sea water take-up facility for cooling reactor auxiliary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Noriko; Mizutani, Akira; Hirako, Shizuka; Uchiyama, Yuichi; Oda, Atsushi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides an improvement of a cooling sea water take-up facility for cooling auxiliary equipments of nuclear power plant. Namely, an existent sea water take-up facility for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments has at least two circulation water systems and three independent sea water systems for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments. In this case, a communication water channel is disposed, which connects the three independent sea water systems for cooling reactor auxiliary equipments mutually by an opening/closing operation of a flow channel partitioning device. With such a constitution, even when any combination of two systems among the three circulation water systems is in inspection at the same time, one system for cooling the reactor auxiliary equipments can be kept operated, and one system is kept in a stand-by state by the communication water channel upon periodical inspection of water take-up facility for cooling the auxiliary equipments. As a result, the sea water take-up facility for cooling auxiliary equipments of the present invention have operation efficiency higher than that of a conventional case while keeping the function and safety at the same level as in the conventional case. (I.S.)

  2. Automatic radiometric analyzer for nuclides in nuclear reactor water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masao; Tokoi, Hiromi; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Urata, Megumu.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the processing time and improve the accuracy for processing water sampled from reactor coolants, as well as simplify the mechanism of the apparatus. Constitution: Reactor water sampled from reactor coolants, after filtered out with insoluble solids, is stored in an ion exchange container. Thereafter, the amount of ion exchanged water is regulated by the coarse measurement of radioactivity concentration by a monitor. Further, ion exchange resins are charged from a resin tank, agitated by gases and dispersed into sampled water. Then, all of the radioactive iodines contained in the sample are collected in the resins. The resins are recovered through evacuation into instrumenting vessels for measurement of radioactivity. Since ion exchange resins are dispersed in the sampled water in this system, the processing time can be shortened. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  5. Containment for small pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, W.C.; Marda, R.S.; Smith, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox Company has prepared studies under ERDA contract of small and intermediate size (313, 365 and 1200 MWt) PWR reactor plants, for industrial cogeneration or electric power generation. Studies and experience with nuclear plants in this size range indicate unfavorable economics. To offset this disadvantage, modular characteristics of an integral reactor and close-coupled vapor suppression containment have been exploited to shorten construction schedules and reduce construction costs. The resulting compact reactor/containment complex is illustrated. Economic studies to date indicate that the containment design and the innovative construction techniques developed to shorten erection schedules have been important factors in reducing estimated project costs, thus potentially making such smaller plants competetive with competing energy sources

  6. Pressurized heavy-water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, L.; Wilson, R.

    1977-09-01

    CANDU-PWR type reactors routinely release small amounts of radioactive liquids and gases and large quantities of low-grade waste heat. Radioactive emissions are usually below 1% of the derived release limits based on ICRP limits. Waste heat is common to all power plants and is not foreseen as a problem in Canadian conditions. Risk analysis shows a very low accident probability for CANDU type reactors. Multiple barriers to release of radionuclides, quality assurance, control, and inspection, containment systems, the shutdown system, the ECCS, and leak-before-break design, would all combine to mitigate the effects of an accident. (E.C.B.)

  7. Method of controlling power of a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To adjust a level of heavy water in a region of reflection body to control power in a heavy water reactor. Structure: The interior of a core tank filled with heavy water is divided by a partition into a core heavy water region and a reflection body region formed by surrounding the core heavy water region, and a level of heavy water within the reflection body region is adjusted to control power. Preferably, it is desirable to communicate the core heavy water region with the reflection body heavy water region at their lower portion, and gas pressure applied to an upper portion within at least one of said regions is adjusted to adjust the level of heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region. Thereby, the heavy water within the reflection body heavy water region may be introduced into the core region, thus requiring no tank which stores heavy water within the reflection body region. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) which improve fuel utilization in light water reactors (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, H.C.; Freeman, L.B.

    1981-08-01

    This report surveys reactor core design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor which make possible improved fuel utilization in light water reactor systems and breeding with the uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The impact of developing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle on utilization of nuclear fuel resources is discussed. The specific core design features related to improved fuel utilization and breeding which have been implemented in the Shippingport LWBR core are presented. These design features include a seed-blanket module with movable fuel for reactivity control, radial and axial reflcetor regions, low hafnium Zircaloy for fuel element cladding and structurals, and a closely spaced fuel rod lattice. Also included is a discussion of several design modifications which could further improve fuel utilization in future light water reactor systems. These include further development of movable fuel control, use of Zircaloy fuel rod support grids, and fuel element design modifications

  9. Advantages of liquid fluoride thorium reactor in comparison with light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul, E-mail: anizazainul@gmail.com; Majid, Amran Ab.; Al-Areqi, Wadeeah M. [Nuclear Science Program, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) is an innovative design for the thermal breeder reactor that has important potential benefits over the traditional reactor design. LFTR is fluoride based liquid fuel, that use the thorium dissolved in salt mixture of lithium fluoride and beryllium fluoride. Therefore, LFTR technology is fundamentally different from the solid fuel technology currently in use. Although the traditional nuclear reactor technology has been proven, it has perceptual problems with safety and nuclear waste products. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential advantages of LFTR in three aspects such as safety, fuel efficiency and nuclear waste as an alternative energy generator in the future. Comparisons between LFTR and Light Water Reactor (LWR), on general principles of fuel cycle, resource availability, radiotoxicity and nuclear weapon proliferation shall be elaborated.

  10. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  11. Flow analysis in a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, C.H.; Kochan, R.J.; Beller, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), also known as hydrothermal oxidation (HTO), involves the oxidation of hazardous waste at conditions of elevated temperature and pressure (e.g., 500 C--600 C and 234.4 bar) in the presence of approximately 90% of water and a 10% to 20% excess amount of oxidant over the stoichiometric requirement. Under these conditions, organic compounds are completely miscible with supercritical water, oxygen and nitrogen, and are rapidly oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. The essential part of the process is the reactor. Many reactor designs such as tubular, vertical vessel, and transpiring wall type have been proposed, patented, and tested at both bench and pilot scales. These designs and performances need to be scaled up to a waste throughput 10--100 times that currently being tested. Scaling of this magnitude will be done by creating a numerical thermal-hydraulic model of the smaller reactor for which test data is available, validating the model against the available data, and then using the validated model to investigate the larger reactor performance. This paper presents a flow analysis of the MODAR bench scale reactor (vertical vessel type). These results will help in the design of the reactor in an efficient manner because the flow mixing coupled with chemical kinetics eventually affects the process destruction efficiency

  12. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  13. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  14. Press kit. EPR (European pressurized water reactor). The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21 century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. In this framework, this document presents the advantages of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). The EPR is the only third generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. (A.L.B.)

  15. Biological mine water treatment operating a one stage reactor system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, MJ

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available rumen fluid as source of the fermentation organisms, were utilised as electron donor when sulphate, as the electron acceptor, is converted to sulphide. The feed water entered the reactor at the top, to allow the water to get in contact with grass...

  16. The experimental program of neutronphysics for advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Deider, L.; Cathalu, S.; Santamarina, A.; Gomit, M.

    1985-11-01

    The C.E.A. and E.D.F. has jointly undertaken a program of experimental studies on under-moderated water lattices, with mixed oxide fuel UO 2 -PuO 2 . Undermoderated lattices offer high conversion ratios. This type of lattice could limit in the future the natural uranium consumption of pressurized water reactors. This experimental program is aimed at qualifying neutron transport calculations in a large range of moderating ratio (between 0.5 and 1.5). It includes three experiments: ERASME, a critical experiment of large size in the EOLE reactor at Cadarache; ICARE, an irradiation experiment in the MELUSINE reactor at Grenoble; and an experiment to measure the reactivity effects by oscillations in the MINERVE reactor at Cadarache [fr

  17. LOFA analyses for the water and helium cooled SEAFP reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponton, L.; Sjoeberg, A.; Nordlinder, S.

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed in the frame of the European long-term fusion safety programme 1999 (SEAFP99). Loss of flow accidents (LOFA) have been studied for two cases, first for a helium cooled reactor with advanced dual-coolant (DUAL) blanket at 100% nominal power. The second case applies to a water-cooled reactor at 20% nominal power. Both transients were simulated with the code MELCOR 1.8.4. The results for the helium cooled reactor show that with a natural circulation flow of helium after the pump stops, the first wall temperature will stay below the temperature for excepted failure of the construction material. For the water cooled reactor, the results show that the pressurizer set point for its liquid volumetric inventory is reached before the plasma facing components attain a critical temperature. The pressurizer set point will induce a plasma shutdown

  18. Passive safety features in current and future water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    Better understanding of the passive safety systems and components in current and future water-cooled reactors may enhance the safety of present reactors, to the extend passive features are backfitted. This better understanding should also improve the safety of future reactors, which can incorporate more of these features. Passive safety systems and components may help to prevent accidents, core damage, or release radionuclides to the environment. The Technical Committee Meeting which was hosted by the USSR State Committee for Utilization of Nuclear Energy was attended by about 80 experts from 16 IAEA Member States and the NEA-OECD. A total of 21 papers were presented during the meeting. The objective of the meeting was to review and discuss passive safety systems and features of current and future water cooled reactor designs and to exchange information in this area of activity. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 21 papers published in this proceedings. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-01-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean/US/laboratory/university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program

  20. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.