WorldWideScience

Sample records for water nuclear reactor

  1. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  2. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  3. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  4. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigate water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of output water chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerates to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30 %. output water chemistry agree with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined.5 fig., 3 tab

  5. Water treatment process for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwan, M.A.; Khattab, M.S.; Hanna, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Water treatment for purification is very important in reactor cooling systems as well as in many industrial applications. Since impurities in water are main source of problems, it is necessary to achieve and maintain high purity of water before utilization in reactor cooling systems. The present work investigates water treatment process for nuclear reactor utilization. Analysis of outwater chemistry proved that demineralizing process is an appropriate method. Extensive experiments were conducted to determine economical concentration of the regenerants to obtain the optimum quantity of pure water which reached to 15 cubic-meter instead of 10 cubic-meter per regeneration. Running cost is consequently decreased by about 30%. Output water chemistry agrees with the recommended specifications for reactor utilization. The radionuclides produced in the primary cooling water due to reactor operation are determined. It is found that 70% of radioactive contaminants are retained by purification through resin of reactor filter. Decontamination factor and filter efficiency are also determined

  6. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Heavy water moderated tubular type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Masahisa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to effectively change the volume of heavy water per unit fuel lattice in heavy water moderated pressure tube type nuclear reactors. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor in which fuels are charged within pressure tubes and coolants are caused to flow between the pressure tubes and the fuels, heavy water tubes for recycling heavy water are disposed to a gas region formed to the outside of the pressure tubes. Then, the pressure tube diameter at the central portion of the reactor core is made smaller than that at the periphery of the reactor core. Further, injection means for gas such as helium is disposed to the upper portion for each of the heavy water tubes so that the level of the heavy water can easily be adjusted by the control for the gas pressure. Furthermore, heavy water reflection tubes are disposed around the reactor core. In this constitution, since the pitch for the pressure tubes can be increased, the construction and the maintenance for the nuclear reactor can be facilitated. Also, since the liquid surface of the heavy water in the heavy water tubes can be varied, nuclear properties is improved and the conversion ratio is improved. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy; Amit Jain Han Sang Kim; Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

    2006-01-01

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  10. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  11. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  12. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, A.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the present speech is to point out some of the now-a-day existing problems related to the fuel cycle of light water reactors and to foresee their present and future solutions. Economical aspects of nuclear power generation have been considerably improving, partly through technological advancements and partly due to the enlargement of unit capacity. The fuel cycle, defined in the course of this talk, discusses the exploration, mining, ore concentration, purification, conversion, enrichment, manufacturing of fuel elements, their utilization in a reactor, their discharge and subsequent storage, reprocessing, and their re-use or disposal. Uranium market in the world and the general policy of several uranium owning countries are described. The western world requirement for uranium until the year 2000, uranium resources and the nuclear power programs in the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa, France, India, Spain, and Argentina are discussed. The participation of Iran in a large uranium enrichment plant based on French diffusion technology is mentioned

  13. Nuclear fuel performance in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, R.B.; Baily, W.E.; Proebstle, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major development program is described to improve the performance of Boiling Water Reactor fuel. This sustained program is described in four parts: 1) performance monitoring, 2) fuel design changes, 3) plant operating recommendations, and 4) advanced fuel programs

  14. Emergency water supply facility for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Water is stored previously in an equipment storage pit disposed on an operator floor of a reactor building instead of a condensate storage vessel. Upon occurrence of an emergency, water is supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a sucking pipeline to a pump of a high pressure reactor core water injection circuit and a pump of a reactor-isolation cooling circuit to supply water to a reactor. The equipment storage pit is arranged in a building so that the depth thereof is determined to keep the required amount of water by storing water at a level lower than the lower end of a pool gate during normal operation. Water is also supplied from the equipment storage pit by way of a supply pipeline to a spent fuel storage pool on the operation floor of the reactor building. Namely, water is supplied to the spent fuel storage pool by a pump of a fuel pool cooling and cleaning circuit. This can eliminate a suppression pool cleaning circuit. (I.N.)

  15. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  16. Sea water desalination using nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper first underlines the water shortage problem today and in the years to come when, around the time horizon 2020, two-thirds of the total world population would be without access to potable water. Desalination of sea-water (and, to a limited extent, that of brackish water) is shown to be an attractive solution. In this context, sea-water desalination by nuclear energy appears to be not only technically feasible and safe but also economically very attractive and a sustainable solution. Thus, compared to conventional fossil energy based sources, desalination costs by nuclear options could be 30 to 60% lower. The nuclear options are therefore expected to satisfy the fundamental water needs and electricity demands of human beings without in any way producing large amounts of greenhouse gases which any desalination strategy, based on the employment of fossil fuels, cannot fail to avoid. (author)

  17. Method of operating a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysell, G.

    1975-01-01

    When operating a water-cooled nuclear reactor, in which the fuel rods consist of zirconium alloy tubes containing an oxidic nuclear fuel, stress corrosion in the tubes can be reduced or avoided if the power of the reactor is temporarily increased so much that the thermal expansion of the nuclear fuel produces a flow of the material in the tube. After that temporary power increase the power output is reduced to the normal power

  18. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  19. The nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors and advanced pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor strategy between fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs) is being studied. The principal idea of this strategy is that the discharged plutonium from light water reactors (LWRs) provides the inventories of the FBRs and the high-converter APWRs, whereby the LWRs are installed according to the derivative of a logistical S curve. Special emphasis is given to the dynamics of reaching an asymptotic symbiosis between FBRs and APWRs. The main conclusion is that if a symbiotic APWR-FBR family with an asymptotic total power level in the terawatt range is to exist in about half a century from now, we need a large number of FBRs already in an early phase

  20. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  1. Device for controlling water supply to nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshio.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To smoothly control automatic water supply for realizing stable operation of a nuclear reactor by providing a flow rate limiting signal selection circuit and a preferential circuit in a water supply control device for a nuclear reactor wherein the speed of a recirculation pump may be changed in two-steps. Structure: Opening angle signals for a water supply regulating valve are controlled by a nuclear reactor water level signal, a vapor flow rate signal and a supplied water flow rate signal through an adder and an adjuster in response to a predetermined water level setting signal. When the water in the reactor is maintained at a predetermined level, a selection circuit receives a water pump condition signal for selecting one of the signals from a supplied water rate limiting signal generator generating signals for indicating whether one or two water supply pumps are operated. A low value preferential circuit passes the lower of the values generated from the selection circuit and the adder. The selection circuit receives a recirculation pump condition signal and selects either one of the signals from the supplied water flow rate limiting signal generator operated at high speed or low speed. A high value preferential circuit passes the higher value

  2. Nuclear powerplant standardization: light water reactors. Volume 2. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, NUCLEAR POWERPLANT STANDARDIZATION: LIGHT WATER REACTORS. Included in the appendixes are the following: the current state of standardization, an application of the principles of the Naval Reactors Program to commercial reactors; the NRC and standardization, impacts of nuclear powerplant standardization on public health and safety, descriptions of current control room designs and Duke Power's letter, Admiral Rickover's testimony, a history of standardization in the NRC, and details on the impact of standardization on public health and safety

  3. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  4. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Limit regulation system for pressurized water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a limit regulation system for a pressurized water nuclear reactor in combination with a steam generating system connected to a turbine, the nuclear reactor having control rods as well as an operational regulation system and a protective system, which includes reactor power limiting means operatively associated with the control rods for positioning the same and having response values between operating ranges of the operational regulation system, on the one hand, and response values of the protective system, on the other hand, and a live steam-minimal pressure regulation system cooperating with the reactor power limiting means and operatively connected to a steam inlet valve to the turbine for controlling the same

  7. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  8. EDF'S nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction - had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's white book on nuclear safety

  9. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  10. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  11. Needs of nuclear data for advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Hitachi has been developing medium sized ABWRs as a power source that features flexibility to meet various market needs, such as minimizing capital risks, providing a timely return on capital investments, etc. Basic design concepts of the medium sized ABWRs are 1) using the current ABWR design which has accumulated favorable construction and operation histories as a starting point; 2) utilizing standard BWR fuels which have been fabricated by proven technology; 3) achieving a rationalized design by suitably utilizing key components developed for large sized reactors. Development of the medium sized ABWRs has proceeded in a systematic, stepwise manner. The first step was to design an output scale for the 600MWe class reactor (ABWR-600), and the next step was to develop an uprating concept to extend this output scale to the 900MWe class reactor (ABWR-900) based on the rationalized technology of the ABWR-600 for further cost savings. In addition, Hitachi and MHI developed an ultra small reactor, 'Package-Reactor'. About the nuclear data, for the purpose of verification of the nuclear analysis method of BWR for mixed oxide (MOX) cores, UO 2 and MOX fuel critical experiments EPICURE and MISTRAL were analyzed using nuclear design codes HINES and CERES with ENDF/B nuclear data file. The critical keffs of the absorber worth experiments, the water hole worth experiments and the 2D void worth experiments agreed with those of the reference experiments within about 0.1%Δk. The root mean square differences of radial power distributions between calculation and measurement were almost less than 2.0%. The calculated reactivity worth values of the absorbers, the water hole and the 2D void agreed with the measured values within nearly experimental uncertainties. These results indicate that the nuclear analysis method of BWR in the present paper give the same accuracy for the UO 2 cores and the MOX cores. (author)

  12. Nuclear calculation methods for light water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1961-02-01

    This report is intended as an introductory review. After a brief discussion of problems encountered in the nuclear design of water moderated reactors a comprehensive scheme of calculations is described. This scheme is based largely on theoretical methods and computer codes developed in the U.S.A. but some previously unreported developments made in this country are also described. It is shown that the effective reproduction factor of simple water moderated lattices may be estimated to an accuracy of approximately 1%. Methods for treating water gap flux peaking and control absorbers are presented in some detail, together with a brief discussion of temperature coefficients, void coefficients and burn-up problems. (author)

  13. Method of controlling the water quality in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a simple and reliable water quality calculation system and water quality control method based thereon for the entire primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors. Method: In a method of controlling the water quality of the reactor water by injecting hydrogen into the primary coolant circuits of a nuclear reactor, by utilizing a first linear relationship established between the concentration of oxygen and hydrogen in the main steam system and the concentration of radiolysis products in the reactor core and separators and mixing plenum portions, each of the above-mentioned concentrations is calculated from the concentrations for hydrogen or oxygen. Further, by utilizing the first linear relationship established between the concentrations for the oxygen and hydrogen in the recycling system and the concentration of the radiolysis products in the system from the downcomer to the lower plenum portion, the above-mentioned concentration is calculated from the concentration for oxygen and hydrogen. Then, the hydrogen injection rate into the primary coolant system is determined such that the calculated value takes an aimed value. (Ikeda, J.)

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  15. Measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products in nuclear reactor coolant water during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the detection and measurement of delayed neutron-emitting fission products contained in nuclear reactor coolant water while the reactor is operating. The method is limited to the measurement of the delayed neutron-emitting bromine isotope of mass 87 and the delayed neutron-emitting iodine isotope of mass 137. The other delayed neutron-emitting fission products cannot be accurately distinguished from nitrogen 17, which is formed under some reactor conditions by neutron irradiation of the coolant water molecules. The method includes a description of significance, measurement variables, interferences, apparatus, sampling, calibration, standardization, sample measurement procedures, system efficiency determination, calculations, and precision

  16. Steam generator for a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.; Berger, W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a steam generator which has a vertical cylindrical housing having a steam output outlet, a horizontal tube sheet closing the lower end of this housing, and an inverted U-shaped tube bundle inside of the housing and having vertical inlet and outlet legs with their ends mounted in the tube sheet. Beneath the tube sheet there are inlet and outlet manifolds for the respective ends of the tube bundle so that pressurized-water coolant from a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor can be circulated through the tube bundle

  17. DIRECT-CYCLE, BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, J.M.; Fromm, L.W. Jr.; Kolba, V.M.

    1962-08-14

    A direct-cycle boiling-water nuclear reactor is described that employs a closed vessel and a plurality of fuel assemblies, each comprising an outer tube closed at its lower end, an inner tube, fuel rods in the space between the tubes and within the inner tube. A body of water lying within the pressure vessel and outside the fuel assemblies is converted to saturated steam, which enters each fuel assembly at the top and is converted to superheated steam in the fuel assembly while it is passing therethrough first downward through the space between the inner and outer tubes of the fuel assembly and then upward through the inner tube. (AEC)

  18. Materialistic Aspects of Raising Resource of Pressurized Water Reactors for Low-Power Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.; Muratov, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of using ships reactors for low-power nuclear plants is considered. Some aspects of working constructional materials on cases of water-water reactors of ships nuclear units are considered. Advantages of raising resource of ships reactors are shown

  19. Press kit. EPR (European pressurized water reactor). The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21 century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. In this framework, this document presents the advantages of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor). The EPR is the only third generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. (A.L.B.)

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  2. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which the...

  3. Remerschen nuclear power station with BBR pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of many decades of successful cooperation in the electricity supply sector with the German RWE utility, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg and RWE jointly founded Societe Luxembourgeoise d'Energie Nucleaire S.A. (SENU) in 1974 in which each of the partners holds a fifty percent interest. SENU is responsible for planning, building and operating this nuclear power station. Following an international invitation for bids on the delivery and turnkey construction of a nuclear power station, the consortium of the German companies of Brown, Boveri and Cie. AG (BBC), Babcock - Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH (BBR) and Hochtief AG (HT) received a letter of intent for the purchase of a 1,300 MW nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The 1,300 MW station of Remerschen will be largely identical with the Muelheim-Kaerlich plant under construction by the same consortium near Coblence on the River Rhine since early 1975. According to present scheduling, the Remerschen nuclear power station could start operation in 1981. (orig.) [de

  4. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  6. Current status of nuclear power generation in Japan and directions in water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, T.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand aspects and current status of nuclear power generation in Japan are outlined. Although the future plan for nuclear power generation has not been determined yet the Japanese nuclear research centers and institutes are investigating and developing some projects on the next generation of light water reactors and other types of reactors. The paper describes these main activities

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  9. Automatic radiometric analyzer for nuclides in nuclear reactor water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masao; Tokoi, Hiromi; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Urata, Megumu.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the processing time and improve the accuracy for processing water sampled from reactor coolants, as well as simplify the mechanism of the apparatus. Constitution: Reactor water sampled from reactor coolants, after filtered out with insoluble solids, is stored in an ion exchange container. Thereafter, the amount of ion exchanged water is regulated by the coarse measurement of radioactivity concentration by a monitor. Further, ion exchange resins are charged from a resin tank, agitated by gases and dispersed into sampled water. Then, all of the radioactive iodines contained in the sample are collected in the resins. The resins are recovered through evacuation into instrumenting vessels for measurement of radioactivity. Since ion exchange resins are dispersed in the sampled water in this system, the processing time can be shortened. (Ikeda, J.)

  10. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0055] Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of Final Design Approval The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final design approval (FDA) to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic...

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  12. Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Community (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided in 1989 to update the state of the art concerning hydrogen in water cooled nuclear power reactors by commissioning a report which would review, all the available information to-date and make recommendations for the future. This joint report was prepared by committees formed by the IAEA and by the CEC. The aim of this report is to review the current understanding on the areas in which the research on hydrogen in LWR is conventionally presented, taking into account the results of the latest reported research developments. The main reactions through which hydrogen is produced are assessed together with their timings. An estimation of the amount of hydrogen produced by each reaction is given, in order to reckon their relative contribution to the hazard. An overview is then given of the state of knowledge of the most important phenomena taking place during its transport from the place of production and the phenomena which control the hydrogen combustion and the consequences of combustion under various conditions. Specific research work is recommended in each sector of the presented phenomena. The last topics reviewed in this report are the hydrogen detection and the prevent/mitigation of pressure and temperature loads on containment structures and structures and safety related equipment caused by hydrogen combustion

  13. A stability identification system for boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Chevrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    Boiling water reactors are subject to instabilities under low-flow, high-power operating conditions. These instabilities are a safety concern and it is therefore important to determine stability margins. This paper describes a method to estimate a measure of stability margin, called the decay ratio, from autoregressive modelling of time series data. A phenomenological model of a boiling water reactor with known stability characteristics is used to generate time series to validate the program. The program is then applied to signals from local power range monitors from the cycle 7 stability tests at the Leibstadt plant. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  14. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  18. Minimization of radioactive material deposition in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Blaies, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method for inhibiting the deposition of radioactive cobalt in a water-bearing vessel of a water-cooled nuclear reactor which comprises adding zinc ion to water entering the water-bearing vessel. The improvement contains a substantially lower proportion of the /sup 64/Zn isotope than naturally occurring zinc

  19. Steam water cycle chemistry of liquid metal cooled innovative nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurmanov, Victor; Lemekhov, Vadim; Smykov, Vladimir

    2012-09-01

    selection of chemistry controls is vital for NPPs with liquid metal cooled reactors. This paper highlights principles and approaches to chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors. The recommendations on how to arrange chemistry controls in steam/water cycles of future NPPs with innovative liquid metal cooled reactors are based taking into account: - the experience with operation of fossil power industry; - secondary side water chemistry of lead-bismuth eutectics cooled nuclear reactors at submarines; - steam/water cycles of NPPs with sodium cooled fast breeders BN-350 and BN-600; - secondary water chemistry at conventional NPPs with WER, RBMK and some other reactors. (authors)

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  3. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  7. Absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Peletan, R.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns an absorber rod bundle actuator in a pressurized water reactor with spectral shift control. The device comprises two coaxial control bars. The inner bar is integral with the absorber rod bundle; it has an enlarged zone which acts as a proton under pressure difference across an annular seal which can be radially expanded, the pressure difference allowing to the absorber rod bundles actuating on the piston. When a pressure difference is applied, the seal expands radially by a sufficient amount to make sealing contact with the zone of larger diameter in the outer bar. The invention applies more particularly to reactors with spectral shift control using bundles of fertile rods [fr

  8. Evaporation-preventive device for nuclear reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurusu, Yoshihisa; Akabori, Shiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent pool water from evaporating by a great amount in a reactor pool such as a spent fuel storing pool. Constitution: Air discharge and in-take ports are disposed just above the surface of the pool water and charge and discharge of airs are forcively carried out to form air curtains above the pool water. Water vapor evaporated from the surface of the pool water does not diffuse above the air curtains due to the air stream of the curtains, but is intaken into the intake port and then condensated into water by a steam condensator and re-supplied to the pool. Since diffusion of water vapor and radioactive materials are suppressed above the air curtains, the working circumstance in the pool chamber can be maintained desirably thereby keeping the radioactivity dose in the atmosphere. Further, incorporation of dusts from above into the pool can also be prevented by the air curtains to provide an effect for the prevention of radioactive contamination. Further, since covers are not used, visual observation can be insured. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Design of make-up water system for Tehran research reactor spent nuclear fuels storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghoyeh, Reza Gholizadeh [Reactor Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), North Amirabad, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hosein, E-mail: hkhalafi@aeoi.org.i [Reactor Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), North Amirabad, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Spent nuclear fuels storage (SNFS) is an essential auxiliary system in nuclear facility. Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent nuclear fuels have to be stored in water pool of SNFS away from reactor to allow for radioactive to decay and removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage of fuels and other equipments, the storage pool is filled with de-ionized water which serves as moderator, coolant and shielding. The de-ionized water will be provided from make-up water system. In this paper, design of a make-up water system for optimal water supply and its chemical properties in SNFS pool is presented. The main concern of design is to provide proper make-up water throughout the storage time. For design of make-up water system, characteristics of activated carbon purifier, anionic, cationic and mixed-bed ion-exchangers have been determined. Inlet water to make-up system provide from Tehran municipal water system. Regulatory Guide 1.13 of the and graver company manual that manufactured the Tehran research reactor (TRR) make-up water system have been used for make-up water system of TRR spent nuclear fuels storage pool design.

  10. Design of make-up water system for Tehran research reactor spent nuclear fuels storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghoyeh, Reza Gholizadeh; Khalafi, Hosein

    2010-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuels storage (SNFS) is an essential auxiliary system in nuclear facility. Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent nuclear fuels have to be stored in water pool of SNFS away from reactor to allow for radioactive to decay and removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage of fuels and other equipments, the storage pool is filled with de-ionized water which serves as moderator, coolant and shielding. The de-ionized water will be provided from make-up water system. In this paper, design of a make-up water system for optimal water supply and its chemical properties in SNFS pool is presented. The main concern of design is to provide proper make-up water throughout the storage time. For design of make-up water system, characteristics of activated carbon purifier, anionic, cationic and mixed-bed ion-exchangers have been determined. Inlet water to make-up system provide from Tehran municipal water system. Regulatory Guide 1.13 of the and graver company manual that manufactured the Tehran research reactor (TRR) make-up water system have been used for make-up water system of TRR spent nuclear fuels storage pool design.

  11. Design guide for heat transfer equipment in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    Information pertaining to design methods, material selection, fabrication, quality assurance, and performance tests for heat transfer equipment in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems is given in this design guide. This information is intended to assist those concerned with the design, specification, and evaluation of heat transfer equipment for nuclear service and the systems in which this equipment is required. (U.S.)

  12. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Glebov, V B

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network. (paper)

  13. The risks of nuclear energy technology. Safety concepts of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnk (IKET); Kessler, Guenter; Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-11-01

    Analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. Discusses the security concept of reactors. Analyzes possible crash of air planes on a reactor containment. Presents measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident. Written in engaging style for professionals and policy makers. The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on a reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: - A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These safety concepts are also compared with the experiences of the Fukushima accidents. In addition, the safety design concepts of the future modern European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and of the future modern Boiling Water Reactor SWR-1000 (KERENA) are presented. These are based on new safety research results of the past decades. - In a second, part the possible crash of military or heavy commercial air planes on a reactor containment is analyzed. It is shown that reactor containments can be designed to resist to such an airplane crash. - In a third part, an online decision system is presented. It allows to analyze the distribution of radioactivity in the atmosphere and to the environment after a severe reactor accident. It provides data for decisions to be taken by authorities for the minimization of radiobiological effects to the population. This book appeals to readers who have an interest in save living conditions and some understanding for physics or engineering.

  14. Performance of water cooled nuclear power reactor fuels in India – Defects, failures and their mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Chaitanyamoy

    2015-01-01

    Water cooled and moderated nuclear power reactors account for more than 95% of the operating reactors in the world today. Light water reactors (LWRs) consisting of pressurized water reactor (PWR), their Russian counterpart namely VVER and boiling water reactor (BWR) will continue to dominate the nuclear power market. Pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), also known as CANDU, is the backbone of the nuclear power program in India. Updates on LWR and PHWR fuel performance are being periodically published by IAEA, OECD-NEA and the World Nuclear Association (WNA), highlighting fuel failure rate and the mitigation of fuel defects and failures. These reports clearly indicate that there has been significant improvement in in – pile fuel performance over the years and the present focus is to achieve zero fuel failure in high burn up and high performance fuels. The present paper summarizes the status of PHWR and LWR fuel performance in India, highlighting the manufacturing and the related quality control and inspection steps that are being followed at the PHWR fuel fabrication plant in order to achieve zero manufacturing defect which could contribute to achieving zero in – pile failure rate in operating and upcoming PHWR units in India. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  17. Steam-generator tube failures: world experience in water-cooled nuclear power reactors in 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Steam-generator tube failures were reported at 25 of 59 water-cooled nuclear power reactors surveyed in 1974, compared to 11 of 49 in 1973. A summary is presented of these failures, most of which, where the cause is known, were the result of corrosion. Water chemistry control, inspection and repair procedures, and failure rates are discussed

  18. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenouard, J.; Dirian, G.; Roth, E.; Vignet, P.; Platzer, R.

    1959-01-01

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author) [fr

  19. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  2. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudier, S.; Badel, D.; Beraha, R.; Champ, M.; Tricot, N.; Tran Dai, P.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: 1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; 2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and 3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs

  3. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudier, S [Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Badel, D; Beraha, R [Direction Regionale de l` Industrie, de la Recherche et de l` Environnement Rhone-Alpes, Lyon (France); Champ, M; Tricot, N; Tran Dai, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-12-31

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: (1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; (2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and (3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs.

  4. Technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2016-01-01

    This academic report for graduation in engineering first presents operation principles of a nuclear reactor core. It presents core components, atomic nuclei, the notions of transmutation and radioactivity, quantities used to characterize ionizing radiations, the nuclear fission, statistical aspects of fission and differences between fast and slow neutrons, a comparison between various heat transfer fluids, the uranium enrichment process, and different types of reactor (boiling water, natural uranium and heavy water, pressurized water, and fourth generation). Then, after having recalled the French installed power, the author proposes an analysis of a typical 900 MWe nuclear power plant: primary circuit, reactor, fuel, spent fuel, pressurizer and primary pump, secondary circuit, aspects related to control-command, regulation, safety and exploitation. The last part proposes a modelling of the thermodynamic cycle of a pressurized water plant by using an equivalent Carnot cycle, a Rankine cycle, and a two-phase expansion cycle with drying-overheating

  5. Steam-generator tube performance: world experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of steam-generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978 is reviewed. Tube failures occurred at 31 of the 86 reactors surveyed. The causes of these failures and the procedures designed to deal with them are described. The number of tubes plugged has decreased dramatically in 1978 compared to the previous year. This is attributed to the diligent application of techniques developed through in-plant experience and research and development programs over the past several years

  6. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathania, R.S.; Tatone, O.S.

    1979-02-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1977. Failures were reported in 34 of the 79 reactors surveyed. Causes of these failures and inspection and repair procedures designed to deal with them are presented. Although corrosion remained the leading cause of tube failures, specific mechanisms have been identified and methods of dealing with them developed. These methods are being applied and should lead to a reduction of corrosion failures in future. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  9. Prospects for development of an innovative water-cooled nuclear reactor for supercritical parameters of coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyakin, S. G.; Kirillov, P. L.; Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Nikitenko, M. P.; Makhin, V. M.; Churkin, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The state of nuclear power engineering as of February 1, 2014 and the accomplished elaborations of a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor are briefly reviewed, and the prospects of this new project are discussed based on this review. The new project rests on the experience gained from the development and operation of stationary water-cooled reactor plants, including VVERs, PWRs, BWRs, and RBMKs (their combined service life totals more than 15 000 reactor-years), and long-term experience gained around the world with operation of thermal power plants the turbines of which are driven by steam with supercritical and ultrasupercritical parameters. The advantages of such reactor are pointed out together with the scientific-technical problems that need to be solved during further development of such installations. The knowledge gained for the last decade makes it possible to refine the concept and to commence the work on designing an experimental small-capacity reactor.

  10. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  11. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine based on particle bed reactor using light water steam as a propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James R.; Ludewig, Hans; Maise, George

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of configuring a water cooled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket, based on a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is investigated. This rocket will be used to operate on water obtained from near earth objects. The conclusions reached in this paper indicate that it is possible to configure a PBR based NTP rocket to operate on water and meet the mission requirements envisioned for it. No insurmountable technology issues have been identified.

  12. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine based on particle bed reactor using light water steam as a propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Maise, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of configuring a water cooled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket, based on a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is investigated. This rocket will be used to operate on water obtained from near earth objects. The conclusions reached in this paper indicate that it is possible to configure a PBR based NTP rocket to operate on water and meet the mission requirements envisioned for it. No insurmountable technology issues have been identified

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  14. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  15. Development of the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosch, R.; Moraw, G.; Musil, G.; Schneeberger, M.

    1976-01-01

    The authors investigate the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany in the years 1966 to 1976. They determine the effect of the price development for the individual components of the nuclear fuel cycle on the fuel-cycle costs averaged over the whole power station life. Here account is taken also of inflation rates and the change in the DM/US $ parity. In addition they give the percentage apportionment of the fuel-cycle costs. The authors show that real fuel-cycle costs for nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany have risen by 11% between 1966 and 1976. This contradicts the often repeated reproach that fuel costs in nuclear power stations are rising very steeply and are no longer competitive. (orig.) [de

  16. Advanced light water reactor program at ABB-Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, H.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of Electric Utilities ordering nuclear power plants in the 1990s, ABB-Combustion Engineering is developing two designs which will meet EPRI consensus requirements and new licensing issues. The System 80 Plus design is an evolutionary pressurized water reactor plant modelled after the successful System 80 design in operation in Palo Verde and under construction in Korea. System Plus is currently under review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with final design approval expected in 1991 and design certification in 1992. The Safe Integral Reactor (SIR) plant is a smaller facility with passive safety features and modular construction intended for design certification in the late 1990s. (author)

  17. Technical support to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, R.E.

    1976-09-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) in FY 1975 to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer (BWR-BDHT) program. The support provided by ANC is that of an independent assessor of the program to ensure that the data obtained are adequate for verification of analytical models used for predicting reactor response to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The support included reviews of program plans, objectives, measurements, and actual data. Additional activity included analysis of experimental system performance and evaluation of the RELAP4 computer code as applied to the experiments

  18. Method of decommissioning nuclear reactor building by utilizing sea water buyoancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashima, Sumio; Ogoshi, Shigeru; Kobari, Shin-ichi.

    1989-01-01

    Upon dismantling nuclear reactor buildings, peripheral yards are excavated and channels leading to sea shore are formed. Since the outer walls of the reactor buildings are made of iron-reinforced concretes, the opening poritons are grouted with concretes to attain a tightly such closed structure that radioactive wastes, etc. in the inside are not flown out upon reactor discommisioning. Peripheral buildings at relatively low level of radiation contaminations are dismantled and withdrawn. The fundations of the nuclear reactor buildings were dug out and jacked to separate base rocks and the reactor buildings. Then, sea water is introduced into the water channels to entirely float up the buildings. A water gate is disposed in the water channel on the side of sea shore to control the level of sea water. The buildings are moved and guided to the sea shore and towed to a site optimum as a permanent storage area and then burried in that place. The operation period for the discommissioning work can greatly be shortened and the radiation dose and the amount of the wastes can be reduced. (T.M.)

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  20. Franco-German nuclear cooperation: from the 'common product' to the first European pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    It has now been 10 years since Framatome and Siemens decided to collaborate on the design and sales of an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) model based on pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Originally called the 'common product', this model was renamed the European pressurized water reactor when Electricite de France (EDF) and the German electric utilities joined this cooperative development effort in 1992. Since the beginning, this cooperation has been formalized in the framework of an agreement that led to the founding of a joint and equally owned subsidiary, Nucler Power International (NPI), which is reponsible for leading the development of the new model and later handling its export sales

  1. Steam generator tube failures: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1978-02-01

    A survey was conducted of experience with steam generator tubes at nuclear power stations during 1976. Failures were reported at 25 out of 68 water-cooled reactors. The causes of these failures and the repair and inspection procedures designed to cope with them are summarized. Examination of the data indicates that corrosion was the major cause of steam generator tube failures. Improvements are needed in steam generator design, condenser integrity and secondary water chemistry control. (author)

  2. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L.; Espinosa P, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  3. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors. Part 2 and conclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The article gives brief descriptions of a new cycle for nuclear fuel in the core and, in particular, fuel replacement, stock pool management for irradiated fuel elements, transport containers for irradiated nuclear fuels, treatment of low activity waste, the Climax system for long-term stocking of irradiated fuel, and transport of irradiated fuel over the Nevada Test Site. (A.E.W.)

  4. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  5. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installation includes a pressurized-water coolant reactor vessel and a concrete biological shield surrounding this vessel. The shield forms a space between it and the vessel large enough to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant therefrom in the event the vessel ruptures. Struts extend radially between the vessel and shield for a distance permitting normal radial thermal movement of the vessel, while containing the vessel in the event it ruptures, the struts being interspaced from each other to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant from the space between the shield and the vessel

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  7. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-07

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

  8. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

  9. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures

  10. Energy-analysis of the total nuclear energy cycle based on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistemaker, J.

    1975-01-01

    The energy economy of the total nuclear energy cycle is investigated. Attention is paid to the importance of fossil fuel saving by using nuclear energy. The energy analysis is based on the construction and operation of power plants with an electric output of 1000MWe. Light water moderated reactors with a 2.7 - 3.2% enriched uranium core are considered. Additionally, the whole fuel cycle including ore winning and refining, enrichment and fuel element manufacturing and reprocessing has been taken into account. Neither radioactive waste storage problems nor safety problems related to the nuclear energy cycle and safeguarding have been dealt with, as exhaustive treatments can be found elswhere

  11. Overview of Prevention for Water Hammer by Check Valve Action in Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dayong; Yoon, Hyungi; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Kim, Seonhoon

    2016-01-01

    Water hammer can cause serious damage to pumping system and unexpected system pressure rise in the pipeline. In nuclear reactor, water hammer can influence on the integrity of safety related system. Water hammer in nuclear reactor have been caused by voiding in normally water-filled lines, steam condensation line containing both steam and water, as well as by rapid check valve action. Therefore, this study focuses on the water hammer by check valve among the sources of water hammer occurrence and suggests proper methodology for check valve type selection against water hammer. This study focuses on the water hammer by check valve action among the sources of water hammer occurrence and suggests proper methodology for check valve type selection against water hammer. If the inadvertent pump trip or pipe rupture in high velocity and pressure pipe is predicted, the fast response check valve such as tiled disc, dual disc and nozzle check valve should be installed in the system. If the inadvertent pump trip or pipe rupture in very high velocity and pressure pipe and excessively large revered flow velocity are predicted, the very slowly closing check valve such as controlled closure check valve should be installed in the system

  12. Overview of Prevention for Water Hammer by Check Valve Action in Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dayong; Yoon, Hyungi; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Kim, Seonhoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Water hammer can cause serious damage to pumping system and unexpected system pressure rise in the pipeline. In nuclear reactor, water hammer can influence on the integrity of safety related system. Water hammer in nuclear reactor have been caused by voiding in normally water-filled lines, steam condensation line containing both steam and water, as well as by rapid check valve action. Therefore, this study focuses on the water hammer by check valve among the sources of water hammer occurrence and suggests proper methodology for check valve type selection against water hammer. This study focuses on the water hammer by check valve action among the sources of water hammer occurrence and suggests proper methodology for check valve type selection against water hammer. If the inadvertent pump trip or pipe rupture in high velocity and pressure pipe is predicted, the fast response check valve such as tiled disc, dual disc and nozzle check valve should be installed in the system. If the inadvertent pump trip or pipe rupture in very high velocity and pressure pipe and excessively large revered flow velocity are predicted, the very slowly closing check valve such as controlled closure check valve should be installed in the system.

  13. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs

  14. The effect of heavy water reactors and liquid fuel reactors on the long-term development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.; Wiechers, W.K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the rates at which various combinations of power reactor types are installed on the long-range (to the year 2040) uranium and plutonium inventory requirements are examined. Consideration is given to light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heavy water reactors, and thermal breeder reactors, in various combinations, and assuming alternatively a 3% and a 5% growth in energy demand

  15. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T.L.; Corletti, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit by pumping water from an in-containment refueling water storage tank during staged depressurization of the coolant circuit, the final stage including passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank to the coolant circuit and to flood the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and avoids the final stage of depressurization with its flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary, but does not prevent the final stage when it is necessary. A high pressure makeup water storage tank coupled to the reactor coolant circuit holds makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tanks for cooling the tank. (Author)

  17. Processing of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sraier, V.

    1978-11-01

    A comprehensive review is given of the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from LWR's (covering references up to No. 18 (1977) of INIS inclusively). Particular attention is devoted to waste processing, safety, and reprocessing plants. In the addendum, the present status is shown on the example of KEWA, the projected large German fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  18. Robust observer based control for axial offset in pressurized-water nuclear reactors based on the multipoint reactor model using Lyapunov approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidabadinejad, Majid; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza [Isfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    In nuclear reactor imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These fluctuations must be maintained bounded within allowable limits. Otherwise, the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded these oscillations is considered to be a restriction for the load following operation. Also, in order to design the nuclear reactor control systems, poisons concentrations, especially xenon must be accessible. But, physical measurement of these parameters is impossible. In this paper, for the first time, in order to estimate the axial xenon oscillations and ensures these oscillations are kept bounded within allowable limits during load-following operation, a robust observer based nonlinear control based on multipoint kinetics reactor model for pressurized-water nuclear reactors is presented. The reactor core is simulated based on the multi-point nuclear reactor model (neutronic and thermal-hydraulic). Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer based controller for the load-following operation.

  19. Robust observer based control for axial offset in pressurized-water nuclear reactors based on the multipoint reactor model using Lyapunov approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidabadinejad, Majid; Ansarifar, Gholam Reza

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear reactor imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These fluctuations must be maintained bounded within allowable limits. Otherwise, the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded these oscillations is considered to be a restriction for the load following operation. Also, in order to design the nuclear reactor control systems, poisons concentrations, especially xenon must be accessible. But, physical measurement of these parameters is impossible. In this paper, for the first time, in order to estimate the axial xenon oscillations and ensures these oscillations are kept bounded within allowable limits during load-following operation, a robust observer based nonlinear control based on multipoint kinetics reactor model for pressurized-water nuclear reactors is presented. The reactor core is simulated based on the multi-point nuclear reactor model (neutronic and thermal-hydraulic). Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer based controller for the load-following operation.

  20. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Takenori.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a nuclear reactor container in which heat is removed from a container by external water injection. Heat is removed from the container by immersing the lower portion of the container into water and scattering spary water from above. Thus, the container can be cooled by the spray water falling down along the outer wall of the container to condensate and cool vapors filled in the container upon occurrence of accidents. Further, since the inside of the container can be cooled also during usual operation, it can also serve as a dry well cooler. Accordingly, heat is removed from the reactor container upon occurrence of accidents by the automatic operation of a spray device corresponding to the change of the internal temperature and the pressure in the reactor container. Further, since all of these devices are disposed out of container, maintenance is also facilitated. (I.S.)

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  2. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  3. Indian nuclear power programme with pressurised heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    This compilation is a part of ongoing efforts by Nuclear Power Corporation (NPC) to enable persons: to visit the plants under construction and operation to see for themselves adoption of new and advanced techniques; to have contact with the realities of NPC`s facilities; to familiarize themselves with the regulatory aspects on radiological and environmental protection; and assess for themselves the extent of thrust and importance given to overall safety. figs., tabs.

  4. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1980-02-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1978. Tube failures occurred at 31 of the 86 reactors surveyed. Causes of these failures and procedures designed to deal with them are described. A dramatic decrease in the number of tubes plugged was evident in 1978 compared to the previous year. This is attributed to diligent application of techniques developed from in-plant experience and research and development programs over the past several years. (auth)

  5. Steam generator tube performance: experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1983 and 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Meindl, P.; Taylor, G.F.

    1986-06-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 47 (35.6%) of the reactors in 1983 and at 63 (42.6%) of the reactors during 1984. In 1983 and 1984 3291 and 3335 tubes, respectively, were removed from service, about the same as in 1982. The leading causes assigned to tube failure were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side and stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack from the secondary side. In addition 5668 tubes were repaired for further service by installation of internal sleeves. Most of these were believed to have deteriorated by one of the above mechanisms or by pitting. There is a continuing trend towards high-integrity condenser tube materials at sites cooled by brackish or sea water. 31 refs

  6. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 3, presents papers on: Structural engineering; Advanced reactor research; Advanced passive reactors; Human factors research; Human factors issues related to advanced passive light water researchers; Thermal Hydraulics; and Earth sciences. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  7. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-01-01

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in a circular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mass velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel

  8. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  9. Thorium fuel for light water reactors - reducing proliferation potential of nuclear power fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, A; Radkowski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    The proliferation potential of the light water reactor fuel cycle may be significantly reduced by utilization of thorium as a fertile component of the nuclear fuel. The main challenge of Th utilization is to design a core and a fuel cycle, which would be proliferation-resistant and economically feasible. This challenge is met by the Radkowsky Thorium Reactor (RTR) concept. So far the concept has been applied to a Russian design of a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor, known as a WWER-1000, and designated as VVERT. The following are the main results of the preliminary reference design: * The amount of Pu contained in the RTR spent fuel stockpile is reduced by 80% in comparison with a VVER of a current design. * The isotopic composition of the RTR-Pu greatly increases the probability of pre-initiation and yield degradation of a nuclear explosion. An extremely large Pu-238 content causes correspondingly large heat emission, which would complicate the design of an explosive device based on RTR-Pu. The economic incentive to reprocess and reuse the fissile component of the RTR spent fuel is decreased. The once-through cycle is economically optimal for the RTR core and cycle. To summarize all the items above: the replacement of a standard (U-based) fuel for nuclear reactors of current generation by the RTR fuel will provide an inherent barrier for nuclear weapon proliferation. This inherent barrier, in combination with existing safeguard measures and procedures is adequate to unambiguously disassociate civilian nuclear power from military nuclear power. * The RTR concept is applied to existing power plants to assure its economic feasibility. Reductions in waste disposal requirements, as well as in natural U and fabrication expenses, as compared to a standard WWER fuel, provide approximately 20% reduction in fuel cycle (authors).

  10. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  11. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan

  12. Design and construction of demineralized water production and maintenance system for RA-O nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumis, D.; Martin, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The normal operation of zero power RA-O Nuclear Reactor requires a production and maintenance of demineralized water system. This system was designed and built-up during the works for actualization, upgrading and new start up at Cordoba National University of this facility. This paper comments the relevant aspects about the didactical purpose of that system and the details considered for training and practices with it. Similarly, considerations about solids wastes and effluents treatment are discussed. (Author)

  13. Process for superheating the steam generated by a light water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakil, H.B.; Brown, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    A process is submitted for superheating the pressurised steam generated in a light water nuclear reactor in which the steam is brought to 340 0 C at least. This superheated steam is used to operate a turbo-generator unit. The characteristic of the process is that an exothermal chemical reaction is used to generate the heat utilised during the superheating stage. The chemical reaction is a mechanisation, oxidation-reduction or hydrogenation reaction [fr

  14. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  15. Analysis of water hammer in control rod drive systems of boiling water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, H.H.; Arastu, A.H.; Lau, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of characteristics is applied to analyze water hammer in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) Control Rod Drive (CRD) Systems following fast opening of scram valves. The modelling of the CRD mechanism is presented. Numerical predictions are compared to experimental data. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: ioliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  19. A modified firefly algorithm applied to the nuclear reload problem of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Iona Maghali Santos de; Schirru, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem (NRRP) is an issue of great importance and concern in nuclear engineering. It is the problem related with the periodic operation of replacing part of the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Traditionally, this procedure occurs after a period of operation called a cycle, or whenever the nuclear power plant is unable to continue operating at its nominal power. Studied for more than 40 years, the NRRP still remains a challenge for many optimization techniques due to its multiple objectives concerning economics, safety and reactor physics calculations. Characteristics such as non-linearity, multimodality and high dimensionality also make the NRRP a very complex optimization problem. In broad terms, it aims at getting the best arrangement of fuel in the nuclear reactor core that leads to a maximization of the operating time. The primary goal is to design fuel loading patterns (LPs) so that the core produces the required energy output in an economical way, without violating safety limits. Since multiple feasible solutions can be obtained to this problem, judicious optimization is required in order to identify the most economical among them. In this sense, this paper presents a new contribution in this area and introduces a modified firefly algorithm (FA) to perform LPs optimization for a pressurized water reactor. Based on the original FA introduced by Xin-She Yang in 2008, the proposed methodology seems to be very promising as an optimizer to the NRRP. The experiments performed and the comparisons with some well known best performing algorithms from the literature, confirm this statement. (author)

  20. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  1. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 1 report, Light water reactor utilization and improvement: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested that the Office of Nuclear Energy prepare a strategic national plan that outlines the Department's role in the future development of civilian nuclear power and that the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad hoc panel to review and comment on this plan. The Energy Research Advisory Board formed a panel for this review and three subpanels were formed. One subpanel was formed to address the institutional issues surrounding nuclear power, one on research and development for advanced nuclear power plants and a third subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. The subpanel on light water reactors held two meetings at which representatives of the DOE, the NRC, EPRI, industry and academic groups made presentations. This is the report of the subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. This report presents the subpanel's assessment of initiatives which the Department of Energy should undertake in the national interest, to develop and support light water reactor technologies

  2. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and 233 U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles

  3. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  4. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  6. Chemical elimination of alumina in suspension in nuclear reactors heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, A.

    1967-02-01

    Corrosion of aluminium in contact with moderating water in nuclear reactor leads to the formation of an alumina hydrosol which can have an adverse effect on the operation of the reactor. Several physical methods have been used in an attempt to counteract this effect. The method proposed here consists in the elimination of the aluminium by dissolution and subsequent fixation in the ionic form on mixed-bed ion-exchange resin. In order to do this, the parameters and the values of these parameters most favorable to the dissolution process have been determined. If the moderator is heavy water, the deuterated acid can be prepared by converting a solution in heavy water to a salt of the acid using a deuterated cationic resin. (author) [fr

  7. Development of an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, N.S.

    1981-06-01

    The results of work carried out under IAEA Contract No. 2336/RB are described (subject: an automated system of nuclear materials accounting for nuclear power stations with water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER) reactors). The basic principles of an accounting system for this type of nuclear power plant are outlined. The general structure and individual units of the information computer program used to achieve automated accounting are described and instructions are given on the use of the program. A detailed example of its application (on a simulated nuclear power plant) is examined

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  10. Direct harvesting of Helium-3 (3He) from heavy water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentoumi, G.; Didsbury, R.; Jonkmans, G.; Rodrigo, L.; Sur, B.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal neutron activation of deuterium inside a heavy-water-moderated or -cooled nuclear reactor produces a build-up of tritium in the heavy water. The in situ decay of tritium can, for certain reactor types and operating conditions, produce potentially useable amounts of 3 He, which can be directly extracted via the heavy-water cover gas without first separating, collecting and storing tritium outside the reactor. It is estimated that the amount of 3 He available for recovery from the moderator cover gas of a 700 MWe class Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) ranges from 0.1 to 0.7 m 3 (STP) per annum, varying with the tritium activity buildup in the moderator. The harvesting of 3 He would generate approximately 12.7 m 3 (STP) of 3 He, worth more than $30M at current market rates, over a typical 25-year operating cycle of the PHWR. This paper discusses the production of 3 He in the moderator of a PHWR and its extraction from the 4 He moderator cover gas system using conventional methods. (author)

  11. Zr-alloys, the nuclear material for water reactor fuel. A survey and update with focus on fuel for pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a solid overview on the development of the requirements and the respective answers found as far as water cooled fuel rods and assemblies are concerned. It shall be a help as well for designers and manufacturers as also for users of this fuel, because only a broad and consistent knowledge on all aspects of the application of this material in nuclear fuel can guarantee a successful operation under the still increasing requirements in water cooled reactor cores

  12. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  13. Nonlinear control for core power of pressurized water nuclear reactors using constant axial offset strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Ansarifar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important operations in nuclear power plants is load following, in which an imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation is considered to be a constraint for the load following operation. In this paper, the design of a sliding mode control (SMC, which is a robust nonlinear controller, is presented. SMC is a means to control pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR power for the load following operation problem in a way that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO strategy to ensure xenon oscillations remain bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for the load following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model with a three delayed neutron groups. The stability analysis is given by means of the Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the SMC exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness, and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load following operation is so effective that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the given region.

  14. Thermal aspects of mixed oxide fuel in application to supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.; Peiman, W.; Rodriguez-Prado, A.; Villamere, B.; Mikhael, S.; Allison, L.; Pioro, I., E-mail: lisa.grande@mycampus.uoit.ca, E-mail: igor.pioro@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    SuperCritical Water-cooled nuclear Reactors (SCWRs) are a renewed technology being developed as one of the Generation IV reactor concepts. This reactor type uses a light water coolant at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. These elevated operating conditions will improve Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermal efficiencies by 10 - 15% compared to those of current NPPs. Also, SCWRs will have the ability to utilize a direct cycle, thus decreasing NPP capital and operational costs. The SCWR core has 2 configurations: 1) Pressure Vessel (PV) -type enclosing a fuel assembly and 2) Pressure Tube (PT) -type consisting of individual pressurized channels containing fuel bundles. Canada and Russia are developing PT-type SCWRs. In particular, the Canadian SCWR reactor has an output of 1200 MW{sub el} and will operate at a pressure of 25 MPa with inlet and outlet fuel-channel temperatures of 350 and 625°C, respectively. These extreme operating conditions require alternative fuels and materials to be investigated. Current CANadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) nuclear reactor fuel-channel design is based on the use of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) fuel; zirconium alloy sheath (clad) bundle, pressure and calandria tubes. Alternative fuels should be considered to supplement depleting world uranium reserves. This paper studies general thermal aspects of using Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel in an Inconel-600 sheath in a generic PT-type SCWR. The bulk fluid, sheath and fuel centerline temperatures along with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles were calculated at uniform and non-uniform Axial Heat Flux Profiles (AHFPs). (author)

  15. An Order Coding Genetic Algorithm to Optimize Fuel Reloads in a Nuclear Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Juan Jose; Requena, Ignacio

    2004-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the nuclear fuel reload for a boiling water reactor, and an order coding is proposed for the chromosomes and appropriate crossover and mutation operators. The fitness function was designed so that the genetic algorithm creates fuel reloads that, on one hand, satisfy the constrictions for the radial power peaking factor, the minimum critical power ratio, and the maximum linear heat generation rate while optimizing the effective multiplication factor at the beginning and end of the cycle. To find the values of these variables, a neural network trained with the behavior of a reactor simulator was used to predict them. The computation time is therefore greatly decreased in the search process. We validated this method with data from five cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in Mexico

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  17. Indian experience with radionuclide transport, deposition and decontamination in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Lawrence, D.A.; Mathur, P.K.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The present generation of water-cooled nuclear reactors uses construction materials chosen with utmost care so that minimum corrosion occurs during the life of the reactor. As interaction between the primary coolant and the construction materials is unavoidable, the coolant is chemically treated to achieve maximum compatibility. First measurements of the chemical and radiochemical composition of the crud present on the in-core and out-of-core primary heat transport system surfaces of a pressurized heavy-water-moderated and cooled reactor (PHWR) are given; then experience in India in the development of a low temperature, one-stage decontaminating formulation for chemical decontamination of the radioactive deposits formed on stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions is discussed. The effect of the magnitude of the transients in parameters such as reactor power, system temperature, dissolved oxygen content in the coolant, etc. on the nature and migration behaviour of primary heat transport system crud in a PHWR is described. Contributions to radioactive sources and insoluble crud from different primary heat transport system materials are identified and correlated with reactor operations in a PHWR. Man-rem problems faced by nuclear reactors, especially during off-line maintenance, stress the need for reducing the deposited radioactive sources from system surfaces which would otherwise be accessible. Laboratory and on-site experimentation was carried out to effect chemical decontamination on the radioactive deposits formed on the stainless steel surfaces under BWR conditions. Both the reducing and oxidizing formulations were subsequently used in a small-scale, in-plant trial in the clean-up system of a BWR. More than 85% of the deposited 60 Co activity was found to have been removed by the oxidizing formulation. Efforts to develop a decontaminating mixture containing a reducing agent with the help of a circulating loop are in progress in the laboratory. (author)

  18. Refueling of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, J.W.; Swidwa, K.J.; Hornak, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for refueling a nuclear reactor, the reactor being disposed for refueling under water in a pit in a containment, the apparatus including a bridge to be mounted moveably over the pit on the containment, first means connected to the bridge, for moving the bridge forward and backward on the containment over the pit along a first path, a first pulse generator, connected to the moving means, responsive to the movement of the bridge, for producing pulses, means, connected to the generator,for counting the pulses, the count of the pulses being dependent on the distance of the movement of the bridge

  19. Nuclear reactor containment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume of a containment shell and decrease the size of a containment equipment for BWR type reactors by connecting the containment shell and a suppression pool with slanted vent tubes to thereby shorten the vent tubes. Constitution: A pressure vessel containing a reactor core is installed at the center of a building and a containment vessel for the nuclear reactor that contains the pressure vessel forms a cabin. To a building situated below the containment shell, is provided a suppression chamber in which cooling water is charged to form a suppression pool. The suppression pool is communicated with vent tubes that pass through the partition wall of the containment vessel. The vent tubes are slanted and their lower openings are immersed in coolants. Therefore, if accident is resulted and fluid at high temperature and high pressure is jetted from the pressure vessel, the jetting fluid is injected and condensated in the cooling water. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  1. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised

  2. Hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of water vapour and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Pierre Py; Alain Capitaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents hydrogen production by a nuclear reactor (High Temperature Reactor, HTR or Pressurized Water Reactor, PWR) coupled to a High Temperature Electrolyser (HTE) plant. With respect to the coupling of a HTR with a HTE plant, EDF and AREVA NP had previously selected a combined cycle HTR scheme to convert the reactor heat into electricity. In that case, the steam required for the electrolyser plant is provided either directly from the steam turbine cycle or from a heat exchanger connected with such cycle. Hydrogen efficiency production is valued using high temperature electrolysis. Electrolysis production of hydrogen can be performed with significantly higher thermal efficiencies by operating in the steam phase than in the water phase. The electrolysis performance is assessed with solid oxide and solid proton electrolysis cells. The efficiency from the three operating conditions (endo-thermal, auto-thermal and thermo-neutral) of a high temperature electrolysis process is evaluated. The technical difficulties to use the gases enthalpy to heat the water are analyzed, taking into account efficiency and technological challenges. EDF and AREVA NP have performed an analysis to select an optimized process giving consideration to plant efficiency, plant operation, investment and production costs. The paper provides pathways and identifies R and D actions to reach hydrogen production costs competitive with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  4. Compact nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, S.I.

    1975-01-01

    A compact nuclear reactor of the pressurized-water variety is described which has two separate parts separably engageable for ease of inspection, maintenance and repair. One of the parts is a pressure vessel having an active core and the other of the parts is a closure adapted on its lower surface with an integral steam generator. An integral pump, external pressurizer and control rods are provided which communicate with the active core when engaged to form a total unit. (U.S.)

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  6. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. M. Pimblott

    2000-10-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  7. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  8. Safety problems of nuclear power plants with channel-type graphite boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Vasilevskij, V.P.; Volkov, V.P.; Gavrilov, P.A.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Kunegin, E.P.; Rybakov, N.Z.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of nuclear power plants in a highly populated region near large industrial centres necessitates to pay a special attention to their nuclear and radiation safety. Safety problems of nuclear reactor operation are discussed, in particular, they are: reliable stoppage of fission chain reaction at any emergency cases; reliable core cooling with failure of various equipment; emergency core cooling with breached pipes of a circulating circuit; and prevention of radioactive coolant release outside the nuclear power plant in amount exceeding the values adopted. Channel-type water boiling reactors incorporate specific features requiring a new approach to safety operation of a reactor and a nuclear power plant. These include primarily a rather large steam volume in the coolant circuit, large amount of accumulated heat, void reactivity coefficient. Channel-type reactors characterized by fair neutron balance and flexible fuel cycle, have a series of advantages alleviating the problem of ensuring their safety. The possibility of reliable control over the state of each channel allows to replace failed fuel elements by the new ones, when operating on-load, to increase the number of circulating loops and reduce the diameter of main pipelines, simplifies significantly the problem of channel emergency cooling and localization of a radioactive coolant release from a breached circuit. The concept of channel-type reactors is based on the solution of three main problems. First, plant safety should be assured in emergency switch off of separate units and, if possible, energy conditions should be maintained, this is of particular importance considering the increase in unit power. Second, the system of safety and emergency cooling should eliminate a great many failures of fuel elements in case of potential breaches of any tube in the circulating circuit. Finally, rugged boxes and localizing devices should be provided to exclude damage of structural elements of the nuclear power

  9. Nuclear piping criteria for Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Volume 1--Failure mechanisms and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This WRC Bulletin concentrates on the major failure mechanisms observed in nuclear power plant piping during the past three decades and on corrective actions taken to minimize or eliminate such failures. These corrective actions are applicable to both replacement piping and the next generation of light-water reactors. This WRC Bulletin was written with the objective of meeting a need for piping criteria in Advanced Light-Water Reactors, but there is application well beyond the LWR industry. This Volume, in particular, is equally applicable to current nuclear power plants, fossil-fueled power plants, and chemical plants including petrochemical. Implementation of the recommendations for mitigation of specific problems should minimize severe failures or cracking and provide substantial economic benefit. This volume uses a case history approach to high-light various failure mechanisms and the corrective actions used to resolve such failures. Particular attention is given to those mechanisms leading to severe piping failures, where severe denotes complete severance, large ''fishmouth'' failures, or long throughwall cracks releasing a minimum of 50 gpm. The major failure mechanisms causing severe failure are erosion-corrosion and vibrational fatigue. Stress corrosion cracking also has been a common problem in nuclear piping systems. In addition thermal fatigue due to mixing-tee and to thermal stratification also is discussed as is microbiologically-induced corrosion. Finally, water hammer, which represents the ultimate in internally-generated dynamic high-energy loads, is discussed

  10. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  12. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  13. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  14. Multi-stage-flash desalination plants of relative small performance with integrated pressurized water reactors as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Peltzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination plants with a performance in the range of 10 000 to 80 000 m 3 distillate per day heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The design study shows that IPWR systems have specific advantages up to 200 MWth compared to other reactor types at least being adapted for single- and dual-purpose desalination plants. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show that due to fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (author)

  15. Use mobile pumps and liquid chilling water units to provide chilled water for nuclear reactor during nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guobin; Feng Jiaxuan

    2012-01-01

    From the nuclear accident in Japan Fuksuhima in March this year, despite a shut down of the reactor, the residue heat inside the reactor was not able to remove due to the failure of the cooling system and it finally caused the catastrophe. It was observed that when the failure of the cooling system after an earthquake of magnitude 9 and a tsunami of 28 meters height, the containment vessel for the reactor core was still able to maintain its integrity in the first 24 hours before the first explosion was happened. A backup emergency heat removal system for nuclear power plants using mo- bile pumps and liquid chilling units has been proposed 20 years ago by Cheung [Ref. 1]. Due to the fact that there are more than 400 nuclear power plants around the world and 10% of them are located in earthquake active zone, together with the aging of some of the power plants which were built more than 30 years ago, the risk of another nuclear accident becomes high. An emergency safety measure has to be designed in order to deal with the unforeseen scenario. This re- port re-visits the proposal again; to re-design to the suit the need and to integrate with the current situation of the nuclear industry. (authors)

  16. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  17. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  18. Method and plant to remote tritium from the cooling water of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    A method is proposed for the extraction of tritium from the cooling water of a nuclear reactor, based on the principle of concentrating the tritium by a multi-stage transfer process. The cooling water is brought into contact in each stage with basic, labile, hydrogen-containing material with high pH value, whereby the tritium is transfered into an intermediate solid product and can be separated off. The technical details of the plant are described. Cellulose materials, such as cotton and wood as well as protein-containing material, such as muscle tissue are mentioned as examples of materials with a high affinity to tritium, greater than the affinity of water to tritium. They extract tritium from the cooling water. (HK) [de

  19. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  20. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  1. Water chemistry in nuclear power stations with high-temperature reactors with particular reference to the AVR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, R.; Resch, G.

    1976-01-01

    The water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with a helium-cooled high-temperature reactor differs in design data significantly and extensively from the corresponding cycles of light-water-cooled nuclear reactors and resembles to a great extent the water-steamcycle of a modern conventional power plant. The radioactive constituents of the water-steam cycle can be satisfactorily removed apart from Tritium by means of a pre-coat filter with powder-resisn, as comprehensive experiments have demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  2. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  3. Data list of nuclear power plants of pressurized-water reactor type in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1981-08-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations for nuclear power plants of the pressurized-water reactor type in Japan. The data used in the report are based on informations that were collected before December in 1980. The report is edited by modifing changes of the data appeared after publication of 1979 edition (JAERI-M 8947), and extending the data-package to cover new plants proposed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP, which has been developed as an exclusive use of data processing. (author)

  4. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioiri, Akio.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a vent tube communication port is disposed to a pressure suppression pool at a position higher than the pool water therein for communication with an upper dry well, and the upper end opening of a dry well communication pipe is disposed at a position higher than the communication port. When condensate return pipeline is ruptured in the upper dry well, water in a water source pool is injected to the pressure vessel and partially discharged out of the ruptured port and a depressurization valve connected to the pressure vessel to the inside of the upper dry well. The discharged water stays in the upper dry well and, when the water level reaches the height of the vent tube communication port, it flows into the pressure suppression pool. Even in a state that the entire amount of water in the water source pool is supplied, since water does not reach the upper opening port of the dry well communication pipe, water does not flow into a lower dry well. Accordingly, the motor of a control rod drives disposed in the lower dry well can be prevented from submerging. The reactor core can be cooled more reliably, to improve the reliability of the pressure suppression function. (N.H.)

  5. Study of essential safety features of a three-loop 1,000 MWe light water reactor (PWR) and a corresponding heavy water reactor (HWR) on the basis of the IAEA nuclear safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Based on the IAEA Standards, essential safety aspects of a three-loop pressurized water reactor (1,000 MWe) and a corresponding heavy water reactor were studied by the TUeV Baden e.V. in cooperation with the Gabinete de Proteccao e Seguranca Nuclear, a department of the Ministry which is responsible for Nuclear power plants in Portugal. As the fundamental principles of this study the design data for the light water reactor and the heavy water reactor provided in the safety analysis reports (KWU-SSAR for the 1,000 MWe PWR, KWU-PSAR Nuclear Power Plant ATUCHA II) are used. The assessment of the two different reactor types based on the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards shows that the reactor plants designed according to the data given in the safety analysis reports of the plant manufacturer meet the design requirements laid down in the pertinent IAEA Standards. (orig.) [de

  6. Steam generator tube performance: world experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors is reviewed for 1979. Tube failures occurred at 38 of the 93 reactors surveyed. The causes of these failures and the procedures designed to deal with them are described. The defect rate, although higher than that in 1978, was still lower than the rates of the two previous years. Methods being employed to detect defects include the increased use of multifrequency eddy-current testing and a trend to full-length inspection of all tubes. To reduce the incidence of tube failure by corrosion, plant operators are turning to full-flow condensate demineralization and more leak-resistant condenser tubes. 10 tables

  7. Control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  8. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  9. Nuclear power reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Risoe National Laboratory was established more than twenty years ago with research and development of nuclear reactor technology as its main objective. The Laboratory has by now accumulated many years of experience in a number of areas vital to nuclear reactor technology. The work and experience of, and services offered by the Laboratory within the following fields are described: Health physics site supervision; Treatment of low and medium level radioactive waste; Core performance evaluation; Transient analysis; Accident analysis; Fuel management; Fuel element design, fabrication and performance evaluation; Non-destructive testing of nuclear fuel; Theoretical and experimental structural analysis; Reliability analysis; Site evaluation. Environmental risk and hazard calculation; Review and analysis of safety documentation. Risoe has already given much assistance to the authorities, utilities and industries in such fields, carrying out work on both light and heavy water reactors. The Laboratory now offers its services to others as a consultant, in education and training of staff, in planning, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for the development and specification of fabrication techniques. (author)

  10. Method of neutronic calculations for a spherical cell equivalent to cylindrical one for using computer codes in light water reactors in the fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, V.; Sefidvash, F.; Rastogi, E.P.; Huria, H.C.; Krishnani, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    In order to use the existing light water reactor cell calculation codes for fluidized bed nuclear reactor having spherical fuel cells, an equivalence method has been developed. This method is shown to be adequate in calculation of the Dancoff factor. This method also was applicable in LEOPARD code and the results obtained in calculation of K ∞ was compared with the obtained using the DTF IV code, the results showed that the method is adequate for the calculations neutronics of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor. (author) [pt

  11. Numerical investigation of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor in horizontal rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang Zhi, E-mail: shangzhi@tsinghua.org.c [Faculty of Engineering, Kingston University, London SW15 3DW (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.co [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round rods and rod bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal rods and rod bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. In the rod bundle simulations, it is found that the geometry and orientation of the rod bundle have strong effects on the wall temperature distributions and heat transfers. In one orientation the square bundle has a higher wall temperature difference than other bundles. However, when the bundles are rotated by 90 deg. the highest wall temperature difference is found in the hexagon bundle. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  12. Improving activity transport models for water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill, K.A

    2001-08-01

    Eight current models for describing radioactivity transport and radiation field growth around water-cooled nuclear power reactors have been reviewed and assessed. A frequent failing of the models is the arbitrary nature of the determination of the important processes. Nearly all modelers agree that the kinetics of deposition and release of both dissolved and particulate material must be described. Plant data must be used to guide the selection and development of suitable improved models, with a minimum of empirically-based rate constraints being used. Limiting case modelling based on experimental data is suggested as a way to simplify current models and remove their subjectivity. Improved models must consider the recent change to 'coordinated water chemistry' that appears to produce normal solubility behaviour for dissolved iron throughout the fuel cycle in PWRs, but retrograde solubility remains for dissolved nickel. Profiles are suggested for dissolved iron and nickel concentrations around the heat transport system in CANDU reactors, which operate nominally at constant chemistry, i.e., pH{sub T} constant with time, and which use carbon steel isothermal piping. These diagrams are modified for a CANDU reactor with stainless steel piping, in order to show the changes expected. The significance of these profiles for transport in PWRs is discussed for further model improvement. (author)

  13. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  14. Impact of nuclear library difference on neutronic characteristics of thorium-loaded light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, H.; Isaka, S.; Nakagome, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Impact of nuclear library difference on neutronic characteristics of thorium-loaded light water reactor fuel is investigated through cell burnup calculations using SRAC code system. Comparison of k ∞ and nuclide composition was made between the results obtained by JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI.8 and JEFF3.0 for (U, Th)O 2 fuels as well as UO 2 fuels, with special interest on the burnup dependence of the neutronic characteristics. The impact of nuclear data library difference on k ∞ of (U, Th)O 2 fuels was found to be significantly large compared to that of UO 2 fuels. Notable difference was also found in nuclide concentration of TRU nuclides. (authors)

  15. Regulation of nuclear power: the case of the light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolph, E.

    1977-06-01

    This report is one of a series of documents that trace the history of the development and commercialization of the light water reactor in the expectation that a better appreciation of the development and commercialization process of this complex technology could be instructive in understanding the regulatory and economic obstacles currently slowing diffusion of that technology and the problems that may be encountered in similar large-scale, high-technology development projects. This regulatory history of the Atomic Energy Commission chronicles the significant events between 1954, when the AEC was given responsibility for regulating nuclear power plants, and 1974, when the AEC was absorbed by the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It identifies the origins of regulatory problems that have arisen during the period and describes how the AEC dealt with them. The history is based, for the most part, on primary source documents: hearings, news reports, and AEC documents

  16. CFD investigation of vertical rod bundles of supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhi

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD v4.02 is used as the numerical simulation tool for the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The numerical simulation is based on the real full 3D rod bundles' geometry of the nuclear reactors. For satisfying the near-wall resolution of y + ≤ 1, the structure mesh with the stretched fine mesh near wall is employed. The validation of the numerical simulation for mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model for the heat transfer of supercritical water is carried out to compare with 3D tube experiments. After the validation, the same mesh generation strategy and the turbulence model are employed to study three types of the geometry frame of the real rod bundles. Through the numerical investigations, it is found that the different arrangement of the rod bundles will induce the different temperature distribution at the rods' walls. The wall temperature distributions are non-uniform along the wall and the values depend on the geometry frame. At the same flow conditions, downward flow gets higher wall temperature than upward flow. The hexagon geometry frame has the smallest wall temperature difference comparing with the others. The heat transfer is controlled by P/D ratio of the bundles.

  17. Aiming at super long term application of nuclear energy. Scope and subjects on the water cooled breeder reactor, the 'reduced moderation water reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2001-01-01

    In order to make possible on nuclear energy application for super long term, development of sodium cooling type fast breeder reactor (FBR) has been carried out before today. However, as it was found that its commercialization was technically and economically difficult beyond expectation, a number of nations withdrew from its development. And, as Japan has continued its development, scope of its actual application is not found yet. Now, a research and development on a water cooling type breeder reactor, the reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR)' using LWR technology has now been progressed under a center of JAERI. This RMWR is a reactor intending a jumping upgrade of conversion ratio by densely arranging fuel bars to shift neutron spectrum to faster region. The RMWR has a potential realizable on full-dress plutonium application at earlier timing through its high conversion ratio, high combustion degree, plutonium multi-recycling, and so on. And, it has also feasibility to solve uranium resource problem by realization of conversion ratio with more than 1.0, to contribute to super long term application of nuclear energy. Here was investigated on an effect of reactor core on RMWR, especially of its conversion ratio and plutonium loading on introduction effect as well as on how RMWR could be contributed to reduction of uranium resource consumption, by drawing some scenario on development of power generation reactor and fuel cycle in Japan under scope of super long term with more than 100 years in future. And, trial calculation on power generation cost of the RMWR was carried out to investigate some subjects at a viewpoint of upgrading on economy. (G.K.)

  18. Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

  19. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team

  20. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed

  1. Development of a method for detecting nuclear fuel debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It is the important issue to fill up each nuclear reactor/containment vessel with water and to take out debris of damaged fuel from them for decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. It is necessary to detect the debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel for the purpose. However, the method is not completely developed in the present stage. Accordingly, we have developed a method for detecting debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization. Experiments of the flow visualization were conducted using two types of water tanks. An optical fiber and a collimator lens were employed for modifying a straight laser beam into a sheet projection. Some visualized images were obtained through the experiments. Particle Image Velocimetry, i.e. PIV, analysis was applied to the images for quantitative flow rate analysis. Consequently, it is considered that the flow visualization method has a possibility for the practical use. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  4. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  5. The Nuclear option for U.S. electrical generating capacity additions utilizing boiling water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrity, T.F.; Wilkins, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The technology status of the Advanced Boiling Water (ABWR) and Simplified Boiling Water (SBWR) reactors are presented along with an analysis of the economic potential of advanced nuclear power generation systems based on BWR technology to meet the projected domestic electrical generating capacity need through 2005. The forecasted capacity needs are determined for each domestic North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region. Extensive data sets detailing each NERC region's specific generation and load characteristics, and capital and fuel cost parameters are utilized in the economic analysis of the optimal generation additions to meet this need by use of an expansion planning model. In addition to a reference case, several sensitivity cases are performed with regard to capital costs and fuel price escalation

  6. Continuous radiochemical analysis of fission products in a nuclear reactor water coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Zakharov, L.K.; Leont'ev, G.G.; Mel'nikov, V.A.; Orlenkov, I.S.; Slutskij, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Method for continuous radiochemical analysis of I, Cs, Ba, Sr and Ce isotopes in a reactor water heat-transfer agent was developed. A continuous two-dimensional chromatographic process of complex mixtures separation of substances proved to be feasible on several parallel sorbent layers, which moved at constant velocities and separated by stationary intermediate collectors. Tests on model solutions containing I, Ce, Cs and Ba isotopes and on heat-carrier samples showed quantitative separation of elements. The results were indicative of a basic possibility of using multisorbent chromatographs for continuous control of multicomponent mixtures, particularly for control of radioactive fission product compositions in water heat-transfer agents in nuclear power plants. A diagram is shown for a two-dimensional chromatographic separation of a multicomponent mixture. Also shown is a flow chart of an installation for continuous control of iodine and cesium isotope activities

  7. Detection of heavy-water leaks in nuclear reactors : a novel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.; Gor, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, BARC has designed, developed and produced several high sensitivity mass spectrometer helium leak detectors over a period of two decades. Sometimes back, when there was a problem of detecting heavy water leaks in situ in one of the nuclear power reactors of the Department of Atomic Energy, it was referred to this division for a technical solution. After discussing with the site engineers, the various problems involved in the on-line detection of heavy water leaks especially near the end fittings of the coolant assemblies, a novel method of leak detection was developed. Some of the salient features of the method and the results obtained in the laboratory tests are given in this paper. (author)

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-10-16

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value.

  10. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  11. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Rika; Kawabe, Ryuhei.

    1989-01-01

    A venturi scrubber is connected to a nuclear reactor container. Gases containing radioactive aerosols in the container are introduced into the venturi scrubber in the form of a high speed stream under the pressure of the container. The radioactive aerosols are captured by inertia collision due to the velocity difference between the high speed gas stream and water droplets. In the case of the present invention, since the high pressure of the reactor container generated upon accident is utilized, compressor, etc. is no more required, thereby enabling to reduce the size of the aerosol removing device. Further, since no external power is used, the radioactive aerosols can be removed with no starting failure upon accidents. (T.M.)

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  13. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  14. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  15. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tooru; Murase, Michio; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Masataka; Sumita, Isao; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a chamber in communication with a wet well of a pressure suppression chamber is disposed and situated to such a position that the temperature is lower than a chamber containing pool water upon occurrence of loss of coolant accident. In addition, the inner surface of the pressure suppression chamber is constituted with steel walls in contact with pool water, and an outer circumferential pool is disposed at the outer circumferential surface thereof. Further, a circulation channel is disposed, and a water intake port is disposed at a position higher than an exit to the pool water, and a water discharge port is opened in the pool water at a position lower than the exit to the pool water. With such a constitution, the allowable temperature of the pressure suppression pool water can be elevated to a saturated steam temperature corresponding to the resistant pressure of the container, so that the temperature difference between the pressure suppression pool and the outer side thereof is increased by so much, to improve thermal radiation performance. Accordingly, it can be utilized as a pressure suppression means for a plant of greater power. Further, thermal conduction efficiency from the pool water region of the pressure suppression chamber to the outer circumferential pool water is improved, or thermal radiation area is enlarged due to the circulation channel, to improve the heat radiation performance. (N.H.)

  16. Thermal-hydraulic R and D infrastructure for water cooled reactors of the Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Jain, V.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    R and D has been the critical ingredient of Indian Nuclear Power Program from the very inception. Approach to R and D infrastructure has been closely associated with the three-stage nuclear power program that was crafted on the basis of available resources and technology in the short-term and energy security in the long-term. Early R and D efforts were directed at technologies relevant to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) which are currently the mainstay of Indian nuclear power program. Lately, the R and D program has been steered towards the design and development of advanced and innovative reactors with the twin objective of utilization of abundant thorium and to meet the future challenges to nuclear power such as enhanced safety and reliability, better economy, proliferation resistance etc. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is an Indian innovative reactor currently being developed to realize the above objectives. Extensive R and D infrastructure has been created to validate the system design and various passive concepts being incorporated in the AHWR. This paper provides a brief review of R and D infrastructure that has been developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for thermal-hydraulic investigations for water-cooled reactors of Indian nuclear power program. (author)

  17. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  19. Transmutation of nuclear waste in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, K.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Pilate, S.; Wehmann, U.K.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this joint study of ECN, Belgonucleaire, and Siemens is to investigate possibilities for transmutation of nuclear waste in regular nuclear reactors or in special transmutation devices. Studies of possibilities included the limits and technological development steps which would be needed. Burning plutonium in fast reactors, gas-cooled high-temperature reactors and light water reactors (LWR) have been considered. For minor actinides the transmutation rate mainly depends on the content of the minor actinides in the reactor and to a much less degree on the fact whether one uses a homogeneous system (with the actinides mixed into the fuel) or a heterogeneous system. If one wishes to stabilise the amount of actinides from the present LWRs, about 20% of all nuclear power would have to be generated in special burner reactors. It turned out that reactor transmutation of fission products would require considerable recycling efforts and that the time needed for a substantial transmutation would be rather long for the presently available levels of the neutron flux. If one would like to design burner systems which can serve more light water reactors, a large effort would be needed and other burners (possibly driven by accelerators) should be considered. (orig.)

  20. Preliminary Assessment of Heavy-Water Thorium Reactors in the Brazilian Nuclear Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvo Brito, S. de; Lepecki, W. P.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Radioativas, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    1968-04-15

    Since December 1965, the Instituto de Pesquisas Radioativas has been studying for the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission the feasibility of a thorium reactor programme in Brazil; since June 1966, the programme has been developed in close co-operation with the French Atomic Energy Commission. A reference conceptual design of a heavy-water-cooled and -moderated thorium converter reactor has been developed. The main features of that concept are the use of a prestressed-concrete pressure vessel, integrated arrangement of the primary circuit and the possibility of on-load fuel management. Economic competitiveness could be the result of high compactness, low capital costs and low fuel consumption. The technology involved is not very sophisticated; intensive engineering development work must be done in areas like fuel charge machine, concrete vessel insulation, and proper design of heat exchangers, but it is the feeling of the Group that these problems could be solved without seriously compromising the economic feasibility of the concept. Preliminary studies were made on the alternative use of enriched uranium or plutonium as a feed for the programme; in the latter case, plutonium could be produced in natural uranium reactors of the same type. The general conditions favouring each of these approaches to the thorium cycle have been determined, in particular those related to the costs of the fissile materials in the world market and to the country's policy related to nuclear fuel imports. The results of the preliminary studies are very encouraging and could justify the beginning of a research and development programme leading to the construction of a prototype in the 1970's. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1989-01-01

    Aerosol filters considered so far for nuclear reactor containers in conventional BWR type nuclear power plants make the facility larger and involve a risk of clogging. In view of the above, in the present invention, the diameter of a flow channel of gases entering from a bent pipe to a suppression pool is made smaller thereby decreasing the diameter of gas bubbles in the supperssional pool. Since this reduces the force of surface tension, the diameter of resulted gas bubbles is made remarkably smaller as compared with the case where the gases are released from the lower end of the bent pipe. Since the absorption velocity of bubble-entrained aerosols into water is in proportion to the square of the bubble diameter, the absorption efficiency can be increased remarkably by reducing the diameter of the gas bubbles. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the efficiency of eliminating radioactivity of released gases. (K.M.)

  2. Method for operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to judge the fuel failures, if any, without opening a reactor container for BWR type reactors, a method has been described for measuring the difference between the temperature dependent iodine spike value and the pressure dependent iodine spike value in the pressure vessel. Method: After the scram of a nuclear reactor, steam generated by decay heat is condensed in a remaining heat exchanger and cooling water is returned through a recycling pipe line to a reactor core. At the same time, a control rod drive system pump is operated, the reactor core is filled with the cooling water. Then, the coolant is taken from the recycling pipe line to cool the reactor core. After applying the temperature fluctuation, the cooling water is sampled at a predetermined time interval at a sampling point to determine the changes with time in the radioactive concentration of iodine. When the radioactivity of iodine in the cooling water is lowered sufficiently by a reactor purifying system, the nuclear reactor vessel is depressurized. After applying pressure fluctuation, iodine spike value is determined. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Exergy analysis of a system using a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, M.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M. A.; Pioro, I

    2007-01-01

    The power generation efficiency of nuclear plants is mainly determined by the permissible temperatures and pressures of the nuclear reactor fuel and coolants. These parameters are limited by materials properties and corrosion rates and their effect on nuclear reactor safety. The advanced materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ steam as a coolant and heat carrier, permit the increased steam parameters (outlet temperature up to 625 degree C and pressure of about 25 MPa). Supercritical water-cooled (SCW) nuclear power plants are expected to increase the power generation efficiency from 35 to 45%. Supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors can be linked to thermochemical water splitting cycles for hydrogen production. An increased steam temperature from the nuclear reactor makes it also possible to utilize its energy in thermochemical water splitting cycles. These cycles are considered by many as one of the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require a heat supply at the temperatures over 550-600 degree C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump which increases the temperature the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. A high temperature chemical heat pump which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with a SCW nuclear plant on one side and thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature level of the 'nuclear' heat and, thus, the intensity of

  4. Surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong-Sun; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Park, Dae-Gyu; Jung, Yang-Hong; Yoo, Byung-Ok; Oh, Wan-Ho; Baik, Seung-Je; Koo, Dae-Seo; Lee, Key-Soon

    1999-01-01

    The surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels were established to monitor the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in the beltline according to US NRC 10 CFR 50 App. G, US NRC RG1.99-rev.2, ASTM E185-82 and E185-94 in Irradiated Materials Examination Facility(IMEF). The surveillance capsule was transported from NPPs pool sites to KAERI IMEF by using a shipping cask. The capsule was cut and dismantled by capsule cutting machine and milling machine in M2 hot cell. Charpy tests and tension tests were performed in M5a and M5b hot cells respectively. Especially the EPMA located at hot lab was used to analyze the Ni and Cu wt% composition of base metal and weld for predicting the adjusted reference temperature(ART). The established process and test results were summarized in this paper. (author)

  5. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 2, presents papers on: Severe accident research; Severe accident and policy implementation; and Accident management. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  6. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels

  7. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Shang, E-mail: zhi.shang@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lo, Simon, E-mail: simon.lo@uk.cd-adapco.com [CD-adapco, Trident House, Basil Hill Road, Didcot OX11 7HJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In a vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in a horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-{epsilon} turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculation region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR.

  8. CFD in supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR) with horizontal tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Zhi; Lo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The commercial CFD code STAR-CD 4.02 is used as a numerical simulation tool for flows in the supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor (SCWR). The basic heat transfer element in the reactor core can be considered as round tubes and tube bundles. Reactors with vertical or horizontal flow in the core can be found. In vertically oriented core, symmetric characters of flow and heat transfer can be found and two-dimensional analyses are often performed. However, in horizontally oriented core the flow and heat transfer are fully three-dimensional due to the buoyancy effect. In this paper, horizontal tubes and tube bundles at SCWR conditions are studied. Special STAR-CD subroutines were developed by the authors to correctly represent the dramatic change in physical properties of the supercritical water with temperature. From the study of single round tubes, the Speziale quadratic non-linear high-Re k-ε turbulence model with the two-layer model for near wall treatment is found to produce the best results in comparison with experimental data. In tube bundle simulations, it is found that the temperature is higher in the top half of the bundle and the highest tube wall temperature is located at the outside tubes where the flow rate is the lowest. The secondary flows across the bundle are highly complex. Their main effect is to even out the temperature over the area within each individual recirculating region. Similar analysis could be useful in design and safety studies to obtain optimum fuel rod arrangement in a SCWR. (author)

  9. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  10. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  11. Indian advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of important issues like safety, waste management, economics etc. are to be addressed. To do this, a number of advanced reactor designs as well as fuel cycle technologies are being pursued worldwide. The advanced reactors being developed in India are the AHWR and the CHTR. Both the reactors use thorium based fuel and have many passive features. This paper describes the Indian advanced reactors and gives a brief account of the international initiatives for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (author)

  12. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  13. Method of safely operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of safely operating an nuclear reactor, comprising supporting a load applied to a reactor container partly with secondary container facilities thereby reducing the load borne by the reactor container when water is injected into the core to submerge the core in an emergency. Method: In a reactor emergency, water is injected into the reactor core thereby to submerge the core. Further, water is injected into a gap between the reactor container and the secondary container facilities. By the injection of water into the gap between the reactor container and the secondary container facilities a large apparent mass is applied to the reactor container, as a result of which the reactor container undergoes the same vibration as that of the secondary container facilities. Therefore, the load borne by the reactor container itself is reduced and stress at the bottom part of the reactor container is released. This permits the reactor to be operated more safely. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  15. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  16. Emergency cooling system with hot-water jet pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.O.W.

    1977-01-01

    The ECCS for a PWR or BWR uses hot-water jet pumps to remove the thermal energy generated in the reactor vessel and stored in the water. The hot water expands in the nozzle part (Laval nozzle) of the jet pump and sucks in coolant (borated water) coming from a storage tank containing subcooled water. This water is mixing with the hot water/steam mixture from the Laval nozzle. The steam is condensed. The kinetic energy of the water is converted into a pressure increase which is sufficient to feed the water into the reactor vessel. The emergency cooling may further be helped by a jet condenser also operating according to the principle of a jet pump and condensing the steam generated in the reactor vessel. (DG) [de

  17. Two-phase flow in the upper plenum of a boiling water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan

    2003-01-01

    The end part of the Emergency Core Spray System (ECSS) of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) at Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is situated in the Upper Plenum. It consists of a pipe network equipped with water injection nozzles. In case of Lost-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs), the ECSS should maintain the core covered by water and, at the same time, rapidly cool and decompress the reactor by means of cold water injection. In similar reactors, some welds belonging to the ECSS support have, after a period of time, shown crack indications. Inspection, repair or replacement of these welds is time consuming and expensive. For this reason, it has now been decided to permanently remove the end part of the ECSS and to replace it by water injection in the Downcomer. However, this removal should not be accompanied by undesirable effects like an increase in the moisture of the steam used for operating the turbines. To investigate the effect of this removal on the steam moisture, a CFD analysis of the two-phase flow in the Upper Plenum of Unit 3, with and without ECSS, has been carried out by means of a two-phase Euler model in FLUENT 6.0. The inlet conditions are given by an analysis of the core kinetics and thermal hydraulics by mean of the POLCA-code. The outlet conditions, i. e. the steam separator pressure drops, are given by empirical correlations from the experiments carried out at the SNORRE facility. The predicted the mass flow-rates to each separator, together with empirical correlations for the moisture content of the steam leaving the separators and the steam dryer, indicate a slight decrease in the steam moisture when the ECSS is removed. Also, a minor decrease in pressure losses over the Upper Plenum is achieved with this removal. On the other hand, rounding the sharp edges of the inlet openings to the steam separators at the shroud cover may give a large reduction in pressure losses

  18. Method of 16N generation for test of radiation controlled channels at nuclear power stations with water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khryachkov, V.A.; Bondarenko, I.P.; Dvornikov, P.A.; Zhuravlev, B.V.; Kovtun, S.N.; Khromyleva, T.A.; Pavlov, A.V.; Roshchin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    The preferences of nuclear reaction use for radiation control channels test in water-cooled power reactors have been analyzed in the paper. The new measurements for more accurate determination of reaction cross section energy dependence have been carried out. A set of new methods for background reducing and improvement of events determination reliability has also been developed [ru

  19. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  20. The nuclear accident of Fukushima Daiichi - Management of contaminated waters from damaged reactors. Situation at the end of June 2103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report first describes the water accumulation and continuous flow in buildings of the Fukushima nuclear power station. This water has different origins: some was used to cool the damaged reactors, and some comes from the underground. Waters under buildings must to pumped, processed and stored. The report describes the main objectives of water processing (desalinating and partial removal of radionuclides) and how they are addressed by Tepco. The last part briefly describes how and where Tepco is storing this always increasing volume of processed waters, with of course other water-tightness problems

  1. The pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor technology has reached a maturity that has engendered a new surge of innovation, which in turn, has led to significant advances in the technology. These advances, characterized by bold thinking but conservative execution, are resulting in nuclear plant designs which offer significant performance and safety improvements. This paper describes the innovations which are being designed into mainstream PWR technology as well as the desings which are resulting from such innovations. (author)

  2. Separated type nuclear superheating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Kazuki.

    1993-01-01

    In a separated type nuclear superheating reactor, fuel assemblies used in a reactor core comprise fuel rods made of nuclear fuel materials and moderator rods made of solid moderating materials such as hydrogenated zirconium. Since the moderating rods are fixed or made detachable, high energy neutrons generated from the fuel rods are moderated by the moderating rods to promote fission reaction of the fuel rods. Saturated steams supplied from the BWR type reactor by the fission energy are converted to high temperature superheated steams while passing through a steam channel disposed between the fuel rods and the moderating rods and supplied to a turbine. Since water is not used but solid moderating materials sealed in a cladding tube are used as moderation materials, isolation between superheated steams and water as moderators is not necessary. Further, since leakage of heat is reduced to improve a heat efficiency, the structure of the reactor core is simplified and fuel exchange is facilitated. (N.H.)

  3. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loenhout, Gerard van [Flowserve B.V., Etten-Leur (Netherlands). Nuclear Services and Solutions Engineering; Hurni, Juerg

    2014-07-01

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. The paper describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motorgenerator set.

  4. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenhout, Gerard van; Hurni, Juerg

    2014-01-01

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. The paper describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motorgenerator set.

  5. Nuclear and thermal analyses of supercritical-water-cooled solid breeder blanket for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshihiko; Sato, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Kikuchi, Shigeto; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kosaku, Yasuo; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    Within a design study of a fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating technologies of fusion power plant, supercritical water is applied as a coolant of solid breeder blanket to attain high thermal efficiency. The blanket has multi-layer composed of solid breeder pebbles (Li{sub 2}O) and neutron multiplier pebbles (Be) which are radially separated by cooling panels. The first wall and the breeding region are cooled by supercritical water below and above the pseudo-critical temperature, respectively. Temperature distribution and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) have been estimated by one-dimensional nuclear and thermal calculations. The local TBR as high as 1.47 has been obtained after optimization of temperature distribution in the breeder region under the following conditions: neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m{sup 2}, {sup 6}Li enrichment of 30% and coolant temperature at inlet of breeder region of 380degC. In the case of the higher coolant temperature 430degC of the breeder region the local TBR was reduced to be 1.40. This means that the net TBR higher than 1.0 could be expected with the supercritical-water-cooled blanket, whose temperature distribution in the breeder region would be optimized by following the coolant temperature, and where a coverage of the breeder region is assumed to be 70%. (author)

  6. New generation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwaszczewski, S.

    2000-01-01

    The development trends of the construction of nuclear reactors has been performed on the background of worldwide electricity demand for now and predicted for future. The social acceptance, political and economical circumstances has been also taken into account. Seems to Electric Power Research Institute (US) and other national authorities the advanced light water reactors have the best features and chances for further development and commercial applications in future

  7. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  8. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Vinicius Damas

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  11. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  12. Several perspectives on water-chemical cycles for nuclear power stations equipped with type VVER and RBMK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamet, A.P.; Mamet, V.A.; Pashevich, V.I.; Nazarenko, P.N.

    1982-01-01

    Water-chemical cycles for loops I and II of VVER reactors are discussed. These cycles are mixed ammonia-sodium with a variable concentration of boric acid and ammonia hydrazine with a pH factor of 9.1 +/- 0.1. New water-chemical cycles are considered for use in both existing and new nuclear power plants. Application of these new water-chemical cycles showed produce a significant improvement in operating conditions of nuclear power plants. Upon accumulation of sufficient operating experience with these cycles, it should be possible to raise the issue of revising applicable standard documentation

  13. The use of CFD code for numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Vasconcelos, Victor, E-mail: ymo@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    For the experimental study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in Nuclear Reactors, were built at CDTN an acrylic test sections with the same geometric shape of 'hot leg' of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The hydraulic circuit is designed to be used with air and water at pressures near to atmospheric and ambient temperature. Due to the complexity of the CCFL experimental, the numerical simulation has been used. The aim of the numerical simulations is the validation of experimental data. It is a global trend, the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and prediction of physical phenomena related to heat transfer in nuclear reactors. The most used CFD codes are: FLUENT®, STAR- CD®, Open Foam® and CFX®. In CFD, closure models are required that must be validated, especially if they are to be applied to nuclear reactor safety. The Thermal- Hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN offers computing infrastructure and license to use commercial code CFX®. This article describes a review about CCFL and the use of CFD for numerical simulation of this phenomenal for Nuclear Rector. (author)

  14. The use of CFD code for numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Vasconcelos, Victor

    2015-01-01

    For the experimental study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in Nuclear Reactors, were built at CDTN an acrylic test sections with the same geometric shape of 'hot leg' of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The hydraulic circuit is designed to be used with air and water at pressures near to atmospheric and ambient temperature. Due to the complexity of the CCFL experimental, the numerical simulation has been used. The aim of the numerical simulations is the validation of experimental data. It is a global trend, the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and prediction of physical phenomena related to heat transfer in nuclear reactors. The most used CFD codes are: FLUENT®, STAR- CD®, Open Foam® and CFX®. In CFD, closure models are required that must be validated, especially if they are to be applied to nuclear reactor safety. The Thermal- Hydraulics Laboratory of CDTN offers computing infrastructure and license to use commercial code CFX®. This article describes a review about CCFL and the use of CFD for numerical simulation of this phenomenal for Nuclear Rector. (author)

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of the use a chemical heat pump to link a supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor and a thermochemical water-splitting cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved 'steam' parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625degC and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600degC. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the 'nuclear' heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of

  16. Damage evaluation of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor nuclear containment for aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukreja, Mukesh [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: mrkukreja@yahoo.com

    2005-08-01

    Safety assessment of Indian nuclear containments has been carried out for aircraft impact. The loading time history for Boeing and Airbus categories of aircrafts is generated based on the principle of momentum transfer of crushable aircrafts. The case studies include the analysis of BWR Mark III containment as a benchmark problem and analyses of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor containment (inner and outer containment) for impulsive loading due to aircraft impact. Initially, the load is applied on outer containment wall model and subsequently the load is transferred to inner containment after the local perforation of the outer containment wall is noticed in the transient simulation. The analysis methodology evolved in the present work would be useful for studying the behavior of double containment walls and multi barrier structural configurations for aircraft impact with higher energies. The present analysis illustrates that with the provision of double containments for Indian nuclear power plants, adequate reserve strength is available for the case of an extremely low probability event of missile impact generated due to the commercial aircrafts operated in India.

  17. Damage evaluation of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor nuclear containment for aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukreja, Mukesh

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment of Indian nuclear containments has been carried out for aircraft impact. The loading time history for Boeing and Airbus categories of aircrafts is generated based on the principle of momentum transfer of crushable aircrafts. The case studies include the analysis of BWR Mark III containment as a benchmark problem and analyses of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor containment (inner and outer containment) for impulsive loading due to aircraft impact. Initially, the load is applied on outer containment wall model and subsequently the load is transferred to inner containment after the local perforation of the outer containment wall is noticed in the transient simulation. The analysis methodology evolved in the present work would be useful for studying the behavior of double containment walls and multi barrier structural configurations for aircraft impact with higher energies. The present analysis illustrates that with the provision of double containments for Indian nuclear power plants, adequate reserve strength is available for the case of an extremely low probability event of missile impact generated due to the commercial aircrafts operated in India

  18. Assessment of water hammer effects on boiling water nuclear reactor core dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousbia-Salah Anis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex phenomena, as water hammer transients, occurring in nuclear power plants are still not very well investigated by the current best estimate computational tools. Within this frame work, a rapid positive reactivity addition into the core generated by a water hammer transient is considered. The numerical simulation of such phenomena was carried out using the coupled RELAP5/PARCS code. An over all data comparison shows good agreement between the calculated and measured core pressure wave trends. However, the predicted power response during the excursion phase did not correctly match the experimental tendency. Because of this, sensitivity studies have been carried out in order to identify the most influential parameters that govern the dynamics of the power excursion. After investigating the pressure wave amplitude and the void feed back responses, it was found that the disagreement between the calculated and measured data occurs mainly due to the RELAP5 low void condensation rate which seems to be questionable during rapid transients. .

  19. Optimal management of fuel in nuclear reactors with slightly enriched uranium and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiuta, D.

    1994-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis presents the general principles guiding the optimal management of the fuel in CANDU type reactors with slightly enriched uranium. A method is devised which is based on the specific physical characteristics of this type of reactors and makes use of the multipurpose mathematical programming satisfying economical and nuclear safety requirements. The main goal of this work was the establishing of a refueling optimal methodology at equilibrium maintaining the reactor critical during operation. It also minimizes the fuel cycle cost through minimization of the utilized fissile material and at the same time by maximizing the reactor duty time through an optimal chain of refilling operations. This work can be considered as a contribution to a future project of CANDU type reactor core based on slightly enriched uranium. 74 Figs., 9 Tabs., 62 Refs

  20. An evaluation of light water breeder reactor system (LWBR) as an alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, I.L.

    1981-01-01

    The LWBR system as an alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil, was technically and economically evaluated. The LWBR system has been characterized comparatively with the Pressurized Water Reactors through technological and investment cost analysis and through the analysis of the processes and unit costs of the fuel cycle stages. The characteristics of the LWBR system in comparison to the PWR system, with respect to utilization and cumulative consumption of uranium and thorium resources, fuel cycle processes and associated costs have been determined for possible alternatives of nuclear power participation in the Brazilian hidro-thermal electricity generating system. The analysis concluded that the LWBR system does not represent an attractive alternative for nuclear power generation in Brazil and even has no potential to compete with conventional Pressurized Water Reactors. (Author) [pt

  1. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  2. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  3. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  4. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E., E-mail: thiago.brito86@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: wagner@unicap.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  5. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E.; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  6. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1970-04-01

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  7. A multi-stage-flash desalination plant of relative small performance with an integrated pressurized water reactor as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, M.; Petersen, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination-plants with a performance in the range of 10,000 to 80,000 m 3 /d heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the integrated pressurized water reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show, that due to the fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (orig.) [de

  8. Energy from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospe, J.

    1977-01-01

    This VDI-Nachrichten series has the target to provide a technical-objective basis for the discussion of the pros and cons of nuclear power. The first part deals with LWR-type reactors which so far have prevailed in nuclear power generation. (orig.) [de

  9. Method of avoiding hazards resulting from accidents in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, S.; Schretzmann, K.; Schumacher, G.

    1984-01-01

    In water-cooled reactors, e.g. BWRs and PWRs, elemental hydrogen is released by hydrolysis (in-leakage). In case of an accident in these reactors or at emergency cooling of e.g., a gas-cooled reactor with water additional hydrogen is produced by chemical reactions of the water with the cladding material. In order to prevent hydrogen pressurizing and the formation of a detonating gas mixture, dry powder containers are provided for in the endangered compartments of the reactor. In case of danger powdered CuO, MnO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , or CdO, the oxygen content of which recombines with the hydrogen, is ejected from them. In addition, an extinguishing substance with an anticatalytic resp. inhibition effect and/or an inert gas of the group N 2 , He, Ar, CO 2 may be admixed to the powder resp. powder mixture. (orig./PW)

  10. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  11. Technical limits on performance reserves and life expectancy in nuclear power stations with light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, R.; Brosi, S.; Duijvestijn, G.

    1990-01-01

    The safety margin (i.e. the difference between the loads equipment can take and those actually imposed on components) in a reactor pressure vessel is a major factor in the life expectancy of a nuclear power station. This safety margin is reduced considerably by reductions in the toughness of equipment caused by neutron irradiation and growth of cracks. Once the minimum safety margin is infringed, the nuclear power station is at the end of its working life. 13 figs., 11 refs

  12. Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty for the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor II: Full core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, S.E.; Buijs, A.; Pencer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H-2, Pu-239, and Th-232 make large contributions to SCWR modelling sensitivity. • H-2, Pu-239, and Th-232 make large contributions to SCWR modelling uncertainty. • Isotopes of Zr make large contributions to SCWR modelling uncertainty. - Abstract: Uncertainties in nuclear data are a fundamental source of uncertainty in reactor physics calculations. To determine their contribution to uncertainties in calculated reactor physics parameters, a nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty study is performed on the Canadian supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to the neutron multiplication factor k eff are 6.31 mk for the SCWR at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and 6.99 mk at the end of cycle (EOC). Both of these uncertainties have a statistical uncertainty of 0.02 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR) are 1.0 mk and 0.9 mk for BOC and EOC, respectively, both with statistical uncertainties of 0.1 mk. The nuclear data uncertainty contributions to other reactivity parameters range from as low as 3% of to as high as ten times the values of the reactivity coefficients. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in the reactor physics parameters are Pu-239, Th-232, H-2, and isotopes of zirconium

  13. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loenhout, Gerard van [Flowserve B.V., Etten-Leur (Netherlands). Nuclear Services and Solutions Engineering; Hurni, Juerg

    2015-05-15

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core by feeding into multiple stationary jet pumps inside the vessel. Together with the jet pumps, they allow station operators to vary coolant flow and variable pump speed provides the best and most stable reactor power control. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. This article describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motor-generator set. This article will also discuss the 2,500 hour laboratory test results conducted under reactor recirculation pump sealing conditions using a newly developed seal face technology recently implemented to overcome challenges when sealing neutral, ultra-pure water. In addition, the article will describe the elaborate shaft grounding arrangement and the preliminary measurement results achieved in order to eliminate potential damages to both pump and mechanical seal.

  14. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  15. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55

  16. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  17. Steam generator tube performance. Experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Tapping, R.L.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes at water-cooled reactors during 1985 has been reviewed. Seventy-three of 168 reactors in the survey experienced tube degradation sufficient for the tubes to be plugged. The number of tubes plugged was 6837 or 0.28% of those in service. The leading cause of tube failure was stress corrosion cracking from the primary side. Stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack from the secondary side and pitting were also major causes of tube failure. Unlike most previous years, fretting was a substantial problem at some reactors. Overall, corrosion continued to account for more than 80% of the defects. 20 refs

  18. Nuclear power plant control room task analysis. Pilot study for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barks, D.B.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Eckel, S.

    1982-05-01

    The purposes of this nuclear plant task analysis pilot study: to demonstrate the use of task analysis techniques on selected abnormal or emergency operation events in a nuclear power plant; to evaluate the use of simulator data obtained from an automated Performance Measurement System to supplement and validate data obtained by traditional task analysis methods; and to demonstrate sample applications of task analysis data to address questions pertinent to nuclear power plant operational safety: control room layout, staffing and training requirements, operating procedures, interpersonal communications, and job performance aids. Five data sources were investigated to provide information for a task analysis. These sources were (1) written operating procedures (event-based); (2) interviews with subject matter experts (the control room operators); (3) videotapes of the control room operators (senior reactor operators and reactor operators) while responding to each event in a simulator; (4) walk-/talk-throughs conducted by control room operators for each event; and (5) simulator data from the PMS

  19. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  20. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Zhengang; Yang, Huilong; Satoh, Yuhki; Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie; Abe, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  1. Hydrogen behaviour and mitigation in water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Loggia, E.

    1992-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), within the framework of their safety research activities, initiated and arranged a series of specialist meetings and research contracts on hydrogen behaviour and control. The result of this work is summarized in a report jointly prepared by the two international organizations entitled 'Hydrogen in water-cooled nuclear power reactors'. Independently, the Kurchatov Atomic Energy Institute organized a workshop on the hydrogen issue in Sukhumi, USSR, with CEC and IAEA cooperation. Commonly expressed views have emerged and recommendations were formulated to organize the subsequent seminar/workshop concentrating mainly on the most recent research and analytical projects and findings related to the hydrogen behaviour, and-most importantly-on the practical approaches and engineering solutions to the hydrogen control and mitigation. The seminar/workshop, therefore, addressed the 'theory and practice' aspects of the hydrogen issue. The workshop was structured in the following sessions: combustible gas production; hydrogen distribution; combustion phenomena; combustion effects and threats; and detection and migration

  2. Development of BWR [boiling water reactor] and PWR [pressurized water reactor] event descriptions for nuclear facility simulator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Bovell, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    A number of tools that can aid nuclear facility training developers in designing realistic simulator scenarios have been developed. This paper describes each of the tools, i.e., event lists, events-by-competencies matrices, and event descriptions, and illustrates how the tools can be used to construct scenarios

  3. Artificial intelligence in nuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Ruan; Benitez-Read, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be examined through a SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats). Special attention will be paid to the current cooperation between the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) and the Mexican Nuclear Centre (ININ) on AI-based intelligent control for nuclear reactor operation under the partial support of the National Council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT). (authors)

  4. Considerations regarding design of ion exchange columns for applications in heavy water nuclear reactors- a comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joginder Kumar; Nema, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear reactor applications the principal role of the purification system is to maintain a satisfactory chemistry of moderator and coolant which are different at various stages of reactor operations e.g. during reactor start up, for removal of neutron poison from the moderator, the purification flows are much different compared to steady state operation of the reactor. In order to cater to varying requirements regarding purification load, optimisation in connection with ion exchange column design plays an important role and becomes very challenging in Heavy Water Nuclear Reactors mainly due to the fact that heavy water is very very expensive. In this paper a comprehensive review is made for various designs adopted so far regarding IX column in Indian PHWRs of 220 MWe size for normal operations. Design and operating experience regarding large size IX column used for occasional needs during dilute chemical decontamination of 220 MWe PHWRs is also discussed. The experience regarding development testing of the proposed design of ion exchange column for 500 MWe PHWRs is also discussed

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, C.N.; Bybee, R.T.; Mason, F.L.; Worsham, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention pertains to an improved monitoring system for the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor. It is proposed to combine neutron flux detectors, a thermoelement, and a background radiation detector in one measuring unit. The spatial arrangement of these elements is fixed with great exactness; they are enclosed by an elastic cover and are brought into position in the reactor with the aid of a bent tube. The arrangement has a low failure rate and is easy to maintain. (HP) [de

  7. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1988-01-01

    Cables coverd with non-halogen covering material are used as electric wire cables wired for supplying electric power to a reactor recycling pump. Silicone rubber having specified molecular formula is used for the non-halogen covering material. As a result, formation of chlorine in a nuclear reactor container can be eliminated and increase in the deposited salts to SUS pipeways, etc. can be prevented, to avoid the occurrence of stress corrosion cracks. (H.T.)

  8. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Mikhaj, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  9. Nuclear fuel, with emphasis on its utilization in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, R.; Roshanzamir, M.

    1997-01-01

    Production processes of nuclear fuel on one hand and using nuclear fuels in reactors, particularly PWR Type reactors on the other hand is investigated. The first chapter reviews the relationship between fuel and reactors; The principals of reactor physics in relation with fuel are described shortly. The second chapter reviews uranium exploration and extraction as well as production of uranium concentrate and uranium dioxides. The third chapter is specified to the different procedures of uranium enrichment. In the fourth chapter, processing of uranium dioxide powder and fuel pellet is described. In the fifth chapter fabrication of fuel rod and fuel assemblies is explained thoroughly. The sixth chapter devoted to the different phenomena which occur ed in fuel structure and can during operational time of reactor; damage to fuel rods and developing theoretical models to describe these phenomena and analysis of fuel structure. The seventh chapter discusses how fuel rods are to be experimented during fabrication, operation and development of technology. The eighth chapter explains different fuels such as uranium compounds and mixed oxide fuel of uranium Gadolinium and uranium plutonium and the process of fabrication of zircaloy. In the tenth chapter, fuel reprocessing is investigated and the difficulties of developing this technology is referred

  10. Nuclear reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Shoji; Kato, Ryoichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the cost of reactor buildings and satisfy the severe seismic demands in tank type FBR type reactors. Constitution: In usual nuclear reactor buildings of a flat bottom embedding structure, the flat bottom is entirely embedded into the rock below the soils down to the deck level of the nuclear reactor. As a result, although the weight of the seismic structure can be decreased, the amount of excavating the cavity is significantly increased to inevitably increase the plant construction cost. Cross-like intersecting foundation mats are embedded to the building rock into a thickness capable withstanding to earthquakes while maintaining the arrangement of equipments around the reactor core in the nuclear buildings required by the system design, such as vertical relationship between the equipments, fuel exchange systems and sponteneous drainings. Since the rock is hard and less deformable, the rigidity of the walls and the support structures of the reactor buildings can be increased by the embedding into the rock substrate and floor responsivity can be reduced. This enables to reduce the cost and increasing the seismic proofness. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  12. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since the seventies, economic incentives have led the utilities to drive a permanent evolution of the light water reactor (LWR). The evolution deals with the reactor designs as well as the way to operate them in a more flexible manner. It is for instance related to the fuel technologies and management. On the one hand, the technologies are in continuous evolution, such as the fuel pellets (MOX, Gd fuel, or Cr doped fuels..) as well as advanced cladding materials (M5 TM , MDA or ZIRLO). On the other hand, the fuel management is also subject to continuous evolution in particular in terms of increasing the level of burn-up, the reactor (core) power, the enrichment, as well as the duration of reactor cycles. For instance, in a few years in France, the burn-up has raised beyond the value of 39 GWj/t, initially authorized up to 52 GWj/t for the UO 2 fuel. In the near future, utilities foreseen to reach fuel burn-up of 60 GWj/t for MOX fuel and 70 GWj/t for UO 2 fuel. Furthermore, the future reactor of fourth generation will use new fuels of advanced conception. Furthermore with the objective of improving the safety margins, methods and calculation tools used by the utilities in the elaboration of their safety demonstrations submitted to the Safety Authority, are in movement. The margin evaluation methodologies often consist of a calculation chain of best-estimate multi-field simulations (e.g. various codes being coupled to simulate in a realistic way the evolution of the thermohydraulic, neutronic and mechanic state of the reactor). The statistical methods are more and more sophisticated and the computer codes are integrating ever-complex physical models (e.g. three-dimensional at fine scale). Following this evolution, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), whose one of the roles is to examine the safety records and to rend a technical expertise, considers the necessity of reevaluating the safety issues for advanced

  13. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  14. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing

  15. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  16. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  17. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  18. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  19. Exxon nuclear neutronics design methods for pressurized water reactors. Supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogen, F.B.; Stout, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications to the Exxon Nuclear PWR neutronic design calculational methods are presented as well as the results obtained when these improved methods are compared to reactor measurements. The basic PWR design tools remain unchanged; i.e., the XPOSE code is used for generating the basic nuclear parameters, the PDQ-7 code is used for calculating reactivity and x-y power distributions, and the XTG code is used for three-dimensional analysis. The recent start-up experiences at D. C. Cook Unit 1 and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 have provided a significant increase in the data base supporting the current ENC PWR neutronic methods. The verification comparisons contained in the supplement include reactor measurements from D. C. Cook Unit 1, Cycle 2; H. B. Robinson Unit 2, Cycles 4 and 5; Palisades Cycle 2, and R. E. Ginna, Cycle 7

  20. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Ross, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  1. Limiting factor analysis of high availability nuclear plants (boiling water reactors). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, L.G.; Brady, R.M.; Shor, S.W.W.; McCusker, J.T.; Alden, W.M.; Kovacs, S.

    1979-08-01

    The pertinent results are presented of a 16-month study conducted for Electric Power Research Institute by General Electric Company, Bechtel Power Corporation, and Philadelphia Electric Company. The study centered around the Peach Bottom 2 Atomic Power Station, but also included limited study of operations at 20 additional operating boiling water reactors. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate key factors limiting plant availability, and to identify potential improvements for eliminating or alleviating those limitations. The key limiting factors were found to be refueling activities; activities related to the reactor fuel; reactor scrams; activities related to 20 operating systems or major components; delays due to radiation, turbid water during refueling operations, facilities/working conditions, and dirt/foreign material; and general maintenance/repair of valves and piping. Existing programs to reduce the effect on plant unavailability are identified, and suggestions for further action are made

  2. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs.

  3. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs

  4. Numerical simulation study on the air/water countercurrent flow limitation in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morghi, Youssef; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: ssfmorghi@gmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Puente, Jesus, E-mail: jpuente720@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educaçao Tecnologica Celso Suckowda Fonseca (CEFET), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil); Baliza, Ana R., E-mail: baliza@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Eletronuclear Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    After a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the temperature of the fuel elements cladding increases dramatically due to the heat produced by the fission products decay, which is not adequately removed by the vapor contained in the core. In order to avoid this sharp rise in temperature and consequent melting of the core, the Emergency Core Cooling System is activated. This system initially injects borated water from accumulator tanks of the reactor through the inlet pipe (cold leg) and the outlet pipe (hot leg), or through the cold leg only, depending on the plant manufacturer. Some manufacturers add to this, direct injection into the upper plenum of the reactor. The penetration of water into the reactor core is a complex thermo fluid dynamic process because it involves the mixing of water with the vapor contained in the reactor, added to that generated in the contact of the water with the still hot surfaces in various geometries. In some critical locations, the vapor flowing in the opposite direction of the water can control the penetration of this into the core. This phenomenon is known as Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) or Flooding, and it is characterized by the control that a gas exerts in the liquid flow in the opposite direction. This work presents a proposal to use a CFD to simulate the CCFL phenomenon. Numerical computing can provide important information and data that is difficult or expensive to measure or test experimentally. Given the importance of computational science today, it can be considered a third and independent branch of science on an equal footing with the theoretical and experimental sciences. (author)

  5. Nuclear power station with a water-cooled reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Brunner, G.; Jost, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produces radiolysis gases, which are undesirable for corrosion and oxyhydrogen gas reasons. To limit the proportion of this radiolysis gas, the invention provides that catalytic surfaces should be introduced into the primary circuit, to produce recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. These surfaces can be accommodated in the upper part of the reactor pressure vessel. The live steam screen can also have a catalytic surface. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Behaviour of a pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Carl, H.; Kubis, K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the foundation of the design basis accident in a PWR-type nuclear power plant - Loss of Coolant Accident -the actual status of the processes to be expected in the reactor are described. Operating behaviour of the heat removal system and efficiency of the safety systems are evaluated. Final considerations are concerned with the overall behaviour of the plant under such conditions. Probable failures, shut down times and possibilities of repair are estimated. (author)

  7. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo; Izumi, Fumio.

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author)

  8. Design characteristics for pressurized water small modular nuclear power reactors with focus on safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kani, Iraj Mahmoudzadeh [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; Zandieh, Mehdi [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Civil Faculty; International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty; Abadi, Saeed Kheirollahi Hossein [International Univ. of Imam Khomeini (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Architecture Faculty

    2016-05-15

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are a technology, attracting attention. Light water SMR possess an upgraded design case and emphasize the significance of integral models. Beside of these advantages, SMRs has faced numerous challenges, e.g. licensing, cost/investment, safety and security observation, social and environmental issues in building new plants.

  9. Method and apparatus for suppressing water-solid overpressurization of coolant in nuclear reactor power apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanstad, O.J.; Sklencar, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor-coolant relief valve is opened for increase in mass influx if the rate of change of coolant pressure exceeds a setpoint during a predetermined interval, if, during this interval, the coolant temperature is less than a setpoint and if the level of the fluid in the pressurizer is above a predetermined setpoint (water-solid state). (author)

  10. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  12. Process for changing fuel elements of a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.; Rau, P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to change fuel elements, a water-filled duct can be installed between the rector pressure vessel and a space for accommodating the fuel elements. The fuel elements are transported there under water by a fuelling machine. The duct is installed as watertight connection closed on all sides between the reactor pressure vessel and a fuel element transport container brought close to it. The fuelling machine works in this duct. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  14. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  15. Real-time stability monitoring method for boiling water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, K.; Suzuki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A method for real-time stability monitoring is developed for supervising the steady-state operation of a boiling water reactor core. The decay ratio of the reactor power fluctuation is determined by measuring only the output neutron noise. The concept of an inverse system is introduced to identify the dynamic characteristics of the reactor core. The adoption of an adaptive digital filter is useful in real-time identification. A feasibility test that used measured output noise as an indication of reactor power suggests that this method is useful in a real-time stability monitoring system. Using this method, the tedious and difficult work for modeling reactor core dynamics can be reduced. The method employs a simple algorithm that eliminates the need for stochastic computation, thus making the method suitable for real-time computation with a simple microprocessor. In addition, there is no need to disturb the reactor core during operation. Real-time stability monitoring using the proposed algorithm may allow operation under less stable margins

  16. Nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor assembly includes a reactor pressure tank having a substantially cylindrical side wall surrounded by the wall of a cylindrical cavity formed by a biological shield. A rotative cylindrical wall is interposed between the walls and has means for rotating it from outside of the shield, and a probe is carried by the rotative wall for monitoring the pressure tank's wall. The probe is vertically movable relative to the rotative cylindrical wall, so that by the probe's vertical movement and rotation of the rotative cylinder, the reactor's wall can be very extensively monitored. If the reactor pressure tank's wall fails, it is contained by the rotative wall which is backed-up by the shield cavity wall. (Official Gazette)

  17. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  18. Modeling Chilled-Water Storage System Components for Coupling to a Small Modular Reactor in a Nuclear Hybrid Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misenheimer, Corey Thomas

    The intermittency of wind and solar power puts strain on electric grids, often forcing carbonbased and nuclear sources of energy to operate in a load-follow mode. Operating nuclear reactors in a load-follow fashion is undesirable due to the associated thermal and mechanical stresses placed on the fuel and other reactor components. Various Thermal Energy Storage (TES) elements and ancillary energy applications can be coupled to nuclear (or renewable) power sources to help absorb grid instabilities caused by daily electric demand changes and renewable intermittency, thereby forming the basis of a candidate Nuclear Hybrid Energy System (NHES). During the warmer months of the year in many parts of the country, facility air-conditioning loads are significant contributors to the increase in the daily peak electric demand. Previous research demonstrated that a stratified chilled-water storage tank can displace peak cooling loads to off-peak hours. Based on these findings, the objective of this work is to evaluate the prospect of using a stratified chilled-water storage tank as a potential TES reservoir for a nuclear reactor in a NHES. This is accomplished by developing time-dependent models of chilled-water system components, including absorption chillers, cooling towers, a storage tank, and facility cooling loads appropriate for a large office space or college campus, as a callable FORTRAN subroutine. The resulting TES model is coupled to a high-fidelity mPower-sized Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Simulator, with the goal of utilizing excess reactor capacity to operate several sizable chillers in order to keep reactor power constant. Chilled-water production via single effect, lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chillers is primarily examined in this study, although the use of electric chillers is briefly explored. Absorption chillers use hot water or low-pressure steam to drive an absorption-refrigeration cycle. The mathematical framework for a high-fidelity dynamic

  19. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2013-10-01

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  20. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, E. D.; Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlie...

  1. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  2. Damage evaluation of 500 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor nuclear containment for air craft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukreja, Mukesh; Singh, R.K; Vaze, K.K; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    Non-linear transient dynamic analysis of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) nuclear containment has been carried out for the impact of Boeing and Airbus category of aircraft operated in India. The impulsive load time history is generated based on the momentum transfer of the crushable aircraft (soft missiles) of Boeing and Airbus families on the containment structure. The case studies include the analyses of outer containment wall (OCW) single model and the combined model with outer and inner containment wall (ICW) for impulsive loading due to aircraft impact. Initially the load is applied on OCW single model and subsequently the load is transferred to ICW after the local perforation of the OCW is noticed in the transient simulation. In the first stage of the analysis it is demonstrated that the OCW would suffer local perforation with a peak local deformation of 117 mm for impact due to B707-320 and 196 mm due to impact of A300B4 without loss of the overall integrity. However, this first barrier (OCW) cannot absorb the full impulsive load. In the second stage of the analysis of the combined model, the ICW is subjected to lower impulse duration as the load is transferred after 0.19 sec for B707-320 and 0.24 sec for A300B4 due to the local perforation of OCW. This results in the local deformation of approx. 115 mm for B707-320 and 124 mm for A300B4 in ICW and together both the structures (OCW and ICW) are capable of absorbing the full impulsive load. The analysis methodology evolved in the present work would be useful for studying the behaviour of double containment walls and multi barrier structural configurations for aircraft impact with higher energies. The present analysis illustrates that with the provision of double containments for Indian nuclear power plants, adequate reserve strength is available for the case of an extremely low probability event of missile impact generated due commercial aircraft operated in India. (author)

  3. Approximate computation of hydrothermal conditions of nuclear reactor spray ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarkho, A.A.; Borshchev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for determining the evaporation numbers of nuclear reactor spray ponds which provide necessary reactor cooling during its normal operation under given meteorological conditions with account of restrictions on the cooled water temperature at the reactor entrance

  4. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun; Kang, Hie Chan

    2016-01-01

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins

  5. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins.

  6. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  7. Australia's new nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    On 19 and 20 April 2007, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) celebrated the recent commissioning of its new, world-class, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) research reactor at the Lucas Heights. On the 19th, scientists, business leaders and academics were introduced to the reactor and its technical capacity for the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals, its material science applications, its environmental services and its neutron scattering facilities for business applications. The formal OPAL opening function took place that evening and, on the 20th, Prime Minister John Howard visited ANSTO to be briefed about OPAL and to be shown the work being carried out at Lucas Heights

  8. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chending; Zhao, Fuqiang; Zhang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH 4 ) and CO 2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ∼9.66 × 10 4 t/y and ∼26.6 × 10 4 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration

  9. Water inlet and steam outlet pipes fitted one inside the other for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Donald, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a combined exhaust nozzle and intake pipe system to support a heat exchanger inside a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. It comprises a generally cylindrical part on the exhaust nozzle, the cylindrical part having an inside passage, a flange around the passage and provided with means to secure the exhaust nozzle to the reactor pressure vessel so as to make it fluidtight. The cylindrical part has an aperture inside to take the intake pipe inside the passage so as to enable the intake pipe to project into the heat exchanger. A collar made on the heat exchanger projects from the heat exchanger to the cylindrical nozzle component to establish communication with the inside passage for the fluid [fr

  10. Continuous control of pH value and chloride concentration in a water coolant of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Krasnoperov, V.M.; Fokina, K.G.; Vilkov, N.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    Potentiometry method with the use of flowing cells with two identical electrodes is the simplest and most safe for continuous pH value and chloride control in nuclear reactor circulating circuits. The constant potential on the comparison electrode may be provided by supplying the analyzed solution to it through the ion resin filter of mixed operation. The pos--sibility of a continuous pH value monitoring in a flowing cell with two glass electrodes in parallel is considered. To monitor clorides a cell with two porous chlorine-silver electrodes positioned in series is used. The cells of the design described are shown to be workable in water simulating coolants for water-cooled reactors

  11. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the issue of severe accidents which may occur on operating pressurised water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    While containing other related documents (expert report, mail), this synthetic report analyses and comments some aspects of the assessment and treatment of severe accidents by EDF in its operating PWRs (pressurised water nuclear reactors). These aspects are: the EDF referential related to severe accidents (objectives of consequence limitation and prevention, long term management, probabilistic objectives, radiological objectives, expected performance of equipment and systems), the re-assessment of the 'S3 reference source term' which corresponds to a typical discharge (selection of representative scenarios, new approach based on waste categorization, the taking into account of various species, components and systems), the water management in the reactor tank (risks of explosion, of critical corium level, etc.), the strategy of an anticipated opening of the containment envelope venting-filtration device in order to avoid a core fusion, and the risk associated by a cesspool filling-in by debris

  12. Passive Safety Systems in Advanced Water Cooled Reactors (AWCRS). Case Studies. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    This report presents the results from the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) collaborative project (CP) on Advanced Water Cooled Reactor Case Studies in Support of Passive Safety Systems (AWCR), undertaken under the INPRO Programme Area C. INPRO was launched in 2000 - on the basis of a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21) - to ensure that nuclear energy is available in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, and it seeks to bring together all interested Member States to consider actions to achieve innovation. An important objective of nuclear energy system assessments is to identify 'gaps' in the various technologies and corresponding research and development (R and D) needs. This programme area fosters collaboration among INPRO Member States on selected innovative nuclear technologies to bridge technology gaps. Public concern about nuclear reactor safety has increased after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident caused by the loss of power to pump water for removing residual heat in the core. As a consequence, there has been an increasing interest in designing safety systems for new and advanced reactors that are passive in nature. Compared to active systems, passive safety features do not require operator intervention, active controls, or an external energy source. Passive systems rely only on physical phenomena such as natural circulation, thermal convection, gravity and self-pressurization. Passive safety features, therefore, are increasingly recognized as an essential component of the next-generation advanced reactors. A high level of safety and improved competitiveness are common goals for designing advanced nuclear power plants. Many of these systems incorporate several passive design concepts aimed at improving safety and reliability. The advantages of passive safety systems include simplicity, and avoidance of human intervention, external power or signals. For these reasons, most

  13. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  14. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  15. Coupled thermohydraulic-neutronic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors: a review of the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Rey, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the current state of the art on the topic of coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs). The topic of BWR instabilities is of great current relevance since it affects the operation of a large number of commercial nuclear reactors. The recent trends towards introduction of high efficiency fuels that permit reactor operation at higher power densities with increased void reactivity feedback and decreased response times, has resulted in a decrease of the stability margin in the low-flow, high-power region of the operating map. This trend has resulted in a number of 'unexpected' instability events. For instance, United States plants have experienced two instability events recently, one of them resulted in an automatic reactor scram; in Spain, two BWR plants have experienced unstable limit cycle oscillations that required operator action to suppress. Similar events have been experienced in other European countries. In recent years, BWR instabilities has been one of the more exciting topics of work in the area of transient thermohydraulics. As a result, significant advances in understanding the physics behind these events have occurred, and a 'new and improved' state of the art has emerged recently. (authors). 6 figs., 57 refs., 1 appendix

  16. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  17. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  18. Nuclear reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a nuclear reactor core and a fuel storage area while the fuel assembies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. The system comprises an in-vessel fuel transfer machine located inside the reactor vessel and an ex-vessel fuel transfer machine located in a fuel storage tank. The in-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises two independently rotatable frames with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed on the lower rotatable frame. The ex-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises one frame with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed thereon. The pivotable apparatuses are capable of being aligned with each other to transfer a fuel assembly between the reactor vessel and fuel storage tank while the fuel assembly remains completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. 9 claims, 7 figures

  19. Five MW Nuclear Heating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dafang; Dong Duo; Su Qingshan

    1997-01-01

    The 5 MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR-5) developed and designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has been operated for four winter seasons since 1989. During the time of commissioning and operation a number of experiments including self-stability, self-regulation, and simulation of ATWS etc. were carried out. Some operating experiences such as water chemistry, radiation protection and environmental impacts and so on were also obtained at the same time. All of these results demonstrate the design of the NHR-5 is successful. (author). 9 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs

  20. Five MW Nuclear Heating Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafang, Zhang; Duo, Dong; Qingshan, Su [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The 5 MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR-5) developed and designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has been operated for four winter seasons since 1989. During the time of commissioning and operation a number of experiments including self-stability, self-regulation, and simulation of ATWS etc. were carried out. Some operating experiences such as water chemistry, radiation protection and environmental impacts and so on were also obtained at the same time. All of these results demonstrate the design of the NHR-5 is successful. (author). 9 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs.

  1. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  2. Static seals and their application in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Information relative to six types of static seals commonly used in the primary cooling systems of nuclear reactors is compiled. This information includes a description of each type of seal, its material of construction, design features, operating experience, and advantages and disadvantages. The types covered include spiral-wound asbestos-filled gaskets, hollow metallic O-rings, Belleville spring type of gasketed joints, integrated elastomer and metal retainer gaskets, and solid metal gaskets with heavy cross sections. Omega, canopy, and lip seals are discussed briefly, and information on flange design for gasketing is also presented

  3. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  4. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  5. Shields for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The patent concerns shields for nuclear reactors. The roof shield comprises a normally fixed radial outer portion, a radial inner portion rotatable about a vertical axis, and a connection between the inner and outer portions. In the event of hypothecal core disruption conditions, a cantilever system on the inner wall allows the upward movement of the inner wall, in order to prevent loss of containment. (UK)

  6. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described which has an equal number of fuel sub-assemblies and sensing instruments. Each instrument senses temperature and rate of coolant flow of a coolant derived from a group of three sub-assemblies so that an abnormal value for one sub-assembly will be indicated on three instruments thereby providing for redundancy of up to two of the three instruments. The abnormal value may be a precurser to unstable boiling of coolant

  7. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the topic of water way answers to implement in case of accident with core meltdown occurring on operating pressurized water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    This report briefly discusses the efficiency of technical measures adopted for the implementation of water ways as answers to an accident with core meltdown in operating pressurized water nuclear reactors. While mentioning the importance of the hydro-geological characteristics of the various sites, the IRSN asks EDF to plan and implement means to prevent any rejection through water ways for some of these sites, to investigate the possibility of building a geotechnical enclosure, to define a storing-control-treatment-rejection chain which would guarantee an efficient management of the water to be pumped, to study retention phenomena for strontium and caesium isotopes in sands and gravels

  8. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  9. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  10. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  11. Nuclear reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi; Honma, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention comprises a reactor core/reactor system data measuring and controlling device, a radioactivity concentration calculation device for activated coolants for calculating a radioactivity concentration of activated coolants in a main steam and reactor water by using an appropriate physical model, a radioactivity concentration correlation and comparison device for activated coolants for comparing correlationship with a radiation dose and an abnormality alarm device. Since radioactivity of activated primary coolants is monitored at each of positions in the reactor system and occurrence of leakage and the amount thereof from a primary circuit to a secondary circuit is monitored if the reactor has secondary circuit, integrity of the reactor system can be ensured and an abnormality can be detected rapidly. Further, radioactivity concentration of activated primary circuit coolants, represented by 16 N or 15 C, is always monitored at each of positions of PWR primary circuits. When a heat transfer pipe is ruptured in a steam generator, leakage of primary circuit coolants is detected rapidly, as well as the amount of the leakage can be informed. (N.H.)

  12. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  13. Experimental study on the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear reactor containment wall cooled by gravitationally falling water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Ari D.; Umar, Efrison; Suwono, Aryadi; Manalu, Reinhard E. E.

    2012-06-01

    Gravitationally falling water cooling is one of mechanism utilized by a modern nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) for its Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). Since the cooling is closely related to the safety, water film cooling characteristics of the PCCS should be studied. This paper deals with the experimental study of laminar water film cooling on the containment model wall. The influences of water mass flow rate and wall heat rate on the heat transfer characteristic were studied. This research was started with design and assembly of a containment model equipped with the water cooling system, and calibration of all measurement devices. The containment model is a scaled down model of AP 1000 reactor. Below the containment steam is generated using electrical heaters. The steam heated the containment wall, and then the temperatures of the wall in several positions were measure transiently using thermocouples and data acquisition. The containment was then cooled by falling water sprayed from the top of the containment. The experiments were done for various wall heat rate and cooling water flow rate. The objective of the research is to find the temperature profile along the wall before and after the water cooling applied, prediction of the water film characteristic such as means velocity, thickness and their influence to the heat transfer coefficient. The result of the experiments shows that the wall temperatures significantly drop after being sprayed with water. The thickness of water film increases with increasing water flow rate and remained constant with increasing wall heat rate. The heat transfer coefficient decreases as film mass flow rate increase due to the increases of the film thickness which causes the increasing of the thermal resistance. The heat transfer coefficient increases slightly as the wall heat rate increases. The experimental results were then compared with previous theoretical studied.

  14. Steam generator tube failures: world experience in water-cooled nuclear power reactors in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.G.

    1976-11-01

    Steam generator tube failures were reported in 22 out of 62 water-cooled nuclear power plants surveyed in 1975. This was less than in 1974, and the number of the tubes affected was noticeably less. This report summarizes these failures, most of which were due to corrosion. Secondary-water chemistry control, procedures for inspection and repair, tube materials, and failure rates are discussed. (author)

  15. Passive pH adjustment of nuclear reactor containment flood water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlowski, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of automatically and passively adjusting the pH of the recirculating liquid used to flood the containment structure of a nuclear reactor upon the occurence of an accident in order to cool the reactor core, wherein the containment structure has a concrete floor which is provided with at least one sump from which the liquid is withdrawn for recirculation via at least one outlet pipe. The method consists of: prior to flooding and during or prior to normal operation of the reactor, providing at least one perforated basket within at least one sump with the basket containing crystals of a pH adjusting chemical which is soluble in the liquid, and covering each basket with a plastic coating which is likewise soluble in the liquid, whereby upon flooding of the containment structure the liquid in the sump will reach the level of the baskets, causing the coating and the crystals to be dissolved and the chemical to mix with the recirculating liquid to adjust the pH

  16. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  17. Neutron dosimetry at nuclear power plants with light water reactors (LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, B.; Schwarz, W.; Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1989-02-01

    During nuclear start-up of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant in 1986 the neutron radiation fields in the primary and auxiliary component rooms of the containment were investigated using the Single Sphere Albedo Technique and additional measurement techniques. For personnel monitoring albedo neutron dosemeters were used consisting of thermoluminescent detectors and track etch detectors combined with boron converters. Results: (1) The neutron radiation fields reach dose rate values up to 1000 mSv/h at the sleeves of the reactor coolant pipes, in the refuelling pool and the reactor cavity sump. The neutron component varies between 10% in the steam generator rooms up to 92% in the refuelling pool. (2) The mean value of the effective neutron energy at the different locations was found to be about 100 keV. Thermal neutrons contribute with about 10% to the area dose. (3) By direct intercomparisons and different evaluation methods of the Single Sphere Albedo Dosemeter it was shown, that rem-counters used within routine monitoring in the mixed radiation fields of the LWR overestimate the neutron dose rate only insignificantly (+20%) and are therefore usable for practical radiation protection work. (4) The sensitivity of albedo neutron dosemeters allows the detection of neutrons above 10 μSv. The contribution of neutrons to the total personnel dose was 25% in maximum. For the evaluation of albedo detectors a constant calibration factor can be applied. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Study of the effect of slight variants to a 3-loop pressurized water nuclear reactor design in order to improve the reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, F.; Oliveri, E.; Taibi, S.; Vella, G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve the safety features of a 3-loop pressurized water nuclear reactor we propose a slight design variant consisting in the introduction of a bypass hole in the divider plate of the coolant chambers of the steam generators. The aim is to reduce both the extent and the duration of the core exposure and thus the maximum value of the peak cladding temperature, in case of a hypothetical cold leg small break loss of coolant accident. The proposal, as attested by a preliminary RELAP5/MOD3 analysis, seems to deserve some attention. (6 figures) (Author)

  19. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  20. Nuclear reactor cavity streaming shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, R.J.; Stephen, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The upper portion of a nuclear reactor vessel supported in a concrete reactor cavity has a structure mounted below the top of the vessel between the outer vessel wall and the reactor cavity wall which contains hydrogenous material which will attenuate radiation streaming upward between vessel and the reactor cavity wall while preventing pressure buildup during a loss of coolant accident

  1. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  2. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias

    2011-01-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  3. Study of the light and heavy water leaks in nuclear reactors and development of techniques for their detection, location and estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashiruddin Mahmood, S.

    1979-01-01

    In heavy water type nuclear reactors the detection and control of heavy water and light water escapes from different systems is of vital importance in the successful and economic operation of these type of plants. The high cost of heavy water makes it imperative to minimise all such escapes, in order to reduce the loss as well as the upgrading cost of downgraded collection recovered from the reactor building. Original methods and devices have been developed at the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant which successfully solve this problem. This report describes the constructional and operational features of these devices

  4. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  5. Pressurized water reactor in-core nuclear fuel management by tabu search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Natasha J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a tabu search implementation for PWR reload core design. • We conduct computational experiments to find optimal parameter values. • We test the performance of the algorithm on two representative PWR geometries. • We compare this performance with that given by established optimization methods. • Our tabu search implementation outperforms these methods in all cases. - Abstract: Optimization of the arrangement of fuel assemblies and burnable poisons when reloading pressurized water reactors has, in the past, been performed with many different algorithms in an attempt to make reactors more economic and fuel efficient. The use of the tabu search algorithm in tackling reload core design problems is investigated further here after limited, but promising, previous investigations. The performance of the tabu search implementation developed was compared with established genetic algorithm and simulated annealing optimization routines. Tabu search outperformed these existing programs for a number of different objective functions on two different representative core geometries

  6. Multidimensional space-time kinetics of a heavy water moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.; Baumann, N.P.; Jewell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion theory analysis of a series of multidimensional space-time experiments is appraised in terms of the final experiment of the series. In particular, TRIMHX diffusion calculations were examined for an experiment involving free-fall insertion of a 235 U-bearing rod into a heavy water moderated reactor with a large reflector. The experimental transient flux-tilts were accurately reproduced after cross section adjustments forced agreement between static diffusion calculations and static reactor measurements. The time-dependent features were particularly well modeled, and the bulk of the small discrepancies in space-dependent features should be removable by more refined cross-section adjustments. This experiment concludes a series of space-time experiments that span a wide range of delayed neutron holdback effects. TRIMHX calculations of these experiments demonstrate the accuracy of the modeling employed in the code

  7. Economics of radioactive material transportation in the light-water reactor nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; O'Malley, L.C.

    1980-10-01

    This report presents estimates of certain transportation costs, in 1979 dollars, associated with Light-Water Reactor (LWR) once-through and recycle fuel cycles. Shipment of fuel, high-level waste and low-level waste was considered. Costs were estimated for existing or planned transportation systems and for recommended alternate systems, based on the assumption of mature fuel cycles. The annual radioactive material transportation costs required to support a nominal 1000-MW(e) LWR in a once-through cycle in which spent fuel is shipped to terminal storage or disposal were found to be approx. $490,000. Analogous costs for an average reactor operating in a fuel cycle with uranium and plutonim recycle were determined to be approx. $770,000. These results assume that certain recommended design changes will occur in radioactive material shipping systems as a mature fuel cycle evolves

  8. Experiences on reduction of reactor water silica and fresh resin leaching organics for Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, T-J.; Wang, C-H.

    2010-01-01

    The silica level in reactor water of Kuo-Sheng nuclear power plants has been slowly increased from 200 ppb to the high level above 500 ppb in recent years. The results obtained from steam/liquid mass balance calculation indicated that an increase of reactor water silica was mainly caused by continuing equilibrium leakage from deep bed condensate demineralizers, where the ion exchange zone was periodically disturbed by resin backwashing - scrubbing operation. The fastest and the most effective way to reduce the silica inventory in reactor system is to operate by continuously precoating of two sets of the reactor water clean up filter demineralizers to a lower effluent silica end point, and perhaps as frequently as three or four days. Leaching organic contaminants into feed water from the ion exchange resin becomes a key greater problem of current concern for the stable water quality promotion of condensate demineralizer. The presence of those impurities have practically been difficult to analyze by simple quality testing of the resin, and may result in as much as a hundred fold increase in chloride and sulfate in reactor water. As resin displacement with high leachable TOC, a repeated continuous soaking and effectively rinsing is required so that steady state TOC content less than 150 ppb should be achieved in an acceptably short period of time before put in-service. It is clear that cation resin containing high leachables generates high level of sulfates and sometimes also gives unexpected level of chlorides. The current TOC limits in condensate demineralizer effluent with 0.1 ppb become a significant experience to maintain reactor water soluble impurity in low levels. New resin should be subjected to TOC quality control testing prior to acceptance especially when first placed into service. TOC and organic chloride leachables for as-received virgin cation resin that are to be used in condensate polisher should be limited to be less than 100 mg-TOC and 0.5 mg-Cl per

  9. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program. Technical Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimblott, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  10. SARIE upgrade: Nuclear reactor and water systems 'engineering and training' simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, P.

    2006-01-01

    Confronted as of its origins with the on-board layout constraints of the French Navy ships, TECHNICATOME integrates, as of the design, the ergonomics and the risks control related to the human factors. During more than 30 years, TECHNICATOME demonstrated a one of a kind know-how from the design to the execution of powerful, flexible and highly available nuclear compact reactors. A total control which includes up to the supervision and monitoring systems, the acoustic discreetly of the systems and its components, implemented on on-board reactors, testing reactors as well as experimental reactors. The functionalities of simulation were right from the start used by TECHNICATOME during the design phase of these installations to carry out operation engineering analyses on the thermal hydraulic and neutron aspects, to validate the principles of operation of the supervision systems like by the use of digital models in 3D CAD to validate the kinematics of operation or the interactions between systems. More recently, and starting from the end of the Nineties, a thought needs was launched to determine the interests related to the development of a training simulator associated with these installations with objectives, among others, to ensure the phase of initial training of the new operators, to widen the field of the training to the accidental situations, the management of crisis and crews behaviour supervision, the possibilities of replay which support the consolidation of the acquired knowledge(debriefing) with situation resume, and to increase the overall training capacity. An upgrade and modernisation project of these various simulation means was thus launched since 2001 with the objective to optimize the whole of the tasks supported by these means. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    Results from the previously conducted Semiscale Mod-1 ECC injection test series were analyzed. Testing in the LOFT counterpart test series was essentially completed, and the steam generator tube rupture test series was begun. Two tests in the alternate ECC injection test series were conducted which included injection of emergency core coolant into the upper plenum through use of the low pressure injection system. The Loss-of-Fluid Test Program successfully completed nonnuclear Loss-of-Coolant Experiment L1-4. A nuclear test, GC 2-3, in the Power Burst Facility Reactor was performed to evaluate the power oscillation method of determining gap conductance and to determine the effects of initial gap size, fill gas composition, and fuel density on the thermal performance of a light water reactor fuel rod. Additional test results were obtained relative to the behavior of irradiated fuel rods during a fast power increase and during a high power film boiling transient. Fuel model development and verification activities continued for the steady state and transient Fuel Rod Analysis Program, FRAP-S and FRAP-T. A computer code known as RELAP4/MOD7 is being developed to provide best-estimate modeling for reflood during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A prediction of the fourth test in the boiling water reactor (BWR) Blowdown/Emergency Core Cooling Program was completed and an uncertainty analysis was completed of experimental steady state stable film boiling data for water flowing vertically upward in round tubes. A new multinational cooperative program to study the behavior of entrained liquid in the upper plenum and cross flow in the core during the reflood phase of a pressurized water reactor LOCA was defined.

  13. Reactors of different types in the world nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    The status of the world nuclear power is briefly reviewed. It is noted that PWR reactors have decisive significance in the world power. The second place is related to gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactors. Channel-type heavy water moderated reactors are relatively important. Nuclear power future is associated with fast liquid-metal cooled breeder reactors

  14. Design of an integral missile shield in integrated head assembly for pressurized water reactor at commercial nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, Ravi; Watts, Tom Neal; Kamath, Harish

    2015-01-01

    In ICONE22, the authors presented the Integrated Head Assembly (IHA) design concept implemented at Callaway Nuclear Power Plant in Missouri, USA. The IHA concept is implemented to reduce the outage duration and the associated radiation exposure to the workers by reducing critical path time during Plant Refueling Outage. One of the head area components in the IHA is a steel missile shield designed to protect the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) assembly from damaging other safety-related components in the vicinity in the Containment. Per Federally implemented General Design Criteria for commercial nuclear plants in the USA, the design of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) must provide protection from the damages caused by a postulated event of CRDM housing units and their associated parts disengaging from the reactor vessel assembly. This event is considered as a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and assumes that once the CRDM housing unit and their associated parts disengage from the reactor vessel internals assembly, they travel upward by the water jet with the following sequence of events: Per Reference 1, the drive shaft and control rod cluster are forced out of the reactor core by the differential pressure across the drive shaft with the assumption that the drive shaft and control rod cluster, latched together, are fully inserted when the accident occurs. After the travel, the rod cluster control spider will impact the lower side of the upper support plate inside the reactor vessel fracturing the flexure arms in the joint freeing the drive shaft from the control rod cluster. The control rod cluster is stopped by the upper support plate and will remain below the upper support plate during this accident. However, the drive shaft will continue to accelerate in the upward direction until it is stopped by a safety feature in the IHA. The integral missile shield as a safety feature in the IHA is designed to stop the CRDM drive shaft from moving further up in the

  15. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincic, A.

    2009-01-01

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  17. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with pressurized heavy water reactors and measures for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. In 1998, the IAEA completed IAEA-TECDOC-1044 entitled Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for their Resolution and established the associated LWRGSIDB database (Computer Manual Series No. 13). The present compilation, which is based on broad international experience, is an extension of this work to cover pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). As in the case of LWRs, it is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It addresses generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants using PHWRs. In most cases, the measures taken or planned to resolve these issues are also identified. The work on this report was initiated by the Senior Regulators of Countries Operating CANDU-Type Nuclear Power Plants at one of their annual meetings. It was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's programme on National Regulatory Infrastructure for Nuclear Installation Safety and serves to enhance regulatory effectiveness through the exchange of safety related information

  18. Nuclear reactor trip system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Each parameter of the processes of a nuclear reactor and components operatively associated with it is monitored by a set of four like sensors. A trip system normally operates on a ''two out four'' configuration; i.e., to trip the reactor it is necessary that at least two sensors of a set sense an off-normal parameter. This assumes that all sensors are in normal operating condition. However, when a sensor is in test or is subject to maintenance or is defective or disabled, the ''two out of four''configuration would be reduced to a ''one out of three'' configuration because the affected sensor is taken out of service. This would expose the system to the possibility that a single sensor failure, which may be spurious, will cause a trip of the reactor. To prevent this, it is necessary that the affected sensor be bypassed. If only one sensor is bypassed, the system operates on a ''two out of three'' configuration. With two sensors bypassed, the sensing of an off-normal parameter by a third sensor trips the reactor. The by-pass circuit also disables the circuit coupling the by-passed sensor to the trip circuit. (author)

  19. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  20. Evaluation of filters in RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) in OPAL research reactor at ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization) using Gamma Spectrometry System and Liquid Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jim In; Foy, Robin; Jung, Seong Moon; Park, Hyeon Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization(ANSTO) has a research reactor, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor) which is a state-of-art 20 MW reactor for various purposes. In OPAL reactor, there are many kinds of radionuclides produced from various reactions in pool water and those should be identified and quantified for the safe use of OPAL. To do that, it is essential to check the efficiency of filters which are able to remove the radioactive substance from the reactor pool water. There are two main water circuits in OPAL which are RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) water circuits. The reactor service pool is connected to the reactor pool via a transfer canal and provides a working area and storage space for the spent and other materials. Also, HWL is the upper part of the reactor pool water and it minimize radiation dose rates at the pool surface. We collected water samples from these circuits and measured the radioactivity by using Gamma Spectrometry System (GSS) and Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) to evaluate the filters. We could evaluate the efficiency of filters in RSPCS and HWL in OPAL research reactor. Through the measurements of radioactivity using GSS and LSC, we could conclude that there is likely to be no alpha emitter in water samples, and for beta and gamma activity, there are very big differences between inlet and outlet results, so every filter is working efficiently to remove the radioactive substance.

  1. Aspects of the physics and chemistry of water radiolysis by fast neutrons and fast electrons in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, D.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Tsang, K.T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Laughton, P.J

    1998-09-01

    Detailed radiation physics calculations of energy deposition have been done for the coolant of CANDU reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The geometry of the CANDU fuel channel was modelled in detail. Fluxes and energy-deposition rates for neutrons, recoil ions, photons, and fast electrons have been calculated using MCNP4B, WIMS-AECL, and specifically derived energy-transfer factors. These factors generate the energy/flux spectra of recoil ions from fast-neutron energy/flux spectra. The energy spectrum was divided into 89 discrete ranges (energy bins).The production of oxidizing species and net coolant radiolysis can be suppressed by the addition of hydrogen to the coolant of nuclear reactors. It is argued that the net dissociation of coolant by gamma rays is suppressed by lower levels of excess hydrogen than when dissociation is by ion recoils. This has consequences for the modelling of coolant radiolysis by homogeneous kinetics. More added hydrogen is required to stop water radiolysis by recoil ions acting alone than if recoil ions and gamma rays acted concurrently in space and time. Homogeneous kinetic models and experimental data suggest that track overlap is very inefficient in providing radicals from gamma-ray tracks to recombine molecular products in ion-recoil tracks. An inhomogeneous chemical model is needed that incorporates ionizing-particle track structure and track overlap. Such a model does not yet exist, but a number of limiting cases using homogeneous kinetics are discussed. There are sufficient uncertainties and contradictions in the data relevant to the radiolysis of reactor coolant that the relatively high CHC's (critical hydrogen concentration) observed in NRU reactor experiments (compared to model predictions) may be explainable by errors in fundamental data and understanding of water radiolysis under reactor conditions. The radiation chemistry program at CRL has been focused to generate quantitative water-radiolysis data in a

  2. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Forest Hull, S.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Data analysis for high-performance simulations of reactors will be a problem that we address with a new management system. • We describe new input-output libraries for nuclear reactor simulations. • We describe a new user interface for visualizing and analyzing simulation results. • We show the utility of these systems with a 17 × 17 fuel assembly example simulation. • The availability of the code and avenues for collaboration are presented. - Abstract: Building a new generation of fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. One important challenge is the need to share and present results from new high-fidelity, high-performance simulations in an easily usable way. Since modern multiscale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, they will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest (e.g., pin powers, temperatures) with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately available in the community and need to be developed. This paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It describes requirements to build such a system and the technical challenges faced in its development at all levels (simulation, user interface, etc.). An example comparing results from two different simulation suites for a single assembly in a light-water reactor is presented, along with a detailed discussion of the system’s requirements and design

  3. Fuel assemblies for use in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schluderberg, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A fuel assembly for use in pressurized water cooled nuclear fast breeder reactors is described in which moderator to fuel ratios, conducive to a high Pu-U-D 2 O reactor breeding ratio, are obtained whilst at the same time ensuring accurate spacing of fuel pins without the parasitic losses associated with the use of spacer grids. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear power plant with boiling water reactor VK-300 for district heating and electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Lisitza, F.D.; Romenkov, A.A.; Tokarev, Y.I.

    1998-01-01

    The paper considers specific design features of a pressure vessel boiling water reactor with coolant natural circulation and three-step in-vessel steam separation (at draught tube outlet of the upcomer, within zone of overflow from the upcomer to downcomer and in cyclon-type separators). Design description and analytical study results are presented for the passive core cooling system in the case of loss of preferred power and rupture in primary circuit pipeline. Specific features of a primary containment (safeguard vessel) are given for an underground NPP sited in a rock ground. (author)

  5. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  6. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  7. Fast reactors in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkovskii, O

    1981-02-01

    The possible applications are discussed of fast reactor nuclear power plants. Basic differences are explained in fast and thermal reactors, mainly with a view to nuclear fuel utilization. Discussed in more detail are the problems of nuclear fuel reproduction and the nost important technical problems of fast reactors. Flow charts are shown of heat transfer for fast reactors BN-350 (loop design) and BN-600 (integral coolant circuit design). Main specifications are given for demonstration and power fast reactors in operation, under construction and in project-stage.

  8. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  9. Direct potentiometric control of chloride-ion content in water coolant of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Vilkov, N.Ya.; Krasnoperov, V.M.; Epimakhova, L.V.

    1979-01-01

    The work of automatic chloride measuring device designed for continuous determination of chloride-ion concentration in water coolants of nuclear power plants is investigated. A series of experiments have been performed to investigate a device with sensitive element in the form of potentiometric cell with two flowing porous metal silver electrodes (PSE), placed in series. A calibration circuit of chloride measuring devices and PSE is described. A comparison is made between the results obtained by means of automatic chloride measuring device and results of manual control of samples. A conclusion is drawn that automatic chloride measuring devices meet the requirements of nuclear power plants for methods and instruments of control of chloride-ions microconcentration. The development and implantation of automatic chloride-ion analizers will make the analytical control on nuclear power plants easier and make it possible to obtain more reliable information

  10. Sliding Mode Control for Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactors in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansarifar, G.R.; Saadatzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present SMC which is a robust nonlinear controller to control the PWR power. • Xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. • The stability analysis has been based on Lyapunov approach. • Simulation results indicate the high performance of this new control. - Abstract: One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, sliding mode control (SMC) which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) power for the load-following operation problem that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model and one delayed neutron group. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is sufficiently effective so that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the considered region

  11. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  12. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  13. Spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Lezberg, A.J.; Votaw, E.F.; Collingham, M.I.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the cask handling capabilities of those reactors which are operating or under construction. A computerized data base that includes cask handling information was developed with information from the literature and utility-supplied data. The capability of each plant to receive and handle existing spent fuel shipping casks was then evaluated. Modal fractions were then calculated based on the results of these evaluations and the quantities of spent fuel projected to be generated by commercial nuclear power plants through 1998. The results indicated that all plants are capable of receiving and handling truck casks. Up to 118 out of 130 reactors (91%) could potentially handle the larger and heavier rail casks if the maximum capability of each facility is utilized. Design and analysis efforts and physical modifications to some plants would be needed to achieve this high rail percentage. These modifications would be needed to satisfy regulatory requirements, increase lifting capabilities, develop rail access, or improve other deficiencies. The remaining 12 reactors were determined to be capable of handling only the smaller truck casks. The percentage of plants that could receive and handle rail casks in the near-term would be reduced to 64%. The primary reason for a plant to be judged incapable of handling rail casks in the near-term was a lack of rail access. The remaining 36% of the plants would be limited to truck shipments. The modal fraction calculations indicated that up to 93% of the spent fuel accumulated by 1998 could be received at federal storage or disposal facilities via rail (based on each plant's maximum capabilities). If the near-term cask handling capabilities are considered, the rail percentage is reduced to 62%

  14. Requirements and international co-operation in nuclear safety for evolutionary light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles of safety are now well known and implemented world-wide, leading to a situation of harmonisation in accordance with the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Future reactors are expected not only to meet current requirements but to go beyond the safety level presently accepted. To this end, technical safety requirements, as defined by the IAEA document Safety Fundamentals, need be duly considered in the design, the risks to workers and population must be decreased, a stable, transparent and objective regulatory process, including an international harmonisation with respect to licensing of new reactors, must be developed, and the issue of public acceptance must be addressed. Well-performing existing installations are seen as a prerequisite for an improved public acceptability; there should be no major accidents, the results from safety performance indicators must be unquestionable, and compliance with internationally harmonised criteria is essential. Economical competitiveness is another factor that influences the acceptability; the costs for constructing the plant, for its operation and maintenance, for the fuel cycle, and for the final decommissioning are of paramount importance. Plant simplification, longer fuel cycles, life extension are appealing options, but safety will have first priority. The IAEA can play an important role in this field, by providing peer reviews by teams of international experts and assistance to Member States on the use of its safety standards. (author)

  15. Functional issues and environmental qualification of digital protection systems of advanced light-water nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Issues of obsolescence and lack of infrastructural support in (analog) spare parts, coupled with the potential benefits of digital systems, are driving the nuclear industry to retrofit analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with digital and microprocessor-based systems. While these technologies have several advantages, their application to safety-related systems in nuclear power plants raises key issues relating to the systems` environmental qualification and functional reliability. To bound the problem of new I&C system functionality and qualification, the authors focused this study on protection systems proposed for use in ALWRs. Specifically, both functional and environmental qualification issues for ALWR protection system I&C were addressed by developing an environmental, functional, and aging data template for a protection division of each proposed ALWR design. By using information provided by manufacturers, environmental conditions and stressors to which I&C equipment in reactor protection divisions may be subjected were identified. The resulting data were then compared to a similar template for an instrument string typically found in an analog protection division of a present-day nuclear power plant. The authors also identified fiber-optic transmission systems as technologies that are relatively new to the nuclear power plant environment and examined the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber-optic components and systems. One reason for the exercise of caution in the introduction of software into safety-critical systems is the potential for common-cause failure due to the software. This study, however, approaches the functionality problem from a systems point of view. System malfunction scenarios are postulated to illustrate the fact that, when dealing with the performance of the overall integrated system, the real issues are functionality and fault tolerance, not hardware vs. software.

  16. Functional issues and environmental qualification of digital protection systems of advanced light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Wood, R.T.

    1994-04-01

    Issues of obsolescence and lack of infrastructural support in (analog) spare parts, coupled with the potential benefits of digital systems, are driving the nuclear industry to retrofit analog instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems with digital and microprocessor-based systems. While these technologies have several advantages, their application to safety-related systems in nuclear power plants raises key issues relating to the systems' environmental qualification and functional reliability. To bound the problem of new I ampersand C system functionality and qualification, the authors focused this study on protection systems proposed for use in ALWRs. Specifically, both functional and environmental qualification issues for ALWR protection system I ampersand C were addressed by developing an environmental, functional, and aging data template for a protection division of each proposed ALWR design. By using information provided by manufacturers, environmental conditions and stressors to which I ampersand C equipment in reactor protection divisions may be subjected were identified. The resulting data were then compared to a similar template for an instrument string typically found in an analog protection division of a present-day nuclear power plant. The authors also identified fiber-optic transmission systems as technologies that are relatively new to the nuclear power plant environment and examined the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber-optic components and systems. One reason for the exercise of caution in the introduction of software into safety-critical systems is the potential for common-cause failure due to the software. This study, however, approaches the functionality problem from a systems point of view. System malfunction scenarios are postulated to illustrate the fact that, when dealing with the performance of the overall integrated system, the real issues are functionality and fault tolerance, not hardware vs. software

  17. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  18. Nuclear reactor control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an assembly for providing global power control in a nuclear reactor having the core split into two halves. It comprises a disk assembly formed from at least two disks each machined with an identical surface hole pattern such that rotation of one disk relative to the other causes the hole pattern to open or close, the disk assembly being positioned substantially at the longitudinal center of and coaxial with the core halves; and means for rotating at least one of the disks relative to the other

  19. Nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  20. Preliminary definition of the design of a nuclear reactor for research and radioisotope production using natural uranium and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llagostera Beltran, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted about the evolution of the Brazilian importations of radioisotopes, from the beginning of the 70's since they have been increasingly used in the Country. In view of the limited production capacity of radioactive isotopes now existing in Brazil, a nuclear reactor type (natural uranium and heavy water) was defined, for research and production of radioisotopes, wich, besides providing, at least partially, the Brazilian needs of said isotopes, permits a large national participation in its project, construction and operating maintenance. The processes for heavy water production have been analyzed and it could be detected what is the best alternative for the production thereof, in low scale, in Brazil. The options concerning the definition of the main components of the reactor were justified and its most important features were determined, in relation to the neutronic and thermal aspects, being so defined its most significant parameters. The annual quantities were estimated, in terms of total and specific activity, for the radioisotopes that could be obtained by means of the proposed reactor, which, by now, are participating, to a large extent, in the total of Brazilian importation of radioactive isotopes. (Author) [pt

  1. The Swr 1000: a nuclear power plant concept with boiling water reactor for maximum safety and economy of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    2001-01-01

    The SWR 1000 is a design concept for a light water reactor nuclear power plant that meets all requirements regarding plant safety, economic efficiency and environ-mental friendliness. As a result of the plant's safety concept, the occurrence of core damage can, for all practical intents and purposes, be ruled out. If a core melt accident should nevertheless occur, the molten core can be retained inside the RPV, thus ensuring that all consequences of such an accident remain restricted to the plant itself. The power generating costs of the SWR 1000 are lower than with those of coal-fired and combined-cycle power plants. Power generation using nuclear energy does not release carbon dioxide to the environment, thus meeting the need for sustainable protection of our global climate. (author)

  2. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  3. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  4. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  5. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor metal pressure vessel is surrounded by a concrete wall forming an annular space around the vessel. Thermal insulation is in this space and surrounds the vessel, and a coolant-conductive layer is also in this space surrounding the thermal insulation, coolant forced through this layer reducing the thermal stress on the concrete wall. The coolant-conductive layer is formed by concrete blocks laid together and having coolant passages, these blocks being small enough individually to permit them to be cast from concrete at the reactor installation, the thermal insulation being formed by much larger sheet-metal clad concrete segments. Mortar is injected between the interfaces of the coolant-conductive layer and concrete wall and the interfaces between the fluid-conductive layer and the insulation, a layer of slippery sheet material being interposed between the insulation and the mortar. When the pressure vessel is thermally expanded by reactor operation, the annular space between it and the concrete wall is completely filled by these components so that zero-excursion rupture safeguard is provided for the vessel. 4 claims, 1 figure

  6. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Nobuaki.

    1991-01-01

    The secondary container in a nuclear reactor building is made of a transparent structure having a shielding performance such as lead glass, by which the inside of the secondary container can be seen without undergoing radiation exposure. In addition, an operator transportation facility capable of carrying about 5 to 10 operators at one time is disposed, and the side of the facility on the secondary container is constituted with a transparent material such as glass, to provide a structure capable of observing the inside of the secondary container. The ventilation and air conditioning in the operator's transportation facility is in communication with the atmosphere of a not-controlled area. Accordingly, operators at the outside of the reactor building can reach the operator's transportation facility without taking and procedures for entering the controlled area and without undergoing radiation exposure. The inside of the secondary container in the reactor building can be seen from various directions through the transparent structure having the shielding performance. (N.H.)

  7. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  8. CLASSIFICATION OF SYSTEMS FOR PASSIVE AFTERHEAT REMOVAL FROM REACTOR CONTAINMENT OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH WATER-COOLED POWER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A classification on systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment has been developed in the paper.  The classification permits to make a detailed analysis of various concepts pertaining to systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of new generation. The paper considers main classification features of the given systems.

  9. Enhancement of nuclear heat transfer in a typical pressurized water reactor by new spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazifi, M.; Nematollahi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The fuel element geometry typically used in nuclear reactor is rod bundle whose rod-to-rod clearance is maintained by grid spacer. The heat generated in the rod by nuclear reaction is removed by coolant, usually in turbulent flow. The coolant moves axially through the subchannels. Fuel spacer grid affects the coolant flow distribution in a fuel rod bundle, and so spacer geometry has a strong influence on a bundle's thermal-hydraulic characteristics such as critical heat flux and pressure drop. An understanding of the detailed structure of the turbulent flow and heat transfer in the rod bundle, used especially as nuclear fuel elements, is of major interest to the nuclear power industry for their safe and reliable operation. The flow mixing devices on grid spacer would enhance the mixing rate between sub-channels and promote the turbulence in subchannel. The present study evaluates the effects of mixing vane shape on flow structure and heat transfer downstream of mixing vane in a sub-channel of fuel assembly, by obtaining velocity and pressure fields, turbulent intensity, flow mixing factors, heat transfer coefficient and friction factor using three-dimensional RANS analysis. Six new shapes mixing vane designed by the authors, are simulated numerically to evaluate the performance in enhancing the heat transfer, in comparison with commercialized split vane. Standard K-epsilon model are used as a turbulence closure model and periodic and symmetry condition are set as boundary conditions. The capability of the model to predict the coolant flow distribution inside rod bundles is shown and discussed on the base of comparison with experimental data for a variety of geometrical and Reynolds number conditions. It is conformed that the turbulence in the sub-channel was significantly promoted by spacer and mixing devices but rapidly decreased to a fully developed level approximately 10 time of hydraulic diameter downstream of the top of spacer. Ring type mixer showed a high

  10. SPLOSH II: A dynamics programme for nuclear - thermal - hydrodynamic behaviour of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moxon, D.

    1966-01-01

    A dynamics code is described that solves the two-group neutron diffusion equations simultaneously with the thermal and the hydraulic equations for an average channel of a water-cooled reactor. Other reactor channels can be represented as 'slaves', which have no feedback to the average channel. The fission power at any axial station in a slave channel is related to that in the average by prescribed time-dependent factors, and the hydraulic flow is determined from pressure-drop requirements dictated by the performance of the average channel. A finite difference model of the fuel element and can represents the behaviour of the fuel temperatures and surface heat flux. The representation of the hydraulic circuit has been made sufficiently general that the code is applicable to B.W.R., P.W.R. and pressure tube reactor designs. The code can be used to study transients resulting from imposed time variations in coolant flow, inlet enthalpy, system pressure, electrical torque supplied to the circulating pumps, (or alternatively, the angular velocity of the pump rotors,) moderator height, frictional resistances simulating blockages and control rod and fuel element insertions. The harmonic response can be obtained by injecting sinusoidal time variations until the starting transient has been damped out. Output includes axial distributions of the neutron fluxes, heat flux, coolant density and temperature, burn-but margin, and the fuel and can temperatures in both the average and the slave channels. The code was originally written in FORTRAN II for use on the IBM 7090. Computing times vary greatly with the problem and the desired accuracy but experience has shown that a computing time which is slower than real time by a factor thirty is adequate for a wide range of cases. The code has recently been converted to S2 and EGTRAN for use on the IBM 7030 and the English Electric Leo Marconi KDF 9 computers. (author)

  11. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Takashi; Shimazu, Youichiro

    2008-01-01

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. RB research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1989, I - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.; Pesic, M.; Hadimahmutovic, N.; Vranic, S.; Petronijevic, M.; Jevremovic, M.; Ilic, I.

    1989-12-01

    This report is made of three parts. Part one contains a short description of the reactor, reactor operation, incidents, status of reactor equipment and components (nuclear fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, electronic, electric and mechanical equipment, auxiliary systems and Vax-8250 computer). It includes dosimetry and radiation protection data, personnel and financial data. Second part of this report in concerned with maintenance of reactor components and instrumentation. Part three includes data about reactor utilization during 1989

  14. Nuclear reactor power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector is interposed between the protection system and the control system. This selector prevents a parameter signal of a set of signals, which differs from the other parameters signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation of the sensors which produce the set, from passing to the control system. The selectors include a pair of signal selection units, one unit sending selected process signals to primary control channels and the other sending selected process signals to back-up control channels. Test signals are periodically impressed by a test unit on a selected pair of a selected unit and control channels. When test signals are so impressed the selected control channel is disabled from transmitting control signals to the reactor and/or its associated components. This arrangement eliminates the possibility that a single component failure which may be spurious will cause an inadvertent trip of the reactor during test

  15. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wati, Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  16. Nuclear power plant conference 2010 (NPC 2010): International conference on water chemistry of nuclear reactor systems and 8th International radiolysis, electrochemistry and materials performance workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Chemistry Conference was held in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada on October 3-7, 2010. It was hosted by the Canadian Nuclear Society and was held in Canada for the first time. This international event hosted over 300 attendees, two thirds from outside of Canada, mostly from Europe and and Far East. The conference is formally known as the International Conference on Water Chemistry of Nuclear Reactor Systems and is the 15th of a series that began in 1977 in Bournemouth, UK. The conference focussed on the latest developments in the science and technology of water chemistry control in nuclear reactor systems. Utility scientists, engineers and operations people met their counterparts from research institutes, service organizations and universities to address the challenges of chemistry control and degradation management of their complex and costly plants for the many decades that they are expected to operate. Following the four day conference, the 8th International Radiolysis, Electrochemistry and Materials Performance Workshop was held as associated, but otherwise free-standing event on Friday, October 8, 2010. It was also well attended and the primary focus was the effect of radiation on corrosion. When asked about the importance of chemistry in operating nuclear power plants, the primary organizers summarized it in the following statement: 'Once a nuclear plant is in operation, chemistry improvement is the only way to increase the longevity of the plant and its equipment'. The organisers of the 2010 Workshop and the NPC 2010 conference decided that these two events would be held consecutively, as previous, but for the first time the organization and registration would be shared, which proved to be a winning combination by the attendance.

  17. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Parametric studies for the nuclear design of high-conversion pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, J.; Oldekop, W.

    1987-01-01

    Undermoderated high-conversion pressurized water reactors with steel canning tubes offer the possibility of high burnup together with a comparatively low consumption of fissionable material; however, they require a relatively large inventory of fissionable material. The effects of different fuel compositions upon the specific consumption of fissionable material are investigated for a fixed burnup and moderator-to-fuel volume ratios varying between 0.5 and 2.0. Moreover, the required inventory of fissionable material is determined and the influence on the costs of electric power generation is shown. Further investigations deal with the neutron-physical effects of decreasing fuel rod diameters and the influence of differing steel additives. It appears that the parasitic neutron absorption by alloying constituents depends on the moderation level in a non-uniform manner and that the contribution of the fissionable material to the electric power generation costs is rather independent of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio. (orig.) [de

  19. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  20. Nuclear fuel saving assessment of poison-free control in LWRs [light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Zaied, G.

    1988-01-01

    If neutron losses to control absorbers are to be eliminated, an alternative reactivity control system has to be introduced. Due to improved neutron economy, the fuel utilization of these other alternatives is better than for a conventional poison-controlled PWR [pressurized water reactor]. It is the objective in this work to assess the uranium savings attributable to reactivity control without poison. An investigation into the savings due to the elimination of PWR control by neutron capture has been carried out. The most important finding was that up to a 30% savings in natural uranium can be achieved if fuel to moderator ratio, V f /V m , of SSC [spectral-shift-control] core at EOC [end of cycle] is similar to the standard core V f /V m

  1. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  2. Nuclear reaction data and nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paver, N [University of Trieste (Italy); Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Gandini, A [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-15

    These two volumes contain the lecture notes of the workshop 'Nuclear Reaction Data and Nuclear Reactors: Physics, Design and Safety', which was held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in the Spring of 2000. The workshop consisted of five weeks of lecture courses followed by practical computer exercises on nuclear data treatment and design of nuclear power systems. The spectrum of topics is wide enough to timely cover the state-of-the-art and the perspectives of this broad field. The first two weeks were devoted to nuclear reaction models and nuclear data evaluation. Nuclear data processing for applications to reactor calculations was the subject of the third week. On the last two weeks reactor physics and on-going projects in nuclear power generation, waste disposal and safety were presented.

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  4. Condensation During Nuclear Reactor Loca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihan, Y.; Teamah, M.; Sorour, M.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-phase channel flow with condensation is a common phenomenon occurs in a number of nuclear reactor accident scenarios. It also plays an important role during the operation of the safety coolant injection systems in advanced nuclear reactors. Semiempirical correlations and simple models based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer processes have been previously applied. Rigorous models, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical algorithms used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, are scare, and are of great interest. The objective of this research is to develop a method for modeling condensation, with noncondensable gases, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical methods for the solution of multi-phase field equations. A methodology for modeling condensation, based on the stagnant film theory, and compatible with the reviewed numerical algorithms, is developed. The model treats the coupling between the heat and mass transfer processes, and allows for an implicit treatment of the mass and momentum exchange terms as the gas-liquid interphase, without iterations. The developed model was used in the application of loss of coolant in pressurized water reactor accidents

  5. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  6. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  7. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashanii, Ahmed Ali

    2010-01-01

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  8. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  9. Model engineering for piping layout of boiling water reactor nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Koji; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Wada, Takanao; Jibu, Noboru.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power station is made up of a wide variety of equipment, piping, ventilation ducts, conduits, and cable trays, etc. Even if equipment arrangement and piping layout are carefully planned on drawings, troubles such as interference often occur at field installation. Accordingly, it is thought very useful to make thorough examinations with plastic three-dimensional models in addition to drawings in reducing troubles at field, shortening the construction period, and improving economics. Examination with plastic models offers the following features: (1) It permits visual three-dimensional examination. (2) Group thinking and examination is possible. (3) Troubles due to failure to understand complicated drawings can be reduced drastically. Manufacturing a 1/20 scale model of the reactor building of the Tokai No. 2 Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Co., Hitachi has performed model engineering-solution of interference troubles related to equipment and piping, securing of work space for in-service inspection (ISI), carry-in/installation of various equipment and piping, and determination of the piping route of which only the starting and terminating points were given under the complicated ambient conditions. Success with this procedure has confirmed that model engineering is an effective technique for future plant engineering. (auth.)

  10. Nuclear reactors for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Kamble, M.T.; Dulera, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    For the sustainable development of nuclear power plants with enhanced safety features, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection, several advanced reactor developments have been initiated world-wide. The major advanced reactor initiatives and the proposed advanced reactor concepts have been briefly reviewed along with their advantages and challenges. Various advanced reactor designs being pursued in India have also been briefly described in the paper. (author)

  11. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with light water reactors and measures taken for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The IAEA Conference on 'The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future' in 1991 was a milestone in nuclear safety. Two of the important items addressed by this conference were ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants and treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards. A number of publications related to these two items issued subsequent to this conference were: A Common Basis for Judging the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards, INSAG-9 (1995), the IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-O12, periodic Safety Review of Operational Nuclear Power Plants (1994) and an IAEA publication on the Safety Evaluation of Operating Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards - A Common Basis for Judgement (1997). Some of the findings of the 1991 Conference have not yet been fully addressed. An IAEA Symposium on reviewing the Safety of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in 1996 showed that there is an urgent need for operating organizations and national authorities to review operating nuclear power plants which do not meet the high safety levels of the vast majority of plants and to undertake improvements with assistance from the international community if required. Safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants take on added importance in the context of the Convention on Nuclear safety and its implementation. The purpose of this TECDOC compilation based on broad international experience, is to assist the Member States in the reassessment of operating plants by providing a list of generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants together with measures taken to resolve these issues. These safety issues are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors and the measures for their resolution are for use as a reference for the safety reassessment of operating plants. The TECDOC covers issues thought to be significant to Member States based on consensus process. It provides an introduction to the use of generic safety issues for

  12. Device for monitoring radioactivity of cooling water in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Yasuo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide means for monitoring the peak channel of γ-ray spectrum in cooling water and the time-wise attenuation value of the counts of the peak channels and capable of early detecting abnormal phenomenon with a constant reference. Structure: It is provided with a γ-ray detector, a multi-channel γ-ray spectrometer, peak determining means for determining the peak position of the spectrum from the count value of each channel of the γ-ray spectrum, a peak channel memory for memorizing the channel number of the peak channels, attenuation measurement means for measuring the attenuation value by repeatedly measuring the count value of the peak channel, an attenuation memory for memorizing the attenuation value and a variation detector for detecting the variation in radioactivity of the reactor cooling water from the count value of the peak channel and peak channel attenuation value. When a difference is detected by the variation detector, the measurement value is provided as defective value. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Nuclear reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaya; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transfer performance, as well as reducing and simplifying the structure while preventing the intrusion of primary coolants to utilization systems. Constitution: Heat transfer from the primary coolant circuit to the utilization circuits is conducted by means of heat pipe type heat exchangers. The heat exchanger comprises a tightly closed vessel divided by a partition wall, through which a plurality of heat pipes are passed. The primary coolants receiving the heat from the nuclear reactor enter the first chamber of the heat exchanger to heat the evaporating portion of the heat pipes. The heated flow of steams in the heat pipes transfer to the condensating portion in the second chamber to conduct heat exchange with the utilization system. In this way, since secondary coolant circuits are saved, the heat transfer performance can be improved significantly and the risk of failure can be reduced. (Kamimura, M,)

  14. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod

  15. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  17. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements to guide tubes for the fuel assemblies of light water nuclear reactors, said assemblies being immersed in operation in the cooling water of the core of such a reactor, the guide tubes being of the type made from zircaloy and fixed at their two ends respectively to an upper end part and a lower end part made from stainless steel or Irconel and which incorporate devices for braking the fall of the control rods which they house during the rapid shutdown of the reactor, wherein the said braking devices are constituted by means for restricting the diameter of the guide tubes comprising for each guide tube a zircaloy inner sleeve spot welded to the said guide tube and whose internal diameter permits the passage, with a calibrated clearance, of the corresponding control rod, the sleeve being distributed over the lower portion of each guide tube and associated with orifices made in the actual guide tubes to produce the progressive hydraulic absorption of the end of the fall of the control rods

  18. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Norring, K.

    1994-01-01

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  19. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Michio; Fujii, Tadashi; Susuki, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    A wet well space above a pressure suppression pool is divided into a first wet well on the side in contact with the pressure suppression pool and a second wet well on the side not in contact with the pool. Cooling water is contained in the second wet well and it is in communication with the first wet well by pipelines. Since steams flown into the second well are condensed in the cooling water, they continuously transfer from the first wet well to the second wet well, thereby capable of eliminating the effects of incondensible gases in the first wet well. With such procedures, the effect of the incondensible gases can be eliminated even without cooling from the outside of the reactor. Heat accumulation can be increased in a container of any material, so that thermal load on cooling circuits for removing after-heat can be mitigated. (T.M.)

  20. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  1. Guidelines for nuclear reactor equipments safety-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The safety analysis in approving the applications for nuclear reactor constructions (or alterations) is performed by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety in accordance with various guidelines prescribed by the Atomic Energy Commission. In addition, the above Committee set forth its own regulations for the safety analysis on common problems among various types of nuclear reactors. This book has collected and edited those guidelines and regulations. It has two parts: Part I includes the guidelines issued to date by the Atomic Energy Commission: and Part II - regulations of the Committee. Part I has collected 8 categories of guidelines which relate to following matters: nuclear reactor sites analysis guidelines and standards for their applications; standard exposure dose of plutonium; nuclear ship operation guidelines; safety design analysis guidelines for light-water type, electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments; safety evaluation guidelines for emergency reactor core cooling system of light-water type power reactors; guidelines for exposure dose target values around light-water type electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments, and guidelines for evaluation of above target values; and meteorological guidelines for the safety analysis of electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments. Part II includes regulations of the Committee concerning - the fuel assembly used in boiling-water type and in pressurized-water type reactors; techniques of reactor core heat designs, etc. in boiling-water reactors; and others

  2. System of large transport containers for waste from dismantling light water and gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M.S.T.; Lafontaine, I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this volume is to introduce the main types of nuclear reactor in the European Community (EC), select reference plants for further study, estimate the waste streams from the reference reactors, survey the transport regulations and assess existing containers

  3. Small nuclear reactors for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, K.

    1978-01-01

    Small nuclear reactors are considered to have an output of not more than 400MW thermal. Since they can produce steam at much higher conditions than needed by the brine heater of a multi-flash desalination unit, it may be economically advantageous to use small reactors for a dual-purpose installation of appropriate size, producing both electricity and desalted water, rather than for a single-purpose desalination plant only. Different combinations of dual-purpose arrangements are possible depending principally on the ratio of electricity to water output required. The costs of the installation as well as of the products are critically dependent on this ratio. For minimum investment costs, the components of the dual-purpose installation should be of a standardised design based on normal commercial power plant practice. This then imposes some restrictions on the plant arrangement but, on the other hand, it facilitates selection of the components. Depending on the electricity to water ratio to be achieved, the conventional part of the installation - essentially the turbines - will form a combination of back-pressure and condensing machines. Each ratio will probably lead to an optimum combination. In the economic evaluation of this arrangement, a distinction must be made between single-purpose and dual-purpose installations. The relationship between output and unit costs of electricity and water will be different for the two cases, but the relation can be expressed in general terms to provide guidelines for selecting the best dimensions for the plant. (author)

  4. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Volpi, L.

    2003-01-01

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy. 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques. 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination. And 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  5. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Volpi, L.

    2001-01-01

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy; 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques; 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination; and 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  6. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  7. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  8. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Takeo; Ochiai, Kanehiro; Niino, Tsuyoshi; Kodama, Toyokazu; Hirako, Shizuka.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain structures suitable to a container structures for nuclear power plants used in those districts where earthquakes occur frequently, in which no local stresses are caused to the fundamental base portions and the workability for the fundamental structures is improved. Constitution: Basic stabilizers are attached to a nuclear reactor container (PCV) and a basic concrete recess for receiving a basic stabilizer is disposed in basic concretes. A top stabilizer is joined and fixed to a top stabilizer receiving plate at the inside of an outer shielding wall. On the other hand, a PCV top recess for conducting the load of PCV to the top stabilizer is attached to the top of the PCV. By disposing stabilizer structures allowing miner displacements at the two points, that is, the top and the lowermost portion of the PCV, no local stress concentrations can be generated to the extension on the axial direction of components due to the inner pressure of the PCV and to the horizontal load applied to the upper portion of the PCV upon earthquakes. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Exxon nuclear power distribution control for pressurized water reactors: Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.S.; Burnside, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The power distribution control procedure, denoted PDC-II, described in this report enables nuclear plants to manage core power distributions such that Technical Specification Limits on F/sub Q//sup T/ are not violated during normal operation and limits on MDNBR are not violated during steady-state, load-follow, and anticipated transients. The PDC-II data base described provides the means for predicting the maximum F/sub Q//sup T/(z) distribution anticipated during operation under the PDC-II procedure taking into account the incore measured equilibrium power distribution data for the reactor in question. A comparison of this distribution with the Technical Specification limit curve determines whether the Technical Specification limit can be protected by PDC-II procedure. If such protection can be confirmed for a given operating cycle interval, APDMS monitoring is not necessary over this interval and the excore monitored constant axial offset limits will protect the Technical Specification F/sub Q//sup T/ limits. This document describes the maximum possible variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) which can occur during operation when following the PDC-II procedures. This bounding variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) is referred to as V(z). This V(z) distribution represents the maximun variation in F/sub Q//sup T/(z) when the axial offset is maintained within the range defined in this report [+- 5% at full power condition

  11. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  12. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory

  13. One-phase and two-phase homologous curves for coolant pumps of the pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The single-phase pump characteristics are an essential feature for operational transients studies, for example, the shut-down and start-up of pump. These parameters, in terms of the homologous curves, set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for transients and accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the single-phase and two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  14. Local multigrid mesh refinement in view of nuclear fuel 3D modelling in pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbie, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the performances, in terms of memory space and computational time, of the current modelling of the Pellet-Cladding mechanical Interaction (PCI), complex phenomenon which may occurs during high power rises in pressurised water reactors. Among the mesh refinement methods - methods dedicated to efficiently treat local singularities - a local multi-grid approach was selected because it enables the use of a black-box solver while dealing few degrees of freedom at each level. The Local Defect Correction (LDC) method, well suited to a finite element discretization, was first analysed and checked in linear elasticity, on configurations resulting from the PCI, since its use in solid mechanics is little widespread. Various strategies concerning the implementation of the multilevel algorithm were also compared. Coupling the LDC method with the Zienkiewicz-Zhu a posteriori error estimator in order to automatically detect the zones to be refined, was then tested. Performances obtained on two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases are very satisfactory, since the algorithm proposed is more efficient than h-adaptive refinement methods. Lastly, the LDC algorithm was extended to nonlinear mechanics. Space/time refinement as well as transmission of the initial conditions during the re-meshing step were looked at. The first results obtained are encouraging and show the interest of using the LDC method for PCI modelling. (author) [fr

  15. Importance of self-shielding for improving sensitivity coefficients in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method has been developed for calculating sensitivity coefficients. • This method is based on the use of infinite dilution cross-sections instead of effective cross-sections. • The change of self-shielding factor due to cross-section perturbation has been considered. • SRAC and SAINT codes are used for calculating improved sensitivities, while MCNP code has been used for verification. - Abstract: In order to perform sensitivity analyzes in light water reactors where self-shielding effect becomes important, a new method has been developed for calculating sensitivity coefficient of core characteristics relative to the infinite dilution cross-sections instead of the effective cross-sections. This method considers the change of the self-shielding factor due to cross-section perturbation for different nuclides and reactions. SRAC and SAINT codes are used to calculate the improved sensitivity; while the accuracy of the present method has been verified by MCNP code and good agreement has been found

  16. Role of non destructive techniques for monitoring structural integrity of primary circuit of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Sreenivas, P.

    2015-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations is ensured by assessing status of primary equipment for performing the intended function reliably and maintaining the integrity of pressure boundaries. The pressure boundary materials undergo material degradation during the plant operation. Pressure boundary materials are subjected to operating stresses and material degradation that results in material properties changes, discontinuities initiation and increase in size of existing discontinuities. Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) is performed to generate reference base line data of initial condition of the pressure boundary. In-Service Inspections (ISI) are performed periodically to confirm integrity of pressure boundaries through comparison with respect to base line data. The non destructive techniques are deployed considering nature of the discontinuities expected to be generated through operating conditions and degradation mechanisms. The paper is prepared considering Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant. The paper describes the degradation mechanisms observed in the PWR nuclear power plants and salient aspect of PSI and ISI and considerations in selecting non destructive testing. The paper also emphasises on application of acoustic emission (AE) based condition monitoring systems that can supplement in-service inspections for detecting and locating discontinuities in pressure boundaries. Criticality of flaws can be quantitatively evaluated by determining their size through in-service inspection. Challenges anticipated in deployment of AE based monitoring system and solutions to cater those challenges are also discussed. (author)

  17. Proposal of space reactor for nuclear electric propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Takaaki; Nagata, Hidetaka; Nakashima, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installed in spacecrafts is considered here. The nuclear reactor could stably provide an enough amount of electric power in deep space missions. Most of the nuclear reactors that have been developed up to now in the United States and the former Soviet Union have used uranium with 90% enrichment of 235 U as a fuel. On the other hand, in Japan, because the uranium that can be used is enriched to below 20%, the miniaturization of the reactor core is difficult. A Light-water nuclear reactor is an exception that could make the reactor core small. Then, the reactor core composition and characteristic are evaluated for the cases with the enrichment of the uranium fuel as 20%. We take up here Graphite reactor, Light-water reactor, and Sodium-cooled one. (author)

  18. A nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1974-01-01

    Between the steel pressure vessel of the pressurized water power reactor and the biological shield a gap is found which enables inspections as well as cooling by air or gas. Within the gap, fins are equally distributed around the circumference of the pressure vessel summing parallel to each other and to the longitudinal axis of the vessel or being inclined. The fins cross the gap for about 9/10. Each fin consists of a sectional bar supported with its foot on a girder. The girder has got a rectangular steel section of two sectional iron parts. Between one of the parts and a plate anchored in the biological shield a ceramic body is inserted as a heat insulation. A further heat insulation of aluminium foils connects the fins with each other and divides the gap into two concentric subspaces which can be streamed through by a gas having different temperatures. (DG) [de

  19. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  20. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  1. Nuclear reactor plants and control systems therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Boer, G.A.; de Hex, M.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor plant is described comprising at least two hydraulically separated but thermally interconnected heat conveying circuits, of which one is the reactor circuit filled with a non-water medium and the other one is the water-steam-circuit equipped with a steam generator, a feed water conduit controlled by a valve and a steam turbine, and a control system mainly influenced by the pressure drop caused in said feed water conduit and its control valve and having a value of at least 10 bars at full load

  2. Neutron flux measuring system for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazuo.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the generation of an undesired scram signal due to abrupt changes in the neutron level given to the detectors disposed near the boundary between the moderator and the atmosphere. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor adapted to conduct power control by the change of the level in the moderator such as heavy water, the outputs from the neutron detectors disposed vertically are averaged and the nuclear reactor is scramed corresponding to the averaged value. In this system, moderator level detectors are additionally provided to the nuclear reactor and their outputs, moderator level signal, are sent to a power averaging device where the output signals of the neutron detectors are judged if they are delivered from neutrons in the moderator or not depending on the magnitude of the level signal and the outputs of the detectors out of the moderator are substantially excluded. The reactor interlock signal from the device is utilized as a scram signal. (Seki, T.)

  3. Nuclear reactor system for ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Koji

    1997-01-01

    Various tests and measurements were performed during the pre-operational test run of Unit No. 6 of The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc.'s Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the first advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) unit in the world, and the design and performance adequacy of the ABWR were confirmed. The realization of the ABWR in Japan took about 20 years. It was decided that technologies for the reactor internal pump (RIP) and the fine-motion control rod drive (FMCRD), which had been applied in Europe, would be incorporated in the ABWR aiming at simplification of its structure and operation. These main components were evaluated, modified and verified in consideration of the unique Japanese environment, such as seismic conditions, through a joint study program with Japanese utilities as well as an improvement and standardization program in cooperation with the government. In addition to incorporating RIP and FMCRD technologies, the ABWR also has improved features in terms of the design of the reactor pressure vessel and internals, as well as automated servicing equipment for the RIP, FMCRD, and primary containment vessel. (author)

  4. Use of nuclear reactors for seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) status report on desalination, including nuclear desalination, was issued nearly 2 decades ago. The impending water crisis in many parts of the world, and especially in the Middle East, makes it appropriate to provide an updated report as a basis for consideration of future activities. This report provides a state-of-the-art review of desalination and pertinent nuclear reactor technology. Information is included on fresh water needs and costs, environmental risks associated with alternatives for water production, and data regarding the technical and economic characteristics of immediately available desalination systems, as well as compatible nuclear technology. 68 refs, 60 figs, 11 tabs

  5. Prospect of increases the efficiency of nuclear energy production in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin; Belikov, Svyatoslav; Novikov, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Values of quality factor and pass-band for acoustic model of reactor core of reactor unit with WWER - 1000 are defined at single-phase and biphasic conditions of the coolant. The settlement-theoretical substantiation of conditions of growth of vibrations of internals and fuel assembly within a pass-band limits. Results of calculation and measurements have suitable coincidence. The technique of forecasting is developed and results of forecasting of vibration acoustical resonances of fuel assemblies with coolant in stationary and transitive operating modes of reactor unit with WWER - 1000 are worked out. (author)

  6. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: Manufacturing technology, operational experience and development objectives in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the Federal Republic of Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized-, boiling- and heavy-water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are Reaktor-Brennelement Union (RBU) and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilities to produce UO 2 -gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem manufactures mixed-oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 fuel and fuel rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by Nuklearrohr-Gesellschaft (NRG) and Mannesmannroehren-Werke (MRW). Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control, an integrated quality assurance system has been established between the reactor vendor's fuel design and engineering division and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. Operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and has shown good performance. Possible reasons for a small fraction of defective rods could be identified quickly by a fast feedback system incorporating close co-operation between Kraftwerk Union (KWU) and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and pool-side service facilities as well as fuel technology linked to manufacturing. The responsibility of KWU for core and fuel design, which enabled an integral optimization, was also an important reason for the successful operation and design flexibility. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor kinetics and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, integrated account of modern developments in the study of nuclear reactor kinetics and the problem of their efficient and safe control. It aims to prepare the student for advanced study and research or practical work in the field. Special features include treatments of noise theory, reliability theory and safety related studies. It covers all aspects of the operation and control of nuclear reactors, power and research and is complete in providing physical data methods of calculation and solution including questions of equipment reliability. The work uses illustrations of the main types of reactors in use in the UK, USA and Europe. Each chapter contains problems and worked examples suitable for course work and study. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introductory review; neutron and precursor equations; elementary solutions at low power; linear reactor process dynamics with feedback; power reactor control systems; fluctuations and reactor noise; safety and reliability; nonlinear systems (safety and control); analogue computing. (author)

  8. Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    This meeting contains articles of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting 2008 of Korean Nuclear Society, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Chinese Nuclear Society, European Nuclear Society and American Nuclear Society. It was held on Oct. 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea and subject of Meeting is 'New Clear' Fuel - A green energy solution. This proceedings is comprised of 5 tracks. The main topic titles of track are as follows: Advances in water reactor fuel technology, Fuel performance and operational experience, Transient fuel behavior and safety-related issues, Fuel cycle, spent fuel storage and transportations and Fuel modeling and analysis. (Yi, J. H.)

  9. Purification of cooling water for nuclear reactors using ion exchangers; Preciscavanje vode za hladjenje nuklearnih reaktora pomocu neorganskih jonoizmenjivaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    Zirconiumphosphate, zirconiumoxide and natural magnetite as inorganic substances with favourable adsorption properties were the subject of investigations dealing with problems of water purification for nuclear rector cooling. Study on adsorption of impurities form reactor water to 300 deg C and 100 Atm was done by specially constructed autoclaves. On the other hand, a pre-project covering a laboratory plant for investigation of inorganic ion exchangers under real dynamic conditions is given. In order to obtain necessary data on the basis of which techno-economical analyses regarding utilization of zirconiumphosphate, zirconiumoxide and magnetite for water purification is cooling the reactors types BWR and PWR, could be performed, systematic investigations of physical and chemical properties of these substances were commenced. Equilibrium constants have been determined for adsorption processes at different pH values, as well as under various temperatures. Obtained equilibrium constants were used for calculation of thermodynamic quantities {delta}H, {delta}G and {delta}S (author) [Serbo-Croat] Cirkonijumfosfat, cirkonijumoksid i prirodni magnet, kao neorganski materijali sa pogodnim adsorpcionim osobinama, bili su predmet istrazivanja vezanih za probleme preciscavanja vode za hladjenje nuklearnih reaktora. Izucavanje adsorpcije necistoca iz reaktorske vode do 300 deg C i 100 Atm vrseno je pomocu specijalno konstruisanog autoklava, a za ispitivanje neorganskih jonoizmenjivaca pri realnim dinamickim uslovima dat je idejni projekt jednog laboratorijskog postrojenja. Za dobijanje potrebnih podataka, na osnovu kojih se mogu napraviti tehno-ekonomske analize o koriscenju cirkonijumfosfata, cirkoijumoksida i magnetita za preciscavanje vode za hladjenje reaktora tipa BWR i PWR, zapoceto je sa sistematskim proucavanjima fizickih i hemijskih osobina pomenutih materijala, odredjivane su konstante ravnoteze za procese adsorpcije pri razlicitim pH vrednostima, kao i na razlicitim

  10. Nuclear reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Izzo, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a vertically oriented bottom entry control rod from a nuclear reactor: a frame including an elongated central spine of cruciform cross section connected between an upper support member and a lower support member both of cruciform shape having four laterally extending arms. The arms are in alignment with the arms of the lower support member and each aligned upper and lower support members has a sheath extending between; absorber plates of neutron absorber material, different from the material of the frame, one of the absorber plates is positioned within a sheath beneath each of the arms; attachment means suspends the absorber plates from the arms of the upper support member within a sheath; elongated absorber members positioned within a sheath between each of the suspended absorber plates and an arm of the lower support member; and joint means between the upper ends of the absorber members and the lower ends of the suspended absorber plates for minimizing gaps; the sheath means encloses the suspended absorber plates and the absorber members extending between aligned arms of the upper and lower support members and secured

  11. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of decommissioning of water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, a large amount of rad-waste in the form of graphite stack fragments is generated (on average 1500-2000 tons per reactor). That is why it is essentially important, although complex from the technical point of view, to develop advanced technologies based on up-to-date remotely-controlled systems for unmanned dismantling of the graphite stack containing highly-active long-lived radionuclides and for conditioning of irradiated graphite (IG) for the purposes of transportation and subsequent long term and ecologically safe storage either on NPP sites or in special-purpose geological repositories. The main characteristics critical for radiation and nuclear hazards of the graphite stack are as follows: the graphite stack is contaminated with nuclear fuel that has gotten there as a result of the accidents; the graphite mass is 992 tons, total activity -6?104 Ci (at the time of unit shutdown); the fuel mass in the reactor stack amounts to 100-140 kg, as estimated by IPPE and RDIPE, respectively; γ-radiation dose rate in the stack cells varies from 4 to 4300 R/h, with the prevailing values being in the range from 50 to 100 R/h. In this paper the traditional methods of rad-waste handling as bituminization technology, cementing technology are discussed. In terms of IG handling technology two lines were identified: long-term storage of conditioned IG and IG disposal by means of incineration. The specific cost of graphite immobilization in a radiation-resistant polymeric matrix amounts to -2600 USD per 1 t of graphite, whereas the specific cost of immobilization in slag-stone containers with an inorganic binder (cement) is -1400 USD per 1 t of graphite. On the other hand, volume of conditioned IG rad-waste subject for disposal, if obtained by means of the first technology, is 2-2.5 times less than the volume of rad-waste generated by means of the second technology. It can be concluded from the above that

  12. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Tower, S.N.; Huckestein, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprises a 5x5 array of guide tubes in a generally 20x20 array of fuel elements, the guide tubes being arranged to accommodate either control rods or water displacer rods. The fuel assembly has top and bottom Inconel (Registered Trade Mark) grids and intermediate Zircaloy grids in engagement with the guide tubes and supporting the fuel elements and guide tubes while allowing flow of reactor coolant through the assembly. (author)

  13. Bond graph modeling of nuclear reactor dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A tenth-order linear model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is developed using bond graph techniques. The model describes the nuclear heat generation process and the transfer of this heat to the reactor coolant. Comparisons between the calculated model response and test data from a small-scale PWR show the model to be an adequate representation of the actual plant dynamics. Possible application of the model in an advanced plant diagnostic system is discussed

  14. Possibilities of optimizing non-nuclear simulation of pressurized water reactor transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Filho, E.

    1985-01-01

    The GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH has instituted the concept of a scaled test facility (volume scale factor of 1/100) of a typical PWR of the 1 300 MWe class for the purpose of studying small breaks Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCA) and transients. Having in mind the goal of an optimization of this concept has been choosen a station blackout with and without reactor shutdown and a small break LOCA in a primary loop piping to investigate the thermohydraulic behaviour of the test facility in comparison to the reactor plant. The computer code RELAP 5/MOD 1 has been utilized to compare the test facility behaviour with the reactor plant one. Recommendations are given for minimization of distortions between test facility and reactor plant. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  16. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  17. Control rod drive of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Gorjunov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear reactors and, more particularly, to a drive of a control rod of a nuclear reactor and allows power control, excess reactivity compensation, and emergency shut-down of a reactor. (author)

  18. A new fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new nuclear reactor design based on the fluidized bed concept is proposed. A current design utilizes spherical fuel of slightly enriched Zircaloy-clad uranium dioxide fluidized by light water under pressure. The reactor is modular in system; therefore, any size reactor can be constructed from the basic standard modul. The reactor physics calculations show that reactivity increases with porosity to a maximum value and thereafter decreases. This produces inherent safety and eliminates the need for control rods and burnable poisons. The heat transfer calculations show that the maximum power extracted from the reactor core is not limited to the material temperature limits but to the maximum mass flow of coolant, which corresponds to the desired operating porosity. Design simplicity and inherent safety make it an attractive small reactor design. (Author) [pt

  19. Overview of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Thai Sinh; Luong Ba Vien

    2016-01-01

    The present reactor called Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been reconstructed from the former TRIGA Mark II reactor which was designed by General Atomic (GA, San Diego, California, USA), started building in early 1960s, put into operation in 1963 and operated until 1968 at nominal power of 250 kW. In 1975, all fuel elements of the reactor were unloaded and shipped back to the USA. The DNRR is a 500-kW pool-type research reactor using light water as both moderator and coolant. The reactor is used as a neutron source for the purposes of: (1) radioactive isotope production; (2) neutron activation analysis; and (3) research and training

  20. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: manufacturing technology operational experience and development activities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the F.R. Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized - boiling- and heavy water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are RBU and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilites to produce UO 2 -Gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem is manufacturing mixed oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 -fuel and -rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by NRG and MRW. This constitutes the largest single nuclear fuel manufacturing capacity outside the USA. The companies are interested in export and current capacity trends indicate some overcapacity caused by delays in plant schedules. Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant in the FRG has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control in manufacturing an integrated quality assurance-system has been established between the reactor vendor KWU, fuel design and -engineering division, and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. The operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and proves good performance. No generic problems like densification or rod bow were encountered. Possible reasons for the small fraction of defective rods could be quickly identified by a fast feedback system incorporating a close cooperation between KWU and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and poolside service facilities as well as fuel technology linking to manufacturing in one hand. The common responsibility of KWU for core- and fuel design which enabled an integral optimization was also an important reason for the successful operation and flexibility in design. Development efforts will be concentrated on tests to improve the understanding of power ramping capability under extreme operational and postulated abnormal conditions, on statistical evaluation of safety aspects and on improved economy. The LWR fuel development was sponsored by the

  1. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  2. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  3. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammers, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a sodium-cooled nuclear reactor, whose reactor tank contains the primary circuit, shielding surrounding the reactor core and a primary/secondary heat exchanger, particularly a fast breeder reactor on the module principle. In order to achieve this module principle it is proposed to have electromagnetic circulating pumps outside the reactor tank, where the heat exchanger is accomodated in an annular case above the pumps. This case has several openings at the top end to the space above the reactor core, some smaller openings in the middle to the same space and is connected at the bottom to an annular space between the tank wall and the reactor core. As a favoured variant, it is proposed that the annular electromagnetic pumps should be arranged concentrically to the reactor tank, where there is an annual duct on the inside of the reactor tank. In this way the sodium-cooled nuclear reactor is made suitable as a module with a large number of such elements. (orig.) [de

  4. [The Chinese nuclear test and 'atoms for peace' as a measure for preventing nuclear armament of Japan: the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the United States and the introduction of light water reactors into Japan, 1964-1968].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2014-07-01

    Japan and the United States signed in 1968 a new atomic energy agreement through which US light-water nuclear reactors, including those of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, were to be introduced into Japan. This paper studies the history of negotiations for the 1968 agreement using documents declassified in the 1990s in the US and Japan. After the success of the Chinese nuclear test in October 1964, the United States became seriously concerned about nuclear armament of other countries in Asia including Japan. Expecting that Japan would not have its own nuclear weapons, the US offered to help the country to demonstrate its superiority in some fields of science including peaceful nuclear energy to counter the psychological effect of the Chinese nuclear armament. Driven by his own political agenda, the newly appointed Prime Minister Eisaku Sato responded to the US expectation favorably. When he met in January 1965 with President Johnson, Sato made it clear that Japan would not pursue nuclear weapons. Although the US continued its support after this visit, it nevertheless gave priority to the control of nuclear technology in Japan through the bilateral peaceful nuclear agreement. This paper argues that the 1968 agreement implicitly meant a strategic measure to prevent Japan from going nuclear and also a tactic to persuade Japan to join the Nuclear Non -Proliferation Treaty.

  5. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly, hollow guide posts protrude into a fuel assembly and fitting grill from a biased spring pad with a plunger that moves with the spring pad plugging one end of each of the guide posts. A plate on the end fitting grill that has a hole for fluid discharge partially plugs the other end of the guide post. Pressurized water coolant that fills the guide post volume acts as a shock absorber and should the reactor core receive a major seismic or other shock, the fuel assembly is compelled to move towards a pad depending from a transversely disposed support grid. The pad bears against the spring pad and the plunger progressively blocks the orifices provided by slots in the guide posts thus gradually absorbing the applied shock. After the orifice has been completely blocked, controlled fluid discharge continues through a hole coil spring cooperating in the attenuation of the shock. (author)

  6. Estimation of the amount of surface contamination of a water cooled nuclear reactor by cooling water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)]. E-mail: nagyg@sunserv.kfki.hu; Somogyi, A. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Patek, G. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant, P.O. Box 71, Paks H-7031 (Hungary); Pinter, T. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant, P.O. Box 71, Paks H-7031 (Hungary); Schiller, R. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)

    2007-06-15

    Calculations, based upon on-the-spot measurements, were performed to estimate the contamination of NPP primary circuit and spent fuel storage pool solid surfaces via the composition of the cooling water in connection with a non-nuclear incident in the Paks NPP. Thirty partially burnt-up fuel element bundles were damaged during a cleaning process, an incident which resulted in the presence of fission products in the cooling water of the cleaning tank (CT) situated in a separate pool (P1). Since this medium was in contact for an extended period of time with undamaged fuel elements to be used later and also with other structural materials of the spent fuel storage pool (SP), it was imperative to assess the surface contamination of these latter ones with a particular view to the amount of fission material. In want of direct methods, one was restricted to indirect information which rested mainly on the chemical and radiochemical data of the cooling water. It was found that (i) the most important contaminants were uranium, plutonium, cesium and cerium; (ii) after the isolation of P1 and SP and an extended period of filtering the only important contaminants were uranium and plutonium; (iii) the surface contamination of the primary circuit (PC) was much lower than that of either SP or P1; (iv) some 99% of the contamination was removed from the water by the end of the filtering process.

  7. Basic tendencies of restructured UO2 nuclear fuels fabrication industry for water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhova, V.A.; Bokshitskij, V.I.; Blinova, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    Processes of reformation and consolidation of firms and frontier nuclear fuels fabrication industry associated with processes of globalization and deregulation of electric power market are analyzed. Current state of nuclear fuel market and basic factors influenced on the market are presented. The role of nuclear fuel in increasing competition of NPP and fundamental directions of innovation action on the creation of perspective kinds of fuel were considered [ru

  8. Radioactive nuclides in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1982-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also chemical subject materials. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry was considered for students of the school in the previous report (JAERI-M 9827), where the first part of the plan, ''Fundamentals of Reactor Chemistry'', was reviewed. This report is a review of the second part of the plan containing fission products chemistry, actinoids elements chemistry and activated reactor materials chemistry. (author)

  9. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  10. Results of research and development for nuclear power plants with WWER-1000 type light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference met in three sessions: 1. Project designing and construction of nuclear power plants; 2. Materials, technologies and applied mechanics; 3. Physics, thermal physics and control. The proceedings contains 82 papers of which only two have not been inputted in INIS. The final resolutions of session 1 related to the reduction of capital costs for newly built units, processing of project documentation, the introduction of step motors manufactured in Czechoslovakia, in-service diagnostics of nuclear power plants, etc. The final recommendations of session 2 dealt with the centralization of the management of research into the reliability, safety and residual life of nuclear installations, with radiation stability of weld metals, repairs of nuclear power plants by patch welding, with welding in nuclear power plants and stress calculations using mathematical methods. Session 3 centred on questions of the safety, reliability and economy of nuclear power plant operation. It was recommended to make a comparison of the results of theoretical calculations with experiments, to concentrate on the automation of measurement, to extend international division of labour and cooperation of CMEA countries, to extend publishing activities in the field of thermal physics, etc. General recommendations were related to the conception of the construction of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia, the implementation of original scientific, research and development work, to the question of personnel for nuclear research, the experimental base of the Czechoslovak nuclear programme and to planning and management of technical development. (E.S.)

  11. Nuclear data for nuclear reactor analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A discussion of nuclear data is presented emphasizing to what extent data are known and to what accuracy. The principal data of interest is that for neutron cross-sections. The changing status of data, evaluated nuclear data files and data validation and improvement are described. Although the discussion relates to nuclear data for reactor analysis may of the results also apply to fusion, accelerator, shielding, biomedical, space and defense studies. (U.K.)

  12. Reactor Safety Commission Code of Practice for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Commission of the Federal German Republic has summarized in the form of Official Guidelines the safety requirements which, in the Commission's view, have to be met in the design, construction and operation of a nuclear power station equipped with a pressurized water reactor. The Third Edition of the RSK Guidelines for pressurized water reactors dated 14.10.81. is a revised and expanded version of the Second Edition dated 24.1.79. The Reactor Safety Commission will with effect from October 1981 use these Guidelines in consultations on the siting of and safety concept for the installation approval of future pressurized water reactors and will assess these nuclear power stations during their erection in the light of these Guidelines. They have not however been immediately conceived for the adaptation of existing nuclear power stations, whether under construction or in operation. The scope of application of these Guidelines to such nuclear power stations will have to be examined for each individual case. The main aim of the Guidelines is to simplify the consultation process within the reactor Safety Commission and to provide early advice on the safety requirements considered necessary by the Commission. (author)

  13. The future of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards began work in early 1948 with the firm and unanimous conviction that nuclear power could not survive a significant damaging accident. They as a committee felt that their job was to make reactors so safe that no such event would ever occur. However, ambitious reactor planners did not like all the buts and cautions that the committee was raising. They seemed to delay unduly their setting sail into the brave new world of clean, cheap, safe nuclear energy. The committee was soon nicknamed the Committee on Reactor Prevention. Reactors, of course, represented a tremendous step into the future. To an unprecedented extent, they were based on theory. But the committee did not have the luxury of putting a preliminary model into operation and waiting for difficulties to show up. In assessing new designs and developments, they had to anticipate future difficulties. Their proposals in good part were accepted, but their deep emphasis on safety did not become a part of the program. Today, forty years later, the author still believes both in the need for nuclear reactors and in the need of a thorough-going, pervasive emphasis on their safety. Real, understandable safety can be achieved, and that achievement is the key to our nuclear future. The details he gives are only examples. The need for reactors that are not only safe but obviously safe can be ignored only at our peril

  14. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  15. Experience in the development of metal uranium-base nuclear fuel for heavy-water gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikhmin, V.P.; Vorob'ev, M.A.; Gusarov, M.S.; Davidenko, A.S.; Zelenskij, V.F.; Ivanov, V.E.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Stukalov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to solve the problem of making the development of radiation-resistant uranium fuel for power reactors including the heavy-water gas-cooled KS-150 reactor. Factors are considered that limit the lifetime of uranium fuel elements, and the ways of suppressing them are discussed. Possible reasons of the insufficient radiation resistance of uranium rod fuel element and the progress attained are analyzed. Some general problems on the fuel manufacture processes are discussed. The main results are presented on the operation of the developed fuel in research reactor loops and the commercial heavy-water KS-150 reactor. The results confirm an exceptionally high radiation resistance of fuel to burn-ups of 1.5-2%. The successful solution of a large number of problems associated with the development of metal uranium fuel provides for new possibilities of using metal uranium in power reactors

  16. Nuclear Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Ropers, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel connects via a main coolant pipe loop including a main coolant pump, with the lower portion of at least one vertical steam generator horizontally offset from the pressure vessel. This equipment is contained by a concrete structure entirely enclosing the pressure vessel and forming a generator room horizontally enclosing the generator and the loop and extending upwardly to an open top closed by a horizontal ceiling. The concrete structure is completely surrounded by a spherical steel containment shell designed to withstand any internal fluid pressure which might result from an accidental release of the coolant inside of this shell, and the shell forms a large space above the entire concrete structure. The ceiling above the generator room is a horizontal steel gridlike construction defining a plurality of vertical openings which are normally closed by horizontal sheet metal plates which are hinged to the gridlike construction and are light enough in weight to be forced upwardly, to open the openings, when the plates receive upward force from fluid pressure below them resulting from the loop, or other equipment in the generator room, accidentally permitting a sudden release of the pressurized-water coolant. The high fluid pressure that would otherwise develop within the concrete generator room, is in this way almost immediately relieved via the openings of the grid-like construction, by the plates being forced upwardly, the pressure being then dissipated upwardly in the large space above the top of the concrete structure, provided by the steel containment shell. This prevents the upstanding wall portions of the generator room from being stressed, and possibly damaged, by any sudden release of coolant in the generator room. Other features are disclosed

  17. Longtime radionuclide monitoring in the vicinity of Salaspils nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riekstina, D.; Berzins, J.; Krasta, T.; Skrypnik, O.; Alksnis, J.

    2016-01-01

    The research nuclear reactor in Salaspils was decommissioned in 1998. Now reactor is partially dismantled and its territory is used as a temporary storage of radioactivity contaminated materials and water. Environment radioactivity monitoring for presence of artificial radionuclides in the vicinity of Salaspils nuclear reactor is carried out since 1990. Data include Cs-137 concentration in soils, tritium concentration in ground water, as well as H-3, Cs-137, Co-60 concentration and gross beta-activity of reactors sewage and rainwater drainage. The systematic monitoring allowed to detect in December 2014 a leakage from the special wastewater basin and so to prevent a pollution of ground water outside reactors territory.

  18. Technique of nuclear reactors controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1953-12-01

    This report deal about 'Techniques of control of the nuclear reactors' in the goal to achieve the control of natural uranium reactors and especially the one of Saclay. This work is mainly about the measurement into nuclear parameters and go further in the measurement of thermodynamic variables,etc... putting in relief the new features required on behalf of the detectors because of their use in the thermal neutrons flux. In the domain of nuclear measurement, we indicate the realizations and the results obtained with thermal neutron detectors and for the measurement of ionizations currents. We also treat the technical problem of the start-up of a reactor and of the reactivity measurement. We give the necessary details for the comprehension of all essential diagrams and plans put on, in particular, for the reactor of Saclay. (author) [fr

  19. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  20. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)