WorldWideScience

Sample records for water content temporal-spatial

  1. Effect of water level lfuctuations on temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities by the wintering Hooded Crane (Grus monacha)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Zhang; Lizhi Zhou; Yunwei Song

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Yangtze River lfoodplain provides important wintering habitats for Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in China. Fluctuations in the water level change foraging habitat and food availability, affecting their temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities. It is of considerable importance to investigate the effect of these lfuctuations on food availability for wintering Hooded Cranes and their foraging response to these changes. Understanding their behavior patterns is beneifcial in protecting the wintering crane population and restoring their wintering habitats. Methods: A ifeld survey of the winter behavior of cranes was carried out at Shengjin Lake from November in 2013 to April in 2014. Habitat variables, as well as the spatial distribution and behavior patterns of wintering cranes at their foraging sites during ifve stages of water level lfuctuation were collected. Based on this data we analyzed the relation-ship of foraging behavior relative to water level lfuctuations and habitat types. Results: The foraging habitats used by Hooded Cranes varied at the different water level stages. As the water level decreased, the use of meadows and mudlfats increased. When the water dropped to its lowest level, the use by the Hooded Crane in the mudlfats reached a peak. There were statistically signiifcant differences in time budget in the three types of habitats over the ifve stages of the water level. In the mudlfats, the foraging behavior and maintenance behavior varied signiifcantly with the water level, while the alert behavior showed little variation. Analysis of a general-ized linear model showed that the ifve water level stages and three habitat types had a signiifcant effect on forag- ing behavior, while the combined effect of these two variables was signiifcant on the foraging time budget and the length of foraging activity of the Hooded Crane. Conclusions: With the decrease in the water level, the use of mudlfats by Hooded Cranes increased

  2. Long-term temporal-spatial dynamics of marine coastal water quality in the Tolo Harbor,Hong Kong,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fu-liu; K. C. LAM; R. W. Dawson; TAO Shu; Y. D. CHEN

    2004-01-01

    The long-term temporal and spatial dynamics of marine coastal water quality in Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong were explored. The Harbor is divided into three zones represented as Harbor, Buffer, and Channel Subzones. The time range for the study covers the period from the 1970s to the 1990s. The selected indicators for the comprehensive assessment of water quality consist of physical, chemical and biological aspects, including suspended solids(SS), Secchi disk depth(SD), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand( BOD5 ), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus(TP), faecal coliform, chlorophyll-a(Chl-a), and the number of red tide occurrences. The results indicated the presence of obvious temporal and spatial trends with regard to changes in water quality. Spatially, water quality in the Channel Subzone is the best, while that in the Harbor Subzone is the worst. On a temporal basis, the average trend from bad to good was 1980s > 1990s >1970s as indicated by most of the selected water quality indicators. Water quality during the late 1980s reached its worst level with the lowest SD, the highest BOD5, TN, TP, Chl-a concentrations, and the number of red tide occurrences. These long-term temporal-spatial water quality trends were also found in other studies of the Tolo Harbor. The large quantity of pollutants produced as a result of increasing population, industrial and commercial actives, and urbanization and industrialization trends in both Shatin and Tai Po seem to be primarily responsible for the changes in marine coastal water quality.

  3. Effect of water level fluctuations on temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities by the wintering Hooded Crane(Grus monacha)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Zhang; Lizhi Zhou; Yunwei Song

    2015-01-01

    Background:The Yangtze River floodplain provides important wintering habitats for Hooded Cranes(Grus monacha) in China.Fluctuations in the water level change foraging habitat and food availability,affecting their temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities.It is of considerable importance to investigate the effect of these fluctuations on food availability for wintering Hooded Cranes and their foraging response to these changes.Understanding their behavior patterns is beneficial in protecting the wintering crane population and restoring their wintering habitats.Methods:A field survey of the winter behavior of cranes was carried out at Shengjin Lake from November in 2013 to April in 2014.Habitat variables,as well as the spatial distribution and behavior patterns of wintering cranes at their foraging sites during five stages of water level fluctuation were collected.Based on this data we analyzed the relationship of foraging behavior relative to water level fluctuations and habitat types.Results:The foraging habitats used by Hooded Cranes varied at the different water level stages.As the water level decreased,the use of meadows and mudflats increased.When the water dropped to its lowest level,the use by the Hooded Crane in the mudflats reached a peak.There were statistically significant differences in time budget in the three types of habitats over the five stages of the water level.In the mudflats,the foraging behavior and maintenance behavior varied significantly with the water level,while the alert behavior showed little variation.Analysis of a generalized linear model showed that the five water level stages and three habitat types had a significant effect on foraging behavior,while the combined effect of these two variables was significant on the foraging time budget and the length of foraging activity of the Hooded Crane.Conclusions:With the decrease in the water level,the use of mudflats by Hooded Cranes increased correspondingly.Food availability in

  4. Farmland shift due to climate warming and impacts on temporal-spatial distributions of water resources in a middle-high latitude agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Hao, Zengchao; Liu, Hongbin; Shi, Yandan; Hao, Fanghua

    2017-04-01

    Climate warming increases the active accumulated temperature (AAT) of crops and may change crop structures and patterns. Climate warming along with farmland responses has combined consequences for watershed hydrological indicators, which would be expected to exhibit different temporal-spatial patterns. In our study we investigate the combined impacts of increased temperature and shifted farmland on the hydrological features in middle-high latitude agricultural watersheds. The AAT responses in latitudinal and altitudinal directions were revealed by using an agro-climate model under different warming scenarios (△T = 0.1 °C is applied to the interval from 0.7 °C to 1.5 °C). Then, the spatial distributions of dryland shifting to paddy land were determined considering △AAT. For every 1 °C increase in average annual temperature, the boundary for planting paddy fields will shift northward by approximately 160 km and upward in the altitudinal direction by 180 m. Increasing temperature values and the new crop distributions were imported into the SWAT model, which quantified the temporal (monthly and yearly) and spatial changes of runoff and actual evapotranspiration (ET). Annual runoff decreased at a rate of 9.5 mm/°C, and annual ET increased at a rate of 7 mm/°C under climate warming combined with shifted farmlands. Combined impacts increased runoff in February, March and September, and decreased runoff from April to July. ET increased from March to July and decreased in August and September. The comparison of spatial water resource responses indicated that lower altitude and lower latitude areas experienced larger changes in runoff and ET than was the case for higher altitude and higher latitude areas.

  5. Snow water content estimation from measured snow temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertical temperature profiles of snow and sea ice have been measured in the Arctic during the 2nd Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in 2003 (CHINARE2003). The high-resolution temperature profile in snow is solved by one-dimensional heat transfer equation. The effective heat diffusivity, internal heat sources are identified. The internal heat source refers to the penetrated solar radiation which usually warms the lower part of the snow layer in summer. By temperature gradient analysis, the zero level can be clarified quantitatively as the boundary of the dry and wet snow. According to the in situ time series of vertical temperature profile, the time series of water content in snow is obtained based on an evaluation method of snow water content associated with the snow and ice physical parameters. The relationship of snow water content and snow temperature and temporal-spatial distribution of snow water content are presented

  6. Temporal-spatial distributions and ecological risks of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the surface water from the fifth-largest freshwater lake in China (Lake Chaohu)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wen-Xiu; He, Wei; Qin, Ning

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the residues, compositions, distributions and potential ecological risks of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), water samples were collected seasonally between August 2011 and November 2012 from 20 sites in Lake Chaohu and its tributary rivers. The mean concentration of total PFAAs (TPFA...

  7. TEMPORAL-SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS IN FISHERY WATERS OF THE DONGTING LAKE%洞庭湖渔业水域氮磷时空分布分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王崇瑞; 李鸿; 袁希平

    2013-01-01

    The Dongting Lake located in north of Hunan Province and south bank of middle reaches of the Yangtze River is the 2nd largest freshwater lake in China.It not only is the important fishery water,but also the precious fishery genetic resources center.Over the past few decades,as the human population growth,development of industry and agriculture,and the acceleration of urbanization,the extent of pollution in the Dongting Lake is also increased.Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the two most important elements in natural water bodies,because N and P can directly influence the primary productivity of water bodies,then the aquatic community will be changed.This article is based on the 2000-2011 monitoring data of the Dongting Lake fishery environment to analyze the temporal-spatial distribution of total nitrogen (TN),total phosphorus (TP),ammonia (NH3ˉ-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3ˉ-N)concentrations in different fishery waters of the Dongting Lake.The results show as follows.(1) In the Dongting Lake,the mean concentration of TN,TP,NH3ˉ-N and NO3--N were 1.43±0.41 mg/L,0.09±0.03 mg/L,0.32 ± 0.05 mg/L and 0.63 ± 0.11mg/L,respectively.The maximum of TN was 4.80 mg/L,appeared at Lujiao sampling point in May of 2009,and the maximum of TP was 0.417 mg/L,appeared at Lujiao sampling point in January of 2008.(2) One-way ANOVA results of mean annual concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus between 2000 and 2011 showed that the differences were significant (P<0.05).Except for TP,mean annual concentration of TN,NH3-N and NO3ˉ-N showed the rising trend,and the differences of mean concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus during low water period,wet season and median water period were also significant(P<0.05).The mean concentration of TN at median water period and TP at low water period were both the highest.(3) Simultaneously,the differences of mean concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus on spatial distribution were also significant (P<0.05).The maximum of mean

  8. Temporal-spatial dynamics of distribution patterns of microorganism relating to biological soil crusts in the Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Nan; WANG Hongling; LIANG Shaoming; NIE Huali; ZHANG Yuanming

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts serve as an important biological factor contributing to the sand fixation. This study was conducted to investigate the temporal-spatial variability of microorganism in crusts relating to locations, soil layers of sand dunes and seasons. At moss-dominated inter-dune areas,higher soil nutrient and water concentrations were likely to maintain the microbial activities. Bacteria showed the highest capabilities of settlement and growth in inter-dunes in both spring and autumn. Soil water content reached the highest value in soil crusts in the inter-dune areas, especially in spring. Variations of quantities of actinomyces and fungi basically showed the consistent trend in different locations of sand dunes. With the deepening of soil layers, vertical distribution of quantities of each microorganism group showed different characteristics because environmental factors fluctuated in both spring and autumn. Among different microorganism groups, bacteria were predominant, actinomyces the next and fungi the least in both spring and autumn in all soil layers (0-20 cm). The proportion of bacteria and soil water content were higher in spring than those in autumn in all soil layers (0-20 cm). No consistent trends were found in actinomyces and fungi. The results showed that the quantities of microorganisms were significantly positive correlated with organic matter content,soil water content, total N, total P, available P, available K, pH, electrical conductivity, total salt content,catalase, urease, phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase.

  9. Transport for a System with Additive Temporal-Spatial Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui; HAN Yin-Xia; CHEN Shi-Gang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the transport of the system with the additive temporal-spatial noise, by two models, i.e., a spatial asymmetry model and a spatial symmetry model. The study shows that the correlation of the additive noise with the space and the spatial asymmetry are ingredients for the transport.

  10. Temporal-spatial variation and the influence factors of precipitation in Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Precipitation is a key factor in the water cycle.At the same time,precipitation is the focus of study in meteorology and climatology,ecological environmental assessment,non-point source pollution and so on.Understanding the temporal-spatial variation and the corresponding factors of precipitation has become the object of hydrology and environmentology.Based on the annual precipitation data,we analyzed the spatial distribution of precipitation in Sichuan Province in China as well as the temporal-spatial variation and the corresponding influence factors involved.The results show that the amount of precipitation was abundant,but the spatial distribution was not consistent with it and the amount of precipitation gradually declined from the south-east to the north-west in Sichuan Province,China.Moreover,the spatial distribution was different throughout the years.The result of correlation analysis indicated that elevation,temperature and air pressure were three key factors affecting the amount and distribution of precipitation,and the correlation coefficients were -0.56,0.38 and 0.45 respectively.Notably,the relationship between the slope of topography and precipitation were significantly negative and the average correlation coefficient was -0.28.

  11. Characterization of Cloud Water-Content Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    The development of realistic cloud parameterizations for climate models requires accurate characterizations of subgrid distributions of thermodynamic variables. To this end, a software tool was developed to characterize cloud water-content distributions in climate-model sub-grid scales. This software characterizes distributions of cloud water content with respect to cloud phase, cloud type, precipitation occurrence, and geo-location using CloudSat radar measurements. It uses a statistical method called maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the probability density function of the cloud water content.

  12. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of water content of the magma ocean would have water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was likely very significant in the evolution of the lunar mantle. Conclusions: Lunar granites

  13. Increased cerebral water content in hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the impact of hemodialysis on cerebral water homeostasis and its distribution in chronic kidney disease. We used a neuropsychological test battery, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a novel technique for quantitative measurement of localized water content using 3T MRI to investigate ten hemodialysis patients (HD on a dialysis-free day and after hemodialysis (2.4±2.2 hours, and a matched healthy control group with the same time interval. Neuropsychological testing revealed mainly attentional and executive cognitive dysfunction in HD. Voxel-based-morphometry showed only marginal alterations in the right inferior medial temporal lobe white matter in HD compared to controls. Marked increases in global brain water content were found in the white matter, specifically in parietal areas, in HD patients compared to controls. Although the global water content in the gray matter did not differ between the two groups, regional increases of brain water content in particular in parieto-temporal gray matter areas were observed in HD patients. No relevant brain hydration changes were revealed before and after hemodialysis. Whereas longer duration of dialysis vintage was associated with increased water content in parieto-temporal-occipital regions, lower intradialytic weight changes were negatively correlated with brain water content in these areas in HD patients. Worse cognitive performance on an attention task correlated with increased hydration in frontal white matter. In conclusion, long-term HD is associated with altered brain tissue water homeostasis mainly in parietal white matter regions, whereas the attentional domain in the cognitive dysfunction profile in HD could be linked to increased frontal white matter water content.

  14. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  15. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  16. Mapping tree root system in dikes using induced polarization: Focus on the influence of soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we assessed induced polarization as potential non-destructive method for root detection in dike embankments. We used both laboratory and field experiment to describe the electrical signal with a focus on soil water content. Our objective was to determine in which hydric state of the soil, and related electrical properties, roots could be accurately discriminated. We hypothesized that preferential water zone absorption near the roots could, in some conditions, contribute to locate them. During the laboratory experiments, we compared the response of containers filled with the same homogeneous silty clay bare material, and without (A) or with freshly cut root (B) at different levels of soil water content. Resistivity and phase variations with soil water content indicated that it was preferable to work in dry conditions since the contrast was higher. Interactions and overlapping between polarization effects of both root and soil made it difficult to interpret first chargeability maps. This led us to study temporal-spatial variations by considering the dynamics of water absorption during a field experiment. High resolution time lapses images showed a correlation between root location and complex resistivity anomalies. Although these first results have to be confirmed by further measurements, induced polarization seems to add useful information to interpret anomalies produced by woody roots.

  17. 南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼渔场时空分布与海表温度的关系%Relationship between temporal-spatial distribution of yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares fishing grounds and sea surface temperature in the South China Sea and adjacent waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪世建; 周为峰; 王鲁民; 唐峰华; 吴祖立; 陈国宝

    2016-01-01

    为得到南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼(Thunnus albacores)渔场最适宜栖息海表温度(SST)范围,基于美国国家海洋大气局(NOAA )气候预测中心月平均海表温度(SST)资料,结合中西太平洋渔业委员会(WCPFC)发布的南海及临近海域金枪鱼延绳钓渔业数据,绘制了月平均SST和月平均单位捕捞努力量渔获量(CPUE)的空间叠加图,用于分析南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼渔场CPUE时空分布和SST的关系.结果表明,南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼CPUE在16 ℃~31 ℃均有分布.在春季和夏季(3 ~8 月),位于10°~20°N的大部分渔区CPUE较高,其南北侧CPUE较低;而到了秋季和冬季(9月到次年2月),高产渔场区域会向南拓宽.CPUE在各SST区间的散点图呈现出明显的负偏态分布,高CPUE主要集中在26 ℃~30 ℃,最高值出现在29℃附近;在22 ℃ ~26 ℃范围内 CPUE散点分布较为零散,但在这个范围也会出现相当数量的高CPUE;在22 ℃以下的CPUE几乎属于低CPUE和零CPUE;零CPUE的平均SST为26 .7 ℃(±3 .2 ℃),低CPUE的平均SST为27.8 ℃(±2.1 ℃),高CPUE的平均SST为28.4℃(±1.5 ℃),高CPUE在各SST区间的分布要比零CPUE和低CPUE更为集中.采用频次分析和经验累积分布函数计算其最适SST范围,得到南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼最适SST为26 .9 ℃~29 .4 ℃.本研究初步得到南海及临近海域黄鳍金枪鱼中心渔场时空分布特征及SST适宜分布区间,可为开展南海及临近海域金枪鱼渔情预报工作提供理论依据和参考.%South China Sea is an important yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacares longline fishing ground in China. There is little research on relationship between the temporal-spatial distribution of yellowfin tuna fishing grounds and sea surface temperature (SST)environment in the South China Sea and its adjacent waters. Based on the monthly averaged SST data provided by the Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  18. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  19. Impacts of Temporal-Spatial Variant Background Ionosphere on Repeat-Track GEO D-InSAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Hu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An L band geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar (GEO SAR differential interferometry system (D-InSAR will be obviously impacted by the background ionosphere, which will give rise to relative image shifts and decorrelations of the SAR interferometry (InSAR pair, and induce the interferometric phase screen errors in interferograms. However, the background ionosphere varies within the long integration time (hundreds to thousands of seconds and the extensive imaging scene (1000 km levels of GEO SAR. As a result, the conventional temporal-spatial invariant background ionosphere model (i.e., frozen model used in Low Earth Orbit (LEO SAR is no longer valid. To address the issue, we firstly construct a temporal-spatial background ionosphere variation model, and then theoretically analyze its impacts, including relative image shifts and the decorrelation of the GEO InSAR pair, and the interferometric phase screen errors, on the repeat-track GEO D-InSAR processing. The related impacts highly depend on the background ionosphere parameters (constant total electron content (TEC component, and the temporal first-order and the temporal second-order derivatives of TEC with respect to the azimuth time, signal bandwidth, and integration time. Finally, the background ionosphere data at Isla Guadalupe Island (29.02°N, 118.27°W on 7–8 October 2013 is employed for validating the aforementioned analysis. Under the selected background ionosphere dataset, the temporal-spatial background ionosphere variation can give rise to a relative azimuth shift of dozens of meters at most, and even the complete decorrelation in the InSAR pair. Moreover, the produced interferometric phase screen error corresponds to a deformation measurement error of more than 0.2 m at most, even in a not severely impacted area.

  20. Fragmentation of colliding planetesimals with water content

    CERN Document Server

    Maindl, Thomas I; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the outcome of collisions of Ceres-sized planetesimals composed of a rocky core and a shell of water ice. These collisions are not only relevant for explaining the formation of planetary embryos in early planetary systems, but also provide insight into the formation of asteroid families and possible water transport via colliding small bodies. Earlier studies show characteristic collision velocities exceeding the bodies' mutual escape velocity which - along with the distribution of the impact angles - cover the collision outcome regimes 'partial accretion', 'erosion', and 'hit-and-run' leading to different expected fragmentation scenarios. Existing collision simulations use bodies composed of strengthless material; we study the distribution of fragments and their water contents considering the full elasto-plastic continuum mechanics equations also including brittle failure and fragmentation.

  1. Differentiating event-related potential components sensitive to emotion in middle childhood: evidence from temporal-spatial PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Autumn; Weinberg, Anna; Hajcak, Greg; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-07-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) may be particularly useful for examining emotional processing across development. Though a number of ERP components are sensitive to emotional content in adults, previous studies have yet to systematically examine the components sensitive to emotion in children. The current study used temporal-spatial principal components analysis (PCA) to identify ERP components in response to complex emotional images in 9-year-old children. Three components were modulated by emotional content and were similar to those previously observed in adults, including: the early posterior negativity, the P300, and a sustained relative positivity similar to the late positive potential (LPP). Compared to those previously observed in adults, the components sensitive to emotion in children were maximal over more occipital regions and the LPP component appeared to be less protracted in time, perhaps indicative of less elaborative processing of emotional stimuli. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Temporal-Spatial Analysis of Traffic Congestion Based on Modified CTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglong Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified cell transmission model (CTM is proposed to depict the temporal-spatial evolution of traffic congestion on urban freeways. Specifically, drivers’ adaptive behaviors and the corresponding influence on traffic flows are emphasized. Two piecewise linear regression models are proposed to describe the relationship of flow and density (occupancy. Several types of cellular connections are designed to depict urban rapid roads with on/off-ramps and junctions. Based on the data collected on freeway of Queen Elizabeth, Ontario, Canada, we show that the new model provides a relatively higher accuracy of temporal-spatial evolution of traffic congestions.

  3. Estimation of Areal Soil Water Content through Microwave Remote Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oevelen, van P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis the use of microwave remote sensing to estimate soil water content is investigated. A general framework is described which is applicable to both passive and active microwave remote sensing of soil water content. The various steps necessary to estimate areal soil water content are disc

  4. Bread Water Content Measurement Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhi; Møller, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    for bread quality based on near-infrared hyperspectral imaging against the conventional manual loss-in-weight method. For this purpose, the hyperspectral components unmixing technology is used for measuring the water content quantitatively. And the definition on bread water content index is presented......Water content is one of the most important properties of the bread for tasting assesment or store monitoring. Traditional bread water content measurement methods mostly are processed manually, which is destructive and time consuming. This paper proposes an automated water content measurement...... for this measurement. The proposed measurement scheme is relatively inexpensive to implement, easy to set up. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness....

  5. Spatially Periodic System with Infinite Globally Coupled Oscillators Driven by Temporal-Spatial Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yin-Xia; LI Jing-Hui; ZHAO Ying-Kui; CHEN Shi-Gang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study spatially periodic system with infinite globally coupled oscillators driven by temporal-spatial noise and subject to a constant force. The results show that the system exhibits the phenomena of the non-equilibrium phase transition, transport of particles, and the anomalous hysteresis cycle for the mean field and the probability current.

  6. THE TEMPORAL-SPATIAL DIDACTIC RESOURCES IN THE TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS OF HISTORY / LOS RECURSOS DIDÁCTICOS TEMPORALES-ESPACIALES EN EL PROCESO DE ENSEÑANZA-APRENDIZAJE DE LA HISTORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Josué López Ramírez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper points to basic teaching resources, in the process of teaching and learning of history. The teaching resources are analyzed as a basic link in the realization of temporal-spatial relations. There are listed the national and international authors that have contributed to the study of the temporal-spatial and the major limitations of these considerations. It redefines basic concepts such as temporality and spatiality, with criteria attached to our theoretical conceptions. It raises the methodological requirements necessary to be introduced teaching resources in educational practice. You define the categories of teaching resources for the purpose they have on the contents, just as those offered more teaching resources that can contribute to the integrated approach of the temporal-spatial. In the analysis of teaching resources are available for use didactic criteria that have been validated in educational practice for several courses and in advising the subject History as provincial head of it.

  7. Recreational runners with patellofemoral pain exhibit elevated patella water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Hu, Houchun H; Colletti, Patrick M; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-09-01

    Increased bone water content resulting from repetitive patellofemoral joint overloading has been suggested to be a possible mechanism underlying patellofemoral pain (PFP). To date, it remains unknown whether persons with PFP exhibit elevated bone water content. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recreational runners with PFP exhibit elevated patella water content when compared to pain-free controls. Ten female recreational runners with a diagnosis of PFP (22 to 39years of age) and 10 gender, age, weight, height, and activity matched controls underwent chemical-shift-encoded water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify patella water content (i.e., water-signal fraction). Differences in bone water content of the total patella, lateral aspect of the patella, and medial aspect of the patella were compared between groups using independent t tests. Compared with the control group, the PFP group demonstrated significantly greater total patella bone water content (15.4±3.5% vs. 10.3±2.1%; P=0.001), lateral patella water content (17.2±4.2% vs. 11.5±2.5%; P=0.002), and medial patella water content (13.2±2.7% vs. 8.4±2.3%; Ppatella water content observed in female runners with PFP is suggestive of venous engorgement and elevated extracellular fluid. In turn, this may lead to an increase in intraosseous pressure and pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of Communicating Process Skeletons from Temporal-Spatial Logic Specifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1989-01-01

    Temporal-spatial logic is a propositional logic with temporal and spatial modalities asserting on a network.In this paper,a tableau-like decision procedure for network satisfiability in the logic is presented and used in the synthesis of communicating skeletons of CSP-like programs.By explicitly introducing communication network in the logic system,our approach has some advantages over the temporal one.

  9. Temporal, spatial and ecological dynamics of speciation among amphi-Beringian small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G.; Takebayashi, Naoki; Galbreath, Kurt E.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Cook, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary climate cycles played an important role in promoting diversification across the Northern Hemisphere, although details of the mechanisms driving evolutionary change are still poorly resolved. In a comparative phylogeographical framework, we investigate temporal, spatial and ecological components of evolution within a suite of Holarctic small mammals. We test a hypothesis of simultaneous divergence among multiple taxon pairs, investigating time to coalescence and demographic change for each taxon in response to a combination of climate and geography.

  10. Calcium and bromide contents of natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.J.; Graf, D.L.; Jones, B.F.

    1966-01-01

    The linear relation observed in a log Ca++ versus log Br - plot for subsurface Cl- waters is attributed to ultrafiltration by shale of sea water and fresh water that have passed through sedimentary rocks since their formation. Reactions between these solutions and sedimentary minerals, particularly dolomitization, must have contributed additional Ca+ + to solution.

  11. Modelling unfrozen water content in a silty clay permafrost deposit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Frederik Ancker; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of both unfrozen soils and permafrost soils are influenced by the amount of unfrozen water in the pore space. When dealing with foundation engineering in permafrost areas it is essential to estimate the unfrozen water content (wu). This paper deals with the establishing...... of a calibration equation for determining the unfrozen water content of a Greenlandic silty clay permafrost deposit. Calibration experiments have been conducted for water contents in the interval 0 – 10 % at both 5 °C and 22 °C. Calibration equations are verified against permittivity data from a permafrost core...... of material properties similar to the test soil. The calibration for 5°C is seen to make a good fit to the permafrost core data. Further experiments should be performed in order to extend the range of water contents tested and hence the range of validity of the calibration equation....

  12. Soil volumetric water content measurements using TDR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vincenzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A physical model to measure some hydrological and thermal parameters in soils will to be set up. The vertical profiles of: volumetric water content, matric potential and temperature will be monitored in different soils. The volumetric soil water content is measured by means of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR technique. The result of a test to determine experimentally the reproducibility of the volumetric water content measurements is reported together with the methodology and the results of the analysis of the TDR wave forms. The analysis is based on the calculation of the travel time of the TDR signal in the wave guide embedded in the soil.

  13. The Initial Water Content Dependent Swelling Behavior of Clayey Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet Öngen, Ali; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    The variation in water content is known as a main controlling parameter for many physical and mechanical behaviors of clayey soils, particularly soils found in arid and semi-arid regions. Expansive soils found in such regions are naturally subjected to many volume increase and decrease cycles within unsaturated zone during rainy and dry periods, and thus these soils constitute severe hazard to low-rise light buildings and infrastructures constructed in shallow unsaturated depths. Although the relationships between swelling parameters (swelling pressure and swelling percent) and soils' physical - index properties have been investigated in details in previous researches, the continuous effect of water content on swelling mechanisms of soils is not yet sufficiently studied. The water content of unsaturated zone naturally fluctuates with changes in both seasonal climatic conditions and increasing in depths, and therefore, swelling parameters of a soil within unsaturated soils should not be represented with only one single value. For achieving accurate understanding of swelling behavior at field condition, soils should be subjected to swelling tests by considering different initial water content conditions. Considering requirement for further understanding in water content dependent swelling behavior of soils, a research program was aimed to investigate the effect of initial water content on swelling behavior of soil materials. For this purpose, soils having wide range of physical properties such as grain size distributions, mineralogical composition and consistency limits were collected from different locations in Turkey. To minimize the effect of dry unit weight on swelling behavior of soils, samples prepared at same dry unit weight (14.6 kN/m3) with various initial water contents ranging from 0% to approximately 37% were subjected to swelling tests by using convenient odometer device. Beside these tests, grain size distribution, Atterberg limits and mineralogical

  14. Water repellency and critical soil water content in a dune sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Doerr, S.H.; Oostindie, K.; Ziogas, A.K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    Assessments of water repellency of soils are commonly made on air-dried or oven-dried samples, without considering the soil water content. The objectives of this study were to examine the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content, actual water repellency over short distances, and the

  15. Metasomatic control of water contents in the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Woodland, A. B.; Bell, D. R.; Lazarov, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2012-11-01

    Water and trace element contents were measured by FTIR and laser ablation-ICPMS on minerals from peridotite xenoliths in kimberlites of the Kaapvaal craton from Finsch, Kimberley, Jagersfontein (South Africa), Letseng-La-Terae, and Liqhobong (Lesotho) mines. The peridotites record a wide range of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, and metasomatic events. Correlations between water content or OH vibration bands with major, minor and trace elements in pyroxene and garnet precludes disturbance during xenolith entrainment by the host kimberlite magma and indicate preservation of mantle water contents. Clinopyroxene water contents (150-400 ppm H2O, by weight) correlate with those of orthopyroxene (40-250 ppm). Olivines (Peslier et al., 2008, 2010) and garnets have 0-86 and 0-20 ppm H2O, respectively. Relations in individual xenolith suites between the amount of water and that of incompatible elements Ti, Na, Fe3+ and rare earths in minerals suggests that metasomatism by oxidizing melts controls the water content of olivine, pyroxene and garnet. At pressures ⩽5.5 GPa, hydrous, alkaline, siliceous fluids or melts metasomatized Liqhobong and Kimberley peridotites, producing high water contents in their olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. At higher pressures, the percolation of ultramafic melts reacting with peridotite resulted in co-variation of Ca, Ti and water at the edge of garnets at Jagersfontein, and the overall crystallization of garnet with lower water contents than those in the original peridotites. The upward migration of these ultramafic melts through the lithospheric mantle also increased the water content of olivines with decreasing pressure at Finsch Mine. H2O/Ce ratios of melts in equilibrium with Kaapvaal peridotites range from 100 to 20,000 and the larger values may indicate metasomatism in subduction zone settings. Metasomatic events in Kaapvaal peridotites are thought to have occurred from the Archean to the Mesozoic. However, circumstantial evidence

  16. Water content in the Martian mantle: A Nakhla perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Franz A.; Bellucci, Jeremy J.; Skogby, Henrik; Stalder, Roland; Nemchin, Alexander A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2017-09-01

    Water contents of the Martian mantle have previously been investigated using Martian meteorites, with several comprehensive studies estimating the water content in the parental melts and mantle source regions of the shergottites and Chassigny. However, no detailed studies have been performed on the Nakhla meteorite. One possible way to determine the water content of a crystallizing melt is to use the water content in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) such as clinopyroxene and olivine. During or after eruption on the surface of a planetary body and during residence in a degassing magma, these minerals may dehydrate. By reversing this process experimentally, original (pre-dehydration) water concentrations can be quantified. In this study, hydrothermal rehydration experiments were performed at 2 kbar and 700 °C on potentially dehydrated Nakhla clinopyroxene crystals. Rehydrated clinopyroxene crystals exhibit water contents of 130 ± 26 (2σ) ppm and are thus similar to values observed in similar phenocrysts from terrestrial basalts. Utilizing clinopyroxene/melt partition coefficients, both the water content of the Nakhla parent melt and mantle source region were estimated. Despite previous assumptions of a relatively dry melt, the basaltic magma crystallizing Nakhla may have had up to 1.42 ± 0.28 (2σ) wt.% H2O. Based on an assumed low degree of partial melting, this estimate can be used to calculate a minimum estimate of the water content for Nakhla's mantle source region of 72 ± 16 ppm. Combining this value with values determined for other SNC mantle sources, by alternative methods, gives an average mantle value of 102 ± 9 (2σ) ppm H2O for the Martian upper mantle throughout geologic time. This value is lower than the bulk water content of Earth's upper mantle (∼250 ppm H2O) but similar to Earth's MORB source (54-330 ppm, average ∼130 ppm H2O).

  17. Influence of water air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water J. G. Auret,* O. F. R. A. Damm,* G. J. Wright* and F. P. A. Robinson t The influence of increased air content of the cavitating liquid (distilled water... erosion, air (gas) content, distilled water Introduction The existence of cavitation at positive liquid pressures depends on the presence of small gas pockets or nuclei ~. Thus gas (usually air) content is an extremely...

  18. Droplet-Sizing Liquid Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing is one of the most significant hazards to aircraft. A sizing supercooled liquid water content (SSLWC) sonde is being developed to meet a directly related need...

  19. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The water content of clouds, whether in liquid or ice form, is a key variable to be measured when either calibrating remote sensing systems or when calculating the...

  20. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The measurement of cloud water content is of great importance in understanding the formation of clouds, their structure, and their radiative properties which in turn...

  1. Total Suspended Solid Content in Raha Waters, Northeast of Celebes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement on Total Suspended Solid (TSS in Raha waters were carried out in May 2001. The results showed that the content of total suspended solid varied between 74,8 – 78,9 ppm with averages content is 76,5 ppm. This content is still suited to the threshold value stated by government decree in 1988 for fishery and sea conservation park, but not suitable for recreation (swimming, diving activity.

  2. Water diffusion behavior in epoxy resins with various fluorine contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Chen, Yin; Li, Shanjun

    2006-04-01

    In this work, novolac resin with perfluorinated side chains was synthesized and cured with o-Cresol novolac epoxy resin to obtain epoxy resins with various fluorine contents. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR/FT-IR) was used to monitor the in situ water diffusion process in these systems. The diffusion coefficient of water first increased and then slightly decreased with increasing fluorine content, which could be attributed to two opposite effects induced by perfluorinated side chains: enhanced hydrophobicity and increased free volume. In addition, generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis was employed to investigate both the sorption and the desorption process of water diffusion, and two kinds of water molecules, named bound and free water, were found. It was interesting to find that in the sorption process, the change in the population of bound water molecules occurs earlier than the change in the population of free water molecules, while in the desorption process, the sequence was reversed.

  3. Early, but not late visual distractors affect movement synchronization to a temporal-spatial visual cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Ashley J; Elliott, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    The ease of synchronizing movements to a rhythmic cue is dependent on the modality of the cue presentation: timing accuracy is much higher when synchronizing with discrete auditory rhythms than an equivalent visual stimulus presented through flashes. However, timing accuracy is improved if the visual cue presents spatial as well as temporal information (e.g., a dot following an oscillatory trajectory). Similarly, when synchronizing with an auditory target metronome in the presence of a second visual distracting metronome, the distraction is stronger when the visual cue contains spatial-temporal information rather than temporal only. The present study investigates individuals' ability to synchronize movements to a temporal-spatial visual cue in the presence of same-modality temporal-spatial distractors. Moreover, we investigated how increasing the number of distractor stimuli impacted on maintaining synchrony with the target cue. Participants made oscillatory vertical arm movements in time with a vertically oscillating white target dot centered on a large projection screen. The target dot was surrounded by 2, 8, or 14 distractor dots, which had an identical trajectory to the target but at a phase lead or lag of 0, 100, or 200 ms. We found participants' timing performance was only affected in the phase-lead conditions and when there were large numbers of distractors present (8 and 14). This asymmetry suggests participants still rely on salient events in the stimulus trajectory to synchronize movements. Subsequently, distractions occurring in the window of attention surrounding those events have the maximum impact on timing performance.

  4. Assessment of Temporal-Spatial Variation of Hydrological Drought in Xijiang River Basin from 1961 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Q.; Wu, Z.; Singh, V. P.; Guihua, L.

    2016-12-01

    Xijiang is an important estuary for the construction of Pearl River Delta Regional Economic System in China and for the China-ASEAN Free Trade Area, which has the reputation of Golden Watercourse. The Xijiang River hydrological regime has now become complicated and many extreme hydrological drought events that have occurred in recent years have caused widespread concern. In order to effectively mitigate the damage caused by drought disasters, it is essential to comprehensively analyze the temporal-spatial variation of hydrological droughts in the basin. The trend test and the Extreme-Point Symmetric Mode Decomposition (ESMD) methods were employed to investigate the temporal-spatial variability and to analyze the probable influence of meteorology, vegetation and hydraulic operations on the drought. Results showed that the drought frequency and severity increased during 1961-2014, with the mean regional drought concentration being around 0.41. Sustained extreme droughts occur with increasing occurrence frequency from autumn to spring tend to become regional. Comparison of the periods and deficits of extreme drought events, which were divided into two parts by the EI Nino phenomenon, revealed that El Nino might contribute more to creating a favorable climate condition for drought other than aggravating it. The relationship between hydrological and meteorological droughts is intricate, and their trends are consistent but the former shows a higher regional difference. Weakly annual and monthly relationships between hydrological drought severity and the vegetation factor characterized by NDVI (Modis13Q1) indicated that the vegetation change had only a minor influence on the drought. However, the water conservancy project provided a certain relief, for drought severity of Yujiang River basin decreased by 44.7% and that of Xijiang upper reaches by 20.4% under a single or multi-reservoir joint operation in Yujiang and Hongshui River during the 2009/2010 extreme drought

  5. Iodine content in drinking water and other beverages in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ovesen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the variation in iodine content in drinking water in Denmark and to determine the difference in iodine content between organic and non-organic milk. Further, to analyse the iodine content in other beverages. Design and setting: Tap water samples were collected from 41...... evenly distributed localities in Denmark. Organic and non-organic milli was collected at the same time (twice summer and twice winter). Soft drinks, beers and juice were collected from different Danish producers and wine from different countries. All samples were analysed for iodine using inductively...

  6. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    for estimating clay content from hygroscopic water at different relative humidity (RH) levels while considering hysteresis and organic matter content. Continuous adsorption/desorption vapour sorption isotherm loops were measured for 150 differently textured soils with a state-of-the-art vapour sorption analyser......Soil texture, in particular the clay fraction, governs numerous environmental, agricultural and engineering soil processes. Traditional measurement methods for clay content are laborious and impractical for large-scale soil surveys. Consequently, clay prediction models that are based on water...... vapour sorption, which can be measured within a shorter period of time, have recently been developed. Such models are often based on single-point measurements of water adsorption and do not account for sorption hysteresis or organic matter content. The present study introduces regression relationships...

  7. Using hyperspectral remote sensing data for retrieving canopy water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Kooistra, L.

    2009-01-01

    Canopy water content (CWC) is important for understanding functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Spectral derivatives at the slopes of the 970 nm and 1200 nm water absorption features offer good potential as estimators for CWC. An extensively grazed fen meadow is used as test site in this study. Res

  8. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar A; Raju O; Kurthukoti A; Vishwas T

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, bo...

  9. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content - a field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahser, M. H. P.; Matthey, P.-D.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.

    2009-04-01

    In porous saturated media, seismic compressional waves can cause seismoelectric and seismoelectromagnetic signals through electrokinetic coupling. It has been observed that these measureable signals also occur in partially saturated media, but the theory is largely unknown for these circumstances. Seismoelectromagnetic tomography is expected to combine the sensitivity of electrical properties to water-content and permeability, to the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys. A better understanding of the physical processes and a reliable quantification of the conversion between seismic and electric energy are necessary and need to take into account the effect of water-content, especially for shallow subsurface investigations. In order to quantify seismoelectric signals with changing water content, we repeated seismoelectric and seismic measurements on the same profile in the Vosges Mountains during several months. The electrical resistivity was also monitored to take into account the water-content variations. We show that an exponential relation can be established between the seismoelectric amplitudes normalized with the seismic amplitudes and the resistivity which in turn is related to the saturation: Increasing resistivity (decreasing water content) leads to decreasing normalized seismoelectric amplitudes. These results imply that the electrokinetic coefficient should increase with water-saturation, as measured in laboratory, but not predicted by theory. This work was funded by CNRS and Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg.

  10. [Near infrared spectroscopy study on water content in turbine oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with successive projections algorithm (SPA) was investigated for determination of water content in turbine oil. Through the 57 samples of different water content in turbine oil scanned applying near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, with the water content in the turbine oil of 0-0.156%, different pretreatment methods such as the original spectra, first derivative spectra and differential polynomial least squares fitting algorithm Savitzky-Golay (SG), and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were applied for the extraction of effective wavelengths, the correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE) were used as the model evaluation indices, accordingly water content in turbine oil was investigated. The results indicated that the original spectra with different water content in turbine oil were pretreated by the performance of first derivative + SG pretreatments, then the selected effective wavelengths were used as the inputs of least square support vector machine (LS-SVM). A total of 16 variables selected by SPA were employed to construct the model of SPA and least square support vector machine (SPA-LS-SVM). There is 9 as The correlation coefficient was 0.975 9 and the root of mean square error of validation set was 2.655 8 x 10(-3) using the model, and it is feasible to determine the water content in oil using near infrared spectroscopy and SPA-LS-SVM, and an excellent prediction precision was obtained. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of near infrared spectroscopy in on-line monitoring of contamination such as water content in oil.

  11. Dielectric properties of low-water-content tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S R; Foster, K R

    1985-09-01

    The dielectric properties of two low-water-content tissues, bone marrow and adipose tissue, were measured from 1 kHz to 1 GHz. From 1 kHz to 13 MHz, the measurements were performed using a parallel-plate capacitor method. From 10 MHz to 1 GHz, a reflection coefficient technique using an open-ended coaxial transmission line was employed. The tissue water contents ranged from 1 to almost 70% by weight. The dielectric properties correlate well with the values predicted by mixture theory. Comparison with previous results from high-water-content tissues suggests that bone marrow and adipose tissues contain less motionally altered water per unit dry volume than do the previously studied tissues with lower lipid fractions. The high degree of structural heterogeneity of these tissues was reflected in the large scatter of the data, a source of uncertainty that should be considered in practical applications of the present data.

  12. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-08-05

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and environmental conditions.

  13. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  14. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain their cell turgor and metabolism. Osmotic potential is a function of the salt concentration in the soil solution and therefore affected by both salinity (measured as electrical conductivity at a certain water content and soil water content. Soil salinity and water content vary in time and space. Understanding the effect of changes in salinity and water content on soil microorganisms is important for crop production, sustainable land use and rehabilitation of saline soils. In this review, the effects of soil salinity and water content on microbes are discussed to guide future research into management of saline soils.

  15. [Review of monitoring soil water content using hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-hui; Fan, Wen-jie; Cui, Yao-kui; Yan, Bin-yan; Xu, Xi-ru

    2010-11-01

    Soil water content is a key parameter in monitoring drought. In recent years, a lot of work has been done on monitoring soil water content based on hyperspectral remotely sensed data both at home and abroad. In the present review, theories, advantages and disadvantages of the monitoring methods using different bands are introduced first. Then the unique advantages, as well as the problems, of the monitoring method with the aid of hyperspectral remote sensing are analyzed. In addition, the impact of soil water content on soil reflectance spectrum and the difference between values at different wavelengths are summarized. This review lists and summarizes the quantitative relationships between soil water content and soil reflectance obtained through analyzing the physical mechanism as well as through statistical way. The key points, advantages and disadvantages of each model are also analyzed and evaluated. Then, the problems in experimental study are pointed out, and the corresponding solutions are proposed. At the same time, the feasibility of removing vegetation effect is discussed, when monitoring soil water content using hyperspectral remote sensing. Finally, the future research trend is prospected.

  16. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  17. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  18. Remote sensing of vegetation water content using shortwave infrared reflectances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Yilmaz, M. Tugrul

    2007-09-01

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) were to develop and test algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwave infrared reflectances. SMEX04 studied native vegetation in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico, while SMEX05 studied corn and soybean in Iowa, USA. The normalized difference infrared index (NDII) is defined as (R 850 - R 1650)/(R 800 + R 1650), where R 850 is the reflectance in the near infrared and R1650 is the reflectance in the shortwave infrared. Simulations using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL) model indicated that NDII is sensitive to surface moisture content. From Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and other imagery, NDII is linear with respect to foliar water content with R2 = 0.81. The regression standard error of the y estimate is 0.094 mm, which is equivalent to about a leaf area index of 0.5 m2 m -2. Based on modeling the dynamic water flow through plants, the requirement for detection of water stress is about 0.01 mm, so detection of water stress may not be possible. However, this standard error is accurate for input into the tau-omega model for soil moisture. Therefore, NDII may be a robust backup algorithm for MODIS as a standard data product.

  19. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B;

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  20. Temporal-spatial characteristics of vegetation cover and desertification of China by using remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer (NOAA-AVHRR) remote sensing data of 1982~1999, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) reflecting the surface vegetation cover has been obtained. Using the empirical orthogonal function analysis, the temporal-spatial eigenvectors of NDVI are given, and the characteristics of the spatial distribution of vegetation cover and its temporal variation together with the desertification of China are analyzed. It is found that the surface vegetation cover has seriously deteriorated in most part of China since 1995, along with the intensified desertification. All these are mainly caused by human activities although the climate change is responsible for the damage of surface vegetation cover to some extent.

  1. Quantum walk through lattice with temporal, spatial, and fluctuating disordered operations

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekar, C M

    2011-01-01

    Quantum walks and its dynamic properties have provided a framework to various applications ranging from quantum computing to simulation of physical processes in nature. We present a discrete-time quantum walk model with the evolution operator for each step in the form of the Hamiltonian operator. The Hamiltonian form of the evolution operator is extended to define the discrete-time quantum walk using two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice structure such as, triangular, kagome and honeycomb lattice. We also study the walk dynamics using temporal, spatially static, and fluctuating disordered unitary evolution operators and show that the localization is possible only with a spatially static disordered operations. This approach provides a general framework for using a two-state particle discrete-time quantum walk to simulate, control, and study the dynamics in form of ordered and disordered Hamiltonian operations in various one- and two-dimensional physical systems.

  2. Three-stage approach for dynamic traffic temporal-spatial model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆化普; 孙智源; 屈闻聪

    2016-01-01

    In order to describe the characteristics of dynamic traffic flow and improve the robustness of its multiple applications, a dynamic traffic temporal-spatial model (DTTS) is established. With consideration of the temporal correlation, spatial correlation and historical correlation, a basic DTTS model is built. And a three-stage approach is put forward for the simplification and calibration of the basic DTTS model. Through critical sections pre-selection and critical time pre-selection, the first stage reduces the variable number of the basic DTTS model. In the second stage, variable coefficient calibration is implemented based on basic model simplification and stepwise regression analysis. Aimed at dynamic noise estimation, the characteristics of noise are summarized and an extreme learning machine is presented in the third stage. A case study based on a real-world road network in Beijing, China, is carried out to test the efficiency and applicability of proposed DTTS model and the three-stage approach.

  3. Rapid myelin water content mapping on clinical MR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkova, Vyara; Arhelger, Volker [Fachhochschule Koblenz, RheinAhrCampus Remagen (Germany); Schenk, Jochen [Radiologisches Institut, Koblenz (Germany); Neeb, Heiko [Fachhochschule Koblenz, RheinAhrCampus Remagen (Germany); Koblenz Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Medical Engineering and Information Processing - MTI Mittelrhein

    2012-07-01

    We present an algorithm for the fast mapping of myelin water content using standard multiecho gradient echo acquisitions of the human brain. The method extents a previously published approach for the simultaneous measurement of brain T{sub 1}, T{sup *}{sub 2} and total water content. Employing the multiexponential T{sup *}{sub 2} decay signal of myelinated tissue, myelin water content was measured based on the quantification of two water pools ('myelin water' and 'rest') with different relaxation times. As the existing protocol was focussed on the fast mapping of quantitative MR parameters with whole brain coverage in clinically relevant measurement times, the sampling density of the T{sup *}{sub 2} curve was compromised to 10 echo times with a T {sub Emax} of approx. 40 ms. Therefore, pool amplitudes were determined using a quadratic optimisation approach. The optimisation was constrained by including a priori knowledge about brain water pools. All constraints were optimised in a simulation study to minimise systematic error sources given the incomplete knowledge about the real pool-specific relaxation properties. Based on the simulation results, whole brain in vivo myelin water content maps were acquired in 10 healthy controls and one subject with multiple sclerosis. The in vivo results obtained were consistent with previous reports which demonstrates that a simultaneous whole brain mapping of T{sub 1}, T{sup *}{sub 2}, total and myelin water content is feasible on almost any modern MR scanner in less than 10 minutes. (orig.)

  4. Early, but not late visual distractors affect movement synchronization to a temporal-spatial visual cue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley J Booth

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ease of synchronising movements to a rhythmic cue is dependent on the modality of the cue presentation: timing accuracy is much higher when synchronising with discrete auditory rhythms than an equivalent visual stimulus presented through flashes. However, timing accuracy is improved if the visual cue presents spatial as well as temporal information (e.g. a dot following an oscillatory trajectory. Similarly, when synchronising with an auditory target metronome in the presence of a second visual distracting metronome, the distraction is stronger when the visual cue contains spatial-temporal information rather than temporal only. The present study investigates individuals’ ability to synchronise movements to a temporal-spatial visual cue in the presence of same-modality temporal-spatial distractors. Moreover, we investigated how increasing the number of distractor stimuli impacted on maintaining synchrony with the target cue. Participants made oscillatory vertical arm movements in time with a vertically oscillating white target dot centred on a large projection screen. The target dot was surrounded by 2, 8 or 14 distractor dots, which had an identical trajectory to the target but at a phase lead or lag of 0, 100 or 200ms. We found participants’ timing performance was only affected in the phase-lead conditions and when there were large numbers of distractors present (8 and 14. This asymmetry suggests participants still rely on salient events in the stimulus trajectory to synchronise movements. Subsequently, distractions occurring in the window of attention surrounding those events have the maximum impact on timing performance.

  5. An Improved Frequency Domain Technique for Determining Soil Water Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Rui; MA Dao-Kun; LIN Jian-Hui; P. SCHULZE LAMMERS; L. DAMEROW

    2005-01-01

    For many years a soil water content sensor with low cost, reliability and sufficient accuracy has been desirable. Thus,an improved measurement method based on the frequency domain (FD) principle for determining soil water content was considered. Unlike other measurement principles, a new measurable index, η, which was independent of the output impedance and the amplitude of the oscillator while relying on the electrical impedance of a multi-pin probe, was proposed. Moreover, a model for processing the impedance of the multi-pin soil probe was developed, and several important electrical parameters for establishing their operating ranges applicable to this probe were evaluated. In order to confirm the theoretical analysis, an experiment was conducted with a 4-pin probe. Using the developed model, the relationship between the proposed indexηand soil volumetric water content was shown to be linear (R2 = 0.9921). Thus, as the measurable index, ηseemed satisfactory.

  6. Water contents in pyroxenes of intraplate lithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadiman, C.; Hao, Y.-T.; Coltorti, M.; Dallai, L.; Faccini, B.; Hu, H.; Qunke, X.

    2009-04-01

    Water contents of clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene in mantle peridotites from various xenolith occurrences in intraplate settings (both oceanic and continental) were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The localities are as follow: Sal Island (Cape Verde Archipelago); Baker Rocks and Greene Point (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica); Panshishan and Lianshan (Subei Basin, Eastern China). They represent well-known localities where detailed petrographical and geochemical studies have already been carried out or areas which are currently under investigation. The water incorporated in these pyroxenes is low (cpx, 37-399ppm; opx: 9-166ppm)(or very low as in Greene Point, Antarctica; cpx, 5-16ppm; opx: 9-16ppm) and, among each population, no clear correlation with melting parameters (MgO contents) in single mineral is evident. Results are compared with the available literature data on water contents in mantle pyroxene which includes peridotites from on-craton (hosted by kimberlitic-type magmas) and off-craton (hosted by alkaline basic magmas), as well as subarc mantle settings. The "relatively dry" (cpx: 140-528 ppm; opx: 38-280 ppm) sub-arc mantle xenoliths (Peslier et al., 2002) are shown to be wetter than the intraplate (off-craton) xenoliths. Cratonic mantle pyroxenes are only represented by a few determinations on garnet peridotites and eclogite from Kaapvaal and Colorado Plateau. They record the highest water contents (cpx: 342-1012 ppm; opx: 180-491 ppm) so far measured in mantle pyroxenes from various tectonic settings. Despite the limited data set, the indication that the cratonic mantle is strongly hydrated is compelling. Rehydration for the Colorado Plateau craton may be due to the Farallon plate subduction (Li et al., 2008), while for Kaapvaal Craton it might be related to young (<100Ma) metasomatic enrichments (Griffin et al., 2003a; Kobussen et al., 2008). If this is the case then the Archean mantle water content needs to be

  7. Demonstration and Validation of the Geostatistical Temporal-Spatial Algorithm (GTS) for Optimization of Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) of Groundwater at Military and Government Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Validation of the Geostatistical Temporal-Spatial Algorithm (GTS) for Optimization of Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) of Groundwater at Military and... Geostatistical Temporal-Spatial Algorithm (GTS) for Optimization of Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) of Groundwater at Military and Government Sites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...ABSTRACT The primary objective of this ESTCP project was to demonstrate and validate use of the Geostatistical Temporal-Spatial (GTS) groundwater

  8. Water content and water repellency in a field. Implications for irrigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, L. A.; de Rooij, G. H.; Salzman, S.; Allinson, G.; Stagnitti, F.; Carr, R.; Versace, V.; Struck, S.; March, T.

    2010-05-01

    The degree of water repellency of soil material depends on its water content. Irrigated soils preferably should be kept sufficiently wet to render the soil wettable, in order to prevent irrigation water bypassing the root zone. But if this leads to overirrigation, the risk of groundwater pollution increases. We applied three irrigation regimes to individual trees in a Eucalyptus plantation on water-repellent soil. The resulting unimodal distribution of shallow water contents produced a bimodal distribution in the degree of water repellency: at any location, the soil would most likely be either wettable, or strongly water-repellent. We developed a procedure to estimate from both distributions the area of wettable soil based on a population of locally determined water contents.

  9. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  10. Effective Calibration of Low-Cost Soil Water Content Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heye Reemt Bogena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil water content is a key variable for understanding and modelling ecohydrological processes. Low-cost electromagnetic sensors are increasingly being used to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water content, despite the reduced accuracy of such sensors as compared to reference electromagnetic soil water content sensing methods such as time domain reflectometry. Here, we present an effective calibration method to improve the measurement accuracy of low-cost soil water content sensors taking the recently developed SMT100 sensor (Truebner GmbH, Neustadt, Germany as an example. We calibrated the sensor output of more than 700 SMT100 sensors to permittivity using a standard procedure based on five reference media with a known apparent dielectric permittivity (1 < Ka < 34.8. Our results showed that a sensor-specific calibration improved the accuracy of the calibration compared to single “universal” calibration. The associated additional effort in calibrating each sensor individually is relaxed by a dedicated calibration setup that enables the calibration of large numbers of sensors in limited time while minimizing errors in the calibration process.

  11. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kostik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, while in ground water samples from wells boreholes and mineral waters with the technique of ion chromatography. The research shows that lithium concentration in potable water ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 μg/L; in surface water from 0.5 to 15.0 μg/L; ground water from wells boreholes from 16.0 to 49.1 μg/L and mineral water from 125.2 to 484.9 μg/L. Obtained values are in accordance with the relevant international values for the lithium content in water.

  12. The water content of recurring slope lineae on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher S.; Piqueux, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    Observations of recurring slope lineae (RSL) from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have been interpreted as present-day, seasonally variable liquid water flows; however, orbital spectroscopy has not confirmed the presence of liquid H2O, only hydrated salts. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) temperature data and a numerical heat transfer model definitively constrain the amount of water associated with RSL. Surface temperature differences between RSL-bearing and dry RSL-free terrains are consistent with no water associated with RSL and, based on measurement uncertainties, limit the water content of RSL to at most 0.5-3 wt %. In addition, distinct high thermal inertia regolith signatures expected with crust-forming evaporitic salt deposits from cyclical briny water flows are not observed, indicating low water salinity (if any) and/or low enough volumes to prevent their formation. Alternatively, observed salts may be preexisting in soils at low abundances (i.e., near or below detection limits) and largely immobile. These RSL-rich surfaces experience ~100 K diurnal temperature oscillations, possible freeze/thaw cycles and/or complete evaporation on time scales that challenge their habitability potential. The unique surface temperature measurements provided by THEMIS are consistent with a dry RSL hypothesis or at least significantly limit the water content of Martian RSL.

  13. High resolution full-spectrum water Raman lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU FuChao; YI Fan; JIA JingYu; ZHANG YunPeng; ZHANG ShaoDong; YU ChangMing; TAN Ying

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the temporal-spatial distribution of water content in atmosphere and water phase change in cloud is important for atmospheric study.For this purpose,we have developed a high resolution full-spectrum water Raman lidar that can collect Raman signals from ice,water droplets and water vapor simultaneously.A double-grating polychromator and a 32-channel photomultiplier-tube detector are used to obtain a spectral resolution of ~0.19 nm in the full Raman spectrum range of water.Preliminary observations present the water Raman spectrum characteristics of both the mixed-phase cloud and humid air under cloudless condition.

  14. Reliability and Minimum Detectable Change of Temporal-Spatial, Kinematic, and Dynamic Stability Measures during Perturbed Gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Rábago

    Full Text Available Temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures collected during perturbation-based assessment paradigms are often used to identify dysfunction associated with gait instability. However, it remains unclear which measures are most reliable for detecting and tracking responses to perturbations. This study systematically determined the between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values of temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures during three types of perturbed gait. Twenty young healthy adults completed two identical testing sessions two weeks apart, comprised of an unperturbed and three perturbed (cognitive, physical, and visual walking conditions in a virtual reality environment. Within each session, perturbation responses were compared to unperturbed walking using paired t-tests. Between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values were also calculated for each measure and condition. All temporal-spatial, kinematic variability and dynamic stability measures demonstrated fair to excellent between-session reliability. Minimal detectable change values, normalized to mean values ranged from 1-50%. Step width mean and variability measures demonstrated the greatest response to perturbations with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. Orbital stability measures demonstrated specificity to perturbation direction and sensitivity with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. We observed substantially greater between-session reliability and lower minimum detectable change values for local stability measures than previously described which may be the result of averaging across trials within a session and using velocity versus acceleration data for reconstruction of state spaces. Across all perturbation types, temporal-spatial, orbital and local measures were the most reliable measures with the

  15. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  16. NFI-C2 temporal-spatial expression and cellular localization pattern during tooth formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamani, Ejvis; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Currently, little is known regarding critical signaling pathways during later stages of tooth development, especially those associated with root formation. Nfi-c null mice, lacking molar roots, have implicated the transcription factor NFI-C as having an essential role in root development. Previously, we identified three NFI-C isoforms expressed in dental tissues with NFI-C2 being the major transcript. However, the expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein is not characterized. In this study we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using isoform specific probes. We show the production of a NFI-C2 peptide antibody, its characterization, the temporal-spatial expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein during odontogenesis and sub-cellular localization in dental cells. Moderate NFI-C2 staining, as early as bud stage, was detected mostly in the condensing dental ectomesenchyme. This staining intensified within the dental pulp at later stages culminating in high expression in the dentin producing odontoblasts. The dental epithelium showed slight staining until cytodifferentiation of enamel organ into ameloblasts and stratum intermedium. During root formation NFI-C2 expression was high in the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath and later was found in the fully developed root and its supporting tissues. NFI-C2 cellular staining was cytosolic, associated with the Golgi, and nuclear. These data suggest a broader role for NFI-C during tooth formation than limited to root and periodontal ligament development. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Temporal-spatial Characteristics of the Urbanization of Rural Land in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jun; Wu Shixin; Zhang Xiaolei

    2006-01-01

    Relying on remote sensor technology, GIS and Land--sat TM digital images, the authors use spatial and statistical analysis to examine the temporal-spatial characteristics of the change caused by urban construction in Xinjiang's rural areas from the end of the 1980s to the end of the 1990s. The primary findings show the following: 1) The urban construction in rural areas has increased drastically. The expansion speed of urban land use has accelerated over the past decade. The sub-land use changes caused by the urbanization of rural are characterized by salient regional differentiation among the three main regions and among the 85 counties of Xinjiang. 2). The shift of land use is mostly characterized by cultivated land and grassland being used for urban and industrial projects. Moreover, this change of land use is characteristic of regional differences. 3)Factors of rural-urban construction land use changes in Xinjiang, are undoubtedly affected by natural environment, social, economic conditions, and to a larger degree by population growth, GDP development and industrial development.

  18. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  19. Influence of the initial soil water content on Beerkan water infiltration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassabatere, L.; Loizeau, S.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Winiarski, T.; Rossier, Y.; Delolme, C.; Gaudet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding and modeling of water flow in the vadose zone are important with regards water management and infiltration devices design. Water infiltration process clearly depends on initial soil water content, in particular for sandy soils with high organic matter content. This study investigates the influence of initial water content on water infiltration in a hydrophobic sandy soil and on the related derivation of hydraulic parameters using the BEST algorithm (Lassabatere et al., 2006). The studied sandy soil has a high total organic content decreasing from 3.5% (w/w) at the surface to 0.5% (w/w) below 1cm depth. The highest TOC at surface was due to the presence of a dense biofilm and resulted in a high surface hydrophobicity under dry conditions (low initial water contents). The water infiltration experiments consisted in infiltrating known volumes of water through a simple ring at null pressure head (Beerkan method). The infiltrations were performed during three successive days after a dry period with a storm event between the first and the second day (5 mm) and another between the second and the third day (35 mm). These events resulted in an increase in initial water contents, from less than 5% for the first day to around 10% for the last day. Experiments were performed for appropriate conditions for Beerkan experiments: initial water contents below 1/4 of the saturated water content and uniform water profile resulting from water redistribution after each rainfall event. The analysis of the infiltration data clearly highlights the strong effect of hydrophobicity. For the driest initial conditions (first day), infiltration rates increased with time, whereas they decreased with time for wetter conditions. Such a decrease agreed with the principles of water infiltration without hydrophobicity. In addition, total cumulative infiltrations were far higher for the wettest conditions. Regarding hydraulic characterization, only the data obtained during the last

  20. Coulometry for the detection of water content in archaeological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Crupi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we performed coulometric measurements to detect the water content in archaeological pottery in order to get information on the manufacture technique. The samples under study were the so-called "Ionian Cups" coming from various archaeological sites in eastern Sicily (South-Italy. In particular, we tentatively achieved the estimation of firing temperatures of the archaeological samples by comparing the coulometric results with those obtained in the case of raw materials fired under controlled conditions. The results were in good agreement with those previously obtained on the same samples by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS. It is worth underlying that for the first time, the detection of water content as revealed by this analytical technique was related to archaeometric issues.

  1. Certified reference material to water content determination in bioethanol fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína M. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol is a strategic biofuel in Brazil. Thus, a strong metrological basis for its measurements is required to ensure the quality and promote its exportation. Recently, Inmetro certified a reference material for water content in bioethanol. This paper presents the results of these studies. The characterization, homogeneity, short-term stability and long-term stability uncertainty contributions values were 0.00500, 0.0166, 0.0355 and 0.0391 mg g-1, respectively. The certificated value for water content of bioethanol fuel was (3.65 ± 0.11 mg g-1. This CRM is the first and up to now the unique in the world.

  2. Impact of diurnal variation in vegetation water content on radar backscatter from maize during water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; van de Giesen, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave backscatter from vegetated surfaces is influenced by vegetation structure and vegetation water content (VWC), which varies with meteorological conditions and moisture in the root zone. Radar backscatter observations are used for many vegetation and soil moisture monitoring applications und

  3. Radiometric estimation of water vapor content over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Maiti, M.; Sett, S.; Angelis, C. F.; Machado, L. A. T.

    2011-11-01

    A multi-channel microwave radiometre (make: Radiometrics Corporation) is installed at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, Brazil (22°S). The radiometric output of two channels of the radiometer in the form of brightness temperature at 23.834 GHz and 30 GHz, initially, were used to find out the ambient water vapor content and the non-precipitable cloud liquid water content. The necessary algorithm was developed for the purpose. The best results were obtained using the hinge frequency 23.834 GHz and 30 GHz pair having an r.m.s. error of only 2.64. The same methodology was then adopted exploiting 23.034 GHz and 30 GHz pair. In that case the r.m.s. error was 3.42. These results were then compared with those obtained over Kolkata (22°N), India, by using 22.234 GHz and 31.4 GHz radiometric data. This work conclusively suggests the use of a frequency should not be at the water vapor resonance line. Instead, while measuring the vapor content for separation of vapor and cloud liquid, one of them should be a few GHz left or right from the resonance line i.e., at 23.834 GHz and the other one should be around 30 GHz.

  4. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  5. Effects of mineral content of bovine drinking water: does iron content affect milk quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G R; Duncan, S E; Knowlton, K F; Dietrich, A D; O'Keefe, S F

    2013-01-01

    The composition of water given to dairy cattle is often ignored, yet water is a very important nutrient and plays a major role in milk synthesis. The objective of this study was to study effects of elevated levels of iron in bovine drinking water on milk quality. Ferrous lactate treatments corresponding to 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/kg drinking water concentrations were delivered through the abomasum at 10 L/d to 4 lactating dairy cows over 4 periods (1 wk infusion/period) in a Latin square design. On d 6 of infusion, milk was collected, processed (homogenized, pasteurized), and analyzed. Mineral content (Fe, Cu, P, Ca) was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxidative stability of whole processed milk was measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde (MDA) and sensory analysis (triangle test) within 72 h of processing and after 7d of storage (4°C). Significant sensory differences between processed milks from cows receiving iron and the control infusion were observed. No differences in TBARS (1.46±0.04 mg of MDA/kg) or mineral content (0.22±0.01 mg/kg Fe) were observed. A 2-way interaction (iron treatment by cow) for Ca, Cu, and Fe concentrations was seen. While iron added directly to milk causes changes in oxidation of milk, high levels of iron given to cattle have subtle effects that initially may not be obvious.

  6. Intra-abdominal pressure correlates with extracellular water content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    Full Text Available Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume.Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW, extracellular water content (ECW and volume excess (VE were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients.One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP.IAP strongly correlates with ECW.

  7. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results: The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva ® showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Interpretation and Conclusion: Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  8. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A R; Raju, O S; Kurthukoti, A J; Vishwas, T D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  9. Temporal-spatial heterogeneity of under-recording of volcanic events in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Under-recording of events must be taken into account in estimating recurrence rates of explosive eruptions using volcanic eruption record. In the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database (Crosweller et al., 2012, Brown et al., 2014), Japanese events account for about 39 % of the entire set of eruptive events (Kiyosugi et al., 2015). An analysis of the Japanese eruption events show an inverse correlation between VEI and degree of under-reporting suggesting that even larger VEI eruptions are under-recorded in the Quaternary. For example, 89 % of VEI 4 events, 65-66 % of VEI 5 events, 46-49 % of VEI 6 events and 36-39 % of VEI 7 events are missing from the record at 100 ka, 200 ka, 300 ka, and 500 ka, respectively (Kiyosugi et al., 2015). Comparison of frequencies of Japanese and global eruptions suggests that under-recording of the global database is 7.9-8.7 times larger than in the Japanese dataset (Kiyosugi et al., 2015). In addition to the analysis of the entire Japanese eruption events, temporal-spatial heterogeneity of the dataset must be considered in modeling the under-recording of events. The main mechanisms of under-recording are absence of historical records, erosion and alteration of tephra deposits, burial of tephra deposits by younger deposits and disappearance of the source volcano itself due to burial or erosion. Therefore, under-recording of events varies temporally and spatially, reflecting geological and historical backgrounds. For example, an analysis of the Japanese eruption events suggest that many large eruptions are missing in the Izu-Bonin arc because the volcanic arc consists of small volcanic islands where wide-spread tephra deposits are less likely preserved. Understandings of the under-recording in different geological settings improve the estimation of recurrence rate of volcanic eruptions. Furthermore, Koyama (1999) pointed out that the historical record of Japanese volcanic eruptions increases in two time periods

  10. Temporal-spatial dynamics in orthoptera in relation to nutrient availability and plant species richness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob J J Hendriks

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability in ecosystems has increased dramatically over the last century. Excess reactive nitrogen deposition is known to negatively impact plant communities, e.g. by changing species composition, biomass and vegetation structure. In contrast, little is known on how such impacts propagate to higher trophic levels. To evaluate how nitrogen deposition affects plants and herbivore communities through time, we used extensive databases of spatially explicit historical records of Dutch plant species and Orthoptera (grasshoppers and crickets, a group of animals that are particularly susceptible to changes in the C:N ratio of their resources. We use robust methods that deal with the unstandardized nature of historical databases to test whether nitrogen deposition levels and plant richness changes influence the patterns of richness change of Orthoptera, taking into account Orthoptera species functional traits. Our findings show that effects indeed also propagate to higher trophic levels. Differences in functional traits affected the temporal-spatial dynamics of assemblages of Orthoptera. While nitrogen deposition affected plant diversity, contrary to our expectations, we could not find a strong significant effect of food related traits. However we found that species with low habitat specificity, limited dispersal capacity and egg deposition in the soil were more negativly affected by nitrogen deposition levels. Despite the lack of significant effect of plant richness or food related traits on Orthoptera, the negative effects of nitrogen detected within certain trait groups (e.g. groups with limited disperse ability could be related to subtle changes in plant abundance and plant quality. Our results, however, suggest that the changes in soil conditions (where many Orthoptera species lay their eggs or other habitat changes driven by nitrogen have a stronger influence than food related traits. To fully evaluate the negative effects of nitrogen

  11. Sand-dust storms in China: temporal-spatial distribution and tracks of source lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand-dust storm is a special natural disaster that frequentlyoccurs in deserts and their surrounding areas. With the data published on Surface Meteorological Monthly Bulletin and Surface Chart during 1971-1996, the temporal-spatial distribution and annual variation of sand-dust storms are analyzed on the basis of the case study of atmospheric processes. Furthermore, the tracks and source areas of sand-dust storms are determined with the aid of GIS. The results show that except some parts of Qinghai Province and Inner Mongolia as well as Beijing, sand-dust storms decrease apparently in time and space in recent decades in China. Sand-dust storms occur most frequently in spring, especially in April. According to their source areas, sand-dust storms are classified into two types, i.e., the inner-source and outer-source sand-dust storms. Most of the outer-source sand-dust storms move along the north and west tracks. The north-track outer-source sand-dust storms always intrude into China across the Sino-Mongolian border from Hami, a city in the eastern part of Xinjiang, to Xilin Gol, a league in Inner Mongolia, while the west-track ones intrude into China from both southern and northern Xinjiang. The source lands of inner-source sand-dust storms concentrate in the Taklimakan Desert and its surrounding areas in southern Xinjiang, southern part of the Junggar Basin in north of Xinjiang, the Hexi Corridor in western Gansu Province, the dry deserts of Inner Mongolia and the Qaidam Basin in Qinghai.

  12. Temporal-spatial parameters of the upper limb during a Reach & Grasp Cycle for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Erin E; Ladd, Amy L; Lamont, Lauren E; Rose, Jessica

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize normal temporal-spatial patterns during the Reach & Grasp Cycle and to identify upper limb motor deficits in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The Reach & Grasp Cycle encompasses six sequential tasks: reach, grasp cylinder, transport to self (T(1)), transport back to table (T(2)), release cylinder, and return to initial position. Three-dimensional motion data were recorded from 25 typically developing children (11 males, 14 females; ages 5-18 years) and 12 children with hemiplegic CP (2 males, 10 females; ages 5-17 years). Within-day and between-day coefficients of variation for the control group ranged from 0 to 0.19, indicating good repeatability of all parameters. The mean duration of the Cycle for children with CP was nearly twice as long as controls, 9.5±4.3s versus 5.1±1.2s (U=37.0, P=.002), partly due to prolonged grasp and release durations. Peak hand velocity occurred at approximately 40% of each phase and was greater during the transport (T(1), T(2)) than non-transport phases (reach, return) in controls (Pchildren. Children with CP demonstrated an increased index of curvature during reach (U=46.0, P=.0074) and an increased total number of movement units (U=16.5, Pmovements. Total duration of the Reach & Grasp Cycle (rho=.957, Pmovement units (rho=.907, Pchildren with CP and controls reflect utility of the Reach & Grasp Cycle for quantitative evaluation of upper limb motor deficits.

  13. Access tube devices to monitor soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepuder, P.

    2003-04-01

    The Neutron Probe is considered to be one of the best indirect measurement-systems to obtain the soil water content. However, due to health problems and new measuring-techniques, other measurement systems have been developed and placed on the market. The IAEA in special tried hard to find alternatives to the radioactive measurement-techniques. Consequently, the IAEA in co-operation with institutes from Australia, France, Austria, and the USA compared the TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) and the FDR (Frequency Domain Reflectometry) to the radioactive Neutron Probe. During the period from June 2000 to May 2002 those three measurement-systems were tested in practice at three locations in Lower Austria (sandy, loamy, and clay soil conditions) by the Institute of Hydraulics and Rural Water-Management (University of Agricultural Sciences, Vienna). The used equipment consisted of access tube devices TRIME (TDR), DIVINER 2000 (FDR), and SOLO 40 (radioactive). Once a week, measurements of soil water content were taken every 10 cm down to a depth of 1 m with three replications each. In the course of this experiment, all systems were field-calibrated and compared to standard-calibration. Concerning the practical utilisation the Diviner by Sentek is best to handle. After comparing those three systems for more than two years, the FDR-method has proved to be better in results and handling than TDR. The availability of appropriate measurement systems to determine the soil water content is a basic prerequisite for further descriptions of subsurface flow and solute transport process as well as for agricultural aspects.

  14. Runoff simulation sensitivity to remotely sensed initial soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Unkrich, C. L.; Keefer, T. O.; Parry, R.; Bach, L. B.; Amer, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of aircraft remotely sensed and conventional ground-based measurements of volumetric soil water content (SW) were made over two subwatersheds (4.4 and 631 ha) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch experimental watershed during the 1990 monsoon season. Spatially distributed soil water contents estimated remotely from the NASA push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR), an Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (IRE) multifrequency radiometer, and three ground-based point methods were used to define prestorm initial SW for a distributed rainfall-runoff model (KINEROS; Woolhiser et al., 1990) at a small catchment scale (4.4 ha). At a medium catchment scale (631 ha or 6.31 km2) spatially distributed PBMR SW data were aggregated via stream order reduction. The impacts of the various spatial averages of SW on runoff simulations are discussed and are compared to runoff simulations using SW estimates derived from a simple daily water balance model. It was found that at the small catchment scale the SW data obtained from any of the measurement methods could be used to obtain reasonable runoff predictions. At the medium catchment scale, a basin-wide remotely sensed average of initial water content was sufficient for runoff simulations. This has important implications for the possible use of satellite-based microwave soil moisture data to define prestorm SW because the low spatial resolutions of such sensors may not seriously impact runoff simulations under the conditions examined. However, at both the small and medium basin scale, adequate resources must be devoted to proper definition of the input rainfall to achieve reasonable runoff simulations.

  15. Fluoride and bacterial content of bottled drinking water versus municipal tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythri H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water is a divine gift. People quench their thirst without questioning the source of water. But, apprehension about contaminants in municipal water supplies along with increased fear of fluorosis made bottled drinking water as one of the important tradable commodities. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine and compare the fluoride and bacterial contents of commercially available bottled drinking water and municipal tap water in Davangere city, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Fifty samples of 10 categories of bottled drinking water with different batch numbers were purchased and municipal water from different sources were collected. Fluoride levels were determined by an ion-selective electrode. Water was cultured quantitatively and levels of bacteria were calculated as colony-forming units (CFUs per milliliter. Results: Descriptive analysis of water samples for fluoride concentration was in the range of 0.07-0.33 for bottled drinking water, Bisleri showing the highest of 0.33. A comparison of the mean values of microbial count for bottled drinking water with that of municipal tap water showed no statistically significant difference, but was more than the standard levels along with the presence of fungus and maggots. Conclusion: The fluoride concentration was below the optimal level for both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water. CFUs were more than the recommended level in both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water.

  16. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  17. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  18. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vogel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure for its total water content. The stalagmites' water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite. Low δ18Ocalcite values are thereby accompanied by low water yields and vice versa. Based on the paleoclimatic interpretation of the δ18Ocalcite records, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. High drip water supply caused by high precipitation rates supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleoclimate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated precipitation rates.

  19. On the Variation of Water Diffusion Coefficient in Stratum Corneum With Water Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Johnson, Robert; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    Water permeability and transient water sorption data in human and porcine stratum corneum (SC) are analyzed in conjunction with equilibrium water sorption data and a dynamic skin swelling model to develop a quantitative model for water diffusivity in the SC as a function of its water content. The recommended function (model 1) is phenomenological and treats the SC as a uniform, swellable slab. This approach yields satisfactory agreement with experimental data over a wide range of RH and associated equilibrium SC water content, Cw. It is supported by two alternative approaches. Model 2 considers the SC to be a multilaminate membrane consisting of alternating lipid and protein layers. Diffusivity in the protein phase is estimated from water diffusivity in other keratinized tissues, whereas diffusivity in the lipid phase is assumed to be linearly related to the swelling strain on intercellular lipids. Model 3 uses an analysis previously suggested by Stockdale to rationalize transepidermal water loss data in humans over a wide range of relative humidity. All models yield similar results for 0.20 ≤ Cw ≤ 0.78 g/cm(3), the usual range of SC water content in vivo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Temporal-spatial reach parameters derived from inertial sensors: Comparison to 3D marker-based motion capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Rose, Jessica

    2017-02-08

    Reaching is a well-practiced functional task crucial to daily living activities, and temporal-spatial measures of reaching reflect function for both adult and pediatric populations with upper-extremity motor impairments. Inertial sensors offer a mobile and inexpensive tool for clinical assessment of movement. This research outlines a method for measuring temporal-spatial reach parameters using inertial sensors, and validates these measures with traditional marker-based motion capture. 140 reaches from 10 adults, and 30 reaches from nine children aged 18-20 months, were recorded and analyzed using both inertial-sensor and motion-capture methods. Inertial sensors contained three-axis accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers. Gravitational offset of accelerometer data was measured when the sensor was at rest, and removed using sensor orientation measured at rest and throughout the reach. Velocity was calculated by numeric integration of acceleration, using a null-velocity assumption at reach start. Sensor drift was neglected given the 1-2s required for a reach. Temporal-spatial reach parameters were calculated independently for each data acquisition method. Reach path length and distance, peak velocity magnitude and timing, and acceleration at contact demonstrated consistent agreement between sensor- and motion-capture-based methods, for both adult and toddler reaches, as evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients from 0.61 to 1.00. Taken together with actual difference between method measures, results indicate that these functional reach parameters may be reliably measured with inertial sensors.

  1. Liposome/water lipophilicity: methods, information content, and pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Balen, Georgette Plemper; Martinet, Catherine a Marca; Caron, Giulia; Bouchard, Géraldine; Reist, Marianne; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Testa, Bernard

    2004-05-01

    This review discusses liposome/water lipophilicity in terms of the structure of liposomes, experimental methods, and information content. In a first part, the structural properties of the hydrophobic core and polar surface of liposomes are examined in the light of potential interactions with solute molecules. Particular emphasis is placed on the physicochemical properties of polar headgroups of lipids in liposomes. A second part is dedicated to three useful methods to study liposome/water partitioning, namely potentiometry, equilibrium dialysis, and (1)H-NMR relaxation rates. In each case, the principle and limitations of the method are discussed. The next part presents the structural information encoded in liposome/water lipophilicity, in other words the solutes' structural and physicochemical properties that determine their behavior and hence their partitioning in such systems. This presentation is based on a comparison between isotropic (i.e., solvent/water) and anisotropic (e.g., liposome/water) systems. An important factor to be considered is whether the anisotropic lipid phase is ionized or not. Three examples taken from the authors' laboratories are discussed to illustrate the factors or combinations thereof that govern liposome/water lipophilicity, namely (a) hydrophobic interactions alone, (b) hydrophobic and polar interactions, and (c) conformational effects plus hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The next part presents two studies taken from the field of QSAR to exemplify the use of liposome/water lipophilicity in structure-disposition and structure-activity relationships. In the conclusion, we summarize the interests and limitations of this technology and point to promising developments.

  2. Equilibrium water content measurements for acid gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, R.A.; Fitzpatrick, E.; Bernard, F.; Wan, H.H.; Lesage, K.L.; Davis, P.M.; Clark, P.D. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    An accurate understanding of acid gas and water equilibrium is needed in order to design safe acid gas injection facilities. This paper described a joint industry project conducted to measure the water content of acid gas mixtures under moderate pressures and temperatures. The study has accumulated over 160 data points. Techniques used to obtain the measurements have included visual dew point determination for liquid acid gas and hydrates; the equilibration of samples in stirred autoclaves; basic static equilibration cells; and an isolated floating piston with a micro-sampler used to inject gaseous and liquid acid gas phases. As a result of the project, a high pressure micro-sampling technique has been developed to pressure limits of 1000 bar. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Effect of water content on the water repellency for hydrophobized sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Kuroda, T.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Alternative earthen covers such as capillary barriers (CBs) and evapotranspirative covers are recognized as useful technical and low-cost solutions for limiting water infiltration and controlling seepage flow at solid waste landfills in semi-arid and arid regions. However, their application to the landfills at wet regions seems to be matter of concern due to loss of their impending capability under high precipitation. One of the possible techniques to enhance the impermeable properties of CBs is to alter soil grain surfaces to be water-repellent by mixing/coating hydrophobic agents (HAs). In order to examine a potential use of model sands hydrophobized with locally available and environmental-friendly HAs such as oleic acid (OA) and stearic acid (SA) for hydrophobic CBs. In the present study, we first characterized the effect of water content on the degree of water repellency (WR) for hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soil at different depth. Secondly, the time dependency of the contact angle in hydrophobized sands and volcanic ash soils at different water content was evaluated. Further, the effects of hydrophobic organic matter contents on the WR of hydrophobized sands were investigated by horizontal infiltration test. We investigated the degree of WR as functions of volumetric water content (θ) of a volcanic ash soil samples from different depth and water adjusted hydrophobized sand samples with different ratio of HAs by using sessile drop method (SDM). The initial contact angle (αi) measured from SDM decreased gradually with increasing water content in OA and SA coated samples. Measured αi values for volcanic ash soils increased with increasing water content and reached a peak values of 111.7o at θ= 0.325 cm3 cm-3, where-after αi gradually decreased. Each test sample exhibited sharp decrease in contact angle with time at higher water content. Sorptivity values for oleic acid coated samples decreased with increasing HA content and reached the minimum

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  5. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  6. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  7. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  8. Evidence on dynamic effects in the water contentwater potential relation of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    the required material functions, i.e. the moisture storage characteristic and the liquid water conductivity, from measured basic properties. The current state of the art in material modelling as well as the corresponding transport theory implies that the moisture transport function is unique...... and that the moisture storage characteristic is process dependent with varying significance for the numerical simulation. On the basis of different building materials, a comprehensive instantaneous profile measurement study has been accomplished. Profiles of water content and relative humidity were obtained during...... a series of adsorption and desorption processes. The data provides clear evidence that the water contentwater potential relationship is not only dependent on the process history, but also on the process dynamics. The higher moisture potential gradients were induced, the larger was the deviation between...

  9. Determination of Water Content of Water-soluble Paints by Gas Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾润南; 钦维民; 肖舸

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of water content of water-soluble paints by gas chromatography. The water in paints is extracted by dimethyl formamide (DMF) as a solvent.Isopropanol is used as an internal standard. The mixture is separated by low-speed centrifugation.Then a 1-uL sample of the supernatant from the prepared solution is injected into the gas chromatograph. The water content is determined by internal standard calibration curve. The rate of recovery of added standard of this method is more than 98%. Relative mean deviation is less than 3‰.The linearity of calibration curve is good and relativity coefficient is higher than 0.998.

  10. Volumetric water content measurement probes in earth-dam construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardanis Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two frequency domain reflectometry (FDR probes have been used. They were used on compacted soils both in the laboratory and in the field. Measurements in the laboratory were intended for calibration. The range of densities and types of materials where insertion of the probes can be achieved was investigated first. The effect of sporadic presence of coarser grains and density on these calibrations, once insertion could be achieved, were investigated second. Measurements on laboratory prepared samples with the same moisture content were different when the sample was kept in the mould from when it was extruded from it. Also both these measurements were different from that in a sample of the same density but significantly larger in diameter. It was found that measurements with these probes are affected by dilation exhibited by soil around the rods of the probes during insertion. Readings immediately after insertion of the sensors on samples extruded from their moulds were the ones closer to measured values. These readings combined with total volume and mass obtained from sand-cone tests during the construction of an earth-dam allowed fairly accurate estimation of the dry unit weight but not the gravimetric water content.

  11. Vegetation Water Content Retrievals for NAFE06 and CLASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, L.; Jackson, T. J.; Bindlish, R.; Tao, J.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is a valuable input to many microwave based soil moisture retrieval algorithms. Previous research, both theoretical and experimental, has established that VWC can be estimated using multispectral remote sensing. There are limits on the reliability of these methods that are related to canopy characteristics. For some crops index based techniques typically saturate before peak VWC occurs. Therefore, a careful evaluation using validation data is useful, especially in an intensive field campaign. As part of NAFE06 and CLASIC, ground based VWC sampling was conducted in conjunction with surface reflectance and Leaf Area Index (LAI) measurements. These data were used to establish crop/cover condition dependent relationships between the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and VWC. In order to apply these relationships over larger regions it was also necessary to develop land cover classifications using satellite data that incorporated the temporal changes that occurred during the study (i.e. flooding of rice fields). This was accomplished using multiple Landsat Thematic Mapper or ASTER images and a decision tree classifier. The NDWI relationships were applied to the available vegetation index images to generate VWC.

  12. Measurements of water potential and water content in unsaturated crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes; Gimmi, Thomas; Wydler, Hannes; LäSer, Hans-Peter; Baer, Toni

    1995-08-01

    A water desaturation zone develops around a tunnel in water-saturated rock when the evaporative water loss at the rock surface is larger than the water flow from the surrounding saturated region of restricted permeability. We describe the methods with which such water desaturation processes in rock materials can be quantified. The water retention characteristic θ (ψ) of crystalline rock samples was determined with a pressure membrane apparatus. The negative water potential, identical to the capillary pressure, ψ, below the tensiometric range (ψ drilled into the granodiorite as a measuring chamber. The water potentials observed in a cylindrical granodiorite monolith ranged between -0.1 and -3.0 MPa; those near the wall in a ventilated tunnel between -0.1 and -2.2 MPa. Two types of three-rod TDR probes were used, one as a depth probe inserted into the rock, the other as a surface probe using three copper stripes attached to the surface for detecting water content changes in the rock-to-air boundary. The TDR signal was smoothed with a low-pass filter, and the signal length determined based on the first derivative of the trace. Despite the low porosity of crystalline rock these standard methods are applicable to describe the unsaturated zone in solid rock and may also be used in other consolidated materials such as concrete.

  13. Terahertz-dependent evaluation of water content in high-water-cut crude oil using additive-manufactured samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, LiMei; Zhan, HongLei; Miao, XinYang; Zhu, Jing; Zhao, Kun

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of water content in crude oil is of significance to petroleum exploration and transportation. Terahertz (THz) waves are sensitive to fluctuations in the dipole moment of water. However, due to the strong absorption of water in the THz range, it is difficult for the THz spectrum to determine high water content with the common sampler. In this research, micron-grade samplers for THz detection were designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Oil-water mixtures with water content from 1.8% to 90.6% were measured with the THz-TDS system using sample cells. In addition, a detailed analysis was performed of the relationships among THz parameters such as signal peak, time delay, and refractive index as well as absorption coefficient and high water content (>60%). Results suggest that the combination of THz spectroscopy and AM technique is effective for water content evaluation in crude oil and can be further applied in the petroleum industry.

  14. Terahertz-dependent evaluation of water content in high-water-cut crude oil using additive-manufactured samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, LiMei; Zhan, HongLei; Miao, XinYang; Zhu, Jing; Zhao, Kun

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of water content in crude oil is of significance to petroleum exploration and transportation. Terahertz (THz) waves are sensitive to fluctuations in the dipole moment of water. However, due to the strong absorption of water in the THz range, it is difficult for the THz spectrum to determine high water content with the common sampler. In this research, micron-grade samplers for THz detection were designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Oil-water mixtures with water content from 1.8% to 90.6% were measured with the THz-TDS system using sample cells. In addition, a detailed analysis was performed of the relationships among THz parameters such as signal peak, time delay, and refractive index as well as absorption coefficient and high water content (>60%). Results suggest that the combination of THz spectroscopy and AM technique is effective for water content evaluation in crude oil and can be further applied in the petroleum industry.

  15. An analysis of infiltration with moisture content distribution in a two-dimensional discretized water content domain

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-06-11

    On the basis of unsaturated Darcy\\'s law, the Talbot-Ogden method provides a fast unconditional mass conservative algorithm to simulate groundwater infiltration in various unsaturated soil textures. Unlike advanced reservoir modelling methods that compute unsaturated flow in space, it only discretizes the moisture content domain into a suitable number of bins so that the vertical water movement is estimated piecewise in each bin. The dimensionality of the moisture content domain is extended from one dimensional to two dimensional in this study, which allows us to distinguish pore shapes within the same moisture content range. The vertical movement of water in the extended model imitates the infiltration phase in the Talbot-Ogden method. However, the difference in this extension is the directional redistribution, which represents the horizontal inter-bin flow and causes the water content distribution to have an effect on infiltration. Using this extension, we mathematically analyse the general relationship between infiltration and the moisture content distribution associated with wetting front depths in different bins. We show that a more negatively skewed moisture content distribution can produce a longer ponding time, whereas a higher overall flux cannot be guaranteed in this situation. It is proven on the basis of the water content probability distribution independent of soil textures. To illustrate this analysis, we also present numerical examples for both fine and coarse soil textures.

  16. [Spectrum Variance Analysis of Tree Leaves Under the Condition of Different Leaf water Content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Tai-sheng; Pan, Li-xin

    2015-07-01

    Leaf water content is an important factor affecting tree spectral characteristics. So Exploring the leaf spectral characteristics change rule of the same tree under the condition of different leaf water content and the spectral differences of different tree leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content are not only the keys of hyperspectral vegetation remote sensing information identification but also the theoretical support of research on vegetation spectrum change as the differences in leaf water content. The spectrometer was used to observe six species of tree leaves, and the reflectivity and first order differential spectrum of different leaf water content were obtained. Then, the spectral characteristics of each tree species leaves under the condition of different leaf water content were analyzed, and the spectral differences of different tree species leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content were compared to explore possible bands of the leaf water content identification by hyperspectral remote sensing. Results show that the spectra of each tree leaf have changed a lot with the change of the leaf water content, but the change laws are different. Leaf spectral of different tree species has lager differences in some wavelength range under the condition of same leaf water content, and it provides some possibility for high precision identification of tree species.

  17. A Quick Dielectric Method to Determine Insitu Soil Water Content for Precision Water Use under Sustainable Agricultural Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandi Hermawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Precise water use systems under sustainable agriculture may only be achieved if in-situ soil water content and availability of the plant can be measured quickly.  Soil water content can be determined directly using the gravimetrical method by calculating the loss of water when the soil dries out, and indirectly by measuring other variables from which soil water can be calculated.  The indirect methods have some advantages when compared to the direct gravimetrical method because measured; non-destructive soil water data are available instantly.  Soil dielectric properties have strong relationships with soil water content and have been used widely as indirect methods of soil water determination, but the cost of the available instrument is too expensive for small-scale farmers.  Two studies were conducted in 2011 and 2015 to develop a quick, cheap method to determine in-situ soil water content and precise water use by crops.  The method applied a non-linear relation between soil water content (θ, in gg-1 and soil electrical impedance (Z, in kΩ as follows: θ = a.Zb where a and b are constants.  Parameter Z showed a good predictor for soil water content (R ≥ 0.90 therefore can be used to quickly determine soil water content in the field.  The dielectric method has been successfully used to determine the water balance in the vegetated soils, in wich changes in soil water content caused by daily rainfall as low as 10 mm was detected up to the depth of 60 cm.  The method was also successfully capable of calculating the amount of water used by palm oil nursery grown in media with different levels of soil organic matter.

  18. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  19. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  20. The impact of water content and ionic diffusion on the uniaxial compressive strength of shale

    OpenAIRE

    Talal AL-Bazali

    2013-01-01

    Experimental data showed that water content has a profound influence on the uniaxial compressive strength of shale. Testing has shown a great decrease in the uniaxial compressive strength as the water content increases. Regression analysis was used in this work to develop a general equation for predicting uniaxial compressive strength of shale from the available information on its water content and dry uniaxial compressive strength. The impact of ionic diffusion on the compressive strength...

  1. The influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, Bernd; Širok, Brane; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    A study of the influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness was performed. A cavitation tunnel with a single hydrofoil was used for the experiments. While the cavitation number andthe mean flow velocity remained constant throughout the tests, the gas content of the water was changed in steps from low (approximately 1%) to high (4 %). The gas content of the water was adjusted with a bubble generator. In addition tests at a constant cavitation...

  2. a Study on Variations of Shoreline Changes and Temporal-Spatial Potentiality for Cloud Seeding at Urumia Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha Taher, R.; Jafari, M.; Fallah, M.; Alavi, A.

    2015-12-01

    time period has been used. In order to reach better results, images from MODIS satellite has been used as auxiliary data for the images that are with an error margin. Initial classification on the images was conducted to distinguish water and non water applications. Neural network classification was applied with specific scales on the images and the two major applications were thereby extracted. Then, in order to authenticate the proceedings, Error matrix and Kappa coefficient has been applied on the classified images. Base pixel method of neural network was used for the purpose of information extraction while authenticity of that was evaluated too. The outcomes display the trend of Urmia shoreline has been approximately constant between the years of 1976 to 1995 and has experienced very low variations. In 1998 the lake experienced increase of water and therefore advancement of the shoreline of the lake due to increase of precipitation and the volume of inflowing water to the basin. During 2000 to 20125, however, the lake's shoreline has experienced a downward trend, which was intensified in 2007 and reached to its most critical level ever since, that is decreasing to about one third. Further, temporal and spatial potentiality evaluation of clouds seeding in Urmia lake zone has been studied as a solution for improvement and recovery of the current status of the lake, and an algorithm was proposed for optimized temporal- spatial study on could seeding. Ecological, meteorological and synoptic data were used for timing study of the cloud's seeding plan, which upon study; it is easy to evaluate precipitation potential and quality of the system. At the next step, the rate of humidity and also stability of the precipitating system can be analyzed using radar acquired data. Whereas extracted date from MODIS images are expressing the spatial position, therefore in order to study the location of the cloud's seeding, MODIS images of the selected time intervals along with

  3. A STUDY ON VARIATIONS OF SHORELINE CHANGES AND TEMPORAL-SPATIAL POTENTIALITY FOR CLOUD SEEDING AT URUMIA LAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Agha Taher

    2015-12-01

    + sensors in the 35 time period has been used. In order to reach better results, images from MODIS satellite has been used as auxiliary data for the images that are with an error margin. Initial classification on the images was conducted to distinguish water and non water applications. Neural network classification was applied with specific scales on the images and the two major applications were thereby extracted. Then, in order to authenticate the proceedings, Error matrix and Kappa coefficient has been applied on the classified images. Base pixel method of neural network was used for the purpose of information extraction while authenticity of that was evaluated too. The outcomes display the trend of Urmia shoreline has been approximately constant between the years of 1976 to 1995 and has experienced very low variations. In 1998 the lake experienced increase of water and therefore advancement of the shoreline of the lake due to increase of precipitation and the volume of inflowing water to the basin. During 2000 to 20125, however, the lake’s shoreline has experienced a downward trend, which was intensified in 2007 and reached to its most critical level ever since, that is decreasing to about one third. Further, temporal and spatial potentiality evaluation of clouds seeding in Urmia lake zone has been studied as a solution for improvement and recovery of the current status of the lake, and an algorithm was proposed for optimized temporal- spatial study on could seeding. Ecological, meteorological and synoptic data were used for timing study of the cloud’s seeding plan, which upon study; it is easy to evaluate precipitation potential and quality of the system. At the next step, the rate of humidity and also stability of the precipitating system can be analyzed using radar acquired data. Whereas extracted date from MODIS images are expressing the spatial position, therefore in order to study the location of the cloud’s seeding, MODIS images of the selected time

  4. Using measured soil water contents to estimate evapotranspiration and root water uptake profiles - a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guderle, M.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of plants in soil water relations, and thus ecosystem functioning, requires information about root water uptake. We evaluated four different complex water balance methods to estimate sink term patterns and evapotranspiration directly from soil moisture measurements. We tested four methods. The first two take the difference between two measurement intervals as evapotranspiration, thus neglecting vertical flow. The third uses regression on the soil water content time series and differences between day and night to account for vertical flow. The fourth accounts for vertical flow using a numerical model and iteratively solves for the sink term. None of these methods requires any a priori information of root distribution parameters or evapotranspiration, which is an advantage compared to common root water uptake models. To test the methods, a synthetic experiment with numerical simulations for a grassland ecosystem was conducted. Additionally, the time series were perturbed to simulate common sensor errors, like those due to measurement precision and inaccurate sensor calibration. We tested each method for a range of measurement frequencies and applied performance criteria to evaluate the suitability of each method. In general, we show that methods accounting for vertical flow predict evapotranspiration and the sink term distribution more accurately than the simpler approaches. Under consideration of possible measurement uncertainties, the method based on regression and differentiating between day and night cycles leads to the best and most robust estimation of sink term patterns. It is thus an alternative to more complex inverse numerical methods. This study demonstrates that highly resolved (temporally and spatially) soil water content measurements may be used to estimate the sink term profiles when the appropriate approach is used.

  5. Changes in the Iron and Manganese Content and Turbidity in the Vilnius City Water Supply System

    OpenAIRE

    Ramunė Albrektienė

    2011-01-01

    The water of Vilnius boreholes contains excessive quantities of natural iron and manganese, the insoluble forms of which increase the turbidity of the water. Therefore, a ISC Vilniaus Vandenys installed water treatment equipment that remove iron and manganese from drinking water, and decrease the turbidity of the water. Water samples were taken at different points of the water supply network, total iron, manganese content, and turbidity analyses were carried out, and the changes in indicators...

  6. Effect of water content on stability of landslides triggered by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyabanaki, S.; Bagtzoglou, A. C.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake- triggered landslides are one of the most important natural hazards that often result in serious structural damage and loss of life. They are widely studied by several researchers. However, less attention has been focused on soil water content. Although the effect of water content has been widely studied for rainfall- triggered landslides [1], much less attention has been given to it for stability analysis of earthquake- triggered landslides. We developed a combined hydrology and stability model to investigate effect of soil water content on earthquake-triggered landslides. For this purpose, Bishop's method is used to do the slope stability analysis and Richard's equation is employed to model infiltration. Bishop's method is one the most widely methods used for analyzing stability of slopes [2]. Earthquake acceleration coefficient (EAC) is also considered in the model to analyze the effect of earthquake on slope stability. Also, this model is able to automatically determine geometry of the potential landslide. In this study, slopes with different initial water contents are simulated. First, the simulation is performed in the case of earthquake only with different EACs and water contents. As shown in Fig. 1, initial water content has a significant effect on factor of safety (FS). Greater initial water contents lead to less FS. This impact is more significant when EAC is small. Also, when initial water content is high, landslides can happen even with small earthquake accelerations. Moreover, in this study, effect of water content on geometry of landslides is investigated. For this purpose, different cases of landslides triggered by earthquakes only and both rainfall and earthquake for different initial water contents are simulated. The results show that water content has more significant effect on geometry of landslides triggered by rainfall than those triggered by an earthquake. Finally, effect of water content on landslides triggered by earthquakes

  7. Ultrasensitive 4-methylumbelliferone fluorimetric determination of water contents in aprotic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Jurczakowski, Rafał; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to the quantification of relatively small amounts of water present in low polarity, aprotic solvents is proposed. This method takes advantage of protolitic reaction of 4-methylumbelliferone dissolved in the solvent with water, acting as a base. The low emission intensity neutral 4-methylumbelliferone is transformed in reaction with water to a highly fluorescent anionic form. Thus the increase in emission intensity is observed for increasing water contents in aprotic solvents. For low water contents and highly lipophilic solvents, this method yields (in practical conditions) higher sensitivity compared to biamperometric Karl Fischer titration method in volumetric mode. It is also shown that organic compounds of protolitic character (amines, acids) not only interfere with water contents determination but increase the sensitivity of emission vs. water contents dependence. Introduction of aqueous solution of strong acid or base (HCl or NaOH) has similar effect on the system as introduction of pure water.

  8. The mechanism of the flowing ground water impacting on coalbed gas content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Shengfei; SONG Yan; TANG Xiuyi; FU Guoyou

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogeological condition affects the coalbed gas storage dramatically. In an area of stronger hydrodynamics, the coal has a lower gas content, while a higher gas content exists in an area of weaker hydrodynamics. Obviously, the flowing groundwater is harmful to coalbed gas preservation. But few researches focus on the mechanism of how the flowing water diminishes the coalbed gas content.Based on the phenomenon that the flowing groundwater not only makes coalbed gas content lower, but also fractionates the carbon isotope, this research puts forward an idea that it is the water solution that diminishes the coalbed gas content,rather than the water-driven action or the gas dissipation through cap rocks. Only water-soluble action can both fractionate the carbon isotope and lessen the coalbed gas content,and it is an efficient way to take gas away and affect the gas content.

  9. Multiagent-Based Simulation of Temporal-Spatial Characteristics of Activity-Travel Patterns Using Interactive Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a multiagent-based reinforcement learning algorithm, in which the interactions between travelers and the environment are considered to simulate temporal-spatial characteristics of activity-travel patterns in a city. Road congestion degree is added to the reinforcement learning algorithm as a medium that passes the influence of one traveler’s decision to others. Meanwhile, the agents used in the algorithm are initialized from typical activity patterns extracted from the travel survey diary data of Shangyu city in China. In the simulation, both macroscopic activity-travel characteristics such as traffic flow spatial-temporal distribution and microscopic characteristics such as activity-travel schedules of each agent are obtained. Comparing the simulation results with the survey data, we find that deviation of the peak-hour traffic flow is less than 5%, while the correlation of the simulated versus survey location choice distribution is over 0.9.

  10. Temporal-spatial MTF performance analysis of a proximity-focused-image intensifier as a camera electronic shutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shiming; Zhu, Hongquan; Wang, Kuilu

    2007-01-01

    A specially designed-Proximity-focused-MCP-Image Intensifier (MCP-II) has been widely used for a high speed diagnosis system as a ns-level-electronic shutter. Its temporal-spatial (dynamic) MTF or resolution are much concerned in the engineering for single exposure conditions of various shutter times, and input illuminations as well. On basis of the theory of Fourier spectrum and signal-to-noise, it has been analyzed in present paper that dynamic-MTF (or resolution) of the MCP-II system is always deteriorated by its limited temporal frequency bandwidth, as well as S/N performance. Several expressions are given to relate the device's dynamic MTF (or resolution) to its static MTF, input illumination and S/N performances. The theoretical analysis is very useful in evaluating and designing some high speed diagnosis systems with a proximity-focused-image intensifier as a electronic shutter.

  11. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Kostik; Biljana Bauer; Zoran Kavrakovski

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupl...

  12. High temperature ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water foam stabilized with viscoelastic zwitterionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzobaidi, Shehab; Da, Chang; Tran, Vu; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2017-02-15

    Ultralow water content carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) foams with gas phase volume fractions (ϕ) above 0.95 (that is foams may be stabilized with viscoelastic aqueous phases formed with a single zwitterionic surfactant at a concentration of only 1% (w/v) in DI water and over a wide range of salinity. Moreover, they are stable with a foam quality ϕ up to 0.98 even for temperatures up to 120°C. The properties of aqueous viscoelastic solutions and foams containing these solutions are examined for a series of zwitterionic amidopropylcarbobetaines, R-ONHC3H6N(CH3)2CH2CO2, where R is varied from C12-14 (coco) to C18 (oleyl) to C22 (erucyl). For the surfactants with long C18 and C22 tails, the relaxation times from complex rheology indicate the presence of viscoelastic wormlike micelles over a wide range in salinity and pH, given the high surfactant packing fraction. The apparent viscosities of these ultralow water content foams reached more than 120cP with stabilities more than 30-fold over those for foams formed with the non-viscoelastic C12-14 surfactant. At 90°C, the foam morphology was composed of ∼35μm diameter bubbles with a polyhedral texture. The apparent foam viscosity typically increased with ϕ and then dropped at ϕ values higher than 0.95-0.98. The Ostwald ripening rate was slower for foams with viscoelastic versus non-viscoelastic lamellae as shown by optical microscopy, as a consequence of slower lamellar drainage rates. The ability to achieve high stabilities for ultralow water content C/W foams over a wide temperature range is of interest in various technologies including polymer and materials science, CO2 enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration (by greater control of the CO2 flow patterns), and possibly even hydraulic fracturing with minimal use of water to reduce the requirements for wastewater disposal.

  13. Running-induced patellofemoral pain fluctuates with changes in patella water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Hu, Houchun H; Colletti, Patrick M; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Although increased bone water content resulting from repetitive patellofemoral joint loading has been suggested to be a possible mechanism underlying patellofemoral pain (PFP), there is little data to support this mechanism. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether running results in increases in patella water content and pain and whether 48 hours of rest reduces patella water content and pain to pre-running levels. Ten female runners with a diagnosis of PFP (mean age 25.1 years) participated. Patella water content was quantified using a chemical-shift-encoded water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to quantify subjects' pain levels. MRI and pain data were obtained prior to running, immediately following a 40-minute running session, and 48 hours post-running. Pain and patella water content were compared among the 3 time points using one-way ANOVA's with repeated measures. Immediately post-running, persons with PFP reported significant increases in pain and exhibited elevated patella water content. Pain and patella water content decreased to pre-running levels following 48 hours of rest. Our findings suggest that transient changes in patella water content associated with running may, in part, contribute to patellofemoral symptoms.

  14. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: Implications for the water content of the asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4 × 10−2−10−1 S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01–0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  15. Influence of Water Content on the β-Sheet Formation, Thermal Stability, Water Removal, and Mechanical Properties of Silk Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Ishida, Kana; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Hikima, Takaaki; Numata, Keiji

    2016-03-14

    Silk, which has excellent mechanical toughness and is lightweight, is used as a structural material in nature, for example, in silkworm cocoons and spider draglines. However, the industrial use of silk as a structural material has garnered little attention. For silk to be used as a structural material, its thermal processability and associated properties must be well understood. Although water molecules influence the glass transition of silk, the effects of water content on the other thermal properties of silks are not well understood. In this study, we prepared Bombyx mori cocoon raw fibers, degummed fibers, and films with different water contents and then investigated the effects of water content on crystallization, degradation, and water removal during thermal processing. Thermal gravimetric analyses of the silk materials showed that water content did not affect the thermal degradation temperature but did influence the water removal behavior. By increasing the water content of silk, the water molecules were removed at lower temperatures, indicating that the amount of free water in silk materials increased; additionally, the glass transition temperature decreased with increasing water plasticization. Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering of the silk films also suggested that the water molecules in the amorphous regions of the silk films acted as a plasticizer and induced β-sheet crystallization. The plasticizing effect of water was not detected in silk fibers, owing to their lower amorphous content and mobility. The structural and mechanical characterizations of the silk films demonstrated the silk film prepared at RH 97% realized both crystallinity and ductility simultaneously. Thus, the thermal stability, mechanical, and other properties of silk materials are regulated by their water content and crystallinity.

  16. Concurrent temporal stability of the apparent electrical conductivity and soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of spatio-temporal soil water content (SWC) variability within agricultural fields is useful to improve crop management. Spatial patterns of soil water contents can be characterized using the temporal stability analysis, however high density sampling is required. Soil apparent electrical c...

  17. Soil water content interpolation using spatio-temporal kriging with external drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snepvangers, J.J.J.C.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Huisman, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, two techniques for spatio-temporal (ST) kriging of soil water content are compared. The first technique, spatio-temporal ordinary kriging, is the simplest of the two, and uses only information about soil water content. The second technique, spatio-temporal kriging with external drift,

  18. On the use of surface neutron-gamma gauges to estimate soil water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, T.T.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Reichardt, K. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Timm, L.C

    2002-09-01

    Surface neutron-gamma gauges are handy instruments to measure soil water contents and bulk densities of surface layers. Although available for some decades, their optimal use is still not well established. This study is a contribution to improve their use, mainly in relation to calibration, and of the effect of soil dry bulk density on soil water content measurements.

  19. Modeling Soil Water Retention Curves in the Dry Range Using the Hygroscopic Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Arthur, Emmanuel;

    2014-01-01

    curves of soils and to predict SWRCs at the dry end using the hygroscopic water content at a relative humidity of 50% (θRH50). The Oswin model yielded satisfactory fits to dry-end SWRCs for soils dominated by both 2:1 and 1:1 clay minerals. Compared with the Oswin model, the Campbell and Shiozawa model......Accurate information on the dry end (matric potential less than −1500 kPa) of soil water retention curves (SWRCs) is crucial for studying water vapor transport and evaporation in soils. The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of the Oswin model for describing the water adsorption...... combined with the Kelvin equation (CS-K) produced better fits to dry-end SWRCs of soils dominated by 2:1 clays but provided poor fits for soils dominated by 1:1 clays. The shape parameter α of the Oswin model was dependent on clay mineral type, and approximate values of 0.29 and 0.57 were obtained...

  20. NUTRIENT CONTENT IN SUNFLOWERS IRRIGATED WITH OIL EXPLORATION WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADERVAN FERNANDES SOUSA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation using produced water, which is generated during crude oil and gas recovery and treated by the exploration industry, could be an option for irrigated agriculture in semiarid regions. To determine the viability of this option, the effects of this treated water on the nutritional status of plants should be assessed. For this purpose, we examined the nutritional changes in sunflowers after they were irrigated with oil - produced water and the effects of this water on plant biomass and seed production. The sunflower cultivar BRS 321 was grown for three crop cycles in areas irrigated with filtered produced water (FPW, reverse osmosis - treated produced water (OPW, or ground water (GW. At the end of each cycle, roots, shoots, and seeds were collected to examine their nutrient concentrations. Produced water irrigation affected nutrient accumulation in the sunflower plants. OPW irrigation promoted the accumulation of Ca, Na, N, P, and Mg. FPW irrigation favored the accumulation of Na in both roots and shoots, and biomass and seed production were negatively affected. The Na in the shoots of plants irrigated with FPW increased throughout the three crop cycles. Under controlled conditions, it is possible to reuse reverse osmosis - treated produced water in agriculture. However, more long - term research is needed to understand its cumulative effects on the chemical and biological properties of the soil and crop production.

  1. Determining the in situ water content of the Geysers Graywacke of Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, A.

    1994-12-01

    The water content, porosity and permeability measurements of the Northern California Geysers rocks are used to predict the lifetime of the geothermal resource, which provides 10% of Northern California`s electricity. The Geysers rock was drilled from defunct well SB-15-D, and some cores wee sealed in aluminum tubes to preserve the in situ water content. These cores were sent to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to measure the water content. Humidity measurements were taken of the air around a one and a half foot encased core, recovered from a depth of 918.9 feet. Over a seven day period, the humidity reached almost 100% indicating that the air around the core was saturated in water vapor. We believe the sealing method is effective, preserving the in-situ water content. To measure water content, I will use Archimede`s principle to determine the density of the core before and after drying in an oven. Ultrasonic measurements will be taken of the core upon removal from aluminum tube to determine the change of p-wave velocity with change in water content. Water in the pores increases the effective compressibility of the rock therefore increasing the p-velocity. The measured p-wave velocities can then be used in the field to determine in-situ water content. Three dimensional x-ray images will be used to determine the deviations from average density within individual cores. Since the density depends on water content as well as mineralogy, images can show the location of pore fluid and drilling mud. Archimede`s principle, humidity detection, ultrasonics and x-ray scanning are viable methods to measure the in-situ water content and pore water distribution in the graywacke.

  2. [The new method monitoring crop water content based on NIR-Red spectrum feature space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-juan; Xu, Xin-gang; Chen, Tian-en; Yang, Gui-jun; Li, Zhen-hai

    2014-06-01

    Moisture content is an important index of crop water stress condition, timely and effective monitoring of crop water content is of great significance for evaluating crop water deficit balance and guiding agriculture irrigation. The present paper was trying to build a new crop water index for winter wheat vegetation water content based on NIR-Red spectral space. Firstly, canopy spectrums of winter wheat with narrow-band were resampled according to relative spectral response function of HJ-CCD and ZY-3. Then, a new index (PWI) was set up to estimate vegetation water content of winter wheat by improveing PDI (perpendicular drought index) and PVI (perpendicular vegetation index) based on NIR-Red spectral feature space. The results showed that the relationship between PWI and VWC (vegetation water content) was stable based on simulation of wide-band multispectral data HJ-CCD and ZY-3 with R2 being 0.684 and 0.683, respectively. And then VWC was estimated by using PWI with the R2 and RMSE being 0.764 and 0.764, 3.837% and 3.840%, respectively. The results indicated that PWI has certain feasibility to estimate crop water content. At the same time, it provides a new method for monitoring crop water content using remote sensing data HJ-CCD and ZY-3.

  3. Prediction of water content at different potentials from soil property data in Jazan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturki, Ali; Ibrahim, Hesham

    2016-04-01

    In dry regions effective irrigation management is crucial to maintain crop production and sustain limited water resources. Effective irrigation requires good knowledge of soil water content in the root zone. However, measurement of soil water in the root zone over time is extremely expensive and time consuming. On the other hand, weather and basic soil property data are more available, either from existing databases or by direct measurement in the field. Simulation models can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate soil water content and subsequent irrigation requirements based on the available weather and soil data. In this study we investigated three hierarchical approaches to predict water content at variable potentials (0, 10, 33, 60, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 kPa) using the Rosetta model: soil texture class (STC); percent of sand, silt, and clay (SSC); bulk density, percent of sand, silt, and clay, and water content measurements at 33 and 1500 kPa (SSC+WC). Estimation of soil water content at 43 locations in Jazan region using the three hierarchical approaches was compared with gravimetric water content. Results showed that the three approaches failed to describe water content accurately at saturation conditions (achieve effective irrigation scheduling especially in locations where only limited weather and soil date are available.

  4. Total phenol content and antioxidant activity of water solutions of plant extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta; Hribar, J.; Simčić, M.

    2009-01-01

    Water solutions of extracts were investigated for total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant activity. Susceptibility to degradation of water solutions of plant extracts, under light and in the dark, during storage at room temperature was investigated in order to determine their stability prior to their application for fortification of food products. Large dispersion of total phenol (TP) content in the investigated model solutions of selected extracts (olive leaves, green tea, re...

  5. Soil water content and water balance simulation of Caragana korshinskii Kom. in the semiarid Chinese Loess Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shengqi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, to evaluate the hydrological effects of Caragana korshinskii Kom., measured data were combined with model-simulated data to assess the C. korshinskii soil water content based on water balance equation. With measured and simulated canopy interception, plant transpiration and soil evaporation, soil water content was modeled with the water balance equation. The monthly variations in the modeled soil water content by measured and simulated components (canopy interception, plant transpiration, soil evaporation were then compared with in situ measured soil water content. Our results shows that the modeled monthly water loss (canopy interception + soil evaporation + plant transpiration by measured and simulated components ranges from 43.78 mm to 113.95 mm and from 47.76 mm to 125.63 mm, respectively, while the monthly input of water (precipitation ranges from 27.30 mm to 108.30 mm. The relative error between soil water content modeled by measured and simulated components was 6.41%. To sum up, the net change in soil water (ΔSW is negative in every month of the growing season. The soil moisture is approaching to wilting coefficient at the end of the growth season, and the soil moisture recovered during the following season.

  6. Measurements of water content in hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose based hydrogels via texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Cafaro, Maria Margherita; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; d'Amore, Matteo; Barba, Anna Angela

    2013-01-30

    In this work, a fast and accurate method to evaluate the water content in a cellulose derivative-based matrix subjected to controlled hydration was proposed and tuned. The method is based on the evaluation of the work of penetration required in the needle compression test. The work of penetration was successfully related to the hydrogel water content, assayed by a gravimetric technique. Moreover, a fitting model was proposed to correlate the two variables (the water content and the work of penetration). The availability of a reliable tool is useful both in the quantification of the water uptake phenomena, both in the management of the testing processes of novel pharmaceutical solid dosage forms.

  7. Evaluation of Minerals Content of Drinking Water in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrina Azlan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water.

  8. Evaluation of minerals content of drinking water in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azlan, Azrina; Khoo, Hock Eng; Idris, Mohd Aizat; Ismail, Amin; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2012-01-01

    The drinking and mineral water samples obtained from different geographical locations had concentrations of the selected minerals lower than the standard limits, except for manganese, arsenic, and fluoride. The concentrations of manganese and arsenic in two mineral water samples were slightly higher than the standard international recommended limits. One mineral water sample had a fluoride concentration higher than the standard limits, whereas manganese was not detected in nine drinking and mineral water samples. Most of the selected minerals found in the tap water samples were below the international standard limits, except for iron and manganese. The concentrations of iron and manganese in the tap water samples were higher than the standard limits, which were obtained from one and three of the studied locations, respectively. The potable water obtained from various manufacturers and locations in Peninsular Malaysia is safe for consumption, as the minerals concentrations were below the standard limits prescribed by the Malaysian Food Regulations of 1985. The data obtained may also provide important information related to daily intake of these minerals from drinking water.

  9. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Waters in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almulla, Hessa Ibrahim; King, Nigel M; Alnsour, Hamza Mohammad; Sajnani, Anand K

    2016-12-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water has been recognized as one of the most effective ways of achieving community-wide exposure to the caries prevention effects of fluoride (F). A vast majority of people in Qatar use bottled water for drinking. Use of bottled water without knowing the F level may expose children to dental caries risk if the F level is lower than optimal or to dental fluorosis if the F level is too high. The aim of this study was to determine the F concentration of bottled water available in Qatar. A total of 32 brands of bottled water were evaluated. The F concentrations displayed on the labels were recorded. The F ion-selective electrode method was used to measure the F concentration in water samples, and three measurements were taken for every sample to ensure reproducibility. The p value was set at 0.05. The F concentration ranged from 0.06 to 3.0 ppm with a mean value of 0.8 ppm (±0.88). The F levels were provided by the manufacturers on the labels of 60 % of the samples, but this was significantly lower than the measured F levels (p water that was produced in Saudi Arabia had significantly higher levels of F when compared to those produced in other countries (p water. Furthermore, there was a significant disparity between the F levels which were measured and those that were provided on the labels.

  10. Variation in soil water content to rainfall under Caragana microphylla shrub in Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatio-temporal variability of soil water content to rainfall under Caragana microphylla shrub in Horqin Sandy Land,a plot of 25 m × 25 m,where there were 6 shrub canopies of C. microphylla,was sited for measuring soil water content at two soil layers of 0-20 cm (top layer) and 20-40 cm (lower layer). Soil water content was measured on the 1st,5th,10th and 15th day after a 42 mm rainfall in Naiman of Inner Mongolia. The results showed that soil water contents at both layers under C. microphylla shrub were gradually decreased after the rain. Soil water content at the top layer outside the shrub canopy was higher than that inside the shrub canopy within 5 days,and became similar inside and outside the shrub canopy on the 10th day after the 42 mm rainfall,and it was lower outside than that inside the shrub canopy on the 15th day. The soil water content at lower layer in the area without shrubs was higher than that under shrub canopy all along. All the measured values of soil water content can be fitted to a variogram model. There was significant autocorrelation of the values of soil water content between top layer and lower layer,except for the fourth measured values of soil water content at top layer. The range and spatial dependence of soil water content at top layer were lower than that at lower layer.

  11. Measurement and control of water content of organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goderis, H.L.; Fouwe, B.L.; Van Cauwenbergh, S.M.; Tobback, P.P.

    1986-06-01

    An isotopic dilution procedure is described for the quantitative determination of the solubility of water in organic solvents as a function of the relative humidity at which the sample is equilibrated. /sup 3/H/sub 2/O is used as a tracer, and the relative humidity conditions are realized by incubation of the organic solvent above a saturated salt solution having a known water activity. The technique is applicable independent of the concentration range of water present, the minimum amount of moisture being only limited by the concentration of the tritium label used. Solubility isotherms of water in hydrocarbon solvents such as n-hexane are sigmoidal in shape, reflecting cooperative effects in the solubilization of water molecules at the higher relative humidity portion of the curve. Solubility increases with increasing temperature.

  12. MR-based water content estimation in cartilage: design and validation of a method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sophie; Ringgaard, Steffen;

    Purpose: Design and validation of an MR-based method that allows the calculation of the water content in cartilage tissue. Methods and Materials: Cartilage tissue T1 map based water content MR sequences were used on a 37 Celsius degree stable system. The T1 map intensity signal was analyzed on 6...... cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer used. Finally, the method was validated after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained...... data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results:The 37 Celsius degree system and the analysis can be reproduced in a similar way. MR T1...

  13. Correlation Between Soil Water Retention Capability and Soil Salt Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The soil moisture retention capability of Chao soil and coastal saline Chao soil in Shandong and Zhejiang provinces were measured by pressure membrane method. The main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability were studied by the methods of correlation and path analyses. The results indicated that < 0.02mm physical clay and soil salt content were the main factors influencing soil moisture retention capability. At soil suction of 30~50 kPa, the soil salt content would be the dominant factor.

  14. The Soil Characteristic Curve at Low Water Contents: Relations to Specific Surface Area and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    Accurate description of the soil-water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics, plant-water relations, and microbial processes in surface soil. Soil-water retention at soil-water matric potential of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate...... that measurements by traditional pressure plate apparatus generally overestimated water contents at -1.5 MPa (plant wilting point). The 41 soils were classified into four textural classes based on the so-called Dexter index n (= CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing the water film...... thickness at a given soil-water matric potential (low organic soils with n > 10, the estimated SA from the dry soil-water retention was in good agreement with the SA measured using ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME). A strong relationship between the ratio...

  15. REQUIREMENT OF FLUIDITY OF HIGH WATER CONTENT MATERIALS FORTHE GETWAY-SIDE BACKFILLING TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiTaiyue; MaNianjie

    1996-01-01

    Through analyzing the effects of water consumption, diameter of solid particle, and flow velocity on the fluidity of high water content material slurry, the relationship among the fluidity, the isotropy of the slurry, and the pumping facilities applied in getway-side backfilling has been found. And the requirment of fluidity of high water content material for the design of getway-side backfilling technique is put forward in the paper.

  16. EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT, TEMPERATURE AND AVERAGE DROPLET SIZE ON THE SETTLING VELOCITY OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWater-in-oil (W/O emulsions are complex mixtures generally found in crude oil production in reservoirs and processing equipment. Sedimentation studies of water-oil emulsions enable the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior concerning separation of this system composed of two immiscible liquids. Gravitational settling was evaluated in this article for a model emulsion system consisting of water and a Brazilian crude oil diluted in a clear mineral oil as organic phase. The effects of water content and temperature were considered in the study of sedimentation velocity of water-oil emulsions. Water contents between 10% and 50 % and temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 ºC were evaluated, and a Richardson-Zaki type correlation was obtained to calculate settling velocities as a function of the process variables investigated. Water contents and average droplet sizes were monitored at different levels in the settling equipment, thus enabling identification of the effect of these variables on the phenomena of sedimentation and coalescence of the emulsions studied. The results showed that the emulsion stability during sedimentation was governed by the emulsion water content, which yielded high settling velocities at low water contents, even when very small droplets were present. A quantitative analysis of the combined effects of drop size and droplet concentration supports the conclusion that a stronger effect is produced by the higher concentration of particles, compared with the relatively smaller effect of increasing the size of the droplets.

  17. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m-3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m-3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the soil

  18. Germination, seedling growth and relative water content of shoot in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... ... and higher levels of dry matter under water deficient condition (Manga and .... medium seeds with the increase of stress levels. The shoot length of .... It is important that drought resistance is characterized by small reduction ...

  19. Physico-chemical properties and heavy metal content of water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    L), chloride (3.64 to. 184.04mg/L) ... activities such as drinking, cooking, industrial and agricultural ..... Point Source Pollution from Keiskammahoek Sewage Treatment. Plant on the ... European Standards for Drinking Water. World Health.

  20. Influence of Water Content on Mechanical Properties of Rock in Both Saturation and Drying Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zilong; Cai, Xin; Cao, Wenzhuo; Li, Xibing; Xiong, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Water content has a pronounced influence on the properties of rock materials, which is responsible for many rock engineering hazards, such as landslides and karst collapse. Meanwhile, water injection is also used for the prevention of some engineering disasters like rock-bursts. To comprehensively investigate the effect of water content on mechanical properties of rocks, laboratory tests were carried out on sandstone specimens with different water contents in both saturation and drying processes. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique was applied to study the water distribution in specimens with variation of water contents. The servo-controlled rock mechanics testing machine and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique were used to conduct both compressive and tensile tests on sandstone specimens with different water contents. From the laboratory tests, reductions of the compressive and tensile strength of sandstone under static and dynamic states in different saturation processes were observed. In the drying process, all of the saturated specimens could basically regain their mechanical properties and recover its strength as in the dry state. However, for partially saturated specimens in the saturation and drying processes, the tensile strength of specimens with the same water content was different, which could be related to different water distributions in specimens.

  1. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  2. Temporal-Spatial Pattern of Carbon Stocks in Forest Ecosystems in Shaanxi, Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoyang Cui

    Full Text Available The precise and accurate quantitative evaluation of the temporal and spatial pattern of carbon (C storage in forest ecosystems is critical for understanding the role of forests in the global terrestrial C cycle and is essential for formulating forest management policies to combat climate change. In this study, we examined the C dynamics of forest ecosystems in Shaanxi, northwest China, based on four forest inventories (1989-1993, 1994-1998, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008 and field-sampling measurements (2012. The results indicate that the total C storage of forest ecosystems in Shaanxi increased by approximately 29.3%, from 611.72 Tg in 1993 to 790.75 Tg in 2008, partially as a result of ecological restoration projects. The spatial pattern of C storage in forest ecosystems mainly exhibited a latitude-zonal distribution across the province, increasing from north (high latitude to south (low latitude generally, which signifies the effect of environmental conditions, chiefly water and heat related factors, on forest growth and C sequestration. In addition, different data sources and estimation methods had a significant effect on the results obtained, with the C stocks in 2008 being considerably overestimated (864.55 Tg and slightly underestimated (778.07 Tg when measured using the mean C density method and integrated method, respectively. Overall, our results demonstrated that the forest ecosystem in Shaanxi acted as a C sink over the last few decades. However, further studies should be carried out with a focus on adaption of plants to environmental factors along with forest management for vegetation restoration to maximize the C sequestration potential and to better cope with climate change.

  3. MR-based water content estimation in cartilage: design and validation of a method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sophie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    map based water content sequences can provide information that, after being analyzed using a T1-map analysis software, can be interpreted as the water contained inside a cartilage tissue. The amount of water estimated using this method was similar to the one obtained at the dry-freeze procedure...... cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer used. Finally, the method was validated after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained...... data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results:The 37 Celsius degree system and the analysis can be reproduced in a similar way. MR T1...

  4. Mineral content of sorghum genotypes and the influence of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Caroline Liboreiro; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Simeone, Maria Lúcia Ferreira; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos; da Silva, Camila Santana

    2017-01-01

    Sorghum is a source of several minerals whose content may vary depending on the genotype and the production environment. The objective of this study was to screen sorghum genotypes for mineral content and to investigate the effect of water stress on it. A large variability was observed in the mineral content of 100 sorghum genotypes grown in environments without (WoWS) and with water stress (WthWS). The water stress decreased Mn, P, Mg and S contents in 100, 96, 93 and 56% of genotypes, respectively. The genotypes and other factors seemed to have more impact than water stress on K, Ca, Cu, Fe and Zn levels. In 100 sorghum genotypes, 2 were classified as excellent sources of Fe and 25 of Zn, in both environments. The best two genotypes to Fe content were SC21 and SC655 and to Zn were SC320 and SHAN-QUI-RED which showed great potential for use in biofortification.

  5. Rapid assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Present techniques of airborne chlorophyll measurement are discussed as an approach to water pollution assessment. The differential radiometer, the chlorophyll correlation radiometer, and an infrared radiometer for water temperature measurements are described as the key components of the equipment. Also covered are flight missions carried out to evaluate the capability of the chlorophyll correlation radiometer in measuring the chlorophyll content in water bodies with widely different levels of nutrients, such as fresh-water lakes of high and low eutrophic levels, marine waters of high and low productivity, and an estuary with a high sediment content. The feasibility and usefulness of these techniques are indicated.

  6. The reliability and validity of hand-held refractometry water content measures of hydrogel lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jason J; Mitchell, G Lynn; Good, Gregory W

    2003-06-01

    To investigate within- and between-examiner reliability and validity of hand-held refractometry water content measures of hydrogel lenses. Nineteen lenses of various nominal water contents were examined by two examiners on two occasions separated by 1 hour. An Atago N2 hand-held refractometer was used for all water content measures. Lenses were presented in a random order to each examiner by a third party, and examiners were masked to any potential lens identifiers. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), 95% limits of agreement, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to characterize the within- and between-examiner reliability and validity of lens water content measures. Within-examiner reliability was excellent (ICC, 0.97; 95% limits of agreement, -3.6% to +5.7%), and the inter-visit mean difference of 1.1 +/- 2.4% was not biased (p = 0.08). Between-examiner reliability was also excellent (ICC, 0.98; 95% limits of agreement, -4.1% to +3.9%). The mean difference between examiners was -0.1 +/- 2.1% (p = 0.83). The mean difference between the nominally reported water content and our water content measures was -2.1 +/- 1.7% (p refractometry and is material dependent. Therefore, investigators may need to account for bias when measuring hydrogel lens water content via hand-held refractometry.

  7. Fresh Water Content Variability in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Proshutinsky, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    Arctic Ocean model simulations have revealed that the Arctic Ocean has a basin wide oscillation with cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation anomalies (Arctic Ocean Oscillation; AOO) which has a prominent decadal variability. This study explores how the simulated AOO affects the Arctic Ocean stratification and its relationship to the sea ice cover variations. The simulation uses the Princeton Ocean Model coupled to sea ice. The surface forcing is based on NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis and its climatology, of which the latter is used to force the model spin-up phase. Our focus is to investigate the competition between ocean dynamics and ice formation/melt on the Arctic basin-wide fresh water balance. We find that changes in the Atlantic water inflow can explain almost all of the simulated fresh water anomalies in the main Arctic basin. The Atlantic water inflow anomalies are an essential part of AOO, which is the wind driven barotropic response to the Arctic Oscillation (AO). The baroclinic response to AO, such as Ekman pumping in the Beaufort Gyre, and ice meldfreeze anomalies in response to AO are less significant considering the whole Arctic fresh water balance.

  8. Temporal-spatial variations and driving factors analysis of coastal reclamation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Weiqing; Hu, Beibei; He, Mengxuan; Liu, Baiqiao; Mo, Xunqiang; Li, Hongyuan; Wang, Zhongliang; Zhang, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Coastal reclamation is the gain of land from the sea or coastal wetlands for agricultural purposes, industrial use or port expansions. Large-scale coastal land reclamation can have adverse effects on the coastal environment, including loss of marine habitats and deterioration of coastal water quality. In recent decades, coastal land reclamation has occurred extensively to meet the increasing needs of rapid economic development and urbanization in China. The overall objective of this study is to understand the coastal reclamation status of China from 1979 to 2014 and analyzed its driving factors for mitigating negative ecological effects. The data of coastal reclamation were done with the ERDAS Imagine V9.2 platform and ArcGIS software based on remote images including Landsat, SPOT, ZY-2 and ZY-3. Potential driving factors for sea reclamation were selected based on statistics bulletins and the knowledge of experts in coastal management. In order to understand the relationships among possible impact factors and coastal reclamation, the Partial Least-Squares Regression models was constructed. The analysis results indicated that the total area of reclamation was 11162.89 km2 based on remote sensing images between 1979 and 2014. Shandong Province is the largest reclamation area, reaching 2736.54 km2, and the reclamation is mainly concentrated in Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Liaoning, where the reclamation areas were all more than 1000 km2. According to the remote sensing images, there are three coastal reclamation hotspot regions including Bohai bay (in which is located Liaoning, Tianjin and Hebei), Jiangsu province coastal area and Hangzhou bay (in Zhejiang province). A large scale land reclamation plan of more than 5880 km2 has been made by local government and 2469 km2 has approved by the State Council. From the analyzed results, there is a significant collinearity between these indicators, and no significant correlation between the area of reclamation and selected

  9. Influence of compressive stress on the water content of perfluorosulphonated membranes: a {mu}-Raman study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutor, A.K.; Huguet, P.; Le, T.S.; Deabate, S. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMR 5635, ENSCM, UM2, CNRS, Universite de Montpellier II, CC047, Montpellier (France); Morin, A. [Laboratoire des Composants pour Pile a Combustible, Electrolyseur et Modelisation, CEA Grenoble/DRT/Liten/DEHT/LCPEM, Grenoble (France); Gebel, G. [SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble (France)

    2012-04-15

    The effect of compressive stress on the local water content of Nafion NRE 212 and Aquivion E79 membranes is studied by confocal {mu}-Raman spectroscopy using a specific tightening device. This device aims to mimic the geometry of the bipolar plate flow field of actual fuel cells, i.e. the sequence of channels and ribs. The membrane water content decreases with increasing stress, under the ribs as well as in the channel. The higher the initial water content, the larger the water content decreases with mechanical stress. The extent of water loss depends on the position of the membrane in the device, the applied stress and the hydration history of the membrane. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Experimental investigation of Daqing Oilfield mudstone’s creep characteristic under different water contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小兰; 刘建军; 杨春和; 陈剑文

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze mechanism of casing damage,the uniaxial compression experiment and creep experiment of interbedded mudstone samples from Sanan development area of Daqing Oilfield under different water contents were carried out.The changes of the mudstone’s mechanical parameters and creep characteristics with the increment of water saturation were studied.The results indicate that the rock strength and elastic modulus decrease rapidly with the increment of water content,at the same time,the creep strain and creep strain rate of steady state increase with the increment of water content,and also the steady state creep strain rate is enhanced with the increment of deviatoric stress.Through the creep characteristic curves,a non-linear creep constitutive equation of mudstone considering the change of water contents is established,which will be used in future numerical analysis.

  11. Remote sensing of atmospheric water content from Bhaskara SAMIR data. [using statistical linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, B. S.; Hariharan, T. A.; Sharma, A. K.; Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    The 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz passive microwave radiometers (SAMIR) on board the Indian satellite Bhaskara have provided very useful data. From these data has been demonstrated the feasibility of deriving atmospheric and ocean surface parameters such as water vapor content, liquid water content, rainfall rate and ocean surface winds. Different approaches have been tried for deriving the atmospheric water content. The statistical and empirical methods have been used by others for the analysis of the Nimbus data. A simulation technique has been attempted for the first time for 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz radiometer data. The results obtained from three different methods are compared with radiosonde data. A case study of a tropical depression has been undertaken to demonstrate the capability of Bhaskara SAMIR data to show the variation of total water vapor and liquid water contents.

  12. A simple method for determining water content in organic solvents based on cobalt(II) complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhou; Xiao Hua Liu; Hai Xin Bai; Hong Juan Wang

    2011-01-01

    A method to determine water content in organic solvents was developed based on the color change of cobalt(II) nitrate in different solvents. The color-change mechanism and optimal conditions for determining the water content were investigated. The results showed that there was a good linear relationships between the absorbance of cobalt(II) complexes in organic solvents and water contents with y in 0.9989~0.9994. This method has the advantages of low cost, good reproducibility, good sensitivity, simple in operation, fast in detection, friendly to the environment and no limitation on linear range for determining water content. It was used to determine water in samples with a satisfactory recovery in 97.81%~101.24%.

  13. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER VAPOR CONTENT USING GROUND-BASED GPS DATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor content is useful in improving the accuracy of short-term weather prediction.Dense and continuously tracking regional GPS arrays will play an important role in remote sensing atmospheric water vapor content.In this study,a piecewise linear solution method was proposed to estimate the precipitable water vapor (PWV) content from ground-based GPS observations in Hong Kong.To evaluate the solution accuracy of the water vapor content sensed by GPS,the upper air sounding data (radiosonde) that are collected locally was used to calculate the precipitable water vapor during the same period.One-month results of PWV from both ground-based GPS sensing technique and radiosonde method are in agreement within 1~2 mm.This encouraging result will motivate the GPS meteorology application based on the establishment of a dense GPS array in Hong Kong.

  14. Compaction Control of Earth-Rock Mixtures: How to Develop and Use Density Interference Coefficients and Optimum Water Content Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    oversized fraction is substituted for the water content of the oversized fraction Wc . The absorption A is defined as the satu- rated surface- dry water content...approximately within the specified fill place- ment range. In calculating the quantity of water to add, con- sider the air- dry water content of the material

  15. QTL mapping of protein content and seed characteristics under water-stress conditions in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, A; Maury, P; Berger, M; Calmon, A; Grieu, P; Sarrafi, A

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genomic regions controlling seed protein content, kernel and hull weights, and seed density in water-stress conditions in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The experiments consisted of a split-plot design (water treatment and recombinant inbred lines) with three blocks in two environments (greenhouse and field). High significant variation was observed between genotypes for all traits as well as for water treatment x genotype interaction. Several specific and nonspecific QTLs were detected for all traits under well-watered and water-stress conditions. Two SSR markers, ORS671_2 and HA2714, linked to protein content were identified that have no interaction with water treatments in greenhouse conditions. We also detected the E35M60_4 marker associated with kernel weight that had no interaction with water treatments. A specific QTL for protein content was detected with important phenotypic variance (17%) under water-stress conditions. Overlapping QTLs for protein content and seed density were identified in linkage group 15. This region probably has a peliotropic effect on protein content and seed density. QTLs for protein content colocated with grain weight traits were also identified.

  16. Dynamics of soil water content under different tillage systems in agro-pastural eco-zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of soil water content under different tillage systems was studied throughout the growing period of oat (Arena sativa L.).The treatments included tillage system (zero tillage,minimum tillage,and conventional tillage),residue cover (with and without cover),and crop rotation (continuous cropping and crop rotation).The results indicated that soil water content and crop water use efficiency were improved under zero tillage with cover.When crop stubble was removed,soil water content under zero tillage was reduced,especially in the surface soil layer.Compared to conventional tillage,minimum tillage increased soil water content and its storage,either with cover or without cover.For all the three tillage treatments,soil water content with cover was significantly higher than that of without cover.Furthermore,soil water content and crop water use efficiency under crop rotation was consistently higher than continuous cropping.Therefore,it is concluded that minimum tillage with cover is the optimum management system in this area.At present,however,a combination of crop rotation and minimum tillage is a viable option,since there are not enough crop residues available for cover of land.

  17. Predicting sub-grid variability of soil water content from basic soil information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Vanderborght, Jan; Schuh, Max; Priesack, Eckart; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of unresolved soil water content variability within model grid cells (i.e. sub-grid variability) is important for accurate predictions of land-surface energy and hydrologic fluxes. Here, we derived a closed-form expression to describe how soil water content variability depends on mean soil water content using stochastic analysis of 1D unsaturated gravitational flow based on the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model. A sensitivity analysis of this closed-form expression showed that the n parameter strongly influenced both the shape and magnitude of the maximum of this relationship. In a next step, the closed-form expression was used to predict soil water content variability for eight datasets with varying soil texture using VGM parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions that rely on readily available soil information. Generally, there was good agreement between observed and predicted soil water content variability despite the obvious simplifications that were used to derive the closed-form expression (e.g. gravity flow in dry soils). A simplified closed-form expression that neglected the effect of pressure head fluctuations showed that the good performance in the dry soil range is related to the dominant role of the variability in MVG parameters determining water retention as compared to the effect of water flow. Furthermore, the novel closed-form expression was successfully used to inversely estimate the variability of hydraulic properties from observed data on soil water content variability from several test sites in Germany, China and Australia.

  18. Arsenic content in ground and canal waters of Punjab, North-West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundal, H S; Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Dhanwinder

    2009-07-01

    Groundwater is the primary source of drinking water for more than 95% of the population in Punjab. The world health organization and US Environment Protection Agency recently established a new maximum contaminant level of 10 ppb for arsenic in drinking water. The arsenic concentration of deep water tube wells located in Amritsar city used for domestic supply for urban population ranged from 3.8 to 19.1 ppb with mean value of 9.8 ppb. Arsenic content in hand pump water varied from 9 to 85 ppb with a mean value of 29.5 ppb. According to the safe limit of As, 54% and 97%, water samples collected from deep water tube wells and hand pumps, respectively, were not fit for human consumption. Arsenic content in canal water varied from 0.3 to 8.8 ppb with a mean value of 2.89 ppb. Canal water has got higher oxidation potential followed by deep tube well and hand pump water. The present study suggests the regular monitoring of arsenic content in deep tube well and shallow hand pump waters by water testing laboratories. The consumption of water having elevated concentration of As above the safe limit must be discouraged. In south-western districts of Punjab, it recommends the use of canal water for drinking purposes and domestic use by rural and urban populations than ground water sources.

  19. Mobile TDR for geo-referenced measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anton; Schelde, Kirsten; Drøscher, Per;

    2007-01-01

    The development of site-specific crop management is constrained by the availability of sensors for monitoring important soil and crop related conditions. A mobile time-domain reflectometry (TDR) unit for geo-referenced soil measurements has been developed and used for detailed mapping of soil water...... are closely related to the clay and silt fractions of a variable field. The application to early season field mapping of water content, electrical conductivity and clay content is presented. The water and clay content maps are to be used for automated delineation of field management units. Based on a spatial...

  20. Experimental study on the relation between the water content of surface soil and the acoustic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the relation between the water content changing of surface soil and micro-quake recorded before earthquakes, we carried out a simulation experiment in laboratory. Its purpose is to explore whether the acoustic wave generated by micro-fracturing before earthquake are able to change water content of surface soil, so as to understand the relation between thermal anomaly in the remote sensing image got from the seismogenic area and the coming earthquake. The result of the experiment shows that when the acoustic wave enters into the surface soil the water content here increases on the background of decreasing due to natural evaporation. In the meantime, temperature here decreases.

  1. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  2. How NaCl and water content determine water activity during ripening of Gouda cheese, and the predicted effect on inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.; Stara, A.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the diffusion of NaCl and water in Gouda cheese during brining and ripening. Furthermore, we established water activity as a function of the NaCl-in-moisture content in Gouda cheese during ripening. We determined NaCl content, water content, and water activity in block-type G

  3. How NaCl and water content determine water activity during ripening of Gouda cheese, and the predicted effect on inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, E.; Wells-Bennik, M.H.J.; Stara, A.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the diffusion of NaCl and water in Gouda cheese during brining and ripening. Furthermore, we established water activity as a function of the NaCl-in-moisture content in Gouda cheese during ripening. We determined NaCl content, water content, and water activity in block-type

  4. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  5. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007......; Race, 2001; Ramsden, 2003). This trend appears closely related to the ‘from-teaching-to-learning’ movement, which has had a strong influence on pedagogy since the early nineties (Keiding, 2007; Terhart, 2003). Another interpretation of the current interest in methodology can be derived from...... for selection of content (Klafki, 1985, 2000; Myhre, 1961; Nielsen, 2006). These attempts all share one feature, which is that criteria for selection of content appear very general and often, more or less explicitly, deal with teaching at the first Bologna-cycle; i.e. schooling at the primary and lower...

  6. Monitoring Changes in Soil Water Content Using Subsurface Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, C. J.; Miller, S.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L. N.; Gates, J. B.; Volkmer, A.; Weinburg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Closing the water balance is important in many research and water resource applications, but it can be difficult to accomplish due to a variety of factors. A new technique that measures vertical displacement of soil in order to estimate the change in mass of water stored in overlying material is being developed. The measurement technique uses an extensometer that functions as a lysimeter, and we refer to the technique as Displacement Extensometry for Lysimetric Terrain Analysis (DELTA). DELTA extensometers are 2-m-long devices deployed by creating a friction fit with intact soil below a cased borehole. The instrument measures small displacements (better than 10 nm resolution) in response to changes of mass in the overlying soil, or other factors. The instrument averages over a region that scales with the depth of installation (the radius of influence is approximately 2x the depth). The spatial averaging of this instrument extends over regions representative of agricultural fields, hydrologic model grid blocks, and small watersheds. Five DELTA extensometers have been deployed at a field site near Clemson, SC at depths of 3, 6, and 9 m within saprolite derived from biotite gneiss. Barometric pressure, precipitation, and soil moisture are being measured along with displacement. Signals from the co-located extensometers are remarkably similar, demonstrating reproducibility of the technique. Rainfall causes soil compression, and at 6 m depth there is approximately 200 nm of compression per 1 mm of rainfall. There is gradual expansion, which ranges from 0.15 to 1.75 μm/day, following rainfall. The gradual unloading of the soil is interpreted as water loss due to evapotranspiration. Superimposed on the signal are diurnal fluctuations of 0.5 to 1 μm, which correlate to changes in barometric pressure. Four DELTA extensometers were recently deployed in hard, clayey sediments at two field locations south of Amarillo, TX. The instruments will compliment current research on

  7. Oxidative processes in soybean and pea seeds: effect of light, temperature, and water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Oxidative processes are probable determinants of longevity of seeds in storage. Measurements of actual oxygen uptake rates were made for soybean and pea seeds as a comparison of short and long lived seeds when light, temperature, and moisture contents were varied. In both peas and soybeans, the oxygen uptake was depressed at low temperatures (water contents (water contents and at temperatures greater than 22 degrees C are much less. Light enhances the level of oxygen uptake in pea, but reduces the level of oxygen uptake in soybean. The complexities of the interactions of oxygen uptake with environmental conditions in soybean compared to pea suggest that oxidative processes occur in soybean at low water contents, but are essentially absent in pea. It is suggested that the additional oxidative processes in soybean with moisture contents between 0.10 and 0.24 gram per gram may contribute to the poorer longevity of soybean seed compared to pea seed.

  8. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  9. Influence of Water Stress on Endogenous Hormone Contents and Cell Damage of Maize Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunrong Wang; Aifang Yang; Haiying Yin; Juren Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Phytohormones play critical roles In regulating plant responses to stress. We Investigated the effects of water stress Induced by adding 12% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the root medium on the levels of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acid (IAA), zeatin (ZT), and gibberellin3 (GA3) in maize leaves. The results suggested that water stress had significant effects on the four hormone levels. There was a transient increase in the IAA content during the initial stage of adaptation to water stress in maize leaves, but it dropped sharply thereafter in response to water stress. ABA content increased dramatically in maize leaves after 24 h of exposure to water stress, and then the high levels of ABA were maintained to the end, The contents Of ZT and GA3 rapidly declined in maize leaves subjected to water stress. The effects of water stress on chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde levels in maize leaves were also studied. The variation of cell damage was negatively correlated with ZT and GA3 levels in maize leaves under water stress. Thus, we explored the roles of ZT and GA3 on the growth of maize seedlings under water stress by exogenous application. It is possible that both ZT and GA3 were effective in protecting maize seedlings from water stress, which would be of great importance for the improvement of drought tolerance in maize by genetic manipulation.

  10. [Fluoride content in potable water and drinks. Connection with dental caries prevention and dental fluorosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinskiĭ, Iu N; Rumiantsev, V A; Borinskaia, E Iu; Beliaev, V V

    2009-01-01

    Content of fluoride by ion selective electrode in potable water (municipal water supply, bottled, from draw-wells and springs), in juices of industrial and compotes of domestic preparation, in drinks of various grades of the tea made by water with unequal contents of fluorine was analyzed. Fluoride entered organism of the population in non-control mode more often in minimum quantities that explained, in certain measures a wide caries incidence. Granting of the information upon concentration of fluorides in potable water, juices and drinks used by population would allow people to adjust this microelement intake in the organism with the purpose of preventing of dental caries and fluorosis.

  11. Gas content of some thermal and thermal-mineral waters in Bosnia and Herzogovinia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derkovic, B. (Geoinzenjering, Sarajevo, Yugoslavia)

    Studies were made of the gas content of thermal waters from nine wells in Bosnia and Herzogovinia. The wells are located at Kulasi, Olovo, Laktasi, Fojnica, Slatina, Gornji, Ilidza near Sarajevo, and Ilidza near Banja Luka. All the waters were characterized by nitrogen and originate at fairly shallow depths. The gas contents of the waters, in terms of C, CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, He, Ne, As, Kr, and Xe are reported. Due to their ease of recovery, these waters are extensively used in balneological applications.

  12. Controlled Water Content, Crispness and Retrogradation of Fried Coatings with Monosodium Glutamate-compounded Starch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yagishita, Takahiro; Ito, Koichi; Uemura, Ryuji; Endo, Shigeru; Takahashi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    A mono sodium glutamate (GluNa)-compounded starch prepared by autoclaving a mixture of tapioca starch and GluNa under limited water content was applied to improve the physical properties of the fried coatings of Vienna sausages...

  13. Determination of Cloud Ice Water Content and Geometrical Thickness Using Microwave and Infrared Radiometric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man-Li C.

    1987-08-01

    Cloud ice water content and cloud geometrical thickness have been determined using a combination of near-infrared, thermal infrared and thermal microwave radiometric measurements. The radiometric measurements are from a Multispectral Cloud Radiometer, which has seven channels ranging from visible to thermal infrared, and an Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder, which has four channels ranging from 90 to 183 GHz. Studies indicate that the microwave brightness temperatures depend not only on the amount of ice water content but also on the vertical distribution of ice water content. Studies also show that the low brightness temperature at 92 GHz for large ice water content is due to cloud reflection which reflects most of the irradiance incident at the cloud base downward. Therefore the 92 GHz channel detects a low brightness temperature at the cloud top.

  14. Water content - void ratio swell-shrink paths of compacted expansive soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tripathy S; Rao K.S; Fredlund D.G

    2002-01-01

    .... The void ratio and water content of the specimens at several intermediate stages during swelling until the end of swelling and during shrinkage until the end of shrinkage were determined to trace...

  15. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  16. Determination of moisture content and water activity in algae and fish by thermoanalytical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Mota da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The water content in seafoods is very important since it affects their sensorial quality, microbiological stability, physical characteristics and shelf life. In this study, thermoanalytical techniques were employed to develop a simple and accurate method to determine water content (moisture by thermogravimetry (TG and water activity from moisture content values and freezing point depression using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The precision of the results suggests that TG is a suitable technique to determine moisture content in biological samples. The average water content values for fish samples of Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus species were 76.4 ± 5.7% and 63.3 ± 3.9%, respectively, while that of Ulva lactuca marine algae species was 76.0 ± 4.4%. The method presented here was also successfully applied to determine water activity in two species of fish and six species of marine algae collected in the Atlantic coastal waters of Bahia, in Brazil. Water activity determined in fish samples ranged from 0.946 - 0.960 and was consistent with values reported in the literature, i.e., 0.9 - 1.0. The water activity values determined in marine algae samples lay within the interval of 0.974 - 0.979.

  17. Determination of moisture content and water activity in algae and fish by thermoanalytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Vilma Mota da; Silva, Luciana Almeida; Andrade, Jailson B. de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: jailsong@ufba.br; Veloso, Marcia C. da Cunha [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia (CEFET-BA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)); Santos, Gislaine Vieira [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2008-07-01

    The water content in seafoods is very important since it affects their sensorial quality, microbiological stability, physical characteristics and shelf life. In this study, thermoanalytical techniques were employed to develop a simple and accurate method to determine water content (moisture) by thermogravimetry (TG) and water activity from moisture content values and freezing point depression using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The precision of the results suggests that TG is a suitable technique to determine moisture content in biological samples. The average water content values for fish samples of Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus species were 76.4 {+-} 5.7% and 63.3 {+-} 3.9%, respectively, while that of Ulva lactuca marine algae species was 76.0 {+-} 4.4%. The method presented here was also successfully applied to determine water activity in two species of fish and six species of marine algae collected in the Atlantic coastal waters of Bahia, in Brazil. Water activity determined in fish samples ranged from 0.946 - 0.960 and was consistent with values reported in the literature, i.e., 0.9 - 1.0. The water activity values determined in marine algae samples lay within the interval of 0.974 - 0.979. (author)

  18. Influence of nutrient level on methylmercury content in water spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greger, Maria; Dabrowska, Beata

    2010-08-01

    Widely consumed vegetables are often cultivated in sewage waters with high nutrient levels. They can contain high levels of methylmercury (MeHg), because they can form MeHg from inorganic Hg in their young shoots. We determined whether the MeHg uptake and the MeHg formation in the shoots of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were affected by the presence of a high nutrient level in the growth medium. Water spinach shoots were rooted and pretreated in growth medium containing 7% (low) or 70% (high) Hoagland nutrient solution; thereafter, the plants were treated with either 0.02 microM MeHg or 0.2 microM HgCl2 for 3 d. Half the plants were then analyzed for total Hg and MeHg. The remaining plants were transferred to mercury-free medium with low or high nutrient levels and posttreated for 3 days before analysis of total Hg and MeHg in order to measure MeHg formation in the absence of external Hg. The results indicate that nutrient level did not influence MeHg uptake, but that a high nutrient level reduced the distribution of MeHg to the shoots 2.7-fold versus low nutrient level. After treatment with HgCl2, MeHg was found in roots and new shoots but not in old shoots. The MeHg:total-Hg ratio was higher in new shoots than in roots, being 13 times higher at high versus low nutrient levels. Thus, MeHg formation was the same in new shoots independent of inorganic Hg concentration, since the total Hg level decreased at a high nutrient level.

  19. Impact of soil water content on landmine detection using radar and thermal infared sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, S.-H.; Miller, T.W.; H. Tobin; Borchers, B.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.; Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Land mines are a major problem in many areas of the world. In spite of the fact that many different types of land mines sensors have been developed, the detection of non-metallic land mines remains very difficult. Most landmine detection sensors are affected by soil properties such as water content, temperature, electrical conductivity and dielectric constant. The most important of these is water content since it directly influences the three other properties. In this study, the ground penetr...

  20. Effect of water content and organic carbon on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, G.; Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; McCarty, G. W.; Brown, D. J.; Doraiswamy, P. C.

    2009-04-01

    Crop residue cover is an important indicator of tillage method. Remote sensing of crop residue cover is an attractive and efficient method when compared with traditional ground-based methods, e.g., the line-point transect or windshield survey. A number of spectral indices have been devised for residue cover estimation. Of these, the most effective are those in the shortwave infrared portion of the spectrum, situated between 1950 and 2500 nm. These indices include the hyperspectral Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI), and advanced multispectral indices, i.e., the Lignin-Cellulose Absorption (LCA) index and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI), which were devised for the NASA Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor. Spectra of numerous soils from U.S. Corn Belt (Indiana and Iowa) were acquired under wetness conditions varying from saturation to oven-dry conditions. The behavior of soil reflectance with water content was also dependent on the soil organic carbon content (SOC) of the soils, and the location of the spectral bands relative to significant water absorptions. High-SOC soils showed the least change in spectral index values with increase in soil water content. Low-SOC soils, on the other hand, showed measurable difference. For CAI, low-SOC soils show an initial decrease in index value followed by an increase, due to the way that water content affects CAI spectral bands. Crop residue CAI values decrease with water content. For LCA, water content increases decrease crop residue index values and increase them for soils, resulting in decreased contrast. SINDRI is also affected by SOC and water content. As such, spatial information on the distribution of surface soil water content and SOC, when used in a geographic information system (GIS), will improve the accuracy of remotely-sensed crop residue cover estimates.

  1. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochim, April; Zytner, Richard G; McBean, Edward A; Endres, Anthony L

    2013-10-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  2. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  3. Rapid selection of a representative monitoring location of soil water content for irrigation scheduling using surface moisture-density gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Ibrahim; Janat, Mussadak; Makhlouf, Mohsen; Hamdan, Altayeb

    2016-10-01

    Establishing a representative monitoring location of soil water content is important for agricultural water management. One of the challenges is to develop a field protocol for determining such a location with minimum costs. In this paper, we use the concept of time stability in soil water content to examine whether using a short term monitoring period is sufficient to identify a representative site of soil water content and, therefore, irrigation scheduling. Surface moisture-density gauge was used as a means for measuring soil water content. Variations of soil water content in space and time were studied using geostatistical tools. Measuring soil water content was made at 30 locations as nodes of a 6×8 m grid, six times during the growing season. A representative location for average soil water content estimation was allocated at the beginning of a season, and thereafter it was validated. Results indicated that the spatial pattern of soil water content was strongly temporally stable, explained by the relationship between soil water content and fine soil texture. Two field surveys of soil water content, conducted before and after the 1st irrigation, could be sufficient to allocate a representative location of soil water content, and for adequate irrigation scheduling of the whole field. Surface moisture-density gauge was found to be efficient for characterising time stability of soil water content under irrigated field conditions.

  4. Effect of water content and heating temperature on thermal properties of brown rice batter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboukzail, Jehan; Abdullah, Aminah; Ghani, Maaruf Abd

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this research were to assess the effect of water content in the formulation (60%,80%, 100%, 105%, 110%, 120% flour basis) on starch gelatinization of brown rice batter, and to identify the effects of heat treatment at 50°C, 60°C, 70°C, 80°C on starch gelatinization and degree of starch gelatinization of brown rice batter and wheat dough. At 60% water content, there was no gelatinization of brown rice batter, but the batter was gelatinized by increasing the water content to 80%. No significant differences in onset (To) peak (Tp) and endest (Tend) temperature when the water content increased from 80% to 120%; however, enthalpy (ΔH) decreased when water content grew up. Heat treatment of brown rice batter at 60% water content made brown rice batter gelatinized. Starch gelatinization temperature To, Tend and ΔH did not have significant differences when temperature of heat treatment increased from 50°C to 80°C while Tp increased significantly (p<0.05) at 80°C. However, heat treatment had more effect on wheat dough compared to brown rice batter.

  5. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  6. MR-based Water Content Estimation in Cartilage: Design and Validation of a Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    system (the closest to the body temperature) we measured, using the modified MR sequences, the T1 map intensity signal on 6 cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer...... was costumed and programmed. Finally, we validated the method after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue...... contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results We could reproduce twice the 37 Celsius degree system and could perform the measurements in a similar way. We found that the MR T1 map based water content sequences can provide information that, after being analyzed with a special software, can...

  7. Multimode near-field microwave monitoring of free water content of skin and imaging of tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofland, S E [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rowan University, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ 08028 (United States); Mazzatenta, J D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rowan University, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ 08028 (United States); Croman, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rowan University, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ 08028 (United States); Tyagi, S D [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 34th and Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    We have used the near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) technique in the 1-10 GHz range to monitor the free water content of skin. The water content is interpreted from the measured dielectric properties of the epidermis. The finger skin was first hydrated by soaking in water at 37 {sup 0}C for 30 min followed by monitoring of water content as the free water evaporated under ambient conditions. The same technique has also been employed to image a 1 cm x 1 cm sample of chicken skin. It has been shown that variations exist in the resonant frequencies and quality factors of tissue under varying physical parameters. The samples analysed were as-received and thermally dehydrated or damaged chicken tissue samples. We contrast between the dielectric properties with the optical images. We also discuss possible application of our imaging technique in clinical monitoring of the wound healing process.

  8. Monitoring of Water Content in Building Materials Using a Wireless Passive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Stojanović

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an innovative design of a wireless, passive LC sensor and its application for monitoring of water content in building materials. The sensor was embedded in test material samples so that the internal water content of the samples could be measured with an antenna by tracking the changes in the sensor’s resonant frequency. Since the dielectric constant of water was much higher compared with that of the test samples, the presence of water in the samples increased the capacitance of the LC circuit, thus decreasing the sensor’s resonant frequency. The sensor is made up of a printed circuit board in one metal layer and water content has been determined for clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete block, both widely used construction materials. Measurements were conducted at room temperature using a HP-4194A Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer instrument.

  9. MR-based Water Content Estimation in Cartilage: Design and Validation of a Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Ringgaard, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    system (the closest to the body temperature) we measured, using the modified MR sequences, the T1 map intensity signal on 6 cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer...... was costumed and programmed. Finally, we validated the method after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue...... contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results We could reproduce twice the 37 Celsius degree system and could perform the measurements in a similar way. We found that the MR T1 map based water content sequences can provide information that, after being analyzed with a special software, can...

  10. Effect of Water Content on Enthalpic Relaxations in Porcine Septal Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Y; Protsenko, D; Lavernia, E J; Wong, B J F

    2009-03-01

    Cartilage thermoforming is an emerging surgical technology which uses heat to accelerate stress relaxation in mechanically deformed tissue specimens. Heat induced shape change in cartilage is associated with complex thermo mechanical behavior of which the mechanisms are still a subject of debate. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to characterize the threshold temperatures and enthalpies in cartilage as a function of water content. The DSC identified two enthalpic events in porcine nasal septal cartilage, which depend on the water content. The change in the water content of cartilage impacts the interactions between matrix macromolecules and water molecules, which may be associated with a bound-free water transformation (reversible process) and a denaturation of cartilage (irreversible process).

  11. Biocrusts serve as biomarkers for the upper 30 cm soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Giora J.; Benenson, Itzhak

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the spatial distribution of moisture in soil is of great importance especially in arid regions where water is scarce. Following a previous research that showed a significant relationship between daylight surface wetness duration and the average chlorophyll content of 5 biocrusts in the Negev Desert (Israel), and the resultant outcome that pointed to the possible use of biocrusts as biomarkers for surface wetness duration, we hypothesize that biocrusts may also serve as biomarkers for the moisture content of the upper soil layer. Toward this end, daylight surface wetness duration was measured at 5 crust types following rain events during 1993-1995 along with periodical soil sampling of the upper 30 cm (at 5 cm intervals) of the soil profiles underlying these biocrusts. The findings showed a positive linear relationship between daylight surface wetness duration and the chlorophyll content of the crusts (r2 = 0.96-0.97). High correlations were also found between daylight surface wetness duration and the available water content (r2 = 0.96) and duration (r2 = 0.85-0.88) of the upper 30 cm soil and between the chlorophyll content of the crust and the available water content (r2 = 0.93-0.96) and duration (r2 = 0.78-0.84). Topography-induced shading and slope position (which determined additional water either by runoff or subsurface flow) are seen responsible for the clear link between subsurface moisture content, daylight surface wetness duration and chlorophyll content of the crust. This link points to the possible use of biocrusts as biomarkers for subsurface water content and highlights the importance of crust typology and mapping for the study of the spatial distribution of water and their potential use for the study of ecosystem structure and function.

  12. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, S.; Skidmore, A.K.; Naeem, M.; Schlerf, M.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid

  13. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, S.; Skidmore, A.K.; Naeem, M.; Schlerf, M.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid

  14. Porous media matric potential and water content measurements during parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norikane, Joey H.; Jones, Scott B.; Steinberg, Susan L.; Levine, Howard G.; Or, Dani

    2005-01-01

    Control of water and air in the root zone of plants remains a challenge in the microgravity environment of space. Due to limited flight opportunities, research aimed at resolving microgravity porous media fluid dynamics must often be conducted on Earth. The NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight program offers an opportunity for Earth-based researchers to study physical processes in a variable gravity environment. The objectives of this study were to obtain measurements of water content and matric potential during the parabolic profile flown by the KC-135 aircraft. The flight profile provided 20-25 s of microgravity at the top of the parabola, while pulling 1.8 g at the bottom. The soil moisture sensors (Temperature and Moisture Acquisition System: Orbital Technologies, Madison, WI) used a heat-pulse method to indirectly estimate water content from heat dissipation. Tensiometers were constructed using a stainless steel porous cup with a pressure transducer and were used to measure the matric potential of the medium. The two types of sensors were placed at different depths in a substrate compartment filled with 1-2 mm Turface (calcined clay). The ability of the heat-pulse sensors to monitor overall changes in water content in the substrate compartment decreased with water content. Differences in measured water content data recorded at 0, 1, and 1.8 g were not significant. Tensiometer readings tracked pressure differences due to the hydrostatic force changes with variable gravity. The readings may have been affected by changes in cabin air pressure that occurred during each parabola. Tensiometer porous membrane conductivity (function of pore size) and fluid volume both influence response time. Porous media sample height and water content influence time-to-equilibrium, where shorter samples and higher water content achieve faster equilibrium. Further testing is needed to develop these sensors for space flight applications.

  15. Water Content of the Oceanic Lithosphere at Hawaii from FTIR Analysis of Peridotite Xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizmis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Although water in the mantle is mostly present as trace H dissolved in minerals, it has a large influence on its melting and rheological properties. The water content of the mantle lithosphere beneath continents is better constrained by abundant mantle xenolith data than beneath oceans where it is mainly inferred from MORB glass analysis. Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, we determined the water content of olivine (Ol), clinopyroxene (Cpx) and orthopyroxene (Opx) in spinel peridotite xenoliths from Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. Only Ol exhibits H diffusion profiles, evidence of limited H loss during xenolith transport to the surface. Water concentrations (Ol: 9-28 ppm H2O, Cpx: 246-566 ppm H2O, Opx: 116-224 ppm H2O) are within the range of those from continental settings but higher than those from Gakkel ridge abyssal peridotites. The Opx H2O contents are similar to those of abyssal peridotites from Atlantic ridge Leg 153 (170-230 ppm) but higher than those from Leg 209 (10- 14 ppm). The calculated bulk peridotite water contents (94 to 144 ppm H2O) are in agreement with MORB mantle source water estimates and lower than estimates for the source of Hawaiian rejuvenated volcanism (approx 540 ppm H2O) . The water content of Cpx and most Opx correlates negatively with spinel Cr#, and positively with pyroxene Al and HREE contents. This is qualitatively consistent with the partitioning of H into the melt during partial melting, but the water contents are too high for the degree of melting these peridotites experienced. Melts in equilibrium with xenolith minerals have H2O/Ce ratios similar to those of OIB

  16. Detecting leaf-water content in Mediterranean trees using high-resolution spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven M.; Addink, Elisabeth A.; Doelman, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Water content of the vegetation canopy or individual leaves is an important variable in physiological plant processes. In Mediterranean regions where water availability is an important production limiting factor, it is a strong indicator of vegetation stress. Spectroscopic earth-observation techniqu

  17. Water content of acacia honey dertermined by two established methods and by optothermal window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szopos, S.; Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.D.; Ajtony, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of the research study described here was to explore the potential of the optothermal window (OW) technique as a new approach towards a simple, rapid determination of water content in honey. Water, major component of foods, influences their physical and chemical properties. Single

  18. Modeling the release of E. coli D21g with transients in water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transients in water content are well known to mobilize colloids that are retained in the vadose zone. However, there is no consensus on the proper model formulation to simulate colloid release during drainage and imbibition. We present a model that relates colloid release to changes in the air-water...

  19. Three-dimensional visualization and quantification of water content in the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Ahmad B; Carminati, Andrea; Vetterlein, Doris; Vontobel, Peter; Lehmann, Eberhard; Weller, Ulrich; Hopmans, Jan W; Vogel, Hans-Jörg; Oswald, Sascha E

    2011-11-01

    • Despite the importance of rhizosphere properties for water flow from soil to roots, there is limited quantitative information on the distribution of water in the rhizosphere of plants. • Here, we used neutron tomography to quantify and visualize the water content in the rhizosphere of the plant species chickpea (Cicer arietinum), white lupin (Lupinus albus), and maize (Zea mays) 12 d after planting. • We clearly observed increasing soil water contents (θ) towards the root surface for all three plant species, as opposed to the usual assumption of decreasing water content. This was true for tap roots and lateral roots of both upper and lower parts of the root system. Furthermore, water gradients around the lower part of the roots were smaller and extended further into bulk soil compared with the upper part, where the gradients in water content were steeper. • Incorporating the hydraulic conductivity and water retention parameters of the rhizosphere into our model, we could simulate the gradual changes of θ towards the root surface, in agreement with the observations. The modelling result suggests that roots in their rhizosphere may modify the hydraulic properties of soil in a way that improves uptake under dry conditions.

  20. MRI links stem water content to stem diameter variations in transpiring trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepper, De V.; Dusschoten, van D.; Copini, P.; Jahnke, S.; Steppe, K.

    2012-01-01

    In trees, stem diameter variations are related to changes in stem water content, because internally stored water is depleted and replenished over a day. To confirm this relationship, non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was combined with point dendrometer measurements in three actively

  1. MRI links stem water content to stem diameter variations in transpiring trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepper, De V.; Dusschoten, van D.; Copini, P.; Jahnke, S.; Steppe, K.

    2012-01-01

    In trees, stem diameter variations are related to changes in stem water content, because internally stored water is depleted and replenished over a day. To confirm this relationship, non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was combined with point dendrometer measurements in three actively tran

  2. Water content of acacia honey dertermined by two established methods and by optothermal window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szopos, S.; Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.D.; Ajtony, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of the research study described here was to explore the potential of the optothermal window (OW) technique as a new approach towards a simple, rapid determination of water content in honey. Water, major component of foods, influences their physical and chemical properties. Single

  3. Assessment of the manganese content of the drinking water source in Yancheng, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinnan; Li, Aimin; Wang, Qiongjie; Zhou, Yang; Fu, Lichun; Li, Yan

    2010-10-15

    Excessive intake of manganese can damage the nervous system of the human body. In August 2009, the manganese content of the drinking water source in Yancheng exceeded the national standard of drinking water source, which influenced the daily life of the local residents. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to the manganese content of river water in Yancheng exceeding the national standard. To the data, the manganese content of surface water in Yancheng already met the national standard of drinking water source in September 2009, but the manganese content of river sediment was relatively high, especially in Mangshe River and Tongyu River. It was worthwhile to note that the soluble manganese content of the sediment in Mangshe River was even as high as 270 mg kg(-1), which suggested that the release of manganese from the sediment was the major cause of the pollution. The manganese content of the soil near the rivers was also determined, and the results indicated that the wastewater and waste slag discharged by the stainless steel factories nearby were the main pollution sources of manganese. Furthermore, the environmental factors affecting the release of manganese from the sediment were also investigated. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial distribution of soil water content from airborne thermal and optical remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katja; Palladino, Mario; Vuolo, Francesco; Dini, Luigi; D'Urso, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Spatial and temporal information of soil water content is of essential importance for modelling of land surface processes in hydrological studies and applications for operative systems of irrigation management. In the last decades, several remote sensing domains have been considered in the context of soil water content monitoring, ranging from active and passive microwave to optical and thermal spectral bands. In the framework of an experimental campaign in Southern Italy in 2007, two innovative methodologies to retrieve soil water content information from airborne earth observation (E.O.) data were exploited: a) analyses of the dependence of surface temperature of vegetation with soil water content using thermal infrared radiometer (TIR), and b) estimation of superficial soil moisture content using reflectance in the visible and near infrared regions acquired from optical sensors. The first method (a) is applicable especially at surfaces completely covered with vegetation, whereas the second method is preferably applicable at surfaces without or with sparse vegetation. The synergy of both methods allows the establishment of maps of spatially distributed soil water content. Results of the analyses are presented and discussed, in particular in view of an operative context in irrigation studies.

  5. Dynamics of Environmental Humidity and Water Content in Tobacco Leaf and Metabolism of Starch During Curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Chang-rong; YUAN Hong-tao; CHEN Jiang-hua; WANG Na

    2003-01-01

    Effect of environmental humidity and water content in tobacco leaf on starch metabolism was studied by using the electric-heated auto-controlled flue-curing barn supplied by Henan Agricultural University, China. The results indicated that the degradation of starch and decrease of water content in tobacco leaf during early yellowing at low humidity was the most rapid, and the water loss was the highest while the lowest under high humidity. The duration for starch degradation under low humidity was longer than that of CK. So the starch residue in cured leaf of different treatment took the order of high humidity yellowing treatment>low humidity yellowing treatment> CK. When the leaf water content was decreased to around 50%, the starch degradation became slow and the content of starch was stable. Starch degradation and decrease of leaf water content was not synchronous. Starch in tobacco leaf during yellowing degraded more rapidly when humidity was decreased at a high speed, but the degradation stopped earlier at late stage. There was a quicker and higher degradation of starch under high environmental humidity. When the humidity decreased to 70 %,the content of starch was stable. The activity of amylase began to decrease when relative humidity was below 75 %, but it kept a high level of activity when the environmental humidity was below 70 %.

  6. Two-Region Model for Soil Water Repellency as a Function of Matric Potential and Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) occurs worldwide and affects hydrologic processes such as infiltration, preferential flow, and surface erosion. The degree of WR varies with soil organic C (SOC) and water contents. In this study, we measured WR (by ethanol molarity) as a function of moisture conditions...... for two soil profiles (17 layers, of which 13 exhibited WR), representing different vegetation and SOC between 0.6 and 14%. Generally, WR was found at SOC ≥2%. Based on measured data, a two-region water repellency (TRWR) model was developed. The model assumes two linear regions in a WR vs. pF (=log...... by the so-called Dexter index) is useful for predicting if soils are likely to exhibit WR. Expression of soil water repellency depends on soil water content; however, only a limited amount of predictive description is available to date. In this study, based on experimental data, a simple two-region model...

  7. A Simple Beta-Function Model for Soil-Water Repellency as a Function of Water and Organic Carbon Contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2010-01-01

    Soil-water content (θ) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are key factors controlling the occurrence and magnitude of soil-water repellency (WR). Although expressions have recently been proposed to describe the nonlinear variation of WR with θ, the inclusion of easily measurable parameters in predictive...... conditions for 19 soils were used to test the model. The beta function successfully reproduced all the measured soil-water repellency characteristic, α(θ), curves. Significant correlations were found between model parameters and SOC content (1%-14%). The model was independently tested against data...... for further three soils and performed accurately for all three. Consequently, we suggest that the α(θ) model represents a useful strategy to predict the entire soil-water repellency characteristic curve, and thus potential risks for enhanced runoff and preferential (fingered) soil-water flow at given initial...

  8. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, S. J.; Cotton, R. J.; Barrett, P. A.; Vance, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi) data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed-phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low-ice-water-content environments typically found in midlatitude cirrus and the environments with much higher ice water content often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i) a Nevzorov hot-wire probe, (ii) the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour) and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii) a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) (only for cirrus measurements). We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD) with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g m-3) was the method of total water content minus water vapour. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrisation of the Nevzorov baseline drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m-3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of 2 for the CVI (qi > 0.008 g m-3) and the method of total water content minus water vapour (qi > 0.02 g m-3). Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a priori assumptions on the mass-dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and supercooled liquid

  9. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Abel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low ice water content environments typically found in mid-latitude cirrus and the much higher ice water content environments often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i a Nevzorov hot-wire probe (ii the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI (only for cirrus measurements. We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g kg−1 was the total water content minus water vapour method. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrization of the Nevzorov base-line drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m−3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of two for the CVI (qi 0.01 g kg−1 and the total water content minus water vapour method (qi > 0.03 g kg−1. Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a-priori assumptions on the mass–dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and

  10. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Abel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed-phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low-ice-water-content environments typically found in midlatitude cirrus and the environments with much higher ice water content often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i a Nevzorov hot-wire probe, (ii the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI (only for cirrus measurements. We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g m−3 was the method of total water content minus water vapour. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrisation of the Nevzorov baseline drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m−3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of 2 for the CVI (qi > 0.008 g m−3 and the method of total water content minus water vapour (qi > 0.02 g m−3. Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a priori assumptions on the mass–dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and

  11. Pb and Cd Contents in Soil, Water, and Trees at an Afforestation Site, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Nancai; Chen, Bufeng; Liu, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Pb and Cd contents in 13 plantation tree species (leaf and branch components), soil, water (groundwater and river water) at a young (3-5 year-old) seashore afforestation stand were investigated in Nansha district, Guangzhou city in southern China. The results showed that (1) soil, rather than water or trees, had the highest content of both Pb (averagely 48.79 mg/kg) and Cd (0.50 mg/kg), demonstrating that soil might function as a major reservoir for extraneously derived heavy metals; (2) Pb content was higher in branches than in leaves, but Cd content appeared similar in both components, implying possibly different accumulation mechanisms in trees; (3) Pb and Cd appeared to accumulate differently among some tree taxa, whereas almost no significant difference was detected between introduced and indigenous species. The study indicated that trees were potentially useful to remediate sites contaminated with Pb and Cd in the urbanized areas.

  12. Quality of Water Content, Diastase Enzyme Activity and Hidroximetilfurfural (HMF in Rubber and Rambutan Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulis Setio Toto Harjo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF of the rubber and rambutan honey. The method was a laboratory experiments with statistical analysis unpaired student t-test by two treatments and fifteen replications. The variable of this research were water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. The results of rubber and rambutan honey showed that there were significant difference effect (P0.05 that is 11 DN and there is a highly significant difference (P<0.01 on the HMF content of 17.23±0.54 mg/kg and 7.61±0.23 mg/kg. Rubber and rambutan honey have good quality based on the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. It was concluded that the rubber and rambutan honey used were of good quality because it has met the requirements of SNI.

  13. Changes in the Iron and Manganese Content and Turbidity in the Vilnius City Water Supply System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramunė Albrektienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The water of Vilnius boreholes contains excessive quantities of natural iron and manganese, the insoluble forms of which increase the turbidity of the water. Therefore, a ISC Vilniaus Vandenys installed water treatment equipment that remove iron and manganese from drinking water, and decrease the turbidity of the water. Water samples were taken at different points of the water supply network, total iron, manganese content, and turbidity analyses were carried out, and the changes in indicators mentioned above were observed in the water supply network. It was established that this indicators concentrations are changing at water supply networks, but do not exceed the norms allowed by HN 24:2003.Article in Lithuanian

  14. High Water Contents in the Siberian Cratonic Mantle: An FTIR Study of Udachnaya Peridotite Xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Peslier, Anne H.; Ionov, Dimitri A.; Brandon, Alan D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ashchepkov, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Water is believed to be a key factor controlling the long-term stability of cratonic lithosphere, but mechanisms responsible for the water content distribution in the mantle remain poorly constrained. Water contents were obtained by FTIR in olivine, pyroxene and garnet for 20 well-characterized peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite (central Siberian craton) and equilibrated at 2-7 GPa. Water contents in minerals do not appear to be related to interaction with the host kimberlite. Diffusion modeling indicates that the core of olivines preserved their original water contents. The Udachnaya peridotites show a broad range of water contents in olivine (6.5 +/- 1.1 to 323 +- 65 ppm H2O (2 sigma)), and garnet (0 - 23 +/- 6 ppm H2O). The water contents of olivine and garnet are positively correlated with modal clinopyroxene, garnet and FeO in olivine. Water-rich garnets are also rich in middle rare earth elements. This is interpreted as the result of interaction between residual peridotites and water rich-melts, consistent with modal and cryptic metasomatism evidenced in the Siberian cratonic mantle. The most water-rich Udachnaya minerals contain 2 to 3 times more water than those from the Kaapvaal craton, the only craton with an intact mantle root for which water data is available. The highest water contents in olivine and orthopyroxene in this study (>= 300 ppm) are found at the bottom of the lithosphere (> 6.5 GPa). This is in contrast with the Kaapvaal craton where the olivines of peridotites equilibrated at > 6.4 GPa have 6 GPa is lower or similar (8.4× 10(exp 16) to 8.0× 10(exp 18) Pa./s) to that of the asthenosphere (<= 3.7x10(exp 18) Pa./s ). Such lithologies would not be able to resist delamination by the convecting asthenosphere. However, seismology studies as well as the high equilibration pressures of our samples indicate that the Udachnaya cratonic lithosphere is 220-250 km thick. Consequently, the water-rich peridotites are likely not

  15. Considering Organic Carbon for Improved Predictions of Clay Content from Water Vapor Sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2014-01-01

    to water vapor sorption isotherms that can be rapidly measured with a fully automated vapor sorption analyzer are a viable alternative. In this presentation we evaluate the performance of recently developed regression models based on comparison with standard CF measurements for soils with high organic...... carbon (OC) content and propose a modification to improve prediction accuracy. Evaluation of the CF prediction accuracy for 29 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 25% and with OC contents from 2.0 to 8.4% showed that the models worked reasonably well for all soils when the OC content was below 2.......4%. For soils with OC>2.4% and CFcontent. Based on 20 soils with CF between 3 and 15% and OC between 2.6 and 8.4%, we propose correction factors to account for the sorbed water content associated with OC. Evaluation of the OC...

  16. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.;

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... they have large scatter. The data sets that have been measured at low pressures extrapolate well towards the ideal equilibrium values. The two models show similar results, but differ at high pressure and/or temperature. CPA is shown to extrapolate well for methane-water to 1000 bar and 573 K, and our...

  17. Metrologically Traceable Determination of the Water Content in Biopolymers: INRiM Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, F.; Beltramino, G.; Fernicola, V.; Sega, M.; Verdoja, A.

    2017-03-01

    Water content in materials is a key factor affecting many chemical and physical properties. In polymers of biological origin, it influences their stability and mechanical properties as well as their biodegradability. The present work describes the activity carried out at INRiM on the determination of water content in samples of a commercial starch-derived biopolymer widely used in shopping bags (Mater-Bi^{circledR }). Its water content, together with temperature, is the most influencing parameter affecting its biodegradability, because of the considerable impact on the microbial activity which is responsible for the biopolymer degradation in the environment. The main scope of the work was the establishment of a metrologically traceable procedure for the determination of water content by using two electrochemical methods, namely coulometric Karl Fischer (cKF) titration and evolved water vapour (EWV) analysis. The obtained results are presented. The most significant operational parameters were considered, and a particular attention was devoted to the establishment of metrological traceability of the measurement results by using appropriate calibration procedures, calibrated standards and suitable certified reference materials. Sample homogeneity and oven-drying temperature were found to be the most important influence quantities in the whole water content measurement process. The results of the two methods were in agreement within the stated uncertainties. Further development is foreseen for the application of cKF and EWV to other polymers.

  18. Origin and Distribution of Water Contents in Continental and Oceanic Lithospheric Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    The water content distribution of the upper mantle will be reviewed as based on the peridotite record. The amount of water in cratonic xenoliths appears controlled by metasomatism while that of the oceanic mantle retains in part the signature of melting events. In both cases, the water distribution is heterogeneous both with depth and laterally, depending on localized water re-enrichments next to melt/fluid channels. The consequence of the water distribution on the rheology of the upper mantle and the location of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary will also be discussed.

  19. Water content influence on thermal and volumetric properties of wheat starch gelatinization under 10 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowska, Marta; Randzio, Stanislaw L

    2010-02-01

    A transitiometric in situ analysis of wheat starch aqueous suspensions heated over a temperature range from 285 K to 415 K under isobaric conditions of 10 MPa is presented. Measurements were performed at four selected water concentrations: 56.0%, 64.7%, 73.5%, and 82.4% weight/water. Thermal and volumetric properties and their water content dependencies have been determined for three successive starch phase transformations occurred during wheat starch gelatinization.

  20. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

  1. A High Resolution Capacitive Sensing System for the Measurement of Water Content in Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Aslam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ±50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design.

  2. [Metallic content of water sources and drinkable water in industrial cities of Murmansk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doushkina, E V; Dudarev, A A; Sladkova, Yu N; Zachinskaya, I Yu; Chupakhin, V S; Goushchin, I V; Talykova, L V; Nikanov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Performed in 2013, sampling of centralized and noncentralized water-supply and analysis of engineering technology materials on household water use in 6 cities of Murmansk region (Nikel, Zapolyarny, Olenegorsk, Montchegorsk, Apatity, Kirovsk), subjected to industrial emissions, enabled to evaluate and compare levels of 15 metals in water sources (lakes and springs) and the cities' drinkable waters. Findings are that some cities lack sanitary protection zones for water sources, most cities require preliminary water processing, water desinfection involves only chlorination. Concentrations of most metals in water samples from all the cities at the points of water intake, water preparation and water supply are within the hygienic norms. But values significantly (2-5 times) exceeding MACs (both in water sources and in drinkable waters of the cities) were seen for aluminium in Kirovsk city and for nickel in Zapolarny and Nikel cities. To decrease effects of aluminium, nickel and their compounds in the three cities' residents (and preserve health of the population and offsprings), the authors necessitate specification and adaptation of measures to purify the drinkable waters from the pollutants. In all the cities studied, significantly increased concentrations of iron and other metals were seen during water transportation from the source to the city supply--that necessitates replacement of depreciated water supply systems by modern ones. Water taken from Petchenga region springs demonstrated relatively low levels of metals, except from strontium and barium.

  3. CONTENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The Development and Evolution of the Idea of the Mandate of Heaven in the Zhou Dynasty The changes in the idea of Mandate of Heaven during the Shang and Zhou dynasties are of great significance in the course of the development of traditional Chinese culture. The quickening and awakening of the humanistic spirit was not the entire content of the Zhou idea of Mandate of Heaven. In the process of annihilating the Shang dynasty and setting up their state, the Zhou propagated the idea of the Mandate of Heaven out of practical needs. Their idea of the Mandate of Heaven was not very different from that of the Shang. From the Western Zhou on, the Zhou idea of Mandate of Heaven by no means developed in a linear way along a rational track. The intermingling of rationality and irrationality and of awakening and non-awakening remained the overall state of the Zhou intellectual superstructure after their "spiritual awakening".

  4. Water content or water activity: What rules crispy behavior in bread crust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, N.H. van; Primo-Martín, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, T. van

    2008-01-01

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity (a w) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of aw and m

  5. Water content or water activity: What rules crispy behavior in bread crust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, N.H. van; Primo-Martín, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, T. van

    2008-01-01

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity (a w) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of aw and m

  6. Water Content or Water Activity: What Rules Crispy Behavior in Bread Crust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, van N.H.; Primo-Martin, C.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    A dry crust loses its crispness when water migrates into the crust. It is not clear if it is the amount of water absorbed or the water activity (aw) that leads to a loss of crispness. The hysteresis effect observed when recording a water sorption isotherm allowed us to study the effects of aw and mo

  7. Point observations of liquid water content in natural snow – investigating methodical, spatial and temporal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Techel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Information on the amount and distribution of liquid water in the snowpack is important for forecasting wet snow avalanches and predicting melt-water run-off. Considerable spatial and temporal variations of snowpack wetness exist. Currently, available information relies mostly on point observations. Often, the snow wetness is estimated manually using a hand test. However, quantitative measures are also applied. We compare the hand test to quantitative measurements and investigate temporal and small-scale spatial aspects of the snowpack wetness. For this, the liquid water content was measured using dielectric methods, with the Snow Fork and Denoth wetness instrument in the Swiss Alps, mostly above tree-line. More than 12 000 water content measurements were observed on 30 days in 85 locations. The qualitative hand test provides an indication of snowpack wetness, although snowpack wetness is often over-estimated and quantitative water content measurements are more reliable. If the measured water content is very low, it is unclear if the snow is dry or contains small quantities of liquid water. In particular during the initial melt-phase, when the snowpack is only partially wet, it is important to consider spatial aspects when interpreting point observations. One measurement taken at a certain measurement depth may significantly deviate in 10–20% of the cases from snowpack wetness in the surrounding snow. Not surprisingly, diurnal changes in snowpack wetness are significant in layers close to the snow surface. At depth, changes were noted within the course of a day. From a single vertical profile, it was often unclear if these changes were due to the heterogeneous nature of water infiltration. Based on our observations, we propose to repeat three measurements at horizontal distances greater than 50 cm. This approach provides representative snow wetness information for horizontal distances up to 5 m. Further, we suggest a simplified classification

  8. Synergistic Effect of Selenium Addition and Water Stress on Melilotus officinalis L. Mineral Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota KOSTOPOULOU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the combined effects of selenium (Se enrichment and water stress on the accumulation of available macro- and micronutrients in Melilotus officinalis L. aerial parts. Plants of M. officinalis were subjected to three levels of Se addition (0, 1 and 3 mg Se L-1 water and to two water treatments: a full irrigation and b limited irrigation (water stress. The above ground biomass (stems and leaves was analyzed for Se, potassium (K, sodium (Na, magnesium (Mg, iron (Fe, copper (Cu, calcium (Ca, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn. Se addition differentially affected the K, Mg and Ca content of M. officinalis aerial parts, while it led to the reduction of the micronutrients Cu, Fe and Mn. Water stress resulted in the increase of K, Na, Mg, Ca and Cu, and to the decrease of the Fe, Zn and Mn content. An interaction between selenium addition and water treatment was more notable for Ca and Mg, which decreased under water stress at low Se level and for Zn and Cu, which increased under water stress at high Se level. According to our findings, Se-induced increased accumulation of some inorganic ions in the aerial parts of this species under water stress conditions could serve as a means to alleviate the adverse impact of water deficit on important metabolic processes, enhancing M. officinalis tolerance to water stress.

  9. Application of composite protective coatings on the surface of sausages with different water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tyburcy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emulsion coatings on the surface of sausages counteract weight loss during storage. Therefore they could be applied instead of synthetic foils, which are used for vacuum packaging. The aim of this study was the assessment of the properties of two emulsion coatings (with different carrageenan content applied on the surface of two Polish sausages with various water content (kabanosy and frankfurterki. Material and methods. Sausages were coated with emulsions containing gelatine, kappa-carrageenan, beeswax, lard, glycerol and water. Coated and uncoated sausages were stored for 7, 14 or 21 days at the temperature of 4-6°C. After each storage period weight losses and hardness of peeled sausages, as well as colour values (L*, a*, b* and water activity of removed coatings were determined. Results. Coated sausages incurred smaller weight loss and after similar storage periods they were characterized by lower hardness in comparison with uncoated sausages. Reducing the carrageenan content decreased the consumption of emulsion for coating. However, it did not have any impact on the barrier properties of coating. Water activity of coatings decreased during storage. Their colour values also changed. Conclusions. Irrespective of water content in the sausages, emulsion coatings effectively inhibited their weight loss during storage. The coating with lower content of carrageenan could be recommended. Instability of coatings colour during storage implies the need of adding a colorant to the composition of emulsion.  

  10. Pore-Scale Transport of Strontium During Dynamic Water Content Changes in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, W.; Kibbey, T. C. G.; Papelis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic water content changes in the unsaturated zone caused by natural and manmade processes, such as evaporation, rainfall, and irrigation, have an effect on contaminant mobility. In general, in the unsaturated zone, evaporation causes an increase in contaminant concentrations, potentially leading to sorption of contaminants on aquifer materials or precipitation of crystalline or amorphous phases. On the other hand, increase of water content may result in dissolution of precipitated phases and increased mobility of contaminants. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative model for the transport of strontium through sand under dynamic water content conditions, as a function of strontium concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Strontium was selected as a surrogate for strontium-90, a by-product of nuclear reactions. The dynamic water content was determined using an automated device for rapidly measuring the hysteretic capillary pressure—saturation relationship, followed by ambient air evaporation, and gravimetric water content measurement. Strontium concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Flow interruption experiments were conducted to determine whether equilibrium conditions existed for a given flowrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize the treated quartz sand particles and the distribution of strontium on sand grains was determined using elemental maps created by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Strontium behavior appears to be pH dependent as well as ionic strength dependent under these conditions.

  11. Passive remote sensing of the atmospheric water vapour content above land surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, B.; Bakan, S.; Fischer, J.

    The global distribution of the atmospheric water vapour content plays an important role in the weather forecast and climate research. Nowadays there exist various methods dealing with remote sensing of the atmospheric water vapour content. Unfortunately, most of them are restricted to ocean areas, since, in general, the emission of land surfaces is not known well enough. Therefore, a new method is developed which allows the detection of the atmospheric total water vapour content from aircraft or satellite with the aid of backscattered solar radiation in the near infrared above land surfaces. The Matrix-Operator-Method has been used to simulate backscattered solar radiances, including various atmospheric profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapour, and aerosols of various types, several sun zenith angles, and different types of land surfaces. From these calculations it can be concluded, that the detection of water vapour content in cloudless atmospheres is possible with an error of < 10 % even for higher aerosol contents. In addition to the theoretical results first comparisons with aircraft measurements of the backscattered solar radiances are shown. These measurements have been carried out with the aid of OVID (Optical Visible and near Infrared Detector), a new multichannel array spectrometer, in 1993.

  12. A method for canopy water content estimation for highly vegetated surfaces-shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GHULAM; Abduwasit; LI; Zhao-Liang; QIN; QiMing; TONG; QingXi; WANG; JiHua; KASIMU; Alimujiang; ZHU; Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for canopy water content (FMC) estimation for highly vegetated surfaces- shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index (SPSI) is developed using NIR, SWIR wavelengths of Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) on the basis of spectral features and distribution of surface targets with different water conditions in NIR-SWIR spectral space. The developed method is further explored with radiative transfer simulations using PROSPECT, Lillesaeter, SailH and 6S. It is evident from the results of validation derived from satellite synchronous field measurements that SPSI is highly correlated with FMC, coefficient of determination (R squared) and root mean square error are 0.79 and 26.41%. The paper concludes that SPSI has a potential in vegetation water content estimation in terms of FMC.

  13. Differential responses of plumbagin content in Plumbago zeylanica L. (Chitrak under controlled water stress treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharadi R.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted on Plumbago zeylanica L. (Chitrak under controlled water stress environment in greenhouse during the kharif season. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design with five treatments of different water stress levels i.e. control, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% and four replications. Out of five stress levels, 80% water stress has influenced root length, dry herbage, plumbagin, potassium and proline content. In control conditions the plant height, number of leaf, total leaf area, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, photosynthesis, CO2 utilization, H2O utilization and chlorophyll were found to be maximum. The impact of water stress on plumbagin content has shown increase trend with respect to different water stress levels that is maximum at 80 % and minimum at control.

  14. Spatial and temporal mapping of water content across Nafion membranes under wetting and drying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Marble, Andrew E; MacMillan, Bryce; Promislow, Keith; Martin, Jonathan; Wang, Haijiang; Balcom, Bruce J

    2008-10-01

    Water transport and water management are fundamental to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Accurate measurements of water content within and across the Nafion layer are required to elucidate water transport behavior and validate existing numerical models. We report here a direct measurement of water content profiles across a Nafion layer under wetting and drying conditions, using a novel magnetic resonance imaging methodology developed for this purpose. This method, multi-echo double half k-space spin echo single point imaging, based on a pure phase encode spin echo, is designed for high resolution 1D depth imaging of thin film samples. The method generates high resolution (drying, in addition to the steady state.

  15. Accuracy of the Water Vapour Content Measurements in the Atmosphere Using Optical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the accuracy and the errors of water vapour content measurements in the atmosphere using optical methods, especially starphotometer. After the general explanations of the used expressions for the star-magnitude observations of the water vapour absorption in section 3 the absorption model for the water vapour band will be discussed. Sections 4 and 5 give an overview on the technique to determine the model parameters both from spectroscopic laboratory and radiosonde observation data. Finally, the sections 6 and 7 are dealing with the details of the errors; that means errors of observable magnitude, of instrumental extraterrestrial magnitude, of atmospheric extinction determination and of water vapour content determination by radiosonde humidity measurements. The main conclusion is: Because of the high precision of the results the optical methods for water vapour observation are suited to validate and calibrate alternative methods (GPS, LIDAR, MICROWAVE) which are making constant progress wo...

  16. Nondestructive Measurement of Water Content and Moisture Migration of Unsaturated Red Clays in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the moisture migration mechanism of the unsaturated red clays, which are sensitive to water content change and widely distributed in South China, and then rationally use them as a filling material for highway embankments, a method to measure the water content of red clay cylinders using X-ray computed tomography (CT was proposed and verified. Then, studies on the moisture migrations in the red clays under the rainfall and ground water level were performed at different degrees of compaction. The results show that the relationship between dry density, water content, and CT value determined from X-ray CT tests can be used to nondestructively measure the water content of red clay cylinders at different migration time, which avoids the error reduced by the sample-to-sample variation. The rainfall, ground water level, and degree of compaction are factors that can significantly affect the moisture migration distance and migration rate. Some techniques, such as lowering groundwater table and increasing degree of compaction of the red clays, can be used to prevent or delay the moisture migration in highway embankments filled with red clays.

  17. THE EFFECT OF MOISTURE CONTENT OF THE WOOD ON LAYER PERFORMANCE OF WATER BORNE VARNISHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sönmez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The test panels obtained from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Eastern beech (Fagus orientalis L. were initially adjusted to have 8%, 10%, and 12% moisture content in this study. One-component semi-matte and two-component water borne varnishes were applied on the surfaces in order to investigate the effect of the type and the moisture content of the wood on the hardness and the gloss values as well as the adhesion strength of the varnishes. The hardness of the test samples was evaluated based on the standard ANS/ISO1522, the gloss based on TS.4318 EN ISO 2813, and the adhesive strength based on ASTM D-4541. The results indicated that variations in the moisture content of the wood material adversely affected the layer performance of water-borne varnishes and that the best performance was obtained for the wood with moisture contents of 8% and 10%.

  18. Magnetic method for measuring moisture content using diamagnetic characteristics of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiji, Tsukada; Yasuaki, Matsunaga; Yuta, Nakamura; Ryota, Isshiki; Kayo, Fujimoto; Kenji, Sakai; Toshihiko, Kiwa

    2017-01-01

    Moisture content measurements of rice kernels and soil are important for agriculture. Therefore, in this study, a new measurement method using the diamagnetic characteristics of water was developed for measurements of the moisture content of rice kernels and soil. The magnetic characteristics of the samples were determined using a magnetometer developed by us based on a superconducting quantum interference device. Because of the diamagnetic characteristics of water, the susceptibility of rice kernels became more negative with increasing moisture content. In the case of soil, which is a mixture of diamagnetic and ferromagnetic materials, a second-harmonic detection method using AC with DC bias magnetic field was applied to reduce the influence of the ferromagnetic signal. The intensity of the second-harmonic signal of a soil was determined to be proportional to its moisture content.

  19. Modified Liu-Carter Compression Model for Natural Clays with Various Initial Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial water content has a significant effect on the compression behaviour of reconstituted clays. This effect has to be considered in the Liu-Carter model to ensure the addition voids ratio only related to soil structure. A modified Liu-Carter compression model is proposed by introducing the empirical equations for reconstituted clays at different initial water contents into the Liu-Carter model. The proposed model is verified against the experimental results from the literature. The simulations by the proposed method are also compared with that by old method where the influence of initial water content is not considered. The results show that the predicted virgin compression curves of natural clays are similar, but the values of b and Δey may be very different.

  20. Effects of temperature treatment on X-ray sensitivity of Crepis seeds of different water contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atayan, R.R.; Avakyan, G.M.; Kagramanyan, R.S. (Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1983-04-12

    The influence of heat on the frequency of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Crepis capillaris seeds of 5.3 and 10.0% water contents was studied. Possible influence of heat via seed desiccation was considered in specially designed parallel experiments. Pre-treatment at 100/sup 0/C brings about a reduction in aberration yield and eliminates a storage injury. These effects are due to heat-induced oxygen expulsion. Pre-treatment at 60-80/sup 0/C initiates development of post-irradiation damage in seeds of 10% water content and increases storage injury in seeds of 5.3% water content. These effects are due to heat-induced seed desiccation. An increase in injury associated with post-heating is due, partly at least, to heat-induced seed desiccation.

  1. Determination of water content in clay and organic soil using microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarenko, V. V.; Nikitenkov, A. N.; Matveenko, I. A.; Molokov, V. Yu; Vasilenko, Ye S.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the techniques of soil water content determination using microwave radiation. Its practical application would allow solving the problems of resource efficiency in geotechnical survey due to reduction of energy and resource intensity of laboratory analysis as well as its acceleration by means of decreasing labour intensity and, as a result, cost reduction. The article presents a detail analysis of approaches to soil water content determination and soil drying, considers its features and application. The study in soil of different composition, typical for Western Siberia including organic and organic-mineral ones, is a peculiarity of the given article, which makes it rather topical. The article compares and analyzes the results of the investigation into soil water content, which are obtained via conventional techniques and the original one developed by the authors, consisting in microwave drying. The authors also give recommendation on microwave technique application to dry soil.

  2. Characteristic of hyaluronic acid derivative films cross-linked by polyethylene glycol of low water content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jinghua; Chen Jingtao; Xu Zheng; Gu Qisheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To test the characteristics of byaluronic acid (HA) derivative cross-linked by polyethylene glycol films of low water content. Methods: The cross-linked HA film with 200 μm thickness was got at atmospheric pressure at 25℃ for 5 d. After dried, cross-linked films of 10 mm×10 mm were weighed and immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS pH 7.45) at 37℃ for 24 h. Then the solution fraction and water content were estimated. Meanwhile, cross-linked HA derivative films were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS: pH 7.45) at 37℃ for determined time and then implanted subcutaneously in the back of white rats to test in vitro or in vivo degradation characteristic. Results and Conclusion: HA hydrogel cross-linked by polyethylene glycol with water content is as low as 60% and this kind of HA derivative has a slow degradation rate.

  3. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  4. Low sulfur content hot reducing gas production using calcium oxide desulfurization with water recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinman, J.; Mcgreal, J.E.

    1982-03-23

    A process and apparatus are claimed for producing a low sulfur content, hot reducing gas by desulfurizing hot reducing gas. This is done in the following manner; by contacting the sulfur-bearing hot reducing gas with a bed of a particulate calcium oxide desulfurizing agent to thereby produce a product gas stream and a byproduct calcium sulfide compositions recovering sulfur from the calcium sulfide composition by contacting the calcium sulfide composition with hot liquid water at a temperature and corresponding pressure sufficient to maintain steam in the system and to thereby convert the sulfide to calcium hydroxide and hydrogen sulfide and to produce a liquid water stream containing sulfur; combining the sulfur containing water stream with a fresh water stream and recycling this water stream for contacting the calcium sulfide composition. Preferably water vapor produced in the contacting step is condensed and returned to the system in the final stage of contacting the calcium sulfide composition with hot liquid water.

  5. DSC study of phase transition of anhydrous phospholipid DHPC and influence of water content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王邦宁; 谈夫

    1997-01-01

    The phase transition behavior of 1,2-di-n-heptadecanoyl phosphatidylcholme (DHPC)with and without water has been studied by use of differential scanning calorimetry It was found by experiment that the glass transition occurred at first during the first heating of a sample of DHPC without water and then the sample underwent melting as an ordinary crystal.Therefore the sample of DHPC without water was a glassy crystal However,the DHPC sample crystallizing from melt was an ordinary crystal From the relationship between the total melting enthalpy Qf of freezable water and the water content h,it was concluded that the water contained in the DHPC samples might exist in three states recognizable thermodynamically.The water in the first state was an unfreezable water It was the water bound directly with the head groups of the phospholipid,i.e.the primary hydration water Every head group might bind seven such molecules of water.The water in the second state was the secondary hydration water,us melt ing point was

  6. Sugar and inorganic anions content in mineral and spring water-based beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Maciej; Matłok, Natalia; Kaniuczak, Janina; Gorzelany, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Carbonated and non-carbonated beverages manufactured based on mineral and spring waters have been present at the Polish market shortly, and their production and sales are regularly growing. The products have become commonly known as flavoured waters. The aim of the work was to identify and assess the content of carbohydrates used for sweetening mineral and spring water-based beverages and to estimate a concentration of inorganic anions. The study was undertaken for 15 mineral and spring water-based beverages subject to an analysis contents of fructose, glucose and sucrose with the high-performance liquid chromatography method with ELSD detection) and chlorides, nitrates and sulphates contents using the ion chromatography method. A chromatographic analysis has confirmed the total contents of sugar declared by the manufacturers. The carbohydrates identified included fructose, glucose and sucrose (added sugar). Chlorides and sulphates were found in the content of all the analysed beverages while nitrates were not determined in only one of the 15 examined beverages. Mass consumption of mineral and spring water-based beverages should be considered as an important source of sugar and their excessive consumption may be disadvantageous for human health. A consumer should be informed by a manufacturer about a daily dose of sugar in a portion of a drink in per cents, and the easiest way to do it is to provide GDA marks on the label. Mineral and spring water-based beverages do not pose threats to consumer health in terms of their contents of inorganic ions: chlorides, nitrates and sulphates.

  7. Post-Fire Moss Recovery in Northern Peatlands: Separating the Effects of Species and Water Content on Moss Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul; Lukenbach, Max; Waddington, James Michael

    2016-04-01

    Wildfire is the largest disturbance affecting peatlands, where northern peat reserves are becoming increasingly vulnerable to wildfire as climate change is projected to enhance the length and severity of the fire season. However, little is known about the spatio-temporal variability of post-fire recovery in these ecosystems. High water table positions after wildfire are critical to limit atmospheric carbon losses and enable the re-establishment of keystone peatland mosses (i.e., Sphagnum). Post-fire recovery of the moss surface in Sphagnum-feathermoss peatlands, however, has been shown to be limited where moss type and burn severity interact to result in a water repellent surface. While in situ measurements of moss water repellency in peatlands has been shown to be greater for feathermoss in both a burned and unburned state in comparison to Sphagnum moss, it is difficult to separate effects of water content from species. Consequently, we carried out a drying experiment in the lab where we compared the water repellency of two dominant peatland moss species, Sphagnum and feathermoss, for several burn severity classes as well as for unburned samples. The results suggest that water repellency in moss is primarily controlled by water content, where a sharp threshold exists at gravimetric water contents (GWC) lower than ~3 g g-1. While GWC is shown to be a strong predictor of water repellency, the effect is enhanced by combustion. Based on field GWC, we show that there are significant differences in the frequency distribution of near-surface GWC between moss type and burn severity. The differences in the distributions of field GWC are related to characteristic moisture retention curves of unburned samples measured in the lab, as well as morphological differences between moss type.

  8. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Compressive Deformation and Failure of Siltstone under Different Water Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The uniaxial compression and acoustic emission (AE monitoring of siltstone specimens in the Gongchangling open-pit iron mine in Liaoning Province was conducted by evaluating the effects of three water saturation levels: dry, natural, and water-saturated. The siltstone AE characteristics were analyzed according to water content; the relationship between the AE characteristics and the growth and expansion of siltstone cracks was subsequently discussed. Research results indicated the following: siltstone specimens had distinctly different mechanical properties and AE characteristics according to water content; as the water content increased the compressive strength and elasticity modulus of specimens decreased. In the compacting phase of specimens under compression, the AE count rate of the water-saturated specimen was relatively small and the events were relatively stable. In the linear-elastic deformation phase, the AE count rate of the dry specimen increased sharply, reaching approximately 400 times/s. In the plastic yield deformation phase, the peak value of the AE count rate of the dry specimen ranged between 955 and 1,068 times/s, whereas that of the water-saturated specimen only attained a range of 635 to 782 times/s. In the failure phase, the time to reach the peak stress value of the dry specimen was increased as compared to that of the AE count rate.

  9. Azospirillum brasilense affects the antioxidant activity and leaf pigment content of Urochloa ruziziensis under water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Guilherme Bulegon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water stress leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in degradation of leaf pigments and cell death. This study aimed at assessing the oxidative enzyme activity and photosynthetic pigment content in seeds and/or leaves of Urochloa ruziziensis (syn. Brachiaria inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense under water stress. Assessments of soluble proteins, chlorophylls a and b and carotenoid contents, as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, peroxidase (POD and catalase (CAT enzymes, were conducted at the beginning of the water stress process and also under severe water stress and during plant rehydration. Seed inoculation showed a reduction in the action of SOD, under water stress, with an increase after rehydration. POD exhibited an activity greater than CAT in all the assessments, but it did not differ statistically under severe water stress. CAT activity increased under severe stress in all treatments, particularly for leaf inoculation. Chlorophyll a was slightly degraded, maintaining the levels of the irrigated control, while the chlorophyll b and carotenoid contents, in plants subjected to leaf inoculation with A. brasilense, were higher under water stress. It was concluded that the leaf inoculation of U. ruziziensis with A. brasilense makes the plant more efficient at removing reactive oxygen species and protecting chlorophyll a.

  10. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  11. Analytic expression for epithermal neutron spectra amplitudes as a function of water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Darrell

    1993-01-01

    The epithermal portion of an equilibrium neutron spectrum in a planetary body is a function of the water content of its material. The neutrons are produced at high energies but are moderated by elastic and inelastic scattering until they either are captured by surrounding nuclei or escape. We have derived an expression that explicitly shows the dependance of epithermal neutron spectra on water content. Additionally, we compared its predictions to calculations done by Boltzman transport code for infinite media for silicon, oxygen, and a possible lunar composition, and we have obtained very good agreement.

  12. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of estimated soil hydraulic parameters for simulating soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manika; Garg, Naveen Kumar; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis has been carried out for the scalar parameters (soil hydraulic parameters (SHPs)), which govern the simulation of soil water content in the unsaturated soil zone. The study involves field experiments, which were conducted in real field conditions for wheat crop in Roorkee, India under irrigated conditions. Soil samples were taken for the soil profile of 60 cm depth at an interval of 15 cm in the experimental field to determine soil water retention curves (SWRCs). These experimentally determined SWRCs were used to estimate the SHPs by least square optimization under constrained conditions. Sensitivity of the SHPs estimated by various pedotransfer functions (PTFs), that relate various easily measurable soil properties like soil texture, bulk density and organic carbon content, is compared with lab derived parameters to simulate respective soil water retention curves. Sensitivity analysis was carried out using the monte carlo simulations and the one factor at a time approach. The different sets of SHPs, along with experimentally determined saturated permeability, are then used as input parameters in physically based, root water uptake model to ascertain the uncertainties in simulating soil water content. The generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation procedure (GLUE) was subsequently used to estimate the uncertainty bounds (UB) on the model predictions. It was found that the experimentally obtained SHPs were able to simulate the soil water contents with efficiencies of 70-80% at all the depths for the three irrigation treatments. The SHPs obtained from the PTFs, performed with varying uncertainties in simulating the soil water contents. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty estimation, Pedotransfer functions, Soil hydraulic parameters, Hydrological modelling

  13. Influence of the water content and water activity on styrene degeneration by Exophiala jeanselmei in biofilters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, H.H.J. [TNO Inst. of Environmenal Sciences, Energy Research and Process Inovation, Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Delf (Netherlands); Magielsen, F.J. [TNO Inst. of Environmenal Sciences, Energy Research and Process Inovation, Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Delf (Netherlands); Doddema, H.J. [TNO Inst. of Environmenal Sciences, Energy Research and Process Inovation, Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Delf (Netherlands); Harder, W. [TNO Inst. of Environmenal Sciences, Energy Research and Process Inovation, Dept. of Environmental Biotechnology, Delf (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The performance at low water availability of styrene-degrading biofilters with the fungus Exophiala jeanselmei growing on perlite, the inert support, was investigated. E. jeanselmei degrades styrene at a water activity of 0.91-1. In biofilters, the styrene elimination capacity at a water activity of 0.91 is 5% of the maximal elimination capacity of 79 g m{sup -3} h{sup -1} (water activity 1). Application of dry air results in a rapid loss of styrene degradation activity, even at 40%-60% (w/w) water in the filter bed and at a water activity of 1. Humidification of the gas and an additional supply of water to the filter bed are necessary to maintain a high and stable styrene elimination capacity. (orig.)

  14. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  15. Vegetation water content mapping in a diverse agricultural landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Tao, Jing; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2010-05-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE'06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE'06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/m2. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy.

  16. Retrieving Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using Linear Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin XU; Binbin ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    A simple linear regression method is developed to retrieve daily averaged soil water content from diurnal variations of soil temperature measured at three or more depths. The method is applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 10, and 30 cm during 11-20 June 1995. The retrieved bulk soil water contents are compared with direct measurements for one pair of nearly collocated Mesonet and ARM stations and also compared with the retrievals of a previous method at 14 enhanced Oklahoma Mesonet stations. The results show that the current method gives more persistent retrievals than the previous method. The method is also applied to Oklahoma Mesonet soil temperature data collected at the depths of 5, 25, 60, and 75 cm from the Norman site during 20 30 July 1998 and 1-31 July 2000. The retrieved soil water contents are verified by collocated soil water content measurements with rms differences smaller than the soil water observation error (0.05 ma m-a). The retrievals are found to be moderately sensitive to random errors (±0.1 K) in the soil temperature observations and errors in the soil type specifications.

  17. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMI ALI METWALLY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metwally SA,Khalid KA, Abou-Leila BH. 2013. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 63-67. The effects of water regime on the growth, content of essential oil and proline of Calendula officinalis L. plants were investigated. Water regimes of 75% of field water capacity increased certain growth characters [i.e. plant height (cm, leaf area (cm2, flower diameter (cm and spike stem diameter] and vase life (day. Water regime promoted the accumulation of essential oil content and its main components as well as proline contents.

  18. MICROBIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECT OF SLOVAKIAN AND POLISH HONEY HAVING REGARD TO THE WATER ACTIVITY AND WATER CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Kačániová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present of this study aimed to characterize forty honeys from apiarists available in the Slovakian and Polish apiarists in respect to microbial quality. The chemical parameters as water activity and water content of each honey sample were obtained to differentiate them, because these two factors are important of microorganisms contamination. Furthermore, the antimicrobial effect against two pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus and one yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also studied. Concerning the chemical parameters, honey samples were found to meet European Legislation (EC Directive 2001/110 except for water content of four samples. Microbiologically, the commercial quality was considered good and all samples showed to be negative in respect to safety parameters. The antimicrobial activities of honey samples were tested by 10%, 25% and 50% (by mass per volume concentration. The strongest antimicrobial effect was shown by 50% honey concentration against Escherichia coli.

  19. Evaluation of free water and water activity measurements as functional alternatives to total moisture content in broiler excreta and litter samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven-Hangoor, van der E.; Rademaker, C.; Paton, N.D.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Litter moisture contents vary greatly between and within practical poultry barns. The current experiment was designed to measure the effects of 8 different dietary characteristics on litter and excreta moisture content. Additionally, free water content and water activity of the excreta and litter

  20. Enhancement of Protein and Pigment Content in Two Chlorella Species Cultivated on Industrial Process Water

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlorella vulgaris were cultivated in pre-gasified industrial process water with high concentration of ammonia representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of growth media and cultivation duration on the nutritional composition of biomass. Variations in proteins, lipid, fatty acid composition, amino acids, tocopherols, and pigments were studied. Both species grew well in industrial process water. The contents of proteins...

  1. Porous Media Matric Potential and Water Content Measurements During Parabolic Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Norikane, Joey H.; Jones, Scott B.; Steinberg, Susan L.; Levine, Howard G.; Or, Dani

    2005-01-01

    Control of water and air in the root zone of plants remains a challenge in the microgravity environment of space. Due to limited flight opportunities, research aimed at resolving microgravity porous media fluid dynamics must often be conducted on Earth. The NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight program offers an opportunity for Earth-based researchers to study physical processes in a variable gravity environment. The objectives of this study were to obtain measurements of water content and matri...

  2. Nitrate, sulphate and chloride contents in public drinking water supplies in Sicily, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco; Bonfanti, Pietro; Brusca, Lorenzo; Longo, Manfredi; Maugeri, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Water samples collected from public drinking water supplies in Sicily were analysed for electric conductivity and for their chloride, sulphate and nitrate contents. The samples were collected as uniformly as possible from throughout the Sicilian territory, with an average sampling density of about one sample for every 7,600 inhabitants. Chloride contents that ranged from 5.53 to 1,302 mg/l were correlated strongly with electric conductivity, a parameter used as a proxy for water salinity. The highest values are attributable to seawater contamination along the coasts of the island. High chloride and sulphate values attributable to evaporitic rock dissolution were found in the central part of Sicily. The nitrate concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 296 mg/l, with 31 samples (4.7% of the total) exceeding the maximum admissible concentration of 50 mg/l. Anomalous samples always came from areas of intensive agricultural usage, indicating a clear anthropogenic origin. The same parameters were also measured in bottled water sold in Sicily, and they all were within the ranges for public drinking water supplies. The calculated mean nitrate intake from consuming public water supplies (16.1 mg/l) did not differ significantly from that of bottled water (15.2 mg/l). Although the quality of public water supplies needs to be improved by eliminating those that do not comply with the current drinking water limits, at present it does not justify the high consumption of bottled water (at least for nitrate contents).

  3. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3 can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preserving pH value in the range from 5.00 to 7.00. The content of fluorides in the samples can be determined by the method of direct potentiometer, and in the case of very low concentration by standard addition method. In this paper it was analyzed the determination of fluoride ions concentration in bottled mineral waters and water from Belgrade plumbing in two Belgrade districts (Palilula and Novi Beograd and in tea, by using the fluoride selective electrode. It was determined that the content of fluoride ions in bottled mineral water significantly differs from values given on declaration, and that content of fluoride ions varies over a period of time. The content of fluoride ions in water from plumbing in two Belgrade districts at the time of analysis was significantly increased and exceeded values given in Regulation for drinking water quality. The received results from the analysis of fluorides in teas show that fluorides exist in teas in different concentrations. There are also differences between the same kinds of tea, which is noted with mint (Mentha piperitae folium, as a consequence of differences between soils where it was planted. As taking of fluorides, according to World Health Organisation recommendation (WHO, is limited in the range from 2 to 4 mg per day, it is necessary to give the content of fluorides on all products that are used in human consumption.

  4. Certification of the reference material of water content in water saturated 1-octanol by Karl Fischer coulometry, Karl Fischer volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Ma, Kang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jia; Sun, Guohua; Li, Hongmei

    2012-10-15

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) of water content are widely used in the calibration and validation of Karl Fischer coulometry and volumetry. In this study, the water content of the water saturated 1-octanol (WSO) CRM was certified by Karl Fischer coulometry, volumetry and quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (Q NMR). The water content recovery by coulometry was 99.76% with a diaphragm-less electrode and Coulomat AG anolyte. The relative bias between the coulometry and volumetry results was 0.06%. In Q NMR, the water content of WSO is traceable to the International System (SI) of units through the purity of internal standard. The relative bias of water content in WSO between Q NMR and volumetry was 0.50%. The consistency of results for these three independent methods improves the accuracy of the certification of the RM. The certified water content of the WSO CRM was 4.76% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.09%.

  5. [Progress in retrieving vegetation water content under different vegetation coverage condition based on remote sensing spectral information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; Li, Li; Yao, Feng-Mei

    2010-06-01

    The present paper reviews the progress in the methods of retrieving vegetation water content using remote sensing spectral information, including vegetation spectral reflectance information (VIR, SWIR, and NIR) to directly extract vegetation water content and establish vegetation water indices (WI), i. e. NDWI = (R860 - R1 240)/(R860 + R1 240) and PWI = R970/R900; and using radiation transfer (RT) model such as PROSPAIL to detect plant water content information. The authors analyze the method of retrieving vegetation water content under low crop coverage condition. The plant water can be estimated by using canopy physiological parameters firstly, and using vegetation indices and radiation transfer model secondly, which can eliminate soil background effect. The estimated agricultural drought and vegetation water content by using multi-angle polarized reflectance and bi-directional reflectance (BRDF) was discussed in this paper. In the end, the possible development trend of retrieval methods for plant water information under plant low coverage conditions was discussed.

  6. Effects of Water Bottle Materials and Filtration on Bisphenol A Content in Laboratory Animal Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Jenny Q T; Kentner, Amanda C; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2017-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins that are found in laboratory animal husbandry materials including cages and water bottles. Concerns about BPA exposure in humans has led to investigations that suggest physiologic health risks including disruptions to the endocrine system and CNS. However, the extent of exposure of laboratory animals to BPA in drinking water is unclear. In the first study, we compared the amount of BPA contamination in water stored in plastic bottles used in research settings with that in glass bottles. The amount of BPA that leached into water was measured across several time points ranging from 24 to 96 h by using a BPA ELISA assay. The results showed that considerable amounts of BPA (approximately 0.15 μg/L) leached from polycarbonate bottles within the first 24 h of storage. In the second study, BPA levels were measured directly from water taken from filtered compared with unfiltered taps. We observed significantly higher BPA levels in water from unfiltered taps (approximately 0.40 μg/L) compared with taps with filtration systems (approximately 0.04 μg/L). Taken together, our findings indicate that the use of different types of water bottles and water sources, combined with the use of different laboratory products (food, caging systems) between laboratories, likely contribute to decreased rigor and reproducibility in research. We suggest that researchers consider reporting the types of water bottles used and that animal care facilities educate staff regarding the importance of flushing nonfiltered water taps when filling animal water bottles.

  7. Cosmic-Ray Neutron Probe: Non-Invasive Measurement of Soil Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreda, M.; Desilets, D.; Ferre, T. P.

    2005-12-01

    Water content measurement methods have been designed primarily for either highly accurate, small scale applications (time domain reflectometry, neutron probe) or for rapid estimation over very large areas (satellite imagery), but no established technique exists for the scale intermediate to point measurement and satellite images. We are developing a novel technique for soil water determination that operates on the horizontal scale of dekameters. This scale of operation makes the method an appealing tool for both direct measurement at relevant scales and for calibration of satellite remote sensors. The method is based on the same principle that underlies conventional neutron probes: thermalization of neutrons by hydrogen atoms. The standard neutron probe works by emitting fast neutrons from a source in the instrument, and measuring the flux of neutrons that are scattered back. Our new probe uses a similar detector, but has cosmic-ray neutrons as a source. Results from a series of laboratory and field experiments show that our cosmic-ray probe is capable of measuring changes of water content resulting from irrigation or infiltration after a storm event. Our sensitivity experiments indicate that that 1% change in volumetric water content corresponds to approximately 1% change in neutron flux. Neutron intensities are sensitive to water in the upper 10-50 cm of soil and over a footprint of 10-100 m in diameter. Both the depth and the footprint decrease with increasing soil water content. Coupling neutron detectors with various shielding materials (we used cadmium and polyethylene) changes the energy sensitivity of the instrument, and thereby also the sensitivity to water content. The maximum sensitivity of the instrument to water (or hydrogen) content is achieved by placing the instrument about 20 cm below the surface or about 100-200 m above the surface (in a balloon or an aircraft). Our new method has several useful features: it is non-invasive and non

  8. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  9. Photosynthetic pigments, cell extrusion and relative leaf water content of the castor bean under silicon and salinity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferraz, Rener L. de S; Magalhães, Ivomberg D; Beltrão, Napoleão E. de M; Melo, Alberto S. de; Brito Neto, Jósé F. de; Rocha, Maria do S

    2015-01-01

    .... Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the contents of photosynthetic pigments, cell membrane extrusion and the relative water content in the leaves of the castor bean cultivar 'BRS Energia' under...

  10. Remote Estimation of Leaf and Canopy Water Content in Winter Wheat with Different Vertical Distribution of Water-Related Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishi Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the vertical distribution of gravimetric water content (GWC, relative water content (RWC, and equivalent water thickness (EWT in winter wheat during heading and early ripening stages, and evaluated the position of leaf number at which Vegetation Indexes (VIs can best retrieve canopy water-related properties of winter wheat. Results demonstrated that the vertical distribution of these properties followed a near-bell-shaped curve with the highest values at the intermediate leaf position. GWC of the top three or four leaves during the heading stage and the top two or three leaves during the early ripening stage can represent the GWC of the whole canopy, but the RWC and EWT of the whole canopy should be calculated based on the top four leaves. At leaf level, the analysis demonstrated strong relationships between EWT and VIs for the top leaf layer, but for GWCD, GWCF, and RWC, the strongest relationships with VIs were found in the intermediate leaf layers. At canopy level, VIs provided the most accurate estimation of GWCfor the top three or four leaves. Water absorption-based VIs could estimate canopy EWT of winter wheat for the top four leaves, but the suitable bands sensitive to water absorptions should be carefully selected for the studied species.

  11. Aluminum bioavailability from drinking water is very low and is not appreciably influenced by stomach contents or water hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, R A; Rhineheimer, S S; Brauer, R D; Sharma, P; Elmore, D; McNamara, P J

    2001-03-21

    The objectives were to estimate aluminum (Al) oral bioavailability under conditions that model its consumption in drinking water, and to test the hypotheses that stomach contents and co-administration of the major components of hard water affect Al absorption. Rats received intragastric 26Al in the absence and presence of food in the stomach and with or without concomitant calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) at concentrations found in hard drinking water. The use of 26Al enables the study of Al pharmacokinetics at physiological Al concentrations without interference from 27Al in the environment or the subject. 27Al was intravenously administered throughout the study. Repeated blood withdrawal enabled determination of oral 26Al bioavailability from the area under its serum concentrationxtime curve compared to serum 27Al concentration in relation to its infusion rate. Oral Al bioavailability averaged 0.28%. The presence of food in the stomach and Ca and Mg in the water that contained the orally dosed 26Al appeared to delay but not significantly alter the extent of 26Al absorption. The present and published results suggest oral bioavailability of Al from drinking water is very low, about 0.3%. The present results suggest it is independent of stomach contents and water hardness.

  12. New down-hole TDR method for deep profile soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive irrigation and salinity management both require accurate knowledge of field soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity to depths greater than the root zone depth in agricultural fields. Scientists at the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, ...

  13. Time-lapse monitoring of soil water content using electromagnetic conductivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The volumetric soil water content (VWC) is fundamental to agriculture. Unfortunately, the universally accepted thermogravimetric method is labour intensive and time-consuming to use for field-scale monitoring. Electromagnetic (EM) induction instruments have proven to be useful in mapping the spatio-...

  14. Radar vegetation indices for estimating the vegetation water content of rice and soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important biophysical parameter and has a significant role in the retrieval of soil moisture using microwave remote sensing. In this study, the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) was evaluated for estimating VWC. Analysis utilized a data set obtained using a ground-bas...

  15. Alteration of water-soluble S-100 protein content in microembolized rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada,Yasuhiro

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available The amount of S-100 protein in rat brain embolized with carbon microspheres decreased in parallel with the development of cerebral edema as judged by water content, recovering to the normal range by 24h after embolization. These results suggest the participation of S-100 protein in the permeability characterisitics of nervous system capillaries known as the blood-brain barrier.

  16. Influence of water content and drying on the physical structure of native hyaluronan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prusova, A.; Vergeldt, F.J.; Kucerik, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydration properties of semi-diluted hyaluronan were studied by means of time domain nuclear magnetic resonance. Based on the transverse proton relaxation times T2, the plasticization of hyaluronan which was precipitated by isopropylalcohol and dried in the oven have been determined at water content

  17. Release of E.coli D21g with transients in water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transients in water content are well known to mobilize microorganisms that are retained in the vadose zone. However, there is no consensus on the relative importance of drainage and imbibition events on microorganism release. To overcome this limitation, we have systematically studied the release o...

  18. Relationship Between Kernel Moisture Content and Water Activity in Different Maturity Stages of Peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    The water activity (aw) and moisture content (KMC) of individual peanut kernels representing five different maturity stages were measured during a period of late-season drought stress leading up to normal harvest time. Curves were generated describing the relationship between aw and KMC for yellow 1...

  19. Sensitivity of in-situ gamma-ray spectra to soil density and water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, A.V.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Maucec, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of sediment water content and bulk density on measurements of in-situ environmental gamma-radiation were investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulations consider a large bismuth-germanate detector in a semi-infinite geometry. The volume contributing radiation to the detector

  20. Stiffness of a granular base under optimum and saturated water contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Andrés Molina Gómez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research work addressed the comparison of the stiffness of a granular base under optimum water content and total saturation conditions.Methodology: The methodology focused in the development of an experimental program and the computation of a function, which permits to assess the elastic moduli of the material. A triaxial cell equipped by local LVDT transducers, capable of managing different stress paths, was used to measure the small-strain stiffness of a granular base under two different conditions of moisture. The material was compacted with optimum water content and subjected to a series of loading-unloading cycles under isotropic conditions. In addition, identical specimens were prepared to be saturated and the experimental procedure was repeated to obtain the moduli in these new circumstances. The moduli were assessed by a hyperbolic model, and its relationship with the confining pressure was computed.Results: The results indicated that numerical model was adjusted to the experimental results. In addition, it was found that the elastic moduli decrease 3% to 8% in conditions of total saturation versus the condition of optimum water contents. Conclusions: The small-strain stiffness in the granular base depends on the water content, and the moisture can affect the deformation in the pavement structures. 

  1. [FEATURES OF THE CONTENT OF DRINKING WATER IN THE CITY OF MAGADAN AND POPULATION HEALTH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovaya, E A; Stepanova, E M

    2016-01-01

    By methods of atom-emission and mass spectrometry with inductively bonded argon plasma there was determined the content of 25 macro- and trace elements in tap cold drinking water used by the residents of the city of Magadan for food purposes and in hair samples of 30 young male Europeans aged of 17-23 years, who are the residents, of the city of Magadan. According to our data the content of 25 elements in drinking water conforms to standards, but that content of such essential elements as Co, Cr Cu, I, Mn, Na, Se, Zn is shown to be lower than referential indices. After boiling the water the concentration of trace elements is changed. The content of Cd, Cu, K, P Pb, Zn, Ni becomes lower significantly. In healthy young men aged of 17-23 years, from the number of natives Europeoids, residents of the North there was detected deficit of Co and I (86% and 62%, respectively), lower concentrations of Ca, Mg, Se, Zn (76%, 69%, 24%, 24%, respectively). The constant use by residents of the city of Magadan of ultrafresh brackish drinking water in food aims may be the one of the main reasons of the imbalance of macro- and micronutrients in the body, characterized by features of the so-called "northern" type with a marked deficiency of basic essential elements.

  2. Impact of soil water content on landmine detection using radar and thermal infared sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S.-H.; Miller, T.W.; Tobin, H.; Borchers, B.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.; Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Land mines are a major problem in many areas of the world. In spite of the fact that many different types of land mines sensors have been developed, the detection of non-metallic land mines remains very difficult. Most landmine detection sensors are affected by soil properties such as water content,

  3. Impact of soil water content on landmine detection using radar and thermal infared sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S.-H.; Miller, T.W.; Tobin, H.; Borchers, B.; Hendrickx, J.M.H.; Lensen, H.A.; Schwering, P.B.W.

    2001-01-01

    Land mines are a major problem in many areas of the world. In spite of the fact that many different types of land mines sensors have been developed, the detection of non-metallic land mines remains very difficult. Most landmine detection sensors are affected by soil properties such as water content,

  4. A Long Term Study of the Water Content Changes in Three Types of Hydrogel Contact Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Linder 4 0 described the procedures of wet end dry state weight measurement method. In 1983 Snyder nd Koers discussed that same method and included...arid. Koers , D.M. Water Content Measurement of Hydroel Lenses--Does Technique Make a Difference? Intern Contact Lens Clin ,’ 1963;10(6):344-346

  5. Retrieval of leaf water content spanning the visible to thermal infrared spectra

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ullah, S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the entire spectra (from visible to the thermal infrared; 0.390 µm -14.0 µm) to retrieve leaf water content in a consistent manner. Narrow-band spectral indices (calculated from all possible two band...

  6. An Evaluation of Total Solar Reflectance and Spectral Band Ratioing Techniques for Estimating Soil Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginato, R. J.; Vedder, J. F.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1977-01-01

    For several days in March of 1975, reflected solar radiation measurements were obtained from smooth and rough surfaces of wet, drying, and continually dry Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona, with pyranometers located 50 cm above the ground surface and a multispectral scanner flown at a 300-m height. The simple summation of the different band radiances measured by the multispectral scanner proved equally as good as the pyranometer data for estimating surface soil water content if the multispectral scanner data were standardized with respect to the intensity of incoming solar radiation or the reflected radiance from a reference surface, such as the continually dry soil. Without this means of standardization, multispectral scanner data are most useful in a spectral band ratioing context. Our results indicated that, for the bands used, no significant information on soil water content could be obtained by band ratioing. Thus the variability in soil water content should insignificantly affect soil-type discrimination based on identification of type-specific spectral signatures. Therefore remote sensing, conducted in the 0.4- to 1.0-micron wavelength region of the solar spectrum, would seem to be much More suited to identifying crop and soil types than to estimating of soil water content.

  7. Sustainable Water Supplies:Reducing The Organic Matter Content of Potable Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Mary

    2009-07-01

    As freshwater becomes a limiting factor in sustainable development, water treatment processes which can efficiently oxidize both anthropogenic and natural sources of organic matter are becoming crucial. While many anthropogenic organic compounds found in freshwater pose a direct risk to human health, natural organic matter such as humic acids, pose an indirect risk through the production of disinfection byproducts resulting from chlorination. Removal of dissolved natural organic matter before disinfection of potable water is recommended for the production of potable water in water treatment facilities. Several promising developments in dissolved organic matter oxidation are described including hydroxyl radical, advanced oxidation processes and ferrate (VI). The feasibility of applying these processes to water treatment on a large scale is largely dependent on cost.

  8. Tissue fusion bursting pressure and the role of tissue water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezo, James; Kramer, Eric; Taylor, Kenneth; Ferguson, Virginia; Rentschler, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Tissue fusion is a complex, poorly understood process which bonds collagenous tissues together using heat and pressure. The goal of this study is to elucidate the role of hydration in bond efficacy. Hydration of porcine splenic arteries (n=30) was varied by pre-fusion treatments: 24-48 hour immersion in isotonic, hypotonic, or hypertonic baths. Treated arteries were fused in several locations using Conmed's Altrus thermal fusion device and the bursting pressure was then measured for each fused segment. Artery sections were then weighed before and after lyophilization, to quantify water content. Histology (HE, EVG staining) enabled visualization of the bonding interface. Bursting pressure was significantly greater (p=4.17 E-ll) for the hypotonic group (607.6 +/- 83.2mmHg), while no significant difference existed between the isotonic (332.6 +/- 44.7mmHg) and hypertonic (348.7 +/- 44.0mmHg) treatment groups. Total water content varied (p=8.80 E-24) from low water content in the hypertonic samples (72.5% weight +/- 0.9), to high water content in the hypotonic samples (83.1% weight +/- 1.9), while the isotonic samples contained 78.8% weight +/- 1.1. Strength differences between the treated vessels imply that bound water driven from the tissue during fusion may reveal available collagen crosslinking sites to facilitate bond formation during the fusion process. Thus when the tissue contains greater bound water volumes, more crosslinking sites may become available during fusion, leading to a stronger bond. This study provides an important step towards understanding the chemistry underlying tissue fusion and the mechanics of tissue fusion as a function of bound water within the tissue.

  9. Assessment of capacity sensors for monitoring soil water content in ecological orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrícia Prazeres Marques, Karina; Horcajo, Daniel; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2014-05-01

    Water is an important element for soil tillage and crop development. Its proper management is essential for the development of plants, by preventing excess or shortage in water application. Soil water content is affected by the soil-water-plant system and its monitoring is a required within a sustainable agriculture framework respectful with the natural environment. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of capacitive sensors in monitoring soil moisture from organic orchards. An experimental text was carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Agricultural Engineering School in the Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain). Soil samples were collected within the 0-20 cm depth layers from the university organic orchard. The samples were air dried and subsequently sieved in a 2 mm mesh sieve, removing roots and coarse fractions and keeping the fine soil. The amount of fine soil was calculated from the soil density and the soil samples were compacted to obtain the relative volume that corresponded to their density. The measurements were carried out in dry and in saturated soil and, also in samples where soil was stirring with: 150 cm³, 300 cm³ and 450 cm³ of water. A 1890 ml container was used to hold the fine soil and the soil moisture sensor ECH2O, type 10 HS (Decagon Devices, Inc.) was placed horizontally at 5 cm depth. Soil water readings were recorded on a datalogger Em5b from the same manufacturer. The results showed that the capacitive sensor has a linear response to soil moisture content. Its value was overestimated in comparison to the volumetric values and the largest errors (about 8%) were observed in the soils with high moisture contents. Overall, these results point out that the ECH2O sensor, model 10 HS, could determine with sufficient accuracy the volumetric soil water content from organic orchards although it could be further improved by "in situ" calibration.

  10. A Method for In-Situ Measurement of Stem Water Content in Trees and Shrubs Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J.; Tape, K. D.; Young, J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying vegetation water content is a critical aspect of understanding plant physiology, particularly how plants cope with drought, and ecosystem water balance. Yet, we lack a method to continuously monitor plant water content, particularly on small plants. We developed a method to continuously monitor tree and shrub water content using time domain reflectometry (TDR), a measurement technique commonly used to assess soil moisture. TDR probes were fabricated and inserted into trees and shrubs. Automated measurements were made at 30 minute intervals over several months. Calibration was performed by drying cut sections of trees and shrubs in the lab while making paired TDR and weight measurements on those samples to calculate gravimetric water content. Gravimetric water content was converted to volumetric water content to create a calibration equations relating TDR measurements to water content in Betula neoalaskana, Picea mariana, Populus tremuloides, and Salix alaxensis. Our fabricated TDR probes and our calibration equations permit continuous, non-destructive, and accurate measurements of stem water content in live trees and shrubs. These data show diurnal and seasonal patterns of water content which can be incorporated into plant physiological and hydrological models.

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  12. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Saleem, E-mail: ullah19488@itc.nl [Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Skidmore, Andrew K. [Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Naeem, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan (AWKUM), KPK (Pakistan); Schlerf, Martin [Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann (CRPGL), L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2012-10-15

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid to thermal infrared (2.5-14.0 {mu}m) spectra, based on continuous wavelet analysis. The dataset comprised 394 spectra from nine plant species, with different water contents achieved through progressive drying. To identify the spectral feature most sensitive to the variations in leaf water content, first the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) spectra were transformed into a wavelet power scalogram, and then linear relations were established between the wavelet power scalogram and leaf water content. The six individual wavelet features identified in the mid infrared yielded high correlations with leaf water content (R{sup 2} = 0.86 maximum, 0.83 minimum), as well as low RMSE (minimum 8.56%, maximum 9.27%). The combination of four wavelet features produced the most accurate model (R{sup 2} = 0.88, RMSE = 8.00%). The models were consistent in terms of accuracy estimation for both calibration and validation datasets, indicating that leaf water content can be accurately retrieved from the mid to thermal infrared domain of the electromagnetic radiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mid and thermal infrared spectra are sensitive to variation in leaf water content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous wavelet analysis detected the variation caused by leaf water content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The selected wavelet features are highly correlated with leaf water content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mid wave and thermal infrared spectra have the potential to estimate leaf water content.

  13. Phase equilibrium in a water + n-hexane system with a high water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulov, S. M.; Orakova, S. M.; Isaev, Z. A.

    2017-02-01

    The P, ρ, and T-properties of a water + n-hexane system immiscible under normal conditions are measured piezometrically in the water mole fraction range of 0.918-0.977 at 309-685 K and pressures of up to 66 MPa. Two phase transitions are observed on each isochore corresponding to phase transitions of hydrocarbon liquid into gas or the dissolution of n-hexane in water and the transition of aqueous liquid into gas. The boundaries of phase transitions and their critical parameters are determined.

  14. Evolved-Lithology Clasts in Lunar Breccias: Relating Petrogenetic Diversity to Measured Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Simon, J. J.; Ross, D. K.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the inventory and distribution of water in lunar rocks have recently begun to focus on alkali suite samples as possible water repositories, particularly the most highly evolved granitoid lithologies. Although H analyses of feldspars in these rocks have so far pointed to 'low' (less than 20 ppm) H2O contents, there is sufficient variability in the dataset (e.g., 2-20 ppm) to warrant consideration of the petrogenetic factors that may have caused some granitoid-to-intermediate rocks to be dryer or wetter than others. Given that all examples of these rocks occur as clasts in complex impact breccias, the role of impact and other factors in altering water contents established by primary igneous processes becomes a major factor. We are supporting our ongoing SIMS studies of water in evolved lunar lithologies with systematic SEM and EPMA observations. Here we report a synthesis of the observations as part of developing discriminating factors for reconstructing the thermal, crystallization and shock history of these samples as compared with their water contents.

  15. Red cabbage yield, heavy metal content, water use and soil chemical characteristics under wastewater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Talip; Sahin, Ustun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this 2-year field study was to evaluate the effects of drip irrigation with urban wastewaters reclaimed using primary (filtration) and secondary (filtration and aeration) processes on red cabbage growth and fresh yield, heavy metal content, water use and efficiency and soil chemical properties. Filtered wastewater (WW1), filtered and aerated wastewater (WW2), freshwater and filtered wastewater mix (1:1 by volume) (WW3) and freshwater (FW) were investigated as irrigation water treatments. Crop evapotranspiration decreased significantly, while water use efficiency increased under wastewater treatments compared to FW. WW1 treatment had the lowest value (474.2 mm), while FW treatments had the highest value (556.7 mm). The highest water use efficiency was found in the WW1 treatment as 8.41 kg m(-3), and there was a twofold increase with regard to the FW. Wastewater irrigation increased soil fertility and therefore red cabbage yield. WW2 treatment produced the highest total fresh yield (40.02 Mg ha(-1)). However, wastewater irrigation increased the heavy metal content in crops and soil. Cd content in red cabbage heads was above the safe limit, and WW1 treatment had the highest value (0.168 mg kg(-1)). WW3 treatment among wastewater treatments is less risky in terms of soil and crop heavy metal pollution and faecal coliform contamination. Therefore, WW3 wastewater irrigation for red cabbage could be recommended for higher yield and water efficiency with regard to freshwater irrigation.

  16. Genetic variability for iron and zinc content in common bean lines and interaction with water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, H S; Del Peloso, M J; Bassinello, P Z; Guimarães, C M; Melo, L C; Faria, L C

    2014-08-28

    The common bean is an important source of iron and zinc in humans. Increases in the contents of these minerals can combat mineral deficiencies, but these contents are influenced by environmental conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the interaction between common bean lines and water availability on iron and zinc contents (CFe and CZn, respectively), identify superior lines with stable CFe and CZn, and test for a genetic relationship between CFe and CZn. Six crop trials were performed using a randomized block design with three replications. The trials were performed during the winter sowing period for three different combinations of year and site in Brazil. For each combination, 53 lines were evaluated across two parallel trials; one trial was irrigated according to the crop requirements, and the other trial operated under a water deficit. Interaction was detected between lines and environments, and between lines and water availability for CFe and CZn. However, some lines exhibited high CFe and CZn in both conditions. Lines G 6492 and G 6490 exhibited high mean values, stability, and adaptability for both minerals. Other lines exhibited high CFe (Xamego) or CZn (Bambuí and Iapar 65). A moderate genetic correlation (0.62) between CFe and CZn was detected. Water availability during the common bean cycle had an effect on CFe and CZn; however, lines with high CFe and CZn in different conditions of water availability and environment were detected.

  17. Magnetization transfer characterization of hypertensive cardiomyopathy: significance of tissue water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, T D; Ceckler, T L; Balaban, R S

    1993-03-01

    Magnetization transfer measurements offer the potential for specific noninvasive tissue characterization. The goal of the present study was to determine if changes in magnetization transfer would accompany the myocardial remodeling that occurs with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Using 40-week spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) myocardium, T1, T2, and T1 in the presence of off-resonance irradiation (T1sat) were found to be greater compared to Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. The pseudo-first order rate constant of magnetization transfer (kfor) was less in 40-week SHR compared with WKY while the ratio of equilibrium magnetization in the presence and absence of off-resonance irradiation (MsIM0) was not different. The extent to which observed interspecies differences in tissue water content affected these parameters was investigated by dehydrating normal and hypertrophic myocardium. Significant correlations found between tissue water content and T1, T2, T1sat and kfor, but not MsIM0, suggested changes in tissue water dominated the observed interspecies differences in relaxation parameters. Thus, ventricular remodeling in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy does not alter magnetization transfer though the accompanying change in tissue water content influences water proton relaxation.

  18. Evaluation of a method to measure water content in porous media by employing ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Leonardo Sáenz Cruz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A method to measure water content in porous media, such as solis and grains, was developed as a real time nondestructive test. The method was based on piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers as a sensor system. Transmiters and receivers was developed to administrate the sensors system and ultrasonic signal. Transmiters and receivers are placed facing each other and located inside the porous media 10 cm apart. The method was evaluated in two porous meda, namely a column 30 cm coarse sand and a paddy rice variety Fedearroz 50, in order to evaluate the sensors system performance in two different porous media with different water holder capacity. Tools were developed for data acquisition, capacity of 16 analog signal, 12 bits resolution. Electronic circuits, C++ OPP programming and Matlab were used. The results showed a monotonically increment of millivolts as a response of the transducer as the water content was decreasing

  19. Thermal diffusivity of peat, sand and their mixtures at different water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdkova, Anna; Arkhangelskaya, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity of peat, sand and their mixtures at different water contents was studied using the unsteady-state method described in (Parikh et al., 1979). Volume sand content in studied samples was 0 % (pure peat), 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55 and 62 % (pure sand). Thermal diffusivity of air-dry samples varied from 0.6×10-7m2s-1 for pure peat to 7.0×10-7m2s-1 for pure sand. Adding 5 and 10 vol. % of sand didn't change the thermal diffusivity of studied mixture as compared with that of the pure air-dry peat. Adding 15 % of sand resulted in significant increase of thermal diffusivity by approximately 1.5 times: from 0.6×10-7m2s-1 to 0.9×10-7m2s-1. It means that small amounts of sand with separate sand particles distributed within the peat don't contribute much to the heat transfer through the studied media. And there is a kind of threshold between the 10 and 15 vol. % of sand, after which the continuous sandy chains are formed within the peat, which can serve as preferential paths of heat transport. Adding 20 and 30 % of sand resulted in further increase of thermal diffusivity to 1.3×10-7m2s-1 and 1.7×10-7m2s-1, which is more than two and three times greater than the initial value for pure peat. Thermal diffusivity vs. moisture content dependencies had different shapes. For sand contents of 0 to 40 vol. % the thermal diffusivity increased with water content in the whole studied range from air-dry samples to the capillary moistened ones. For pure peat the experimental curves were almost linear; the more sand was added the more pronounced became the S-shape of the curves. For sand contents of 50 % and more the curves had a pronounced maximum within the range of water contents between 0.10 and 0.25 m3m-3 and then decreased. The experimental k(θ) curves, where k is soil thermal diffusivity, θ is water content, were parameterized with a 4-parameter approximating function (Arkhangelskaya, 2009, 2014). The suggested approximation has an advantage of clear

  20. The influence of water and salt content on the thermal conductivity coefficient of red clay brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Dalia; Koniorczyk, Marcin

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments aimed at the determination of hygro-thermal properties of red clay brick containing water or salt. The main objective of the research is the determination of the relation between the apparent thermal conductivity of brick and its water or Na2SO4 in water solution content. The research is conducted using stationary technique for the dry specimens, as well as the ones containing 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% water or sodium sulphate solution. The experimental results confirm the negative influence of water or sodium sulphate solution on thermal properties of material. However we observe that the presence of Na2SO4 in pores slightly weakens this negative impact.

  1. Isolation of the combined water content and salinity effects on ERT measurement to locate the preferential flow pathways in water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindt, Naaran; Rahav, Matan; Furman, Alex; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used for measuring the dynamics of water flow in soils without disturbing the soil, and recently for identifying the preferential flow pathways that are reported to develop in water repellent soils. Since electrical resistivity is affected mainly by soil saturation and salinity, and given that in many cases salinity in the root zone reaches high values, the isolation of spatial and temporal distribution of water content or salinity in the root zone from ERT scans is a challenge. A model for transient variation of soil water content and salinity within a well-mixed soil unit was developed in the frame of this challenge. The model aims to isolate the temporal changes in water content from subsequent ERT scans. The model assumes that four stages of water dynamics occur in the root zone during an irrigation cycle: 1) Soil water content decreases by evapotranspiration - no irrigation, 2) Irrigation with saline water begins, water content increases but remains below field capacity - negligible drainage, 3) Irrigation continues and drainage starts as the water content becomes higher than field capacity, and 4) Irrigation stops, water content is higher than field capacity, and water content decreases by drainage and evapotranspiration. These four stages restart when drainage stops and water content decreases solely by evapotranspiration. The model was solved analytically and successfully applied to a series of sequential ERT scans accomplished during and between subsequent irrigation events for a soil that was rendered hydrophobic by olive trees irrigated with saline water, and a soil in a citrus orchard that was rendered hydrophobic by prolonged effluent irrigation. The suggested model helps in distinguishing between the temporal changes in water content and salinity within a given soil volume, locating the preferential plow pathways, and tracking the spatial and temporal salinity variation within the root zone during and

  2. On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

  3. Effects of tissue water content on the propagation of laser light during low-level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Shin, Sungho; Jeong, Sungho

    2015-05-01

    This work reports that the laser fluence rate inside porcine skin varied notably with the change of tissue water content under the same laser irradiation conditions. The laser fluence rate inside skin tissue samples with varying water content was measured using an optical fiber sensor, while the target was irradiated either by a low-level 635 or 830 nm laser (50 mW/cm2). It was demonstrated that the distribution of laser fluence rate inside the target is strongly affected by tissue water content and its profile is determined by the water content dependency of optical properties at the laser wavelength.

  4. Effects of tissue water content on the propagation of laser light during low-level laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Shin, Sungho; Jeong, Sungho

    2015-05-01

    This work reports that the laser fluence rate inside porcine skin varied notably with the change of tissue water content under the same laser irradiation conditions. The laser fluence rate inside skin tissue samples with varying water content was measured using an optical fiber sensor, while the target was irradiated either by a low-level 635 or 830 nm laser (50 mW/cm2). It was demonstrated that the distribution of laser fluence rate inside the target is strongly affected by tissue water content and its profile is determined by the water content dependency of optical properties at the laser wavelength.

  5. Water activity of poultry litter: Relationship to moisture content during a grow-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Mark W; McAuley, Jim; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Poultry grown on litter floors are in contact with their own waste products. The waste material needs to be carefully managed to reduce food safety risks and to provide conditions that are comfortable and safe for the birds. Water activity (Aw) is an important thermodynamic property that has been shown to be more closely related to microbial, chemical and physical properties of natural products than moisture content. In poultry litter, Aw is relevant for understanding microbial activity; litter handling and rheological properties; and relationships between in-shed relative humidity and litter moisture content. We measured the Aw of poultry litter collected throughout a meat chicken grow-out (from fresh pine shavings bedding material to day 52) and over a range of litter moisture content (10-60%). The Aw increased non-linearly from 0.71 to 1.0, and reached a value of 0.95 when litter moisture content was only 22-33%. Accumulation of manure during the grow-out reduced Aw for the same moisture content. These results are relevant for making decisions regarding litter re-use in multiple grow-outs as well as setting targets for litter moisture content to minimise odour, microbial risks and to ensure necessary litter physical conditions are maintained during a grow-out. Methods to predict Aw in poultry litter from moisture content are proposed.

  6. Fluoride content in drinking water supply in São Miguel volcanic island (Azores, Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, S; Coutinho, R; Cruz, J V

    2012-08-15

    High fluoride contents in the water supply of the city of Ponta Delgada, located in the volcanic island of São Miguel (Azores, Portugal) have been reported. Dental fluorosis in São Miguel has been identified and described in several medical surveys. The water supply in Ponta Delgada consists entirely of groundwater. A study was carried out in order to characterize the natural F-pollution of a group of springs (30) and wells (3), that are associated to active central volcanoes of a trachytic nature. Two springs known for their high content in fluoride were sampled, both located in the central volcano of Furnas. The sampled waters are cold, ranging from slightly acidic to slightly alkaline (pH range 6.53-7.60), exhibiting a low electrical conductivity (springs range 87-502 μS/cm; wells range 237-1761 μS/cm), and are mainly from the Na-HCO(3), Na-HCO(3)-Cl and Na-Cl-HCO(3) water types. Results suggest two main trends of geochemical evolution: silicate weathering, enhanced by CO(2) dilution, and seawater spraying. Fluoride contents range between 0.17 mg/L and 2 mg/L, and no seasonal variations were detected. Results in the sources of the water supply system are lower than those of the Furnas volcano, which reach 5.09 mgF/L, demonstrating the effect of F-rich gaseous emanations in this area. Instead, the higher fluoride contents in the water supply are mainly due to silicate weathering in aquifers made of more evolved volcanic rocks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Soil specific re-calibration of water content sensors for a field-scale sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Brown, David J.; Anderson, Todd; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining accurate soil moisture data from a sensor network requires sensor calibration. Soil moisture sensors are factory calibrated, but multiple site specific factors may contribute to sensor inaccuracies. Thus, sensors should be calibrated for the specific soil type and conditions in which they will be installed. Lab calibration of a large number of sensors prior to installation in a heterogeneous setting may not be feasible, and it may not reflect the actual performance of the installed sensor. We investigated a multi-step approach to retroactively re-calibrate sensor water content data from the dielectric permittivity readings obtained by sensors in the field. We used water content data collected since 2009 from a sensor network installed at 42 locations and 5 depths (210 sensors total) within the 37-ha Cook Agronomy Farm with highly variable soils located in the Palouse region of the Northwest United States. First, volumetric water content was calculated from sensor dielectric readings using three equations: (1) a factory calibration using the Topp equation; (2) a custom calibration obtained empirically from an instrumented soil in the field; and (3) a hybrid equation that combines the Topp and custom equations. Second, we used soil physical properties (particle size and bulk density) and pedotransfer functions to estimate water content at saturation, field capacity, and wilting point for each installation location and depth. We also extracted the same reference points from the sensor readings, when available. Using these reference points, we re-scaled the sensor readings, such that water content was restricted to the range of values that we would expect given the physical properties of the soil. The re-calibration accuracy was assessed with volumetric water content measurements obtained from field-sampled cores taken on multiple dates. In general, the re-calibration was most accurate when all three reference points (saturation, field capacity, and wilting

  8. An Experimental Study to the Seismoelectric Responses of Unfrozen Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Yuan, L.; Song, L.

    2014-12-01

    For many sections of the Qing-Cang railway line located in the permafrost regions, the monitoring of freeze-thaw cycling is a main mean for the railway operation as the seasons of the permafrost are the main factors that weaken the railway bed. The unfrozen water content is one of the most important parameters in the field monitoring and laboratory research of the freeze-thaw cycling of the permafrost. It has been already shown that the propagation of seismic waves inside a homogeneous porous medium induces a localized seismoelectric conversion field that moves along with the seismic waves, because of relative fluid motion in the pores. As the field is water saturation related, we initially conducted an experiment to study the seismoelectric responses varying with unfrozen water content. In the experiment, a cylinder frozen soil model which is heated gradually from bottom is set up to model a decrease temperature field, corresponding to that the unfrozen water content, from bottom to top. Then a seismic wave field is excited by a ultra acoustic transducer located on the top of the model and seismoelectric conversion responses are measured with a set of electrodes layout along the axis direction of the model with 1cm depth inside the model. At the same time, the temperature at each electrode is measured by a heat sensitive resistance near the electrode. Keeping the heating from bottom of the model, the measurement is performed at a fixed time period until the temperature of each electrode is increasing over zero degree centigrade. The experiment observations show: 1) The travel velocity of the seismoelectric signals is decreasing with increasing of temperature, or that of unfrozen water content, which also verify the flexibility of the experiment. 2) The amplitudes of the seismoelectric signals generally increase with that of temperature, corresponding to that of unfrozen water content increasing. 3) As the seimoelectric responses are measured with point

  9. Assessment of Soil Water Content in Field with Antecedent Precipitation Index and Groundwater Depth in the Yangtze River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-ping; YANG Jing-song

    2013-01-01

    To better understand soil moisture dynamics in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) and predict its variation in a simple way, a field monitoring experiment was carried out along the north branch of the Yangtze River, where seawater intrusion was strong and salt-water variation is one of the limiting factors of local agriculture. In present paper, relation between antecedent precipitation index (API) and soil water content is studied, and effects of groundwater depth on soil water content was analyzed. A relatively accurate prediction result of soil water content was reached using a neural network model. The impact analysis result showed that the variation of the API was consistent with soil water content and it displayed significant correlations with soil water content in both 20 and 50 cm soil layer, and higher correlation was observed in the layer of 20 cm. Groundwater impact analysis suggested that soil moisture was affected by the depth of groundwater, and was affected more greatly by groundwater at depth of 50 cm than that at 20 cm layer. By introducing API, groundwater depth and temperature together, a BP artificial network model was established to predict soil water content and an acceptable agreement was achieved. The model can be used for supplementing monitoring data of soil water content and predicting soil water content in shallow groundwater areas, and can provide favorable support for the research of water and salt transport in estuary area.

  10. Content and distribution of fluorine in rock, clay and water in fluorosis area Zhaotong, Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, K.; Li, H.; Feng, F. (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-04-15

    About 160 samples of coal, pyritic coal balls, coal seam gangue, clay, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin county, China to determine the fluorine content, distribution pattern and source in this fluorosis area. The study shows that the average fluorine content in the coal samples collected from 3 coal mines of the Late Permian coals in Zhenxiong and Weixin county, Zhaotong City, which are the main mining coals there, is 77.13 mg/kg. The average fluorine content coals collected form thee typical fluorosis villages in 72.56 mg/kg. Both of them are close to the world average and little low than the Chinese average. The fluorine content of drinking water is lower than 0.35 mg/L, the clay used as an additive for coal-burning and as a binfer in briquette-making by local residents has a high content of fluorine, ranging from 367-2,435 mg/kg, with the majority higher than 600 mg/kg and an average of 1,084.2 mg/kg. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Modeling the effects of water content on TiO2 nanoparticles transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloni, Ivan; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The transport of manufactured titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticles (NP) in porous media was investigated by metric scale column experiments under different water saturation and ionic strength (IS) conditions. The NP breakthrough curves showed that TiO2 NP retention on the interface between air and water (AWI) and the interface between the solid and the fluid (SWI) is insignificant for an IS equal to or smaller than 3 mM KCl. For larger IS, the retention is depending on the water content and the fluid velocity. The experiments, conducted with an IS of 5 mM KCl, showed a significantly higher retention of NP than that observed under saturated conditions and very similar experimental conditions. Water flow was simulated using the standard Richards equation. The hydrodynamic model parameters for unsaturated flow were estimated through independent drainage experiments. A new mathematical model was developed to describe TiO2 NP transport and retention on SWI and AWI. The model accounts for the variation of water content and water velocity as a function of depth and takes into account the presence of the AWI and its role as a NP collector. Comparisons with experimental data showed that the suggested modeled processes can be used to quantify the NPs retentions at the AWI and SWI. The suggested model can be used for both saturated and unsaturated conditions and for a rather large range of velocities.

  12. Advances in estimation methods of vegetation water content based on optical remote sensing techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of vegetation water content(VWC) using optical remote sensing techniques is helpful in forest fire as-sessment,agricultural drought monitoring and crop yield estimation.This paper reviews the research advances of VWC retrieval using spectral reflectance,spectral water index and radiative transfer model(RTM) methods.It also evaluates the reli-ability of VWC estimation using spectral water index from the observation data and the RTM.Focusing on two main definitions of VWC-the fuel moisture content(FMC) and the equivalent water thickness(EWT),the retrieval accuracies of FMC and EWT using vegetation water indices are analyzed.Moreover,the measured information and the dataset are used to estimate VWC,the results show there are significant correlations among three kinds of vegetation water indices(i.e.,WSI,NDⅡ,NDWI1640,WI/NDVI) and canopy FMC of winter wheat(n=45).Finally,the future development directions of VWC detection based on optical remote sensing techniques are also summarized.

  13. Survey on fluoride, bromide and chloride contents in public drinking water supplies in Sicily (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco; Brusca, Lorenzo; Longo, Manfredi

    2008-10-01

    Six hundred and sixty-seven water samples were collected from public drinking water supplies in Sicily and analysed for electric conductivity and for their Cl(-), Br(-) and F(-) contents. The samples were, as far as possible, collected evenly over the entire territory with an average sampling density of about one sample for every 7,600 inhabitants. The contents of Cl(-) and Br(-), ranging between 5.53 and 1,302 mg/l and between <0.025 and 4.76 mg/l respectively, correlated well with the electric conductivity, a parameter used as a proxy for water salinity. The highest values were found both along the NW and SE coasts, which we attributed to seawater contamination, and in the central part of Sicily, which we attributed to evaporitic rock dissolution. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.023 to 3.28 mg/l, while the highest values (only three exceeding the maximum admissible concentration of 1.5 mg/l) generally correlated either with the presence in the area of crystalline (volcanic or metamorphic) or evaporitic rocks or with contamination from hydrothermal activity. Apart from these limited cases of exceeding F(-) levels, the waters of public drinking water supplies in Sicily can be considered safe for human consumption for the analysed parameters. Some limited concern could arise from the intake of bromide-rich waters (about 3% exceeding 1 mg/l) because of the potential formation of dangerous disinfection by-products.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF CHLORIDE AND PHOSPHATE CONTENTS IN WATER OF CHILIKA LAGOON, ODISHA, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Mishra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are receiving much international attention during past few decades with the better understanding of their values and functions. Wetland science is emerging as a unique discipline encompassing the terrestrial and aquatic ecology i.e. hydrology, limnology and engineering. The quality of surface water of Chilika lagoon with respect to physico-chemical parameters was investigated. The present investigation on evaluation of water quality such as chloride and phosphate contents of Chilika Lagoon will primarily address the changing characteristics and will be a step for formulating an action plan for integrating ecological, social and economical dimensions to promote sustainable development of the lagoon. The variables that are related to pollution sources showed differences. For the study of physico-chemical properties of water, the samples were collected monthly for a period of 2 years from July 2011 to June 2013 from six different sampling stations which spread over all the ecological sectors. Collection of samples was made from the predetermined stations of the water body by holding the polythene bottle (5 L.capacity. The samples were brought to the laboratory for analysis. At the spot of the sampling sites, the temperature of water was recorded. The water samples were analyzed in the laboratory by standard methods. The water samples were then filtered and were used for the measurement. Among the stations, Rambha shows the highest chloride content i.e. 10579.3±483.3 mg/L in summer season and Rambha shows the lowest chloride value i.e. 1008.00±266.8 mg/L in summer season. Among the stations, Kalupada ghat shows the highest value of phosphate content i.e 0.534±0.22 mg/L in the winter and Barakul shows the lowest value i.e. 0.013 ±0.002 mg/L in winter season.

  15. Iodine in drinking water varies by more than 100-fold in Denmark. Importance for iodine content of infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, K M; Laurberg, P; Nohr, S; Jorgensen, A; Andersen, S

    1999-05-01

    The iodine intake level of the population is of major importance for the occurrence of thyroid disorders in an area. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the importance of drinking water iodine content for the known regional differences in iodine intake in Denmark and for the iodine content of infant formulas. Iodine in tap water obtained from 55 different locations in Denmark varied from 139 microg/l. In general the iodine content was low in Jutland (median 4.1 microg/l) with higher values on Sealand (23 microg/l) and other islands. Preparation of coffee or tea did not reduce the iodine content of tap water with a high initial iodine concentration. A statistically significant correlation was found between tap water iodine content today and the urinary iodine excretion measured in 41 towns in 1967 (r=0.68, Piodine excretion in Denmark of 43 microg/24h excluding iodine in water and a daily water intake of 1.7 l. The iodine content of infant formulas prepared by addition of demineralized water varied from 37 to 138 microg/l (median 57 microg/l, n=18). Hence the final iodine content would depend heavily on the source of water used for preparation. We found that iodine in tap water was a major determinant of regional differences in iodine intake in Denmark. Changes in water supply and possibly water purification methods may influence the population iodine intake level and the occurrence of thyroid disorders.

  16. Composite Simulation of Dynamic Water Content and Water Use Efficiency of Winter Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming; WANG

    2014-01-01

    In order to forecast the effect of climate warming on agriculture,ENWATBAL model was used to simulate evapotranspiration of winter wheat due to the change of air temperature and precipitation in the coming decades.The effect of climate warming on winter wheat yield in the future decades was speculated by the past yield and climate data in last decades,and the possible water use efficiency in the future decades was calculated.The results indicate that climate warming would increase winter wheat evapotranspiration,and decrease yield and water use efficiency of winter wheat.It shows that climate warming would intensify the water shortage in agriculture,and it is necessary to develop watersaving agriculture.

  17. Limits to life at low temperatures and at reduced water contents and water activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1978-01-01

    Liquid water is generally considered an absolute requisite for functional terrestrial life; consequently, life is expected to function only over the range of temperatures that permit its existence. These limits, however, do not apply to cell survival. Some can survive the closest attainable approach to 0/sup 0/K and some can survive the loss of over 99% of their water. The author discusses various aspects of the phenomena of cell survival at low temperatures. Included are sections on events occurring during freezing and thawing of cells, the consequences of cell dehydration, limits to cell survival, and minimum temperatures for cell growth. (ACR)

  18. A Global Perspective on Drinking-Water and Sanitation Classification: An Evaluation of Census Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiyu; Wardrop, Nicola A; Bain, Robert E S; Lin, Yanzhao; Zhang, Ce; Wright, Jim A

    2016-01-01

    Following the recent expiry of the United Nations' 2015 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), new international development agenda covering 2030 water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) targets have been proposed, which imply new demands on data sources for monitoring relevant progress. This study evaluates drinking-water and sanitation classification systems from national census questionnaire content, based upon the most recent international policy changes, to examine national population census's ability to capture drinking-water and sanitation availability, safety, accessibility, and sustainability. In total, 247 censuses from 83 low income and lower-middle income countries were assessed using a scoring system, intended to assess harmonised water supply and sanitation classification systems for each census relative to the typology needed to monitor the proposed post-2015 indicators of WASH targets. The results signal a lack of international harmonisation and standardisation in census categorisation systems, especially concerning safety, accessibility, and sustainability of services in current census content. This suggests further refinements and harmonisation of future census content may be necessary to reflect ambitions for post-2015 monitoring.

  19. A Global Perspective on Drinking-Water and Sanitation Classification: An Evaluation of Census Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyu Yu

    Full Text Available Following the recent expiry of the United Nations' 2015 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, new international development agenda covering 2030 water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH targets have been proposed, which imply new demands on data sources for monitoring relevant progress. This study evaluates drinking-water and sanitation classification systems from national census questionnaire content, based upon the most recent international policy changes, to examine national population census's ability to capture drinking-water and sanitation availability, safety, accessibility, and sustainability. In total, 247 censuses from 83 low income and lower-middle income countries were assessed using a scoring system, intended to assess harmonised water supply and sanitation classification systems for each census relative to the typology needed to monitor the proposed post-2015 indicators of WASH targets. The results signal a lack of international harmonisation and standardisation in census categorisation systems, especially concerning safety, accessibility, and sustainability of services in current census content. This suggests further refinements and harmonisation of future census content may be necessary to reflect ambitions for post-2015 monitoring.

  20. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, Jacob, E-mail: jlyoder@lanl.gov [Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, Michael W.; Espy, Michelle A. [Applied Modern Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sevanto, Sanna [Earth Systems Observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (∼1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach – keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable for bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.

  1. Effect of skin care with an emollient containing a high water content on mild uremic pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kazuyoshi; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2004-10-01

    Skin care is very important for preventing uremic pruritus. However, mild uremic pruritus has usually been treated with antihistamine and urea-containing ointments. We therefore examined the effects of an aqueous gel with higher water content. Twenty hemodialysis patients with mild pruritus who were not being treated with any emollient were divided into two groups of 10 each. Patients in one group were treated with an aqueous gel containing 80% water. This emollient was applied twice daily for 2 weeks. No emollient was applied for the next 2 weeks. The other group of patients were not treated with any emollient for the 4 weeks. Visual analog scale scores for itching in the experimental group at week 2 were significantly decreased compared with that at week 0 (3.5 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.2, P emollient was stopped. There were no significant changes in the control group during the study. It is concluded that the aqueous gel with high water content reduced itching and improved xerosis in patients with mild uremic pruritus. It is reasonable that skin care with an emollient containing a high water content is first started for hemodialysis patients with xerosis, even if they do not feel itching.

  2. Organic matter and soil water content influence on BRS 188 castor bean growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Rogerio Dantas de; Araujo, Ester Luiz de; Nascimento, Elka Costa Santos; Barros Junior, Genival [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Guerra, Hugo O. Carvallo; Chaves, Lucia Helena G. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEAg/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Agricola

    2008-07-01

    The castor bean culture has been highlighted due to the several applications of its oil, which constitutes one of the best row materials for biodiesel manufacturing, and the base for several other industrial products. The objective of the present work was to study the effect of different soil water and soil organic matter on the castor bean growth. The experiment was conducted from April to August 2006 under greenhouse conditions using a randomized block 2x4 factorial design with two soil organic mater content (5.0 g.kg{sup -1} e 25.0 g.kg{sup -1}), four levels of available water (100, 90, 80 e 70% ) and three replicates. For this, 24 plastic containers, 75 kg capacity, were used on which was grown one plant 120 days after the seedling. At regular intervals the plant height was measured and the results analyzed statistically. For the qualitative treatments (with and without organic matter) the treatment means were compared through the Tukey test. For the quantitative ones (water levels) were used regressions. The castor bean cultivar height was significantly influenced by the organic matter content only after 80 days. Castor bean height increased significantly with the soil water content after 40 days of growing. (author)

  3. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shibao; Wang, Jianhua; Pei, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the so...

  4. Influence of water content on RF and microwave dielectric behavior of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stuart O; Trabelsi, Samir

    2009-01-01

    The importance of dielectric properties of food materials is discussed with respect to their influence on the heating of materials by radio-frequency and microwave energy and their use for rapid, nondestructive sensing of quality characteristics of such materials. Data are presented graphically showing the frequency and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant and loss factor of wheat, fresh chicken breast meat, several fresh fruits, and apple juice, representing food materials with a wide range of moisture content. The influence of moisture or water content on the dielectric behavior of these materials is discussed, and that behavior is explained in terms of dipolar relaxation and ionic conduction.

  5. Using GPS Interferometric Reflectometry to estimate soil moisture and vegetation water content fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C. C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Braun, J. J.; Shreve, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    High-precision GPS receivers can be used to estimate fluctuations in near surface soil moisture, snow and vegetation water content. This approach, referred to as GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR), relates precise changes in the geometry of reflected GPS signals to observe soil moisture and snow while simultaneously using signal attenuation and diffuse scattering to infer changes in vegetative state. Previous remote sensing research has shown that microwave signals (e.g., L-band) are optimal for measuring hydrologic variables, such as soil moisture, and because GPS satellites transmit similar signals, they can be useful for sensing water in the environment. In addition, standard GPS antenna configurations that are used in NSF's Plate Boundary Observatory network yield sensing footprints of ~1000 m2. Given this sensitivity, hundreds of GPS receivers that exist in the U.S. could be used to provide near-real time estimates of soil moisture and vegetation water content for satellite validation, drought monitoring and related studies. A significant obstacle to using L-band (or similar) signals for remote sensing is differentiating the effects of soil moisture and vegetation on the retrieval of hydrologic variables. This same challenge exists when using GPS-IR data. We have established nine research sites with identical GPS and hydrologic infrastructure to study this problem. These sites span a wide range of soil, vegetation, and climate types. In addition to daily GPS and hourly soil moisture data, we have collected weekly vegetation water content samples at all sites. Our data demonstrate that soil moisture fluctuations can be estimated from GPS-IR records when vegetation water content is low (moisture and vegetation signals and quantifying errors in our retrieval algorithm.

  6. Effects of "natural" water and "added" water on prediction of moisture content and bulk density of shelled corn from microwave dielectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Samir; Nelson, Stuart O; Lewis, Micah A

    2010-01-01

    Dielectric properties of samples of shelled corn of "natural" water content and those prepared by adding water were measured in free space at microwave frequencies and 23 degrees C. Results of measurements of attenuation, phase shift and dielectric constant and loss factor at 9 GHz show no difference between the samples with "natural" water and those in which water was added artificially. Bulk densities and moisture contents predicted from calibration equations expressed in terms of dielectric properties of both natural and added water samples agreed closely, and standard errors were less than 1% for moisture content and relative error for bulk density was less than 5%.

  7. Comparison of Fatty Acid and Cholesterol Content of Pakistani Water Buffalo Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Bhanger

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Present study evaluates the milk fatty acid (FA composition and cholesterol content of two main Pakistani dairy breeds water buffaloes, i.e. Kundi and Nili-Ravi (n = 25 for each breed. The buffaloes were housed together and received the same diet. The results show a significant variation (P < 0.05 in the FA content of the two breeds. The milk fat of Kundi buffalo was found to contain significantly lower (P < 0.05 amount of saturated fatty acid content than Nili-Ravi buffaloes (66.96 and 69.09 g/100 g. Determined mean monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA contents (27.62 vs. 25.20 g/100g and total trans fatty acids (3.48 vs. 2.48 were significantly elevated (P < 0.05 in the milk fat of Kundi buffaloes. Amount of fat and conjugated linoleic acid content was higher (P = 0.04 in Kundi buffalo as compared to Nili-Ravi buffaloes (7.00 vs. 7.78 g /100g and 0.80 vs. 0.71g / 100g, while cholesterol content was not different among both breeds ranging from 8.89 – 10.24 mg /dl. Present studies show that in future genetic selection programs along with altered buffalo nutrition may be able to result in optimum levels of various fatty acids in milk.

  8. The effect of the heel- to- toe rocker shoe on moments of ankle joint and temporal-spatial of gait in female student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    masoomeh Veiskarami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rocker shoes are the most commonly prescribed external therapeutic shoe modification and are used for treatment of the ankle and midfoot problems. The aim of this study was to assesse the effects of the heel- to-toe rocker shoes on temporal-spatial and ankle joint moments in sagital and frontal plane. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-exprimental study, three-dimentional gait analysis was carried out on 20 healthy university female students with normal normal gait pattern selected by convenience sampling method. A Vicon 470 system(Oxford Metrix, U.K. consisting of 6 cameras operating at 60Hz and kistler forceplate (A9286 was used.The paired samples T test was used to statistical analysis. Results: The results showed that there is no significant change in temporal-spatial parameters while wearing this modified shoe ,but the ankle moments while wearing rocker shoes in sagittal plane was significantly less than that while wearing traditional shoes(p=0.002 but in frontal plane significantly increased(p=0.007. Conclusion: Based on the current findings the major benefits of this modified shoe appear to be significantly restricted sagital plane moments with maintenance of walking speed so the loads on ankle joint and achilles tendon reduced, but increases frontal plain moments which leads to increase of mediolateral instability of ankle joint.

  9. Estimating the Relative Water Content of Leaves in a Cotton Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Kupinski, Meredith; French, Andrew; Chipman, Russell; Dahlgren, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Remotely sensing plant canopy water status remains a long-term goal of remote sensing research. Established approaches to estimating canopy water status the Crop Water Stress Index, the Water Deficit Index and the Equivalent Water Thickness involve measurements in the thermal or reflective infrared. Here we report plant water status estimates based upon analysis of polarized visible imagery of a cotton canopy measured by ground Multi-Spectral Polarization Imager (MSPI). Such estimators potentially provide access to the plant hydrological photochemistry that manifests scattering and absorption effects in the visible spectral region.Twice during one day, +- 3 hours from solar noon, we collected polarized imagery and relative water content data on a cotton test plot located at the Arid Land Agricultural Research Center, United States Department of Agriculture, Maricopa, AZ. The test plot, a small portion of a large cotton field, contained stressed plants ready for irrigation. The evening prior to data collection we irrigated several rows of plants within the test plot. Thus, ground MSPI imagery from both morning and afternoon included cotton plants with a range of water statuses. Data analysis includes classifying the polarized imagery into sunlit reflecting, sunlit transmitting, shaded foliage and bare soil. We estimate the leaf surface reflection and interior reflection based upon the per pixel polarization and sunview directions. We compare our cotton results with our prior polarization results for corn and soybean leaves measured in the lab and corn leaves measured in the field.

  10. Quantitative modeling of the Water Footprint and Energy Content of Crop and Animal Products Consumption in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    felichesmi Selestine lyakurwa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the link between water footprint and energy content of crop and animal products is vitally important for the sound management of water resources. In this study, we developed a mathematical relationship between water content, and energy content of many crops and animal products by using an improved LCA approach (water footprint. The standard values of the water and energy contents of crops and animal products were obtained from the databases of Agricultural Research Service, UNESCO Institute for water education and Food, and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The water footprint approach was applied to analyze the relationship between water requirement and energy of content of crop and animal products, in which the uncertainty and sensitivity was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation technique that is contained in the Oracle Crystal Ball Fusion Edition v11.1.1.3.00. The results revealed significant water saving due to changes in food consumption pattern i.e. from consumption of more meat to vegetables. The production of 1kcal of crop and animal products requires about 98% of green, 4.8% blue water and 0.4% of gray water. In which changes in consumption pattern gave annual blue water saving of about 1605 Mm3 that is equivalent to 41.30m3/capita, extremely greater than the standard drinking water requirement for the whole population. Moreover, the projected results indicated, triple increase of dietary water requirement from 30.9 Mm3 in 2005 to 108 Mm3 by 2050. It was also inferred that, Tanzania has a positive virtual water balance of crop and animal products consumption with net virtual water import of 9.1 Mm3 that is the contribution margin to the water scarcity alleviation strategy. Therefore, developed relationship of water footprint and energy content of crops and animal products can be used by water resource experts for sustainable freshwater and food supply.

  11. High water contents in basaltic melt inclusions from Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, J. A.; Plank, T.; Hauri, E. H.; Melson, W. G.; Soto, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    Despite the importance of water to arc magma genesis, fractionation and eruption, few quantitative constraints exist on the water content of Arenal magmas. Early estimates, by electron microprobe sum deficit, suggested up to 4 wt% H2O in olivine-hosted basaltic andesite melt inclusions (MI) from pre-historic ET-6 tephra (Melson, 1982), and up to 7 wt% H2O in plagioclase and orthopyroxene-hosted dacitic MI from 1968 lapilli (Anderson, 1979). These high water contents are consistent with abundant hornblende phenocrysts in Arenal volcanics, but inconsistent with geochemical tracers such as 10Be and Ba/La that suggest a low flux of recycled material (and presumably water) from the subduction zone. In order to test these ideas, and provide the first direct measurements of water in mafic Arenal magmas, we have studied olivine-hosted MI from the prehistoric (900 yBP; Soto et al., 1998) ET3 tephra layer. MI range from andesitic (> 58% SiO2) to basaltic compositions ( 4 wt%) found here for Arenal basaltic MI support the semi-quantitative data from earlier studies, but are somewhat unexpected given predictions from slab tracers. Arenal water contents (4%) approach those of the 1995 eruption of Cerro Negro in Nicaragua (4-5 wt% in basaltic MI; Roggensack et al., 1997), despite the fact that the latter has Ba/La of > 100, while Arenal has Ba/La Boletin de Volcanologia; Roggensack et al. (1997) Science; Soto et al. (1998) OSIVAM; Williams-Jones et al. (2001) Journal of Volc. and Geoth. Res.

  12. Analytical techniques for determination and control of silica content in the water in thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Nataša R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrapure water with minimum contents of impurities is used for the preparation of steam in thermal power plants. More recently it has been found that the corrosion process is also influenced by sodium ions, chloride ions, and all forms of silicon in water. At higher temperatures and under high pressure the less soluble compounds of silicon are extracted, which form deposits on the walls of the boiler, the piping system and the turbine blades. Silicon is found in water in the form of different types (species which are characterized by specific physical and chemical properties. Distinctions can be made between highly reactive species of ionic (silicate anions and molecular forms (silicic acid and relatively inert types (suspended, colloidal, and polymerized silicon. The determination of various forms of silicon in water is a complex analytical task. This paper covers relevant research in the field of silicon specification analysis. Maintaining the unchanged, original composition of silicon species during various stages of analysis (sample collection, storage, and conservation has been given special attention. A large number of methods and procedures have been developed for the analysis of species of silicon, including chromatographic, spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques and combinations thereof. The techniques used for determining both the total amount and individual forms of silicon have been singled out. There is also an overview of the coupled techniques used most frequently in practice by using the methodology which involves preliminary separation of species and then individual specification. The paper offers an overview of analytical properties, advantages and disadvantages of the most representative analytical methods developed specifically for the analysis of silicon species in ultrapure water. The most important studies focusing on the silicon species in water have been highlighted and presented in detail. The determination of

  13. Fluoride content in bottled drinking waters, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices in Davangere city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thippeswamy H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The regular ingestion of fluoride lowers the prevalence of dental caries. The total daily intake of fluoride for optimal dental health should be 0.05-0.07 mg fluoride/kg body weight and to avoid the risk of dental fluorosis, the daily intake should not exceed a daily level of 0.10 mg fluoride/kg body weight. The main source of fluoride is from drinking water and other beverages. As in other countries, consumption of bottled water, juices and carbonated beverages has increased in our country. Objective: To analyze the fluoride content in bottled water, juices and carbonated soft drinks that were commonly available in Davangere city. Materials and Methods: Three samples of 10 commercially available brands of bottled drinking water, 12 fruit juices and 12 carbonated soft drinks were purchased. Bottled water and carbonated soft drinks were stored at a cold place until fluoride analysis was performed and a clear juice was prepared using different fruits without the addition of water. Then, the fluoride analysis was performed. Results: The mean and standard deviation of fluoride content of bottled water, fruit juices and carbonated soft drinks were measured, which were found to be 0.20 mg (±0.19 F/L, 0.29 mg (±0.06 F/L and 0.22 mg (±0.05 F/L, respectively. Conclusion: In viewing the results of the present study, it can be concluded that regulation of the optimal range of fluoride in bottled drinking water, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices should be drawn for the Indian scenario.

  14. Fluoride content in bottled drinking waters, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices in Davangere city, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeswamy, H M; Kumar, Nanditha; Anand, S R; Prashant, G M; Chandu, G N

    2010-01-01

    The regular ingestion of fluoride lowers the prevalence of dental caries. The total daily intake of fluoride for optimal dental health should be 0.05-0.07 mg fluoride/kg body weight and to avoid the risk of dental fluorosis, the daily intake should not exceed a daily level of 0.10 mg fluoride/kg body weight. The main source of fluoride is from drinking water and other beverages. As in other countries, consumption of bottled water, juices and carbonated beverages has increased in our country. To analyze the fluoride content in bottled water, juices and carbonated soft drinks that were commonly available in Davangere city. Three samples of 10 commercially available brands of bottled drinking water, 12 fruit juices and 12 carbonated soft drinks were purchased. Bottled water and carbonated soft drinks were stored at a cold place until fluoride analysis was performed and a clear juice was prepared using different fruits without the addition of water. Then, the fluoride analysis was performed. The mean and standard deviation of fluoride content of bottled water, fruit juices and carbonated soft drinks were measured, which were found to be 0.20 mg (±0.19) F/L, 0.29 mg (±0.06) F/L and 0.22 mg (±0.05) F/L, respectively. In viewing the results of the present study, it can be concluded that regulation of the optimal range of fluoride in bottled drinking water, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices should be drawn for the Indian scenario.

  15. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  16. Influence of drying temperature, water content, and heating rate on gelatinization of corn starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Filiz; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2006-06-14

    The gelatinization properties of starch extracted from corn and waxy corn dried at different temperatures were determined at various water contents and heating rates by differential scanning calorimetry. All gelatinization transition temperatures increased with drying temperature and heating rate. Onset and peak temperatures remained relatively constant, whereas end temperature decreased in the presence of excess water. The gelatinization enthalpy (deltaH(g)) of corn starch decreased with drying temperature at 50% water; however, it remained constant for waxy corn starch. The effects of water content and heating rate on deltaH(g) were dependent on each other. The minimum water levels required for gelatinization of starch extracted from corn dried at 20 and 100 degrees C are 21 and 29%, respectively. The activation energy (E(a)) was calculated using an Arrhenius-type equation and two first-order models; the degree of conversion (alpha) was predicted using a newly proposed model that produced good results for both E(a) and alpha.

  17. Effects of shock and Martian alteration on Tissint hydrogen isotope ratios and water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallis, L. J.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Taylor, G. J.; Stöffler, D.; Smith, C. L.; Lee, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    The Tissint meteorite, a picritic shergottite, fell to Earth in Morocco on the 18th of July 2011, and is only the fifth Martian meteorite witnessed to fall. Hydrogen isotope ratios and water contents are variable within different minerals in Tissint. Ringwoodite and shock melt pockets contain elevated D/H ratios relative to terrestrial values (δD = 761-4224‰). These high ratios in recrystallized phases indicate significant implantation of hydrogen from the D-rich Martian atmosphere during shock. In contrast, although olivine has detectable water abundances (230-485 ppm), it exhibits much lower D/H ratios (δD = +88 to -150‰), suggesting this water was not implanted from the Martian atmosphere. The minimal terrestrial weathering experienced by Tissint gives confidence that the olivine-hosted water has a Martian origin, but its high concentration indicates direct inheritance from the parental melt is improbable, especially given the low pressure of olivine crystallisation. Incorporation of a low δD crustal fluid, or deuteric alteration during crystallisation, could explain the relatively high water contents and low D/H ratios in Tissint olivine.

  18. Using measured soil water contents to estimate evapotranspiration and root water uptake profiles – a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guderle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of plants for soil water relations, and thus for ecosystem functioning, requires information about root water uptake. We evaluated four different complex water balance methods to estimate sink term patterns and evapotranspiration directly from soil moisture measurements. We tested four methods: the first two take the difference between two measurement intervals as evapotranspiration, thus neglecting vertical flow. The third uses regression on the soil water content time series and differences between day and night to account for vertical flow. The fourth accounts for vertical flow using a numerical model and iteratively solves for the sink term. Neither of those methods requires any a priori information of root distribution parameters or evapotranspiration, which is the advantage, compared to common root water uptake models. To test the methods, a synthetic experiment with numerical simulations for a grassland ecosystem was conducted. Additionally, the time series were perturbed to simulate common sensor errors, like those due to measurement precision and inaccurate sensor calibration. We tested each method for a range of measurement frequencies and applied performance criteria to evaluate the suitability of each method. In general, we show that methods accounting for vertical flow predict evapotranspiration and the sink term distribution more accurately than the simpler approaches. Under consideration of possible measurement uncertainties, the method based on regression and differentiating between day and night cycles leads to the best and most robust estimation of sink term patterns. It is thus an alternative to more complex inverse numerical methods. This study demonstrates that highly resolved (temporal and spatial soil water content measurements may be used to estimate the sink term profiles when the appropriate approach is used.

  19. Increases in soil water content after the mortality of non-native trees in oceanic island forest ecosystems are due to reduced water loss during dry periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kachi, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The control of dominant, non-native trees can alter the water balance of soils in forest ecosystems via hydrological processes, which results in changes in soil water environments. To test this idea, we evaluated the effects of the mortality of an invasive tree, Casuarina equisetifolia Forst., on the water content of surface soils on the Ogasawara Islands, subtropical islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, using a manipulative herbicide experiment. Temporal changes in volumetric water content of surface soils at 6 cm depth at sites where all trees of C. equisetifolia were killed by herbicide were compared with those of adjacent control sites before and after their mortality with consideration of the amount of precipitation. In addition, the rate of decrease in the soil water content during dry periods and the rate of increase in the soil water content during rainfall periods were compared between herbicide and control sites. Soil water content at sites treated with herbicide was significantly higher after treatment than soil water content at control sites during the same period. Differences between initial and minimum values of soil water content at the herbicide sites during the drying events were significantly lower than the corresponding differences in the control quadrats. During rainfall periods, both initial and maximum values of soil water contents in the herbicided quadrats were higher, and differences between the maximum and initial values did not differ between the herbicided and control quadrats. Our results indicated that the mortality of non-native trees from forest ecosystems increased water content of surface soils, due primarily to a slower rate of decrease in soil water content during dry periods.

  20. Measurement of density and water content of soil using photon multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertek, C.; Haselberger, N.

    1984-11-01

    A quantitative measure of density and of water content in soil was determined by photon multiple scattering following sample irradiation by a 0.7 mCi 137Cs source. Counting was effected using a stabilized single channel scintillation detector and counter system in the differential mode. Scattered photons of 80 keV energy were measured using a 20 keV window. The moving source method was applied to find the density of soil and count rate ratios of dry soil to wet soil. Independent calibrations were applied for the moisture measurements. Four curves were obtained for the soil density range of 0.5-1.5 g/cm 3 by using soil standards of 2.6, 7.0, 10.6 and 16.1 wt.% water content. Direct influence of photons was measured by blocking the direct path of photons to the detector by shielding both the Cs source and the detector.

  1. High Water Content Material Based on Ba-Bearing Sulphoaluminate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jun; CHENG Xin; LU Lingchao; HUANG Shifeng; YE Zhengmao

    2005-01-01

    A new type of high water content material which is made up of two pastes is prepared, one is made from lime and gypsum, and another is based on Ba-bearing stdphoaluminate cement. It has excellent properties such as slow single paste solidifing,fast double pastes solidifing,fast coagulating and hardening, high early strength, good suspension property at high W/C ratio and low cost. Meanwhile, the properties and hydration mechanism of the material were analyzed by using XRD , DTA- TG and SEM. The hydrated products of new type of high water content material are Ba-bearing ettringite, BaSO4 , aluminum gel and C-S-H gel.

  2. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Saleem; Skidmore, Andrew K; Naeem, Mohammad; Schlerf, Martin

    2012-10-15

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid to thermal infrared (2.5-14.0 μm) spectra, based on continuous wavelet analysis. The dataset comprised 394 spectra from nine plant species, with different water contents achieved through progressive drying. To identify the spectral feature most sensitive to the variations in leaf water content, first the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) spectra were transformed into a wavelet power scalogram, and then linear relations were established between the wavelet power scalogram and leaf water content. The six individual wavelet features identified in the mid infrared yielded high correlations with leaf water content (R(2)=0.86 maximum, 0.83 minimum), as well as low RMSE (minimum 8.56%, maximum 9.27%). The combination of four wavelet features produced the most accurate model (R(2)=0.88, RMSE=8.00%). The models were consistent in terms of accuracy estimation for both calibration and validation datasets, indicating that leaf water content can be accurately retrieved from the mid to thermal infrared domain of the electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Multiscale features including water content of polymer-induced kaolinite floc structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sugandha

    Despite their many uses, fine clay particles such as kaolinite are a nuisance in management of tailings in various industries such as the oil sands and phosphate processing industry. The effective flocculation, sedimentation, and consolidation of these fine particles are a major challenge. In industries, polymers are added to tailings suspension to facilitate formation and eventual sedimentation of flocs. The structure of floc and the water entrapped within the floc determine floc behavior and settling characteristics. The quantification of water entrapped within the kaolinite flocs has not been reported before. The information on kaolinite floc size and shape is also limited due to the challenges in experimental procedures for these delicate structures. In this thesis research, operating conditions for kaolinite flocculation were determined and a suitable polymer was chosen by settling experiments. Further investigation of the floc formed was done in suspended state as well as in sedimented state. The flocs were analyzed for their size, shape, water content, and microstructure. A pool of analytical techniques like the Particle Vision & Measurement (PVM), Dynamic Image Analysis (DIA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution X-ray Microtomography (HRXMT), and image processing software like Fiji, Medical Image Processing Analysis & Visualization (MIPAV), and Drishti were used. The analysis of suspended flocs by PVM and DIA revealed a mean floc size of about 225 microm for high molecular weight, 5% anionic polyacrylamide-induced flocs. The low molecular weight, 70% cationic polymer-induced flocs were found to be smaller in size (145 microm). DIA was used to analyze the flocs at different solid concentration. It was found that the increase in solid concentration leads to increase in floc size. Floc circularity was also analyzed by using both these methods. Most flocs were irregular in shape with circularity ranging between 0.2-0.3. However, the circularity

  4. Development of titania nanotube arrays: The roles of water content and annealing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratnawati, E-mail: rnwt63@yahoo.co.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Institut Teknologi Indonesia, Tangerang Selatan 15320 (Indonesia); Gunlazuardi, Jarnuzi, E-mail: jarnuzi@ui.ac.id [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Science, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Slamet, E-mail: slamet@che.ui.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia)

    2015-06-15

    The effect of water content in the electrolyte solution during annealing process in the synthesis and modification of titania nanotube arrays (TNTAs) by anodic oxidation process has been investigated. Variations in annealing technique that leading to some specific properties of the TNTAs produced have been examined. Doped-TNTAs were obtained by the in-situ anodic oxidation method in glycerol containing fluoride solution followed by annealing to induce crystallization. FESEM and SEM results indicated that TNTAs with inner diameters of 49–80 nm, wall thicknesses from 28 to 42 nm and lengths from 1407 to 1570 nm were synthesized. At water content of 25 v% in the electrolyte solution, self-organized with vertical, ordered of TNTAs with relatively uniform diameter was observed. Suitable morphology of TNTAs such as well developed tubes, vertically oriented, highly ordered, long with optimal diameter and wall thickness of TNTAs could suppress recombination of electrons–holes and, therefore, increase photoelectrochemical properties. Annealing with H{sub 2}/Ar is found to be efficient for introducing dopant C and N into the lattice of TNTAs to form Ti–O–C and N–Ti–O (FTIR analysis). Therefore, the reducing band gap can be obtained (UV–Vis DRS analysis). Annealing under H{sub 2}/Ar of as-synt TNTAs with water content of 25 v% in the electrolyte solution produced anatase phase (XRD analysis) and showed optimal condition in producing the highest photocurrent density. - Highlights: • Water content of 25 v%, annealing with 20% H{sub 2} produced highest photocurrent of TNTAs. • Vertically oriented, long with optimal wall thickness of TNTAs increase photocurrent. • Annealing with H{sub 2}/Ar plays an effective role in reducing the band gap.

  5. Soil penetration resistance in a rhodic eutrudox affected by machinery traffic and soil water content.

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes,Moacir T. de; Debiasi,Henrique; Julio C. Franchini; Silva,Vanderlei R. da

    2013-01-01

    Soil compaction caused by machinery traffic reduces crop yields. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of intensive traffic, and the soil water content, on the soil penetration resistance (PR) of a Rhodic Eutrudox (Distroferric Red Latosol, Brazilian Classification), managed under no-tillage (NT). The experiment consisted of six treatments: NT with recent chiseling, NT without additional compaction, and NT with additional compaction by 4, 8, 10 and 20 passes of a harvester with a weight of...

  6. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  7. Root cortical senescence decreases root respiration, nutrient content, and radial water and nutrient transport in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Hannah M; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Postma, Johannes A; Brown, Kathleen M; Lücke, Andreas; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2017-02-06

    The functional implications of root cortical senescence (RCS) are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that RCS in barley: (1) reduces the respiration and nutrient content of root tissue; (2) decreases radial water and nutrient transport; (3) is accompanied by increased suberization to protect the stele. Genetic variation for RCS exists between modern germplasm and landraces. Nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency increased the rate of RCS. Maximal RCS, defined as the disappearance of the entire root cortex, reduced root nitrogen content by 66%, phosphorus content by 63%, and respiration by 87% compared to root segments with no RCS. Roots with maximal RCS had 90%, 92%, and 84% less radial water, nitrate, and phosphorus transport, respectively compared to segments with no RCS. The onset of RCS coincided with 30% greater aliphatic suberin in the endodermis. These results support the hypothesis that RCS reduces root carbon and nutrient costs and may therefore have adaptive significance for soil resource acquisition. By reducing root respiration and nutrient content, RCS could permit greater root growth, soil resource acquisition, and resource allocation to other plant processes. RCS merits investigation as a trait for improving the performance of barley, wheat, triticale, and rye under edaphic stress.

  8. ROBUST hot wire probe efficiency for total water content measurements in glaciated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Delphine; Lilie, Lyle; Weber, Marc; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2017-04-01

    During the two High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC, Dezitter et al. 2013)/High Ice Water Content (HIWC, Strapp et al., 2016a) international flight campaigns that investigated deep convection in the tropics, the French Falcon 20 research aircraft was equipped with two different devices measuring the Total Water Content (TWC): - the IKP-2 (Isokinetic Probe, Davison et al. 2008, 2016), - and the hot wire ROBUST probe (Strapp et al. 2008; Grandin et al. 2014). The IKP-2 probe is an evaporator that has been specifically designed to measure high ice water content (Strapp et al. 2016b) with a collection efficiency near unity. It has undergone extensive performance assessment in liquid and glaciated conditions in several wind tunnels. The Robust probe was initially developed by Science Engineering Associates to estimate high ice water content in a high speed wind tunnel, in harsh conditions where other hot-wires had been observed to suffer failures. It was known at the outset that, like other hot-wire TWC probes, it would measure only a quasi-constant fraction of the true ice water content. Early wind tunnel and flight experience with the ROBUST probe revealed that this fraction was the order of 40% for ice crystals. During the HAIC/HIWC campaigns (Leroy et al. 2016, 2017), supercooled liquid water conditions were documented according to a detailed analysis of a Rosemount Ice detector (RICE) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) measurements, and were found to be rare. Thus, the HAIC/HIWC dataset represents a unique opportunity to study in more detail the ROBUST efficiency in glaciated conditions, using the IKP-2 values as a comparative reference. Comparison of IKP-2 and ROBUST measurements will show that the ROBUST behavior differs between low (below 1.5 g/m3) and high (above 2 g/m3) ice content conditions and is also sensitive to temperature. The sensitivity of the ROBUST collection efficiency to ice particles size could also be explored as optical imaging probes were part of the

  9. Modification of stool's water content in constipated infants: management with an adapted infant formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Marina M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constipation is a common occurrence in formula-fed infants. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the impact of a formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium, in compliance with the official regulations, on stool water content, as well as a parental assessment of constipation. Materials and methods Thirty healthy term-born, formula-fed infants, aged 4-10 weeks, with functional constipation were included. All infants were full-term and fed standard formula. Exclusion criteria were preterm and/or low birth weight, organic constipation, being breast fed or fed a formula specially designed to treat constipation. Stool composition was measured by near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA and parents answered questions about crying associated with defecation and stool consistency at baseline and after two weeks of the adapted formula. Results After 2 weeks of the adapted formula, stool water content increased from 71 +/- 8.1% to 84 +/- 5.9%, (p Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that an adapted formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium increases stool water content and improves symptoms of constipation in term-born, formula-fed infants. A larger randomized placebo-controlled trial is indicated.

  10. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    (organic matter, clay, silt, fine and coarse sand), variably included in the model depending on the pF value. The volumetric content of a particular soil particle size fraction was included in the model if it was assumed to contribute to the pore size fraction still occupied with water at the given p......F value. Hereby, the Xw*-model implicitly assumes that a given particle size fraction creates an analogue pore size fraction and, also, is based on the validity of the well-known capillary law equation relating equivalent drained pore size to the soil-water matric potential. The Xw*-model was found...... and clay). It performed reasonably well for the dry-end (above a pF value of 2.0; pF = log(|Ψ|), where Ψ is the matric potential in cm), but did not do as well closer to saturated conditions. The Xw*-model gives the volumetric water content as a function of volumetric content of particle size fractions...

  11. Application of Wenner Configuration to Estimate Soil Water Content in Pine Plantations on Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the mean value of surface soil water content rapidly, accurately, and nonintrusively, field investigations on soil electrical resistivity (SER) with the Yokogawa 324400 earth resistivity meter and the surface (0-150 cm) soil water content (SWC) with time domain reflectometry (TDR), together with the abiotic factors including soil texture, structure,and salinity concentrations were conducted in the Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) plantations on a sandy land. The measurement of SER was based on the 4-probe Wenner configuration method. Relationships between the values of SWC and SER were obtained based on analysis of the abiotic factors of the research site, which play a key role in affecting the soil electrical resistivity. Results indicate that the SER meter could be used to estimate the mean value of SWC in the Mongolian pine plantations on the sandy land during the growing seasons. The bulky nature of the equipment simplified the cumbersome measurements of soil water content with the general methods. It must be noted that the Wenner configuration method could only provide the mean values of the SWC, and the soil texture, structure,temperature, and solute concentrations influenced the SER and further affected the estimation of the SWC by the SER meter. Therefore, the results of this study could be applied on a sandy land during the growing seasons only. However,the SWC of other soil types also may be obtained according to the individual soil types using the procedures of this study.

  12. Predicting subgrid variability of soil water content from basic soil information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Vanderborght, J.; Schuh, M.; Priesack, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of unresolved soil water content variability within model grid cells (i.e., subgrid variability) is important for accurate predictions of land-surface energy and hydrologic fluxes. Here we derived a closed-form expression to describe how soil water content variability depends on mean soil water content (σθ()) using stochastic analysis of 1-D unsaturated gravitational flow based on the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model. A sensitivity analysis showed that the n parameter strongly influenced both the shape and magnitude of the maximum of σθ(). The closed-form expression was used to predict σθ() for eight data sets with varying soil texture using VGM parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions that rely on available soil information. Generally, there was good agreement between observed and predicted σθ() despite the obvious simplifications that were used to derive the closed-form expression. Furthermore, the novel closed-form expression was successfully used to inversely estimate the variability of hydraulic properties from observed σθ() data.

  13. Long-term trends of metal content and water quality in the Belaya River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashchevskaia, Tatiana; Motovilov, Yuri

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research is to identify the spatiotemporal regularities of iron, copper and zinc contents in the streams of the Belaya River basin. The Belaya River is situated in the South Ural region and it is one of the biggest tributary in the Volga River basin with catchment area of 142 000 km2. More than sixty years the diverse economic activities are carried out in the Belaya River basin, the intensity of this activity is characterized by high temporal variability. The leading industries in the region are metallurgy, oil production, petroleum processing, chemistry and petro chemistry, mechanical engineering, power industry. The dynamics of human activities in the catchment and intra and inter-annual changes in the water quality were analyzed for the period 1969-2007 years. Inter-annual dynamics of the metal content in the river waters was identified on the basis of the long-term hydrological monitoring statistics at the 32 sites. It was found that the dynamics of intensity of economic activities in the Belaya River basin was the cause statistically significant changes in the metal content of the river network. Statistically homogeneous time intervals have been set for each monitoring site. Within these time intervals there were obtained averaged reliable quantitative estimations of water quality. Calculations showed that the content of iron, copper and zinc did not change during the analyzed period at the sites, located in the mountain and foothill parts of the basin. At other sites, located on the plains areas of the Belaya River Basin and in the areas of functioning of large industrial facilities, metal content varies. A period of increased concentrations of metals is since the second half of 1970 until the end of the 1990s. From the end of 1990 to 2007 the average metal content for a long-term period in the river waters is reduced in comparison with the previous period: iron - to 7.4 times, copper - to 6.7 times, zinc - to 15 times. As a result, by the

  14. Effects of vine water status on dimethyl sulfur potential, ammonium, and amino acid contents in Grenache Noir grapes (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Royer Dupré, N; Schneider, R; Payan, J C; Salançon, E; Razungles, A

    2014-04-02

    We studied the effect of vine water status on the dimethyl sulfur potential (DMSP), ammonium, and amino acid contents of the berry during the maturation of Grenache Noir grapes. Water deficit increased the accumulation of amino acids in berries and favored yeast assimilable amino nitrogen. Similarly, ammonium content was higher in berries from vines subjected to moderate water deficit. DMSP content followed the same trend as yeast assimilable amino acid content, with higher concentrations observed in the berries of vines subjected to water deficit. The high DMSP and yeast assimilable nitrogen contents of musts from vines subjected to water deficit resulted in a better preservation of DMSP during winemaking. The wines produced from these musts had a higher DMSP level and would therefore probably have a higher aroma shelf life, because the DMSP determines the rate of release of dimethyl sulfur during wine storage, and this compound enhances fruity notes.

  15. Simulation of Soil Water Content Variability in a Heavy Clay Soil under Contrasting Soil Managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, A.; Vanderlinden, K.; Martínez, G.; Espejo, A. J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is a key variable for numerous physical, chemical and biological processes that take place at or near the soil surface. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of SWC at the field scale is of prime importance for implementing efficient measurement strategies in applications. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal variation of gravimetric SWC in a heavy clay soil, in a wheat-sunflower-legume rotation under conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) using a simple water balance model. An experimental field in SW Spain, where conventional (CT) and no-till (NT) management of a heavy clay soil are being compared since 1983, was sampled for gravimetric SWC on 38 occasions during 2008 and 2009. Topsoil clay content across the six plots was on average 55%, with a standard deviation of 2.7%. The soil profile was sampled at 54 locations, evenly distributed over the three CT and NT plots, at depths of 0-10, 25-35, and 55-65 cm. Topsoil water retention curves (SWRC) were determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples from each of the 54 locations. A weather station recorded daily precipitation and evapotranspiration, as calculated by the Penman-Monteith FAO equation. The water balance was calculated using the Thornthwaite-Mather model with a daily time step. Three parameters, water holding capacity, and water evaporation corrector coefficients for each of the two years, were inversely estimated at the 54 SWC observation points and probability density functions were identified. Spatial variability of SWC was estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, and simulated and observed variability were compared. This Monte Carlo scheme, using a simple water balance model with only three parameters, was found to be useful for evaluating the influence of soil management on the variability of SWC in heavy clay soils.

  16. Effects of carbon dioxide, water supply, and seasonality on terpene content and emission by Rosmarinus officinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penuelas, J.; Llusia, J. [Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. plants were grown under carbon dioxide concentrations of 350 and 700 {mu}mol (atmospheric CO{sub 2} and elevated CO{sub 2}) and under two levels of irrigation (high water and low water) from October 1, 1994 to May 31, 1996. Elevated CO{sub 2} led on increasingly larger monthly growth rates than the atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments. The increase was 9.5% in spring 1995, 23% in summer 1995, and 53% in spring 1996 in the high-water treatments, whereas in low-water treatments the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} was constrained until the second year spring, when there was a 47% increase. The terpene concentrations was slightly larger in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatments than in atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments and reached a maximum 37% difference in spring 1996. There was no significant effect of water treatment, likely as a result of a mild low water treatment for a Mediterranean plant. Terpene concentrations increased throughout the period of study, indicating possible age effects. The most abundant terpenes were {alpha}-pinene, cineole, camphor, borneol, and verbenone, which represented about 75% of the total. No significant differences were found in the terpene composition of the plants in the different treatments or seasons. The emission of volatile terpenes was much larger in spring (about 75 {mu}g/dry wt/hr) than in autumn (about 10 {mu}g/dry wt/hr), partly because of higher temperature and partly because of seasonal effect, but no significant differences was found because of CO{sub 2} or water treatment. The main terpene emitted was {alpha}-pinene, which represented about 50% of the total. There was no clear correlation between content and emission, either quantitatively or qualitatively. More volatile terpenes were proportionally more important in the total emission than in total content and in autumn than in spring.

  17. Temperature Buffer Test. Measurements of water content and density of the excavated buffer material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    TBT (Temperature Buffer Test) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at understanding and modeling the thermo-hydromechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test was carried out at the - 420 m level in Aespoe HRL in a 8 meters deep and 1.76 m diameter deposition hole, with two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter), surrounded by a MX-80 bentonite buffer and a confining plug on top anchored with 9 rods. It was installed during spring 2003. The bentonite around upper heater was removed during the period October - December 2009 and the buffer around the lower heater was removed during January - Mars 2010. During dismantling of the buffer, samples were taken on which analyses were made. This report describes the work with the deteroemoeination of the water content and the density of the taken samples. Most of the samples were taken from the buffer by core drilling from the upper surface of each installed bentonite block. The cores had a diameter of about 50 mm and a maximum length equal to the original height of the bentonite blocks (about 500 mm). The water content of the buffer was determined by drying a sample at a temperature of 105 deg C for 24 h and the bulk density was determined by weighing a sample both in the air and immerged in paraffin oil with known density. The water content, dry density, degree of saturation and void ratio of the buffer were then plotted. The plots show that all parts of the buffer had taken up water and the degree of saturation of the buffer varied between 90 - 100%. Large variation in the dry density of the buffer was also observed.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of water content across the Nafion membrane in an operational PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Martin, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Haijiang; Promislow, Keith; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2008-08-01

    Water management is critical to optimize the operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. At present, numerical models are employed to guide water management in such fuel cells. Accurate measurements of water content variation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are required to validate these models and to optimize fuel cell behavior. We report a direct water content measurement across the Nafion membrane in an operational polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, employing double half k-space spin echo single point imaging techniques. The MRI measurements with T2 mapping were undertaken with a parallel plate resonator to avoid the effects of RF screening. The parallel plate resonator employs the electrodes inherent to the fuel cell to create a resonant circuit at RF frequencies for MR excitation and detection, while still operating as a conventional fuel cell at DC. Three stages of fuel cell operation were investigated: activation, operation and dehydration. Each profile was acquired in 6 min, with 6 μm nominal resolution and a SNR of better than 15.

  19. Water content and porosity effect on hydrogen radiolytic yields of geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupin, Frédéric; Dannoux-Papin, Adeline; Ngono Ravache, Yvette; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of geopolymers under irradiation is a topic that has not been thoroughly investigated so far. However, if geopolymers are considered to be used as radioactive waste embedding matrices, their chemical and mechanical stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen production must be demonstrated. For that purpose, a particular focus is put on water radiolysis. Various formulations of geopolymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays (60Co source) or 95 MeV/amu 36Ar18+ ions beams and the hydrogen production has been quantified. This paper presents the results of radiolytic gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. A correlation between geopolymers nature, water content on the one side, and the hydrogen radiolytic yield (G(H2)) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For both types of irradiations, a strong influence of the water content on the hydrogen radiolytic yield G(H2) is evidenced. The geopolymers porosity effect has been only highlighted under γ-rays irradiation.

  20. Polyphenol Content and Antioxidant Capacity of Herbal Tea from Vietnamese Water Hyssop (Bacopa monnieri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phan-Tai Huan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable process to produce herbal tea from Vietnamese water hyssop (Bacopa monnieri has been conducted. The product can be used as traditional Ayuvedic medicinal herb. In this study, factors affecting drying process have been investigated including temperature ranging from 60 to 80°C, material thickness from 0.18 to 0.54 g/cm2 and air velocity from 0.5 to 1.5 m/s. Total polyphenols and soluble solid contents were observed during the process. Antioxidant capacity of raw and dried water hyssop have been also evaluated. The optimum result showed that at temperature of 60°C, material thickness of 0.18 g/cm2 and air velocity of 1.5 m/s, polyphenols content and total soluble solids in final herbal tea were found at 15.13 mg/g gallic acid equivalent and 4.00%. With saponins concentrations of 0.53% and 0.50%, the IC50 values of 3.94 µg/ml and 4.45 µg/ml were found in the raw and dried water hyssop tea, respectively. It’s required to dry water hyssop at optimum condition in 180 minutes and chop materials into 1mm lengths before being used as herbal tea.

  1. Influence of the water content in protoplanetary discs on planet migration and formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsch, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    The temperature and density profiles of protoplanetary discs depend crucially on the mass fraction of micrometre-sized dust grains and on their chemical composition. A larger abundance of micrometre-sized grains leads to an overall heating of the disc, so that the water ice line moves further away from the star. An increase in the water fraction inside the disc, maintaining a fixed dust abundance, increases the temperature in the icy regions of the disc and lowers the temperature in the inner regions. Discs with a larger silicate fraction have the opposite effect. Here we explore the consequence of the dust composition and abundance for the formation and migration of planets. We find that discs with low water content can only sustain outwards migration for planets up to 4 Earth masses, while outwards migration in discs with a larger water content persists up to 8 Earth masses in the late stages of the disc evolution. Icy planetary cores that do not reach run-away gas accretion can thus migrate to orbits close...

  2. Modeling shoot water contents in high-elevation Picea rubens during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, R L; Friedland, A J; Macdonald, V N

    1992-12-01

    During the winter of 1990-1991, a meteorological tower was established at an 880-m elevation site within the spruce-fir zone on Mt. Moosilauke, New Hampshire, USA. Hourly means of air, needle and trunk temperatures, wind velocity, relative humidity and solar radiation were recorded. On a weekly basis, shoots that had elongated during the preceding growing season were collected from four red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees and their relative water contents (RWC) determined. Cuticular resistances of needles from these shoots were measured four times during the winter.Measured meteorological parameters were used in a previously developed model to simulate changes in red spruce shoot RWC during the winter. The modeled results were compared to measured shoot RWCs. The predictive power of the model was improved when it was modified to include measured values of cuticular resistance and needle and trunk temperatures. The new version of the model accurately predicted RWC from late December 1990 to the beginning of April 1991, after which spring recharge appeared to occur. We conclude that water lost from foliage was easily replaced by stored reserves and that uptake of water by the roots was not required to maintain an adequate foliar water content during the winter.

  3. Characterization of Volume F Trash from Four Recent STS Missions: Weights, Categorization, Water Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Richard F.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; McCoy, LaShelle E.; Roberts, Michael S.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The fate of space-generated solid wastes, including trash, for future missions is under consideration by NASA. Several potential treatment options are under consideration and active technology development. Potential fates for space-generated solid wastes are: Storage without treatment; storage after treatment(s) including volume reduction, water recovery, sterilization, and recovery plus recycling of waste materials. Recycling might be important for partial or full closure scenarios because of the prohibitive costs associated with resupply of consumable materials. For this study, we determined the composition of trash returned from four recent STS missions. The trash material was 'Volume F' trash and other trash, in large zip-lock bags, that accompanied the Volume F trash. This is the first of two submitted papers on these wastes. This one will cover trash content, weight and water content. The other will report on the microbial Characterization of this trash. STS trash was usually made available within 2 days of landing at KSC. The Volume F bag was weighed, opened and the contents were catalogued and placed into one of the following categories: food waste (and containers), drink containers, personal hygiene items - including EVA maximum absorbent garments (MAGs)and Elbow packs (daily toilet wipes, etc), paper, and packaging materials - plastic firm and duct tape. Trash generation rates for the four STS missions: Total wet trash was 0.602 plus or minus 0.089 kg(sub wet) crew(sup -1) d(sup -1) containing about 25% water at 0.154 plus or minus 0.030 kg(sub water) crew(sup -1) d(sup -1) (avg plus or minus stdev). Cataloguing by category: personal hygiene wastes accounted for 50% of the total trash and 69% of the total water for the four missions; drink items were 16% of total weight and 16% water; food wastes were 22% of total weight and 15% of the water; office waste and plastic film were 2% and 11% of the total waste and did not contain any water. The results can be

  4. Effects of Soil Water Content on Cotton Root Growth and Distribution Under Mulched Drip Irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-tang; CHEN Hu; WANG Jing; MENG Xiao-bin; CHEN Fu-hong

    2009-01-01

    The relation between soil water content and the growth of cotton root was studied for the scheme of field water and cotton yield under mulched drip irrigation.Based on the field experiments,three treatments of soil water content were conducted with 90%θf,75%θf,and 60%θf (θf is field water capacity).Cotton roots and root-shoot ratio were studied with digging method,and the soil moisture was observed with TDR (time domain reflector),and cotton yield was measured.The results indicated that the growth of cotton root accorded with Logistic growth curve in the three treatments,the cotton root grew quickly and its weight was very high under 75%θf because of the suitable soil water condition,while grew slowly and its weight was lower under 90%θf due to water moisture beyond the suitable condition,and the root weight was in between under 60%θf.For the three water treatments,the cotton root weight decreased with soil depth,and decreased more significantly in deeper soil layer with the soil moisture increasing.And the ratio of cotton root weight in 0-30 cm soil layer to the total root weight was the highest under 75%θf.The cotton root system was distributed mainly in the soil of narrow row and wide row mulched with plastic film,and little in the soil outside plastic film.The weight of cotton root was the highest in the soil of narrow row or wide row mulched with plastic film under 75%θf.Root-shoot ratio decreased with the soil moisture increasing.The soil water content affected cotton yields,and cotton yield was the highest under 75%θf.The higher soil moisture level is unfavorable to the growth of cotton root system and yield of cotton under mulched drip irrigation.

  5. Influence of soil organic matter contents on soil water characteristics of forests on east slope of Gongga Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao-hua; WANG Zhen-jian; LIU Zi-ting; HUANG Ai-min; TANG Qing-xin; He Yu-rong

    2007-01-01

    By testing soil organic matter (SOM) contents, soil water contents (SWC) within low suctions, and saturated infiltration rates of samples taken from east slope of Gongga Mountain of China, the enhancive effects of SOM contents on SWC within low suctions and saturated infiltration rates were quantified. The simulated functions might be applied on regional experience forest-hydrology model. The improving function of protecting forest floor and increasing SOM contents on forest ecosystem hydrological effects were also embodied.

  6. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: Metal contents of four selected rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xiang [Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Patteristonkatu 1, FIN-50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Tibet University, No. 36 Jiangsu Lu, Lhasa, T.A.R. 850000 (China)], E-mail: xiang.huang@uku.fi; Sillanpaeae, Mika [Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Patteristonkatu 1, FIN-50100 Mikkeli (Finland)], E-mail: mika.sillanpaa@uku.fi; Duo Bu [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Tibet University, No. 36 Jiangsu Lu, Lhasa, T.A.R. 850000 (China)], E-mail: pudorr@yahoo.com.cn; Gjessing, Egil T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033, Oslo 0315 (Norway)], E-mail: egil.gjessing@kjemi.uio.no

    2008-11-15

    The water used by 85% of the Asian population originates in Tibetan Plateau. During April and May of 2006, water samples were collected from four major Asian rivers in the Plateau (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) and analyzed for Cu, Pb, Zn, Ag, Mo, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Li, Mn, Al, Fe, Mg and Hg. The results showed that elements such as Mg were rather high in Tibetan rivers, giving a mean electrical conductance of 36 mS/m. In a few locations, the results also showed relatively high concentrations of Al and Fe (>1 mg/L). However, the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, and Cr were generally low. Contamination with Pb was identified at a few locations in the Salween and Ni at a few sites in the Yangtze River. - For the first time, total dissolved metal contents in source water of four major Asian rivers were evaluated at the same time.

  7. Effect of soil water content on spatial distribution of root exudates and mucilage in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Water and nutrients are expected to become the major factors limiting food production. Plant roots employ various mechanisms to increase the access to these limited soil resources. Low molecular root exudates released into the rhizosphere increase nutrient availability, while mucilage improves water availability under low moisture conditions. However, studies on the spatial distribution and quantification of exudates in soil are scarce. Our aim was therefore to quantify and visualize root exudates and mucilage distribution around growing roots using neutron radiography and 14C imaging at different levels of water stress. Maize plants were grown in rhizotrons filled with a silty soil and were exposed to varying soil conditions, from optimal to dry. Mucilage distribution around the roots was estimated from the profiles of water content in the rhizosphere - note that mucilage increases the soil water content. The profiles of water content around different root types and root ages were measured with neutron radiography. Rhizosphere extension was approx. 0.7 mm and did not differ between wet and dry treatments. However, water content (i.e. mucilage concentration) in the rhizosphere of plants grown in dry soils was higher than for plants grown under optimal conditions. This effect was particularly pronounced near the tips of lateral roots. The higher water contents near the root are explained as the water retained by mucilage. 14C imaging of root after 14CO2 labeling of shoots (Pausch and Kuzyakov 2011) was used to estimate the distribution of all rhizodeposits. Two days after labelling, 14C distribution was measured using phosphor-imaging. To quantify 14C in the rhizosphere a calibration was carried out by adding given amounts of 14C-glucose to soil. Plants grown in wet soil transported a higher percentage of 14C to the roots (14Croot/14Cshoot), compared to plants grown under dry conditions (46 vs. 36 %). However, the percentage of 14C allocated from roots to

  8. Water content determination of soil surface in an intensive apple orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riczu, Péter; Nagy, Gábor; Tamás, János

    2015-04-01

    Currently in Hungary, less than 100,000 hectares of orchards can be found, from which cultivation of apple is one of the most dominant ones. Production of marketable horticulture products can be difficult without employing advanced and high quality horticulture practices, which, in turn, depends on appropriate management and irrigation systems, basically. The got out water amount depend on climatic, edafic factors and the water demand of plants as well. The soil water content can be determined by traditional and modern methods. In order to define soil moisture content, gravimetry measurement is one of the most accurate methods, but it is time consuming and sometimes soil sampling and given results are in different times. Today, IT provides the farmers such tools, like global positioning system (GPS), geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS). These tools develop in a great integration rapidly. RS methods are ideal to survey larger area quick and accurate. Laser scanning is a novel technique which analyses a real-world or object environment to collect structural and spectral data. In order to obtain soil moisture information, the Leica ScanStation C10 terrestrial 3D laser scanner was used on an intensive apple orchard on the Study and Regional Research Farm of the University of Debrecen, near Pallag. Previously, soil samples from the study area with different moisture content were used as reference points. Based on the return intensity values of the laser scanner can be distinguished the different moisture content areas of soil surface. Nevertheless, the error of laser distance echo were examined and statistically evaluated. This research was realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4. A/2-11-1-2012-0001 "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and operating an inland student and researcher personal support system". The project was subsidized by the European Union and co-financed by the European Social Fund.

  9. [Arsenic contents in soil, water, and crops in an e-waste disposal area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chun-xia; Yin, Xue-bin; Song, Jing; Li, Chen-xi; Qian, Wei; Zhao, Qi-guo; Luo, Yong-ming

    2008-06-01

    In order to study whether disposing electronic wastes and secondary metal smelting could cause an arsenic pollution in the environment or not, Luqiao town, Taizhou City, Zhejiang Province was selected as a study area. The main purpose of this paper was to characterize arsenic contents in the local environment, including waters, sediments, soils and rice, and to assess the potential risk to humans. Additionally, the arsenic spatial distribution property and arsenic uptake-translocation rule in soil-rice system were also studied. The results showed that the average arsenic levels in the surface water and the groundwater were 8.26 microg/L and 18.52 microg/L, respectively, which did not exceed the limiting value of Chinese Environment Standards class III . Whereas,some groundwater exceeded the recommended standard by the WHO for drinking water (10 microg/L). The arsenic (on average 7.11 mg/kg) in paddy soils and arsenic (on average 6.17 mg/kg) in the vegetable garden soils were lower than the value recommended by the National Standard (level I). The average arsenic contents in brown rice and husks were 165.1 microg/kg and 144.2 microg/kg, which was also lower than the Chinese Foods Quality Standard. The arsenic contents between the corresponding soils-rice and husks-brown rice showed significantly positive correlations. By comparison, the arsenic contents of soils and husks collected around electroplating were relatively higher than most of other pollutant sources, indicating the electroplating may lead accumulation of arsenic in the paddy soil-rice system.

  10. Experimental dehydration of natural obsidian and estimation of DH2O at low water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon, A.; Zhang, Y.; Stolper, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Water diffusion experiments were carried out by dehydrating rhyolitic obsidian from Valles Caldera (New Mexico, USA) at 510-980 degrees C. The starting glass wafers contained approximately 0.114 wt% total water, lower than any glasses previously investigated for water diffusion. Weight loss due to dehydration was measured as a function of experiment duration, which permits determination of mean bulk water diffusivity, mean Dw. These diffusivities are in the range of 2.6 to 18 X 10(-14) m2/s and can be fit with the following Arrhenius equation: ln mean Dw (m2/s) = -(25.10 +/- 1.29) - (46,480 +/- 11,400) (J/mol) / RT, except for two replicate runs at 510 degrees C which give mean Dw values much lower than that defined by the above equation. When interpreted according to a model of water speciation in which molecular H2O is the diffusing species with concentration-independent diffusivity while OH units do not contribute to the transport but react to provide H2O, the data (except for the 510 degrees C data) are in agreement with extrapolation from previous results and hence extend the previous data base and provide a test of the applicability of the model to very low water contents. Mean bulk water diffusivities are about two orders of magnitude less than molecular H2O diffusivities because the fraction of molecular H2O out of total water is very small at 0.114 wt% total water and less. The 510 degrees C experimental results can be interpreted as due to slow kinetics of OH to H2O interconversion at low temperatures.

  11. MONITORING OF PHOSPHORUS CONTENT IN “WATER-PARTICULATE MATERIALS-BOTTOM SEDIMENTS SYSTEM” FOR RIVER PRUT

    OpenAIRE

    VASILE RUSU; LARISA POSTOLACHI

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of phosphorus content in “water-particulatematerials-bottom sediments system” for river Prut. Seasonal and spatialdynamics of phosphorus forms in water, particulate materials and bottomsediments of river Prut was elucidated. The scheme for determination ofphosphorus forms in water and particulate materials according to World HealthOrganization classification was evaluated. Additionally, this scheme was tested forestimation of phosphorus content in bottom sediments. The supplemented...

  12. Influence of water content on hardening and handling of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Aberg, Jonas; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Handling of calcium phosphate cements is difficult, where problems often arise during mixing, transferring to syringes, and subsequent injection. Via the use of premixed cements the risk of handling complications is reduced. However, for premixed cements to work in a clinical situation the setting time needs to be improved. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the addition of water on the properties of premixed cement. Monetite-forming premixed cements with small amounts of added water (less than 6.8 wt.%) were prepared and the influence on injectability, working time, setting time and mechanical strength was evaluated. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of water had significant influence on the properties of the premixed cement. With the addition of just 1.7 wt.% water, the force needed to extrude the cement from a syringe was reduced from 107 (±15) N to 39 (±9) N, the compression strength was almost doubled, and the setting time decreased from 29 (±4) min to 19 (±2) min, while the working time remained 5 to 6h. This study demonstrates the importance of controlling the water content in premixed cement pastes and how water can be used to improve the properties of premixed cements.

  13. Influence of packaging and conditions of storaging on content of mineral water Guber-Srebrenica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Dragana D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral waters are found in nature in greater depths most often in reduction conditions, so after surfacing their content alters in contact with oxygen, which is caused by oxidation of certain components. Due to this, efforts were made to make these waters more stabile so they could be used after certain time. This work monitors the stability of Guber (Argentaria-Srebrenica water exposed to light and with addition of ascorbic acid. The methods of analysis and the parameters analyzed are: gravimetric (SO2-4, suspended solids, total dry residue at 180°C, conductometry (electric conductivity, volumetric (Al3+, spectrometric (SiO2 and atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, K+, Ca2+, Na+ i Cu2+. Obtained results of water analysis, after retaining water in PET (polyethylentereftalate and glass bottles, in certain time intervals, show that significant changes of concentration of Fe2+, Al3+, K+, Ca2+, pH value and electric conductivity occurred. Concentration of iron Fe2+ has been slightly changed after 120 days, in sample stabilized with 0,2 g ascorbic acid, while concentrations of Al and K+ were changing the same as without adding of stabilizer. Samples of water in glass packaging without added stabilizer are less stable compared to samples which were retained in PET packaging.

  14. [Fluoride content of bottled natural mineral waters in Spain and prevention of dental caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Francisco; Vitoria, Isidro; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel; Armijo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of fluoride in natural mineral waters marketed in Spain in order to prevent tooth decay without the risk of causing dental fluorosis Descriptive and cross-sectional study during 2012. Natural mineral waters marketed in Spain. Three bottles with different bottling dates of 109 natural mineral waters (97 Spanish and 12 imported brands). Determination of fluoride by ion chromatography Median fluoride concentrations of the natural mineral waters bottled in Spain was 0.22 (range 0.00-4.16; interquartile range:0.37). Most samples (61 brands, 62%) contained less than 0.3mg/L. There are 19 Spanish brands with more than 0.6 mg/L. The median level in imported brands was 0.35 (range 0.10-1.21; interquartile range: 0.23). Only 28 of the 109 brands examined (25.6%) specified the fluoride content on the label. Good correlation was observed between the concentrations indicated and those determined. Fluoride concentrations in natural mineral waters showed high variation. Given the growing consumption of natural mineral waters in Spain, this type of information is important to make proper use of fluoride in the primary prevention of dental caries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Water contents and deformation mechanism in ductile shear zone of middle crust along the Red River fault in southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we measured water contents of quartz and feldspar for four thin sections of felsic mylonite and two thin sections of banded granitic gneiss col- lected from a ductile shear zone of middle crust along the Red Rivers-Ailaoshan active fault. The ab- sorbance spectra and peak position suggest that water in quartz and feldspar of granitic gneiss and felsic mylonite occurs mainly as hydroxyl in crystal defect, but also contains inclusion water and grain boundary water. The water contents of minerals were calculated based on the absorbance spectra. Water content of feldspar in granitic gneiss is 0.05 wt%-0.15 wt%, and that of quartz 0.03 wt%-0.09 wt%. Water content of feldspar ribbon and quartz ribbon in felsic mylonite is 0.095 wt%-0.32 wt%, and those of fine-grained feldspar and quartz are 0.004 wt%-0.052 wt%. These data show that the water content of weakly deformed feldspar and quartz ribbons is much higher than that of strongly deformed fine-grained feldspar and quartz. This suggests that strong shear deformation leads to breakage of the structures of constitutional water, inclusion and grain boundary water in feldspar and quartz, and most of water in minerals of mylonite is released to the upper layer in the crust.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations of metal content and water quality in the Belaya River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashchevskaia, T. B.; Motovilov, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research is to identify the spatiotemporal regularities of iron, copper and zinc contents dynamics in the streams of the Belaya River basin. The Belaya River is situated in the South Ural region and is one of the biggest tributary in the Volga River basin with catchment area of 142 000 km2. More than sixty years the diverse economic activities are carried out in the Belaya River basin, the intensity of this activity is characterized by high temporal variability. The leading industries in the region are oil, mining, petroleum processing, chemistry and petro chemistry, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, power industry. The dynamics of human activities in the catchment and intra and inter-annual changes in the water quality are analyzed for the period 1969-2007 years. Inter-annual dynamics of the metal content in the river waters was identified on the basis of the long-term hydrological monitoring statistics at the 32 sites. It was found that the dynamics of intensity of economic activities in the Belaya River basin is the cause statistically significant changes in the metal content of the river network. Statistically homogeneous time intervals have been set for each monitoring site. Within these time intervals there were obtained averaged reliable quantitative estimations of water quality. Empirical probability distributions of iron, copper and zinc concentrations for various phases of the water regime in all investigated monitoring sites were approximated by Pearson type III curves and the averages of the concentration values, the coefficient of variation and asymmetry, as well as the values of the concentrations of metal in the range of 1-95% of frequency were estimated. It was found that by the end of the test period, the average long-term concentrations for iron and copper exceed MAC for fishery use, for zinc become smaller MAC in many streams of Belaya River basin. Acknowledgements. The work was financially supported by the Russian Foundation

  17. Crust recycling induced compositional-temporal-spatial variations of Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Liu, Yongsheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Zong, Keqing; Hu, Zhaochu; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Lian

    2017-03-01

    It has been advocated that the stagnant Pacific slab within the mantle transition zone played a critical role in the genesis of the Cenozoic basalts in the eastern part of the North China Craton (NCC); however, it is not clear whether this recycled oceanic crust contributed to the chemical makeup of the Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO, the central zone of the NCC). Here, we show that Cenozoic basalts from the TNCO are featured by low CaO contents, high TiO2 and FeOT contents and high Fe/Mn and Zn/Fe ratios, indicating a mantle source of pyroxenite. Temporally, these basalts evolved from alkali basalts of Late Eocene-Oligocene age to coexisting alkali and tholeiitic basalts of Late Miocene-Quaternary age. Spatially, their isotopic and chemical compositions vary symmetrically from the center to both the north and the south sides along the TNCO, i.e., SiO2 contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase, FeOT contents and 143Nd/144Nd, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb ratios decrease. The estimated average melting pressure of the TNCO tholeiitic basalts ( 3 GPa) agrees well with the present lithosphere thickness beneath the north region of the TNCO ( 90-120 km). The temporal and spatial chemical variations of Cenozoic basalts in the TNCO suggest that the recycled oceanic crust in the mantle of the TNCO is mainly related to the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate and the northward subduction of the Tethyan ocean plate. The westward subduction of Pacific slab may not have contributed much than previously thought.

  18. Valorization of MSWI bottom ash for biogas desulfurization: Influence of biogas water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontseré Obis, Marta; Germain, Patrick; Troesch, Olivier; Spillemaecker, Michel; Benbelkacem, Hassen

    2017-02-01

    In this study an alternative valorization of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) Bottom Ash (BA) for H2S elimination from landfill biogas was evaluated. Emphasis was given to the influence of water content in biogas on H2S removal efficiency by BA. A small-scale pilot was developed and implemented in a landfill site located in France. A new biogas analyzer was used and allowed real-time continuous measurement of CH4, CO2, O2, H2S and H2O in raw and treated biogas. The H2S removal efficiency of bottom ash was evaluated for different inlet biogas humidities: from 4 to 24gwater/m(3). The biogas water content was found to greatly affect bottom ash efficiency regarding H2S removal. With humid inlet biogas the H2S removal was almost 3 times higher than with a dry inlet biogas. Best removal capacity obtained was 56gH2S/kgdryBA. A humid inlet biogas allows to conserve the bottom ash moisture content for a maximum H2S retention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deuterium content of water from wells and perennial springs, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J.D.; Veronda, Guida; Smith, G.I.; Friedman, Irving; Martin, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The areal distribution of the concentrations of the stable isotopes deuterium and oxygen-18 in ground water in southeastern California is depicted and evaluated in this report. The deuterium content of about 300 ground-water samples and the oxygen-18 content of 101 of these samples are presented. Thirty-two of the samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1977–78 as part of a study to determine the mineral and brine potential of playa lakes in selected basins in southeastern California. Most of the remaining samples were collected during the winters and springs of 1981 and 1982 as part of the Climate Change Program of the Geological Survey. Selected additional samples were collected through 1986. Stable-isotope data from three previous studies also have been included. These data are for 19 samples from the Coso thermal area east of the southern Sierra Nevada (Fournier and Thompson, 1980, tables 1,2), 5 samples from areas in Nevada just east of Death Valley (Winograd and Friedman, 1972, table 1), and 9 samples from the Imperial Valley (Coplen, 1971, table 1). Also presented for comparison are weighted averages of deuterium content of recent precipitation collected for this report at 32 stations over the 7-year period from April 1982 to April 1989 (Irving Friedman and G.I. Smith, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 1989).

  20. MONITORING OF PHOSPHORUS CONTENT IN “WATER-PARTICULATE MATERIALS-BOTTOM SEDIMENTS SYSTEM” FOR RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASILE RUSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of phosphorus content in “water-particulatematerials-bottom sediments system” for river Prut. Seasonal and spatialdynamics of phosphorus forms in water, particulate materials and bottomsediments of river Prut was elucidated. The scheme for determination ofphosphorus forms in water and particulate materials according to World HealthOrganization classification was evaluated. Additionally, this scheme was tested forestimation of phosphorus content in bottom sediments. The supplemented schemeallows the analysis of the phosphorus forms for the entirely system “water –particulate materials – bottom sediments”, extending possibilities for interpretationof phosphorus dynamics in natural waters.

  1. The Atmospheric Water Vapor Content in Fennoscandia Measured by GPS 1996- 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgered, G.; Nilsson, T.; Ning, T.; Johansson, J.

    2008-12-01

    We have used 10 years of ground-based GPS data to estimate time series of the water vapor content above each one of 33 GPS receiver sites in Finland and Sweden. Although a 10 year period is much too short to search for climate change we use the data set to assess the stability and consistency of the linear trend of the water vapor content that can be estimated from the data. The linear trends in the integrated water vapor content range from -0.2 to +1.0 kg m-2 decade-1. As one may expect we find different systematic patterns for summer and winter data. The formal uncertainty of these trends, taking the temporal correlation of the variability about the estimated model into account, are of the order of 0.4 kg m-2 decade-1. Mostly, this uncertainty is due to the natural short-term variability in the water vapor content, while the formal uncertainties in the GPS measurements have only a small impact on the trend errors. The overall goal for the possible use of GPS data in climate research is to determine to which extent these independent data can be used to discriminate between different climate models --- both in terms of absolute values as well as long term trends --- thereby improving the quality of the models and increasing the probability to produce realistic scenarios of the future climate. It seems reasonable to assume that such applications will require uncertainties of less than 0.1 kg m-2 decade-1. In addition to GPS also additional global navigational satellite systems (GNSS), such as the European Galileo and the finalization of the Russian GLONASS, can be used in the future. This will significantly improve the spatial sampling of the atmosphere, and also reduce the relative influence of orbit errors for individual satellites. On the other hand such changes can introduce new systematic effects in the estimated water vapor time series and care must be taken in order to understand and correct for such effects.

  2. Estimating spatial variations in soil water content from electrical conductivity surveys across semiarid Mediterranean agrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki, Insaf; Jaiez, Zeineb; Jacob, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is an important driver for number of soil, water and energy fluxes at different temporal and spatial scales. The non-invasive electromagnetic induction sensor, such as EM38, that measures the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa), has been widely used to infer spatial and temporal patterns of soil properties. The objective of this study has been to explore the opportunity for estimating and mapping the soil water content (SWC) based on in-situ data collected in different fields and during dry and wet soil conditions in a hilly landscape. The experiment was carried out during two campaigns under dry and wet conditions to represent the major soil association, land use and topographic attributes at the cultivated semiarid Mediterranean Lebna catchment, northeastern Tunisia. The temporal evolution of SWC is a dry-wet-dry pattern. Gravimetric soil water content sampling and ECa measured with EM38 (Geonics Ltd., Ontario, Canada) surveys have been performed simultaneously. ECa measurements, geo-referenced with GPS, were collected raising the EM38 to sample at various depths of the soil. The EM38 was placed in both horizontal and vertical dipole modes on a PVC stand 150 cm above the soil surface. The number of investigated points varied between n=70 in February to n=38 in October 2012. Results showed that different SWC related to the soil spatial variability and lead to differences in ECa averaged values and a substantial changes in the ECa as SWC changed. The relationship between SWC an ECa in a separate vertical and horizontal mode using all possible sets of surveys was tested with linear regression. The correlation coefficient between ECa and SWC for the horizontal mode was lower than the vertical mode. Coefficients of determination of linear regressions between SWC in 0-100 cm soil depth and ECa in the vertical mode were, r²=0.74, in February 2013, r²=0.52 in October 2012. The lowest correlations were found in horizontal mode when SWC

  3. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  4. A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor for deep soil water content and bulk EC

    Science.gov (United States)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) TDR sensor was invented and the design optimized through a combination of electromagnetic modeling and several rounds of prototyping and testing in air, water, mixtures of water and ethylene glycol, sand, and silty clay loam soils over a range of water contents and ...

  5. Systematized Water content Calculation in Cartilage Using T1-mapping MR Estimations. Design of a Mathematical Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Ramirez Garcia-Luna, Jose Luis; Rahbek, Ole

    Background Water is present in all human body. Healthy tissues encompass an intricate balance of water inside cells and extracellular matrix. Disease can cause this relation to be altered. It has been published that MR technology is able to measure water content, but no quantitative method has be...

  6. Temporal-spatial distribution of archaeological sites in the Nihewan-Huliu Basin during the Paleolithic-Neolithic and Iron Age in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. X.; Wang, X. Y.; Yang, R. X.; Li, X. Z.; Zhang, W.

    2016-11-01

    The Nihewan-Huliu Basin is one of the great regions of human evolution, located in geographical transition zone. This study reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of archaeological sites based on the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) data, and analyses the changes for four periods (Paleolithic-Neolithic transition, Neolithic Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age). These sites expanded from the Sanggan River to the Huliu River and from the central and lower Huliu River to its upper reaches. The population and cultural development in the Nihewan Basin gradually lagged behind the Huliu River Baisin after the Paleolithic-Neolithic transition Age, because of the environmental impacts. The results may aid the understanding and study of the cultural heritage and civilization evolution in northern China.

  7. Temporal-spatial parameters of gait: reference data of normal subjects from Chinese adults%中国正常成人步行时空参数分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李香平; 舒彬; 顾小红; 蒋宛凌; 吕琳

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To research temporal-spatial parameters characteristics of gait of Chinese normal adults to provide reference for gait analysis in clinic.Method: A total of 365 healthy adults were divided into 10 groups according to their ages and gender: 20-29 years group, 30-39 years group, 40-49 years group, 50-59 years group and 60-75 years group. All the subjects received gait analysis with the gait mat (a gait analysis system) which could provide temporal-spatial parameters: velocity, step length, stride length, step time, swing time, stance time and single support time and double support time etc. Height and weight of the subjects were also been measured.Result: The men walked faster than women except 30-39 and 60-75 years groups(P<0.05). The velocity decreased with age in both genders and started to decrease after 50 years old for both men and women (P<0.01). The step lengths of men were longer than that of women(/J<0.05), and it started to decrease after 50 years old for women and after 60 years old for men(.P<0.01).Conclusion: This is the first time to establish the reference base of temporal-spatial parameters of Chinese normal adults with gait mat and to reveal the characteristics of temporal-spatial parameters of gait of Chinese normal adults.%目的:探讨中国正常成人的步行特征,为临床步态分析提供科学参考依据.方法:365名正常受试者,按性别、年龄分为20-29岁组、30-39岁组、40-49岁组、50-59岁组、60-75岁组共10组.应用人体步态垫测量与分析系统,测试受试者自由行走时的步速、步长、步幅、步长时间、摆动时间、支撑时间、单足支撑时间、双足支撑时间等时空参数,并对每位受试者的身高、体重进行测试.结果:年龄组内平均步速,除30-39岁组、60-75岁组外,男性均大于女性(P<0.05),50岁以后,男、女步速均减慢,与50岁以前相比差异具有显著性(P<0.01);各年龄组步长,男性均大于女性(P<0.05),

  8. Thermodynamic properties of water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Prette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jackfruit tree is one of the most significant trees in tropical home gardens and perhaps the most widespread and useful tree in the important genus Artocarpus. The fruit is susceptible to mechanical and biological damage in the mature state, and some people find the aroma of the fruit objectionable, particularly in confined spaces. The dehydration process could be an alternative for the exploitation of this product, and the relationship between moisture content and water activity provides useful information for its processing and storage. The aim of this study was to determine the thermodynamic properties of the water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content. Desorption isotherms of the different parts of the jackfruit (pulp, peduncle, mesocarp, peel, and seed were determined at four different temperatures (313.15, 323.15, 333.15, and 343.15 K in a water activity range of 0.02-0.753 using the static gravimetric method. Theoretical and empirical models were used to model the desorption isotherms. An analytical solution of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was proposed to calculate the isosteric heat of sorption, the differential entropy, and Gibbs' free energy using the Guggenhein-Anderson-de Boer and Oswin models considering the effect of temperature on the hygroscopic equilibrium.

  9. Estimating the vertical profiles of cloud water content in warm rain clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Guo, Jingchao; Fu, Yufei; Min, Qinlong; Wang, Yu; Gao, Xiaoming; Dong, Xue

    2017-04-01

    The cloud water content (CWC) in rainy clouds is a crucial parameter to determine the onset and the growth rate of precipitation, and to quantify the associated latent heating rate. No direct retrieval of CWC in rainy cloud from satellite observations is reported due to the difficulties of separating cloud particles from precipitation sized particles. However, based on multiple cloud simulations from the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model, we have found that the CWC profile in warm rains can be well determined by three macro-physical cloud properties of cloud water path (CWP), cloud top height (CTH), and cloud bottom height (CBH). The CBH can be estimated using CWP, CTH and near surface rain rate. We proposed an algorithm with a lookup table for estimating the CWC profile using CWP, CTH and near surface rain rate as inputs. The performance of this algorithm was tested with WRF model simulations and a real drizzle case observed by the CloudSat satellite. Testing verified that the algorithm can retrieve the vertical distribution of CWC correctly with few errors at different spatiotemporal scales. In addition, the algorithm is not confined to particular microphysics schemes and is valid for multiple cloud systems in different areas over the world. This algorithm is expected to improve current knowledge of cloud water content in rainy clouds.

  10. Bacterial spore heat resistance correlated with water content, wet density, and protoplast/sporoplast volume ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, T C; Greenamyre, J T; Corner, T R; Pankratz, H S; Gerhardt, P

    1982-05-01

    Five types of dormant Bacillus spores, between and within species, were selected representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The wet and dry density and the solids and water content of the entire spore and isolated integument of each type were determined directly from gram masses of material, with correction for interstitial water. The ratio between the volume occupied by the protoplast (the structures bounded by the inner pericytoplasm membrane) and the volume occupied by the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was calculated from measurements made on electron micrographs of medially thin-sectioned spores. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated directly with the wet density and inversely with the water content and with the protoplast/sporoplast volume ratio. Altogether with results supported a hypothesis that the extent of heat resistance is based in whole or in part on the extent of dehydration and diminution of the protoplast in the dormant spore, without implications about physiological mechanisms for attaining this state.

  11. Digestibility prediction of cooked plantain flour as a function of water content and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo Toro, A; Gibert, O; Ricci, J; Dufour, D; Mestres, C; Bohuon, P

    2015-03-15

    The effect of temperature (T=55-120°C) and water content (X1=1.4-2.0 kg kg(-1) dry basis) on the gelatinization and digestibility of plantain flour (Dominico Harton genotype) were investigated. The degree of plantain starch gelatinization (α) was measured by DSC and modelled as a function of T and X1, using the Weibull model. Rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and resistant starch (RS) fractions were evaluated for different α values. An appropriate dimensionless variable was introduced to the analyzed and modelled RDS and RS as a function of α. Starch gelatinization begins at a temperature above 59.6 ± 0.5°C and α is strongly dependent on T in non-limiting water conditions. The combined effects of T and X1 on the RDS and RS can be explained by α. We demonstrate that various heat treatments and water contents lead to the same α, with the same RDS and RS values.

  12. [Vegetation water content retrieval and application of drought monitoring using multi-spectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Tao; Wang, Shi-Xin; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Fu-Tao

    2011-10-01

    The vegetation is one of main drying carriers. The change of Vegetation Water Content (VWC) reflects the spatial-temporal distribution of drought situation and the degree of drought. In the present paper, a method of retrieving the VWC based on remote sensing data is introduced and analyzed, including the monitoring theory, vegetation water content indicator and retrieving model. The application was carried out in the region of Southwest China in the spring, 2010. The VWC data was calculated from MODIS data and spatially-temporally analyzed. Combined with the meteorological data from weather stations, the relationship between the EWT and weather data shows that precipitation has impact on the change in vegetation moisture to a certain extent. However, there is a process of delay during the course of vegetation absorbing water. So precipitation has a delaying impact on VWC. Based on the above analysis, the probability of drought monitoring and evaluation based on multi-spectral VWC data was discussed. Through temporal synthesis and combined with auxiliary data (i. e. historical data), it will help overcome the limitation of data itself and enhance the application of drought monitoring and evaluation based on the multi-spectral remote sensing.

  13. Gas exchange and leaf contents in bell pepper under energized water and biofertilizer doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca R. M. Borges

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of energized water and bovine biofertilizer doses on the gas exchange and NPK contents in leaves of yellow bell pepper plants. The experiment was conducted at the experimental area of the Federal University of Ceará, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, from June to November 2011. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, in a split-plot scheme; the plots were composed of treatments with energized and non-energized water and the subplots of five doses of liquid biofertilizer (0, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mL plant-1 week-1. The following variables were analyzed: transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and leaf contents of nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K. Water energization did not allow significant increases in the analyzed variables. The use of biofertilizer as the only source of fertilization was sufficient to provide the nutrients N, P and K at appropriate levels for the bell pepper crop.

  14. 蔬菜冷链物流时空运行模式的研究%Temporal-spatial Distribution Model of Co Chain Logistics for Vegetables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绍慧; 张鹏; 鲁晓翔; 李江阔

    2012-01-01

    [目的]对蔬荣冷链物流的时空运行模式进行研究。[方法]以西兰花为例,以时间和空间转变为依据,从成本和效益角度提出蔬桨冷链物流时空运行模式,并对冷链物流中信息时效性、效率、风险和产品附加值、客户满意度等效益评价体系所产生的效益进行综合评价。[结果]蔬菜冷链物流时空运行模式可有效提高蔬菜冷链物流效率。[结论]蔬菜冷链物流时空运行模式可评价蔬菜时空运行中的成本与效益。%[Objective] The aim was to study on temporal-spatial distribution model of cold chain logistics for vegetables. [Method] Broccoli was taken as an example. Detailedly, time-space distribution model of cold chain logistics for broccoli was proposed from standpoints of costs and benefits based on changes of time and space, and a comprehensive evaluation was made on timeliness, efficiency, risks, added- value of products and satisfaction of information in cold-chain logistics. [Result] The efficiency of cold chain logistics for vegetable can be greatly improved by temporal- spatial distribution model of cold chain logistics. [Conclusion] Costs and benefits of vegetables in temporal-apstial distribution could be evaluated by the model.

  15. Perceived risks of produced water management and naturally occurring radioactive material content in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Luisa; Yadav, Om Prakash; Khan, Eakalak

    2017-07-01

    Unconventional oil and gas development using hydraulic fracturing has caused conflict and controversy across the globe including the U.S. where some States banned the practice. Nevertheless, North Dakota (ND) has supported the practice because the State perceives the risks to be acceptable and because it has brought growth and opportunities to small communities. However, social acceptance of new technology is based on a number of factors and not contingent on economic benefits. To date, no research has been conducted to understand public risk perception of hazards associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing in ND. This study focuses on understanding the risk perception of select ND stakeholder groups regarding produced water management and naturally occurring radioactive material. The software Qualtrics was used to create an online survey, collect data, and perform statistical analysis. The most important variables that seem to influence risk perception are the images and thoughts associated with produced water, level of knowledge about produced water handling and content, and knowing how to proceed in case of a spill of produced water. Overall, social risk perception could be in alignment with actual technical risk if availability of objective information is improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of threshold value of soil water content for field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, S.

    2009-04-01

    Both the potential water consumption of plants and their ability to withdraw soil water are necessary in order to estimate actual evapotranspiration and to predict irrigation timing and amount. In relating to root water uptake the threshold value at which plants reducing evapotranspiration is an important parameter. Since transpiration is linearly correlated to dry matter production, under the condition that the AET/PET-Quotient is smaller than 1.0 (de Wit 1958, Tanner & Sinclair 1983), the dry matter production begins to decline too. Plants respond to drought with biochemical, physiological and morphological modifications in order to avoid damages, for instance by increasing the root water uptake. The objective of the study is to determine threshold values of soil water content and pressure head respectively for different field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements and to derive so called reduction functions. Both parameter, potenzial water demand in several growth stages and threshold value of soil water content or pressure head can be determined with weighable field lysimeter. The threshold value is reached, when the evapotranspiration under natural rainfall condition (AET) drop clearly (0.8 PET) below the value under well watered condition (PET). Basis for the presented results is the lysimeter plant Buttelstedt of the Thuringian State Institute of Agriculture. It consist of two lysimeter cellars, each with two weighable monolithic lysimeters. The lysimeter are 2.5 m deep with a surface area of 2 m2 to allow a non-restrictive root growth and to arrange a representative number of plants. The weighing accuracy amounts to 0.05 mm. The percolating water is collected by ceramic suction cups with suction up to 0.3 MPa at a depth of 2.3 m. The soil water content is measured by using neutron probe. One of the two lysimeter cellars represents the will irrigated, the other one the non irrigated and/or reduced irrigated part of field. The soil is a Haplic

  17. State-space approach for the analysis of soil water content and temperature in a sugarcane crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dourado-Neto Durval

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-space approach is used to describe surface soil water content and temperature behaviour, in a field experiment in which sugarcane is submitted to different management practices. The treatments consisted of harvest trash mulching, bare soil, and burned trash, all three in a ratoon crop, after first cane harvest. One transect of 84 points was sampled, meter by meter, covering all treatments and borders. The state-space approach is described in detail and the results show that soil water contents measured along the transect could successfully be estimated from water content and temperature observations made at the first neighbour.

  18. High-resolution prediction of soil available water content within the crop root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghverdi, Amir; Leib, Brian G.; Washington-Allen, Robert A.; Ayers, Paul D.; Buschermohle, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    A detailed understanding of soil hydraulic properties, particularly soil available water content (AWC) within the effective root zone, is needed to optimally schedule irrigation in fields with substantial spatial heterogeneity. However, it is difficult and time consuming to directly measure soil hydraulic properties. Therefore, easily collected and measured soil properties, such as soil texture and/or bulk density, that are well correlated with hydraulic properties are used as proxies to develop pedotransfer functions (PTF). In this study, multiple modeling scenarios were developed and evaluated to indirectly predict high resolution AWC maps within the effective root zone. The modeling techniques included kriging, co-kriging, regression kriging, artificial neural networks (NN) and geographically weighted regression (GWR). The efficiency of soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) as proximal data in the modeling process was assessed. There was a good agreement (root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.052 cm3 cm-3 and r = 0.88) between observed and point prediction of water contents using pseudo continuous PTFs. We found that both GWR (mean RMSE = 0.062 cm3 cm-3) and regression kriging (mean RMSE = 0.063 cm3 cm-3) produced the best water content maps with these accuracies improved up to 19% when ECa was used as an ancillary soil attribute in the interpolation process. The maps indicated fourfold differences in AWC between coarse- and fine-textured soils across the study site. This provided a template for future investigations for evaluating the efficiency of variable rate irrigation management scenarios in accounting for the spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic attributes.

  19. Plant vitrification solution 2 lowers water content and alters freezing behavior in shoot tips during cryoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Gayle M; Walters, Christina

    2006-02-01

    Plant shoot tips do not survive exposure to liquid nitrogen temperatures without cryoprotective treatments. Some cryoprotectant solutions, such as plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2), dehydrate cells and decrease lethal ice formation, but the extent of dehydration and the effect on water freezing properties are not known. We examined the effect of a PVS2 cryoprotection protocol on the water content and phase behavior of mint and garlic shoot tips using differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature and enthalpy of water melting transitions in unprotected and recovering shoot tips were comparable to dilute aqueous solutions. Exposure to PVS2 changed the behavior of water in shoot tips: enthalpy of melting transitions decreased to about 40 J g H2O(-1) (compared to 333 J g H2O(-1) for pure H2O), amount of unfrozen water increased to approximately 0.7 g H2O g dry mass(-1) (compared to approximately 0.4 g H2Og dry mass(-1) for unprotected shoot tips), and a glass transition (T(g)) at -115 degrees C was apparent. Evaporative drying at room temperature was slower in PVS2-treated shoot tips compared to shoot tips receiving no cryoprotection treatments. We quantified the extent that ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide components permeate into shoot tips and replace some of the water. Since T(g) in PVS2-treated shoot tips occurs at -115 degrees C, mechanisms other than glass formation prevent freezing at temperatures between 0 and -115 degrees C. Protection is likely a result of controlled dehydration or altered thermal properties of intracellular water. A comparison of thermodynamic measurements for cryoprotection solutions in diverse plant systems will identify efficacy among cryopreservation protocols.

  20. EFFECT OF GROWTH REGULATORS ON MAIZE GRAIN YIELDS AND ITS WATER CONTENT AT HARVESTING

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The results of three-year studies devoted to the effect of pre-sowing seeds treatment with growth regulators on grain yielding and pre-sowing water content in grain are submitted. The object of studies was the ROSS-140CB and Obsky-140CB corn hybrids. A day before sowing the seeds were treated with the following growth regulators: Lignogumat AM, Gumi-20, Mival-Agro, Krezatsin, Novosil, Immunocitovit, Phytosporin and Ribav-Extra. The total amount of the treatment solution used was 10-20 l per o...

  1. Empirical Relations for Optical Attenuation Prediction from Liquid Water Content of Fog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of the liquid water content (LWC and optical attenuation have been analyzed to predict optical attenuation caused by fog particles. Attenuation has been measured at two different wavelengths, 830 nm and 1550 nm, across co-located links. Five months measured data have been processed to assess power-law empirical models, which estimate optical attenuation from the LWC. The proposed models are compared with other published models and are demonstrated to perform sufficiently well to predict optical attenuation if the LWC values are available.

  2. Temporal, spatial, and body size effects on growth rates of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorndal, Karen A.; Schroeder, Barbara A.; Foley, Allen M.; Witherington, Blair E.; Bresette, Michael; Clark, David; Herren, Richard M.; Arendt, Michael D.; Schmid, Jeffrey R.; Meylan, Anne B.; Meylan, Peter A.; Provancha, Jane A.; Hart, Kristen M.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Carthy, Raymond R.; Bolten, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    In response to a call from the US National Research Council for research programs to combine their data to improve sea turtle population assessments, we analyzed somatic growth data for Northwest Atlantic (NWA) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from 10 research programs. We assessed growth dynamics over wide ranges of geography (9–33°N latitude), time (1978–2012), and body size (35.4–103.3 cm carapace length). Generalized additive models revealed significant spatial and temporal variation in growth rates and a significant decline in growth rates with increasing body size. Growth was more rapid in waters south of the USA (<24°N) than in USA waters. Growth dynamics in southern waters in the NWA need more study because sample size was small. Within USA waters, the significant spatial effect in growth rates of immature loggerheads did not exhibit a consistent latitudinal trend. Growth rates declined significantly from 1997 through 2007 and then leveled off or increased. During this same interval, annual nest counts in Florida declined by 43 % (Witherington et al. in Ecol Appl 19:30–54, 2009) before rebounding. Whether these simultaneous declines reflect responses in productivity to a common environmental change should be explored to determine whether somatic growth rates can help interpret population trends based on annual counts of nests or nesting females. Because of the significant spatial and temporal variation in growth rates, population models of NWA loggerheads should avoid employing growth data from restricted spatial or temporal coverage to calculate demographic metrics such as age at sexual maturity.

  3. Water content and thickness of the stratum corneum contribute to skin surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J; Yanai, M; Hirao, T; Denda, M

    2000-08-01

    Skin surface morphology has long been recognized as reflecting skin pathology. In the present study, we evaluated skin surface morphology using hairless mice under contrasting conditions of humidity. The skin surface microrelief was recorded with opaque quick-drying silicone rubber, and examined under a microscope. A binary image was produced by density slicing. Within 3 days of exposure to dry conditions, skin roughness was significantly increased. The skin roughness was partially mitigated by topical application of an aqueous solution of glycerol or hydration by immersion in water. A significant correlation between skin roughness and stratum corneum thickness was also observed. These results suggest that skin surface morphology is associated with both water content and thickness of the stratum corneum.

  4. Aerobic Exercise Training Increases Muscle Water Content in Obese Middle-Age Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Sanchez-Roncero, Alicia; Fernández-Elías, Valentin Emilio;

    2016-01-01

    L⁻¹·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) metabolic syndrome men completed a 4-month aerobic cycling training program. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected before and 72 h after the completion of the last training bout. Water content, total protein, glycogen concentration, and citrate synthase activity were measured in biopsy tissue.......023). Cardiorespiratory fitness (i.e., V˙O2peak), exercise maximal fat oxidation (i.e., FOmax), and maximal cycling power (i.e., Wmax) improved with training (11%, 33%, and 10%, respectively; P ...) although without reaching statistical significance when expressed as per kilogram of wet weight (P = 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that aerobic cycling training increases quadriceps muscle water although reduces muscle protein concentration in obese metabolic syndrome men. Reduced protein...

  5. Fungal endophyte (Epichloe festucae alters the nutrient content of Festuca rubra regardless of water availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz R Vázquez-de-Aldana

    Full Text Available Festuca rubra plants maintain associations with the vertically transmitted fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae. A high prevalence of infected host plants in semiarid grasslands suggests that this association could be mutualistic. We investigated if the Epichloë-endophyte affects the growth and nutrient content of F. rubra plants subjected to drought. Endophyte-infected (E+ and non-infected (E- plants of two half-sib lines (PEN and RAB were subjected to three water availability treatments. Shoot and root biomass, nutrient content, proline, phenolic compounds and fungal alkaloids were measured after the treatments. The effect of the endophyte on shoot and root biomass and dead leaves depended on the plant line. In the PEN line, E+ plants had a greater S:R ratio than E-, but the opposite occurred in RAB. In both plant lines and all water treatments, endophyte-infected plants had greater concentrations of N, P and Zn in shoots and Ca, Mg and Zn in roots than E- plants. On average, E+ plants contained in their shoots more P (62%, Zn (58% and N (19% than E- plants. While the proline in shoots increased in response to water stress, the endophyte did not affect this response. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status and plant line impose stronger differences in the performance of the plants than the water stress treatments. Furthermore, differences between PEN and RAB lines seemed to be greater in E- than in E+ plants, suggesting that E+ plants of both lines are more similar than those of their non-infected version. This is probably due to the endophyte producing a similar effect in both plant lines, such as the increase in N, P and Zn in shoots. The remarkable effect of the endophyte in the nutrient balance of the plants could help to explain the high prevalence of infected plants in natural grasslands.

  6. Changes in seasonal snow liquid water content during the snowmelt period in the Western Tianshan Mountains, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Snow liquid water content is a very important parameter for snow hydrological processes, avalanche research and snow cover mapping by remote sensing. Snow liquid water content was measured with a portable instrument (Snow Fork in the Tianshan Station for Snow Cover and Avalanche Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences during the snowmelt period in spring 2010. This study analyzed the temporal and spatial distribution of snow liquid water content in different weather conditions. The average liquid water content of snow in the whole layer exponentially increased and can be calculated using a regression function of prior moving average temperature. The proportion of net radiation, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in total energy changed in different snowmelt period. During the pre-snowmelt period (0.3% ≤ Wvol < 1%, snow liquid water content and its temporal variation were relatively small, with liquid water accumulated in the coarse snow layer. During the mid-snowmelt period (1% ≤ Wvol < 2.5%, the variation was significant in the upper layer and decreased drastically during the snowfall and the following one to two days. Only the temporal variation decreased after rain or snow (ROS events. During the late-snowmelt period (Wvol ≥ 2.5%, the distribution and variation of every snow layer showed a~uniform trend, and the effect of ROS events on liquid water content only occurred during rainfall and snowfall.

  7. Hydrocarbon contamination increases the liquid water content of frozen Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Steven D; Schafer, Alexis N; Forgeron, Michelle A M; Snape, Ian

    2008-11-15

    We do not yet understand why fuel spills can cause greater damage in polar soils than in temperate soils. The role of water in the freezing environment may partly be responsible for why polar soils are more sensitive to pollution. We hypothesized that hydrocarbons alter the liquid water in frozen soil, and we evaluated this hypothesis by conducting laboratory and field experiments at Casey Station, Antarctica. Liquid water content in frozen soils (theta(liquid)) was estimated by time domain reflectometry in laboratory, field collected soils, and in situ field measurements. Our results demonstrate an increase in liquid water associated with hydrocarbon contamination in frozen soils. The dependence of theta(liquid) on aged fuel and spiked fuel were almost identical,with a slope of 2.6 x 10(-6) mg TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons) kg(-1) for aged fuel and 3.1 x 10(-6) mg TPH kg(-1) for spiked fuel. In situ measurements found theta(liquid) depends, r2 = 0.75, on fuel for silt loam soils (theta(liquid) = 0.094 + 7.8 x 10(-6) mg TPH kg(-1)) but not on fuel for silt clay loam soils. In our study, theta(liquid) doubled in field soils and quadrupled in laboratory soils contaminated with diesel which may have profound implications on frost heave models in contaminated soils.

  8. Fluoride Content of Bottled Drinking Water Available in North West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Fouladi Fard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumption of bottled waters has received popularity and more acceptances. Fluoride is necessary for human life. But high levels of fluoride can cause some problems for human health such as Fluorosis and teeth and bones problems. The aim of this study is measure the fluoride content in bottled waters consumed in North West of Iran and comparison with the amount listed on their labels and with the drinking water standards. Methods: In this study, 10 brands of bottled water were sampled from markets over the two seasons randomly. Samples were analyzed for fluoride using Ion Chromatography (IC method. Results: Results showed that fluoride concentration in different brands had a significant difference (P <0.05. The concentration of fluoride in samples ranged between 0.04 and 0.32 mg/L. Among analyzed selected brands four brands were observed significant differences with the measured values. Conclusion:  Totally the measured values didn’t match with the values declared on the labels (Reliability coefficient <0. It was revealed that fluoride concentration in all brands was less than the lower range of Iranian national standard (0.7-1.2 mg/lit.

  9. [Spatial variation characteristics of surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on Karst slopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Chen, Hong-Song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-Peng; Ye, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil water-physical properties play a decisive role in the dynamics of deep soil water. Knowledge of their spatial variation is helpful in understanding the processes of rainfall infiltration and runoff generation, which will contribute to the reasonable utilization of soil water resources in mountainous areas. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m x 10 m) and geostatistical methods, this paper aimed to study the spatial variability of surface (0-10 cm) soil water content, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on a typical shrub slope (90 m x 120 m, projected length) in Karst area of northwest Guangxi, southwest China. The results showed that the surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity had different spatial dependence and spatial structure. Sample variogram of the soil water content was fitted well by Gaussian models with the nugget effect, while soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity were fitted well by exponential models with the nugget effect. Variability of soil water content showed strong spatial dependence, while the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity showed moderate spatial dependence. The spatial ranges of the soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were small, while that of the soil bulk density was much bigger. In general, the soil water content increased with the increase of altitude while it was opposite for the soil bulk densi- ty. However, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity had a random distribution of large amounts of small patches, showing high spatial heterogeneity. Soil water content negatively (P conductivity, while there was no significant correlation between the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  10. Water contents and deformation mechanism in ductile shear zone of middle crust along the Red River fault in southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YongSheng; HE ChangRong; YANG XiaoSong

    2008-01-01

    Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we measured water contents of quartz and feldspar for four thin sections of felsic mylonite and two thin sections of banded granitic gneiss collected from a ductile shear zone of middle crust along the Red Rivers-Ailaoshan active fault. The absorbance spectra and peak position suggest that water in quartz and feldspar of granitic gneiss and felsic mylonite occurs mainly as hydroxyl in crystal defect, but also contains inclusion water and grain boundary water. The water contents of minerals were calculated based on the absorbance spectra.Water content of feldspar in granitic gneiss is 0,05 wt%-0.15 wt%, and that of quartz 0.03 wt%-0.09wt%. Water content of feldspar ribbon and quartz ribbon in felsic mylonite is 0.095 wt%-0.32 wt%, and those of fine-grained feldspar and quartz are 0.004 wt% -0.052 wt%. These data show that the watercontent of weakly deformed feldspar and quartz ribbons is much higher than that of strongly deformed fine-grained feldspar and quartz. This suggests that strong shear deformation leads to breakage of the structures of constitutional water, inclusion and grain boundary water in feldspar and quartz, and most of water in minerals of mylonite is released to the upper layer in the crust.

  11. In-Line Measurement of Water Contents in Ethanol Using a Zeolite-Coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Chul Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM was utilized to measure the water content in ethanol. For the improvement of measurement sensitivity, the QCM was modified by applying zeolite particles on the surface with poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA binder. The measurement performance was examined with ethanol of 1% to 5% water content in circulation. The experimental results showed that the frequency drop of the QCM was related with the water content though there was some deviation. The sensitivity of the zeolite-coated QCM was sufficient to be implemented in water content determination, and a higher ratio of silicon to aluminum in the molecular structure of the zeolite gave better performance. The coated surface was inspected by microscopy to show the distribution of zeolite particles and PMMA spread.

  12. Correction of resistance to penetration by pedofunctions and a reference soil water content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Tuzzin de Moraes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The soil penetration resistance is an important indicator of soil compaction and is strongly influenced by soil water content. The objective of this study was to develop mathematical models to normalize soil penetration resistance (SPR, using a reference value of gravimetric soil water content (U. For this purpose, SPR was determined with an impact penetrometer, in an experiment on a Dystroferric Red Latossol (Rhodic Eutrudox, at six levels of soil compaction, induced by mechanical chiseling and additional compaction by the traffic of a harvester (four, eight, 10, and 20 passes; in addition to a control treatment under no-tillage, without chiseling or additional compaction. To broaden the range of U values, SPR was evaluated in different periods. Undisturbed soil cores were sampled to quantify the soil bulk density (BD. Pedotransfer functions were generated correlating the values of U and BD to the SPR values. By these functions, the SPR was adequately corrected for all U and BD data ranges. The method requires only SPR and U as input variables in the models. However, different pedofunctions are needed according to the soil layer evaluated. After adjusting the pedotransfer functions, the differences in the soil compaction levels among the treatments, previously masked by variations of U, became detectable.

  13. Does the Nazca Slab Beneath Central Argentina Influence the Water Content of the Adjacent Transition Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, J. R.; Pomposiello, M. C.; Favetto, A.; Burd, A.

    2008-12-01

    When the Nazca flat-slab rolls over and plunges into the transition zone under Argentina, it appears to separate an electrically resistive transition zone to the west from an electrically conductive transition zone to the east. The simplest explanation for this is that the water content of the transition zone is much lower to the west than the east. The low conductivity to the west can be explained if anhydrous upper mantle mantle is being carried down into the transition zone by slab motion. The much higher conductivity to the east is beneath the Rio de la Plata Craton whose root almost certainly inhibits vertical motion east of the slab. Thus water injected by the descending slab is likely to accumulate in the transition zone. This idea was first presented in a Nature paper in 2004. Since then, we have collected more magnetotelluric data to the south where the slab dip is normal, but voluminous back-arc basaltic volcanism occurs and in the region where the slab is said to be flexing continuously between the two geometries. A goal of this work is to test whether the slab has a similar relation to transition zone conductivity along strike. The new data, originally collected along linear profiles perpendicular to the expected strike of the slab in the mantle clearly indicated that 2-D interpretation would be problematic. Indeed, analysis of new data in the flexure region using 2-D methods reveals a narrow, roughly east-west, near vertical resistive structure extending down to the top of a conductive transition zone. A possible, but controversial interpretation of this structure is that it is the signature of a slab tear rather than the widely-accepted continuous flexure geometry. If a tear is indeed correct, then there is an opportunity to test how the slab is influencing the transition zone conductivity and by inference the water content by looking at the southern edge of the plunging 'flat- slab' as it enters the transition zone. Since the original data were

  14. Mapping soil resistance under different soil water content conditions using indicator kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Avalos, J. M.; Bonnin-Acosta, J.; Sande-Fouz, P.; Pereira-Lanças, K.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.

    2009-04-01

    In many agricultural problems, it is of interest to map the zones where the variable under study shows the probability of being greater than a threshold value. Soil resistances higher than 2 MPa might difficult the establishment of cultures; therefore, further management or tillage techniques should be undertaken. The aim of this work was to map soil resistance using geostatistical techniques, therefore, an analysis of the spatial distribution of soil compaction and the influence of soil water content on the resistance to penetration was carried out. The studied clay-textured soil was managed under no-tillage practices. Soil resistance was described by the cone index which was obtained using a penetrometer. This attribute was assessed at 5 different depths, i.e. 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, 30-40 cm and deeper than 40 cm, whereas soil water content was described at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm. In the end, 73 data points were surveyed. Soil water conditions varied during the five different samplings. Statistical analysis showed that datasets followed a normal distribution, therefore, no transformation was required. Studied attributes showed low and non-significant correlation coefficients which impeded the application of cross-variogram and cokriging techniques. Because of the limited number of measured data, only the omnidirectional semivariogram was computed, and hence the spatial variability is assumed to be identical in all directions. Spatial dependence was observed in 33 out of 35 data series, both for cone index and soil water content. Fitted theoretical structures corresponded to exponential models in 20 cases, 10 Gaussian models and 3 spherical models. Nugget effect varied from 0 to 44.4 depending on the dataset and spatial dependence maximum range was 90 m. A strong spatial dependence was observed in 18 of the data sets whereas only 2 showed a weak autocorrelation. Taking into account the 2 MPa threshold, indicator kriging was used to map the soil resistance

  15. Spatial variability in the soil water content of a Mediterranean agroforestry system with high soil heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Antonio Jaime; Llorens, Pilar; Aranda, Xavier; Savé, Robert; Biel, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Variability of soil water content is known to increase with the size of spatial domain in which measurements are taken. At field scale, heterogeneity in soil, vegetation, topography, water input volume and management affects, among other factors, hydrologic plot behaviour under different mean soil water contents. The present work studies how the spatial variability of soil water content (SWC) is affected by soil type (texture, percentage of stones and the combination of them) in a timber-orientated plantation of cherry tree (Prunus avium) under Mediterranean climatic conditions. The experimental design is a randomized block one with 3 blocks * 4 treatments, based on two factors: irrigation (6 plots irrigated versus 6 plots not irrigated) and soil management (6 plots tillaged versus 6 plots not tillaged). SWC is continuously measured at 25, 50 and 100 cm depth with FDR sensors, located at two positions in each treatment: under tree influence and 2.5 m apart. This study presents the results of the monitoring during 2012 of the 24 sensors located at the 25 cm depth. In each of the measurement point, texture and percentage of stones were measured. Sandy-loam, sandy-clay-loam and loam textures were found together with a percentage of stones ranging from 20 to 70 %. The results indicated that the relationship between the daily mean SWC and its standard deviation, a common procedure used to study spatial variability, changed with texture, percentage of stones and the estimation of field capacity from the combination of both. Temporal stability analysis of SWC showed a clear pattern related to field capacity, with the measurement points of the sandy-loam texture and the high percentage of stones showing the maximun negative diference with the global mean. The high range in the mean relative difference observed (± 75 %), could indicate that the studied plot may be considered as a good field-laboratory to extrapolate results at higher spatial scales. Furthermore, the

  16. A thermal inertia model for soil water content retrieval using thermal and multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, A.; Minacapilli, M.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; D'Asaro, F.

    2010-10-01

    Soil moisture is difficult to quantify because of its high spatial variability. Consequently, great efforts have been undertaken by the research community to develop practical remote sensing approaches to estimate the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture over large areas and with high spatial detail. Many methodologies have been developed using remote sensing data acquiring information in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Conventional field measurement techniques (including gravimetric and time-domain reflectometry) are point-based, involve on-site operators, are time expensive and, in any case, do not provide exhaustive information on the spatial distribution of soil moisture because it strongly depends on pedology, soil roughness and vegetation cover. The technological development of imaging sensors acquiring in the visible (VIS), near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), renewed the research interest in setting up remote sensed based techniques aimed to retrieve soil water content variability in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (SPA). In this context different approaches have been widely applied at regional scale throughout synthetic indexes based on VIS, NIR and TIR spectral bands. A laboratory experiment has been carried out to verify a physically based model based on the remote estimation of the soil thermal inertia, P, to indirectly retrieve the soil surface water content, θ. The paper shows laboratory retrievals using simultaneously a FLIR A320G thermal camera, a six bands customized TETRACAM MCA II (Multiple Camera Array) multispectral camera working in the VIS/NIR part of the spectrum. Using these two type of sensors a set of VIS/NIR and TIR images were acquired as the main input dataset to retrieve the spatial variability of the thermal inertia values. Moreover, given that the accuracy of the proposed approach strongly depends on the accurate estimation of the soil thermal conductivity, a Decagon Device KD2 PRO thermal

  17. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibao Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the soil-crop system under different conditions, the study shows that there are no significant differences in the heavy metal content when the quantity of reclaimed water for irrigation varies. Reclaimed water for short-term irrigation does not cause pollution to either the soil environment or the crops. Nor will it cause the accumulation of heavy metals, and the index for the heavy metal content is far below the critical value of the national standard, which indicates that the vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water during their growth turn out to be free of pollutants. The heavy metals brought into the soil by reclaimed water are less than that taken away by the crops. The input and output quantities have only small effects on the heavy metal balance in the soil. This paper provides a reference for the evaluation and safety control of irrigation with reclaimed water.

  18. Effect of fertilizer and water content on N2O emission from three plantation soils in south China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-an; ZOU Bi; XIA Han-ping; DING Yong-zhen; TAN Wan-neng; MA Zhen-rong

    2005-01-01

    The effects of fertilizers and water content on N2O emission were studied using the three most typical plantation soils. Soil incubations were performed and fertilization and water content treatments were designed. At 25 % of saturated water content(SWC), N2O emissions from the soil treated with urea, KNO3, (NH4)2 SO4 and KH2 PO4 were compared at application rates of 0, 100, 200, 300 and 500kg/hm2 . At 80% of SWC, similar experiments were carried out but at only one application rate(500 kg/hm2 ). N2O emissions at various water contents(20%, 35%, 50%, 65%, 80% and 100% of SWC) were studied. At low water content(25% of SWC), neither nitrogen However, at high water content(80 % SWC), the fertilizers resulted in much greater N2O emission irregardless of soil tested. The highest low level but steadily increased to a very high level for the soil treated with KNO3. High NO3- content was a basis of high level of N2O emission. N2O emission rates from soils peaked shortly after flooding, rapidly dropping to a very low level in soil from non-legume plantations, but lasting for a relatively long period in soil from legume plantations. When soil water content increased equaling to or higher than 65%, the accumulated N2O emission over a period of 13 d ranged from 20.21-29.78 mg/m2 for S. superba, 30.57-70.12 mg/m2 for P. elliottii and 300.89-430.51 mg/m2 for A. mangium. The critical water content was 50% of SWC, above which a high level of N2O emission could be expected, and below which very little N2O emissions were detected. The results suggest that, at low water content( <50% of SWC), the fertilization practice is safe with regard to N2O emissions, but at high water content( > 50% of SWC), nitrogen fertilizer in the form of nitrate could yield a 100-fold increase in N2O emissions. Legume plantations like A. mangium should be avoided in low lands which could easily suffer from flooding or poor drainage.

  19. Olivine water contents in the continental lithosphere and the longevity of cratons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H; Woodland, Alan B; Bell, David R; Lazarov, Marina

    2010-09-02

    Cratons, the ancient cores of continents, contain the oldest crust and mantle on the Earth (>2 Gyr old). They extend laterally for hundreds of kilometres, and are underlain to depths of 180-250 km by mantle roots that are chemically and physically distinct from the surrounding mantle. Forming the thickest lithosphere on our planet, they act as rigid keels isolated from the flowing asthenosphere; however, it has remained an open question how these large portions of the mantle can stay isolated for so long from mantle convection. Key physical properties thought to contribute to this longevity include chemical buoyancy due to high degrees of melt-depletion and the stiffness imparted by the low temperatures of a conductive thermal gradient. Geodynamic calculations, however, suggest that these characteristics are not sufficient to prevent the lithospheric mantle from being entrained during mantle convection over billions of years. Differences in water content are a potential source of additional viscosity contrast between cratonic roots and ambient mantle owing to the well-established hydrolytic weakening effect in olivine, the most abundant mineral of the upper mantle. However, the water contents of cratonic mantle roots have to date been poorly constrained. Here we show that olivine in peridotite xenoliths from the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary region of the Kaapvaal craton mantle root are water-poor and provide sufficient viscosity contrast with underlying asthenosphere to satisfy the stability criteria required by geodynamic calculations. Our results provide a solution to a puzzling mystery of plate tectonics, namely why the oldest continents, in contrast to short-lived oceanic plates, have resisted recycling into the interior of our tectonically dynamic planet.

  20. n3- polyunsaturated Fat Acid Content of Some Edible Fish from Bahrain Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Arrayedu, F. H.; Al Maskati, H. A.; Abdullah, F. J.

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids in 10 fish species that are commonly consumed in Bahrain in addition to the main commercial shrimp species. White sardinella, which is a plankton feeder, had the highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids. It had the highest value of eicosapentaenoic acid (146.5 ± 20 mg 100 g-1) and linolenic acid (98.9±f 100 g-1) and the second highest value of docosahexaenoic acid at (133.7 ± 22 mg 100 g-1). Spanish mackerel which feeds mainly on sardinella was second with eicosapentaenoc acid at 55 ± 5.4 mg 100 g-1, docosahexaenoic acid at 161 ± 19.8 mg 100 g-1, linolenic acid at 16.4 mg 100 g-1 and docosapentaenoic acid at 25 ± 1.9 mg 100 g-1. Rabbitfish, the most popular edible fish in Bahrain which feeds mainly on benthic algae had the third highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids with eicosapentaenoic acid at 37.5 ± 3.9 mg 100 g-1, docosahexaenoic acid at 76 ± 6.7 mg 100 g-1, and docosapentaenoic acid at 85.8 ± 10 mg 100 g-1. The other fish and crustacean species studied were Arabian carpet shark, doublebar bream, grouper, gray grunt, golden travally, keeled mullet, spangled emperor and shrimp. The study explores the transfer of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids through the food webs of the examined fish. It is apparent, generally, that plankton feeders displayed the highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids followed by seaweed and algae grazers, with benthic carnivores feeding on invertebrates displaying the poorest content. The values reported here, however, are much lower than those reported for fish available in American markets and in Mediterranean fish. Warm water temperature and high salinity which lead to lowering of the density of phytoplankton and phytoplankton content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids are suggested as the reason for the observed low values of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids in Bahrain fish.

  1. Variation of inulin content, inulin yield and water use efficiency for inulin yield in Jerusalem artichoke genotypes under different water regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The information on genotypic variation for inulin content, inulin yield and water use efficiency of inulin yield (WUEi) in response to drought is limited. This study was to investigate the genetic variability in inulin content, inulin yield and WUEi of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) ...

  2. Application of spatial Markov chains to the analysis of the temporal-spatial evolution of soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Wang, Xiujuan; Xu, Fei; Yu, Wenwen

    Soil and water conservation in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area of China is important, and soil erosion is a significant issue. In the present study, spatial Markov chains were applied to explore the impacts of the regional context on soil erosion in the Xiangxi River watershed, and Thematic Mapper remote sensing data from 1999 and 2007 were employed. The results indicated that the observed changes in soil erosion were closely related to the soil erosion levels of the surrounding areas. When neighboring regions were not considered, the probability that moderate erosion transformed into slight and severe erosion was 0.8330 and 0.0049, respectively. However, when neighboring regions that displayed intensive erosion were considered, the probabilities were 0.2454 and 0.7513, respectively. Moreover, the different levels of soil erosion in neighboring regions played different roles in soil erosion. If the erosion levels in the neighboring region were lower, the probability of a high erosion class transferring to a lower level was relatively high. In contrast, if erosion levels in the neighboring region were higher, the probability was lower. The results of the present study provide important information for the planning and implementation of soil conservation measures in the study area.

  3. Enhancement of Protein and Pigment Content in Two Chlorella Species Cultivated on Industrial Process Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlorella vulgaris were cultivated in pre-gasified industrial process water with high concentration of ammonia representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of growth media and cultivation duration on the nutritional composition of biomass. Variations in proteins, lipid, fatty acid composition, amino acids, tocopherols, and pigments were studied. Both species grew well in industrial process water. The contents of proteins were affected significantly by the growth media and cultivation duration. Microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa produced the highest concentrations of protein (65.2% ± 1.30% DW while Chlorella vulgaris accumulated extremely high concentrations of lutein and chlorophylls (7.14 ± 0.66 mg/g DW and 32.4 ± 1.77 mg/g DW, respectively. Cultivation of Chlorella species in industrial process water is an environmentally friendly, sustainable bioremediation method with added value biomass production and resource valorization, since the resulting biomass also presented a good source of proteins, amino acids, and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  4. Profiles of relative permittivity and electrical conductivity from unsaturated soil water content models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Porretta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of water diffusion in the vadose zone has been implemented for different types of soil textures in order to determine the soil water content (SWC profiles in dependence of depth and time. From these profiles, obtained for different soils, we derived the characteristic electrical parameters, such as relative permittivity (epsilonr and electrical conductivity (sigma, and their variation in time, employing empirical relations available in the scientific literature. The simulation through mathematical models has been performed taking into account different types of soils characterized by the percentage composition of sand, clay and silt in the textural triangle, which provides some physical and chemical properties that affect the water retention in the soil. The resulting simulated profiles of SWC and consequently permittivity and conductivity profiles, span over a certain range of values suggesting the best techniques and the limits in geophysical investigation. Moreover this a-prior knowledge helps in the elaboration and interpretation of permittivity and conductivity data obtained by the measurements. Permittivity and conductivity profiles are particularly useful in some environmental applications when the soil textures are (or supposed to be known as in the typical case of landfill leachate dispersion. Since the soil textures beneath or nearby a disposal waste are characterized by a SWC, the values of (epsilonr and (sigma at various depth can be directly inferred.

  5. Measuring snow liquid water content with low-cost GPS receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska; Prasch, Monika; Schmid, Lino; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2014-11-06

    The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC) in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  6. Measuring Snow Liquid Water Content with Low-Cost GPS Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Koch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The amount of liquid water in snow characterizes the wetness of a snowpack. Its temporal evolution plays an important role for wet-snow avalanche prediction, as well as the onset of meltwater release and water availability estimations within a river basin. However, it is still a challenge and a not yet satisfyingly solved issue to measure the liquid water content (LWC in snow with conventional in situ and remote sensing techniques. We propose a new approach based on the attenuation of microwave radiation in the L-band emitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS. For this purpose, we performed a continuous low-cost GPS measurement experiment at the Weissfluhjoch test site in Switzerland, during the snow melt period in 2013. As a measure of signal strength, we analyzed the carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0 and developed a procedure to normalize these data. The bulk volumetric LWC was determined based on assumptions for attenuation, reflection and refraction of radiation in wet snow. The onset of melt, as well as daily melt-freeze cycles were clearly detected. The temporal evolution of the LWC was closely related to the meteorological and snow-hydrological data. Due to its non-destructive setup, its cost-efficiency and global availability, this approach has the potential to be implemented in distributed sensor networks for avalanche prediction or basin-wide melt onset measurements.

  7. Effect of heavy metals and water content on the strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj, Irene; Torras, Josep; Casellas, Daniel; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan

    2009-10-15

    In this paper the mechanical properties of magnesium potassium phosphate cements used for the Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) of galvanic wastes were investigated. Surrogate wastes (metal nitrate dissolutions) were employed containing Cd, Cr(III), Cu, Ni, Pb or Zn at a concentration of 25 g dm(-3) and different water-to-solid (W/S) ratios (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 dm(3)kg(-1)) have been employed. Cements were prepared by mixing hard burned magnesia of about 70% purity with potassium dihydrogen phosphate. Compressive strength and tensile strength of specimens were determined. In addition the volume of permeable voids was measured. It was found that when comparing pastes that the volume of permeable voids increases and mechanical strength decreases with the increase of water-to-solid ratio (W/S). Nevertheless pastes with the same material proportions containing different metals show different mechanical strength values. The hydration products were analyzed by XRD. With the increase of water content not previously reported hydration compound was detected: bobierrite.

  8. Application of Neural Network in the Measuring System On-line for Water Content of Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengrong Zhao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to introduce a new way to measure the water content of Crude Oil. In this measurement system, capacitive sensor is used as sensitive element and BP neural network model is adopted to deal with data. Water content and temperature are used as input parameters to set up BP neural network model. By MATLAB simulation, a moisture content of crude oil is forecasted, so that the influence comes from temperature variation is compensated and the accuracy of the measurement result is improved.

  9. In-Line Measurement of Water Content in Ethanol Using a PVA-Coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Chul Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An in-line device for measuring the water content in ethanol was developed using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-coated quartz crystal microbalance. Bio-ethanol is widely used as the replacement of gasoline, and its water content is a key component of its specifications. When the PVA-coated quartz crystal microbalance is contacted with ethanol containing a small amount of water, the water is absorbed into the PVA increasing the load on the microbalance surface to cause a frequency drop. The determination performance of the PVA-coated microbalance is examined by measuring the frequency decreases in ethanol containing 2% to 10% water while the ethanol flows through the measurement device. The measurements indicates that the higher water content is the more the frequency reduction is, though some deviation in the measurements is observed. This indicates that the frequency measurement of an unknown concentration of water in ethanol can be used to determine the water content in ethanol. The PVA coating is examined by microscopy and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  10. In-line measurement of water content in ethanol using a PVA-coated quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yamamoto, Takuji; Kim, Young Han

    2014-01-16

    An in-line device for measuring the water content in ethanol was developed using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated quartz crystal microbalance. Bio-ethanol is widely used as the replacement of gasoline, and its water content is a key component of its specifications. When the PVA-coated quartz crystal microbalance is contacted with ethanol containing a small amount of water, the water is absorbed into the PVA increasing the load on the microbalance surface to cause a frequency drop. The determination performance of the PVA-coated microbalance is examined by measuring the frequency decreases in ethanol containing 2% to 10% water while the ethanol flows through the measurement device. The measurements indicates that the higher water content is the more the frequency reduction is, though some deviation in the measurements is observed. This indicates that the frequency measurement of an unknown concentration of water in ethanol can be used to determine the water content in ethanol. The PVA coating is examined by microscopy and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy.

  11. [Water and electrolyte content of the organs and tissues of male rats following a flight on the Kosmos 1667 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, L A; Lavrova, E A; Natochin, Iu V; Serova, L V

    1988-01-01

    After the 7-day space flight onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1667 the water, Na, K, Ca and Mg content of the liver, kidney, heart, skin and bone of male rats was measured. No significant changes in the weight or water content of the above organs were seen. The exception was a decrease of water contained in the heart and an increase of water contained in the caudal appendage of the epididymis. After flight the mineral composition of the liver was identical to that after control studies. The K content of the heart of the flight rats was lower and that of Na, Ca and Mg was identical to the parameter in the controls. The K content of the skin and bone increased and the Na content of the skin also grew. In the kidney the Ca content did not change whereas the content of K, Na and Mg decreased significantly. In the testis Na decreased and K increased after flight. Thus, changes in fluid-electrolyte homeostasis at the organ and tissue level can develop within 7 days of space flight. They occur not only in the musculoskeletal system but may also evolve in the nonweight-bearing organs.

  12. Mercury content in wetland rice soil and water of two different seasons at small-scale gold mine processing areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sugianti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to identify the impact of small-scale gold processing activities on mercury content in wetland rice soil and water during the rainy and first dry seasons in Central Lombok and West Lombok Districts. The method used for this study was survey method. Measurement of mercury levels in water samples was conducted at Agro Bogor Centre using SNI 6989.77: 2011 methods. The data was collected and processed in a simple statistic presented descriptively, in order to obtain information. Results of the study showed that mercury content soils in the rainy season exceeded the threshold of 0.005 ppm, while in the first dry season the mercury content in soil decreased, but it was still above the threshold value permitted. The contents of mercury in water samples in the rainy season and the first dry season were still at a safe point that was less than 0.05 ppm. The wetland rice soil and water had been polluted with mercury, although the mercury content in the water was still below the threshold, but the accumulation of mercury that could have been absorbed by the plants are of particular concerns. The decrease of mercury content in soil in dry season was due to lack of gold processing activities.

  13. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  14. Physical and chemical characteristics of ultrasonically-prepared water-in-diesel fuel: effects of ultrasonic horn position and water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Imazu, Hiroki; Nishida, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    An ultrasonic technique was applied to preparation of two-phase water-in-oil (W/O) emulsified fuel of water/diesel oil/surfactant. In this study, an ultrasonic apparatus with a 28 kHz rod horn was used. The influence of the horn tip position during ultrasonic treatment, sonication time and water content (5 or 10 vol%) on the emulsion stability, viscosity, water droplet size and water surface area of emulsion fuels prepared by ultrasonication was investigated. The emulsion stability of ultrasonically-prepared fuel significantly depended on the horn tip position during ultrasonic irradiation. It was found that the change in the stability with the horn tip position was partly related to that in the ultrasonic power estimated by calorimetry. Emulsion stability, viscosity and sum of water droplets surface area increased and water droplet size decreased with an increase in sonication time, and they approached each limiting value in the longer time. The maximum values of the viscosity and water surface area increased with water content, while the limiting values of the emulsion stability and water droplet size were almost independent of water content. During ultrasonication of water/diesel oil mixture, the hydrogen and methane were identified and the cracking of hydrocarbon components in the diesel oil occurred. The combustion characteristics of ultrasonically-prepared emulsion fuel were studied and compared with those of diesel oil. The soot and NOx emissions during combustion of the emulsified fuel with higher water contents were significantly reduced compared with those during combustion of diesel oil.

  15. Ensemble kalman filtering to perform data assimilation with soil water content probes and pedotransfer functions in modeling water flow in variably saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data from modern soil water contents probes can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling, i.e. continual correction of the flow model performance based on observations. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. The method requires estimates of the unce...

  16. Concomitant changes in cross-sectional area and water content in skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Uhrbrand, Anders; Hansen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how one bout (1EX) and three bouts (3EX) of strenuous resistance exercise affected the cross-sectional area (CSA) and water content (WC) of the quadriceps muscle and patella tendon (PT), 4 h and 52 h after the last exercise bout. Ten healthy untrained male subjects performed...... was significantly reduced at 52 h (3EX: 14 ± 2%) compared with baseline and (3EX: 13 ± 1%) compared with 4 h. Present data demonstrate that strenuous resistance exercise results in an acute increase in muscle WC and underlines the importance of ensuring sufficient time between the last exercise bout...

  17. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    Laser backscattering imaging (LBI) is a low-cost technology proposed to determine non-invasively composition and microstructural characteristics of agro food and dairy products. The aim of this work was to define the effect of different acquisition conditions (wavelength, object distance and angle...... of laser incidence) and to analyse the laser-light backscattering changes caused by additional hot air drying and proteolysis of dry-cured ham slices. The feasibility of the technology to determine water content and proteolysis (which is related to textural characteristics) of commercial sliced dry......-cured ham was also evaluated. Results showed that a red laser (635 nm) is more convenient than a green laser (532 nm) to analyse dry-cured ham but no preferable angle or object distance to evaluate dryness or proteolysis was found. Nevertheless, light scattering parameters were modified depending...

  18. Improvements in Inversion of Magnetic Resonance Exploration-Water Content, Decay Time, and Resistivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ugur Yaramanci; Mike Müller-Petke

    2009-01-01

    In this review article, we present recent developments and Improvements in magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), a newly established geophysical exploration method that provides unique information about hydrogeophysical properties due to its direct sensitivity to hydrogen protons and proton dynamics. Starting with the most sophisticated and complete MRS formulation, we give a detailed view on how to solve the equation, i.e., inverting exactly for all model parameters: water content, decay time, and resistivity. Giving a short review of general inversion schemes used in geophysics, the special properties of MRS inversion are evaluated and the development of MRS inversion over recent years is shown. We present the extension of MRS to magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), i.e., the extension to two-dimensional investigations and appropriate inversions. Finally, we address restrictions, limitations, and inconsistencies as well as future developments.

  19. Strontium-Doped Hematite as a Possible Humidity Sensing Material for Soil Water Content Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Grignani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the sensing behavior of Sr-doped hematite for soil water content measurement. The material was prepared by solid state reaction from commercial hematite and strontium carbonate heat treated at 900 °C. X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry were used for microstructural characterization of the synthesized powder. Sensors were then prepared by uniaxially pressing and by screen-printing, on an alumina substrate, the prepared powder and subsequent firing in the 800–1,000 °C range. These sensors were first tested in a laboratory apparatus under humid air and then in an homogenized soil and finally in field. The results evidenced that the screen printed film was able to give a response for a soil matric potential from about 570 kPa, that is to say well below the wilting point in the used soil.

  20. Vibrating-Wire, Supercooled Liquid Water Content Sensor Calibration and Characterization Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael C.; Bognar, John A.; Guest, Daniel; Bunt, Fred

    2016-01-01

    NASA conducted a winter 2015 field campaign using weather balloons at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate a validation database for the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System. The weather balloons carried a specialized, disposable, vibrating-wire sensor to determine supercooled liquid water content aloft. Significant progress has been made to calibrate and characterize these sensors. Calibration testing of the vibrating-wire sensors was carried out in a specially developed, low-speed, icing wind tunnel, and the results were analyzed. The sensor ice accretion behavior was also documented and analyzed. Finally, post-campaign evaluation of the balloon soundings revealed a gradual drift in the sensor data with increasing altitude. This behavior was analyzed and a method to correct for the drift in the data was developed.

  1. Tomographic Imaging of Water Content and Mine-Induced Stress Distribution in North Aurora, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, A. J.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Located in North Aurora, Illinois, the Lafarge-Conco plant is a room-and-pillar mine that is in active production of aggregates, taken from the Galena-Platteville formations. To better understand how stresses are distributed among the pillars over periods of mining production, tomographic images of the interior of the pillar using seismic data collected in November 2012 and March 2013 were created. Seismic tomographic images showed changes in seismic velocity between the two surveys, which is interpreted as change in stress. The southeast corner pillar showed a significant stress increase, and could indicate a possible area of very high stresses within the pillar. While the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomographic image was used to assess a very uniform water content and porosity distribution within the pillar. Understanding how stress and moisture distribution changes within pillars during excavation is valuable to mine design and to the maintenance of mine safety.

  2. Effects of Different Levels of Water Stress on Leaf Water Potential, Stomatal Resistance, Protein and Chlorophyll Content and Certain Anti-oxidative Enzymes in Tomato Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hatem Zgallai; Kathy Steppe; Raoul Lemeur

    2006-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed in order to investigate the effects of different levels of water stress on leaf water potential (ψw), stomatal resistance (rs), protein content and chlorophyll (Chi) content of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Nikita). Water stress was induced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG 6 000) to the nutrient solution to reduce the osmotic potential (ψs). We investigated the behavior of anti-oxidant enzymes, such as catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), during the development of water stress. Moderate and severe water stress (i.e.ψs= -0.51 and -1.22 MPa, respectively) caused a decrease in ψw for all treated (water-stressed) plants compared with control plants, with the reduction being more pronounced for severely stressed plants. In addition, rs was significantly affected by the induced water stress and a decrease in leaf soluble proteins and Chi content was observed. Whereas CAT activity remained constant, SOD activity was increased in water-stressed plants compared with unstressed plants. These results indicate the possible role of SOD as an anti-oxidant protector system for plants under water stress conditions. Moreover, it suggests the possibility of using this enzyme as an additional screening criterion for detecting water stress in plants.

  3. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Bore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  4. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  5. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  6. Resolving precipitation-induced water content profiles through inversion of dispersive GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has become a popular tool for monitoring hydrologic processes. When monitoring infiltration, the thin wetted zone that occurs near the ground surface at early times may act as a dispersive waveguide. This low-velocity layer traps the GPR waves, causing specific frequencies of the signal to travel at different phase velocities, confounding standard traveltime analysis. In a previous numerical study we demonstrated the potential of dispersion analysis for estimating the depth distribution of waveguide water contents. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of the methodology when applying it to experimental time-lapse dispersive GPR data collected during a laboratory infiltration experiment in a relatively homogenous soil. A large sand-filled tank is equipped with an automated gantry to independently control the position of 1000 MHz source and receiver antennas. The system was programmed to repeatedly collect a common mid-point (CMP) profile at the center of the tank followed by two constant offset profiles (COP) in the x and y direction. Each collection was completed in 30 s and repeated 50 times during a 28 min experiment. Two minutes after the start of measurements, the surface of the sand was irrigated at a constant flux rate of 0.006 cm/sec for 23 minutes. Time-lapse COPs show increases in traveltime to reflectors in the tank associated with increasing water content, as well as the development of a wetting front reflection. From 4-10 min, the CMPs show a distinct shingling characteristic that is indicative of waveguide dispersion. Forward models where the waveguide is conceptualized as discrete layers and a piece-wise linear function were used to invert picked dispersion curves for waveguide properties. We show the results from both inversion approaches for multiple dispersive CMPs and show how the single layer model fails to represent the gradational nature of the wetting front.

  7. Ni2+ toxicity in rice: effect on membrane functionality and plant water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Andreu; Ullrich, Cornelia I; Sanz, Amparo

    2008-10-01

    The heavy metal nickel is an essential mineral trace nutrient found at low concentrations in most natural soils. However, it may reach toxic levels in certain areas and affect a number of biochemical and physiological processes in plants. Wilting and leaf necrosis have been described as typical visible symptoms of Ni(2+) toxicity. The plasma membrane (PM) of root cells constitutes the first barrier for the entry of heavy metals but also a target of their toxic action. This work studies the relationship between disturbances of membrane functionality and the development of the typical symptoms of Ni(2+) toxicity. Rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. Bahia) grown in nutrient medium containing 0.5mM Ni(2+) showed a significant decrease in water content as a consequence of the stress. Addition of Ni(2+) to the solution bathing the roots induced a concentration-dependent PM depolarization but the activity of the PM-H(+)-ATPase was not inhibited by the presence of Ni(2+) and the initial resting potential recovered in less than 1h. In the short term (hours), membrane permeability of root cells was not significantly affected by Ni(2+) treatments. However, in the long term (days) a drastic loss of K(+) was measured in roots and shoots, which should be responsible for the changes in the water content measured, since stomatal conductance and the transpiration rate remained unaffected by Ni(2+) treatment. The effects induced by Ni(2+) were not permanent and could be reverted, at least in part, by transferring the plants to a medium without Ni(2+).

  8. Effect of churning temperature on water content, rheology, microstructure and stability of butter during four weeks of storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønholt, Stine; Madsen, Ann Sophie; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain

    2014-01-01

    The effect of churning temperature (10 °C vs. 22 °C) is evaluated with respect to water content, rheology, microstructure and stability of butter produced using the batch churning method with a temperature ramp of 4 °C/min. Using pulsed-nuclear magnetic resonance, an increase in relative solid fat...... content from 44% to 49.5% was observed when decreasing the churning temperature. Due to lower solid fat content formed upon churning at high temperatures, average water droplet size significantly increased from 5.5 μm to 18.5 μm and less water could be incorporated into the butter during mixing. Using...... differential scanning calorimetry, it was observed that water addition as well as churning at low temperatures induced a transition toward more stable crystal structures, as the melting point in the high melting fraction was slightly lower for butter churned at high temperature. This did, however, not reflect...

  9. Theory and practice concerning classification for expansive soils using standard moisture absorption water content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Hailin; CHENG; Ping; YANG; Yang; WU; Wanping

    2005-01-01

    A series of tests on physical, mechanical and chemical properties of expansive soils have shown that the standard moisture absorption water content (SMA) of expansive soils has a good linear relationship with montmorillonite content, cation exchange capacity, specific surface, and it also presents a linear relationship tendency to plastic index and free swell ratio. All this indicates that the above SMA is of clear significance in physics. The plastic index can better reflect the interaction extent between composition and dispersing character of grains, cation and clay minerals. Consequently, SMA can reflect the basic essential properties of expansive soils. On the basis of the classification results that have been published in literature and in consideration of the succession to the classification results for the free swell ratio, this paper puts forward three indexes, i.e. the SMA, plastic index and free swell ratio to classify expansive soils. The tests proposed for the classification indexes are easy to operate, simple in testing device and last a short time. Compared with the latest issued "Classification Standard Code for Rocks and Soils of Railway Projects" (TB10077-2001), the method proposed in this paper is more convenient and reasonable, and can be popularized, when environment conditions ripen, for the application in field of exploration and design of highway in the areas surrounded by expansive soils.

  10. Accuracy of the cosmic-ray soil water content probe in humid forest ecosystems: The worst case scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-09-01

    Soil water content is one of the key state variables in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum due to its important role in the exchange of water and energy at the soil surface. A new promising method to measure integral soil water content at the field or small catchment scale is the cosmic-ray probe (CRP). Recent studies of CRP measurements have mainly presented results from test sites located in very dry areas and from agricultural fields with sandy soils. In this study, distributed continuous soil water content measurements from a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) were used to investigate the accuracy of CRP measurements for soil water content determination in a humid forest ecosystem. Such ecosystems are less favorable for CRP applications due to the presence of a litter layer. In addition, lattice water and carbohydrates of soil organic matter and belowground biomass reduce the effective sensor depth and thus were accounted for in the calibration of the CRP. The hydrogen located in the biomass decreased the level of neutron count rates and thus also decreased the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray probe, which in turn resulted in an increase of the measurement uncertainty. This uncertainty was compensated by using longer integration times (e.g., 24 h). For the Wüstebach forest site, the cosmic-ray probe enabled the assessment of integral daily soil water content dynamics with a RMSE of about 0.03 cm3/cm3 without explicitly considering the litter layer. By including simulated water contents of the litter layer in the calibration, a better accuracy could be achieved.

  11. [Responses of winter wheat photosynthetic characteristics and chlorophyll content to water-retaining agent and N fertilizer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Hui; Wu, Pu-Te; Wu, Ji-Cheng; Zhao, Shi-Wei; Huang, Zhan-Bin; He, Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of water-retaining agent (60 kg x hm(-2)) and nitrogen fertilizer (0, 225, and 450 kg x hm(-2)) on the leaf photosynthetic characteristics, chlorophyll content, and water utilization of winter wheat at jointing and grain-filling stages were studied under field conditions. In all treatments, the net photosynthetic rate, stomata conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, water use efficiency, and chlorophyll content were greater at grain-filling stage than at jointing stage. Under nitrogen fertilization but without water-retaining agent application, the water use efficiency (WUE) of single leaf at jointing stage increased with increasing nitrogen fertilization rate, while the net photosynthetic rate, stomata conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and transpiration rate decreased after an initial increase. The chlorophyll content was the highest under 225 kg x hm(-2) nitrogen fertilization. In the treatments of water-retaining agent application, the intercellular CO2 con- centration decreased with increasing nitrogen application rate, but the net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and WUE increased. The application of water-retaining agent or its combination with nitrogen fertilization increased the chlorophyll content, but excessive nitrogen fertilization had lesser effects. At grain-filling stage, applying nitrogen fertilizer alone significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate and WUE, but decreased the stomata conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and transpiration rate. The chlorophyll content increased with increasing nitrogen application rate. After applying water-retaining agent and with the increase of nitrogen fertilization rate, the photosynthetic rate and WUE decreased after an initial increase, while the intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were in adverse but still lower than those without water-retaining agent application. The stomata conductance increased with increasing nitrogen fertilization

  12. Response of forestland soil water content to heavy rainfall on Beijing Mountain, northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Jia; Xinxiao Yu; Yitao Li

    2016-01-01

    Continuous recording of precipitation and soil water content (SWC), especially during long periods of tor-rential rainfall, has proven challenging. Over a 16 h period spanning 21–22 July, 2012, Beijing experienced historic rainfall that totaled 164.4 mm. We used large lysimeter technology in four forested plots to record precipitation and variation in SWC at 10-min intervals to quantify the response of forestland SWC to heavy rainfall in a semi-arid area. Mean, maximum and minimum rainfall intensities were 23.4, 46.8 and 12.0 mm/h, respectively. Rainfall was concentrated in 2–6 mm bursts that accounted for 67.32%of the total rainfall event. Soil moisture conditions in this region are strongly dependent on patterns of precipitation. Water infiltration into 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 cm soil layers required 1, 5, 20, 37, 46, 52 and 61 mm of precipitation, respectively, and to fully saturate these soil layers required 80, 120, 140, 150, 180, 200 and 220 mm of precipitation, respectively.

  13. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  14. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoad, C L [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Marciani, L [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Foley, S [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Totman, J J [Brain and Body Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Wright, J [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bush, D [Division of GI Surgery, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Cox, E F [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Campbell, E [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Spiller, R C [Wolfson Digestive Diseases Centre, QMC, Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gowland, P A [Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-07

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug interventio000.

  15. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the f