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Sample records for waste tsw portland

  1. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions

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    Kurudirek, Murat [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoglu, Salih Zeki [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ataturk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients ({mu}/{rho}), photon interaction cross sections ({sigma}{sub t}), effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) and effective electron densities (N{sub e}) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25 keV and {gamma}-rays at 88 keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition.

  2. Basalt waste added to Portland cement

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    Thiago Melanda Mendes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is widely used as a building material and more than 4.3 billion tons were produced in 2014, with increasing environmental impacts by this industry, mainly through CO2 emissions and consumption of non-removable raw materials. Several by-products have been used as raw materials or fuels to reduce environmental impacts. Basaltic waste collected by filters was employed as a mineral mixture to Portland cement and two fractions were tested. The compression strength of mortars was measured after 7 days and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Electron Diffraction Scattering (EDS were carried out on Portland cement paste with the basaltic residue. Gains in compression strength were observed for mixtures containing 2.5 wt.% of basaltic residue. Hydration products observed on surface of basaltic particles show the nucleation effect of mineral mixtures. Clinker substitution by mineral mixtures reduces CO2 emission per ton of Portland cement.

  3. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

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    M. A. Trezza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs. For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement.

  4. Waste with chrome in the Portland cement clinker production.

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    Trezza, M A; Scian, A N

    2007-08-17

    Hazardous wastes, coming from industries are usually used in the Portland cement production in order to save energy, costs and/or stabilize toxic substances and heavy metals inside the clinker. This work focuses on the effect produced on the Portland cement clinker when it is obtained using tanned leather shavings whit chrome salts as part of the process. The raw materials were clinkered in laboratory with different percentages of shavings, which contained 2% of Cr(2)O(3). DTA-TG of the raw mixtures was performed to evaluate the thermal behavior changes that can take place during the clinkering process, analyzing the crystalline phases obtained by XRD. The milling behavior of clinkers was studied, analyzing also the refractoriness variation on those clinkers. The chrome retention was evaluated by leaching tests. The structural modification determined by the chrome presence in the silicate structure brought consequences in the hydration speed, mechanical resistance and pore distribution.

  5. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

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    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  6. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

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    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L; Borosnyói, A

    2014-01-01

    In several countries, waste glass causes environmental concerns as quantities stockpiled exceed recycling in the packaging stream. Being amorphous and having relatively high silicium and calcium contents, glass is pozzolanic or even cementitious, when finely ground. Reducing particle sizes typically to less than 100 µm may give control over the alkali-silica reaction in concrete, therefore making this material a possible substitute to Portland cement. Such use may moderate the problem of dump...

  7. Feasibility study of the Portland cement industry waste for the reduction of energy consumption

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    Bernardo, Ana Carla de Souza Masselli; Junqueira, Mateus Augusto F. Chaib; Jorge, Ariosto Bretanha; Silva, Rogerio Jose da [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Institute of Mechanical Engineering]. E-mails: anacarlasz@unifei.edu.br; mateus_afcj@yahoo.com.br; ariosto.b.jorge@unifei.edu.br; rogeriojs@unifei.edu.br

    2008-07-01

    The Portland cement industry demand a high specific consumption of energy for the production of the clinker. The energy consumption for clinker production varies between 3000 and 5300 kJ/kg of produced clinker. The clinker is produced by blending of different raw materials in order t o achieve precise chemical proportions of lime, silica, alumina and iron in the finished product and by burning them at high temperatures. The Portland cement is a mixture of clinker, gypsum and other materials. Due to need of high temperatures, tradition ally the fuels used in the cement industry are mineral coal, fuel oil, natural gas and petroleum coke. The fuel burning in high temperature leads to the formation of the pollutant thermal NOx. The level of emissions of this pollutant is controlled by environmental law, thus the formation of pollutants in process need be controlled. Moreover, industrial waste has been used by Portland cement industries as a secondary fuel through a technique called co -processing. Materials like waste oils, plastics, waste tyres and sewage sludge are often proposed as alternative fuels for the cement industry. The residues can be introduced as secondary fuel or secondary raw material. For energy conservation in the process, mineralizers are added during the process production of the clinker. The mineralizers promote certain reactions which decrease the temperature in the kiln and improve the quality of the clinker. The adequate quantity of constituents in production process is complex, for maintain in controlled level, the quality of final product, the operational conditions of kiln, and the pollutant emissions. The purpose of the present work is to provide an analysis of an optimal production point through of the optimization technique considering, the introduction of the fuels, industrial wastes as secondary fuels, and raw materials, for the reduction of energy in the process of Portland cement production. (author)

  8. Leaching of heavy metals from solidified waste using Portland cement and zeolite as a binder.

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    Napia, Chuwit; Sinsiri, Theerawat; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the properties of solidified waste using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing synthesized zeolite (SZ) and natural zeolite (NZ) as a binder. Natural and synthesized zeolites were used to partially replace the OPC at rates of 0%, 20%, and 40% by weight of the binder. Plating sludge was used as contaminated waste to replace the binder at rates of 40%, 50% and 60% by weight. A water to binder (w/b) ratio of 0.40 was used for all of the mixtures. The setting time and compressive strength of the solidified waste were investigated, while the leachability of the heavy metals was determined by TCLP. Additionally, XRD, XRF, and SEM were performed to investigate the fracture surface, while the pore size distribution was analyzed with MIP. The results indicated that the setting time of the binders marginally increased as the amount of SZ and NZ increased in the mix. The compressive strengths of the pastes containing 20 and 40wt.% of NZ were higher than those containing SZ. The compressive strengths at 28 days of the SZ solidified waste mixes were 1.2-31.1MPa and those of NZ solidified waste mixes were 26.0-62.4MPa as compared to 72.9MPa of the control mix at the same age. The quality of the solidified waste containing zeolites was better than that with OPC alone in terms of the effectiveness in reducing the leachability. The concentrations of heavy metals in the leachates were within the limits specified by the US EPA. SEM and MIP revealed that the replacement of Portland cement by zeolites increased the total porosity but decreased the average pore size and resulted in the better containment of heavy ions from the solidified waste. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

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    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Characterization of Moroccan coal waste: valorization in the elaboration of the Portland clinker

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    Belkheiri D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Coal exploited in the mine of Jerada (northeast of Morocco was accompanied by large quantities of waste. The purpose of this work is to characterize this waste with the aim of its use as a material for civil engineering. Mineral and chemical investigations on this waste in the raw state, and at different temperature of heat treatments, were carried out by various methods: X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy. These analyzes showed that the studied waste, contain essentially a mineral part formed by silica and various clays, as well as coal’s residues. The thermal investigation of waste, by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, revealed an exothermic phenomenon attributed to the combustion of coal residues. Other phenomena were noted on the thermograms due to the mineral part transformations. In this analysis a comparison was also made with pure coal. These characteristics of coal waste encourage studying its development in reducing energy consumption in the Portland cement manufacture. Mixtures of waste with limestone or with raw cement materials were studied, and the resulting products were analyzed by different methods.

  11. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

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    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  12. Enhancement of cemented waste forms by supercritical CO{sub 2} carbonation of standard portland cements

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    Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.; Taylor, C.M.V.

    1997-08-01

    We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with cements, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wastes do not qualify for underground disposition, however, because they do not meet disposal requirements for free liquids, decay heat, head-space gas analysis, and/or leachability. The treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented waste form by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced free liquids, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as the reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories. Simultaneously, the treatment process removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement. The treatment method allows for on-line process monitoring of leachates and can be transported into the field. We will describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of solid and semi-solid waste forms. some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed, with particular attention to the engineering requirements for the establishment of on-site processing facilities. Finally, the initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid processing will be presented.

  13. Use of waste gypsum to replace natural gypsum as set retarders in portland cement.

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    Chandara, Chea; Azizli, Khairun Azizi Mohd; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Sakai, Etsuo

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on clarifying the influence of waste gypsum (WG) in replacing natural gypsum (NG) in the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). WG taken from slip casting moulds in a ceramic factory was formed from the hydration of plaster of paris. Clinker and 3-5wt% of WG was ground in a laboratory ball mill to produce cement waste gypsum (CMWG). The same procedure was repeated with NG to substitute WG to prepare cement natural gypsum (CMNG). The properties of NG and WG were investigated via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)/thermogravimetric (TG) to evaluate the properties of CMNG and CMWG. The mechanical properties of cement were tested in terms of setting time, flexural and compressive strength. The XRD result of NG revealed the presence of dihydrate while WG contained dihydrate and hemihydrate. The content of dihydrate and hemihydrates were obtained via DSC/TG, and the results showed that WG and NG contained 12.45% and 1.61% of hemihydrate, respectively. Furthermore, CMWG was found to set faster than CMNG, an average of 15.29% and 13.67% faster for the initial and final setting times, respectively. This was due to the presence of hemihydrate in WG. However, the values obtained for flexural and compressive strength were relatively the same for CMNG and CMWG. Therefore, this result provides evidence that WG can be used as an alternative material to NG in the production of OPC.

  14. Influence of the waste glass in the axial compressive strength of Portland cement concrete; Influencia dos residuos vitreos na resistencia a compressao axial do concreto de cimento Portland

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    Miranda Junior, E.J.P.; Paiva, A.E.M., E-mail: edson.jansen@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (PPGEM/IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    In this work, was studied the influence of the incorporation of waste glass, coming from the stage of thinning and polishing of a company of thermal glass treatments, in the axial compressive strength of Portland cement concrete. The coarse and ground aggregates used was crushed stone and sand, respectively. For production of the concrete, percentages of glass residues of 5%, 10% and 20% had been used in substitution to the sand, and relations water/cement (a/c) 0,50, 0,55 and 0,58. The cure of the test bodies was carried through in 7, 14 and 28 days. The statistics analysis of the results was carried out through of the analysis of variance for each one of the cure times. From the results of the compressive strength of the concrete, it could be observed that the concrete has structural application for the relation a/c 0,5, independently of waste glass percentage used, and for the relation a/c 0,55 with 20% of waste glass. (author)

  15. Partial replacement of Portland cement by red ceramic waste in mortars: study of pozzolanic activity; Substituicao parcial do cimento Portland por residuo de ceramica vermelha em argamassas: estudo da atividade pozolonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.R. da; Cabral, K.C.; Pinto, E.N. de M.G.l., E-mail: kleber.cabral@ufersa.edu.br [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), Mossoro, RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the pozzolanic activity of red ceramic residue on the partial replacement of Portland cement in mortars. The mortars were prepared by substituting 25% of the Portland cement for ground of ceramic residue with water cement’s factor of 0.48. The concrete used to construct the reference mortars and those with addiction was CPII-Z-32 (compound of Portland pozzolana cement). The chemical analysis and physical ceramic waste showed that this meets the requirements of NBR12653 (2014) for use as pozzolanic material. The pozzolanic activity index (IAP) obtained for the ceramic waste to twenty-eight days cure rate was 80.28%. (author)

  16. Mercury pollution from irrigation with treated sewage water (TSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, A E; Yaghi, B; Williams, J R; Al-Kindy, S

    2007-06-01

    The lack of potable water in arid countries leads to the use of treated sewage water (TSW) for crop growth. Mercury accumulation (up to 500 ng/g) in agricultural soil originating from daily irrigation with TSW was found at two sites fed separately from a hospital sewage plant and an industrial plant. A control site irrigated with potable water ([Hg] irrigation with comparatively higher Hg levels. Remedial measures could be approached from the perspective of curbing this inconsistency to produce more consistent Hg concentrations below 0.5 ng/ml. It was found that the electrical conductivity of TSW is a useful indicator to rapidly monitor fluctuations in treatment. A novel development in the study was the potential capacity of the plastic TSW discharge-pipes to behave as crude 'chromatographic' columns for possible Hg adsorption. If this property of the pipes is developed further it could have a considerable mitigating effect on the Hg levels. Possible recommendations for remediation to limit the Hg levels and promote sustainable development are discussed.

  17. Potencialidades da metacaolinita e do tijolo queimado moído como substitutos parciais do cimento Portland Potentialities of metakaolin and crushed waste calcined clay brick as partial replacement of Portland cement

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    João de Farias Filho

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Avalia-se, neste trabalho, a potencialidade do uso da metacaolinita e dos resíduos de produção de tijolos cerâmicos queimados finamente moídos, como substitutos parciais do cimento Portland. Os materiais foram caracterizados física, química e mineralogicamente, além de determinado o índice de atividade pozolânica com cimento Portland. A evolução da resistência a compressão e a flexão das argamassas foi avaliada até as idades de, respectivamente, 365 e 208 dias. As porcentagens de substituição do cimento Portland, em peso, pelos materiais pozolânicos, variaram de 20 a 50%, enquanto o fator água/cimento variou de 0,37 a 0,45. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que a metacaolinita e o tijolo moído queimado possuem elevada atividade pozolânica e que a resistência a compressão, aos 28 dias, das argamassas mistas, foi superior à das argamassas de cimento Portland para os níveis de substituição e fatores água/cimento estudados. Um modelo matemático para predição da resistência à compressão das argamassas mistas é proposto com base em um desenho fatorial de experimentos.This paper evaluates the potentiality of metakaolin and crushed waste fired clay brick as cement replacement materials. They were characterised physically, chemically and mineralogically and their activity with Portland cement determined. The influence of the partial replacement of Portland cement on the development of compressive and flexural strength was evaluated until the age of, respectively, 365 and 208 days. The percentage of cement replacement, in weight, ranged from 20 to 50%, whereas the water/cement ratio ranged from 0.37 to 0.45. The results obtained show that the metakaolin and crushed calcined clay brick presented a good pozolanic activity and that the compressive strength of the blended mortars after 28 days of cure was higher than that observed for the reference Portland cement for all levels of cement replacement and water/cement ratio. A

  18. Recycling of spent catalyst and waste sludge from industry to substitute raw materials in the preparation of Portland cement clinker

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    Kae-Long Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the feasibility of using waste limestone sludge, waste stone sludge, iron oxide sludge, and spent catalyst as raw materials in the production of eco-cement. The compressive strength development of the Eco Cement-A (ECO-A paste was similar to that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC pastes. The compressive strength development of the ECO-B paste was higher than that of OPC pastes. In addition, the C2S (Ca2SiO4, C2S and C3S (Ca3SiO5 minerals in the eco-cement paste were continuously utilized to hydrate the Ca(OH2 and calcium silicate hydrates gel (Ca6Si3O12·H2O, C–S–H throughout the curing time. When ECO-C clinker contained 8% spent catalyst, the C3S mineral content decreased and C3A (3 CaO·Al2O3 content increased, thereby causing the structure to weaken and compressive strength to decrease. The results showed that the developed eco-cement with 4% spent catalyst possessed compressive strength properties similar to those of OPC pastes.

  19. Determination of molecular, atomic, electronic cross-sections and effective atomic number of some boron compounds and TSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icelli, Orhan [Department of physics Education, Faculty of Education Erzincan University, 24030 Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: orhanicelli@gmail.com; Erzeneoglu, Salih [Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    The transmission of gamma-rays of some boron compounds (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) and the trommel sieve waste (TSW) have been measured by using an extremely narrow-collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range 15.74-40.93 keV. Molecular, atomic and electronic cross-sections and effective atomic numbers have been determinated on the basis of mixture rule and compared with the results obtained from theory.

  20. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

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    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  1. Investigation on the potential of waste cooking oil as a grinding aid in Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Huang, Yuyan; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Xiaojie; Yang, Zhenghong; Chen, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Although there are several methods for managing waste cooking oil (WCO), a significant result has not been achieved in China. A new method is required for safe WCO management that minimizes the environmental threat. In this context, this work was developed in which cement clinker and gypsum were interground with various WCOs, and their properties, such as grindability, water-cement ratio required to achieve a normal consistency, setting times, compressive strength, contents of calcium hydroxide and ettringite in the hardened paste, microstructure and economic and environmental considerations, were addressed in detail. The results show that, overall, WCO favorably improves cement grinding. WCO prolonged the cement setting times and resulted in longer setting times. Additionally, more remarkable effects were found in cements in which WCO contained more unsaturated fatty acid. WCOs increased the cement strength. However, this enhancement was rated with respect to the WCO contents and components. WCOs decreased the CH and AFt contents in the cement hardened paste. Even the AFt content at later ages was reduced when WCO was used. WCO also densify microstructure of the hardened cement paste. It is economically and environmentally feasible to use WCOs as grinding aids in the cement grinding process. These results contribute to the application of WCOs as grinding aids and to the safe management of WCO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mineralogy and microstructure of two Mexican Portland cements for the confinement of radioactive waste; Mineralogia y microestructura de dos cementos mexicanos Portland para el confinamiento de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus El Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, Carretera Toluca-Ixtlahuaca Km. 15.5, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava E, N., E-mail: nasiega_181@hotmail.com [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The cementitious materials are involved in the different stages of radioactive waste management because they are used for the waste immobilization in the container, as well as filling in the spaces between containers vaults and also as engineering barrier and construction material in civil construction site. Therefore, is necessary to have a study of commercial cement available nationwide involving solid timely analysis in order to identify which phases are responsible for confinement of radionuclides, if considered the most reactive phase -CSH- or called secondary phases. In this research the hydration products of cement are presented as well as its importance in the nuclear industry. The analysis and observation of the cement clinker and the hydration products on the manufactured pulps with two commercial cements resistant to sulphates was realized using the observation technique of solid X-ray diffraction and nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Fluorescence. The results show the presence of calcium silicate hydrates in the amorphous phase and the presence of ettringite crystals and portlandite sheets is appreciated. The abundant iron phase called tetra calcium ferro aluminate has been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Author)

  3. Use of alumina spent catalyst and RFCC wastes from petroleum refinery to substitute bauxite in the preparation of Portland clinker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dhamri, Hilal; Melghit, Khaled

    2010-07-15

    Bauxite was substituted with spent catalysts for clinker preparation. Three different clinkers were prepared: one with bauxite as a reference, one with spent alumina catalyst and another with reduced fluid cracking catalyst. Powder X-ray diffraction technique, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize each clinker sample. Rietveld refinement shows that, in all clinkers prepared, alite was formed with hexagonal lattice and monoclinic belite has higher unit cell volume compared to the known beta-Ca(2)SiO(4). The physical and mechanical properties (specific area, setting time, heat of hydration, soundness and compressive strength) of the cement samples were studied. The results show that substitution of bauxite by spent catalysts gave close results in terms of chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties of the Portland clinker. Also it shows the spent catalysts do not affect the quality of the prepared cement. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Portland clinker production with carbonatite waste and tire-derived fuel: crystallochemistry of minor and trace elements

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    F. R. D. Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results on the composition of Portland clinkers produced with non-conventional raw-materials and fuels, focusing on the distribution of selected trace elements. Clinkers produced with three different fuel compositions were sampled in an industrial plant, where all other parameters were kept unchanged. The fuels have chemical fingerprints, which are sulfur for petroleum coke and zinc for TDF (tire-derived fuel. Presence of carbonatite in the raw materials is indicated by high amounts of strontium and phosphorous. Electron microprobe data was used to determine occupation of structural site of both C3S and C2S, and the distribution of trace elements among clinker phases. Phosphorous occurs in similar proportions in C3S and C2S; while considering its modal abundance, C3S is its main reservoir in the clinker. Sulfur is preferentially partitioned toward C2S compared to C3S. Strontium substitutes for Ca2+ mainly in C2S and in non-silicatic phases, compared to C3S.

  5. Utilização de rejeitos de pilha zinco-carvão em argamassas e concretos de cimento Portland Waste preparing of zinc battery for use in mortar and concrete materials of portland cement

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    M. A. Coimbra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi recuperar um resíduo proveniente de pilhas do tipo zinco-carvão para ser utilizado como aditivo em argamassas e concretos, dando assim, uma solução para as pilhas e ao mesmo tempo ajudando a resolver a questão ambiental incluindo-as na indústria brasileira de reciclagem. Desse modo, foi possível caracterizar e avaliar as possibilidades de utilização desse rejeito. Foram coletadas pilhas para serem caracterizadas através de diferentes análises, assim como, densidade real e área específica (BET. Também se utilizou a técnica de difração de raios X, pH e microscopia eletrônica de varredura em conjunto com espectroscopia dispersiva de energia por raios X.The aim of this work was to recover one waste from zinc battery by use like additive in mortar and concrete materials and this way, promoting both battery and environment solutions. Hence, the morphological, chemical and mineralogical characterizations were made focusing its use in the recycling Brazilian industry. Moreover, the tests performed in a true density and specific surface area (BET, X-ray diffraction, pH and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS.

  6. Lodging Update: Portland, Maine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J. Roginsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Each quarter, Pinnacle Advisory Group prepares an analysis of the New England lodging industry, which provides a regional summary and then focuses in depth on a particular market. These reviews look at recent and proposed supply changes, factors affecting demand and growth rates, and the effects of interactions between such supply and demand trends. In this issue, the authors summarize regional performance for 2012, offer projections for 2013, and spotlight the lodging market in Portland, Maine.

  7. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  8. Coal Bottom Ash for Portland Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Argiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of industrialization growth, the amount of coal power plant wastes has increased very rapidly. Particularly, the disposal of coal bottom ash (CBA is becoming an increasing concern for many countries because of the increasing volume generated, the costs of operating landfill sites, and its potential hazardous effects. Therefore, new applications of coal bottom ash (CBA have become an interesting alternative to disposal. For instance, it could be used as a Portland cement constituent leading to more sustainable cement production by lowering energy consumption and raw material extracted from quarries. Coal fly and bottom ashes are formed together in the same boiler; however, the size and shape of these ashes are very different, and hence their effect on the chemical composition as well as on the mineralogical phases must be studied. Coal bottom ash was ground. Later, both ashes were compared from a physical, mechanical, and chemical point of view to evaluate the potential use of coal bottom ash as a new Portland cement constituent. Both ashes, produced by the same electrical power plant, generally present similar chemical composition and compressive strength and contribute to the refill of mortar capillary pores with the reaction products leading to a redistribution of the pore size.

  9. 75 FR 44304 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Noise Exposure Map Notice, Portland International Airport, Portland, OR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Port of Portland for Portland International Airport... the FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 21, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  10. Genetic mapping of the Tsw locus for resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus in Capsicum spp. and its relationship to the Sw-5 gene for resistance to the same pathogen in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, M; Paran, I; Hoffmann, K; Radwanski, E R; Livingstone, K D; Grube, R C; Aftergoot, E; Lapidot, M; Moyer, J

    2000-06-01

    The Tsw gene conferring dominant resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in Capsicum spp. has been tagged with a random amplified polymorphic DNA marker and mapped to the distal portion of chromosome 10. No mapped homologues of Sw-5, a phenotypically similar dominant TSWV resistance gene in tomato, map to this region in C. annuum, although a number of Sw-5 homologues are found at corresponding positions in pepper and tomato. The relationship between Tsw and Sw-5 was also examined through genetic studies of TSWV. The capacity of TSWV-A to overcome the Tsw gene in pepper and the Sw-5 gene in tomato maps to different TSWV genome segments. Therefore, despite phenotypic and genetic similarities of resistance in tomato and pepper, we infer that distinct viral gene products control the outcome of infection in plants carrying Sw-5 and Tsw, and that these loci do not appear to share a recent common evolutionary ancestor.

  11. Utilization of gold tailings as an additive in Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ozlem; Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Piskin, Sabriye

    2006-06-01

    Mine tailings are formed as an industrial waste during coal and ore mining and processing. In the investigated process, following the extraction of gold from the ore, the remaining tailings are subjected to a two-stage chemical treatment in order to destroy the free cyanide and to stabilize and coagulate heavy metals prior to discharge into the tailings pond. The aim of this study was the investigation of the feasibility of utilization of the tailings as an additive material in Portland cement production. For this purpose, the effects of the tailings on the compressive strength properties of the ordinary Portland cement were investigated. Chemical and physical properties, mineralogical composition, particle size distribution and microstructure of the tailings were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), particle size analyzer (Mastersizer) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Following the characterization of the tailings, cement mortars were prepared by intergrinding Portland cement with dried tailings. Composition of the cement clinkers were adjusted to contain 5, 15, 25% (wt/wt) dried tailings and also silica fume and fly ash samples (C and F type) were added to clinker in different ratios. The mortars produced with different amounts of tailings, silica fume, fly ashes and also mixtures of them were tested for compressive strength values after 2, 7, 28 and 56 days according to the European Standard (EN 196-1). The results indicated that gold tailings up to 25% in clinker could be beneficially used as an additive in Portland cement production. It is suggested that the gold tailings used in the cement are blended with silica fume and C-type fly ash to obtain higher compressive strength values.

  12. Long-Run Diversion Effects of Changes in Truck Size and Weight (TS&W) Restrictions: An Update of the 1980 Friedlaender Spady Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to estimate the effect that revised truck size and weight (TS&W) restrictions would have on competitive rail-truck markets in the United States. The analysis is based on a classic study of the intercity freight markets that Ann Friedlaender and Richard Spady (FS) published in the Review of Economics and Statistics in 1980.1 The FS study provided a macro-level perspective on the freight markets by focusing on transportation decisions in key industrial sectors—fo...

  13. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facility's production process.

  14. Gravity Data for the Greater Portland Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1,522 records) were compiled by the Portland State University. This data base was received in August 1990. Principal gravity parameters...

  15. 2015 City of Portland, Maine, Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 2015 City of Portland Maine Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Woolpert Order No. 75564 Contractor: Woolpert, Inc. This task is for a high resolution data set of...

  16. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  17. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  18. Stabilization of marly soils with portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maksim; Karzin, Evgeny; Lukina, Valentina; Lukinov, Vitaly; Kholkin, Anatolii

    2017-10-01

    Stabilization of marlous soils with Portland cement will increase the service life of motor roads in areas where marl is used as a local road construction material. The result of the conducted research is the conclusion about the principal possibility of stabilization of marlous soils with Portland cement, and about the optimal percentage of the mineral part and the binding agent. When planning the experiment, a simplex-lattice plan was implemented, which makes it possible to obtain a mathematical model for changing the properties of a material in the form of polynomials of incomplete third order. Brands were determined for compressive strength according to GOST 23558-94 and variants of stabilized soils were proposed for road construction.

  19. 75 FR 20523 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ...'' rather than ``marine'' to describe the activities that may take place in the area where the sediment caps... ] Portland, Oregon. The RNAs are necessary to preserve the integrity of engineered sediment caps placed... sediment caps in that area. DATES: This rule is effective May 20, 2010. ADDRESSES: Comments and material...

  20. Toxicity and Histopathological Effects of Portland Cement Powder in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common gill changes at all doses of Portland cement powder in solution were destruction of gill lamella, epithelial hyperplasia and epithelial hypertrophy. Hepatic lesions in the liver tissues of fish exposed to Portland cement powder in solution were characterized by degeneration of hepatocyte, vascuolization of ...

  1. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of some boron compounds and the trommel sieve waste in the energy range 15.746-40.930 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icelli, Orhan E-mail: orhan_icelli@hotmail.com; Erzeneoglu, Salih; Boncukcuoglu, Recep

    2003-05-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of some boron compounds (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} and B{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and the trommel sieve waste (TSW) have been measured by using an extremely narrow collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range 15.746-40.930 keV. The characteristic K{alpha} and K{beta} X-rays of Zr, Mo, Ag, In, Sb, Ba and Pr passed through H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, B{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TSW were detected with a high-resolution Si(Li) detector. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained using the WINXCOM.

  2. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island at...

  3. Lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Portland Base Bed and Portland Whit Bed limestone as related to durability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubelaar, C.W.; Engering, S.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Koch, R.; Lorenz, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the differences in lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Base Bed and Whit Bed Portland limestone and the presumed relationships between these characteristics and the durability of this building stone. As Portland limestone probably will be used as a stone for several

  4. Age-Friendly Portland: a university-city-community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Margaret B; DeLaTorre, Alan K; Carder, Paula C

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the question of how creating an age-friendly city has come to be an important policy and planning issue in Portland, Oregon. In 2006, researchers from Portland State University's Institute on Aging examined the meanings of age friendliness among a broad range of participants in Portland, Oregon. The research was conducted in conjunction with the World Health Organization's (WHO) Age-Friendly Cities project and followed the completion of two earlier non-WHO-related projects. The city of Portland, through the Institute on Aging, was one of nine original members to apply for and be accepted into the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities. An Age-Friendly Portland Advisory Council was formed to guide the development of an action plan, monitor progress over time, and suggest additional research. To understand how Portland's age-friendly policy effort has developed over time, we use Kingdon's (1984) agenda-setting framework to explain how the policy problem was formulated, how solutions were developed, and the influence of local politics. The policy actors, including individuals and organizations working within and outside of government, are described. The Portland experience provides a case study that other cities, especially those with a strong commitment to community-engaged urban planning, may find useful as they develop age-friendly initiatives.

  5. Glass containing portland slag cement materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Петровна Бондаренко

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of glass powder on the kinetics of curing materials based on Portland slag cement is investigated. As a result of optimizing the domain of existence it is obtained binder composition, limited by the axis X1 from 25 to 55% of the axis X2 from 5 to 7.5 % and the X3 axis values of W/C from 0.243 to 0.33, allowing to obtain an artificial stone, characterized by a compressive strength of 30-106 MPa in the range 2-90 days of hardening, characterized by porosity: total - 27.1 %; open - 21.42 % and closed – 5 %

  6. 77 FR 46371 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants,'' which was published in the Federal Register on July 18, 2012. The...

  7. 75 FR 54969 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants; Final Rule... Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is...

  8. 76 FR 2832 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants... (NESHAP) from the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance (NSPS) for Portland Cement Plants. The final rules were published on September 9, 2010. This direct final action amends...

  9. 76 FR 28318 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants... Pollutants emitted by the Portland Cement Industry and the New Source Performance Standards for Portland Cement Plants issued under sections 112(d) and 111(b) of the Clean Air Act, respectively. The EPA is also...

  10. Traditional Portland cement and MgO-based cement: a promising combination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Monica; Martini, Francesca; Calucci, Lucia; Geppi, Marco; Borsacchi, Silvia; Ridi, Francesca

    2017-06-01

    MgO/SiO2 cements are materials potentially very useful for radioactive waste disposal, but knowledge about their physico-chemical properties is still lacking. In this paper we investigated the hydration kinetics of cementitious formulations prepared by mixing MgO/SiO2 and Portland cement in different proportions and the structural properties of the hydrated phases formed in the first month of hydration. In particular, the hydration kinetics was investigated by measuring the free water index on pastes by means of differential scanning calorimetry, while the structural characterization was carried out by combining thermal (DTA), diffractometric (XRD), and spectroscopic (FTIR, 29Si solid state NMR) techniques. It was found that calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gels mainly form as separate phases, their relative amount and structural characteristics depending on the composition of the hydrated mixture. Moreover, the composition of the mixtures strongly affects the kinetics of hydration and the pH of the aqueous phase in contact with the cementitious materials. The results here reported show that suitable mixtures of Portland cement and MgO/SiO2 could be used to modify the properties of hydrated phases with potential application in the storage of nuclear waste in clayey disposal.

  11. Increasing the compressive strength of portland cement concrete using flat glass powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda Junior, Edson Jansen Pedrosa de; Bezerra, Helton de Jesus Costa Leite; Politi, Flavio Salgado; Paiva, Antonio Ernandes Macedo, E-mail: edson.jansen@ifma.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranha (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica e Materiais

    2014-08-15

    This paper analyzes the compressive strength of Portland cement concrete in response to the incorporation of 5%, 10% and 20% of flat glass powder in place of sand, at w/c (water/cement) ratios of 0.50, 0.55 and 0.58. A statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed after 7, 14 and 28 days of curing. The compressive strength test results indicate that the concrete containing a w/c ratio of 0.50 can be used for structural applications, regardless of the waste glass content, as can that with a w/c ratio of 0.55 containing 20% of waste glass. We suggest that the use of flat glass powder in place of sand in the above mentioned percentages is feasible for the production of an environmentally appropriate and structurally applicable concrete. However, the concrete's fluidity and void content must be taken into account. (author)

  12. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 1176 block groups in Portland, Oregon. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  13. Taxi Regulatory Revision in Portland, Oregon : A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Interest in taxi regulatory revision stems from the taxicab's potential to complement or to be an alternative to conventional fixed-route transit. Taxi regulatory revision in Portland, Oregon, and other cities reflects the current awareness to reduce...

  14. Effects of portland cement particle size on heat of hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Following specification harmonization for portland cements, FDOT engineers reported signs of : deterioration in concrete elements due to temperature rise effects. One of the main factors that affect : concrete temperature rise potential is the heat g...

  15. Impact of aggregate gradation on properties of portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Increasingly, aggregates in South Carolina are failing to meet the standard requirements for gradation for use in portland cement concrete. The effect of such failed aggregate gradations on concrete properties and the consequent effect on short- and ...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 146 block groups in Portland, Maine. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  17. INTENSIFY HEAT-RESISTANT BINDER BASED ON PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Curbanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article presents the results of a study of heat-resistant binder based on Portland cement with the addition of a local mill ground minerals.Methods. Activation is carried out on a planetary mill "Activator - 4M". Activation of the binder increases the strength of heat-resistant concrete by increasing the reactivity bundles "Portland is the active fine additive" to the mechano-chemical additive.Results. It is determined that the mill ground additives result in the formation of low-melting and thereby reduce the temperature of the use of heat-resistant concrete with Portland cement binder.Conclusion. It is proved that high mechanochemical strength refractory concrete samples on activated binder is caused by the process of increasing the chemical activity of the materials included in a bundle of "Portland cement is the active fine additive" which creates favorable conditions for hardening of heat-resistant concrete.

  18. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, ME Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  19. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  20. Portland, Maine Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Portland, Maine Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  1. Portland cement concrete pavement restoration : final summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    This final summary report is comprised of an Initial Construction Report; a Final Report; and two Interim Reports. These reports document the construction of Louisiana's Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Restoration project and its performance during...

  2. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  4. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  5. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  6. The use of glass powder as a partial Portland cement replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Finely grinded waste glass powder can become material having suitable properties from the point of view of particle size and pozzolanic activity. Glass powder incorporation into cement paste and cement-based composites can bring improvement in porous structure resulting in increased mechanical strength and durability characteristics. On this account, two types of recycled glass powder are investigated in the presented paper as a possible partial Portland cement substitutes in cement blends. For raw glass powders, basic physical parameters and chemical composition are measured. The studied glass powders are applied as 5, 10 and 20 mass% of Portland cement replacement in cement paste mix composition, whereas water/binder ratio of 0.3 is used for all studied pastes. Fresh paste mixtures are characterized using initial and final setting time measurement. For hardened pastes cured 28 days in water, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity and mechanical properties represented by flexural and compressive strength are accessed. Portlandite consumption by the pozzolanic reaction is monitored with TGA. The obtained results show effectiveness of a borosilicate glass powder that acts as a pozzolanic active admixture. This resulted in improvement of mechanical characteristics for cement substitution up to 10 mass%.

  7. Properties of radioactive wastes and waste containers. Progress report No. 7, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, Jr, R. M.

    1978-04-01

    Trial solidifications were made using portland type II cement--sodium silicate as the solidification agent. The sodium silicate was found to produce an initial rapid set for all wastes because of the precipitation of relatively insoluble silicate compounds upon reaction with soluble multivalent cations in solution in the cement-waste mixture. Achievement of the ultimate waste form strength required time intervals similar to waste forms produced using portland cement alone. A hard waste form was not obtained within seventy-eight days with formulations used to solidify boric acid waste. The flash points and flame points of Pioneer 221 bitumen and bitumen waste forms were determined using the Cleveland open cup method. The bitumen alone had a flash point of 610 +- 2/sup 0/F and a flame point of 668 +- 4/sup 0/F. The bitumen waste forms exhibited similar flame points but slightly higher (15 to 20/sup 0/F) flash points were measured. Self-irradiation exposure dose curves were calculated for BWR and PWR waste forms. These curves indicate the cumulative waste form exposure dose with time and serve as the basis for radiation stability experiments. Waste form specific activities of 0.01 to 100 Ci/ft/sup 3/ were considered. Bitumen waste forms containing sodium sulfate from the solidification of BWR chemical regenerative waste were prepared and leach tested. These specimens swelled and cracked during leach testing, exposing substantial new surface area to the leachant. The volumetric efficiencies of urea-formaldehyde and portland type II cement for various wastes and waste/binder ratios were calculated from compression test specimen data.

  8. Portland-pfa cement: a comparison between intergrinding and blending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monk, M.

    1983-09-01

    Portland-pfa cements containing 20-40% (by weight) pfa have been prepared in the laboratory both by intergrinding the ashes with clinker and by blending with cement. Cement properties have been assessed according to BS 4550 and scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of grinding upon the pfa particles. The work has shown that intergrinding leads to an improvement in the water-reducing properties of coarse pfas and also in their pozzolanic activity as indicated by compressive strength development at later ages. Setting times have been found to be essentially the same for blended and interground cements, both being considerably longer than for typical ordinary Portland cements. Thus the results of this investigation indicate that, provided pfa's are chemically acceptable, they can be used for Portland-pfa cement manufacture by intergrinding irrespective of their coarseness.

  9. Apatite formation on calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangdaeng, S; Sata, V; Aguiar, J B; Pacheco-Torgal, F; Chindaprasirt, P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer was investigated for use as biomaterial. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activators. In vitro test was performed with simulated body fluid (SBF) for bioactivity characterization. The formation of hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked samples surface was tested using SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results showed that the morphology of hydroxyapatite was affected by the source material composition, alkali concentration and curing temperature. The calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer with relatively high compressive strength could be fabricated for use as biomaterial. The mix with 50% white Portland cement and 50% calcined kaolin had 28-day compressive strength of 59.0MPa and the hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked sample surface was clearly evident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Portland, OR Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) dataset includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2012) Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Portland, OR land cover web service includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and various smaller towns and rural...

  12. Regional economic impact assessment: Evaluating remedial alternatives for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David; Coughlin, Conor; Hogan, Dylan; Edwards, Deborah A; Smith, Benjamin C

    2018-01-01

    The present paper describes a methodology for evaluating impacts of Superfund remedial alternatives on the regional economy in the context of a broader sustainability evaluation. Although economic impact methodology is well established, some applications to Superfund remedial evaluation have created confusion because of seemingly contradictory results. This confusion arises from failure to be explicit about 2 opposing impacts of remediation expenditures: 1) positive regional impacts of spending additional money in the region and 2) negative regional impacts of the need to pay for the expenditures (and thus forgo other expenditures in the region). The present paper provides a template for economic impact assessment that takes both positive and negative impacts into account, thus providing comprehensive estimates of net impacts. The paper also provides a strategy for identifying and estimating major uncertainties in the net impacts. The recommended methodology was applied at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, located along the Lower Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, USA. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) developed remedial alternatives that it estimated would cost up to several billion dollars, with construction durations possibly lasting decades. The economic study estimated regional economic impacts-measured in terms of gross regional product (GRP), personal income, population, and employment-for 5 of the USEPA alternatives relative to the "no further action" alternative. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:32-42. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  13. Lime kiln dust as a potential raw material in portland cement manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Michael; Callaghan, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the manufacture of portland cement involves burning in a rotary kiln a finely ground proportional mix of raw materials. The raw material mix provides the required chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other ingredients. The majority of calcium is supplied in the form of calcium carbonate usually from limestone. Other sources including waste materials or byproducts from other industries can be used to supply calcium (or lime, CaO), provided they have sufficiently high CaO content, have low magnesia content (less than 5 percent), and are competitive with limestone in terms of cost and adequacy of supply. In the United States, the lime industry produces large amounts of lime kiln dust (LKD), which is collected by dust control systems. This LKD may be a supplemental source of calcium for cement plants, if the lime and cement plants are located near enough to each other to make the arrangement economical.

  14. Belite Portland Clinkers. Synthesis and Mineralogical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Torre, A. G.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The quaternary system CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3 has been taken into account to design five compositions of belite Portland clinkers with belite (Ca2SiO4 contents ranging from 60 to 65 wt%, located in its primary phase field of crystallization. The synthesis of these belite clinkers has been studied by high temperature microscopy, dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. As a result, the optimum clinkerization temperature has been established at 1360 ± 5ºC. The quantitative phase analyses of the clinkers were carried out by X-ray powder diffraction with the Rietveld methodology. The mineralogical composition depends on the initial dosages, on the highest temperature achieved and on the time of residence at this temperature. The reaction was completed at 1365ºC during 15 min (free CaO < 0.5 wt%, in those conditions the β-belite form is stabilized and the harmful transformation β→γ is avoided.

    Teniendo en cuenta el sistema cuaternario CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3, se han diseñado cinco composiciones de clínqueres Pórtland belíticos, con contenidos del 60 y del 65% en peso de belita (Ca2SiO4, situadas en su campo primario de cristalización. La síntesis de estos clínqueres belíticos se ha estudiado “in situ” por microscopía de alta temperatura, dilatometría y análisis térmico diferencial y termogravimétrico. La temperatura óptima de clinquerización, determinada con estas técnicas, ha sido de 1360 ± 5ºC. Los análisis cuantitativos de los clínqueres se llevaron a cabo por difracción de rayos-X con la metodología Rietveld. Los porcentajes de las diferentes fases dependen de las dosificaciones iniciales, de la temperatura alcanzada y del tiempo de residencia a dicha temperatura. Se ha conseguido una reacción total (%CaO libre < 0.5% en peso tratando a 1365ºC durante 15 min, en cuyas condiciones se estabiliza la forma β de la belita y se evita la transformación perjudicial β→γ.

  15. Hydration and microstructure of Portland cement partially substituted with ultrafine silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante, J. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal waste, a by-product of steam power plants that use geothermal underground resources, was studied as a possible replacement for Portland cement. This waste consists primarily in amorphous nanometric silica with traces of sodium and potassium chlorides. The replacement ratios studied were 0, 10 and 20% in cements cured at 20 and 60 ºC. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that clinker phase hydration took place earlier in the presence of the geothermal waste. Scanning electron microscopy, in turn, revealed a reduction in porosity and intense calcium hydroxide consumption as a result of the pozzolanic reaction. The pastes containing 20% waste, however, an intense cracking was observed due to the formation of alkali silica reaction gel and ettringite. Cracking was more prominent at 60 ºC but was not observed in either the neat cement or the blend with 10 % waste. The presence of these detrimental phases was attributed to the formation of Friedel’s salt in the initial hydration stages, induced by the chlorides in the geothermal material.Se investigaron pastas de cemento Portland sustituido con un desecho geotérmico, subproducto de la generación de electricidad en plantas que emplean recursos geotérmicos. El desecho está compuesto principalmente de sílice amorfa de tamaño nanométrico, con cloruros de sodio y potasio. Se investigaron cementos con niveles de substitución de 0, 10 y 20%, curados a 20 y 60 °C. En presencia del desecho geotérmico, se observó por Difracción de rayos X cuantitativa que la hidratación de las fases del clínker se aceleró; además mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido se encontró una disminución en la porosidad y un intenso consumo de hidróxido de calcio por la reacción puzolánica. Sin embargo, para pastas con 20% de desecho geotérmico, se observó agrietamiento con la presencia de gel de reacción álcali sílice y ettringita; fue más acentuado a 60 °C y no se observó para pastas de

  16. 77 FR 42367 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry and Standards of Performance for Portland Cement Plants; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 138 / Wednesday...-AQ93 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

  17. 76 FR 78240 - Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... International Trade Administration Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty... antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and clinker from Japan, pursuant to section 751(c) of the... International Trade Commission (ITC) that revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and...

  18. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland Cement...

  19. 77 FR 10618 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC... direct control of Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC (PVJR), a wholly owned subsidiary of Columbia..., Columbia Basin R.R., Cent. Wash. R.R. and Portland Vancouver Junction R.R.--Corporate Family Transaction...

  20. Comparative study of the properties of ordinary portland cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored metakaolin as alternative material to cement. It compares the properties of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete and binary concrete containing metakaolin as partial replacement of OPC. Two set of concrete samples; one with 10% Metakaolin (MK) replacing OPC by weight, and the other without ...

  1. Portland cement concrete pavement best practices summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work and findings from WA-RD 744. This work consisted of four separate efforts related to best practices for portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement design and construction: (1) a review of past and current PCC pavement, (2...

  2. 77 FR 20718 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... foot race scheduled for April 15, 2012. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed... event. The Bridge to Brews event is an annual 8-10K footrace held in Portland, OR. The race course... 117.35. Dated: March 19, 2012. Randall D. Overton, Bridge Administrator. BILLING CODE 9110-04-P ...

  3. Dehydration kinetics of Portland cement paste at high temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Portland cement paste is a multiphase compound mainly consisting of calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) gel, calcium hydroxide (CH) crystal, and unhydrated cement core. When cement paste is exposed to high temperature, the dehydration of cement paste leads to not only the decline in strength, but also

  4. Evaluation of physical stability and leachability of Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) solidified chemical sludge generated from textile wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Hema, E-mail: hhasija@gmail.com [TERI University, Plot No. 10, Institutional Area, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi (India); Pandey, Suneel [Centre for Regulatory and Policy Research, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India Habitat Centre, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge from textile wastewater treatment plants using Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) containing fly ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical engineering (compressive strength and block density) indicates that sludge has potential to be reused for construction purpose after stabilization/solidification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leaching of heavy metals from stabilized/solidified materials were within stipulated limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a modification of microstructural properties of PPC with sludge addition as indicated by XRD and SEM patterns. - Abstract: The chemical sludge generated from the treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a hazardous waste as per Indian Hazardous Waste Management rules. In this paper, stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge was carried out to explore its reuse potential in the construction materials. Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) was selected as the binder system which is commercially available cement with 10-25% fly ash interground in it. The stabilized/solidified blocks were evaluated in terms of unconfined compressive strength, block density and leaching of heavy metals. The compressive strength (3.62-33.62 MPa) and block density (1222.17-1688.72 kg/m{sup 3}) values as well as the negligible leaching of heavy metals from the stabilized/solidified blocks indicate that there is a potential of its use for structural and non-structural applications.

  5. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  6. City of Portland: Businesses for an environmentally sustainable tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The sustainable business development program in Portland (OR) is known as BEST. BEST stands for Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow. The Portland Energy Office operates BEST as a {open_quotes}one-stop service center{close_quotes} for business owners and managers. BEST provides information and assistance on resource efficient buildings and business practices. The results of BEST`s two years of operation have been generally impressive. Nearly 150 new or expanding businesses have been connected with utility design assistance programs. Businesses have also received assistance with water conservation, telecommuting, construction debris recycling, and alternative fuel vehicles. BEST has received local and national publicity and BEST services have been the topic at more than a dozen conferences, meetings, or other speaking engagements. A guidebook for communities wishing to start a similar program will be available in early 1996.

  7. Trees in the city: valuing street trees in Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.H. Donovan; D.T. Butry

    2010-01-01

    We use a hedonic price model to simultaneously estimate the effects of street trees on the sales price and the time-on-market (TOM) of houses in Portland. Oregon. On average, street trees add $8,870 to sales price and reduce TOM by 1.7 days. In addition, we found that the benefits of street trees spill over to neighboring houses. Because the provision and maintenance...

  8. The Portland Harbor Superfund Site Sustainability Project: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne G; Apitz, Sabine E; Harrison, David; Ruffle, Betsy; Edwards, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    This article introduces the Portland Harbor Superfund Site Sustainability Project (PHSP) special series in this issue. The Portland Harbor Superfund Site is one of the "mega-sediment sites" in the United States, comprising about 10 miles of the Lower Willamette River, running through the heart of Portland, Oregon. The primary aim of the PHSP was to conduct a comprehensive sustainability assessment, integrating environmental, economic, and social considerations of a selection of the remedial alternatives laid out by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A range of tools were developed for this project to quantitatively address environmental, economic, and social costs and benefits based upon diverse stakeholder values. In parallel, a probabilistic risk assessment was carried out to evaluate the risk assumptions at the core of the remedial investigation and feasibility study process. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:17-21. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  9. Physical evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from portland cement

    OpenAIRE

    Negm, Ahmed; Hassanien, Ehab; Abu-Seida, Ashraf; Nagy, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of addition of 10% and 25% by weight calcium hydroxide on the physicochemical properties of Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide in order to develop a new pulp capping material. Material and Methods The solubility, pH value, setting time, compressive strength, and push out bond strength of modified Portland were evaluated and compared to those of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement containing 20% bismuth oxide. Results T...

  10. 78 FR 10005 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... dioxins and furans EPA Environmental Protection Agency ESP Electrostatic Precipitators ERT Electronic... the EPA's methodology for establishing the Portland cement NESHAP, denied all petitions for review...

  11. APC fly ashes stabilized with Portland cement for further development of road sub-base aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, J.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Huete-Hernández, S.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Although waste-to-energy plants allow reducing the mass and volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated, an average around 30 % of the total content remains as bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) ashes at the end of combustion process. While weathered bottom ash (WBA) is considered a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate, APC fly ashes generated during the flue gas treatment are classified as hazardous waste and are handled in landfill disposal after stabilization, usually with Portland cement (OPC). However, taking into account the amount of APC residues produced and the disposing cost in landfill, their revalorization is an important issue that could be effectively addressed. As MSW can be incinerated producing bottom ashes (BA) or air pollutant control (APC) residues, the development of a mortar formulated with APC fly ash as secondary building material is a significant risk to the environment for their content of heavy metals. In this way, Design of Experiment (DoE) was used for the improvement of granular material (GM) formulation composed by APC and OPC for further uses as road sub-base aggregate. DoE analysis was successful in the modelling and optimization the formulation as function of the mechanical properties and APC amount. Consequently, an optimal mortar formulation (OMF) of around 50 wt.% APC and 50 wt.% OPC was considered. The OMF leachates and abrasion resistance have been analyzed. These results have demonstrated the viability of OMF as non-hazardous material feasible to be used as secondary aggregate. Moreover, it would be possible to consider the environmental assessment of a GM composed by ≈20 wt.% of OMF and ≈80 wt.% of WBA in order to improve mechanical properties and heavy metals stabilization.

  12. UTILIZAÇÃO DA CINZA DA CASCA DO COCO VERDE COMO SUBSTITUIÇÃO PARCIAL DO CIMENTO PORTLAND EM ARGAMASSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleidson Carneiro Guimarães

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: O presente trabalho tem como objetivo principal avaliar a influência da cinza da casca de coco verde (CCCV nas propriedades das argamassas no estado fresco e endurecido, a partir da substituição parcial do cimento Portland (CP por cinza. Esta proposta surge da problemática ligada à destinação da casca do coco como resíduo urbano e agroindustrial e dos impactos ambientais provocados pela produção do cimento Portland. Para realização dessa pesquisa foram produzidas uma argamassa de referência e outras três argamassas com diferentes teores de substituição do CP por CCCV. Inicialmente, foi feita a caracterização dos materiais utilizados no trabalho e a análise de índice de pozolanicidade da cinza. Em seguida, foram feitas análises referenciais das propriedades das argamassas produzidas no estado fresco e no estado endurecido. A partir das análises pode-se perceber que a presença da cinza na argamassa influencia na trabalhabilidade, resistência mecânica e na durabilidade da argamassa e que a CCCV não possui potencial pozolânico. A adição de até 10% de CCCV substituindo o cimento Portland é viável. ABSTRACT: This study aims to evaluate the influence of ash green coconut shell (AGCS on the properties of mortars in fresh and hardened, from the partial replacement of Portland cement (PC by gray. This proposal arises from problems linked to the allocation of coconut shell as urban and agro-industrial waste and environmental impacts caused by the production of Portland cement. For this survey were produced a reference mortar and three mortars with different CP replacement levels by AGCS. Initially, it was the characterization of the materials used at work and ash pozzolanicity index analysis. Next, analyzes were made reference the properties of mortars produced in fresh and hardened state. From the analysis it can be seen that the ash presence in the mortar influences the workability, strength and durability of the

  13. Corrosion inhibitor mechanisms on reinforcing steel in Portland cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Farrel James

    2001-07-01

    The mechanisms of corrosion inhibitor interaction with reinforcing steel are investigated in the present work, with particular emphasis on effects associated with corrosion inhibitors admixed into Portland cement paste. The principal objective in reinforcing steel corrosion inhibition for Portland cement concrete is observed to be preservation of the naturally passive steel surface condition established by the alkaline environment. Introduction of chloride ions to the steel surface accelerates damage to the passive film. Excessive damage to the passive film leads to loss of passivity and a destabilization of conditions that facilitate repair of the passive film. Passive film preservation in presence of chloride ions is achieved either through stabilization of the passive film or by modification of the chemical environment near the steel surface. Availability of inhibitors to the steel surface and their tendency to stabilize passive film defects are observed to be of critical importance. Availability of admixed corrosion inhibitors to the passive film is affected by binding of inhibitors during cement paste hydration. It is determined that pore solution concentrations of inorganic admixed inhibitors tend to be lower than the admixed concentration, while pore solution concentrations of organic admixed inhibitors tend to be higher than the admixed concentration. A fundamental difference of inhibitor function is observed between film-forming and defect stabilizing corrosion inhibitors. Experiments are conducted using coupons of reinforcing steel that are exposed to environments simulating chloride-contaminated Portland cement concrete. A study of the steel/cement paste interface is also performed, and compounds forming at this interface are identified using X-Ray diffraction.

  14. Reciclagem secundária de rejeitos de porcelanas elétricas em estruturas de concreto: determinação do desempenho sob envelhecimento acelerado Secondary recycling of electrical insulator porcelain waste in Portland concrete structures: determination of the performance under accelerated aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Portella

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O uso de entulhos, entre outros rejeitos industriais e domésticos, pela construção civil vem sendo prática comum em diversos países desenvolvidos, em razão tanto do aumento da quantidade de rejeitos e conseqüente esgotamento de espaços apropriados para seu destino final, quanto da constante e cada vez mais rigorosa fiscalização e punição pelos organismos ambientais competentes. Antecipando maneiras para solução desses problemas, propôs-se o estudo da reciclagem e imobilização de rejeitos de porcelanas elétricas em concreto, em substituição parcial aos agregados graúdos e miúdos naturais. A vantagem não foi total por causa do indício de reações expansivas que poderiam prejudicar determinadas aplicações. Assim, foi proposto o estudo das condições ideais de dosagem para mitigar os efeitos de tais reações pela presença de contaminantes destes rejeitos. Os resultados demonstraram a efetiva promoção de reações do tipo álcali-agregado, e que o uso de cimentos especiais poderá diminuir o efeito prejudicial dos subprodutos formados.The use of rubbish and other kinds of domestic and industrial wastes on civil construction has been a common practice in many developed countries, due either to the increase in the amount of waste and the resultant reduction of appropriate places to its final disposal, as well as to the severity and steadiness of environmental inspection organizations. In order to provide beforehand manners to solve or reduce these problems, study of recycling and co-disposal of waste from porcelain electrical insulators in concrete was proposed. Besides the occurrence of expansive reactions, which may be harmful to the stability of important structures, the overall results were encouraging. Some contaminants found in the three phases of porcelain contributed to the happening of alkali-aggregate reaction, which can easily inhibited by the using of special cements, such as a sulfur-resistant one.

  15. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All...

  16. 77 FR 33267 - Eric Temple-Control Exemption-Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Eric Temple--Control Exemption--Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC... verified notice of exemption to acquire direct control of Portland Vancouver Junction Railroad, LLC (PVJR...

  17. Reuse of grits waste for the production of soil--cement bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, F B; Holanda, J N F

    2013-12-15

    This investigation focuses on the reuse of grits waste as a raw material for replacing Portland cement by up to 30 wt.% in soil-cement bricks. The grits waste was obtained from a cellulose factory located in south-eastern Brazil. We initially characterized the waste sample with respect to its chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, fineness index, morphology, pozzolanic activity, and pollution potential. Soil-cement bricks were then prepared using the waste material and were tested to determine their technological properties (e.g., water absorption, apparent density, volumetric shrinkage, and compressive strength). Microstructural evolution was accompanied by confocal microscopy. It was found that the grits waste is mainly composed of calcite (CaCO3) particles. Our results indicate that grits waste can be used economically, safely, and sustainably at weight percentages of up to 20% to partially replace Portland cement in soil-cement bricks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plans and Living Practices for the Green Campus of Portland State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jung Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to comprehend Portland State University (PSU’s green campus strategies, and students’ level of knowledge and living practices relating to green campus. PSU’s sustainable campus plan has been nationally and internationally recognized. A literature review, field investigation, and interviews were conducted to ascertain the PSU green campus strategies. This study also used a survey to understand students’ level of knowledge and practices. The survey results were analyzed by SPSS. Green campus projects at PSU were operated by official organizations and funded according to PSU’s long term plans in 12 multilateral categories: administration, energy, water, climate action, green buildings, green purchasing, waste reduction and recycling, food and dining services, transportation, land use, action, and education and student activity. The survey results show that the level of students’ understanding about PSU’s green campus strategies was somewhat low, but the amount of practice of a sustainable lifestyle was higher. Students who had taken courses related with sustainability or were engaged in sustainable activities had more knowledge about green campus strategies than students who had not. Therefore, it would be important to focus more on educating students and developing related programs in order to have more positive effects of green campus projects.

  19. INFLUENCE OF BARIUM OXIDE ADDITIONS ON PORTLAND CLINKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anezka Zezulova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, nuclear power plants are widespread around the world and research is of great interest. Together with nuclear research, shielding of different types of radiation is an important current topic of research aiming at their safety. Portland cement has been an elementary building material for centuries. Since barium is very efficient in shielding different types of radiation, it can be assumed that the radiation shielding capability of cement can be improved by incorporation of barium. This work deals with the influence of barium oxide, added in the form of barium carbonate and sulphate, on the formation and properties of Portland clinker. The structure of burnt clinkers and the ratio of clinker phases were studied by polarizing microscopy and by X-ray diffraction. With increasing barium content, the alite-belite ratio decreases and the content of free lime gradually increases. Moreover, sulphates induce the growth of alite crystals. The ability of barium to be a part of the clinker minerals was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Belite and clinker melt contain the highest amount of barium, but aggregates of barium oxide are formed in the clinker melt. Furthermore, the rate of alite crystallization was studied under isothermal conditions.

  20. Effect of three natural pozzolans in portland cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahhal, V.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural pozzolans have been used since ancient times and continues to be used today. The chemistry and morphological composition of natural pozzolans and their particle size distribution allows classifying them as more or less reactive pozzolan. In this research several techniques have been used to study the influence of pozzolan on portland cement hydration as much as to evaluate the mechanical and durable properties of concretes, mortars and pastes containing pozzolans. This paper describes the effect of incorporating three natural pozzolans to two cements with very different mineralogical composition. The techniques used were: conduction calorimetry and Fratini test. Results proved that pozzolanic activity and the acceleration and retardation of hydration reaction depend on the mineralogical composition of the portland cernent used. Effects of dilution, stimulation, acceleration or retardation reactions, behavior into areas of heat dissipation and pozzolanic activity depend on the percentage of pozzolan used and the age in which it has been analyzed.

    El uso de las puzolanas naturales se remonta a la antigüedad, no obstante, actualmente continúa su utilización. La composición química y morfológica de las puzolanas naturales, sumado al tamaño de sus partículas, las califican como más o menos reactivas. En el estudio de las mismas, se han aplicado variadas técnicas para el análisis de sus interferencias en las reacciones de hidratación de los cementos portland; así como para la evaluación de las propiedades resistentes y duraderas que pueden conferirle a los hormigones, morteros o pastas de los que formen parte. Este trabajo versará sobre los efectos que produce la incorporación de tres puzolanas naturales a dos cementos portland de muy diferente composición mineralógica. Las técnicas aplicadas para su estudio han sido: la calorimetría de conducción y el ensayo de Fratini. Los resultados obtenidos permiten determinar

  1. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement clinker from...

  2. 76 FR 54206 - Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Final Results of the Expedited Third Sunset Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... International Trade Administration Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From Japan: Final Results of the Expedited... review of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and clinker from Japan. As a result of this... duty order on gray portland cement and clinker from Japan \\1\\ pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff...

  3. 76 FR 23193 - Traffic Separation Schemes: In the Approaches to Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay, MA; Chesapeake Bay, VA, and Cape Fear... Portland, ME; in the approaches to Boston, MA; in the approaches to Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay... Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay, MA; Chesapeake Bay, VA; and Cape Fear...

  4. Physical evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Ahmed; Hassanien, Ehab; Abu-Seida, Ashraf; Nagy, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the effects of addition of 10% and 25% by weight calcium hydroxide on the physicochemical properties of Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide in order to develop a new pulp capping material. The solubility, pH value, setting time, compressive strength, and push out bond strength of modified Portland were evaluated and compared to those of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement containing 20% bismuth oxide. The statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results show that the strength properties and push out bond strength of Portland cement were adversely affected by addition of calcium hydroxide especially with a ratio of 25 wt%, however, the setting time and pH were not affected. MTA showed a statistically significant lower setting time than other cements (P≤0.001). Portland cement with bismuth oxide and Port Cal I showed a statistically significant higher Push out Bond strength than MTA and Port Cal II (P=0.001). Taking the setting time, push out bond strength and pH value into account, addition of 10 wt% calcium hydroxide to Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide produces a new pulp capping material with acceptable physical and adhesive properties. Further studies are recommended to test this cement biologically as a new pulp capping material. Calcium hydroxide, MTA, Portland cement, setting time, solubility, strength.

  5. Pulpotomies with portland cement in human primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Regina Conti

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases in which Portland cement (PC was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy of mandibular primary molars in children are presented. Pulpotomy using PC was carried out in two mandibular first molars and one mandibular second molar, which were further followed-up. At the 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up appointments, clinical and radiographic examinations of the pulpotomized teeth and their periradicular area revealed that the treatments were successful in maintaining the teeth asymptomatic and preserving pulpal vitality. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC could be observed in the three molars treated. PC may be considered as an effective alternative for primary molar pulpotomies, at least in a short-term period. Randomized clinical trials with human teeth are required in order to determine the suitability of PC before unlimited clinical use can be recommended.

  6. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Mechanical behavior of cementitious composites with processed sugar cane bagasse ashes; Comportamento mecanico de cimento Portland com cinza de bagaco de cana-de-acucar processada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Augusto C.S.; Saraiva, Sergio L.C.; Sena, Natalia O.; Pereira, Gabriela M.; Rodrigues, Conrado S.; Ferreira, Maria C.N.F., E-mail: augustobezerra@des.cefetmg.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), MG (Brazil); Castro, Laurenn W.A.; Silva, Marcos V.M.S. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais, MG (Brazil); Gomes, Romero C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil); Aguilar, Maria T.P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Sugar cane bagasse is waste from the sugar and ethanol industry and is primarily intended for burning in boilers to generate energy. As waste from the cogeneration of energy, sugar cane bagasse ashes (SCBA) are produced with no honorable destination. This paper studies the use of SCBA to partially replace Portland cement in producing cementitious composites. The ashes were processed by reburning and grinding, and after processing were characterized by a scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, laser granulometry, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. After characterization, cement compounds were fashioned, replacing 0, 10, 20 and 30% of the cement with SCBA. The composites were mechanically evaluated by means of compression strength tests, tensile strength tests by bending. The results proved significant, indicating the possible use of SCBA when added to the cement on manufacture. (author)

  8. Sulfatos en el cemento portland y su incidencia sobre el falso fraguado: Estado actual del conocimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Cruz, Ignacio

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available A bibliographical study is carried out of the sulphates which may be present in the clinker and Portland cement, as likewise the effects of the aeration and temperature on the setting. This work is a prior phase of a wide experimental investigation carried out in the IETCC, on anomalies or setting and phenomena of "lumping" in Portland cement.

    Se realiza un estudio bibliográfico de los sulfatos que pueden estar presentes en el clínker y cemento portland, así como de los efectos de la aireación y temperatura sobre el fraguado. Este trabajo es la fase previa de una amplia investigación experimental realizada en el IETCC, sobre anomalías de fraguado y fenómenos de "aterronamiento" en el cemento portland.

  9. Experimental placement of stone matrix asphalt : project STP-8724 (00) X South Portland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In September 2003 the Maine Department of Transportation used stone matrix asphalt and Superpave to : renovate two intersections in South Portland, Maine. The experimental placement of stone matrix asphalt : (SMA) and Superpave with modified binder w...

  10. Portland cement concrete pavement review of QC/QA data 2000 through 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report analyzes the Quality Control/Quality Assurance (QC/QA) data for Portland cement concrete pavement : (PCCP) awarded in the years 2000 through 2009. Analysis of the overall performance of the projects is accomplished by : reviewing the Calc...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Portland, ME Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) data was generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green,...

  12. 2014 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Metro Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset encompasses 1221.6 square miles in portions of the greater Portland Metro area in the state of Oregon. The highest hit digital surface models (DSM)...

  13. 2014 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar DEM: Metro Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset encompasses 1221.6 square miles in portions of the greater Portland Metro area in the state of Oregon. The highest hit digital surface models (DSM)...

  14. Recycled Portland cement concrete pavements : Part II, state-of-the art summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This report constitutes a review of the literature concerning recycling of portland cement concrete pavements by crushing the old pavement and reusing the crushed material as aggregate in a number of applications. A summary of the major projects cond...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2010) Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The Portland, ME land cover...

  16. Pathways to Urban Sustainability: perspective from Portland and the Pacific Northwest : summary of a workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brose, Dominic A

    2014-01-01

    "Pathways to Urban Sustainability: Perspective from Portland and the Pacific Northwest is the summary of a workshop convened by the National Research Council's Science and Technology for Sustainability Program in May 2013 to examine...

  17. Evaluation of a thin-bonded Portland cement concrete pavement overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the performance of the Virginia Department of Transportation's first modern rehabilitation project involving a thin-bonded portland cement concrete overlay of an existing jointed concrete pavement. The performance of the rigid o...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 1176 block groups in Portland, Oregon. The US EPA's...

  19. Nanotechnology-Based Performance Improvements For Portland Cement Concrete - Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    A fundamental understanding of the nano-structure of Portland cement concrete (PCC) is the key to realizing significant breakthroughs regarding high performance and susta : (MBTC 2095/3004) using molecular dynamics (MD) provided new understanding of ...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 146 block groups in Portland, Maine. The US EPA's...

  1. Clinical and computed tomographic evaluation of portland cement pulpotomy in primary molar: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kamrun Nahar; A. K. M. Bashar; Mozammal Hossain; Ali Asgor Moral

    2016-01-01

    The present case describes the clinical & radiographic outcome of a Portland Cement pulpotomy. The 5 years old girl presenting extensive carious exposure in her mandibular left 2nd deciduous molar and was suffering pain in her left lower jaw only on exposure to cold for last 2 days. She was ultimately diagnosed clinic-radio-graphically as a case of irreversible pulpitis. Coronal pulpotomy procedure was carried out in the responsible tooth and Portland cement (PC) was applied as a medicame...

  2. Steel corrosion resistance in model solutions and reinforced mortar containing wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the corrosion resistance of steel in alkaline model solutions and in cement-based materials (mortar). The model solutions and the mortar specimens were Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based. Further, hereby discussed is the implementation of an eco-friendly approach of waste

  3. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  4. Quieting of Portland cement concrete highway surfaces with texture modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, various types of asphalt surfaces have become identified as ``quiet pavements'' due to their ability to reduce tire/pavement noise and, ultimately, traffic noise. Often lost in this perception is the fact that substantial reductions in tire/pavement noise can also be made by texture modifications to existing Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) or by novel constructions. PCC surfaces have been found to span a range of as much as 16 dB. As a result, there is the potential to achieve large noise reductions depending on the existing and final surfaces. In California, grinding of bridge decks and elevated structures has been found to reduce tire/pavement source levels 3 to 10 dB with comparable reductions in wayside measurements. In Arizona, grinding of PCC has reduced source levels up to 9 dB relative to some transversely tined surfaces. Measurements conducted in Europe using the same measurement methodology indicated a range of 11 dB including more novel porous PCC surfaces. In this paper, measurement results and case histories are reviewed for situations where PCC modifications were successful and unsuccessful in producing quieter pavement.

  5. Blasted copper slag as fine aggregate in Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, M A G; Sales, A T C; Andrade, N

    2017-07-01

    The present work focuses on assessing the viability of applying blasted copper slag, produced during abrasive blasting, as fine aggregate for Portland cement concrete manufacturing, resulting in an alternative and safe disposal method. Leaching assays showed no toxicity for this material. Concrete mixtures were produced, with high aggregate replacement ratios, varying from 0% to 100%. Axial compressive strength, diametrical compressive strength, elastic modulus, physical indexes and durability were evaluated. Assays showed a significant improvement in workability, with the increase in substitution of fine aggregate. With 80% of replacement, the concrete presented lower levels of water absorption capacity. Axial compressive strength and diametrical compressive strength decreased, with the increase of residue replacement content. The greatest reductions of compressive strength were found when the replacement was over 40%. For tensile strength by diametrical compression, the greatest reduction occurred for the concrete with 80% of replacement. After the accelerated aging, results of mechanic properties showed a small reduction of the concrete with blasted copper slag performance, when compared with the reference mixture. Results indicated that the blasted copper slag is a technically viable material for application as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Arsenic content in Portland cement: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenorio de Franca Talita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement (PC is a hydraulic binding material widely used in the building industry. The main interest in its use in dentistry is focused on a possible alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA because PC is less expensive and is widely available. In dentistry, PC has been used in dental procedures such as pulpotomy, pulp capping, repair of root perforation and root-end filling. The purpose of this article is review the dental literature about the PC, its composition with special attention to arsenic content, properties, and application in dentistry. A bibliographic research was performed in Bireme, PubMed, LILACS and Scopus data bases looking for national and international studies about the PC composition, properties and clinical use. It was observed that PC has favorable biological properties very similar to those of MTA. The PC has shown good cell proliferation induction with formation of a monolayer cell, satisfactory inflammatory response, inhibitory effect of prostaglandin and antimicrobial effect. Studies have shown that PC is not cytotoxic, stimulates the apposition of reparative dentin and permits cellular attachment and growth. Regarding arsenic presence, its levels and release are low. PC has physical, chemical and biological properties similar to MTA. Arsenic levels and release are low, therefore, unable to cause toxic effects.

  7. Durabilidad de un suelo contaminado y tratado con cemento portland Durability of a contaminated soil treated with portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José W Jiménez Rojas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene por objetivo la aplicación de la técnica de solidificación/estabilización de suelos contaminados, analizando específicamente el comportamiento físico del suelo a través de ensayos de durabilidad. El suelo fue contaminado en laboratorio con residuo oleoso y la aplicación de la técnica tuvo cómo agente de encapsulamiento el cemento Portland CP V-ARI. Los ensayos de durabilidad, realizados según la NBR 13554 (1996, tuvieron como objetivo estudiar el grado de desagregación y vulnerabilidad del material con diversas combinaciones de dosificaciones de cemento y residuo oleoso, así cómo estudiar la variación volumétrica de los mismos. A partir de los resultados es posible observar que cuanto mayor la cantidad de contaminante, mayor es la pérdida de masa. Sin embargo, cuánto mayor es la cantidad de cemento, menor es la pérdida de masa y menor la variación volumétrica.This work seeks the application of solidification/stabilization techniques to contaminated soils analyzing specifically de physical behavior of the soil through tests of durability. The soil was contaminated in laboratory with acidic oily sludge industrial residues and the application of that technique had an encapsulate agent, the Portland cement CP V-ARI. The tests were carried out according to NBR 13.554 (1996, and they aimed to study the level of degradation and the vulnerability of the material with several combinations of cement and acidic oily sludge as well as study their volumetric variations. Starting from the results, it is possible to observe that the larger the contamination the larger the mass loss; however the larger the amount of cement, the smaller the mass loss and the more stable the volumetric variation.

  8. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600ºC.

  9. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  11. DURABILIDAD DEL CEMENTO PORTLAND BLANCO ADICIONADO CON PIGMENTO AZUL ULTRAMAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINA GIRALDO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El pigmento Azul Ultramar (AU es un aluminosilicato polisulfurado de sodio que reacciona con el aluminato tricálcico (C3A y con el óxido de calcio (CaO del cemento Pórtland blanco en presencia de agua, generando cantidades considerables de etringita a edad temprana y en menor proporción de tobermorita. Esta etringita primaria se presenta en forma de fibras no orientadas mejorando el desempeño mecánico de los morteros, y al mismo tiempo dejando pocas cantidades de C3A disponible para la formación de etringita secundaria. En esta investigación se evalúa la durabilidad a diferentes edades de curado en morteros de cemento Portland blanco sustituidos por 0%, 10% y 20% de AU en peso, mediante pruebas de succión capilar y evaluación del cambio longitudinal de morteros expuestos a una solución de sulfato de sodio con una concentración del 5% (ASTM C1012. Los resultados evidencian una mayor resistencia a compresión y a flexión, una significativa disminución de la expansión y una reducción hasta del 800% de la absorción de agua en morteros con AU. Todo esto debido a la formación de las fases minerales adicionales (etringita primaria y tobermorita, las cuales fueron identificadas mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM.

  12. Reuse of a residue from petrochemical industry with portland cement Reutilización de un residuo de la industria petroquímica como adición al cemento portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth Torres Agredo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the possibility of using waste from the petrochemical industry,as partial replacement of Portland cement is studied, evaluating the presenceof contaminants in the waste and the encapsulation, once it is confined on the cement. This has been done, in order to find a use to this residue without cause damage to the environment. This residue, called spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC, is mainly formed by a type Y zeolite, which is dispersing in an inorganic oxides matrix. The toxicity characteristic leaching proceeding was applied, in mortars adding with 20% of FCC as Portland cement replacement. The results showed that the residue does not represent a problem from the point of view of the leaching of elements, such as As, Pb, Zn, Cr, and La, which were below to the permissible limits. Additionally, the pozzolanic activity of FCC was evaluated according to ASTM C311, where the efficiency of the residue as pozzolanic addition is demonstrated. With the results the importance of reusing a residue of the petrochemical industry is emphasized, that decreases the amount of cement to be used and improves the mechanical resistance of the materials containing it.En el presente artículo se estudia la posibilidad de utilizar un residuo de la industria petroquímica, como sustitución parcial del cemento Portland, evaluando la presencia de elementos contaminantes en el residuo y su encapsulación, una vez se haya confinado con el cemento. Lo anterior, con el fin de determinar si su uso como material de construcción, puede o no causar un efecto negativo al medio ambiente. El residuo, denominado catalizador usado de craqueo catalítico (FCC, es un material que está compuesto por una zeolita tipo Y, dispersa en una matriz de óxidos inorgánicos. Se aplicó la técnica de TCLP (del inglés Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, en morteros adicionados con un 20%, de FCC con respecto a la cantidad de cemento. Los resultados

  13. Immediate and delayed solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Bodanezi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and Portland cement since its mixture until 672 hours, by means of two complimentary methods. Metal ring molds filled with the cements were covered with distilled water and, at each experimental time (3, 24, 72, 168, 336 and 672 hours, were weighed as soon as the plates in which the samples have been placed. Empty rings served as the control group (n=8. Mean weight gain and loss was determined and analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for all pairwise comparisons. Only Portland cement showed less than 3% weight loss through 24 hours. Detached MTA residues were heavier than those of Portland cement over the 3 to 168 hours. The weight of MTA rings increased more than that of Portland rings within 672 hours (p=0.05. The findings of the present study indicate that, in an aqueous environment MTA is more soluble than Portland cement and exceeds the maximum weight loss considered acceptable by ISO 6876 standard (2001.

  14. The chemical constitution and biocompatibility of accelerated Portland cement for endodontic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Montesin, F E; Di Silvio, L; Pitt Ford, T R

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate and accelerated Portland cement and their eluants by assessing cell metabolic function and proliferation. The chemical constitution of grey and white Portland cement, grey and white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and accelerated Portland cement produced by excluding gypsum from the manufacturing process (Aalborg White) was determined using both energy dispersive analysis with X-ray and X-ray diffraction analysis. Biocompatibility of the materials was assessed using a direct test method where cell proliferation was measured quantitatively using Alamar Blue dye and an indirect test method where cells were grown on material elutions and cell proliferation was assessed using methyltetrazolium assay as recommended by the International standard guidelines, ISO 10993-Part 5 for in vitro testing. The chemical constitution of all the materials tested was similar. Indirect studies of the eluants showed an increase in cell activity after 24 h compared with the control in culture medium (Pbismuth oxide to the accelerated Portland cement did not interfere with biocompatibility. The new accelerated Portland cement showed similar results. Cell growth was poor when seeded in direct contact with the test cements. However, the elution made up of calcium hydroxide produced during the hydration reaction was shown to induce cell proliferation.

  15. Studies on potential of Portland cement mortar for binding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramalinggam Thanalechumi

    cement mortar (CM) to produce a cement mortar-water- works composite referred to as cement-solidified water- works sludge (CMWWS) for use as a construction material has not been studied. The S/S often immobilizes contami- nants (such as heavy metals) within a waste material (such as sludge) to form a solid.

  16. Stakeholder value-linked sustainability assessment: Evaluating remedial alternatives for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Sabine E; Fitzpatrick, Anne G; McNally, Amanda; Harrison, David; Coughlin, Conor; Edwards, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory decisions on remediation should consider affected communities' needs and values, and how these might be impacted by remedial options; this process requires that diverse stakeholders are able to engage in a transparent consideration of value trade-offs and of the distribution of risks and benefits associated with remedial actions and outcomes. The Stakeholder Values Assessment (SVA) tool was developed to evaluate remedial impacts on environmental quality, economic viability, and social equity in the context of stakeholder values and priorities. Stakeholder values were linked to the pillars of sustainability and also to a range of metrics to evaluate how sediment remediation affects these values. Sediment remedial alternatives proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site were scored for each metric, based upon data provided in published feasibility study (FS) documents. Metric scores were aggregated to generate scores for each value; these were then aggregated to generate scores for each pillar of sustainability. In parallel, the inferred priorities (in terms of regional remediation, restoration, planning, and development) of diverse stakeholder groups (SGs) were used to evaluate the sensitivity and robustness of the values-based sustainability assessment to diverse SG priorities. This approach, which addresses social indicators of impact and then integrates them with indicators of environmental and economic impacts, goes well beyond the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act's (CERCLA) 9 criteria for evaluating remedial alternatives because it evaluates how remedial alternatives might be ranked in terms of the diverse values and priorities of stakeholders. This approach identified trade-offs and points of potential contention, providing a systematic, semiquantitative, transparent valuation tool that can be used in community engagement. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018

  17. Formation of cement mortar with incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ng Hooi; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Jin, Tan Soo

    2017-04-01

    Product of incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash was substitute to Portland cement in construction industry. This study investigated the changes of bottom ash in Portland cement by chemical and mineralogical testing. Various substitution of bottom ash (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) to Portland cement was investigated. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the cement mortar with bottom ash particles. The result indicated that the chemical and mineralogical of the cement mortar incorporating bottom ash was not significantly changed with the substitution of 10-40% bottom ash. However, the use of bottom ash minimizes the main composition of cement mortar. Overall, it was found that there is significant potential to increase the utilization of bottom ash.

  18. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United... cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  19. The Anglo-Dutch favourite : the career of Hans Willem Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649-1709)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onnekink, D.M.L.

    2004-01-01

    William III, the main opponent of William III, surrounded himself with a small circle of confidants who played an important role in advising him. The most prominent among these was undoubtedly Hans Willem Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649-1709). This thesis analyses Portland's career within the

  20. 78 FR 19698 - Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau; Notice of Application.... Date filed: February 13, 2013. d. Applicant: Lucid Energy, Inc., The City of Portland Water Bureau. e.... Applicant Contact: Ms. Jan Lee, Water & Energy Resource Services P.O. Box 2517, Clackamas, OR 97105, Cell at...

  1. Developing flood-inundation maps for Johnson Creek, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Beal, Benjamin A.

    2017-04-14

    Digital flood-inundation maps were created for a 12.9‑mile reach of Johnson Creek by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The flood-inundation maps depict estimates of water depth and areal extent of flooding from the mouth of Johnson Creek to just upstream of Southeast 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon. Each flood-inundation map is based on a specific water level and associated streamflow at the USGS streamgage, Johnson Creek at Sycamore, Oregon (14211500), which is located near the upstream boundary of the maps. The maps produced by the USGS, and the forecasted flood hydrographs produced by National Weather Service River Forecast Center can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapper Web site (http://wimcloud.usgs.gov/apps/FIM/FloodInundationMapper.html).Water-surface elevations were computed for Johnson Creek using a combined one-dimensional and two‑dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow model. The model was calibrated using data collected from the flood of December 2015 (including the calculated streamflows at two USGS streamgages on Johnson Creek) and validated with data from the flood of January 2009. Results were typically within 0.6 foot (ft) of recorded or measured water-surface elevations from the December 2015 flood, and within 0.8 ft from the January 2009 flood. Output from the hydraulic model was used to create eight flood inundation maps ranging in stage from 9 to 16 ft. Boundary condition hydrographs were identical in shape to those from the December 2015 flood event, but were scaled up or down to produce the amount of streamflow corresponding to a specific water-surface elevation at the Sycamore streamgage (14211500). Sensitivity analyses using other hydrograph shapes, and a version of the model in which the peak flow is maintained for an extended period of time, showed minimal variation, except for overbank areas near the Foster Floodplain Natural Area.Simulated water-surface profiles were combined with light detection and ranging (lidar

  2. Optimal fluorite/gypsum mineralizer ratio in Portland cement clinkering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobón, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the joint effect of fluorite and gypsum as mineralizers in the manufacture of Portland cement. A laboratory- scale Box-Behnken statistical design was used to quantify the effects of the explanatory variables fluorite content (0.00, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75%, fluorite/gypsum ratio (2/15, 1/3 and 8/15, and clinkering temperature (1250, 1300, and 1350 °C on the response variable free CaO content in the clinker produced. The clinker was characterized by the ethylene method, XRD, DSC and optical microscopy. Free CaO decreases of 81% and 56% were found in the mineralized clinker, compared to the same clinker without mineralizers, at 1300 °C and 1250 °C, respectively. Petrographic analysis showed that at lower temperatures, the amount of alite in the mineralized clinker was higher than the amount of alite in the clinker without mineralizers. The best condition was found for the fluorite/gypsum ratio of 2/15.Este artículo presenta el efecto combinado de la fluorita y el yeso como mineralizadores. Se usó el diseño experimental estadístico Box-Behnken, a escala de laboratorio, para cuantificar el efecto de la fluorita en porcentajes de 0.00, 0.25, 0.50 y 0.75%; relaciones fluorita/yeso de 2/15, 1/3 y 8/15; con temperaturas de clinkerización de 1250, 1300 y 1350 °C y la cal libre como variable de respuesta. El clínker producido fue caracterizado midiendo el contenido de cal libre por el método de etileno, DRX, DSC y microscopía óptica. Se encontró un descenso de la cal libre del 81 y 56% en el clinker mineralizado en comparación con el clinker sin mineralizadores a 1300 y 1250 °C respectivamente. El análisis petrográfico mostró que la cantidad de alita en el clinker mineralizado a bajas temperaturas es más alta que en el clinker sin mineralizadores. La mejor condición se encontró para la relación fluorita/yeso de 2/15.

  3. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source...

  4. Ecological indices of manufacture of Portland cement clinker and production of the dolomite clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnichenko Varvara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the production of dolomite clinker in comparison with that of Portland cement is environmentally appropriate. When calcining dolomite for cementitious binder, the pollution of the atmosphere by carbon dioxide is reduced due to its isolation during decarbonization reactions of calcium carbonates. Reducing fuel consumption for clinker burning provides less carbon dioxide emissions from combustion products. Reducing the firing temperature creates obstacles to the formation of nitrogen oxides. The production of binders from dolomite in comparison with the production of Portland cement helps to protect the environment from contamination

  5. Physical and Thermodynamical Properties of Water Phases in Hardening Portland Cement Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T. Bæk

    The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process.......The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process....

  6. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  7. Four Decades of Systems Science Teaching and Research in the USA at Portland State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Wakeland

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systems science is defined in general fashion, and a brief background is provided that lists some of the systems science-related societies, conferences, journals, research institutes, and educational programs. The Systems Science Graduate Program at Portland State University in Portland, OR, USA, is described in detail, including its history, curriculum, students, faculty, and degrees granted. Dissertation topics are summarized via word diagrams created from dissertation titles over the years. MS degrees, student placement, and undergraduate courses are also mentioned, and future plans for the program are described including its support for sustainability education.

  8. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  9. Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canonico, J. Scott [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-07-26

    Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C

  10. Development of the Portland cement slurries with diatomaceous earth to the oil industry; Desenvolvimento de pastas de cimento Portland com adicao de diatomita para a industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Roseane A; Melo, Dulce M.A.; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Simao, Cristina A.; Paiva, Maria D.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Melo, Marcus A.F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    The class-G Portland cement has been used with success in oil well cementing. The material is usually shipped to the Northeast Brazil, because the only plant that manufactures class-G is located in Cantagalo/RJ. The present work investigates the influence of the partial substitution of Portland cement by diatomaceous earth, aiming at reducing the costs in oil well cementing, improving the slurry properties and using local raw material. The diatomaceous earth has pozzolanic properties and can be used as extenders of cement slurries. This properties added to the lower cost and availability of this material in Northeast Brazil, make the diatomaceous earth a candidate material to produce light cements, to well conditions in advanced phases of production. It were evaluated the rheological properties of the slurries (at 25 and 52 deg C), volume of free water, compressive strength after curing for 8, 24 and 48 h at 38 deg C, and consistometry tests. The results show that the diatomaceous earth maintain the viscosity values and gel force suitable for use in oil well cementing. No free water was observed in the formulations. It was also verified that the compressive strength of slurries hardened with diatomaceous earth is similar to those with only Portland cement and that the minimum compressive strength of 300 psi, after curing for 8 h was reached. The thickening time was longer than the average value and the application value. (author)

  11. CERCLA-linked environmental impact and benefit analysis: Evaluating remedial alternatives for the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amanda D; Fitzpatrick, Anne G; Mirchandani, Sera; Salmon, Matthew; Edwards, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    This analysis focused on evaluating the environmental consequences of remediation, providing indicators for the environmental quality pillar of 3 "pillars" of the Portland Harbor Sustainability Project (PHSP) framework (the other 2 pillars are economic viability and social equity). The project an environmental impact and benefit analysis (EIBA) and an EIBA-based cost-benefit analysis. Metrics developed in the EIBA were used to quantify and compare remedial alternatives' environmental benefits and impacts in the human and ecological domains, as a result of remedial actions (relative to no action). The cost-benefit results were used to evaluate whether remediation costs were proportionate or disproportionate to the environmental benefits. Alternatives B and D had the highest overall benefit scores, and Alternative F was disproportionately costly relative to its achieved benefits when compared to the other remedial alternatives. Indeed, the costlier alternatives with larger remedial footprints had lower overall EIBA benefit scores-because of substantially more air emissions, noise, and light impacts, and more disturbance to business, recreational access, and habitat during construction-compared to the less costly and smaller alternatives. Put another way, the adverse effects during construction tended to outweigh the long-term benefits, and the net environmental impacts of the larger remedial alternatives far outweighed their small incremental improvements in risk reduction. Results of this Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)-linked environmental analysis were integrated with indicators of economic and social impacts of remediation in a stakeholder values-based sustainability framework. These tools (EIBA, EIBA-based cost-benefit analysis, economic impact assessment, and the stakeholder values-based integration) provide transparent and quantitative evaluations of the benefits and impacts associated with remedial alternatives

  12. Application of probabilistic risk assessment: Evaluating remedial alternatives at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site, Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffle, Betsy; Henderson, James; Murphy-Hagan, Clare; Kirkwood, Gemma; Wolf, Frederick; Edwards, Deborah A

    2018-01-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) was performed to evaluate the range of potential baseline and postremedy health risks to fish consumers at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site (the "Site"). The analysis focused on risks of consuming fish resident to the Site containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), given that this exposure scenario and contaminant are the primary basis for US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) selected remedy per the January 2017 Record of Decision (ROD). The PRA used probability distributions fit to the same data sets used in the deterministic baseline human health risk assessment (BHHRA) as well as recent sediment and fish tissue data to evaluate the range and likelihood of current baseline cancer risks and noncancer hazards for anglers. Areas of elevated PCBs in sediment were identified on the basis of a geospatial evaluation of the surface sediment data, and the ranges of risks and hazards associated with pre- and postremedy conditions were calculated. The analysis showed that less active remediation (targeted to areas with the highest concentrations) compared to the remedial alternative selected by USEPA in the ROD can achieve USEPA's interim risk management benchmarks (cancer risk of 10-4 and noncancer hazard index [HI] of 10) immediately postremediation for the vast majority of subsistence anglers that consume smallmouth bass (SMB) fillet tissue. In addition, the same targeted remedy achieves USEPA's long-term benchmarks (10-5 and HI of 1) for the majority of recreational anglers. Additional sediment remediation would result in negligible additional risk reduction due to the influence of background. The PRA approach applied here provides a simple but adaptive framework for analysis of risks and remedial options focused on variability in exposures. It can be updated and refined with new data to evaluate and reduce uncertainty, improve understanding of the Site and target populations, and foster informed remedial decision

  13. Gamma-ray spectrometry method used for radioactive waste drums characterization for final disposal at National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste--Baita, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2014-05-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Department from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, performs the conditioning of the institutional radioactive waste in concrete matrix, in 200 l drums with concrete shield, for final disposal at DNDR - Baita, Bihor county, in an old exhausted uranium mine. This paper presents a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the characterization of the radioactive waste drums' radionuclides content, for final disposal. In order to study the accuracy of the method, a similar concrete matrix with Portland cement in a 200 l drum was used. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  14. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-11

    This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light

  16. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  17. Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire E n g in e e r R e s e a rc h a n d...Petrographic Analysis ........................................................................................ 5 3 Results and Discussion...4 3 Preface This study was conducted in support of the Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC) to assess concrete obtained from Pease

  18. Transit access and the agglomeration of new firms : a case study of Portland and Dallas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine whether new firms are more likely to form near rail transit stations. Two relatively new : light-rail systemsone in Portland, Oregon, and the other in Dallas, Texasform the basis of the analysis. A geoc...

  19. The effect and mechanism of chloride ion attack on portland cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect and mechanism of chloride ion attack on Portland cement concrete and the structural steel reinforcement was investigated. At low concentrations, chloride ion has little or no effect on the physical stability of concrete structure but it causes the corrosion of the reinforcing steel in the concrete but at high ...

  20. 76 FR 25278 - Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ..., which will then become highlighted in blue. In the ``Document Type'' drop down menu select ``Proposed..., will be starting construction of the new Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Bridge on July 1, 2011 (with in... traffic. The rule will only limit entry into certain areas of the river for safety; the other section of...

  1. Prevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Portland, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeitz, Jennifer L; Gillin, Colin M; Bildfell, Rob J; Debess, Emilio E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons living in the metropolitan area of Portland, Oregon, USA, in order to assess the potential public health risk involved in the transmission of B. procyonis to humans and companion animals. Sixty-nine euthanized raccoons were collected from Portland wildlife-control agencies. Infection with B. procyonis was determined through the harvesting of adult worms from raccoon intestines during necropsy and by fecal analysis using modified double-centrifugation technique with a sugar-flotation solution. Fifty-eight percent of sampled raccoons were found to be infected with B. procyonis. Juveniles represented a greater percentage (64%) of raccoons captured by wildlife-control agents and were found to have the highest prevalence (70%) and heavier adult worm burdens (mean=35 worms). No gender bias was evident. This is one of the few studies of Baylisascaris prevalence in the Pacific Northwest, and it demonstrates that there is a high prevalence of B. procyonis in raccoons inhabiting the Portland area. This factor should be considered in raccoon relocation and management. The data also suggest that juvenile raccoons are the major potential source of B. procyonis contamination in the Portland community and may merit special attention to minimize their interaction with humans.

  2. Physicochemical Properties of MTA and Portland Cement after Addition of Aloe Vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique Borges, Alvaro; Aguirre Guedes, Orlando; Evaristo Ricci Volpato, Luiz; Siebert Filho, Gilberto; Meireles Borba, Alexandre; Zina, Omar; Piva, Evandro; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the liquid-powder ratio, setting time, solubility, dimensional change, pH, and radiopacity of white structural and non-structural Portland cement, ProRoot MTA and MTA Bio, associated with a 2% glycolic solution containing Aloe Vera, as vehicle. Five samples of each material were used for each test, according to the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) specification No. 57. Statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance. When sample distribution was not normal, non-parametric analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used (α=0.05). No statistical differences were found in liquid-powder ratios among the tested materials. ProRoot MTA showed the longest setting time. Dimensional change values were acceptable in all groups. Also, no significant differences were found in pH values and pH was alkaline in all samples throughout the experiment. Mean radiopacity results obtained for white Portland cements did not meet ANSI/ADA requirements, and were significantly lower than those obtained for MTA-based cements. Finally, Portland cements showed significantly higher mean solubility values compared to the other samples. The physicochemical properties of the tested materials in association with Aloe Vera were compatible with ANSI/ADA requirements, except for the white Portland cements, which failed to meet the radiopacity specification.

  3. 78 FR 37212 - Portland General Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... General Electric (licensee) proposes to construct, operate and maintain small turbine facilities at four... turbine and induction generator utilizing North Fork fishway attraction flows. The total capacity of the... Energy Regulatory Commission Portland General Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

  4. 3D visualisation of a Jurassic oolitic system with GPR data, Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    some preliminary field observations, we have decided to shoot an extensive GPR survey of the same stratigraphic interval (The Portland Freestone). With a total of 85 GPR profiles, we have produced grids on top of most of the coastal cliffs and quarry faces. We have encountered 3 main architectures, 2-m...

  5. Interest in nonsurgical female permanent contraception among men in Portland, Oregon and eastern Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Elizabeth K; Gordon, Diana; Bahulekar, Pramod; Garg, B S; Osgood-Roach, Isabel; Jensen, Jeffrey T; Aengst, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    We examined the men's attitudes and perceptions toward the concept of female nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC) or novel approaches to permanent contraception (PC) that do not require incisions or surgical equipment/hysteroscope. Cross-sectional survey of married/partnered men in Portland, OR, and rural eastern Maharashtra, India. Descriptive analysis was performed. In India (N=150), most men (80%) anticipated that their partners would undergo PC in the future, compared to 30% in Portland (N=170). About a third (39.6% in India, 82% in Portland) reported being uncomfortable with PC for partners due to the need for surgery. Most men (85% in India, 82% in Portland) expressed a preference for a hypothetical new method of female NSPC over surgery, if safe and effective. Most men sampled in two diverse settings expressed interest in NSPC for women. Men's perceptions of new female contraceptive methods are important to the contraceptive development process. Men may find a safe and effective nonsurgical method of permanent female contraception more acceptable than surgical PC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alkaline activation of different aluminosilicates as an alternative to Portland cement: alkali activated cements or geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Torres-Carrasco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is considered an excellence building material. This is due mainly to its high performance, its good quality/price ratio and the raw materials from which it is made can be found almost everywhere in the world. However, the development of alternative Portland cements obtained through processes involves lower emission of CO2 into the atmosphere is a priority research and great interest worldwide. Alkaline activation constitutes an alternative to Portland cement, preferably amorphous or vitreous aluminosilicates and alkaline activator (such as NaOH, Na2CO3 or sodium silicates hydrates. The aluminosilicates may be natural products such as metakaolin or industrial by-products such as blast furnace slag or aluminosiliceous fly ash. These cements and concretes obtained by alkali activating aluminosilicates are characterised by high mechanical strength, low heat of hydration and high impermeability, as well as resistance to high and low temperatures and sulphate, seawater and acid attacks. Moreover, the preparation of these alkaline cements requires lower energy than in the manufacturing process of Portland cement. However, we still cannot say or establish that alkaline cements (alkali activated materials or geopolymers are based on a clean chemical to the environment, due to production processes of alkaline solutions such as sodium silicates emit large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere. This article aims to make a trip back in time to the origins of the alkali activation to explain the most characteristic and important chemical concepts.

  7. 77 FR 55182 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR, Authorization of Production Activity, Shimadzu USA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR, Authorization of Production Activity, Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc., (Analytical Instruments-- Liquid Chromatographs and Mass Spectrometer... production activity within Subzone 45G, at the facility of Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc. (Shimadzu...

  8. Elemental atmospheric pollution assessment via moss-based measurements in Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios Gatziolis; Sarah Jovan; Geoffrey Donovan; Michael Amacher; Vicente Monleon

    2016-01-01

    Mosses accumulate pollutants from the atmosphere and can serve as an inexpensive screening tool for mapping air quality and guiding the placement of monitoring instruments. We measured 22 elements using 346 moss samples collected across Portland, Oregon, in December 2013. Our objectives were to develop citywide maps showing concentrations of each element in moss and...

  9. 76 FR 53054 - Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ... 2011 through October 2014. The project includes the construction of four piers, two on land and two... safety zone during the construction of the TriMet Bridge on the Willamette River, in Portland, OR. This... close proximity to cranes and overhead work associated with this construction project. During the...

  10. ‘Ageing in place’: experiences of older adults in Amsterdam and Portland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobner, S.; Musterd, S.; Droogleever Fortuijn, J.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the importance and meanings of formal and informal social support relationships and neighbourhood ties for older adults ‘ageing in place’ in urban neighbourhoods in two different welfare state settings: Portland (Oregon, the United States) and Amsterdam (the Netherlands). The

  11. Disposal of water treatment wastes containing arsenic - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Colin; Tyrer, Mark; Cheeseman, Christopher R; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-03-15

    Solid waste management in developing countries is often unsustainable, relying on uncontrolled disposal in waste dumps. Particular problems arise from the disposal of treatment residues generated by removing arsenic (As) from drinking water because As can be highly mobile and has the potential to leach back to ground and surface waters. This paper reviews the disposal of water treatment wastes containing As, with a particular emphasis on stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies which are currently used to treat industrial wastes containing As. These have been assessed for their appropriateness for treating As containing water treatment wastes. Portland cement/lime mixes are expected (at least in part) to be appropriate for wastes from sorptive filters, but may not be appropriate for precipitative sludges, because ferric flocs often used to sorb As can retard cement hydration. Brine resulting from the regeneration of activated alumina filters is likely to accelerate cement hydration. Portland cement can immobilize soluble arsenites and has been successfully used to stabilise As-rich sludges and it may also be suitable for treating sludges generated from precipitative removal units. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and the formation of calcium-arsenic compounds are important immobilisation mechanisms for As in cements. Geopolymers are alternative binder systems that are effective for treating wastes rich in alumina and metal hydroxides and may have potential for As wastes generated using activated alumina. The long-term stability of cemented, arsenic-bearing wastes is however uncertain, as like many cements, they are susceptible to carbonation effects which may result in the subsequent re-release of As.

  12. Disposal of water treatment wastes containing arsenic - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Colin; Tyrer, Mark [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, Christopher R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Graham, Nigel J.D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Solid waste management in developing countries is often unsustainable, relying on uncontrolled disposal in waste dumps. Particular problems arise from the disposal of treatment residues generated by removing arsenic (As) from drinking water because As can be highly mobile and has the potential to leach back to ground and surface waters. This paper reviews the disposal of water treatment wastes containing As, with a particular emphasis on stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies which are currently used to treat industrial wastes containing As. These have been assessed for their appropriateness for treating As containing water treatment wastes. Portland cement/lime mixes are expected (at least in part) to be appropriate for wastes from sorptive filters, but may not be appropriate for precipitative sludges, because ferric flocs often used to sorb As can retard cement hydration. Brine resulting from the regeneration of activated alumina filters is likely to accelerate cement hydration. Portland cement can immobilise soluble arsenites and has been successfully used to stabilise As-rich sludges and it may also be suitable for treating sludges generated from precipitative removal units. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and the formation of calcium-arsenic compounds are important immobilisation mechanisms for As in cements. Geopolymers are alternative binder systems that are effective for treating wastes rich in alumina and metal hydroxides and may have potential for As wastes generated using activated alumina. The long-term stability of cemented, arsenic-bearing wastes is however uncertain, as like many cements, they are susceptible to carbonation effects which may result in the subsequent re-release of As.

  13. Root perforations treatment using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements Cimentos de agregado trióxido mineral e Portland no tratamento de perfurações radiculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Dias da Silva Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Clinical, radiological and histological evaluation of root perforations treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA or Portland cements, and calcium sulfate barrier. METHODS: One molar and 11 premolar teeth of a male mongrel dog received endodontic treatment and furcations were perforated with a high-speed round bur and treated with a calcium sulfate barrier. MTA, Portland cement type II (PCII and type V (PCV, and white Portland cement (WPC were used as obturation materials. The teeth were restored with composite resin and periapical radiographs were taken. The animal was euthanized 120 days post-surgery for treatment evaluation. RESULTS: Right lower first premolar (MTA, right lower third premolar (PCV, left lower second premolar (MTA, and right lower second premolar (WPC: clinically normal, slightly radio-transparent area on the furcation, little inflammatory infiltrate, and new-bone formation. Left lower third premolar (PCII, right upper first premolar (WPC, right upper third premolar (PCII, and left upper first molar (PCV: clinically normal, radiopaque area on the furcation, and new-bone formation. Right upper second premolar (MTA, left upper second premolar (WPC, left upper third premolar (PCII: presence of furcation lesion, large radiolucent area, and intense inflammatory infiltrate. CONCLUSION: All obturation materials used in this study induced new-bone formation.OBJETIVO: Avaliar clínica, radiológica e histologicamente perfurações radiculares tratadas com MTA e cimentos Portland, com barreira de sulfato de cálcio. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída por 11 dentes pré-molares e um molar de cão macho, sem raça definida. Após tratamento endodôntico realizaram-se perfurações nas furcas com broca esférica de alta rotação e barreira de sulfato de cálcio. Foram utiliados os cimentos MTA, Portland tipo II (CPII, Portland tipo V (CPV e Portland branco estrutural (CPB. Os dentes foram restaurados com resina composta e

  14. Pulp tissue response to Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulpotomy of human primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, N; Lourenço Neto, N; Fernandes, A P; Rodini, C; Hungaro Duarte, M; Rios, D; Machado, M A; Oliveira, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulp treatment of human primary teeth by clinical and radiographic exams and microscopic analysis. Thirty mandibular primary molars were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I - Portland cement; Group II - Portland cement with iodoform (Portland cement + CHI3 ); Group III - Portland cement with zirconium oxide (Portland cement + ZrO2 ); and treated by pulpotomy technique (removal of a portion of the pulp aiming to maintain the vitally of the remaining radicular pulp tissue using a therapeutic dressing). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted and processed for histological analysis. Data were tested using statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. The microscopic findings were descriptively analysed. All treated teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at follow-up appointments. The microscopic analysis revealed positive response to pulp repair with hard tissue barrier formation and pulp calcification in the remaining roots of all available teeth. The findings of this study suggest that primary teeth pulp tissue exhibited satisfactory biological response to Portland cement associated with radio pacifying agents. However, further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the safe clinical indication of this alternative material for pulp therapy of primary teeth. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Characterization of Incorporation the Glass Waste in Adhesive Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D. P.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Hespanhol, R. L.; Alexandre, J.

    Ehe search for reuse generated waste in urban centers, intending to preserve natural resources, has remained fairly constant, both in context of preventing exploitation of resources as the emplacement of waste on the environment. Glass waste glass created a serious environmental problem, mainly because of inconsistency of its flows. Ehe use of this product as a mineral additive, finely ground, cement replacement and aggregate is a promising direction for recycling. This work aims to study the influence of glass waste from cutting process in adhesive mortar, replacing part of cement. Ehe glass powder is used replacing Portland cement at 10, 15 and 20% by mass. Ehe produced mortars will be evaluated its performance in fresh and hardened states through tests performed in laboratory. Ehe selected feature is indicated by producers of additive and researchers to present good results when used as adhesive mortar.

  16. Clinker Production from Wastes of Cellulose and Granite Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassoni, Délio Porto; de Cássia, Alvarenga Rita; Pedrotti, Leonardo; Mendes, Beatryz

    This work present a belite cement based made from two industrial waste types. Binary mixtures were prepares using waste from rock cutting and polishing industries and waste from cellulose industry (named grits), in diferente proportions. The mixed raw materials were burned at a temperature of 950 °C in an electric oven for 30 minutes and then cooled at a rate of 70 °C per minute. The mineralogical composition of the material obtained was studied by means of XRD techniques, confirming the dominance of dicalcium silicate. Mixed mortars produced with the new material, in full replacement of Portland cement, showed satisfactory performance for use in construction works. This research shows that it is possible to obtain hydraulic binders from industrial waste, at lower temperatures than the required for the consumption of non-renewable resources and energy.

  17. Use of glazed ceramic waste as additive in mortar and the mathematical modelling of its strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Zehra Gulten; Erturan, Seyfettin; Tepecik, Abdulkadir

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated the reusability of waste material from the tile manufacturing industry as an alternative material to natural pozzolan trass. Yield strength values of mortar made from Portland cement (CEM 142.5), were measured by adding glazed ceramic waste and trass at various weight ratios (5 to 40%). The test results proved that the strength values at 2, 7, and 28 days gave good results for concentrations of waste materials less than 5-10% in the cement. A decrease in strength was observed at higher concentrations. Mathematical modelling results showed a logarithmic correlation between the mortar strength and weight fraction of cement.

  18. Preparation of clinker from paper pulp industry wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruberri, Leire H; Seabra, M P; Labrincha, J A

    2015-04-09

    The production of paper pulp by the Kraft method generates considerable amounts of wastes. Namely, lime mud generated in the recovery circuit of chemical reagents, biological sludge from the wastewater treatment of wood digestion process and fly ash collected in the fluidized bed combustor used to generate electricity from biomass burning. The final destination of such wastes is an important concern, since environmental regulations are becoming stricter regarding their landfill. Driven by this fact, industries are looking for more sustainable solutions, such as the recycling in distinct products. This work tested these wastes as secondary raw materials to produce clinker/cement that was then experienced in mortar formulations. The first step involved the residues detailed characterization and a generated amounts survey. Then, specific but simple steps were suggested, aiming to facilitate transport and manipulation. Distinct blends were prepared and fired in order to get belitic and Portland clinkers. The Portland clinkers were processed at lower temperatures than the normally used in the industry due to the presence of mineralizing impurities in some wastes. Belite-based cements were used to produce mortars that developed satisfactory mechanical strength and did not reveal signs of deterioration or durability weaknesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring corrosion rate for ordinary portland concrete (OPC) and high-performance concrete (HPC) specimens subjected to chloride attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ismail M.E; Soleymani H.R

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results and the applicability of an electrochemical technique, the Tafel plot method, for determining the corrosion rate of reinforcing steel embedded in laboratory ordinary portland concrete (OPC...

  20. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Poulsen, S.L.; Herfort, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the hydration of blended Portland cement containing 30 wt.% Na2O-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NCAS) glass particles either as the only supplementary cementitious material (SCM) or in combination with limestone, using 29Si MAS NMR, powder XRD, and thermal analyses. The NCAS glass...... represents a potential alternative to traditional SCMs, used for reduction of the CO2 emission associated with cement production. It is found that the NCAS glass takes part in the hydration reactions after about two weeks of hydration and a degree of reaction of approx. 50 % is observed after 90 days...... of hydration. The hydrated glass contributes to the formation of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, consuming a part of the Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) formed during hydration of the Portland cement. Furthermore, the presence of the glass and limestone particles, alone or in combination, results...

  1. Clinical and computed tomographic evaluation of portland cement pulpotomy in primary molar: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamrun Nahar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present case describes the clinical & radiographic outcome of a Portland Cement pulpotomy. The 5 years old girl presenting extensive carious exposure in her mandibular left 2nd deciduous molar and was suffering pain in her left lower jaw only on exposure to cold for last 2 days. She was ultimately diagnosed clinic-radio-graphically as a case of irreversible pulpitis. Coronal pulpotomy procedure was carried out in the responsible tooth and Portland cement (PC was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy. At the 3 & 6-months follow-up appointments, treated tooth was asymptomatic clinically and radiographic examinations revealed no sign of periradicular pathosis in the pulpotomized teeth. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC in the treated tooth was confirmed by RVG and CBCT.

  2. The influence of mechanical activation on the process of reaction sintering of Portland cement clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Branka D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, results of an investigation of the influence of mechanical activation of a raw material mixture on processes of synthesis and reaction sintering of Portland cement clinker are given. Activation was performed in a vibro mill with rings for 30 minutes in a continual regime in air. It has been established that mechanical activation of the starting raw material mixture increases general activity, which is mostly reflected in reduction of temperatures at which relevant chemical reactions and sintering occur. This is very significant from the viewpoint of the increasingly necessary efficiency and cheaper production, i.e. energy savings during synthesis of Portland cement clinker and indicates that further investigation of the influence of mechanical activation is more than justified.

  3. Influencia del yeso sobre la velocidad de hidratación del cemento portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi, G.

    1961-12-01

    Full Text Available Not availablePara esclarecer la Influencia del yeso sobre el fraguado y endurecimiento del cemento, los autores estudiaron el grado de hidratación de los cuatro principales minerales del clínker de cemento Portland y el efecto del yeso sobre ellas. Haciendo uso del análisis cuantitativo de rayos X, se determinó la porción no hidratada. Simultáneamente, se determinaron los tiempos de fraguado y las resistencias. Los ensayos se llevaron a cabo sobre tres clínkeres sintéticos de diferentes composiciones y sobre dos clínkeres de cemento Portland comerciales.

  4. Inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The authors conducted an inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon. The purpose of their inspection was to determine if a covert video surveillance operation conducted at Bonneville Power Administration was consistent with Department of Energy policies and procedures and other applicable regulations and procedures, and to determine if administrative leave policies and procedures used at Bonneville Power Administration in a specific instance were consistent with Department of Energy requirements and the Code of Federal Regulations. This inspection focused on a specific incident that occurred in 1989 on the 5th floor of the BPA Headquarters Building located in Portland, Oregon. The incident involved the soiling of an employee`s personal property with what appeared to be urine.

  5. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  6. Examination of solidified and stabilized matrices as a result of solidification and stabilization process of arseniccontaining sludge with portland cement and lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanapon Phenrat

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available By solidification and stabilization (S/S with Portland cement and lime, it is possible to reduce arsenic concentration in leachate of the arsenic-containing sludge from arsenic removal process by coagulation with ferric chloride. From the initial arsenic concentration in leachate of unsolidified /unstabilized sludge which was around 20.75 mg/L, the arsenic concentrations in leachate of solidified/stabilized waste were reduced to 0.3, 0.58, 1.09, and 1.85 mg/L for the waste-to-binder ratios of 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, and 1, respectively, due tothe formation of insoluble calcium-arsenic compounds. To be more cost effective for the future, alternative uses of these S/S products were also assessed by measurement of compressive strength of the mortar specimens. It was found that the compressive strengths of these matrices were from 28 ksc to 461 ksc. In conclusion, considering compressive strength and leachability of the solidified matrices, some of these solidified/ stabilized products have potential to serve as an interlocking concrete paving block.

  7. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bidar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. His-topathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tis-sue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposedwith a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Port-land cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral triox-ide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Al-though the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45% and the least increase in fibrous tissue were ob-served adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp cap-ping in dog teeth.

  8. Ion release and pH of a new endodontic cement, MTA and Portland cement

    OpenAIRE

    Amini Ghazvini, Sara; Abdo Tabrizi, Maryam; Kobarfard, Farzad; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study measured and compared pH and phosphate and calcium ions release of a new endodontic material (CEM cement), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and Portland cement (PC) using UV-visible technique, atomic absorption spectrophotometry methods, and pH meter, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each material was placed in a plastic tube (n=10) and immersed in a glass flask containing deionized water. Half of the samples were tested for determining pH and released i...

  9. Genenal remarks on Portland cement concretes and a basis for their design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabesinsky Felperinl, M.

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available No availableEstos hormigones, tal y como indica el título de este artículo, están constituidos a base de cemento portland y, además, por: agregados pétreos naturales, agua de amasado y a veces una pequeña cantidad de aditivos minerales y/o químicos para conferirles propiedades especiales, ya sea en estado fresco o en estado endurecido.

  10. Evaluation of the use of red mud as a pozzolanic additive in Portland cement; Avaliacao do uso de residuo de bauxita como aditivo pozolanico no cimento Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Gustavo Mattos; Balbino, Thiago Gabriel Ferreira; Lourenco, Rafaela Roberta; Rodrigues, Jose de Anchieta [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (GEMM/DEMa/UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materias. Grupo de Engenharia de Microestrutura de Materiais; Montini, Marcelo [Alcoa Aluminio S.A., Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    It is estimated that the aluminum industry generates approximately 13.7 million tones/year of red mud (RB) in Brazil. Although, being the RB rich in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} and partially amorphous, a potential pozzolanic activity is suggested. Thus, this work aims to evaluate the application of 15w-% of RB, as a pozzolanic additive, to the ordinary Portland cement (CPI), simulating a pozzolanic compost Portland cement (CPII-Z). To study the pozzolanic activation of the RB, this one was added without calcination, calcinated at 400°C and at 600°C. The compressive strength was measured in mortars of CPI with additions of RB, of CPI and CPII (references), after 28 days of curing. The analysis of the apparent porosity and the characterization of the hydration products were done to complement the evaluation. The mortars with calcinated RB showed good results of mechanical strength, reaching more than 85% (45 MPa) of the CPI's strength and higher values than the CPII-Z32. (author)

  11. SUCCESS RATE OF MEDCEM PORTLAND CEMENT AS A PULP CAPPING AGENT IN PULPOTOMIES OF PRIMARY TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Marie Vilimek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Portland cement (PC as a pulp capping agent in primary teeth pulpotomies. Material and methods: The study included 71 primary teeth (9 incisors and 62 molars, from 20 children aged 3-8 years, of both genders. The teeth had deep carious lesions and symptoms of inflammation of the coronal pulp. Treatment was performed under general anaesthesia, and with the technique of vital amputation. MedCem Portland cement was used as pulp capping agent. GIC was placed over the PC. Incisors were finally restored with composite and molars with preformed stainless steel crowns. Clinical and radiographic success and failure were recorded at 6, 12, 18 and 24-month follow-ups. The treatment success was measured using predetermined criteria and the results were statistically evaluated. Result: After 12 months 69 teeth (97.18% were assessed as successfully treated. After 24 months, the treatment of 66 teeth (92.96% were defined as successful. The results showed a satisfactory success rate of pulpotomies using MedCem PC as a pulp agent in the primary dentition during the observation period. Conclusions: Portland cement may serve as an effective and inexpensive material in primary teeth pulpotomies. Further studies and longer follow-up assessments are needed.

  12. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  13. HYDRATING CHARACTERISTICS OF MODIFIED PORTLAND WITH Ba-BEARING SULPHOALUMINATE MINERALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenchen Gong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydrating characteristics of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals were studied in this paper. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS, mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP and compressive strength were determined to characterize hydrating products and microstructure. Results show that basic physical properties of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals (SMPC are similar with PC except the shorter setting time. Ettringite and C-S-H are the main hydrating produces in SMPC, which is similar to Portland cement (PC. Because of volume expansion of ettringite, SMPC paste structure is denser than PC according to SEM-EDS analysis and the pore size and pore content of SMPC pastes was smaller especially for the harmful pores. Because sulfur aluminum barium calcium was a new early-strength mineral and parts of BaO went into the C₂S lattice and caused lattice distortion to enhance C₂S hydration activity, the compressive strengths of SMPC grew faster and higher than PC.

  14. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Karsten; Jamison, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  15. Food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Arazim, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looks into issues related to food waste and consists of a theoretical and a practical part. Theoretical part aims to provide clear and complex definition of wood waste related problems, summarize current findings in Czech and foreign sources. Introduction chapter explains important terms and legal measures related to this topic. It is followed by description of causes, implications and possibilities in food waste reduction. Main goal of practical part is analyzing food waste in Cz...

  16. Automotive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigard, Selma E; Shariaty, Pooya; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Lashaki, Masoud Jahandar; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature from 2014 related to automotive wastes is presented. Topics include solid wastes from autobodies and tires as well as vehicle emissions to soil and air as a result of the use of conventional and alternative fuels. Potential toxicological and health risks related to automotive wastes are also discussed.

  17. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Mixed Waste Encapsulation in Polyester Resins. Treatment for Mixed Wastes Containing Salts. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference #1685

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    formulation recipes. As an alternative to thermal treatments, low-temperature stabilization of these materials in basic cementitious grouts has also been widely employed. However, salts interfere with the basic hydration reactions of Portland cement, leading to an inadequate set or deterioration of the waste form over time. Sufficient and compliant stabilization in cement can be achieved by lowering waste loadings, but this involves a large and costly increase in the volume of material requiring handling, transporting, and disposal.

  19. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  20. Assessing effects of PCB exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance in Portland Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxon, Matt; Toll, John; Hanson, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an integrated analysis using a Monte Carlo exposure model, dose–response effects model and habitat,and population dynamics models, all of which allow us to quantitatively estimate the effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)exposure on American mink (Mustela vison) abundance at the Portland Harbor Superfund Site (Site), and the associated uncertainties. The Site extends from river mile 1.9 of the Lower Willamette River, near its confluence with the Columbia River, to river mile 11.8, just downstream of downtown Portland, Oregon. The potential effects of PCBs on the American mink population were evaluated in the Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) due to the historical presence of mink in the are a and because mink are known to be highly sensitive to the effects of PCBs. Hazard quotients (HQs) calculated in the BERA indicated that PCB concentrations measured in Portland Harbor fish were above levels known to cause reproductive effects in mink. Further analysis was needed to evaluate the potential magnitude of effects on the Site mink population. The integrated analysis presented herein demonstrates that if an effect of PCB exposure is a less than 30% reduction in kit production, then PCB remediation is not expected to have any effect on mink abundance. This is a Site‐specific conclusion that depends on the quality, abundance, and distribution of mink habitat in Portland Harbor. The PCB dose associated with a 30% reduction in kit production was calculated as 101 mg/kg bw/d (90% CI ¼ 69–146 mg/kg bw/d). The mink PCB dose estimates from the Portland Harbor BERA indicate that if mink are present, their baseline exposure levels probably exceed 101 mg/kg bw/d. Therefore, some level of reduction in PCB exposure could be beneficial to the species if the study area provides sufficient habitat to support a mink population. This analysis demonstrates that risk analysis for population‐level assessment endpoints benefits from analyses

  1. Arsenic encapsulation using Portland cement with ferrous sulfate/lime and Terra-Bond™ technologies - Microcharacterization and leaching studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Paul M

    2012-03-15

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-Bond™, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials included: chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood materials; scorodite-rich mine tailings from the La Trinidad Mine in California; and a soil/smelter dust mixture from the Anaconda Superfund site spiked with monosodium methyl arsenate (MSMA) to simulate an organoarsenic soil material. SEM/EDS and XRD spectra of PFL treated samples showed similarity across all three waste materials while Terra-Bond treated samples showed predominance of elemental sulfur. SEM/EDS of PFL treated samples showed that calcium was imbedded in the structure while micrographs of Terra-Bond treated samples showed the appearance of an epoxy material on the surface. The epoxy material appears to be responsible for encapsulating and reducing the leachability of arsenic. XANES spectra for the PFL treatment of CCA-containing samples showed that arsenic has a predominant pentavalent form (As +5), and the PFL treatment process did not alter the arsenic oxidation state. But, distinct differences were observed for XANES spectra of untreated and PFL treated scorodite-rich mine tailing which changed the arsenic coordination structure from a mixture of As (+3/+5) to exclusively As (+5). Both S/S techniques reduced the amount of arsenic released in the leaching tests. Most cases show lower amounts of arsenic released from wastes treated by the Terra-Bond™ technique when compared to the PFL technique. The pH of the solution significantly affected the leachability, with the amount of arsenic released increasing with pH. Sequential extraction results indicate that sodium hydroxide was favorable in releasing arsenic in the mine tailings. This is due to ligand displacement reactions of hydroxyl ions with arsenic species and high pH conditions that

  2. Utilization of Agricultural Wastes in Stabilization of Landfill Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidzam Rahmat Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA and Rice Husk Ash (RHA are local agricultural waste material from Palm Oil Industry and from Paddy Industry in Malaysia. Currently, the disposal of these ashes from a burning process is a problem to both industries, and hence leads to environmental pollution. The main aim of this research was to investigate the potential of utilizing POFA and RHA as sustainable stabilizer material as partial replacement of traditional one which is lime and Portland Cement (PC. Laboratory investigations were carried out to establish the potential utilization of Malaysian Agricultural wastes POFA and RHA in stabilizing Teluk Kapas Landfill soil. Landfill soil on its own and combination with laterite clay soil were stabilized using POFA or RHA either on its own or in combination with Lime or Portland Cement (PC. The traditional stabilizers of lime or Portland Cement (PC were used as controls. Compacted cylinder test specimens were made at typical stabilizer contents and moist cured for up to 60 days prior to testing for compressive and water absorption tests. The results obtained showed that landfill soil combined with laterite clay (50:50 stabilized with 20% RHA:PC (50:50and POFA: PC (50:50 recorded the highest values of compressive strength compared to the other compositions of stabilizers and soils. However, when the amount of POFA and RHA increased in the system the compressive strength values of the samples tends to increase. These results suggest technological, economic as well as environmental advantages of using POFA and RHA and similar industrial by-products to achieve sustainable infrastructure development with near zero industrial waste.

  3. Agricultural Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  4. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: A secondary level biocompatibility test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Karanth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and white Portland cement. Study Design: Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I or white Portland cement (Group II were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III. After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. Results: At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Conclusion: Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  5. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  6. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium oxide can be added to dental materials rendering them sufficiently radiopaque. It can thus be used to replace the bismuth oxide in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Replacement of Portland cement with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at a water/cement ratio of 0.3 resulted in a material with adequate physical properties. This study aimed at investigating the microstructure, pH and leaching in physiological solution of Portland cement replaced zirconium oxide at either water-powder or water-cement ratios of 0.3 for use as a root-end filling material. The hydration characteristics of the materials which exhibited optimal behavior were evaluated. Portland cement replaced by zirconium oxide in varying amounts ranging from 0 to 50% in increments of 10 was prepared and divided into two sets. One set was prepared at a constant water/cement ratio while the other set at a constant water/powder ratio of 0.3. Portland cement and MTA were used as controls. The materials were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the hydration products were determined. X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was used to analyze the elemental composition of the hydration products. The pH and the amount of leachate in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were evaluated. A material that had optimal properties that satisfied set criteria and could replace MTA was selected. The microstructure of the prototype material and Portland cement used as a control was assessed after 30 days using SEM and atomic ratio diagrams of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca versus Al/Ca were plotted. The hydration products of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at water/cement ratio of 0.3 were calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide and minimal amounts of ettringite and monosulphate. The calcium hydroxide leached in HBSS solution resulted in an increase in the pH value. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and exhibited no reaction with the hydration by-products of Portland

  7. Network Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions From On-road Sources in the Portland OR, (USA) Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To mitigate climate change, governments at multiple levels are developing policies to decrease anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The City of Portland (Oregon) and Multnomah County have adopted a Climate Action Plan with a stated goal of reducing emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The transportation sector alone accounts for about 40% of total emissions in the Portland metropolitan area. Here we show a new street-level model of on-road mobile CO2 emissions for the Portland, OR metropolitan region. The model uses hourly traffic counter recordings made by the Portland Bureau of Transportation at 9,352 sites over 21 years (1986-2006), augmented with freeway loop detector data from the Portland Regional Transportation Archive Listing (PORTAL) transportation data archive. We constructed a land use regression model to fill in traffic network gaps with traffic counts as the dependent variable using GIS data such as road class (32 categories) and population density. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model was used to estimate transportation CO2 emissions. The street-level emissions can be aggregated and gridded and used as input to atmospheric transport models for comparison with atmospheric measurements. This model also provides an independent assessment of top-down inventories that determine emissions from fuel sales, while being an important component of our ongoing effort to assess the effectiveness of emission mitigation strategies at the urban scale.

  8. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  9. Study on the Possibility of Using Vine Stalk Waste ( Vitis Vinifera) for Producing Gypsum Particleboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangavar, H.; Khosro, S. Kh.; Payan, M. H.; Soltani, A.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was the production of gypsum particleboards with vine stalk waste and the investigation of some physical and mechanical properties of the boards. For this purpose, boards were made from gypsum, oven-dried mass of vine stalk waste, and the white portland cement in various ratios. The thickness swelling and water absorption after 2 and 24 hours of immersion in water, the modulus of rupture, the modulus of elasticity, and the internal bond strength of the boards were determined according to the European Norms standard. The results show that, by selecting proper ratios between the constituents, particleboards with good physicomechanical properties can be produced.

  10. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  11. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p epoxy resin and Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  12. Biocompatibility assessment of modified Portland cement in comparison with MTA® : In vivo and in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study is to elaborate a new cement based on Portland cement (PC, Modified Portland Cement (MPC with modified chemical and physical properties that allow easier clinical manipulation and faster setting time than MTA® and then to evaluate its cytotoxicity in vitro and its biocompatibility in vivo in comparison with MTA® . Materials and Methods: Elaboration of MPC: Portland cement powder slenderly grinded to homogenize the particles, mixed with a radiopaque element and a setting time accelerator. A comparative in vitro study (MTS test of the toxic effect of MTA® and MPC with culture isolated from the calvaria of 18-day-old fetal Swiss OF1 mice are done. A comparative in vivo study of the biocompatibility of MTA® and MPC: Under general anaesthesia, three holes (2.5 mm were made in both the left and right femurs of six White New Zealand rabbits. In the first hole MPC is placed, in the second MTA® and the third one is left empty (negative control group. Three weeks after implantation, two rabbits are sacrificed, then two other rabbits over six weeks and the last two after twelve weeks. The neck of the femur is trimmed and prepared for undecalcified histological studies. Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze the results. Results: The cell viability test according to the morphological observations suggested the biocompatibility of the two biomaterials tested. The in vivo test showed similar biocompatibility between MTA® and MPC. Bone healing and minimal inflammatory response adjacent to MTA® and MPC implants were observed at all experimental periods (3, 6 and 12 weeks, suggesting that both materials are well tolerated. Conclusion: This pilot comparative study of MTA® and MPC showed no or very limited toxic effects of both cements in vitro and similar biocompatibility in vivo. However, additional in vivo and clinical studies should be done on MPC before it can be introduced in our clinical practice.

  13. A Critical Review of Research on Reuse of Mechanically Recycled FRP Production and End-of-Life Waste for Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For the last three decades, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite materials have been widely used in major engineering industries. Managing FRP waste is becoming an important issue due to the growth in the production of FRP composite materials. In this article, the issue of FRP waste management is discussed and the commonly used methods for the handling of FRP waste are reviewed. One potentially viable use of FRP waste is in the partial replacement of fillers or aggregates in cementitious materials (particularly portland cement mortar and concrete. A number of important prior investigations performed on the use of FRP waste in concrete and mortar are reviewed. The results from most of those investigations suggest that FRP aggregates significantly reduce the strength of cementitious materials with little significant effect on durability. Recommendations for future research in this area are provided for producing stronger mortars and concretes incorporating FRP production and end-of-life waste.

  14. Hydration of portland cement, natural zeolite mortar in water and sulphate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janotka, I.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to characterise sulphate resistance of mortars made from ordinary Portland cement ( PC and Portland-pozzolan cement with 35 wt.% of zeolite addition (zeolite-blended cement-ZBC . Mortars with two different cement types were tested in water and 5% sodium sulphate solution for 720 days. A favourable effect of zeolite on increased sulphate resistance of the cement is caused by decrease in free Ca(OH2 content of the mortar There is not sufficient of Ca(OH2 available for reacting with the sulphate solution to form voluminous reaction products. A decreased C3A, content due to 35 wt.% replacement of PC by zeolite is the next pronounced factor improving resistance of the mortar with such blended cement.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido estudiar la resistencia a los sulfatos de morteros preparados con cemento portland ordinario (PC y cemento portland puzolánico, con un 35% en peso de zeolita (zeolite-blended cement (ZBC. Ambos tipos de morteros fueron conservados en agua y en una disolución de sulfato sódico al 5% durante 720 días. Se observó una mayor resistencia a los sulfatos en el mortero preparado con el cemento que contenía zeolita debido a su menor contenido en Ca(OH2. No hay cantidad suficiente de Ca(OH2 para que se produzca la reacción de los constituyentes de la pasta con la disolución de sulfato sódico y formar así productos de naturaleza expansiva. La disminución en el contenido de C,3A, debida a la sustitución de un 35% en peso de PC por zeolita, es el factor más determinante en el aumento de la resistencia del mortero en los cementos con adición.

  15. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Bae, Sungchul; Kanematsu, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) in Portland cement (PC) paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF), measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. Th...

  16. Structural Evaluation and Performance of Portland Cement Concretes After Exposure to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tolentino

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the "residual" thermal conductivity of Portland cement concretes (with characteristic compressive strength at 28 days, f ck, of 20 MPa and 50 MPa at room temperature after heat-treating at 180 °C, 300 °C and 600 °C. The description of the geometry of the structure was carried out using mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption. The results showed a decreasing tendency of residual thermal conductivity, which we attributed to heat-induced concrete degradation. Furthermore, the results from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption tests showed that a coarser pore structure is produced with the raise of heat-treatment temperatures.

  17. Tritium/Helium-3 Apparent Ages of Shallow Ground Water, Portland Basin, Oregon, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples for tritium/helium-3 age dating were collected from 12 shallow monitoring wells in the Portland basin, Oregon, in 1997, and again in 1998. Robust tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages were obtained for water samples from 10 of the 12 wells; apparent ages ranged from 1.1 to 21.2 years. Method precision was demonstrated by close agreement between data collected in 1997 and 1998. Tritium/helium-3 apparent ages generally increase with increasing depth below the water table, and agree well with age/depth relations based on assumptions of effects of recharge rate on vertical ground-water movement.

  18. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Portland cement added to radiopacifying agents in primary molar pulpotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço Neto, N; Marques, N C T; Fernandes, A P; Hungaro Duarte, M A; Abdo, R C C; Machado, M A A M; Oliveira, T M

    2015-10-01

    This was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Portland cement (PC) added to radiopacifying agents in primary molar pulpotomies. Thirty primary mandibular molars of children aged between 5 and 9 years were randomly assigned to the following groups: PC; PC with iodoform (PC + CHI(3)); PC with zirconium oxide (PC + ZrO(2)) and treated by pulpotomy technique. Clinical and radiographic follow-up assessments were performed at 6, 12 and 24 months. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test (P pulpotomies.

  19. Properties of Portland-Composite Cements with metakaolin: Commercial and manufactured by Thermal Activation of Serbian Kaolin Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrovic A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Portland-composite cements (CEM II were prepared with addition of 5 to 35% of metakaolin (MK, manufactured by thermal activation/calcination of Serbian kaolin clay, and commercial matakaolin (CMK. Performance of the composite cements was evaluated, through the setting time (initial and final, compressive strengths (for ages 2, 7, 28, 90 and 180 days and soundness, and compared with control cement (Portland cement – CEM I. Setting time (initial and final is accelerated in Portlandcomposite cements, for both metakaolins used. The acceleration is higher in cement with addition of commercial metakaolin. Lower compressive strength is obtained after 2 days of curing for all Portland-composite cements in comparison with control cement, since pozzolanic reaction still did not show its effect. After 7 days, pozzolanic reaction show its effect, manifested as compressive strength increase of Portland-composite cements with addition of up to 35% of CMK, and 25% in the case of cements with MK. After 28 days compressive strength was higher than that for control cement for cements prepared with addition of CMK, and with addition of up to 25% MK. After 90 days increased compressive strength was noticed with addition of 10 - 20% of CMK, and with 10 and 15% of MK, while after 180 days addition of both metakaolins influences compressive strength decrease. The results of the soundness, 0.5 mm for CEM I, and 1.0 mm in most Portland-composite cements indicate soundness increase with addition of metakaolins. Generally, better performance of Portland-composite cements was obtained with addition of commercial metakaolin, which may be attributed to the differences in the pozzolanic activity of the applied metakaolins, 20.5 MPa and 14.9 MPa for CMK and MK, respectively. By our previous findings pozzolanic activity of the thermally activated clay may be increased by subsequent milling of the metakaolin manufactured by thermal activation process.

  20. Results from five years of treatability studies using hydraulic binders to stabilize low-level mixed waste at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gering, K.L.; Schwendiman, G.L.

    1997-05-01

    This paper summarizes work involving bench-scale solidification of nonincinerable, land disposal restricted low-level mixed waste. Waste forms included liquids, sludges, and solids; treatment techniques included hydraulic systems (Portland cement with and without additives), proprietary commercial formulations, and sulphur polymer cement. Solidification was performed to immobilize hazardous heavy metals (including mercury, lead, chromium, and cadmium), and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Pretreatment options for mixed wastes are discussed, using a decision tree based on the form of mixed waste and the type of hazardous constituents. Hundreds of small concrete monoliths were formed for a variety of waste types. The experimental parameters used for the hydraulic concrete systems include the ratio of waste to dry binder (Portland cement, proprietary materials, etc.), the total percentage of water in concrete, and the amount of concrete additives. The only parameter that was used for the sulfur polymer-based monoliths is ratio of waste to binder. Optimum concrete formulations or {open_quotes}recipes{close_quotes} for a given type of waste were derived through this study, as based on results from the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure analyses and a free liquids test. Overall results indicate that high waste loadings in the concrete can be achieved while the monolithic mass maintains excellent resistance to leaching of heavy metals. In our study the waste loadings in the concrete generally fell within the range of 0.5 to 2.0 kg mixed waste per kg dry binder. Likewise, the most favorable amount of water in concrete, which is highly dependent upon the concrete constituents, was determined to be generally within the range of 300 to 330 g/kg (30-33% by weight). The results of this bench-scale study will find applicability at facilities where mixed or hazardous waste solidification is a planned or ongoing activity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. Tsetsaut History: The Forgotten Tribe of Southern Southeast Alaska. Portland Canal Early History (Misty Fiord National Monument). Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History #147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangeli, Reginald H.

    Written by one of the tribe's few remaining members and based on oral history and legend, this study traces the history of the Tsetsaut tribe, ancient original inhabitants of the Portland Canal area of southeastern Alaska. Chapters recount the quest for the coast, legends of Portland Canal, exploration of the area, material culture, establishment…

  2. Hydration kinetics for the alite, belite, and calcium aluminate phase in Portland cements from 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a valuable tool for obtaining the quantities of alite and belite in hydrated Portland cements. The hydration (1-180 days) of a white Portland cement with 10 wt.% silica fume added is investigated and the degrees of hydration for alit...

  3. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  4. EnviroAtlas -Portland, ME- One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2010) Web Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The Portland, ME land cover map was generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green, blue and near infrared) aerial photography from Late Summer 2010 at 1 m spatial resolution. Nine land cover classes were mapped: water, impervious surfaces (dark and light), soil and barren land, trees and forest, grass and herbaceous non-woody vegetation, agriculture, and wetlands (woody and emergent). An accuracy assessment using a stratified random sampling of 600 samples yielded an overall accuracy of 87.5 percent using a minimum mapping unit of 9 pixels (3x3 pixel window). The area mapped is defined by the US Census Bureau's 2010 Urban Statistical Area for Portland.This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  5. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2012) Web Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Portland, OR land cover web service includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and various smaller towns and rural areas in Oregon and Washington. The total area classified was approximately 2160 square kilometers. The land cover data were generated from 1-m, four-band (red, green, blue, and near-infrared) aerial photography acquired from the United States Department of Agriculture's National Agriculture Imagery Program. Imagery for Oregon was collected in 2012, and imagery for Washington was collected in 2011. In addition, ancillary datasets were derived for the classification from two LiDAR datasets collected in 2007 and one LiDAR dataset collected in 2010. Eight land cover classes were mapped: water, impervious surfaces, soil and barren land, trees and forest, grass and herbaceous non-woody vegetation, agriculture, and wetlands (both woody and emergent). An accuracy assessment using 600 completely random and 54 stratified random land cover reference points yielded an overall accuracy of 78.6%. Using a liberal interpretation with similar classes (e.g. soil / grass, soil / agriculture) the overall fuzzy accuracy is 91.4%. For more information on fuzzy accuracy assessment see the overview section. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (http:/www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, m

  6. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover Data (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Portland, OR land cover dataset includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and various smaller towns and rural areas in Oregon and Washington. The total area classified was approximately 2160 square kilometers. The land cover data were generated from 1-m, four-band (red, green, blue, and near-infrared) aerial photography acquired from the United States Department of Agriculture's National Agriculture Imagery Program. Imagery for Oregon was collected in 2012, and imagery for Washington was collected in 2011. In addition, ancillary datasets were derived for the classification from two LiDAR datasets collected in 2007 and one LiDAR dataset collected in 2010. Eight land cover classes were mapped: water, impervious surfaces, soil and barren land, trees and forest, grass and herbaceous non-woody vegetation, agriculture, and wetlands (both woody and emergent). An accuracy assessment using 600 completely random and 54 stratified random land cover reference points yielded an overall accuracy of 78.6%. Using a liberal interpretation with similar classes (e.g. soil / grass, soil / agriculture) the overall fuzzy accuracy is 91.4%. For more information on fuzzy accuracy assessment see the overview section. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (http:/www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mappi

  7. CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATES HYDRATES: FORMATION, STABILITY AND INFLUENCE ON STANDARD PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziliunas A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of phosphogypsum to produce the binders requires a much higher input than preparation of natural gypsum stone. This makes it uncompetitive material. The investigations presented therein are meant to reduce this input by looking for the ways of rendering impurities harmless. Soluble acid orthophosphates are the main harmful impurity of phosphogypsum. The studies show that dry insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates (1.09 % and 2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum have little effect on W/C, setting times and soundness of Portland cement pastes. Insoluble calcium orthophosphates hydrates {CaHPO4∙2H2O, Ca8(HPO42(PO44∙5H2O and Ca9(HPO4(PO45(OH∙4H2O} formed in acidic medium (pH = 4.2 - 5.9 have been destroyed in alkaline medium and reduce standard compressive strength of cement up to 28 %. Calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group are stable in alcaline medium, while in dry state they reduce the standard compressive strength of cement until 10 %, but their suspensions prolong setting times of Portland cement as soluble orthophosphates – 2 - 3 times. Alkalis in cement increase pH of paste, but do not change the process of formation of calcium orthophosphates hydrates of hydroxyapatite group: it takes place through an intermediate phase - CaHPO4·2H2O, whose transformation into apatite lasts for 2 - 3 months.

  8. Evaluation of pozzolime mixtures as a sustainable binder to replace portland cement in structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadum Nahida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the properties of concrete mixes produced mainly of hydrated lime and different types of Pozzolan. This mixture, which is nominated as PozzoLime, is presented as an alternative sustainable binder to replace Portland cement in concrete. The study tends to optimize the Pozzolan to lime proportions with respect to workability and strength of concrete. The investigated parameters are; water to binder ratio, aggregate to binder ratio and type of Pozzolan. The effects of these parameters on properties of the mixture in fresh and hardened states are studied. The included tests were; temperature profile, slump, fresh and oven-dry density, compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Silicafume, Fly ash and Metakaolin were the used Pozzolan in this study .The temperature profile through hydration (coffee cup test shows that all PozzoLime mixtures have significantly less environmental impacts (evolved heat than Portland cement. The results also show that structural concrete with more than 28 MPa compressive strength at 28 days age can be produced by a binder consisted of 1:1 by weight ratio of Silicafume to hydrated lime, , and with a total binder content of 333 kg/m3.

  9. Properties of expansive cements, made with Portland cement, gypsum and high alumina cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monfore, G. E.

    1966-03-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLos cementos expansivos se han desarrollado durante las tres décadas pasadas, principalmente por las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en Francia, URSS y Estados Unidos. Los cementos expansivos que fueron utilizados en los estudios de los cuales se da cuenta en el presente trabajo se obtuvieron mediante la mezcla de cemento Portland, cemento aluminoso y yeso. En las investigaciones se utilizaron morteros con los cuales se pudo determinar los efectos de la composición, tiempo y temperatura de curado sobre las resistencias, dilatación libre, retracción y desarrollo de resistencias en probetas pretensadas. Se hace una revisión sobre los estudios hechos con cementos expansivos y desarrollados en la Universidad de California. Las propiedades de taIes hormigones son, en términos generales, comparables a aquellos obtenidos con mezclas de cementos portland, cemento aluminoso y yeso. Es necesaria más información sobre pérdidas de tensión en los aceros y durabilidad de los hormigones autopretensados.

  10. Apatite and Portland/apatite composite cements obtained using a hydrothermal method for retaining heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M I; Carpena, J; Borschnek, D; Centeno, M A; Odriozola, J A; Rose, J

    2008-01-15

    Apatite and Portland/apatite composite cements containing steelwork dusts have been prepared using a low temperature hydrothermal method (200 degrees C, 48h). The produced solids were characterized by means of XRD, IR, and SEM-EDX, and the remaining liquid was analyzed by ICP. The results clearly show the capability of these cements to inertise the heavy metals contained in steelwork dusts, that is Fe, Pb, Mo, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn. In the case of apatitic cements, Fe, Mg, Cr, Mn, and Pb coming from steel dust replaced Ca in the divalent cation position of the apatite structure, while Si and Mo replaced P in tetrahedral position. The average crystal size of the apatite-containing dust is smaller than in pure apatite synthesized using the same procedure, which is related to the magnesium content of the dust, since magnesium seems to inhibit the crystal growth. XRD diagrams of composite cements show only peaks corresponding to phases observed in the single cements, and in that no new phases are found. However, EDX analysis reveals the introduction of cations coming from Portland cement into the apatite structure. From the results of water analysis it could be concluded that the capability of retention is higher in composite matrices than in the pure apatite one. In conclusion, the obtained data allow stating that the proposed method, the hydrothermal synthesis of steelwork dust containing cement, is a reliable one for immobilization of toxic residues containing heavy leachable cations.

  11. Synergistic Action of a Ternary System of Portland Cement - Limestone - Silica Fume in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelić, J.; Jozić, D.; Krpan-Lisica, D.

    Some experimental investigations on a synergistic action when a ternary system of Portland cement - silica fume - limestone is used in mortar or concrete are present in this paper. Standard laboratory tests with respect to the pore size distribution, micromorphology, compressive strength and sulphate resistance in both sodium and magnesium sulphate solutions were performed on mortars made with 70% (by mass) of Portland cement (PC), type CEM II/B-S and 30% of cement replacement materials consisted of various combination of fine ground limestone filler (LF) and silica fume (SF). In addition to these ternary systems, binary blends, such as: PC-LF, as well as PC-SF, along with 100 % PC mortars, were investigated for comparison. It is found that SF-blends reach higher compressive strengths than LF-blends for the same replacement of cement. When SF was added together with LF, the mortars show considerable increase in the compressive strength and show a lower expansion than a control, sulphate-resisting mortar, independent of the type of sulphate solutions, due to pore size refinement microstructure of mortars.

  12. The Greenhouse Gas Emission from Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Construction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng; Sha, Aimin; Yang, Panpan; Huang, Yue

    2016-06-24

    This study proposes an inventory analysis method to evaluate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from Portland cement concrete pavement construction, based on a case project in the west of China. The concrete pavement construction process was divided into three phases, namely raw material production, concrete manufacture and pavement onsite construction. The GHG emissions of the three phases are analyzed by a life cycle inventory method. The CO₂e is used to indicate the GHG emissions. The results show that for 1 km Portland cement concrete pavement construction, the total CO₂e is 8215.31 tons. Based on the evaluation results, the CO₂e of the raw material production phase is 7617.27 tons, accounting for 92.7% of the total GHG emissions; the CO₂e of the concrete manufacture phase is 598,033.10 kg, accounting for 7.2% of the total GHG emissions. Lastly, the CO₂e of the pavement onsite construction phase is 8396.59 kg, accounting for only 0.1% of the total GHG emissions. The main greenhouse gas is CO₂ in each phase, which accounts for more than 98% of total emissions. N₂O and CH₄ emissions are relatively insignificant.

  13. Effect of addition of opaline siliceous rocks at different proportions to portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxan, M. P.

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de la presencia de rocas silíceas opalinas, procedentes de las provincias de Salamanca, Zamora y Avila, en las propiedades de los cementos mixtos fabricados con cemento portland y proporciones variables de estas rocas utilizadas como adiciones activas. La caracterización de estos materiales y el estudio de las propiedades de los cementos preparados revelan la capacidad puzolánica de las rocas opalinas, y su singularidad respecto a otras puzolanas naturales, así como su posibilidad de empleo en la fabricación de cementos con adiciones.

    En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de la presencia de rocas silíceas opalinas, procedentes de las provincias de Salamanca, Zamora y Avila, en las propiedades de los cementos mixtos fabricados con cemento portland y proporciones variables de estas rocas utilizadas como adiciones activas. La caracterización de estos materiales y el estudio de las propiedades de los cementos preparados revelan la capacidad puzolánica de las rocas opalinas, y su singularidad respecto a otras puzolanas naturales, así como su posibilidad de empleo en la fabricación de cementos con adiciones.

  14. Efeito do tempo de cura na rigidez de argamassas produzidas com cimento Portland Effect of the curing time on the stiffness of mortars produced with Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. R. Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O concreto de cimento Portland é um dos materiais mais usados no mundo inteiro, entretanto, devido a sua estrutura ser muito complexa, torna-se imprescindível estudar suas propriedades com bastante profundidade. O concreto é produzido a partir de uma argamassa, de areia e cimento, com adição de agregados graúdos, sendo que suas propriedades estão basicamente suportadas nessa argamassa de constituição. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a variação da rigidez de duas argamassas de composições com razão cimento:areia de 1:2 e 1:3 em função do tempo de cura, tendo como parâmetro a variação do módulo de Young. Os resultados mostraram que o módulo de Young cresce até atingir o valor máximo no oitavo dia, sendo que nos três primeiros dias esse crescimento é mais acentuado. A análise dos resultados indica que grande parte do processo de hidratação do cimento, com formação das ligações químicas responsáveis pela rigidez da argamassa, acontece nos primeiros dias de cura.Concrete produced with Portland cement is one of building materials most widely used worldwide. However, due to its highly complex structure, its properties require in-depth studies. Concrete is a mortar consisting of a mixture of cement, sand and coarse aggregates, and its properties are represented basically by the mortar base. The aim of this work was to study the change in stiffness of two mortar compositions cured at 25 ºC with a cement-to-sand ratio of 1:2 and 1:3, as a function of curing time using the variation of Young modulus as the measuring parameter. The results showed that Young modulus increases up to a maximum value on the 8th day, and that this increase is more pronounced during the first three days. An analysis of the results indicates that a large part of the cement hydration process, involving the formation of chemical bonds that are responsible for the mortar stiffness, takes place in the early days of curing.

  15. cimento portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Akira Mori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of cement bonded particleboards can be jeopardized by chemical incompatibility between some lignocellulosic materials and cement, which can inhibit the glue of this cement; however, this effect can be minimized with chemicals treatments of the materials. The different species of Eucalyptus can be promising as raw material in the production of these panels, mainly residues produced in form of barks. The objective of the work was to evaluate chemical compatibility of wood and barks (without and with chemical treatment of Eucalyptus grandis with cement. The chemical treatment of barks was carried out with sodium hydroxide. Results showed that the Eucalyptus grandis wood presented a moderate aptitude with cement, the treated barks presented high aptitude and the untreated bark presented extremely low aptitude. It was verified positive influence of the chemical treatment in the barks, making possible, in the future, the incorporation of these elements in the manufacturing of cement-bonded particleboard.

  16. Low Carbon Footprint mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Mehman navaz, Hossein Ali; Moayed Zefreh, Fereshteh; Aboata, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of low carbon mortar with POFA and PFA replacement in cement was affected and changed by replacing percent finesse, physical and chemical properties and pozzolanic activity of these wastes. Waste material replacement instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was used in this study. This in turn was useful for promoting better quality of construction and innovative systems in construction industry, especially in Malaysia. This study was surely a step forward to achieving quality products which were affordable, durable and environmentally friendly. Disposing ash contributes to shortage of landfill space in Malaysia. Besides, hazard of ash might be another serious issue for human health. The ash disposal area also might create a new problem, which is the area's sedimentation and erosion.

  17. Basalt mine-tailings as raw-materials for Portland clinker Rejeitos da mineração de basalto como matérias-primas para clínquer Portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. D Andrade

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Large volumes of waste materials are produced by crushing of basaltic rocks for aggregate production, which is widely used in regions that lack rocks of granitic or gneissic composition. Two types of waste materials are produced (a quarry fines, which are in part used as fine aggregates in concrete and (b vesicular basalt, a porous variety of basalt that is useless as aggregate. This paper presents a procedure to use basaltic mine-tailings as raw-mixtures for Portland cement by adjusting the proportion of the other raw-materials (limestone, clay, iron ore. It is demonstrated that there is no need for additional fluxes to the basalt-bearing raw-mixtures, since the setting of the chemical parameters is enough to guarantee clinker formation. Two series of experimental clinkers were synthesized with raw-mixtures containing residues from a basalt quarry that produces aggregates for concrete. Experimental clinkers were produced from raw-mixtures with similar lime saturation factors, silica and alumina modules, which were set by adjusting the proportions of limestone, clay and iron ore to the varying proportions of basaltic materials added to them. One series of clinkers was made with basalt quarry fines, which are in part used as fine aggregate, but also accumulate as mine-tailings. Other series was made using vesicular (porous basalt, a variety not resistant enough to be used as aggregate. It is demonstrated that the basaltic composition is fully compatible with clinker production, and no addition of fluxes or other additions is required. Composition of the raw-mixtures was checked by chemical analysis. Quantitative phase analysis of the clinkers was made by optical microscopy point counting, together with qualitative X-ray diffraction. All mixtures produced clinkers with acceptable proportions of major and minor crystalline phases, inside the range of common industrial Portland clinkers.Duas séries de clínqueres experimentais foram sintetizadas

  18. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  19. 78 FR 8493 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; SoloPower Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Activity; SoloPower Inc. (Thin Film Photovoltaic Solar Panels); Portland, OR SoloPower Inc. (SoloPower) has... production of thin film photovoltaic solar panels. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would be... sourced from abroad include: Polymer film; diodes; conductive paste; junction boxes; sealant; silicone...

  20. Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles used on pier rehabilitation, Little Diamond Island, Casco Bay, Portland, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles were used on a pier rehabilitation project at : Little Diamond Island in Casco Bay near Portland Maine. The project was the replacement : of an aging wooden pier at the ferry berthing terminal. The FRP p...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1315 - Safety Zones: Fireworks displays in the Captain of the Port Portland Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zones: Fireworks displays... Coast Guard District § 165.1315 Safety Zones: Fireworks displays in the Captain of the Port Portland Zone. (a) Safety zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) Cinco de Mayo Fireworks...

  2. 76 FR 34252 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; Portland Cement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... Cement Association Notice is hereby given that, on May 12, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Portland Cement... specified circumstances. Specifically, Drake Cement, LLC, Scottsdale, AZ; Argos USA Corporation, Houston, TX...

  3. Contribución al estudio de los reacciones de hidratación del cemento portland por espectroscopia infrarroja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez Moreno, Tomás

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEn dos artículos anteriores (1 y (2 que figuran en los n.° 161 y 162 de esta Revista, respectivamente, se estudiaron, por medio de la espectroscopia IR, las fases del clinker y el cemento portland anhidro. Con el presente trabajo se da paso al estudio de los procesos de hidratación.

  4. WOOD PRE-TREATMENT INFLUENCE ON THE HYDRATION OF PORTLAND CEMENT IN COMBINATION WITH SOME TROPICAL WOOD SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusirat Aderinsola SADIKU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of three pre-treatment methods on the hydration characteristics of Portland cement in combination with three tropical hardwood species was investigated. The maximum hydration temperature and time to reach maximum hydration temperature were analysed for the wood-cement-water mixtures of the three species after removing inhibitory extractives of wood samples by extraction with 5% Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, cold and hot water after removing inhibitory extractives of wood samples. There were differences in the hydration reaction of the wood species with Portland cement using the different pre-treatment methods. The compatibility of the wood species with Portland cement improved following pre-treatment. Sodium hydroxide pre-treatment had the most significant effect followed by hot water. Terminalia ivorensis (Idigbo, and Antiaris africana (Oriro species showed considerable improvement in their compatibility with Portland cement at 5% Sodium hydroxide pre-treatment with maximum hydration temperature of 65oC where Arere had 60.5oC where both cold and hot water were unable to raise the hydration temperature beyond 55.5oC . This study shows that the wood species requires more than cold and hot water extraction to make them suitable for wood cement composite materials as extraction with sodium hydroxide (1% solution was found to be the most effective treatment for the wood species under investigation.

  5. Microstructure Development and Transport Properties of Portland Cement-fly Ash Binary Systems : In view of service life predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of burning coal in electric power generating plants. It is commonly known that owing to its pozzolanic properties fly ash is widely used as a partial replacement for Portland cement in concrete. The use of fly ash in concrete not only reduces the landfill costs of fly ash,

  6. 77 FR 39793 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Portland-Hillsboro Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Portland--Hillsboro Airport, Hillsboro, OR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Proposal to Release Airport Property... Airport under the provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment Reform Act for the...

  7. 77 FR 28568 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, OR; Application for Subzone, Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, OR; Application for Subzone, Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc., Canby, OR An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by... Shimadzu USA Manufacturing, Inc. (SUM), located in Canby, Oregon. The application was submitted pursuant to...

  8. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  9. Performance of portland limestone cements : cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of ASTM : C150/AASHTO M85. When this project was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% intergr...

  10. Online Community-Based Learning as the Practice of Freedom: The Online Capstone Experience at Portland State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Deborah Smith; Newton-Calvert, Zapoura

    2015-01-01

    Given the design of Portland State University's (PSU) undergraduate curriculum culminating in a capstone experience, the dramatic growth in online courses and online enrollments required a re-thinking of the capstone model to ensure all students could participate in this effective learning model and have a powerful learning experience. In recent…

  11. Utilization of Stone Waste in the Development of Value Added Products: A State of the Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Lakhani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilisation of stone waste, in the form of mineral admixture as a pozzolanic and non-pozzolanic material for mortar and concrete has received considerable attention in recent years. This interest is part of the widely spread attention directed towards the utilisation of wastes and industrial by-products in order to minimise Portland cement (PC and sand consumption, the utilisationof which being environmentally damaging. Another reason is that mortar and concrete, which contain pozzolanic as well as non-pozzolanic materials, exhibit considerable enhancement in durability properties. This paper reviews work carried out on the use of stone waste as a partial non-pozzolanic replacement for sand in mortar and concrete and in the containment of hazardous wastes. The literature demonstrates that different stone wastes is an effective inert filler which causes great improvement in the pore structure and hence the resistance of the concrete to the action of harmful solutions.

  12. Histologic evaluation of repair of mechanical furcal perforations in dog premolars, using gray MTA, white MTA & Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidar M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Furcal perforation has a great impact on prognosis of endodontic treatments, requiring immediate and proper intervention. Gray MTA is applied as material of choice in repairing perforations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repair of mechanical furcal perforations, histologically using white MTA and Portland cement and compare them with gray MTA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, second to fourth mandibular and maxillary premolar teeth of five dogs received endodontic treatment, then the furcation area of the teeth were perforated and repaired as follow: gray MTA in group1, white MTA in group 2, Portland cement in group 3 and cotton pellet in group 4 (control. Animals were controlled for 4 months and sacrificed using an over dosage of sodium thiopental intravenous injection and perfusion of 10% formaldehyde. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare hard tissue formation between groups and between each two groups, respectively. Non-parametric Kruskall Wallis and Dunn procedure were also used to compare degree of inflammation among groups and between each two groups, respectively. Results: Gray MTA had more favorable results (90.9% hard tissue formation and only 9.1% severe inflammation but the difference between gray MTA, white MTA and Portland cement was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The difference between gray MTA, white MTA and Portland cement groups was not statistically significant for degree of inflammation and hard tissue formation. In conclusion both white MTA and Portland cement can be used instead of gray MTA to repair perforations in accordance to esthetic considerations.

  13. Sulphuric Acid Resistant of Self Compacted Geopolymer Concrete Containing Slag and Ceramic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiq I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a one of the developing countries where the constructions of infrastructure is still ongoing, resulting in a high demand for concrete. In order to gain sustainability factors in the innovations for producing concrete, geopolymer concrete containing granulated blast-furnace slag and ceramics was selected as a cement replacement in concrete for this study. Since Malaysia had many ceramic productions and uses, the increment of the ceramic waste will also be high. Thus, a new idea to reuse this waste in construction materials have been tested by doing research on this waste. Furthermore, a previous research stated that Ordinary Portland Cement concrete has a lower durability compared to the geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer binders have been reported as being acid resistant and thus are a promising and alternative binder for sewer pipe manufacture. Lack of study regarding the durability of the geopolymer self-compacting concrete was also one of the problems. The waste will be undergoing a few processes in the laboratory in order to get it in the best form before undergoing the next process as a binder in geopolymer concrete. This research is very significant in order to apply the concept of sustainability in the construction field. In addition, the impact of this geopolymer binder is that it emits up to nine times less CO2 than Portland Cement.

  14. Microstructure engineering of Portland cement pastes and mortars through addition of ultrafine layer silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Holger; Geiker, Mette; Krøyer, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Pozzolanic submicron-sized silica fume and the non-pozzolanic micron- and nano-sized layer silicates (clay minerals) kaolinite, smectite and palygorskite have been used as additives in Portland cement pastes and mortars. These layer silicates have different particle shape (needles and plates...... is that the cement paste structure and porosity can be engineered by addition of selected layer silicates having specific particle shapes and surface properties (e.g., charge and specific surface area). This seems to be due to the growth of calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) on the clay particle surfaces......), surface charge, and size (micron and nano). The structure of the resulting cement pastes and mortars has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), helium porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption (specific surface area and porosity), low-temperature calorimetry (LTC) and thermal analysis. The main result...

  15. Particle size and shape analysis of MTA finer fractions using Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to observe particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio of mineral trioxide aggregate finer fractions using Portland cement. The High Power Field mode of the flow particle image analyzer was used for analysis. Images of particle samples were automatically collected by the analyzer along with analysis parameters. Mean, standard deviation, and the number of particles were calculated in each group. Parameters of length, width, and perimeter did not show a statistical significance when groups were compared. Examining the parameter of aspect ratio, there was evidence of a statistical significance seen (pparticles that were between 0.5 and 3 microm in size was 88%. Fine particles may penetrate dentin tubules. The average aspect ratio was 0.744 (SD=0.155). It can be speculated that a dentin tubule occlusion pattern is dependent on the aspect ratio.

  16. Standard Test Method for Bond Strength of Ceramic Tile to Portland Cement Paste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the ability of glazed ceramic wall tile, ceramic mosaic tile, quarry tile, and pavers to be bonded to portland cement paste. This test method includes both face-mounted and back-mounted tile. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Zero Energy With an Affordable Price Tag: Friends School of Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-09

    More than half of all operating school districts in the U.S. are in rural areas. These small schools operate at a different scale and have different needs than their city counterparts. In 2003-2004, 20% of public schools in the U.S. served fewer than 200 students(1). Although the Friends School of Portland - which was designed to achieve both zero energy performance and Passivhaus certification - is an independent school, it faced financial constraints similar to those faced by many other small schools throughout the country. The project was financed through a capital campaign and a mortgage that forced a hard cost cap on the project, so the project team had to be diligent about every dollar that was spent. In its first year of operation, the school site energy use intensity was just 12 kbtu/ft2, a bit more than the 9 kbtu/ft2 predicted.

  18. Effects of Two Redispersible Polymer Powders on Efflorescence of Portland Cement-based Decorative Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimei ZHU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of redispersible polymer powders of ethylene/Vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA and ethylene/vinyl laurate/vinyl chloride terpolymer (E/VL/VC on the efflorescence of Portland cement-based decorative mortar (PCBDM were studied. The results showed that EVA slightly prolongs the efflorescence duration of fresh PCBDM; and exacerbates efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, because it increases the content of soluble salts such as Ca2+, K+, Na+ ions in hardened PCBDM and promotes their migration. E/VL/VC exacerbates efflorescence of fresh PCBDM due to it easily dissolves in the surface water; but reduces efflorescence of hardened PCBDM, which is attributed to that it decreases the soluble salts content in hardened PCBDM and prohibits salts migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4053

  19. Prediction of compressive strength up to 28 days from microstructure of Portland cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar; Justnes, H.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the characteristics or the microstructure of Portland cement on compressive strength up to 28 days has been statistically investigated by application of partial least square (PLS) analysis. The main groups of characteristics were mineralogy and superficial microstructure...... represented by curves from X-ray diffraction analysis and differential thermogravimetric analysis, as well as particle size distributions. PLS gave maximum explained variance in compressive strength at 1, 2, 7 and 28 days of 93%, 90%, 79% and 67%, respectively. The high explained variance makes the prediction...... of the compressive strength up to 28 days from the characteristics reliable. The prediction ability makes it possible in this case to predict strength from cement characteristics and vice versa. Such a prediction can be utilized to design a cement to achieve target strength performance....

  20. Prediction of potential compressive strength of Portland clinker from its mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar; Justnes, H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a statistical model first applied for prediction of compressive strength up to 28 d from the microstructure of Portland cement, potential compressive strength of clinker has been predicted from its mineralogy. The prediction model was evaluated by partial least squares regression....... The mineralogy was described by patterns from X-ray diffraction analysis in the 20-regions 29.88-30.70 degrees and 32.90-34.10 degrees (using CuK alpha-radiation). It has been shown that prediction of potential compressive strength of clinker up to 28 d from the observed variation in the mineralogy gave...... a significant variation of the strength at both 1 and 28 d. Sensitivity analysis based on simulation, optimisation and prediction made it possible to study the influence of the mineralogy on the strength in more detail....

  1. Microstructure engineering of Portland cement pastes and mortars through addition of ultrafine layer silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Holger; Geiker, Mette Rica; Krøyer, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Pozzolanic submicron-sized silica fume and the non-pozzolanic micron- and nano-sized layer silicates (clay minerals) kaolinite, smectite and palygorskite have been used as additives in Portland cement pastes and mortars. These layer silicates have different particle shape (needles and plates...... is that the cement paste structure and porosity can be engineered by addition of selected layer silicates having specific particle shapes and surface properties (e.g., charge and specific surface area). This seems to be due to the growth of calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) on the clay particle surfaces......, and the nano-structure of the C-S-H depends on type of layer silicate. The effect of layer silicate addition is most pronounced for palygorskite and smectite having the largest surface area and negative charges on the particle surfaces. The cement pastes containing palygorskite and bentonite have...

  2. Contribution to the determination of gypsum and hemihydrates content in Portland cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Arús, Fernando

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa mayoría de los técnicos de cemento, aceptan, que las anormalidades del fraguado, conocidas como "falso fraguado" en el cemento portland, se deben primordialmente a la presencia de yeso parcialmente deshidratado (S04Ca1/2H20. Si el clínker que se muele está enriquecido en cal libre, o la temperatura del molino es elevada (superior a los 110 °C o hay escasa ventilación de éste, se llega a originar una parcial deshidratación del yeso, que se mantiene durante el proceso de ensilado y que origina las anormalidades del fraguado al que anteriormente nos hemos referido. Por esta razón creemos muy importante poder conocer el grado de deshidratación en que se encuentra el yeso en un cemento.

  3. Effectiveness of shrinkage-reducing admixtures on Portland pozzolan cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla, C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying shrinkage causes tensile stress in restrained concrete members. Since all structural elements are subject to some degree of restraint, drying shrinkage is regarded to be one of the main causes of concrete cracking. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SRA in reducing drying shrinkage strain in Portland pozzolan cement concrete. The major variables examined included slump, admixture type and dose, and specimen size. The measured results indicate that any of the admixtures used in the study significantly reduced shrinkage. Concrete manufactured with shrinkage reducing admixtures shrank an average of 43% less than concrete without admixtures. As a rule, the higher the dose of admixture, the higher was its shrinkage reduction performance. The experimental results were compared to the shrinkage strain estimated with the ACI 209, CEB MC 90, B3, GL 2000, Sakata 1993 and Sakata 2001 models. Although none of these models was observed to accurately describe the behaviour of Portland pozzolan cement concrete with shrinkage reducing admixtures, the Sakata 2001 model, with a weighted coefficient of variation of under 30%, may be regarded to be roughly adequate.

    La retracción por secado es un fenómeno intrínseco del hormigón que produce tensiones de tracción en elementos restringidos de hormigón. Puesto que todos los elementos presentan algún grado de retracción, se considera a la retracción por secado como una de las principales causas de agrietamiento en proyectos de construcción en hormigón. Por lo tanto, el objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar la efectividad de los aditivos reductores de retracción (SRA en hormigones fabricados con cemento Portland puzolánico. Las variables principales estudiadas incluyen el asentamiento de cono de Abrams, marca y dosis de aditivo reductor de retracción, y tamaño de espécimen de hormigón. Los resultados obtenidos permiten concluir que el uso de

  4. Economic deprivation and racial segregation: comparing Superfund sites in Portland, Oregon and Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chad L

    2009-09-01

    The research presented here weighs the ability of two major explanations of social inequality-Massey and Denton's racial segregation explanation and Wilson's emphasis on economic deprivation (concentrated poverty)-to predict environmental inequality. Two sets of logistic regression analyses are used to predict the location of Superfund sites in Portland, Oregon and Detroit, Michigan providing a conditional understanding of environmental inequality within a larger sociological context. The analysis includes a general examination of the two theories in all census tracts in both cities and a set of analyses focusing upon Black neighborhoods in Detroit. The findings indicate that there is support for explanations of environmental inequality that include both racial segregation and economic deprivation, but that the more powerful of the two is economic deprivation. The results suggest that even though African-American neighborhoods disproportionately house Superfund sites, these facilities are more likely to be located in Black neighborhoods that are economically deprived.

  5. A combined QXRD/TG method to quantify the phase composition of hydrated Portland cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soin, Alexander V.; Catalan, Lionel J.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Kinrade, Stephen D., E-mail: stephen.kinrade@lakeheadu.ca [Department of Chemistry, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    A new method is reported for quantifying the mineral phases in hydrated cement pastes that is based on a combination of quantitative X-ray diffractometry (QXRD) and thermogravimetry (TG). It differs from previous methods in that it gives a precise measure of the amorphous phase content without relying on an assumed stoichiometric relationship between the principal hydration products, calcium hydroxide (CH) and calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). The method was successfully applied to gray and white ordinary Portland cements (GOPC and WOPC, respectively) that were cured for up to 56 days. Phase distributions determined by QXRD/TG closely matched those from gray-level analysis of backscattered scanning electron microscope (BSEM) images, whereas elemental compositions obtained for the amorphous phase by QXRD/TG agreed well with those measured by quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)

  6. Influence of portland cement replacement in high calcium fly ash geopolymer paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanakorn Phoo-ngernkham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the influence of ordinary Portland cement (OPC replacement in high calcium fly ash (FA geopolymer paste. FA was used to replace OPC at the rate of 5, 10 and 15% by mass of binder. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 and 10 molar sodium hydroxide (NaOH solutions were used as the alkaline solution in the reaction. The Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 2.0 and the liquid/binder (L/B ratio of 0.60 were used in all mixtures. The results of increase OPC replacement, the setting time and compressive strain capacity decreased while the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity increased. The compressive strength and modulus of elasticity at 28 days of geopolymer pastes with 15% OPC replacement were 36.7 MPa and 13,300 MPa, respectively.

  7. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  8. A defined management strategy improves early outcomes after the Fontan procedure: the PORTLAND protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstrom, Rachel E; Muralidaran, Ashok; Gerrah, Rabin; Reed, Richard D; Good, Milon K; Armsby, Laurie R; Rekito, Andrew J; Zubair, M Mujeeb; Langley, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing the Fontan procedure may have extended hospital stay due to various postoperative factors including prolonged chest tube drainage. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of our Fontan management protocol in reducing chest tube drainage and length of stay. Patients who underwent a Fontan procedure at our institution from June 2008 to September 2013 were analyzed (n = 42). We currently manage our patients according to the PORTLAND protocol: Peripheral vasodilation, Oxygen, Restriction of fluids, Technique of surgery, Low-fat diet, Anticoagulation (including antithrombin III management), No ventilator, and Diuretics. Group A (n = 28) had surgery prior to initiation of this protocol; group B (n = 14) had surgery during the current protocol era. The median number of chest tube days was lower in group B (6 vs 11 days, p < 0.001) as was the total indexed drainage (126 vs 259 mL/kg, p < 0.001). Patients in group B had shorter intensive care unit length of stay (4 vs 7 days, p = 0.004) and hospital length of stay (8 vs 13 days, p = 0.001). Group B had higher preoperative common atrial pressures (7.0 vs 5.8 mm Hg, p = 0.017), end-diastolic pressures (9 vs 7 mm Hg, p = 0.026), and trended toward higher pulmonary artery pressures (11.5 vs 9.5 mm Hg, p = 0.077). There was no statistically significant difference in age, weight, transpulmonary gradient, or pulmonary vascular resistance between groups. The PORTLAND protocol has improved early outcomes after the Fontan procedure. Chest tube drainage and duration, and both intensive care unit and hospital length of stay have been reduced since initiation of this protocol. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical and mechanical characterization of Portland cement mortars made with expanded polystyrene particles addition (EPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrándiz-Mas, V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On this work the influence of the addition of different types (commercial and recycled and contents of expanded polystyrene on the physical and mechanical properties of Portland cement mortars has been studied. Variables studied are: workability, air content, bulk density, mechanical strength, porosity, water absorption and sound absorption. Mixtures have been also characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Air-entraining agents, water retainer and superplasticizer additives have been used in order to improve the workability of mortars. The results show that the workability and mechanical strength decreases with increasing content of expanded polystyrene. Additives improve the workability and porosity, allowing manufacture mortars with high levels of recycled material that show mechanical properties suitable for use as masonry mortars, stucco and plaster.

    El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar la influencia de la adición de distintos tipos y dosificaciones de poliestireno expandido, tanto comerciales como procedentes de reciclado, sobre las características físicas y mecánicas de morteros de cemento portland. Las variables estudiadas fueron: consistencia, aire ocluido, densidad aparente, resistencias mecánicas, porosidad, absorción de agua y absorción acústica. Los morteros también se han caracterizado por microscopia electrónica de barrido. Con objeto de mejorar la trabajabilidad de los morteros se ha empleado aditivos aireante, retenedor de agua y fluidificante. Los resultados muestran que al aumentar la cantidad de poliestireno expandido la trabajabilidad y las resistencias mecánicas disminuyen. El empleo de aditivos mejora la trabajabilidad y la porosidad, permitiendo fabricar morteros con altos contenidos de residuo, con propiedades mecánicas adecuadas para su empleo como morteros de albañilería, revoco y enlucido.

  10. The Production of Organic Nitrates in Portland, Oregon and the Columbia River Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Holly Ann

    This work studied the production of aerosol-phase organic nitrates in both Portland and the Columbia River Gorge (CRG). Ozone and NO x species were investigated for correlation with organic nitrate aerosol, as they function as precursors to the production of organic nitrates. These ambient gas-phase measurements were collected in the same locations as high-volume (Hi-Vol) filters samples, in an urban and rural gorge setting to investigate correlations at the origin of the pollution plume and downwind. A novel Soxhlet extraction method for Hi-Vol filters was developed based on literature and EPA standard methods. Analysis for nitrate production was done by segregating data based on times when the wind blew out of Portland and down the CRG versus times when flow was not westerly. Filters were then compared to ambient gas-phase measurements and derived NO3 radical production rates to look for trends. Wind direction had a strong influence on the concentrations of precursor molecules in the CRG. On days with a westerly wind direction into the gorge, concentrations of the measure aerosol organic nitrates were similar at both sides. This suggests some contribution of a broader regional production of organic nitrates. There was some correlation between the production rate of NO3 radicals and the measured organic nitrate aerosol, suggesting a role for NO3 + VOC production of organic nitrates that later partition to the aerosol phase. This information will better illuminate the fate of nitrogen downwind of pollution sources. The information will also help to create a better understanding of the way topography and meteorological conditions can influence the flow of pollution. Understanding the downwind oxidative chemistry that happens in the CRG would better support both pollution prevention and mitigation efforts..

  11. Development of a CE-QUAL-W2 temperature model for Crystal Springs Lake, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.

    2016-05-19

    During summer 2014, lake level, streamflow, and water temperature in and around Crystal Springs Lake in Portland, Oregon, were measured by the U.S. Geological Survey and the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services to better understand the effect of the lake on Crystal Springs Creek and Johnson Creek downstream. Johnson Creek is listed as an impaired water body for temperature by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ), as required by section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. A temperature total maximum daily load applies to all streams in the Johnson Creek watershed, including Crystal Springs Creek. Summer water temperatures downstream of Crystal Springs Lake and the Golf Pond regularly exceed the ODEQ numeric criterion of 64.4 °F (18.0 °C) for salmonid rearing and migration. To better understand temperature contributions of this system, the U.S. Geological Survey developed two-dimensional hydrodynamic water temperature models of Crystal Springs Lake and the Golf Pond. Model grids were developed to closely resemble the bathymetry of the lake and pond using data from a 2014 survey. The calibrated models simulated surface water elevations to within 0.06 foot (0.02 meter) and outflow water temperature to within 1.08 °F (0.60 °C). Streamflow, water temperature, and lake elevation data collected during summer 2014 supplied the boundary and reference conditions for the model. Measured discrepancies between outflow and inflow from the lake, assumed to be mostly from unknown and diffuse springs under the lake, accounted for about 46 percent of the total inflow to the lake.

  12. Mechanical characterization of Portland cement mortars containing petroleum or coal tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcés, P.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses experimental data on the flexural and compressive strength of Portland cement mortars containing additions or cement replacements consisting in petroleum or coal tar, by-products of the oil and coal industries. The materials studied were two coal (BACA and BACB and two petroleum (BPP and BPT tars. The results show that it is feasible to use such materials as a partial replacement for cement in mortar manufacture. This should lead to the design of a new sustainable product that will contribute to lowering the environmental impact of construction materials while at the same time opening up an avenue for the re-use of this type of industrial by-products.En este artículo se presentan datos experimentales de resistencia a flexión y a compresión de morteros de cemento Portland con adición y sustitución de breas de petróleo y de alquitrán de carbón, que son subproductos de la industria del carbón o del petróleo. Los materiales estudiados son breas de alquitrán de carbón A (BACA y B (BACB, y dos breas de petróleo (BPP y (BPT. Los datos demuestran la viabilidad del uso de estas breas en la fabricación de morteros con menores contenidos de cemento, permitiendo diseñar un nuevo material sostenible con el medio ambiente y que contribuya a reducir el impacto ambiental de los materiales de construcción, hecho que permite abrir una nueva vía de valorización de estos subproductos.

  13. Applicability of the Waste Fibres in Cement Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina KALPOKAITĖ DIČKUVIENĖ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibres produced from waste catalyst together with commercially available polypropylene fibres were incorporated into ordinary Portland cement paste. The effects of fibre content as well as a mix of different type of fibres on mechanical and physical properties of wet and dry samples were investigated. The results showed that presence of fibres reduced compressive strength of the plain cement in wet and dry state. Contrary, when the combination of 1.5 wt% waste and 1.5 wt% polypropylene fibres was used flexural strength of cement mixture increased by up to 9 % at the age of 28 days. It was observed that addition of 1.5 wt% of only waste fibres improved flexural strength after long hydration period as well. However, the lowest mechanical strength results showed samples with 3 wt% of waste fibres. It was also observed that higher content of waste fibres reduced porosity of the cement mixture and consequently, decreased water absorption capacity. Presence of fibres reduced drying shrinkage of samples and they were lower than plain cement after 28 days of hydration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.1992

  14. Early age behaviour of concrete supercontainers for radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craeye, Bart [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent University, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 904, 9052 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Bart.Craeye@UGent.be; Schutter, Geert de [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent University, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 904, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Humbeeck, Hughes van [ONDRAF/NIRAS, Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (Belgium); Cotthem, Alain van [Tractebel Development Engineering, Consulting Company (Belgium)

    2009-01-15

    Various types of radioactive waste were and are produced in Belgium. This waste originates from different producers: nuclear power plants, medical applications, industry, research centre, etc. During the past 25 years several preliminary repository designs were proposed. Today, the cylindrical supercontainer is considered to be the most promising Belgian design on the matter of enclosing the vitrified high level radioactive waste (HLW) and the spent fuel assemblies and is based on the use of an integrated waste package composed of a carbon steel overpack surrounded by an Ordinary Portland Cement buffer. For the choice of this cementious buffer two compositions, a self-compacting concrete (SCC) and a traditional vibrated concrete (TVC), are being considered, tested and compared by means of an intensive laboratory characterization program. Through-going cracks in the concrete buffer should, at all times, be avoided because they will considerably ease the transport mechanisms inside the supercontainer. Therefore, finite element simulations are performed, using a 2.5-D thermal and crack modelling program, to predict the mechanical and thermal behaviour of the concrete buffer at any time during hardening. Looking at the finite element simulation results of the first stage of manufacturing of the supercontainer (cast in one), and the emplacement of the heat-emitting waste canister (second stage), we experience no early age cracking of the concrete buffer. The impact of environmental conditions and shrinkage and creep behaviour on the simulation results are noticeable.

  15. Study on solidification for municipal solid waste incineration fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Q.; Yang, J.; Xi, W. [Chongqing Univ., Chongqing (China); Huang, B. [Southwest Petroleum Univ., Chengdu (China)

    2008-07-01

    The appropriate management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major environmental issues, despite the significant efforts to prevent, reduce, reuse and recycle waste. Two primary options can be used for managing MSW incineration fly ash. These are landfill disposal or incineration. Incineration is effective in toxic substance destruction, waste volume reduction and energy recovery, as compared with landfill. MSW fly ash generally contains higher content of easily leachable heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, and zinc. In China, source separation of municipal solid wastes is not well practiced and has resulted in high concentrations of heavy metals being detected in the MSW fly ash. This paper presented a preliminary study to examine the properties of MSW fly ash and the fixing abilities of ordinary Portland cement and hydrated time on heavy metals. The paper discussed the effects of experimental parameters on the properties of solidified fly ash and the optimal technology conditions. The fly ash used in the study was collected from solid waste incineration plants in Shenzhen, Shanghai, and Chongqing, China. It was concluded that the effect on solidification got better and the leaching quantities of heavy metals such as zinc, lead, cadmium, or chromium decreased with the addition of cement used as adhesive. The optimal proportion of cement was 8 per cent. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. Portland cement with additives in the repair of furcation perforations in dogs Cimento Portland com aditivos na reparação de perfurações radiculares em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Dias da Silva Neto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of Portland cements with additives as furcation perforation repair materials and assess their biocompatibility. METHODS: The four maxillary and mandibular premolars of ten male mongrel dogs (1-1.5 years old, weighing 10-15 kg received endodontic treatment (n=80 teeth. The furcations were perforated with a round diamond bur (1016 HL. The perforations involved the dentin, cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. A calcium sulfate barrier was placed into the perforated bone to prevent extrusion of obturation material into the periradicular space. The obturation materials MTA (control, white, Type II, and Type V Portland cements were randomly allocated to the teeth. Treated teeth were restored with composite resin. After 120 days, the animals were sacrificed and samples containing the teeth were collected and prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the amount of newly formed bone between teeth treated with the different obturation materials (p=0.879. CONCLUSION: Biomineralization occurred for all obturation materials tested, suggesting that these materials have similar biocompatibility.OBJETIVO: Avaliar o uso de cimentos Portland aditivados na reparação de perfurações radiculares e a biocompatibilidade destes materiais. MÉTODOS: Oitenta pré-molares, quatro da arcada dentária superior e quatro da arcada inferior de 10 cães machos, sem raça definida, com idade em torno de um a um ano e meio, pesando entre 10 e 15 kg foram submetidos a tratamento endodôntico, sendo realizadas perfurações nas furcas com broca de diamante 1016 HL. A cavidade envolveu dentina e cemento, como também periodonto e o osso alveolar. Na porção óssea da obturação, barreira de sulfato de cálcio foi utilizada evitando extravasamento do cimento para o espaço periodontal. Foi realizada a distribuição randomizada dos cimentos MTA (controle, Portland tipo II, Portland tipo V e

  17. Assessment the potential of using Carbon nanotubes reinforcements for improving the tensile/flexural strength and fracture toughness of Portland cement paste for damage resistant concrete transportation infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The focus of this study was on exploring the use of nanotechnology-based nano-filaments, such as carbon : nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement in improving the mechanical properties of Portland : cement paste as a construction mat...

  18. Estimated Depth to Ground Water and Configuration of the Water Table in the Portland, Oregon Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable information on the configuration of the water table in the Portland metropolitan area is needed to address concerns about various water-resource issues, especially with regard to potential effects from stormwater injection systems such as UIC (underground injection control) systems that are either existing or planned. To help address these concerns, this report presents the estimated depth-to-water and water-table elevation maps for the Portland area, along with estimates of the relative uncertainty of the maps and seasonal water-table fluctuations. The method of analysis used to determine the water-table configuration in the Portland area relied on water-level data from shallow wells and surface-water features that are representative of the water table. However, the largest source of available well data is water-level measurements in reports filed by well constructors at the time of new well installation, but these data frequently were not representative of static water-level conditions. Depth-to-water measurements reported in well-construction records generally were shallower than measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the same or nearby wells, although many depth-to-water measurements were substantially deeper than USGS measurements. Magnitudes of differences in depth-to-water measurements reported in well records and those measured by the USGS in the same or nearby wells ranged from -119 to 156 feet with a mean of the absolute value of the differences of 36 feet. One possible cause for the differences is that water levels in many wells reported in well records were not at equilibrium at the time of measurement. As a result, the analysis of the water-table configuration relied on water levels measured during the current study or used in previous USGS investigations in the Portland area. Because of the scarcity of well data in some areas, the locations of select surface-water features including major rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and

  19. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  20. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  1. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  2. Dairy Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Richard F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the dairy industry covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) government regulations; (2) ion-plant control of dairy effluents; (3) dairy effluent treatment methods; and (4) research on dairy effluents. A list of 26 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Evolution and quantification of the main Sensitisers in commercial portland cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías, M.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The commercial Portland cements contain minor elements in their chemical compositions. The presence of these elements has a direct incidence in different aspects: rheological behaviour, reaction kinetics, environmental, etc. Some of them also have a negative effect on the human health; so, chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co are the main allergens present in Portland cements, causing of Professional Dermatitis in construction workers. The current study is focussed on the quantification of total and soluble chromium, nickel and cobalt in a wide range of Spanish commercial cements. These values can represent a contribution to the establishing of possible limitations or reductions of these elements in forthcoming standards. Analytical data show that clinkers are the main responsibles of the presence of soluble chromium in commercial cements. This fact could be indicating that chromium solubility (from inert Cr III to soluble Cr VI would be closely related to the clinkerisation conditions. On the other hand, there is not a direct ratio between total chromium and soluble chromium; it means that analytical results are punctual and not any case can be extrapolating ones. Ni and Co solubility in water is practically negligible either raw as clinkers.

    Los cementos Portland comerciales contienen elementos minoritarios en su composición química. La presencia de estos elementos tiene una incidencia directa en diferentes aspectos: comportamiento reológico, cinética de reacción, contaminación ambiental, etc. Algunos de ellos, aparte de su incidencia mencionada anteriormente, tienen un efecto negativo en la salud humana. Así, el cromo (Cr, níquel (Ni y cobalto (Co son los principales alérgenos contenidos en los cementos y, por lo tanto, los principales causantes de la Dermatitis Profesional. Este trabajo se centra en la cuantifîcación de los contenidos totales y solubles de cromo, níquel y cobalto presentes en los cementos comerciales

  4. Thermal Properties of Cement Based Composites with Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Fly Ash Accessed by Two Different Transient Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan FOŘT

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of cement composite with Mixed Fly Ash (MFA from different parts of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI process as a partial replacement of Portland cement are researched in the paper. MFA is applied in the amount of 10 %, 20 % and 30 % of the mass of cement, while sand and water quantities are kept constant. For the sake of comparison, a reference mixture with Portland cement as the only binder is studied as well. For the characterization of studied materials, their basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity are measured using gravimetric method combined with helium pycnometry. Among the thermal properties, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity are accessed by two transient methods having different experimental arrangement and time of measurement. The measured data obtained by the particular methods are compared and the applicability of the methods for the measurement of thermal properties of solid building materials is discussed.

  5. Review of palm oil fuel ash and ceramic waste in the production of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasya Mazenan, Puteri; Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Shahidan, Shahiron; Shamsuddin, Shamrul-mar

    2017-11-01

    High demand for cement in the concrete production has been increased which become the problems in the industry. Thus, this problem will increase the production cost of construction material and the demand for affordable houses. Moreover, the production of Portland cement leads to the release of a significant amount of CO2 and other gases leading to the effect on global warming. The need for a sustainable and green construction building material is required in the construction industry. Hence, this paper presents utilization of palm oil fuel ash and ceramic waste as partial cement replacement in the production of concrete. Using both of this waste in the concrete production would benefit in many ways. It is able to save cost and energy other than protecting the environment. In short, 20% usage of palm oil fuel ash and 30% replacement of ceramic waste as cement replacement show the acceptable and satisfactory strength of concrete.

  6. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance

  7. Evaluation of Greek type Portland cement based on Megalopolis fly ash addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivanakis, V.; Papamantellos, D. [University of Patras (Greece). Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Metallurgy; Galanoulis, E. [Titan Cement Company S.A., Drepano, Achaias (Greece)

    2003-04-01

    Fly-ash is considered as a fine material which is produced during firing of powdered solid fuels in steam generating plants. It is contained in the output exhaust gases and collected in the electrostatic filters. In the lignite fired power plants of Public Power Corporation in the regions of Ptolemais-Amynteon and Megalopolis 65 . 10 t/a of lignite are consumed nowadays with a corresponding fly ash production of about 13 . 10{sup 6} t/a. The utilisation of fly ash generated in Megalopolis plant ({proportional_to} 3.5 . 106 t/a) in cement industry has been investigated by the Laboratory of Metallurgy (METLAB) in collaboration with the cement company Titan and the Greek P.P.C. since 1979. The primary target of this research and development work, was to investigate the addition of Megalopolis fly ash in the manufacturing process of cement, in quantities around 10%, replacing the so-called Volcanic Rock (Santorini's earth), which was used as a pozzolanic material. Megalopolis fly ash was considered to be unsuitable for use as hydraulic powder due to its high SiO{sub 2} content ({proportional_to}50%), in contrast to Ptolemais-Amynteon fly ash, which contains high percentages of CaO (30 - 40%). The first results were very encouraging as they proved that addition of blended fly ash could be added up to 50% without considerable reduction in the compressive strength of cement. Consequently, exploitation of Megalopolis fly ash by Titan cement industry began in 1982, with the production of Greek type Portland cement that contains 15 - 20% of Megalopolis fly ash. The annual consumption of Megalopolis fly ash since 1982 is in the range of 300.000 - 500.000 t/a. In the years following 1983, a systematic investigation of the influence of Megalopolis fly ash addition, up to a content of 80% upon the technological properties of cement and concrete was carried out. The workability, compressive strength (2, 7, 28 days), long-term compressive strength (up to 180 days) and the

  8. Water dynamics in hardened ordinary Portland cement paste or concrete: from quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordallo, Heloisa N; Aldridge, Laurence P; Desmedt, Arnaud

    2006-09-14

    Portland cement reacts with water to form an amorphous paste through a chemical reaction called hydration. In concrete the formation of pastes causes the mix to harden and gain strength to form a rock-like mass. Within this process lies the key to a remarkable peculiarity of concrete: it is plastic and soft when newly mixed, strong and durable when hardened. These qualities explain why one material, concrete, can build skyscrapers, bridges, sidewalks and superhighways, houses, and dams. The character of the concrete is determined by the quality of the paste. Creep and shrinkage of concrete specimens occur during the loss and gain of water from cement paste. To better understand the role of water in mature concrete, a series of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments were carried out on cement pastes with water/cement ratio varying between 0.32 and 0.6. The samples were cured for about 28 days in sealed containers so that the initial water content would not change. These experiments were carried out with an actual sample of Portland cement rather than with the components of cement studied by other workers. The QENS spectra differentiated between three different water interactions: water that was chemically bound into the cement paste, the physically bound or "glassy water" that interacted with the surface of the gel pores in the paste, and unbound water molecules that are confined within the larger capillary pores of cement paste. The dynamics of the "glassy" and "unboud" water in an extended time scale, from a hundred picoseconds to a few nanoseconds, could be clearly differentiated from the data. While the observed motions on the picosecond time scale are mainly stochastic reorientations of the water molecules, the dynamics observed on the nanosecond range can be attributed to long-range diffusion. Diffusive motion was characterized by diffusion constants in the range of (0.6-2) 10(-9) m(2)/s, with significant reduction compared to the rate of diffusion

  9. Puntos de vista sobre el contenido de yeso de los cementos Portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calleja, J.

    1965-12-01

    Full Text Available No availableSe justifican, mediante los datos y observaciones expuestos en este trabajo, las modificaciones introducidas en el Pliego (Norma española para conglomerantes hidráulicos de 1961 -PCCH 61- en relación con el antiguo Pliego de 1930 y sus revisiones hasta 1957, respecto del contenido de: yeso de los cementos Portland, expresado por el valor máximo de SO3 admitido en los mismos. Se justifica igualmente el mantenimiento de dichas modificaciones en la nueva y reciente versión del Pliego de 1964 -PCCH 64-, en la misma o muy parecida forma en que fueron originalmente introducidas, conservándose íntegramente el criterio que presidió su introducción. Se demuestra que este criterio ha sido y sigue siendo adoptado por otras Normas de diversos países, después de su implantación con carácter original y de prioridad en el nuestro. Se estima que, por existir indiscutibles y bien fundadas razones científico-técnicas, apoyadas por resultados experimentales, para adoptar y mantener tal criterio, no debe in,.. tentarse lo contrario, a menos que se aduzcan otras razones y otros hechos suficientemente convincentes para ello. La consideración de que por ser, en general, el valor máximo de SO3, admitido en el Pliego español, superior a los correspondientes de otras Normas extranjeras, ello pudiera dificultar una posible concurrencia de los cementos españoles a los mercados internacionales, es inconsistente, por cuanto que dicho valor limitativo es, precisamente, un máximo maximorum. No debe olvidarse tampoco, a este respecto, que, por razón de las materias primas, muy pocos cementos Portland extranjeros, si es que hay alguno, poseen -en promedio- un contenido tan elevado de aluminato tricálcico como el de los cementos españoles.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires

  11. Soil Remediation of an Arsenic-Contaminated Site With Ferrous Sulfate and Type V Portland Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Rivera, N.; Root, R.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2005-12-01

    High levels of arsenic are present in a site adjacent to San Francisco Bay (in East Palo Alto, CA) as a consequence of the activity of a former pesticide manufacturing plant. Most of the readily accessible arsenic at the site has been removed by remedial excavation and surface capping. In-situ fixation of residual arsenic was performed close to the source about 10 years ago where arsenic values in capped soils ranged from 500 to 5000 mg kg-1. The fixation method consisted of the addition of ferrous sulfate (3% w/w), type V Portland cement (10% w/w) and water. Both products were mixed with the contaminated soil to a treatment depth between 1.5 and 9 meters. The treated soil was then capped to prevent weathering. This long-term amended soil offers an opportunity to compare the processes that prevent microbial arsenic reduction and control the immobilization of arsenic in the treated soils versus natural soils, and to study the aging effects of arsenic sorption. Solid phase characterization of soil samples from both the field and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study the speciation and bioavailability of arsenic and to ascertain the mechanisms of the arsenic immobilization in the treated soil. These methods included physical description by field observations, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, total elemental concentrations, and solid phase fractionation by sequential extraction. Both synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and XRD measurements were used to determine oxidation state of arsenic and iron and host phases present in the soil. The remedial treatment was successful in immobilizing the arsenic in the contaminated soil, and decreasing its leachability. Measurements taken at short aging times (during the first month) showed that the treatment was effective in reducing leachable arsenic as evidenced by the TCLP wet test (arsenic speciation. The treated soil in both field

  12. Influence of The Activated Qatari Attapulgite Clay Admixture on The Mechanical Properties and Hydration Kinetics of Ordinary Portland Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Noaimi, Kawkab Kh. [كوكب النعيمي

    2001-01-01

    Blended cements are types of cements containing additives other than those used m Portland cement, which have considerable technological interest, because such addition increases the chemical resistance to sulfate and chloride attack. The present investigation represents a laboratory study, which provides a unique opportunity to introduce an effective practical attempt to deal with the problem of concrete deterioration m Qatar and the Arabian Gulf region, and to provide a solution to the prob...

  13. Effect of Nanosilica on the Fresh Properties of Cement-Based Grouting Material in the Portland-Sulphoaluminate Composite System

    OpenAIRE

    Shengli Li; Tingting Xu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of NS particle size and content on the fresh properties of the grouting material based on the portland-sulphoaluminate composite system was analyzed. The experimental results indicated that air content increased and apparent density decreased, with increased NS content, but the NS particle sizes have minimal effect on the air content and apparent density. The setting time of mortar was significantly shortened, with increased NS content; however, NS particle sizes had little influen...

  14. The effect of urban trees on the rental price of single-family homes in Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; David T. Butry

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have estimated the effect of environmental amenities on the rental price of houses. We address this gap in the literature by quantifying the effect of urban trees on the rental price of single-family homes in Portland, Oregon, USA. We found that an additional tree on a house's lot increased monthly rent by $5.62, and a tree in the public right of way...

  15. Relation between Portland cement carbonation, range of clinker burning and some expansive phenomena in the autoclave test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz de Cauna, A.

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEn este trabajo se estudia el doble pico que aparece en la región de altas temperaturas de las curvas derivatométricas, realizadas en atmósfera de vapor de agua, de los cementos portland anhidros e hidratados y en general el efecto de la carbonatación sobre los silicatos y aluminatos presentes en los cementos portland, especialmente sobre el perfil de las curvas derivatométricas de los cementos portland anhidros e hidratados. Se recogen y examinan los cambios experimentados en el doble pico al someter los cementos a la acción de diversos tratamientos y de agentes modificantes, tales como el tiempo, el CO2, la hidratación normal, las hidrataciones bajo agua a ebullición, en autoclave y en suspensión acuosa con agitación, la adición de puzolana y de fuertes proporciones de S04Ca. Se estudia y compara, asimismo, el comportamiento al análisis térmico bajo vapor de agua y al ensayo de autoclave de algunos clínkeres y cementos que presentan el doble pico en forma acusada y poco apreciable, respectivamente. De los resultados obtenidos se deducen conclusiones que explican los comportamientos experimentales observados. Las principales conclusiones se refieren a la interpretación de los picos que aparecen en las curvas derivatométricas o de velocidad de pérdida de peso de los cementos portland anhidros e hidratados, y a algunos aspectos de su carbonatación, a la probable existencia de un compuesto intermedio, consecuencia de la incompleta formación del silicato tricálcico y a la explicación de determinadas grandes expansiones producidas en el ensayo de autoclave.

  16. In vitro sealing ability of white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and white Portland cement used as apical plugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zanatta Aranha Coneglian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sealing ability of apical plugs made of white and gray MTA-Angelus® and white Portland cement placed via the root canal and having different thicknesses (2, 5 and 7 mm. Ninety extracted human single-rooted teeth were instrumented using a size 40 K-file to standardize the foraminal opening by the stepback technique. The teeth were assigned to 3 groups (n=30, according to the material used for fabrication of the apical plugs: A = gray MTA; B = white MTA; C = white Portland cement. The groups were subdivided into groups of 10 teeth each according to the apical plug thickness (2, 5 and 7 mm. Marginal apical dye leakage was assessed using 0.2% Rhodamine B solution in which the specimens were immersed for 72 hours at 37ºC. The roots were sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual direction for apical plug exposure, and digital photographs were taken and analyzed by Image Tool image-analysis software. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Significance level was set at 5%. The least percent leakage was observed for 5- and 7-mm-thick plugs (p0.05 was found between gray MTA and white Portland cement. Among the three materials analyzed, white MTA presented the highest marginal leakage (p<0.05. The findings of the present study showed that gray MTA and Portland cement had better sealing ability than white MTA when used as apical plugs. Dye leakage was smaller for 5- and 7-mm-thick plugs compared to 2-mm-thick plugs.

  17. ENERGY, ACOUSTICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS OF BUILDING SYSTEMS BASED ON WOOD WOOL MINERALIZED WITH PORTLAND CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Pavarin, Cora

    2014-01-01

    In the present work various aspects of the energetic, thermal and acoustic properties of porous materials with wood wool mineralized Portland cement have been analyzed, in cooperation with the company Celenit Srl, a manufacturer of panels for building insulation. These products are also recognized interesting and desirable for their environmental sustainability through specific certifications. Remind that sustainability means "development that meets the needs of the present without comprom...

  18. Phase I: energy conservation potential of Portland Cement particle size distribution control. Progress report, November 1978-January 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmuth, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    Progress is reported on the energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control. Results of preliminary concrete tests, Series IIIa and Series IIIb, effects of particle size ranges on strength and drying shrinkage, are presented. Series IV, effects of mixing and curing temperature, tests compare the properties of several good particle size controlled cements with normally ground cements at low and high temperatures. The work on the effects of high alkali and high sulfate clinker cements (Series V) has begun.

  19. Proceedings of the First Landscape State-and-Transition Simulation Modeling Conference, June 14–16, 2011, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky K. Kerns; Ayn J. Shlisky; Colin J. Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The first ever Landscape State-and-Transition Simulation Modeling Conference was held from June 14–16, 2011, in Portland Oregon. The conference brought together over 70 users of state-and-transition simulation modeling tools—the Vegetation Dynamics Development Tool (VDDT), the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Analysis (TELSA) and the Path Landscape Model. The goal of the...

  20. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrein, Julia R; Morris, Jeffrey M; Chitwood, Rob S; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B

    2016-08-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2092-2102. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  1. Influence of bismuth oxide concentration on the pH level and biocompatibility of white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Marina Angélica; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Minotti, Paloma Gagliardi; Midena, Raquel Zanin; Guimarães, Bruno Martini; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate if there is a relation between the increase of bismuth oxide and the decrease of pH levels and an intensification of toxicity in the Portland cement. White Portland cement (WPC) was mixed with 0, 15, 20, 30 and 50% bismuth oxide, in weight. For the pH level test, polyethylene tubes were filled with the cements and immersed in Milli-Q water for 15, 30 and 60 days. After each period, the increase of the pH level was assessed. For the biocompatibility, two polyethylene tubes filled with the cements were implanted in ninety albino rats (n=6). The analysis of the intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate was performed after 15, 30 and 60 days. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn and Friedman tests for the pH level and the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for the biological analysis (p0.05). For the inflammatory infiltrates, no significant statistical differences were found among the groups in each period (p>0.05). The 15% WPC showed a significant decrease of the inflammatory infiltrate from 15 to 30 and 60 days (pbismuth oxide into Portland cement did not affect the pH level and the biological response. The concentration of 15% of bismuth oxide resulted in significant reduction in inflammatory response in comparison with the other concentrations evaluated.

  2. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrein, Julia R.; Morris, Jeffrey M.; Chitwood, Rob S.; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance.

  3. Biocompatibility and setting time of CPM-MTA and white Portland cement clinker with or without calcium sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Monteiro BRAMANTE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the biocompatibility and the setting time of Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA-CPM. Material and Methods Twenty-four mice (Rattus norvegicus received subcutaneously polyethylene tubes filled with Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA. After 15, 30 and 60 days of implantation, the animals were killed and specimens were prepared for microscopic analysis. For evaluation of the setting time, each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles weighing 113.5 g and 456.5 g, according to the ASTM specification Number C266-08 guideline. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test for setting time and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test for biocompatibility at 5% significance level. Results Histologic observation showed no statistically significant difference of biocompatibility (p>0.05 among the materials in the subcutaneous tissues. For the setting time, clinker without calcium sulfate showed the shortest initial and final setting times (6.18 s/21.48 s, followed by clinker with 2% calcium sulfate (9.22 s/25.33 s, clinker with 5% calcium sulfate (10.06 s/42.46 s and MTA (15.01 s/42.46 s. Conclusions All the tested materials showed biocompatibility and the calcium sulfate absence shortened the initial and final setting times of the white Portland cement clinker.

  4. Effect of the use nickeliferous laterite and pumice as additives in the performance and durability of the Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carolina Rueda-Gualdrón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se evalúa el comportamiento puzolánico de la laterita niquelífera de Cerromatoso (Córdoba y la pumita de Cemex (Boyacá en la preparación de morteros según normas NTC para agregados finos. Los morteros se prepararon con adiciones de 2,5%, 5% y 10% como sustitutos del cemento Portland tipo I, los cuales fueron sometidos a ensayos de resistencia mecánica antes y después de ser sometidos a ambientes extremos (altas temperaturas y ataques químicos como H2 SO4 y MgSO4 . Los resultados demuestran cómo estos materiales alternativos incrementan o disminuyen su grado de puzolanidad, así como el efecto de estos aditivos al interior de las mezclas de mortero en el tiempo, demostrando propiedades similares con relación a los morteros preparados con cemento Portland tipo I. Por lo tanto, los morteros tienen una respuesta aceptable ante las condiciones evaluadas, aunque es posible mejorar su desempeño y durabilidad, colaborando no solo con el ahorro energético en la producción del cemento Portland tipo I sino también en el uso de aditivos alternativos que permitan mitigar el impacto ambiental provocado por la industria cementera.

  5. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  6. Some contributions to the examination of composites from power plant wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Prvoslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an investigation into the possibilities of the use of all three types of solid power plant wastes: fly ash (FA, flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGD gypsum and bottom ash (BA as components of composites for road construction. Two mixtures were made: 1. power plant wastes - Portland cement (PC and 2. power plant wastes - sand (S - Portland cement (PC. The mass ratio of components in these mixtures was: 1. FA - FGD gypsum - BA - PC = 2 : 1.5 : 5 : 1.5 and 2. FA- FGD gypsum-BA - S - PC= 2 : 1.5 : 4 : 1 : 1.5. For both mixtures, the compressive strength, the mineralogical composition, the water absorption and the resistance to freeze-thaw treatment were determined 7 and 28 days after preparation of samples (mixing with water. The obtained results showed that both mixtures could have potential to be used for sub-base layers in road construction and the second mixture (with natural aggregate-sand has advantage over the first mixture in terms of compressive strength, mineralogical composition, and resistance to freeze-thaw treatment.

  7. Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL`s Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form`s chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs.

  8. Solidification-stabilization of organic and inorganic contaminants using portland cement: a literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuet, Pak K; Paria, Santanu

    2006-01-01

    ... (S-S) is of increasing importance as an option for remediating contaminated sites. Indeed, among the various treatment techniques, S-S is one of the most widely used methods for treating inorganic wastes...

  9. Effect of MTA and Portland Cement on Fracture Resistance of Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Forghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is important to evaluate the effects of endodontic materials on tooth structures to avoid endodontic treatment failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA and Portland cement (PC on fracture resistance of dentin. Materials and methods. Thirty-six freshly extracted human single-rooted premolar teeth were selected. The crowns were removed and the roots were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. The root samples were longitudinally divided into two halves and a dentin bar (2×2×10 mm was cut from each root section for short-term (2 weeks and long-term (12 weeks evaluations. The root sections in the experimental groups were exposed to MTA or PC, while keeping the control group specimens in physiologic saline. The fracture resistance of each specimen was measured using an Instron testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, a post hoc Tukey test and paired ttest at 5% significance level. Results. The fracture resistance of MTA-treated specimens significantly increased between 2 and 12 weeks (P0.05. Conclusion. The results showed that MTA increased the fracture resistance of root dentin, while PC had no significant effect on dentin fracture resistance.

  10. Effects of Using Pozzolan and Portland Cement in the Treatment of Dispersive Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, A. H.; Selamat, M. R.; Moayedi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Use of dispersive clay as construction material requires treatment such as by chemical addition. Treatments to dispersive clay using pozzolan and Portland cement, singly and simultaneously, were carried out in this study. When used alone, the optimum amount of pozzolan required to treat a fully dispersive clay sample was 5%, but the curing time to reduce dispersion potential, from 100% to 30% or less, was 3 month long. On the other hand, also when used alone, a 3% cement content was capable of reducing dispersion potential to almost zero percent in only 7 days; and a 2% cement content was capable of achieving similar result in 14 days. However, treatment by cement alone is costly and could jeopardize the long term performance. Thus, a combined 5% pozzolan and 1.5% cement content was found capable of reducing dispersion potential from 100% to zero percent in 14 days. The results indicate that although simultaneous treatment with pozzolan and cement would extend the required curing time in comparison to treatment by cement alone of a higher content, the task could still be carried out in a reasonable period of curing time while avoiding the drawbacks of using either pozzolan or cement alone. PMID:23864828

  11. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  12. Degradation of Alumina and Magnesia Chrome refractory bricks in Portland cement kiln – Corrected version*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Addi K.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In cement plants, the refractory products are particularly confronted to partially liquid oxide phases at temperature ranging between 900°C and 1700°C. All constituents of these products have to resist not only to thermal constraints, but also to the thermochemical solicitations which result from contact material/coating. In order to study the phenomenon of degradation of refractory bricks in cement kilns and to identify the causes of their degradation, we proceed to the examination of industrial cases in cement kiln. Many chemical tests of the degraded refractory bricks have been done and the results acquired were compared to the ones not used. The analysis of the results is doing using different techniques (Loss of ignition, X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray Diffraction. The results show that the degradation of the used bricks in the clinkering and cooling zone is due to the infiltration of aggressive elements such us sulphur, alkali (Na2O, K2O .... The chemical interaction between the Portland clinker phases and refractory material has also an importance on the stability of the coating and consequently on the life of the refractories.

  13. Occupational Contact Dermatitis: Workers' Compensation Patch Test Results of Portland, Oregon, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Zinsmeister, Chris; Norris, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Workers are exposed to potential irritants and allergens with constant introduction of new industrial chemicals in the workplace. Characterize the final diagnoses, demographics, occupations, exposures, clinical presentations, patch test results, dermatologic histories, and risk factors of workers evaluated for suspected work-related allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). A retrospective chart review of 310 workers' compensation independent medical examinations evaluated for suspected work-related ACD was performed. Workers were seen in a community dermatology clinic in Portland, Oregon, from 2005 to 2014. Evaluation included history, physical examination, patch testing, and further diagnostic workup when indicated. Hand dermatitis was the most common presentation (n = 148, 47.7%). Prevalent occupations included health care workers (n = 51, 16.5%), custodial staff (n = 41, 13.2%), and machinists (n = 36, 11.6%). Allergic contact dermatitis (47.5%) was more common than irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) (38.9%) in those diagnosed as having occupational skin disease (n = 185). The highest-frequency work-related allergens were thiuram mix (21 of 88, 23.9%), carba mix (20 of 88, 22.7%), potassium dichromate (9 of 88, 10.2%), and epoxy resin (9 of 88, 10.2%). Allergic contact dermatitis and ICD are common occupational skin disorders. In this population of workers' compensation referrals, ACD was more common, with 73.3% of those cases work related, compared with 86.7% of ICD. Blue collar work and wet work were risk factors for the development of ACD and ICD.

  14. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods. PMID:28772472

  15. ESTUDIO SOBRE PASTAS Y MORTEROS DE CEMENTO PORTLAND CON REEMPLAZO POR LOZA SANITARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Zito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analiza el uso de Loza Sanitaria como reemplazo del cemento portland. Los reemplazos utilizados fueron 8, 24 y 40 % en peso; los ensayos empleados contemplaron la evolución de la hidratación desde los primeros minutos (hasta 48 horas a través de la calori metría , y a partir de los dos días (hasta 28 días por medio de la velocidad de fijación del hidróxido de calcio, el agua químicamente combinada, la resistencia mecánica a flexión y a compresión y la porosidad. Los resultados mostraron que a medida que aum enta el porcentaje de reemplazo, a las primeras edades d el efecto de dilución solapa y se contrapone con el de estimulación física ; y a la edad de 28 días todas las mezclas presentan además de la estimulación física también la química , por la reactividad puzolánica.

  16. Characteristics of Portland blast-furnace slag cement containing cement kiln dust and active silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdel Rahman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This investigation dealt with the effect of active silica, silica fume (SF or rice husk ash (RHA, on the mechanical and physico-chemical characteristics of the hardened blended cement pastes made of Portland blast-furnace slag cement (PSC containing cement kiln dust (CKD cured under normal conditions. Two blends made of PSC and CKD, improved by SF and two blends made of PSC and CKD improved by RHA were investigated. Hardened blended cement pastes were prepared from each cement blend by using water/cement ratio (W/C of 0.30 by weight and hydrated for various curing ages of 1, 3, 7, 28 and 90 days at the normal curing conditions under tap water at room temperature. Each cement paste was tested for its physico-chemical and mechanical characteristics; these characteristics include: compressive strength and kinetics of hydration. The phase composition of the formed hydration products was identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA. It was found that the partial substitution of PSC by 10% and 15% of CKD is associated with an increase in the rate of hydration and a subsequent improvement of compressive strength of hardened PSC–CKD pastes. In addition, the replacement of PSC, in PSC–CKD blends, by 5% active silica was accompanied by further improvement of the physico-mechanical characteristics of the hardened PSC–CKD pastes.

  17. Analysis of Metal Contents in Portland Type V and MTA-Based Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati Dorileo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine, by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS, the concentration levels of 11 metals in Type V gray and structural white PC, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Bio. Samples, containing one gram of each tested cement, were prepared and transferred to a 100 mL Teflon tube with a mixture of 7.0 mL of nitric acid and 21 mL of hydrochloric acid. After the reaction, the mixture was filtered and then volumed to 50 mL of distilled water. For each metal, specific patterns were determined from universal standards. Arsenic quantification was performed by hydride generator. The analysis was performed five times and the data were statistically analyzed at 5% level of significance. Only the cadmium presented concentration levels of values lower than the quantification limit of the device. The AAS analysis showed increased levels of calcium, nickel, and zinc in structural white PC. Type V PC presented the greatest concentration levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and manganese (P<0.05. Bismuth was found in all cements, and the lowest concentration levels were observed in Portland cements, while the highest were observed in ProRoot MTA. Both PC and MTA-based cements showed evidence of metals inclusion.

  18. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  19. Ion release and pH of a new endodontic cement, MTA and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini Ghazvini, Sara; Abdo Tabrizi, Maryam; Kobarfard, Farzad; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study measured and compared pH and phosphate and calcium ions release of a new endodontic material (CEM cement), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and Portland cement (PC) using UV-visible technique, atomic absorption spectrophotometry methods, and pH meter, respectively. Each material was placed in a plastic tube (n=10) and immersed in a glass flask containing deionized water. Half of the samples were tested for determining pH and released ions after 1h, 3h, 24h, 48h, 7d and 28d. Remaining samples (n=5), were evaluated after 28d. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results indicated that all materials were highly alkaline and released calcium and low concentration of phosphate ions in all the time intervals. CEM cement released considerably higher concentration of phosphate during the first hour (Pcalcium and phosphate. These conditions can stimulate the calcification process and explain the basic physico-chemical mechanisms of hard tissue regeneration of CEM cement.

  20. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 1176 block groups in Portland, Oregon. The US EPA's Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) was used to estimate the incidence of adverse health effects (i.e., mortality and morbidity) and associated monetary value that result from changes in pollution concentrations for Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties in Oregon and Clark County, WA. Incidence and value estimates for the block groups are calculated using i-Tree models (www.itreetools.org), local weather data, pollution data, and U.S. Census derived population data. This dataset was produced by the US Forest Service to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  1. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 146 block groups in Portland, Maine. The US EPA's Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) was used to estimate the incidence of adverse health effects (i.e., mortality and morbidity) and associated monetary value that result from changes in pollution concentrations for Cumberland and York Counties, ME. Incidence and value estimates for the block groups are calculated using i-Tree models (www.itreetools.org), local weather data, pollution data, and U.S. Census derived population data. This dataset was produced by the US Forest Service to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  2. Properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes with Portland cement as an additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoo-ngernkham, Tanakorn; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Sata, Vanchai; Pangdaeng, Saengsuree; Sinsiri, Theerawat

    2013-02-01

    The effect of Portland cement (OPC) addition on the properties of high calcium fly ash geopolymer pastes was investigated in the paper. OPC partially replaced fly ash (FA) at the dosages of 0, 5%, 10%, and 15% by mass of binder. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions were used as the liquid portion in the mixture: NaOH 10 mol/L, Na2SiO3/NaOH with a mass ratio of 2.0, and alkaline liquid/binder (L/B) with a mass ratio of 0.6. The curing at 60°C for 24 h was used to accelerate the geopolymerization. The setting time of all fresh pastes, porosity, and compressive strength of the pastes at the stages of 1, 7, 28, and 90 d were tested. The elastic modulus and strain capacity of the pastes at the stage of 7 d were determined. It is revealed that the use of OPC as an additive to replace part of FA results in the decreases in the setting time, porosity, and strain capacity of the paste specimens, while the compressive strength and elastic modulus seem to increase.

  3. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-26

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel-space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  4. The impact of sulphate and magnesium on chloride binding in Portland cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Weerdt, K., E-mail: klaartje.d.weerdt@ntnu.no [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Orsáková, D. [Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Brno, Brno (Czech Republic); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    The effect of magnesium and sulphate present in sea water on chloride binding in Portland cement paste was investigated. Ground well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, NaCl, NaCl + MgCl{sub 2}, MgSO{sub 4} + MgCl{sub 2} and artificial sea water solutions with a range of concentrations at 20 °C. Chloride binding isotherms are determined and pH of the solutions were measured. A selection of samples was examined by SEM-EDS to identify phase changes upon exposure. The experimental data were compared with calculations of a thermodynamic model. Chloride binding from sea water was similar to chloride binding for NaCl solutions. The magnesium content in the sea water lead to a slight decrease in pH, but this did not result in a notable increase in chloride binding. The sulphate present in sea water reduces both chloride binding in C–S–H and AFm phases, as the C–S–H incorporates more sulphates instead of chlorides, and part of the AFm phases converts to ettringite.

  5. Influence of Crumb-Rubber in the Mechanical Response of Modified Portland Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Retama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of crumb-rubber on the mechanical properties of Portland cement concrete (PCC is studied by experimental tests and numerical simulations. The main hypothesis of the study is that replacing part of the stone aggregate with crumb-rubber in the mix modifies the energy dissipation during the cracking process and affects the concrete behaviour under monotonically increasing loads. The experimental research program characterizes the mechanical properties of PCC for three different types of concrete with a variable content of crumb-rubber. The experimental results showed that fracture energy and other properties are directly related to the rubber fineness used in the mixture. The material properties derived for these laboratory tests are used to study, by numerical models, its response through its damage evolution. The numerical model used to simulate the damage evolution of the concrete is the Embedded Discontinuity Method (EDM. One characteristic of the EDM is that it does not need to modify the mesh topology to propagate the damage through the continuum solid. For this study, the Disk-Shaped Compact Tension specimen geometry, normed by the D7313-13 of the ASTM, is used. Results showed that the numerical methods provide good approximation of the experimental curve in the elastic and softening branches.

  6. DURABILITY PERFORMANCE OF RFCC SPENT CATALYSTBLENDED PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE EXPOSED TO SEA WATER ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahverdi A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the performance of the paste of Portland cement blended with spent catalyst from Resid Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (RFCC unit of petroleum refining processes in sea water. 28-day cured paste specimens prepared from binary cement mixes containing different amounts of spent catalyst were exposed to Persian Gulf sea water. Compressive strength, weight, and length changes of the specimens were monitored and considered for evaluating the extent of deterioration. Laboratory techniques of X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were also used to study the deteriorated specimens. The results confirm that at relatively high replacement levels, the pozzolanic property of the spent catalyst and the increased open pore volume of such blended cements may result in contradictory consequences. Specimens of relatively higher replacement levels exhibit higher rates of deterioration in spite of their superior mechanical strength behavior caused by pozzolanic reaction. The results obtained by X-ray diffractometry confirm the presence of higher amounts of chlorine-containing Friedel’s salt in specimens containing RFCC spent catalyst compared to plain reference specimens.

  7. Sulphate in Liquid Nuclear Waste: from Production to Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M.; Grandjean, A.; Ledieu, A.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Barre, Y.; Tronche, E. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Batiment 208 BP17171, Bagnols sur Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear industry produces a wide range of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes which can include different radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. In La Hague reprocessing plant and in the nuclear research centers of CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), the coprecipitation of strontium with barium sulphate is the technique used to treat selectively these contaminated streams with the best efficiency. After the decontamination process, low and intermediate level activity wastes incorporating significant quantities of sulphate are obtained. The challenge is to find a matrix easy to form and with a good chemical durability which is able to confine this kind of nuclear waste. The current process used to contain sulphate-rich nuclear wastes is bituminization. However, in order to improve properties of containment matrices and simplify the process, CEA has chosen to supervise researches on other materials such as cements or glasses. Indeed, cements are widely used for the immobilization of a variety of wastes (low and intermediate level wastes) and they may be an alternative matrix to bitumen. Even if Portland cement, which is extensively used in the nuclear industry, presents some disadvantages for the containment of sulphate-rich nuclear wastes (risk of swelling and cracking due to delayed ettringite formation), other cement systems, such as calcium sulfo-aluminate binders, may be valuable candidates. Another matrix to confine sulphate-rich waste could be the glass. One of the advantages of this material is that it could also immobilize sulphate containing high level nuclear waste which is present in some countries. This waste comes from the use of ferrous sulfamate as a reducing agent for the conversion of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+} in the partitioning stage of the actinides during reprocessing. Sulphate solubility in borosilicate glasses has already been studied in CEA at laboratory and pilot scales. At a pilot scale, low level liquid waste has been

  8. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  9. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  10. Recycling waste brick from construction and demolition of buildings as pozzolanic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kae-Long; Wu, Hsiu-Hsien; Shie, Je-Lueng; Hwang, Chao-Lung; An Cheng

    2010-07-01

    This investigation elucidates the pozzolic characteristics of pastes that contain waste brick from building construction and demolition wastes. The TCLP leaching concentrations of waste brick for the target cations or heavy metals were all lower than the current regulatory thresholds of the Taiwan EPA. Waste brick had a pozzolanic strength activity index of 107% after 28 days. It can be regarded as a strong pozzolanic material. The compressive strengths of waste brick blended cement (WBBC) that contain 10% waste brick increased from 71.2 MPa at 28 days to 75.1 MPa at 60 days, an increase of approximately 5% over that period. At 28 days, the pozzolanic reaction began, reducing the amount of Ca(OH)(2) and increasing the densification. The intensity of the peak at 3640 cm(- 1) associated with Ca(OH)(2) is approximately the same for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes. The hydration products of all the samples yield characteristics peaks at 978 cm(-1) associated with C-S-H, and at ~3011 cm(-1) and 1640 cm(-1) associated with water. The samples yield peaks at 1112 cm(-1), revealing the formation of ettringite. In WBBC pastes, the ratio Q(2)/Q(1) increases with curing time. These results demonstrate that increasing the curing time increases the number of linear polysilicate anions in C-S-H. Experimental results reveal that waste brick has potential as a pozzolanic material in the partial replacement of cement.

  11. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  12. Cement-based radioactive waste hosts formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (FUETAP concretes) for Savannah River Plant high-level defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Rogers, G.C.; Morgan, M.T.; Stinton, D.P.; Kessler, J.H.; Robinson, S.M.; Moore, J.G.

    1983-03-01

    Concretes that are formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (called FUETAP) are effective hosts for high-level radioactive defense wastes. Tailored concretes developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been prepared from common Portland cements, fly ash, sand, clays, and waste products. These concretes are produced by accelerated curing under mild autoclave conditions (85 to 200/sup 0/C, 0.1 to 1.5 MPa) for 24 h. The solids are subsequently dewatered (to remove unbound water) at 250/sup 0/C for 24 h. The resulting products are strong (compressive strength, 40 to 100 MPa), leach resistant (plutonium leaches at the rate of 10 pg/(cm/sup 2/.d)), and radiolytically stable, monolithic waste forms (total gas value = 0.005 molecule/100 eV). This report summarizes the results of a 4-year FUETAP development program for Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level defense wastes. It addresses the major questions concerning the performance of concretes as radioactive waste forms. These include leachability, radiation stability, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, impact strength, permeability, phase complexity, and effect of waste composition.

  13. Towards zero industrial waste: Utilisation of brick dust waste in sustainable construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinuthia, J M; Nidzam, R M

    2011-08-01

    Laboratory investigations were carried out to establish the potential utilisation of brick dust (BD) in construction. The dust is a waste material from the cutting of fired clay bricks. Currently, the disposal of the dust is a problem to the brick fabrication company, and hence an environmental pollution concern. The dust was stabilised either used on its own or in combination with Pulverised Fuel Ash (PFA), a by-product material from coal combustion. The traditional stabilisers of lime and/or Portland Cement (PC) were used as controls. The main aim was to use a sustainable stabiliser material, where these stabilisers were partially replaced with Ground Granulated Blastfurnace Slag (GGBS), a by-product material from steel manufacture. Compacted cylinder test specimens were made at typical stabiliser contents and moist cured for up to 56 days prior to testing for compressive and California Bearing Ratio (CBR) strength tests, and to linear expansion during moist curing and subsequent soaking in water. The results obtained showed that partial substitution of the dust with PFA resulted in stronger material compared to using it on its own. The blended stabilisers achieved better performance. These results suggest technological, economic as well as environmental advantages of using the brick dust and similar industrial by-products to achieve sustainable infrastructure development with near zero industrial waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  15. Waste Reduction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help solid waste planners and organizations track/report GHG emissions reductions from various waste management practices. To assist in calculating GHG emissions of baseline and alternative waste management practices and provide the history of WARM.

  16. Hazardous Waste Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The HazWaste database contains generator (companies and/or individuals) site and mailing address information, waste generation, the amount of waste generated etc. of...

  17. The temporality of waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Katrine Dahl; Jordt Jørgensen, Nanna; Læssøe, Jeppe

    Waste is, indisputably, one of the key issues of environmental concerns of our times. In an environment and sustainability education perspective, waste offers concrete entry points to issues of consumption, sustainability and citizenship. Still, waste education has received relatively little...

  18. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    .) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow......'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  19. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  20. Informative document packaging waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten JM; Nagelhout D; Duvoort GL; Weerd M de

    1989-01-01

    This "informative document packaging waste" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the instructions of the Direcotrate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  1. Vibrational study on the bioactivity of Portland cement-based materials for endodontic use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, P.; Tinti, A.; Gandolfi, M. G.; Rossi, P. L.; Prati, C.

    2009-04-01

    The bioactivity of a modified Portland cement (wTC) and a phosphate-doped wTC cement (wTC-P) was studied at 37 °C in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline (DPBS). The cements, prepared as disks, were analysed at different ageing times (from 1 day to 2 months) by micro-Raman and ATR/FT-IR spectroscopies. The presence of deposits on the surface of the cements and the composition changes as a function of the storage time were investigated. The presence of an apatite deposit on the surface of both cements was already revealed after one day of ageing in DPBS. The trend of the I 965/I 991 Raman intensity ratio indicated the formation of a meanly thicker apatite deposit on the wTC-P cement at all the investigated times. This result was confirmed by the trend of the I 1030/I 945 IR intensity ratio calculated until 14 days of ageing. At 2 months, the thickness of the apatite deposit on wTC and wTC-P was about 200 and 500 μm, respectively, as estimated by micro-Raman spectroscopy, confirming the higher bioactivity of the phosphate-doped cement. Vibrational techniques allowed to gain more insights into the cement transformation and the different hydration rates of the various cement component. The setting of the cement and the formation of the hydrated silicate gel (C-S-H phase) was spectroscopically monitored through the I 830/I 945 IR intensity ratio.

  2. OBTENTION D’UN CLINKER PORTLAND CONSOMMANT PEU D’ENERGIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Kacimi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available L’objectif de notre travail consiste à diminuer la température de cuisson du clinker Portland par l'ajout de minéralisateurs dans le mélange des matières premières. Une série de composés chimiques purs, de matières naturelles et de déchets industriels ont été additionnés séparément aux mélanges crus de trois cimenteries algériennes (Zahana, Béni-Saf et Chlef. La plupart de ces additifs, avec un pourcentage ne dépassant pas 4% du mélange, ont pu diminuer la température de clinkerisation à 1300 °C. Leurs effets sur les propriétés hydrauliques du clinker sont cependant différents. Ceci est lié à la composition minéralogique et la structure des minéraux du clinker synthétisé. Les déchets industriels et les fluorures ont présenté une grande efficacité dans la baisse de la température de cuisson. Le phosphogypse et NaF ont amélioré la cristallisation des minéraux du clinker en formant un taux élevé d’alite. Ces caractéristiques expliquent l’amélioration des propriétés physiques et mécaniques de ce clinker.

  3. Characterize Cold Bituminous Emulsion Mixtures Incorporated Ordinary Portland Cement Filler for Local Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Amoori Kadhim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold Bituminous Emulsion Mixtures have many environmental, logistical, and economic advantages over conventional Hot Mix Asphalt. Nevertheless, their inferior performance and high water sensitivity at early life attract little attentions. Moreover, it is impossible to apply CBEM as a structural surface layer if left without treatment or enhancement. The main aim of this study is to enhance the properties of CBEM for the hope of using it as a structural layer. Thus, a trial has been made to improve CBEM mechanical and durability properties by replacing the Ordinary Portland Cement by the Conventional Mineral Filler with 3 percentages; namely, 0, 50%, and 100%. CBEM mixtures mechanical properties were evaluated in term of Marshall Stability and Flow, Indirect Tensile Strength, and Wheel Track Test. While Moisture damage was evaluated in terms of Retained Marshall Stability. Test results showed that the addition of 100%OPC filler can improve CBEM mechanical and durability properties efficiently. In terms of mechanical properties results, CBEM comprised 100%OPC, can be used as a structural Surface layer based on local Iraqi specifications limits, where mixture enhanced about 1.9, 1.78, 9,4.85, and 2.6  times in term of MS, MF, rutting deformation resistance, resistance to tensile cracking, and moisture damage resistance, respectively as compared to untreated CBEM. Also, CBEM-100%OPC mix seemed comparable (and sometime superior to HMA, e.g., resistance to rutting of CBEM is about 6.2 times higher than that of HMA. It’s worth to say that OPC upgrades CBEM to a significant level that enables it to use as a structural layer in terms of the mechanical and the durability properties.

  4. A cognitive stressor for event-related potential studies: the Portland arithmetic stress task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Rachel; Ellingson, Roger; Klee, Daniel; Memmott, Tabatha; Oken, Barry

    2017-05-01

    In this experiment, we developed and evaluated the Portland Arithmetic Stress Task (PAST) as a cognitive stressor to evaluate acute and sustained stress reactivity for event-related potential (ERP) studies. The PAST is a titrated arithmetic task adapted from the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with added experimental control over presentation parameters, improved and synchronized acoustic feedback and generation of timing markers needed for physiological analyzes of real-time brain activity. Thirty-one older adults (M = 60 years) completed the PAST. EEG was recorded to assess feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the magnitude of the stress response through autonomic nervous system activity and salivary cortisol. Physiological measures other than EEG included heart rate, respiration rate, heart rate variability, blood pressure and salivary cortisol. These measures were collected at several time points throughout the task. Feedback-related negativity evoked-potential responses were elicited and they significantly differed depending on whether positive or negative feedback was received. The PAST also increased systolic blood pressure, heart rate variability and respiration rates compared to a control condition attentional task. These preliminary results suggest that the PAST is an effective cognitive stressor. Successful measurement of the feedback-related negativity suggests that the PAST is conducive to EEG and time-sensitive ERP experiments. Moreover, the physiological findings support the PAST as a potent method for inducing stress in older adult participants. Further research is needed to confirm these results, but the PAST shows promise as a tool for cognitive stress induction for time-locked event-related potential experiments.

  5. Land Suitability Analysis for Stormwater Green Infrastructure Placement in an Urban Watershed in Portland, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher De Leon, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Green infrastructure (GI) can decrease the effects of urbanization by reducing storm runoff and enhancing water quality in urban areas. However, the siting of GI is still a complex process, especially in highly developed urban areas. Additionally, while site-scale siting standards for GI have been developed, watershed-scale approaches for urban watersheds are still uncommon, due to greater land use heterogeneity, complexity in hydrological processes and existing land use policies. For this study, a GIS-based model was created to prioritize suitable locations for the placement of several stormwater practices, using an urbanized catchment in Portland, Oregon as a case study. A multi-criteria suitability analysis was run in ArcGIS 10 using several hydrological and topographical parameters (i.e. slope, land use/cover, soil characteristics, and hydrological conditions) that are particular to each GI and local stormwater policies to identify sites that have the greatest potential for GI development for several types of infiltration facilities (detention ponds, bioretention, vegetated bioswales, wetlands, and permeable pavement). Multiple placement GI scenarios are being created using the results from the suitability model, to reduce the study's area overall impervious surface area of 42% down to scenarios of 35%, 25%, and 10%. These resulting scenarios are then being used as inputs in a GIS-based hydrological model to analyze the possible reductions in stormwater runoff. The resulting suitability model will provide a systematic and replicable tool that will assist urban managers in identifying high priority sites for green infrastructure to more effectively manage urban stormwater in Oregon and Washington.

  6. Use of claims data to estimate annual cervical cancer screening percentages in Portland metropolitan area, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nasreen; Laing, Robert S; Hariri, Susan; Young, Collette M; Schafer, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine should reduce cervical dysplasia before cervical cancer. However, dysplasia diagnosis is screening-dependent. Accurate screening estimates are needed. To estimate the percentage of women in a geographic population that has had cervical cancer screening. We analyzed claims data for (Papanicolau) Pap tests from 2008-2012 to estimate the percentage of insured women aged 18-39 years screened. We estimated screening in uninsured women by dividing the percentage of insured Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey respondents reporting previous-year testing by the percentage of uninsured respondents reporting previous-year testing, and multiplying this ratio by claims-based estimates of insured women with previous-year screening. We calculated a simple weighted average of the two estimates to estimate overall screening percentage. We estimated credible intervals using Monte-Carlo simulations. During 2008-2012, an annual average of 29.6% of women aged 18-39 years were screened. Screening increased from 2008 to 2009 in all age groups. During 2009-2012, the screening percentages decreased for all groups, but declined most in women aged 18-20 years, from 21.5% to 5.4%. Within age groups, compared to 2009, credible intervals did not overlap during 2011 (except age group 21-29 years) and 2012, and credible intervals in the 18-20 year group did not overlap with older groups in any year. This introduces a novel method to estimate population-level cervical cancer screening. Overall, percentage of women screened in Portland, Oregon fell following changes in screening recommendations released in 2009 and later modified in 2012. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Permeability predictions for sand-clogged Portland cement pervious concrete pavement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselbach, Liv M; Valavala, Srinivas; Montes, Felipe

    2006-10-01

    Pervious concrete is an alternative paving surface that can be used to reduce the nonpoint source pollution effects of stormwater runoff from paved surfaces such as roadways and parking lots by allowing some of the rainfall to permeate into the ground below. This infiltration rate may be adversely affected by clogging of the system, particularly clogging or covering by sand in coastal areas. A theoretical relation was developed between the effective permeability of a sand-clogged pervious concrete block, the permeability of sand, and the porosity of the unclogged block. Permeabilities were then measured for Portland cement pervious concrete systems fully covered with extra fine sand in a flume using simulated rainfalls. The experimental results correlated well with the theoretical calculated permeability of the pervious concrete system for pervious concrete systems fully covered on the surface with sand. Two different slopes (2% and 10%) were used. Rainfall rates were simulated for the combination of direct rainfall (passive runoff) and for additional stormwater runoff from adjacent areas (active runoff). A typical pervious concrete block will allow water to pass through at flow rates greater than 0.2 cm/s and a typical extra fine sand will have a permeability of approximately 0.02 cm/s. The limit of the system with complete sand coverage resulted in an effective system permeability of approximately 0.004 cm/s which is similar to the rainfall intensity of a 30 min duration, 100-year frequency event in the southeastern United States. The results obtained are important in designing and evaluating pervious concrete as a paving surface within watershed management systems for controlling the quantity of runoff.

  8. Municipal Solid Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Ajaykumar; Patil, Deepak; Argade, Kuldeep

    2016-01-01

    Waste management covers newly generated waste or waste from an onging process. When steps to reduce or even eliminate waste are to be considered, it is imperative that considerations should include total oversight, technical and management services of the total process.From raw material to the final product this includes technical project management expertise, technical project review and pollution prevention technical support and advocacy.Waste management also includes handling of waste, in...

  9. Supermarket food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Food waste occurs along the entire food supply chain and gives rise to great financial losses and waste of natural resources. The retail stage of the supply chain contributes significant masses of waste. Causes of this waste need to be identified before potential waste reduction measures can be designed, tested and evaluated. Therefore this thesis quantified retail food waste and evaluated selected prevention and valorisation measures, in order to determine how the carbon footprint of food ca...

  10. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial action of MTA, calcium hydroxide and Portland cement Avaliação comparativa da ação antimicrobiana do MTA, hidróxido de cálcio e cimento Portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sousa Ribeiro

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial effect of MTA Dentsply, MTA Angelus, Calcium Hydroxide and Portland cement. Four reference bacterial strains were used: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Enterococcus faecalis. Plates containing Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% sheep blood, hemin, and menadione were inoculated with the bacterial suspensions. Subsequently, wells were prepared and immediately filled with materials and incubated at 37ºC for 48 hours under anaerobic conditions, except P. aeruginosa. The diameters of inhibition zones were measured, and data analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test with 1% level of significance. MTA Dentsply, MTA Angelus and Portland cement inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa. Calcium Hydroxide was effective against P. aeruginosa and B. fragillis. Under anaerobic conditions, which may hamper the formation of reactive oxygen species, the materials failed to inhibit E. faecalis, and E. coli.O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar e comparar o efeito antimicrobiano do MTA Dentsply, MTA Angelus, hidróxido de cálcio e cimento Portland sobre quatro cepas bacterianas: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, e Enterococcus faecalis. Placas contendo agar Muller-Hinton suplementadas com 5% de sangue de carneiro, hemina e menadiona foram inoculadas com as suspensões bacterianas. Poços foram confeccionados com auxílio de perfuradores e imediatamente preenchidos com os materiais, e incubados a 37ºC por 48 horas em atmosfera de anaerobiose, exceto P. aeruginosa. O diâmetro dos halos de inibição foi medido e os dados analisados usando o teste estatístico ANOVA e o de Tukey com nível de significância de 1%. O MTA Dentsply, MTA Angelus e Cimento Portland inibiram o crescimento da P.aeruginosa. O hidróxido de cálcio foi efetivo contra P. aeruginosa e B. fragillis. Sob atmosfera de anaerobiose, condição que pode

  11. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  12. Chemical Waste and Allied Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Tse; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Ramli, Siti Fatihah; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Lian-Huey; Huhnke, Christopher Robert

    2016-10-01

    This review of literature published in 2015 focuses on waste related to chemical and allied products. The topics cover the waste management, physicochemical treatment, aerobic granular, aerobic waste treatment, anaerobic granular, anaerobic waste treatment, chemical waste, chemical wastewater, fertilizer waste, fertilizer wastewater, pesticide wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, ozonation. cosmetics waste, groundwater remediation, nutrient removal, nitrification denitrification, membrane biological reactor, and pesticide waste.

  13. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction to modern...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  14. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, R.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  15. Design and manufacture of Portland cement - application of sensitivity analysis in exploration and optimisation Part II. Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2006-01-01

    A program for a model-based optimisation has been developed. The program contains two subprograms. The first one does minimising or maximising constrained by one original PLS-component or one equal to a combination of several. The second one does searching for the optimal combination of PLS-compo......-components, which gives max or min y. The program has proved to be applicable for achieving realistic results for implementation in the design of Portland cement with respect to performance and in the quality control during production....

  16. Imaging a fossil oolitic system with GPR, insights into the exposures of the Isle of Portland (UK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine Lykke; Nielsen, Lars

    . The papers place a shore line between the Isle and the continent striking NEE-SWW and facing towards the Channel. Facies changes are attributed to rapid sea-level variations and Walter’s Law.Following some preliminary field observations, we have decided to shoot an extensive GPR survey of the same...... stratigraphic interval (The Portland Freestone). With a total of 85 GPR profiles, we have produced grids on top of most of the coastal cliffs and quarry faces. We have encountered 3 main architectures, 2-m-high bars with steep clinoforms, 10s of metres-wide channels plugged with a variety of organism...

  17. Combined effect of sodium sulphate and superplasticizer on the hydration of fly ash blended Portland® cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined effect of polycarboxylate type superplasticizer and sodium sulphate on the hydration of fly ash blended Portland® cement has been studied by using different techniques. Water consistency, setting times, non-evaporable water contents, water percolation, air contents, compressive strengths and expansion in corrosive atmosphere were determined. Hydration products were examined with the help of DTA and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is found that the superplasticizer reduces the pore size and its adsorption on cement surfaces is decreased in the presence of sodium sulphate. Mechanism of hydration is discussed.

  18. Detailed characterization of current North American portland cements and clinkers and the implications for the durability of modern concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, P.

    The current study has been undertaken with a view to rationalize the relation between the cement characteristics and concrete properties with the fresh set of data collected from the North American portland cements. The important chemical and physical characteristics of the cement discussed are (a) chemical analysis, (b) phase calculations, (c) various particle characterizations and (d) rheological properties. The important concrete properties discussed are (a) alkali silica reactivity, (b) sulfate attack, (c) delayed ettringite formation (d) chloride ion permeability and (e) compressive strength. Relationship between the cement characteristics and concrete durability was determined using regression methods. The heat of hydration was mainly influenced by the variation in C 3A, SO3, equivalent Na2O contents, and fineness of portland cements. When there was no variation in C3A, SO 3, and fineness, the hydration kinetics of the cement was mainly controlled by the silicate phase hydration. The 7-day hydration was negatively correlated to C2S or C4AF content. As the C2S or C 4AF content increased, the 7-day heat of hydration decreased. C 3S content showed a positive correlation to 1 and 7-day heats of hydration, but significant negative correlation to 14 and 28-day hydration. Equivalent alkalis showed a strong positive correlation to ASR at 2 weeks. SO3 content of portland cement also showed a positive correlation to ASR expansion. A strong negative correlation was observed between C4AF content of portland cement and sulfate attack expansion at 4 and 6 months of exposure. The correlation to sulfate attack was stronger when the ratios of C3A/C4AF were taken into account. C3A content exhibited a negative correlation to chloride ion permeability. This correlation decreased as the curing period increased. SO 3 content also exhibited a negative correlation to the chloride ion permeability. Only alkalis showed a strong negative correlation to the compressive strength after 3

  19. Influencia de la adición, en diferentes proporciones, de rocas silíceas opalinas al cemento portland

    OpenAIRE

    de Luxan, M. P.; Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.; Frías, M.; Saavedra, J.; Martín Patino, M. T.; Madruga, F.

    1989-01-01

    En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de la presencia de rocas silíceas opalinas, procedentes de las provincias de Salamanca, Zamora y Avila, en las propiedades de los cementos mixtos fabricados con cemento portland y proporciones variables de estas rocas utilizadas como adiciones activas. La caracterización de estos materiales y el estudio de las propiedades de los cementos preparados revelan la capacidad puzolánica de las rocas opalinas, y su singularidad respecto a otras puzolanas n...

  20. Geochemical analysis of leachates from cement/low-level radioactive waste/soil systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted as part of the Special Waste Form Lysimeters/endash/Arid Program. These experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical arid, near-surface disposal site, and to evaluate the ability of laboratory tests to predict leaching in actual field conditions. Batch leaching, soil adsorption column, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted using Portland III cement waste forms containing boiling-water reactor evaporator concentrate and ion-exchange resin waste. In order to understand the reaction chemistry of the cement waste form/soil/ground-water system, the compositions of the leachates from the laboratory experiments were studied with the aid of the MINTEQ ion speciation/solubility and mass transfer computer code. The purpose of this report is to describe the changes in leachate composition that occur during the course of the experiments, to discuss the geochemical modeling results, and to explore the factors controlling the major element chemistry of these leachates. 18 refs., 84 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Minimisation and utilisation of waste mineral sludge from sodium perborate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilc, Viktor; Jersan, Rok

    2002-10-01

    Various approaches to waste minimisation, waste treatment and recycling or safe disposal of the waste mineral sludge from sodium perborate production are presented and critically discussed. Some most promising actions for waste (or its harmful potential) reduction on the production level are identified. These include: a) use of better raw materials (richer boron ore), b) improvement of the ore leaching process, and c) intensification of sludge washing and dewatering. These source reduction measures have already resulted in 50% reduction of boron content in the sludge. Utilisation of the raw or treated (e.g. dried, compacted) waste sludge could be found in agriculture, civil engineering and construction material production. Agricultural use (as a lime substitute) is based on favourable content of calcium-magnesium minerals and alkali pH value of the sludge, and simultaneous absence of heavy metals. Application in civil engineering (as an aggregate) is possible after calcination, which is costly, or as a cement kiln additive. Stabilisation of sludge before disposal, when no utilisation is available, is possible by small addition of commercial binders (e.g. Portland cement) or larger amounts of pozzolanic wastes (e.g. coal fly ash).

  2. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  3. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste.

  4. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 2, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1944-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  5. Healing of root perforations treated with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and Portland cement Reparo de perfurações radiculares tratadas com Agregado Trióxido Mineral (MTA e cimento Portland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Juárez Broon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen root perforations were performed for microscopic evaluation of the repair of interradicular tissue in dogs' teeth. These perforations were accomplished at low-speed with a STP 58 bur at the cervical third of the mesial root toward the furcation under irrigation with saline solution, followed by immediate sealing with ProRoot MTA, MTA-Angelus and white Portland cement. The dogs were killed after 90 days, revealing good results. The Kruskal-Wallis test did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference. It was concluded that the three materials showed good sealing in mineralized tissue, with complete closure, and they were free of inflammation in most teeth.Avaliou-se o reparo de perfurações em dentes de cães, tratadas com ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus e cimento Portland branco. As perfurações foram feitas na região de furca de premolares, superiores e inferiores, com broca STP 58 sob refrigeração com soro fisiólogico. Os animais foram mortos após 90 dias e os dentes foram preparados para análise microscópica pela coloração da hematoxilina e eosina. Os três materiais propiciaram o selamento da perfuração com tecido mineralizado e o teste de Kruskal-Wallis demostrou não haver diferença estatística entre eles.

  6. Resistance to acid attack of portland cement mortars produced with red mud as a pozzolanic additive; Resistencia ao ataque acido de argamassas de cimento Portland produzido com residuo de bauxita como aditivo pozolanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbino, Thiago Gabriel Ferreira; Fortes, Gustavo Mattos; Lourenco, Rafaela Roberta; Rodrigues, Jose de Anchieta [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/PPGCEM/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graducao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais. Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Montini, Marcelo [Alcoa Aluminio S.A., Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Portland cement structures are usually exposed to aggressive environments, which requires the knowledge of the performance of these materials under deleterious conditions. In this study, it was evaluated the resistance to acid attack of mortars that contain ordinary (CPI) and compost (CPII-Z) Portland cements, adding to the first red mud (RB) as a pozzolanic additive in different conditions: without calcination, calcined at 400 ° C and at 600 ° C. The specimens were subjected to HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions, both with concentration of 1.0 Mol L{sup -1} for 28 days, monitoring the weight loss and leached material nature by atomic emission inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The hydration products were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the hydrated cement pastes. It was observed a reduction of portlandite amount in the RB containing cement pastes, indicating a possible pozzolanic activity of the red mud. The mortars prepared with RB were more resistant to HCl, while that ones with calcined RB present a better performance in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} attack. (author)

  7. Pulp Tissue Reaction of Dog Canines to Root MTA and Portland Cement Compared to ProRoot MTA as Pulp Capping Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Razmi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mineral trioxid aggregate (MTA cement is widely used for root-end filling, pulp capping, perforation repair and other treatments in endodontics.Investigations have shown similar physical and chemical properties for Portland cement(type I, Root MTA and ProRoot MTA.Purpose: The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the reaction of dog canine pulp after pulp capping with Root MTA and Portland cement versus ProRoot MTA.Materials and Methods: All four canines from fifteen healthy dogs, 12-18 months of age, were mechanically exposed via buccal class V cavities under aseptic conditions.MTA, Portland cement and Root MTA were prepared according to the manufactures’instructions and placed in the cavities. Tricresol formalin was used in the control group.After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the teeth were fixed and processed for light microscopic analysis. The presence and thickness of the dentinal bridge and the degree of inflammation were evaluated. Data were submitted to Mann-Whiteny and Kruskal Wallis tests for statistical analysis.Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the presence and thickness of the dentinal bridge, and the degree of inflammation between Root MTA, Portland cement and ProRoot MTA (P>0.05.Conclusion: Root MTA, Portland cement and ProRoot MTA showed similarcomparative results when used as direct pulp capping materials. The results of this study support the idea that Portland cement and Root MTA have the potential to be used in clinical situation similar to those in which ProRoot MTA is being used.

  8. Quantitative determination of tricalcicum aluminate in portland cement by X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagrera Moreno, José Luis

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Tricalcium aluminate (C3A is one of the constitutive phase of the cement-clinker. Its concentration influences the cement behaviour in sulphate aggressive soils. Therefore its quantification is very convenient and International standards fix its content when the concrete is used in contact with soils or liquids containing sulphate compounds. There are two possibilities in order to calculate the amount of C3A in clinker phases: one consist in a mathematical calculation from the results of the chemical analysis (Bogue formulae and the order is based in X-ray diffraction, using the height of the representative peak of the C3A phase. In the present note, the experimental procedure in order to determine the C3A content from X-ray test is presented.

    El aluminato tricáicico es una de las fases constitutivas del clinker de cemento portland. Su concentración en el cemento influye en el comportamiento de éste, en las obras sometidas a la posible agresividad de diferentes sulfatos cuando entran en contacto con las estructuras que se fabrican con él. Por ello la determinación de su concentración es un dato que puede invalidar su uso en una obra. De ahí que las normas internacionales fijen la cantidad de aluminato tricáicico según se clasifique la agresividad del entorno en el que una estructura será colocada. Existen fórmulas matemáticas para calcular la concentración de cada una de las fases del clinker a partir de las concentraciones de los elementos químicos de clinker expresados en forma de óxidos. Los posibles errores en los análisis químicos producen errores en los cálculos de las concentraciones de cada fase. Para determinar la concentración de dichas fases se puede emplear también la técnica de difracción de rayos X, basándose en la medida de la altura del pico representativo de la fase que se quiere determinar.

  9. Sources of Phosphorus to a Stream in a Residential Neighborhood in Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, K.; Yeakley, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have attributed relatively high phosphorus (P) levels in urbanizing northwestern Oregon streams to naturally occurring groundwater and soil sources of P. We hypothesized, however, that direct input of storm runoff in an urban neighborhood would also account for a significant proportion of P in urban stream water. To test this hypothesis, we instrumented a small residential watershed (30.6 ha with land cover including 35% paved road and roof, 28% vegetation, 37% open and yard space) in Portland, Oregon and implemented a mass balance model to quantify sources of P loading to the stream. Our governing mass balance equation was Q4C4 = Q1C1 + Q2dC2d + Q3dC3d + QgCg + QpCp, where C4= P concentration and Q4 = discharge at the downstream weir, Q1C1 = P flux in the headwaters of the stream, Q2dC2d and Q3dC3d = P flux in runoff from two storm drains, QgCg = P flux in shallow groundwater, and QpCp = P flux in direct precipitation to the stream. Daily water samples and discharge measurements of stream, storm drains, groundwater, and precipitation were collected and analyzed for soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations, spanning both storms and dry periods from October 2001 to April 2002. We found that groundwater contributed 58.1% SRP during storms and 79.8% SRP during pre-storm periods. Contributions via storm drains were higher during storms (37.4%) compared to pre-storm periods (19.2%). Direct input of precipitation to the stream accounted for about 4.5% of total SRP loading during storms. Similarly the major source of TP to the stream was the groundwater, which contributed on average 70.5% TP to the stream during storms and 88.3% TP to the stream during pre-storm periods. Storm drain contributions were higher during storm event (25.8%) compared to pre-storm periods (11.1%). Direct precipitation input accounted for about 3.3% of TP entering the stream during storms. While groundwater was the major source of P to the stream

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding with Portland cement paste containing carbon materials and processed fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornoza, E.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study described in this article explored the effect of adding different types of carbon materials (graphite powder and three types of carbon fibre, fly ash (with 5.6%, 15.9% and 24.3% Fe2O3, and a mix of both on electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding in Portland cement pastes. The parameters studied included the type and aspect ratio of the carbonic material, composite material thickness, the frequency of the incident electromagnetic radiation and the percentage of the magnetic fraction in the fly ash. The findings showed that the polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres, which had the highest aspect ratio, provided more effective shielding than any of the other carbon materials studied. Shielding was more effective in thicker specimens and at higher radiation frequencies. Raising the magnetic fraction of the fly ash, in turn, also enhanced paste shielding performance. Finally, adding both carbon fibre and fly ash to the paste resulted in the most effective EMI shielding as a result of the synergies generated.

    En el presente trabajo se investiga la influencia de la adición de diferentes tipos de materiales carbonosos (polvo de grafito y 3 tipos de fibra de carbono, de una ceniza volante con diferentes contenidos de fase magnética (5,6%, 15,9% y 24,3% de Fe2O3 y de una mezcla de ambos, sobre la capacidad de apantallar interferencias electromagnéticas de pastas de cemento Pórtland. Entre los parámetros estudiados se encuentra: el tipo de material carbonoso, la relación de aspecto del material carbonoso, el espesor del material compuesto, la frecuencia de la radiación electromagnética incidente y el porcentaje de fracción magnética en la ceniza volante. Los resultados obtenidos indican que entre los materiales carbonosos estudiados son las fibras de carbono basadas en poliacrilonitrilo con una mayor relación de aspecto las que dan mejores resultados de apantallamiento. Al aumentar

  11. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  12. Commercial and Institutional Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Commercial and institutional waste is primarily from retail (stores), hotels, restaurants, health care (except health risk waste), banks, insurance companies, education, retirement homes, public services and transport. Within some of these sectors, e.g. retail and restaurants, large variations...... is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. An important part of commercial and institutional waste is packaging waste, and enterprises with large quantities of clean paper, cardboard and plastic waste may have their own facilities for baling and storing their waste...

  13. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of two calcium-silicate based cements: Portland cement and biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhodiry, W; Lyons, M F; Chadwick, R G

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of contamination with saliva and blood on the bi-axial flexural strength and setting time of pure gray Portland cement and Biodentine (Septodont, Allington, UK). A one-way ANOVA showed that contamination caused no significant difference between the cements in bi-axial flexural strength (P> 0.05). However there was a significant difference in setting time (PBiodentine, regardless of the contaminant, and contamination with blood increased the setting time of both materials. Biodentine was similar in strength to Portland cement, but had a shorter setting time for both contaminated and non-contaminated samples.

  14. Production of building elements based on alkali-activated red clay brick waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Andres Robayo-Salazar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the feasibility of reusing a red clay brick waste (RCBW in order to produce building elements such as blocks, pavers and tiles, by using the technique of alkaline activation. The production of these building elements was based on the design of a hybrid mortar with 48.61 MPa of compressive strength, at 28 curing days at room temperature (25 °C. The hybrid mortar was synthesized by adding 10% by weight of Portland cement (OPC to the RCBW, Red Clay Brick Waste. As alkaline activators were used commercial industrial grade sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. Building elements were physically and mechanically characterized, according to Colombian Technical Standards (NTC. This technology process is presented as an alternative for the reuse of RCBW and its contribution to the environmental sustainability.

  15. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  16. Influence of bismuth oxide concentration on the pH level and biocompatibility of white Portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARCIANO, Marina Angélica; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; MINOTTI, Paloma Gagliardi; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; GUIMARÃES, Bruno Martini; ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate if there is a relation between the increase of bismuth oxide and the decrease of pH levels and an intensification of toxicity in the Portland cement. Material and Methods White Portland cement (WPC) was mixed with 0, 15, 20, 30 and 50% bismuth oxide, in weight. For the pH level test, polyethylene tubes were filled with the cements and immersed in Milli-Q water for 15, 30 and 60 days. After each period, the increase of the pH level was assessed. For the biocompatibility, two polyethylene tubes filled with the cements were implanted in ninety albino rats (n=6). The analysis of the intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate was performed after 15, 30 and 60 days. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn and Friedman tests for the pH level and the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for the biological analysis (p0.05). For the inflammatory infiltrates, no significant statistical differences were found among the groups in each period (p>0.05). The 15% WPC showed a significant decrease of the inflammatory infiltrate from 15 to 30 and 60 days (pcement did not affect the pH level and the biological response. The concentration of 15% of bismuth oxide resulted in significant reduction in inflammatory response in comparison with the other concentrations evaluated. PMID:25141197

  17. Microbial leakage of MTA, Portland cement, Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Estrada-Bernabé, Pedro-Felício; de Almeida-Decurcio, Daniel; Almeida-Silva, Julio; Rodrigues-Araújo-Estrela, Cyntia; Poli-Figueiredo, José-Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement (PC), Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) as root-end filling materials. An in vitro microbial leakage test (MLT) with a split chamber was used in this study. A mixture of facultative bacteria and one yeast (S. aureus+E. faecalis+P. aeruginosa+B. subtilis+C. albicans) was placed in the upper chamber and it could only reach the lower chamber containing Brain Heart Infusion broth by way of leakage through the root-end filling. Microbial leakage was observed daily for 60 days. Sixty maxillary anterior human teeth were randomly assigned to different groups--MTA and PC (gray and white), Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE, control groups and subgroups to evaluate the influence of EDTA for smear layer removal. These materials were further evaluated by an agar diffusion test (ADT) to verify their antimicrobial efficacy. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test. In the MLT, Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show evidence of microbial leakage over the 60-day experimental period. The other materials showed leakage from the 15th day. The presence of smear layer influenced microbial leakage. Microbial inhibition zones were not observed in all samples tested by ADT. Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show microbial leakage over the experimental period, whereas it was verified within 15 to 45 days in MTA and Portland cement.

  18. Influence on the physical-mechanical properties of portland-cement mortar, have admixtures of colophony and tannin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Cánovas, M.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The colophony has been used as an admixture in the Portland cement mortar with the intention to observe its influence on the air content, water absorption, adhesive capacity and mechanical properties. The results obtained have shown that, the colophony acts as air entrainment, reduces the permeability and improves the adhesion between the past and aggregates. Likewise, the addition of tannin and montan wax to the colophony has the efect of reducing the formation of foam and improves the impermeability of the mortar.

    Se ha empleado la colofonia como aditivo en el mortero de cemento portland con el fin de observar su influencia sobre el contenido de aire, absorción de agua, capacidad adhesiva y propiedades mecánicas. Los resultados obtenidos han puesto de manifiesto que la colofonia actúa como aireante, aumenta la impermeabilidad y mejora la adherencia de la pasta al árido. Asimismo, la adición de tanino y cera montana a la colofonia tiene el efecto de reducir la formación de espuma y mejorar también la impermeabilidad del mortero.

  19. Influence of Various Soluble Carbonates on the Hydration of Portland Cement studied by X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvešček, Simona; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Meden, Anton

    2017-06-01

    The effect of limestone on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied by many researchers. However, a possible influence of adding more soluble carbonates was not explained. Therefore we executed a qualitative and quantitative research on the influence of slightly soluble (CaCO3, MgCO3, dolomite), medium soluble (Li2CO3) and highly soluble (K2CO3 and KHCO3) carbonates on the hydration. Blending of Portland cement with differently soluble carbonates was found to influence the hydrate assemblage of the hydrated cement. With the help of the Rietveld analysis, the study indicated that the amount of reacted carbonate in cement hydration at a 15% addition of slightly or medium soluble carbonates does not exceed 5% and is not affected by their solubility; at a 15% addition of the highly soluble carbonate K2CO3 the amount of reacted carbonate was around 6%. An increase in temperature (25 to 40 °C) gradually affects the rate of hydration and the quantity of stable phase assemblage.

  20. Nuclear waste solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  1. Municipal Solid Waste Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a source of biomass material that can be utilized for bioenergy production with minimal additional inputs. MSW resources include mixed commercial and residential garbage such as yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, plastics, rubber, leather, textiles, and food wastes. Waste resources such as landfill gas, mill residues, and waste grease are already being utilized for cost-effective renewable energy generation. MSW for bioenergy also represents an opportunity to divert greater volumes of residential and commercial waste from landfills.

  2. Effect of Incorporating Nanoporous Metal Phosphate Materials on the Compressive Strength of Portland Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn M. Wellman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous metal phosphate (NP-MPO materials are being developed for removal of contaminant oxyanions (As(OHO32−, CrO42−, and TcO4−, and cations (mercury, cadmium, and lead from water and waste streams. Following sequestration, incorporation of metal laden NP-MPOs as a portion of cement formulation would provide an efficient and low-cost way to immobilize metal laden NP-MPOs in an easily handled waste form suitable for permanent disposal. There are no known investigations regarding the incorporation of NP-MPOs in concrete and the effects imparted on the physical and mechanical properties of concrete. Results of this investigation demonstrated that incorporating of NP-MPO materials requires additional water in the concrete formulation which decreases the compressive strength. Thus, incorporation of NP-MPOs in concrete may not serve as an efficient means for long-term disposal.

  3. Residuos cerámicos para su posible uso como materia prima en la fabricación de clínker de cemento Portland: caracterización y activación alcalina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The world-wide cement industry is seeking experimental avenues that will lead to cement production that is less energy-intensive, less damaging to the surrounding environment and less prolific in GHG emissions. In Spain and Europe in general, this approach is wholly consistent with the concept of sustainability and compliance with the Kyoto Protocol. The use of different kinds of industrial waste and by-products as alternative materials in cement manufacture has proved to be a very effective way of contributing to such sustainability. These alternative materials may be incorporated during cement production by partial/y replacing conventional fuel and/or the raw materials ground into the raw mix, or by including active additions to the cement and/or clinker.The present paper discusses the preliminary results obtained in a study of the composition and alkali activation of six types of fired ceramic waste with a view to their viability as partial replacements for some of the prime materials used to prepare raw mix for Portland cement.The results show that the chemical and mineralogical composition of the six materials makes them apt for such possible use. They are neither toxic nor radioactive. And as might be expected this type of waste exhibits pozzolanic activity. Alkali activation of the waste, low at the age analyzed (8 days, does not appear to be affected by the vitreous phase content or the nature of the activator. The characterization study conducted on the activated paste shows that the feldspar phases are the ones most susceptible to dissolution and reaction with the alkaline solutions.La industria cementera mundial está buscando vías experimentales que permitan desarrollar cementos que precisen menor energía en su formación, degraden menos los entornos y emitan menos gases contaminantes a la atmósfera. Esta línea, en España y Europa, coincide plenamente con el concepto de sostenibilidad y alcanzar el cumplimiento del Protocolo de

  4. Manufacturing of mortars and concretes non-traditionals, by Portland cement, metakaoline and gypsum (15.05%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talero, R.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a thorough previous research (1, it appeared that creation, evolution and development of the values of compressive mechanical strength (CS and flexural strength (FS, measured in specimens 1x1x6cm of mortar type ASTM C 452-68 (2, manufactured by ordinary Portland cement P-1 (14.11% C3A or PY-6 (0.00% C3A, metakaolin and gypsum (CaSO4∙2H2O -or ternary cements, CT-, were similar to the ones commonly developed in mortars and concretes of OPC. This paper sets up the experimental results obtained from non-traditional mortars and concretes prepared with such ternary cements -TC-, being the portland cement/metakaolin mass ratio, as follows: 80/20, 70/30 and 60/40. Finally, the behaviour of these cements against gypsum attack, has been also determined, using the following parameters: increase in length (ΔL%, compressive, CS, and flexural, FS, strengths, and ultrasound energy, UE. Experimental results obtained from these non-traditional mortars and concretes, show an increase in length (ΔL, in CS and FS, and in UE values, when there is addition of metakaolin.

    En una exhaustiva investigación anterior (1, se pudo comprobar que la creación, evolución y desarrollo de los valores de resistencias mecánicas a compresión, RMC, y flexotracción, RMF, proporcionados por probetas de 1x1x6 cm, de mortero 1:2,75, selenitoso tipo ASTM C 452-68 (2 -que habían sido preparadas con arena de Ottawa, cemento portland, P-1 (14,11% C3A o PY- 6 (0,00% C3A, metacaolín y yeso (CaSO4∙2H2O-, fue semejante a la que, comúnmente, desarrollan los morteros y hormigones tradicionales de cemento portland. En el presente trabajo se exponen los resultados experimentales obtenidos de morteros y hormigones no tradicionales, preparados con dichos cementos ternarios, CT, siendo las proporciones porcentuales en masa ensayadas, cemento portland/metacaolín, las siguientes: 80/20, 70

  5. Imaging a fossil oolitic system with GPR, insights into the exposures of the Isle of Portland (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Julien; Hansen, Trine L.; Nielsen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The Isle of Portland shows exposure of uppermost Jurassic oolitic carbonate all along its coast. The stone of Portland properties are famous as standards for concrete composition, as building material but also for sculpture. As a consequence, the Isle has been quarried intensively for hundreds of years. The regional exposure quality is very high with a potential 3D control. The site has seen generations of geologist trainees coming for field work. The Wessex Basin where the Isle is sitting contains an active petroleum system and the geologists visiting/training there use the carbonates of Portland as an analogue to equivalent Middle-East oil and gas reservoir. Surprisingly, although the site has a tremendous potential to understand the 3D architecture and the sedimentary dynamic of an oolitic system, only punctual observations of logs (1D), sometimes correlated have been published. Several studies place a shore line between the Isle and the continent striking NEE-SWW and facing towards the Channel. Facies changes are attributed to rapid sea-level variations and Walter's Law. We have collected an extensive GPR survey of the same stratigraphic interval (The Portland Freestone). With a total of 99 GPR profiles, we have produced grids on top of most of the coastal cliffs and quarry faces. We have encountered 3 main architectures: 2-m-high bars with steep clinoforms, 10s of metres-wide channels plugged with a variety of organisms and stacked aggrading bundles of multidirectional dunesets. Our dataset does not illustrate any major unconformity which could be attributed to a sharp sea-level drop. We have interpreted our sedimentary architecture to be the result of various hydrodynamic conditions associated with a mix of wave and tide influences. The Isle shows an island barrier complex which progrades into the basin but also expands laterally filling up the available space and cannibalising itself. More proximal facies are effectively observed in the north of the island

  6. Potential use of natural red mud as pozzolan for Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Véras Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Red mud, the main waste generated in aluminum and alumina production by the Bayer process, is considered hazardous due to its high pH, according to the Brazilian standard NBR 10004/2004, and worldwide generation of this waste exceeds 117 million tons/year. In this work, non-calcined red mud was used, thus requiring less energy and time and reducing costs, which is the ideal condition for reusing wastes. Mortars containing 30 wt. (% of cement substituted by red mud showed higher strength of hardened products. The pozzolanic activity index was evaluated based on physical and mechanical parameters (Brazilian NBR 5751 and NBR 5752 standards and on a chemical analysis (European EN 196-5 standard. A comparison of the reference mixture (without red mud and the results obtained with red mud confirm the potential of non-calcined red mud for use a as pozzolanic additive in cementitious materials. The setting time (according to the MERCOSUL NM 65 standard tends to increase but workability remains almost unchanged.

  7. Waste-Form Development Program. Annual progress report, October 1981-September 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-09-01

    Low-level wastes (LLW) at nuclear facilities have traditionally been solidified using portland cement (with and without additives). Urea-formaldehyde has been used for LLW solidification while bitumen (asphalt) and thermosetting polymers will be applied to domestic wastes in the near future. Operational difficulties have been observed with each of these solidification agents. Such difficulties include incompatibility with waste constitutents inhibiting solidification, premature setting, free standing water and fires. Some specific waste types have proven difficult to solidify with one or more of the contemporary agents. Similar problems are also anticipated for the solidification of new wastes, which are generated using advanced volume reduction technologies, and with the application of additional agents which may be introduced in the near future for the solidification of LLW. In the Waste Form Development program, contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their potential applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle LLW streams. The range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to specific LLW streams is being determined. These studies are primarily directed towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes such as ion exchange resins, organic liquids and oils for which prevailing processes, as currently employed, appear to be inadequate, and solidification of new LLW streams including high solids content evaporator concentrates, dry solids, and incinerator ash generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Solidified waste forms are tested and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial (SLB) acceptance criteria and transportation requirements (both as they currently exist and as they are anticipated to be modified with time).

  8. Waste catalysts for waste polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Two fresh and two steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as two used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Also, inert microspheres (MS3) were used as a fluidizing agent to compare with thermal cracking process at BP pilot plant at Grangemouth, Scotland, which used sand as its fluidizing agent. The results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product are fresh FCC catalysts>steamed FCC catalysts approximately used FCC catalysts. The thermal cracking process using MS3 showed that at 450 degrees C, the product distribution gave 46 wt% wax, 14% hydrocarbon gases, 8% gasoline, 0.1% coke and 32% nonvolatile product. In general, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste.

  9. Effects of Curing Temperature and Pressure on the Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Properties of Portland Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xueyu

    This dissertation mainly focuses on studying the fundamental hydration kinetics and mechanisms of Portland cement as well as the effects of curing temperature and pressure on its various properties. An innovative test apparatus has been developed in this study to cure and test cement paste specimens under in-situ conditions, such as down-hole in oil wells with high temperature and high pressure. Two series of tests were performed using cement pastes prepared with four different classes of oilwell cement (namely Class A, C, G, and H cements). Specimens in groups of four were cured at temperatures ranging from ambient to 60 °C and pressures ranging from 0.69 to 51.7 MPa for a period of 48 or 72 hours. The density and w/c ratio of the specimens at the time of casting as well as at the end of the curing period were recorded. Total chemical shrinkage of the cement paste was measured continuously during the entire hydration period while tensile strength was obtained at the end of the curing period using both water pressure and splitting tension test methods. Due to capacity limitations of the test equipment, in-situ tensile strength was obtained for only one test series with a highest curing pressure of 13.1 MPa. Specimens from the other test series were depressurized before the tensile strength tests. Chemical shrinkage test is an important method of measuring cement hydration kinetics in that the normalized total chemical shrinkage is approximately equal to the degree of cement hydration. By studying the correlations between the chemical shrinkage and the non-evaporable water content of cement during hydration, a multi-linear model is first proposed to estimate the normalization factors for different types of cement under different curing conditions. Based on the hydration kinetics data obtained from chemical shrinkage test results, a new approach of modeling the effect of curing temperature and pressure on cement hydration kinetics is proposed. It is found that when

  10. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    The characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) and their effects as partial replacement of Portland Cement (PC) were studied in this research program. The cement industry is currently under pressure to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solid by-products in the form of CKDs. The use of CKDs in concrete has the potential to substantially reduce the environmental impact of their disposal and create significant cost and energy savings to the cement industry. Studies have shown that CKDs can be used as a partial substitute of PC in a range of 5--15%, by mass. Although the use of CKDs is promising, there is very little understanding of their effects in CKD-PC blends. Previous studies provide variable and often conflicting results. The reasons for the inconsistent results are not obvious due to a lack of material characterization data. The characteristics of a CKD must be well-defined in order to understand its potential impact in concrete. The materials used in this study were two different types of PC (normal and moderate sulfate resistant) and seven CKDs. The CKDs used in this study were selected to provide a representation of those available in North America from the three major types of cement manufacturing processes: wet, long-dry, and preheater/precalciner. The CKDs have a wide range of chemical and physical composition based on different raw material sources and technologies. Two fillers (limestone powder and quartz powder) were also used to compare their effects to that of CKDs at an equivalent replacement of PC. The first objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive composition analysis of CKDs and compare their characteristics to PC. CKDs are unique materials that must be analyzed differently from PC for accurate chemical and physical analysis. The present study identifies the chemical and physical analytical methods that should be used for CKDs. The study also introduced a method to quantify the relative abundance of the different

  11. Hazardous Waste: Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Hazardous Waste Contact Us Share Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste Hazardous waste that ... Regulations part 261 . Select a question below to learn more about each step in the hazardous waste ...

  12. High-volume natural volcanic pozzolan and limestone powder as partial replacements for portland cement in self-compacting and sustainable concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Celik, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory study demonstrates that high volume, 45% by mass replacement of portland cement (OPC) with 30% finely-ground basaltic ash from Saudi Arabia (NP) and 15% limestone powder (LS) produces concrete with good workability, high 28-day compressive strength (39 MPa), excellent one year strength (57 MPa), and very high resistance to chloride penetration. Conventional OPC is produced by intergrinding 95% portland clinker and 5% gypsum, and its clinker factor (CF) thus equals 0.95. With 30% NP and 15% LS portland clinker replacement, the CF of the blended ternary PC equals 0.52 so that 48% CO2 emissions could be avoided, while enhancing strength development and durability in the resulting self-compacting concrete (SCC). Petrographic and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations of the crushed NP and finely-ground NP in the concretes provide new insights into the heterogeneous fine-scale cementitious hydration products associated with basaltic ash-portland cement reactions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement as a Carbonic Cement: The Mechanisms, Dynamics, and Implications of Self-Sealing and CO2 Resistance in Wellbore Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, George Drake Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-28

    This report analyzes the dynamics and mechanisms of the interactions of carbonated brine with hydrated Portland cement. The analysis is based on a recent set of comprehensive reactive-transport simulations, and it relies heavily on the synthesis of the body of work on wellbore integrity that we have conducted for the Carbon Storage Program over the past decade.

  14. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  15. Corrosion rate of steel embedded in blended Portland and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payá, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the corrosion levels in steel bars embedded in mortars made with a blend of Portland cement and (0-20% spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R, with a variable (0.3-0.7 water/binder (w/b ratio. The specimens were stored in the following conditions: relative humidity of 40, 80 or 100% and CO2 concentrations of 5 and 100%. The steel corrosion rate was measured with polarization resistance techniques. In the absence of aggressive agents, the steel was found to remain duly passivated in mortars with an FC3R content of up to 15% under all the conditions of relative humidity tested. The reinforcement corrosion level in mortars with a w/b ratio of 0.3 and 15% FC3R subjected to accelerated carbonation was similar to the level observed in the unblended Portland cement control mortar.En este trabajo se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland con relación agua/material cementante (a/mc variable (0,3-0,7, en los que parte del cemento (0-20% se sustituyó por catalizador de craqueo usado (FC3R. Las condiciones de conservación de las probetas elaboradas fueron las siguientes: distintas humedades relativas (40, 80 y 100% y dos concentraciones de CO2 (5 y 100%. La velocidad de corrosión de los aceros se midió mediante la técnica de resistencia de polarización. Se ha podido determinar que, bajo las distintas condiciones de humedad relativa y ausencia de agresivo, los aceros se mantuvieron correctamente pasivados en los morteros con contenidos de FC3R de hasta el 15%. El nivel de corrosión que presenta el refuerzo embebidos en morteros con sustitución de un 15% de cemento por FC3R y relación a/mc 0,3, al ser sometidos a un proceso de carbonatación acelerada, era muy similar al mostrado por el mortero patrón, sin FC3R.

  16. Effect of mixes made of coal bottom ash and fly ash on the mechanical strength and porosity of Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argiz, C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available New additions to the cement are needed to achieve a more sustainable and durable construction material. Within this context, bottom ashes can be used as a main constituent of Portland cements when it is mixed in an optimized proportion with fly ashes. The mechanical characteristics of standarized mortars made of mixes of pulverized coal combustion bottom and fly ashes are studied. The mortars were made of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I 42.5 N and mixes of bottom ashes with fly ashes in similar proportions to those of CEM II/A-V, CEM II/B-V and CEM IV/A (V. Summing up, it can be said that the utilization of bottom ashes mixed with fly ashes in replacement levels from 0% to 100% do not affect significantively on the mechanical caracteristics of the mortars considered in the present study which had an addition maximum content of 35%.

    La utilización de nuevas adiciones en el cemento es necesaria con el fin de obtener un material más sostenible y durable. En este sentido, las cenizas de fondo o cenicero de las centrales termoeléctricas de carbón se podrían reciclar siendo empleadas como un componente principal de los cementos Portland. Se han estudiado las propiedades mecánicas de unos morteros normalizados elaborados con mezclas de cenizas volantes con cenizas de fondo fabricados con unos porcentajes similares a los correspondientes de los CEM II/A-V, CEM II/B-V y CEM IV/A (V. En conclusión, la utilización de mezclas de cenizas de fondo o cenicero con cenizas volantes sustituyendo a éstas últimas entre el 0% y el 100%, no influye significativamente en el comportamiento mecánico de los morteros estudiados en los que el contenido máximo de adición ha sido del 35%, si bien afecta a determinados aspectos microestructurales, como la cantidad y distribución de poros capilares.

  17. CO2-saturated brine reactivity at the Portland cement-shale interface and the integrity of wellbore systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J. W.; Lichtner, P. C.; Wigand, M. O.

    2006-12-01

    Long-term geologic storage of CO2 requires trapping the buoyant CO2 plume beneath impermeable caprocks such as shale. Given a high-quality caprock, wells that penetrate the caprock represent the most significant potential leak point in the sequestration system. This is particularly so because the Portland cement used to create the primary fluid barrier in the wellbore system is reactive with CO2 and may degrade over time. In this study, we used a combination of field observations obtained at the SACROC Unit in West Texas (the oldest CO2-enhanced oil recovery field in the US), experimental studies of cement-CO2-brine interactions, and numerical modeling to investigate the stability of the primary seal. The field observations and the recognition of the large thickness of Portland cement used in the wellbore annulus shows that the primary concern for potential leakage is not matrix flow due to carbonation of the Portland cement, but is the interfaces between the casing and cement and the cement and caprock. We focused on the dynamics of the cement- caprock interface in this study. Both field observations and experiments show that cement carbonation is accompanied by loss of primary cement phases such as portlandite and their replacement by a combination of carbonate minerals (calcite, aragonite, vaterite, and dolomite) and an amorphous alumino-silica residue. The carbonation reaction is accompanied by a transformation of the cement to a distinctive orange color. We have used the field and laboratory observations to construct a numerical model of carbonation at the cement-shale interface. The initial focus was on obtaining an adequate simulation of the cement alteration mineralogy with a 1-D, diffusion-based model. The primary variables controlling the reaction characteristics were porosity, tortuosity, and mineral reaction rates. By suitable adjustment of these parameters, the model successfully reproduces many of the alteration features of the cement including the

  18. Influence of citric acid as setting retarder in CPV portland cement pastes and mortars; Influencia do acido citrico como retardador de pega em pastas e argamassas de cimento portland CPV ARI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.C.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Alvarenga, R.C.S.S.; Fassoni, D.P.; Pedroti, L.G. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil); Azevedo, A.R.G. de, E-mail: afonso.garcez91@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This work aims to study the availability of using and the influence of citric acid in the properties of pastes and mortars made with Portland cement CPV ARI both in fresh and hardened form. The citric acid dosages were 0, 0.4%, and 0.8% relative to the cement mass. The produced cement pastes were tested to determine normal consistency water and initial and final setting times. Mortars were tested to determine the consistency index, specific gravity, air entrained content in the fresh stage, hardened bulk density, compressive strength at ages 7, 14, and 28 days, and analysis by XRD technique. The results show that citric acid, besides improve the mortar workability, contribute to an increase in mechanical strength in older than 14 days. (author)

  19. Biofouling e biodeterioração química de argamassa de cimento portland em reservatório de usina hidroelétrica Biofouling and chemical biodeterioration in hydroeletric power plant portland cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Franke Portella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Last decade Brazilian rivers experimented progressive biofouling of Limnoperna fortunei communities and Cordylophora caspia hydroids. The microhabitat is so favorable that in around 1.5 years L. fortunei increased from 0.39 to nearby 149,000 units/m². Ten Portland cement mortar samples were produced with 1: 3.5: 0.4 dosages and installed for 1 year at Salto Caxias Brazilian Power Plant reservoir in 0.5 m and 1.0 m deep to investigate the biofouling influence on hydraulic civil structures. SEM, EDS, visual investigation and XRF results indicate none direct chemical interrelationships between L. fortunei and the mortar samples. However C. caspia diminished the mortar surface resistance and caused cement paste leaching.

  20. A Histologic Evaluation on Tissue Reaction to Three Implanted Materials (MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement Type I in the Mandible of Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sasani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Nowadays Mineral Trioxide aggregate (MTA is widely used for root end fillings, pulp capping, perforation repair and other endodontic treatments.Investigations have shown similar physical and chemical properties for Portland cement and Root MTA with those described for MTA.Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tissue reaction to implanted MTA, Portland cement and Root MTA in the mandible of cats.Materials and Methods: Under asepsis condition and general anesthesia, a mucoperiosteal flap, following the application of local anesthesia, was elevated to expose mandibular symphysis. Two small holes in both sides of mandible were drilled. MTA, Portland cement and Root MTA were mixed according to the manufacturers, recommendation and placed in bony cavities. In positive control group, the test material was Zinc oxide powder plus tricresoformalin. In negative control group, the bony cavities were left untreated. After 3,6 and 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the mandibular sections were prepared for histologic examination under light microscope. The presence and thickness of inflammation, presence of fibrosis capsule, the severity of fibrosis and bone formation were investigated. The data were submitted to Exact Fisher test, chi square test and Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical analysis.Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the degree of inflammation,presence of fibrotic capsule, severity of fibrosis and inflammation thickness between Root MTA, Portland cement and MTA (P>0.05. There was no statistical difference in boneformation between MTA and Portland cement (P>0.05. However, bone formation was not found in any of the Root MTA specimens and the observed tissue was exclusively of fibrosis type.Conclusion: The physical and histological results observed with MTA are similar to those of Root MTA and Portland cement. Additionally, all of these three materials are biocompatible

  1. Propriedades mecânicas de materiais compósitos à base de cimento Portland e resina epoxi Mechanical properties of composite materials based on portland cement and epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Panzera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de materiais de alto desempenho e multifuncionais, como os compósitos poliméricos cimentícios, tem sido o foco de inúmeras pesquisas na indústria da construção civil. Este trabalho investiga o efeito da combinação de uma fase polimérica termorrígida, uma resina epóxi, com cimento Portland branco estrutural, seguido da avaliação da resistência à compressão e módulo de elasticidade. Este compósito, quando comparado individualmente com as suas matérias-prima originais, promove um aumento da resistência mecânica à compressão, redução da massa específica e, também uma mudança significativa do comportamento mecânico. As mudanças nas propriedades mecânicas estão associadas à hidratação da fase cimentícia na presença da resina, fato comprovado através da análise espectroscópica na região do infravermelho.The study of multi-functional materials of high performance, as the polymeric-cementitious composites, has been the focus of several researches in the industry of the civil engineering. This work investigates the effect of the combination of a thermorigid epoxy phase and the white Portland cement, followed by the evaluation of its compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. This composite, when the phases are individually compared, provides an increase of the compressive strength, a reduction of the density, and a significant change of the mechanical behaviour. The changes in mechanical behaviour are associated with the hydration of cement in the presence of resin, which was evident after infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  2. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... and has just been landfilled. However, in recent years more focus has been put on C&D waste and data are starting to appear. One reason is that it has been recognized that C&D waste may include many materials that are contaminated either as part of their original design or through their use and therefore...... should be managed accordingly. Another reason is that it has been documented that a large fraction of C&D waste (about 90 %) can be easily recycled and thus can conserve landfill capacity. C&D waste may conveniently be divided into three subcategories: Buildings, roads and excavations. This chapter...

  3. Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, James B.

    1977-01-01

    A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

  4. Business unusual - Waste Act implementation: solid waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The preamble to the Waste Act (2008) is very clear that, as a result of this legislation, waste management in South Africa will never be the same again. This should send a clear message that ‘business as usual’ will no longer be sufficient....

  5. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

  6. Adsorption of cefixime from aqueous solutions using modified hardened paste of Portland cement by perlite; optimization by Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulifard, Mohammad Hossein; Khanmohammadi, Soghra; Heidari, Azam

    In the present study, we have used a simple and cost-effective removal technique by a commercially available Fe-Al-SiO2 containing complex material (hardened paste of Portland cement (HPPC)). The adsorbing performance of HPPC and modified HPPC with perlite for removal of cefixime from aqueous solutions was investigated comparatively by using batch adsorption studies. HPPC has been selected because of the main advantages such as high efficiency, simple separation of sludge, low-cost and abundant availability. A Taguchi orthogonal array experimental design with an OA16 (4(5)) matrix was employed to optimize the affecting factors of adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, type of adsorbent, contact time and pH. On the basis of equilibrium adsorption data, Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models were also confirmed. The results showed that HPPC and modified HPPC were both efficient adsorbents for cefixime removal.

  7. The maximum percentage of fly ash to replace part of original Portland cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallisa, Harun; Turuallo, Gidion

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the maximum percent of fly ash to replace part of Orginal Portland Cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete. Many researchers have found that the incorporation of industrial by-products such as fly ash as in producing concrete can improve properties in both fresh and hardened state of concrete. The water-binder ratio was used 0.30. The used sand was medium sand with the maximum size of coarse aggregate was 20 mm. The cement was Type I, which was Bosowa Cement produced by PT Bosowa. The percentages of fly ash to the total of a binder, which were used in this research, were 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%; while the super platicizer used was typed Naptha 511P. The results showed that the replacement cement up to 25 % of the total weight of binder resulted compressive strength higher than the minimum strength at one day of high-strength concrete.

  8. Influence of the synergy between mineral additions and Portland cement in the physical-mechanical properties of ternary binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the synergistic effect of mineral additions on the physical-mechanical performance of ternary blends prepared with different Portland cements (PC. The effect in setting and heat flow release is also analyzed. The mineral additions used are blast furnace slag (BFS, fly ash (FA and limestone filler (LF. PCs with different C3A and alkali content have been tested to study the synergy in ternary blends. Ternary binders with PC low in C3A and alkali content achieve similar mechanical strength gain as plain PC and refinement of pore size distribution from early hydration ages due to the acceleration of PC hydration induced by the mineral additions. In contrast, ternary binders with PC higher in C3A and alkali content have a delayed in mechanical strength at early hydration ages, but significantly higher at long hydration times.

  9. Biohazardous waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.

    2004-01-01

    This plan describes the process for managing non-medical biohazardous waste at Sandia National Laboratories California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of biohazardous waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to non-medical biohazardous waste.

  10. Medical waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  11. INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Truptimala Patanaik; Ambika Priyadarshini Mishra; Aishariya Durga; Gayatri Avipsa

    2016-01-01

    The towns and cities have become the centres of population growth and require three essential services viz., water supply, waste water treatment and solid wastes disposal. The tremendous increase in population accelerates the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation. Hence, the solid waste management (SWM) is one of the essential municipal services, to protect the environment, safeguard public health services and improve productivity.   In this context the case study is c...

  12. Solid waste handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  13. The use of mexican cements in the low and medium radioactive wastes confinement; La utilizacion de cementos mexicanos en el confinamiento de desechos radioactivos de bajo y medio nivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badillo A, V.E.; Almazan T, M.G.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.C. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Inside the relative mark to the radioactive waste confinement, minerals of great fixation capacity like clays, apatites and diverse oxides are studied as matrixes, components and/or additives of the active barriers that separate the barrier geologic and the nuclear wastes. In this case, the cements intervene in those different stages of the waste management, since its are used for the immobilization of radioactive waste in the container, for the production of containers as well as filler of the spaces among the containers of the vaults, and also as engineering barrier and construction material in the civil work. For the above mentioned, it is particularly useful to characterize the Portland cements with at least 97% of clinker, since they are most recommended for this type of applications. Presently investigation work is carried out a preliminary chemical characterization, based on the mineralogical composition, of the Portland Mexican cement. Results are shown by the X-ray Diffraction technique when immobilizing a rich solution in sulfates to 5%, using two Portland commercial cements APASCO and TOLTECA, without observing the significant appearance of new phases. The cements besides incorporating the chemical species in the breast of the matrix, are also present as barriers of civil engineering in the facilities located only some meters deep for the storage of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level, for that the study of the radionuclides fixation, in the cements is of supreme importance to evaluate the safety of a nuclear repository with the help of cements; the retention of the iodine-131 in a limited interval of pH in the commercial APASCO and TOLTECA it was studied, being observed a scarce retention of this homologous of fission products, what indicates the necessity to use additives to improve the retention properties of the Mexican commercial cements for some radionuclides. (Author)

  14. Acompanhamento da hidratação de cimento Portland simples com resíduo de bauxita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. O. Romano

    Full Text Available Resumo A substituição parcial de cimento Portland por resíduo de bauxita (RB resulta em produtos com, no mínimo, propriedades similares às dos produtos fabricados com o ligante puro. No entanto, as interações físico-químicas entre os diferentes tipos de cimento e o RB durante a reação de hidratação ainda é pouco explorada em literatura. A elevada quantidade de sódio e a presença de Al2O3, SiO2 e Fe2O3 são fatores que afetam a formação dos produtos hidratados e dependem do tipo de cimento utilizado na mistura. Sendo assim, este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar o impacto da presença do resíduo de bauxita em associação ao cimento Portland simples nas primeiras idades de hidratação. Calorimetria de condução isotérmica, difração de raios X, análise termogravimétrica e espectroscopia de infravermelho foram as técnicas escolhidas para o monitoramento. Os resultados ilustraram que a presença do resíduo coletado na planta da Alcoa (Poços de Caldas aumenta o tempo de indução, o consumo de portlandita, e as quantidades de etringita e monossulfoaluminato formadas. Ao mesmo tempo, houve formação de silicoaluminato de sódio e bicarbonato de sódio, devido às reações com silicatos, aluminatos e com o carbonato do cimento.

  15. Estimating the deposition of urban atmospheric NO2 to the urban forest in Portland-Vancouver USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.; Gonzalez Abraham, R.; George, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Cities are hotspots of atmospheric emissions of reactive nitrogen oxides, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a US EPA criteria pollutant that affects both human and environmental health. A fraction of this anthropogenic, atmospheric NO2 is deposited onto the urban forest, potentially mitigating the impact of NO2 on respiratory health within cities. However, the role of the urban forest in removal of atmospheric NO2 through deposition has not been well studied. Here, using an observationally-based statistical model, we first estimate the reduction of NO2 associated with the urban forest in Portland-Vancouver, USA, and the health benefits accruing from this reduction. In order to assess if this statistically observed reduction in NO2 associated with the urban forest is consistent with deposition, we then compare the amount of NO2 removed through deposition to the urban forest as estimated using a 4km CMAQ simulation. We further undertake a sensitivity analysis in CMAQ to estimate the range of NO2removed as a function of bulk stomatal resistance. We find that NO2 deposition estimated by CMAQ accounts for roughly one-third of the reduction in NO2 shown by the observationally-based statistical model (Figure). Our sensitivity analysis shows that a 3-10 fold increase in the bulk stomatal resistance parameter in CMAQ would align CMAQ-estimated deposition with the statistical model. The reduction of NO2 by the urban forest in the Portland-Vancouver area may yield a health benefit of at least $1.5 million USD annually, providing strong motivation to better understand the mechanism through which the urban forest may be removing air pollutants such as NO2and thus helping create healthier urban atmospheres. Figure: Comparing the amount of NO2 deposition as estimated by CMAQ and the observationally-based statistical model (LURF). Each point corresponds to a single 4 x 4km CMAQ grid cell.

  16. Household food waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlen, S.; Winkel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Food waste is debated not only in the light of sustainable consumption in research and policy, but also in the broader public. This article focuses on food waste in household contexts, what is widely believed the end of the food chain. However, household food waste is far more complex and intricate

  17. Nuclear wastes; Dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Here is made a general survey of the situation relative to radioactive wastes. The different kinds of radioactive wastes and the different way to store them are detailed. A comparative evaluation of the situation in France and in the world is made. The case of transport of radioactive wastes is tackled. (N.C.)

  18. Waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  19. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  20. Rock & Roll : Waste seperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beunder, L.; Rem, P.C.; Van Den Berg, R.

    2000-01-01

    Five hundred tonnes of glass, 1 million tonnes of plastic,14 million tonnes of building and demolition waste, 7 million tonnes of household waste, 3 million tonnes of packaging, 3.5 million tonnes of paper and board, and 300,000 old cars. All part of the annual harvest of waste materials in the

  1. Waste vs Resource Management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent global waste statistics show that in the order of 70% of all municipal waste generated worldwide is disposed at landfill, 11% is treated in thermal and Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities and the rest (19%) is recycled or treated by mechanical...

  2. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-01

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  3. Investigation on the Effect of Recycled Asphalt Shingle (RAS in Portland Cement Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo An

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tear-off roofing shingle, referred to as Reclaimed asphalt shingle (RAS, is the byproduct of construction demolition and it is a major solid waste stream in the U.S. Reuse of this byproduct in road construction sector can contribute to the success of materials sustainability as well as landfill conservation. Ground RAS has similar particle distribution as sand and its major component includes aggregate granules, fibers, and asphalt. To promote the beneficial utilization of RAS, this study evaluates the effect of RAS in cement mortar when used as replacement of sand. In addition, the study investigates how cellulose fibers from RAS behave under high alkaline environment during cement hydration process, which may significantly affect mortar’s strength performance. The laboratory study includes measurements of physical, mechanical, and durability behaviors of cement mortar containing RAS replacing sand up to 30%. It was found that the optimum mixture proportions are 5% and 10% for compressive strength and toughness, respectively.

  4. Chloride diffusivity in red mud-ordinary portland cement concrete determined by migration tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Véras Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Red mud, which is a solid waste produced in the alumina production process, is classified as dangerous due to its high pH. In this work, the concentration of chlorides was monitored by measuring the conductivity of the anolyte, which initially was distilled water. The steady and nonsteady-state chloride diffusion coefficients were estimated from the "time lag"� and "equivalent time" between diffusion and migration experiments. The capillary water absorption, apparent porosity and pore size distribution of concretes were also analyzed. The addition of red mud apparently ensured lower chloride diffusion in the tested mixtures due to its superfine particle-size distribution and its "filler"� effect. Red mud lengthened the service life of the concrete to 35 years (double that of the reference concrete. This finding is very positive since it indicates a delay in the onset of the rebar corrosion process caused by the migration of chloride ions.

  5. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, D., E-mail: david.chartier@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Muzeau, B. [DEN-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Stefan, L. [AREVA NC/D& S - France/Technical Department, 1 place Jean Millier 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Sanchez-Canet, J. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Monguillon, C. [DEN-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Embedded in cement, magnesium is corroded by residual water present in porosity of the matrix. • Corrosion is enhanced by galvanic phenomenon when magnesium is in contact with graphite. • Galvanic corrosion of magnesium in contact with graphite debris is shown to be severe with ordinary Portland cement. • Galvanic corrosion is significantly lowered in high alkali medium such as sodium hydroxide. • Sodium hydroxide activated blast furnace slag is a convenient binder to embed magnesium. - Abstract: Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article.

  6. Mixed waste management options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  7. Waste Management Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, J.S. [ed.

    1967-08-31

    This Manual has been prepared to provide a documented compendium of the technical bases and general physical features of Isochem Incorporated`s Waste Management Program. The manual is intended to be used as a means of training and as a reference handbook for use by personnel responsible for executing the Waste Management Program. The material in this manual was assembled by members of Isochem`s Chemical Processing Division, Battelle Northwest Laboratory, and Hanford Engineering Services between September 1965 and March 1967. The manual is divided into the following parts: Introduction, contains a summary of the overall Waste Management Program. It is written to provide the reader with a synoptic view and as an aid in understanding the subsequent parts; Feed Material, contains detailed discussion of the type and sources of feed material used in the Waste Management Program, including a chapter on nuclear reactions and the formation of fission products; Waste Fractionization Plant Processing, contains detailed discussions of the processes used in the Waste Fractionization Plant with supporting data and documentation of the technology employed; Waste Fractionization Plant Product and Waste Effluent Handling, contains detailed discussions of the methods of handling the product and waste material generated by the Waste Fractionization Plant; Plant and Equipment, describes the layout of the Waste Management facilities, arrangement of equipment, and individual equipment pieces; Process Control, describes the instruments and analytical methods used for process control; and Safety describes process hazards and the methods used to safeguard against them.

  8. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  9. Introduction to Waste Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management as introduced in Chapter 1.1 builds in many ways on engineering. Waste engineering here means the skills and ability to understand quantitatively how a waste management system works in such a detail that waste management can be planned, facilities can be designed and sited...... and systems can be operated in a way that is environmentally sound, technical feasible, economically efficient and socially acceptable. This applies to all scales of relevance: (1) national surveys of energy use and material flows determining the frame for politically setting goals in waste management, (2......) regional plans for waste management, including (3) the selection of main management technologies and siting of facilities, (4) the design of individual technological units and, for example, (5) the operation of recycling schemes within a municipality. This chapter gives an introduction to waste engineering...

  10. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, D; Muzeau, B; Stefan, L; Sanchez-Canet, J; Monguillon, C

    2017-03-15

    Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on diffusivity of cesium and strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J G; Park, S M; Lee, H K

    2016-11-15

    The present study investigates the physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on leaching behavior of cesium and strontium. Fly ash-based geopolymers and slag-blended geopolymers were used as solidification agents. The leaching behavior of cesium and strontium from geopolymers was evaluated in accordance with ANSI/ANS-16.1. The diffusivity of cesium and strontium in a fly ash-based geopolymer was lower than that in Portland cement by a factor of 10(3) and 10(4), respectively, showing significantly improved immobilization performance. The leaching resistance of fly ash-based geopolymer was relatively constant regardless of the type of fly ash. The diffusivity of water-soluble cesium and strontium ions were highly correlated with the critical pore diameter of the binder. The critical pore diameter of the fly ash-based geopolymer was remarkably smaller than those of Portland cement and slag-blended geopolymer; consequently, its ability physically to retard the diffusion of nuclides (physical barrier effect) was superior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on diffusivity of cesium and strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, J.G.; Park, S.M.; Lee, H.K., E-mail: haengki@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Physical immobilization of radionuclides in geopolymer was quantitatively assessed. • Fly ash-based geopolymer showed excellent immobilization performance. • Diffusivity of soluble Cs and Sr was highly correlated with critical pore diameter. - Abstract: The present study investigates the physical barrier effect of geopolymeric waste form on leaching behavior of cesium and strontium. Fly ash-based geopolymers and slag-blended geopolymers were used as solidification agents. The leaching behavior of cesium and strontium from geopolymers was evaluated in accordance with ANSI/ANS-16.1. The diffusivity of cesium and strontium in a fly ash-based geopolymer was lower than that in Portland cement by a factor of 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4}, respectively, showing significantly improved immobilization performance. The leaching resistance of fly ash-based geopolymer was relatively constant regardless of the type of fly ash. The diffusivity of water-soluble cesium and strontium ions were highly correlated with the critical pore diameter of the binder. The critical pore diameter of the fly ash-based geopolymer was remarkably smaller than those of Portland cement and slag-blended geopolymer; consequently, its ability physically to retard the diffusion of nuclides (physical barrier effect) was superior.

  13. Potencialidades de um caulim calcinado como material de substituição parcial do cimento portland em argamassas Potentialities of a calcined kaolin as material of partial replacement of portland cement in mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia P. de Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de argilas calcinadas na forma de metacaulinita, como material pozolânico para argamassas e concretos, tem recebido atenção considerável nos últimos anos. Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o desempenho mecânico de argamassas, nas quais foi utilizado um caulim calcinado proveniente do Estado da Paraíba, como material de substituição parcial do cimento Portland. Utilizaram-se duas finuras do caulim: passando nas peneiras ABNT 200 (0,074 mm e 325 (0,044 mm e calcinados nas temperaturas de 700, 800 e 900 ºC pelo tempo de 2 h. As amostras foram caracterizadas através de análise química, análise térmica diferencial, difração de raios-X e área específica. Obteve-se o índice de atividade pozolânica com a cal e o cimento Portland. O percentual de substituição adotado foi de 0, 10, 20, 30 e 40%. A relação aglomerante: areia foi de 1:1,5 e a relação água/aglomerante fixada igual 0,4. O efeito da substituição parcial do cimento na argamassa foi avaliado através da resistência à compressão simples, nas idades de 7, 28 e 90 dias. As argamassas estudadas apresentaram resistência superior em relação à da referência, até o nível de 30% de substituição.The use of burnt clays, in the metakaolin form, as pozzolanic material for mortars and concretes has received a remarkable attention in the last years. This paper aimed to evaluate the mechanical property of mortars, in which a calcined kaolin originating from the State of Paraiba, was used as partial cement replacement material. Two finess of the kaolin were used: ABNT 200 (0.074 mm and 325 (0.044 mm and burnt at temperatures of 700, 800 and 900 ºC for a period of 2 h. Both materials were characterized by chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, specific area tests. The pozolanic activity index was obtanied using lime and cement Portland. The amounts of replacement were 10, 20, 30 and 40%, besides the reference mortar. The binder

  14. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Cleaning Up Electronic Waste (E-Waste)

    Science.gov (United States)

    While accurate data on the amount of e-waste being exported from the U.S. are not available, the United States government is concerned that these exports are being mismanaged abroad, causing serious public health and environmental hazards.

  16. Aoife Nolan, Rory O’Connell, Colin Harvey (eds., Human Rights and Public Finance: Budgets and the Promotion of Economic and Social Rights (Oxford and Portland: Hart Publishing, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Ferro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of: Aoife Nolan, Rory O’Connell, Colin Harvey (eds., Human Rights and Public Finance: Budgets and the Promotion of Economic and Social Rights (Oxford and Portland: Hart Publishing, 2013

  17. Immobilization of antimony waste slag by applying geopolymerization and stabilization/solidification technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Güray

    2014-11-01

    During the processing of antimony ore by pyrometallurgical methods, a considerable amount of slag is formed. This antimony waste slag is listed by the European Union as absolutely hazardous waste with a European Waste Catalogue code of 10 08 08. Since the levels of antimony and arsenic in the leachate of the antimony waste slag are generally higher than the landfilling limits, it is necessary to treat the slag before landfilling. In this study, stabilization/solidification and geopolymerization technologies were both applied in order to limit the leaching potential of antimony and arsenic. Different combinations ofpastes by using Portland cement, fly ash, clay, gypsum, and blast furnace slag were prepared as stabilization/solidification or geopoljymer matrixes. Sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution and sodium hydroxide solution at 8 M were used as activators for geopolymer samples. Efficiencies of the combinations were evaluated in terms of leaching and unconfined compressive strength. None of the geopolymer samples prepared with the activators yielded arsenic and antimony leaching below the regulatory limit at the same time, although they yielded high unconfined compressive strength levels. On the other hand, the stabilization/solidification samples prepared by using water showed low leaching results meeting the landfilling criteria. Use of gypsum as an additive was found to be successful in immobilizing the arsenic and antimony.

  18. Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Trotter, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  20. WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-03-20

    The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the

  1. TSA waste stream and final waste form composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

  2. Evaluating portland cement concrete degradation by sulphate exposure through artificial neural networks modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Douglas Nunes de; Bourguignon, Lucas Gabriel Garcia; Tolentino, Evandro, E-mail: tolentino@timoteo.cefetmg.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Costa, Rodrigo Moyses, E-mail: rodrigo@moyses.com.br [Universidade de Itauna, Itauna, MG (Brazil); Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A concrete is durable if it has accomplished the desired service life in the environment in which it is exposed. The durability of concrete materials can be limited as a result of adverse performance of its cement-paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either chemical or physical attack. Among other aggressive chemical exposures, the sulphate attack is an important concern. Water, soils and gases, which contain sulphate, represent a potential threat to the durability of concrete structures. Sulphate attack in concrete leads to the conversion of the hydration products of cement to ettringite, gypsum, and other phases, and also it leads to the destabilization of the primary strength generating calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The formation of ettringite and gypsum is common in cementitious systems exposed to most types of sulphate solutions. The present work presents the application of the neural networks for estimating deterioration of various concrete mixtures due to exposure to sulphate solutions. A neural networks model was constructed, trained and tested using the available database. In general, artificial neural networks could be successfully used in function approximation problems in order to approach the data generation function. Once data generation function is known, artificial neural network structure is tested using data not presented to the network during training. This paper is intent to provide the technical requirements related to the production of a durable concrete to be used in the structures of the Brazilian near-surface repository of radioactive wastes. (author)

  3. Análise microscópica da polpa dental de cães após pulpotomia e proteção pulpar com agregado de trióxido mineral e cimento Portland branco

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Menezes; Clóvis Monteiro Bramante; Roberto Brandão Garcia; Ariadne Letra; Vanessa Graciela Gomes Carvalho; Everdan Carneiro; Sérgio Brunini; Rodrigo Cardoso de Oliveira; Giovana Calichio Canova; Fernanda Gomes de Moraes

    2004-01-01

    Considering previous studies on the similarity between the chemical composition of the mineral trioxide aggregate and the Portland cement, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pulp response of dog's teeth after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with MTA Angelus and white Portland cement. Thirty eight pulp remnants were protected with these materials. One hundred and twenty days after treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histological ...

  4. Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-26

    The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

  5. Waste statistics 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-07

    The 2004 reporting to the ISAG comprises 394 plants owned by 256 enterprises. In 2003, reports covered 403 plants owned by 273 enterprises. Waste generation in 2004 is compared to targets for 2008 in the government's Waste Strategy 2005-2008. The following summarises waste generation in 2004: 1) In 2004, total reported waste arisings amounted to 13,359,000 tonnes, which is 745,000 tonnes, or 6 per cent, more than in 2003. 2) If amounts of residues from coal-fired power plants are excluded from statistics, waste arisings in 2004 were 12,179,000 tonnes, which is a 9 per cent increase from 2003. 3) If amounts of residues from coal-fired power plants and waste from the building and construction sector are excluded from statistics, total waste generation in 2004 amounted to 7,684,000 tonnes, which is 328,000 tonnes, or 4 per cent, more than in 2002. In other words, there has been an increase in total waste arisings, if residues and waste from building and construction are excluded. Waste from the building and construction sector is more sensitive to economic change than most other waste. 4) The total rate of recycling was 65 per cent. The 2008 target for recycling is 65 per cent. The rate of recycling in 2003 was also 65 per cent. 5) The total amount of waste led to incineration amounted to 26 per cent, plus an additional 1 per cent left in temporary storage to be incinerated at a later time. The 2008 target for incineration is 26 per cent. These are the same percentage figures as applied to incineration and storage in 2003. 6) The total amount of waste led to landfills amounted to 8 per cent, which is one percentage point better than the overall landfill target of a maximum of 9 per cent landfilling in 2008. Also in 2003, 8 per cent of the waste was landfilled. 7) The targets for treatment of waste from individual sectors are still not being met: too little waste from households and the service sector is being recycled, and too much waste from industry is being

  6. Comparative analysis of the particle size and shape of commercially available mineral trioxide aggregates and Portland cement: a study with a flow particle image analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the particle size distribution and circularity of various Mineral Trioxide Aggregates (MTA) (ProRoot MTA/ MTA Angelus/Gray and White) and Portland cements with effective size ranges of 1.5-160 microm using a flow particle analyzer (Sysmex FPIA-3000, Kobe, Japan). Cumulative percentage of particles between 6 and 10 microm were, 65, 73, 48, 53, and 70 %, for Gray ProRoot MTA, White ProRoot MTA, Gray MTA Angelus, White MTA Angelus, and Portland cement, respectively. ProRoot MTA contains fewer large particles than MTA Angelus. MTA Angelus contains a higher number of small particles than ProRoot MTA. White MTA contains smaller particles with a narrower range of size distribution than Gray MTA. MTA Angelus particles have relatively low circularity and wide size distribution and are less homogeneous than ProRoot MTA.

  7. Geologic map of the Vancouver and Orchards quadrangles and parts of the Portland and Mount Tabor quadrangles, Clark County, Washington, and Multnomah County, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jim E.; Cannon, Charles M.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Evarts, Russell C.

    2016-06-03

    IntroductionThis is a 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Vancouver and Orchards quadrangles and parts of the Portland and Mount Tabor quadrangles in the States of Washington and Oregon. The map area is within the Portland Basin and includes most of the city of Vancouver, Washington; parts of Clark County, Washington; and a small part of northwestern Multnomah County, Oregon. The Columbia River flows through the southern part of the map area, generally forming the southern limit of mapping. Mapped Quaternary geologic units include late Pleistocene cataclysmic flood deposits, eolian deposits, and alluvium of the Columbia River and its tributaries. Older deposits include Miocene to Pleistocene alluvium from an ancestral Columbia River. Regional geologic structures are not exposed in the map area but are inferred from nearby mapping.

  8. Utilización de ladrillos de adobe estabilizados con cemento portland al 6% y reforzados con fibra de coco, para muros de carga en Tampico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares Santiago, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article conclusions are presented about adobe bricks stabilized with 6% portland cement and reinforced with different percentages of coconut fibers. The author, has developed an experimental plan in laboratory and has built in situ several walls with different bricks, different joints and different orientations, to analyze the behaviour ofthe brick prototypes for the weather conditions in Tampico.En este artículo se presentan las conclusiones acerca del refuerzo Ide ladrillos de adobe, estabilizados con cemento portland al 6% con diferentes porcentajes de fibra de coco. El autol; para llegar a estas conclusiones, desarrolla un plan experimental en laboratorio asi como construye in situ muestras de muros con diferentes clases de ladrillos, diferentes uniones entre ellos y distintas orientaciones, para analizar el comportamiento de prototipos ante las condiciones climáticas de la zona de Tampico.

  9. Acción del agua de mar sobre un cemento portland de alta resistencia inicial, sobre un cemento portland resistente a los sulfatos y sobre un cemento portland: influencia de la adición de escoria. Estudio por DRX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar-Tébar, Demetrio

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    En este trabajo se estudia, por medio de difracción de rayos X, la evolución de las características estructurales de los compuestos cristalinos de la fracción enriquecida (cemento hidratado-atacado extraída de uno de los prismas de mortero (1:3 de 1 X 1 X 6 cm de cada una de las series de probetas fabricadas con tres cementos portland (alta resistencia inicial, cemento 1; resistente a los sulfatos, cemento 2, y normal, cemento 3 y con las mezclas cemento (1, 2 y 3/escoria = 85/15 - 65/35 - 40/60 y 30/70 (en peso, sometidas a la acción del agua de mar artificial (ASTM D 1141-75 durante 56-90-180 y 360 días, después del período de curado (1 día en cámara húmeda y 21 días bajo agua potable filtrada; del mismo modo, se estudia por DRX la composición estructural de la nueva fase sólida formada en el agua de mar artificial en donde han estado sumergidas las probetas de mortero. En los DRX de la nueva fase sólida se han identificado los picos de los compuestos cristalinos calcita, aragonito y brucita, de acuerdo con las condiciones del sistema y, de un modo especial, de las mezclas cemento/escoria utilizadas en la fabricación de las probetas de mortero. Los picos de la brucita, únicamente, se han identificado en la fase sólida formada en el agua de mar artificial en donde han estado sumergidas las probetas de mortero fabricadas con cualquiera de los cementos estudiados y con las mezclas de estos cementos con el 15% de escoria (en peso. En los DRX de la fracción enriquecida (cemento hidratado-atacado se han identificado, con intensidad variable, los picos de los compuestos cristalinos ettringita, brucita y calcita en todos los DRX y los picos de la sal de Friedel, yeso y portlandita en determinados DRX. En este trabajo, se ha puesto de manifiesto la influencia que ejerce la adición de escoria, así como el tiempo de conservación-ataque, en la formación y eliminación de los compuestos mencionados. [fr

  10. Solid solubility of MgO in the calcium silicates of portland clinker. The effect of CaF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available The solid solubility of MgO in the calcium silicates of portland clinker has been determined by XRD and XDS. The influence that the presence of CaF2 has on said solubility has also been verified. The solid solution limit of MgO in C3S at 1275 ºC lies at about 1.0% wt, where the triclinic form II stabilizes. The presence of CaF2 does not alter the maximum value of the MgO solubilized in that silicate, although there does take place the stabilization of the triclinic polymorph II at lower MgO contents (between 0.3 - 0.6% wt. The maximum amount of solubilized MgO in βC2 at 1.050 ºC lies around 0.5% wt. This value does not change by the presence of CaF2.Se ha determinado por DRX y EDX la solubilidad sólida del MgO en los silicatos cálcicos del clínker portland. Se ha comprobado, así mismo la influencia que sobre dicha solubilidad tiene la presencia de CaF2. El límite de disolución sólida del MgO en el C3S a 1.275º C se sitúa alrededor del 1,0% en peso, estabilizándose la forma triclínica II. La presencia de CaF2 no altera el valor máximo de MgO solubilizado en este silicato, aunque si se produce la estabilización del polimorfo triclínico II a contenidos menores de MgO (entre 0,3 – 0,6% en peso. La cantidad máxima de MgO solubilizado en e/ βC2S a 1.050 ºC se sitúa en torno al 0,5% en peso. Este valor no se ve modificado por la presencia de CaF2.

  11. Effect of Combined Calcium Hydroxide and Accelerated Portland Cement on Bone Formation and Soft Tissue Healing in Dog Bone Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorshidi H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recent literatures show that accelerated Portland cement (APC and calcium hydroxide Ca (OH2 may have the potential to promote the bone regeneration. However, certain clinical studies reveal consistency of Ca (OH2, as one of the practical drawbacks of the material when used alone. To overcome such inconvenience, the combination of the Ca (OH2 with a bone replacement material could offer a convenient solution. Objectives: To evaluate the soft tissue healing and bone regeneration in the periodontal intrabony osseous defects using accelerated Portland cement (APC in combination with calcium hydroxide Ca (OH2, as a filling material. Materials and Methods: Five healthy adult mongrel dogs aged 2-3 years old (approximately 20 kg in weight with intact dentition and healthy periodontium were selected for this study. Two one-wall defects in both mesial and distal aspects of the 3rd premolars of both sides of the mandible were created. Therefore, four defects were prepared in each dog. Three defects in each dog were randomly filled with one of the following materials: APC alone, APC mixed with Ca (OH2, and Ca (OH2 alone. The fourth defect was left empty (control. Upon clinical examination of the sutured sites, the amount of dehiscence from the adjacent tooth was measured after two and eight weeks, using a periodontal probe mesiodistally. For histometric analysis, the degree of new bone formation was estimated at the end of the eighth postoperative week, by a differential point-counting method. The percentage of the defect volume occupied by new osteoid or trabecular bone was recorded. Results: Measurement of wound dehiscence during the second week revealed that all five APCs had an exposure of 1-2 mm and at the end of the study all samples showed 3-4 mm exposure across the surface of the graft material, whereas the Ca (OH2, control, and APC + Ca (OH2 groups did not show any exposure at the end of the eighth week of the study. The most

  12. Method for determining the photocatalytic potential of portland cement mortar containing TiO2 for decomposing the pollutant nitrogen monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle M. Bonato

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic materials can minimize atmospheric pollution by decomposing certain organic and inorganic pollutants using sunlight as an energy source. In this paper, the development of a methodology to measure the photocatalytic potential of mortar containing TiO2 nanoparticles is reported. The results indicate that up to 40% of NOx can be degraded by Portland cement mortar containing 30-50% of TiO2, which validates the method developed for evaluating the photocatalytic potential of materials.

  13. How well has land-use planning worked under different governance regimes? A case study in the Portland, OR-Vancouver, WA metropolitan area, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey D. Kline; Paul Thiers; Connie P. Ozawa; J. Alan Yeakley; Sean N. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    We examine land use planning outcomes over a 30-year period in the Portland, OR-Vancouver, WA (USA) metropolitan area. The four-county study region enables comparisons between three Oregon counties subject to Oregon’s 1973 Land Use Act (Senate Bill 100) and Clark County, WA which implemented land use planning under Washington’s 1990 Growth Management Act. We describe...

  14. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  15. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  16. Operational waste volume projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koreski, G.M.

    1996-09-20

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

  17. Evaluation of Portland cement from X-ray diffraction associated with cluster analysis; Avaliacao de cimento Portland a partir da difracao de raios X associada a analise por agrupamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobbo, Luciano de Andrade, E-mail: luciano.gobbo@panalytical.com [Panalytical Brasil, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Montanheiro, Tarcisio Jose, E-mail: tarcisio.montanheiro@gmail.com [Instituto Geologico, Secretaria de Estado do Meio Ambiente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Montanheiro, Filipe, E-mail: flpmontanheiro@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista (LEBAC/UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia Aplicada. Lab. de Estudos de Bacias; Sant' Agostino, Lilia Mascarenhas, E-mail: agostino@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias. Departamento de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental

    2013-12-15

    The Brazilian cement industry produced 64 million tons of cement in 2012, with noteworthy contribution of CP-II (slag), CP-III (blast furnace) and CP-IV (pozzolanic) cements. The industrial pole comprises about 80 factories that utilize raw materials of different origins and chemical compositions that require enhanced analytical technologies to optimize production in order to gain space in the growing consumer market in Brazil. This paper assesses the sensitivity of mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction associated with cluster analysis to distinguish different kinds of cements with different additions. This technique can be applied, for example, in the prospection of different types of limestone (calcitic, dolomitic and siliceous) as well as in the qualification of different clinkers. The cluster analysis does not require any specific knowledge of the mineralogical composition of the diffractograms to be clustered; rather, it is based on their similarity. The materials tested for addition have different origins: fly ashes from different power stations from South Brazil and slag from different steel plants in the Southeast. Cement with different additions of limestone and white Portland cement were also used. The Rietveld method of qualitative and quantitative analysis was used for measuring the results generated by the cluster analysis technique. (author)

  18. Calcium phosphate phase transformation produced by the interaction of the portland cement component of white mineral trioxide aggregate with a phosphate-containing fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman

    2007-11-01

    The bioactivity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been attributed to its ability to produce hydroxyapatite in the presence of phosphate-containing fluids. It is known that stoichiometric hydroxyapatites do not exist in biological systems and do not contribute to the osteogenic potential of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials. Because Portland cement is the active ingredient in white MTA, we have characterized the calcium phosphate phases produced when set white Portland cement was immersed in phosphate-buffered saline using pH and turbidity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. An amorphous calcium phosphate phase was initially formed that transformed to an apatite phase, with the latter consisting of calcium-deficient, poorly crystalline, B-type carbonated apatite crystallites. Amorphous calcium phosphate is a key intermediate that precedes biological apatite formation in skeletal calcification. Thus, the clinical manifestations of bioactivity with the use of MTA may at least be partially attributed to the mineralization induction capacity of its Portland cement component.

  19. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Formocresol, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Portland Cement, and Enamel Matrix Derivative in Primary Teeth Pulpotomies: A Two Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ceren; Basak, Feridun; Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Polat, Gunseli Guven; Altun, Ceyhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of 4 materials (formocresol, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement and enamel matrix derivative) using in primary teeth pulpotomies. Sixty-five patients aged 5-9 years (32 female, 33 male) were included in this study. A total of 140 primary first and second molars with deep caries were treated with pulpotomy. All teeth were then restored with stainless steel crowns. The treated teeth were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. At 24 months, the clinical success rates of formocresol, MTA, Portland cement, and enamel matrix derivative were 96.9%, 100%, 93.9%, and 93.3%, respectively. The corresponding radiographic success rates were 84.4%, 93.9%, 86.7% and 78.1%, respectively. Although there were no statistically significant differences in clinical and radiographic success rates among the 4 groups, MTA appears to be superior to formocresol, Portland cement, and enamel matrix derivative as a pulpotomy agent in primary teeth.

  20. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, R.T. [Bio-Imaging Research, Inc., Lincolnshire, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting, isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU.

  1. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  2. On Value and Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Wallström, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Value and waste are concepts that are used in improvement projects. In lean the concepts are fairly simple. Reduce the waste and the value has increased. However, value is both multidimensional and differs over time. If the concepts value and waste are to be used, the concepts must be clearly defined and measured. Otherwise, value can be reduced for the customer/user and the cost increased for the producer/seller. The purpose in this thesis is to investigate how value and waste are perceived ...

  3. Disposal of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorp, Frits; Grogan, Helen; McCombie, Charles

    The aim of radioactive and non-radioactive waste management is to protect man and the environment from unacceptable risks. Protection criteria for both should therefore be based on similar considerations. From overall protection criteria, performance criteria for subsystems in waste management can be derived, for example for waste disposal. International developments in this field are summarized. A brief overview of radioactive waste sorts and disposal concepts is given. Currently being implemented are trench disposal and engineered near-surface facilities for low-level wastes. For low-and intermediate-level waste underground facilities are under construction. For high-level waste site selection and investigation is being carried out in several countries. In all countries with nuclear programmes, the predicted performance of waste disposal systems is being assessed in scenario and consequence analyses. The influences of variability and uncertainty of parameter values are increasingly being treated by probabilistic methods. Results of selected performance assessments show that radioactive waste disposal sites can be found and suitable repositories can be designed so that defined radioprotection limits are not exceeded.

  4. Avoidable waste management costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  5. Microscopic analysis of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp protection with mineral trioxide aggregate and white Portland cement Análise microscópica da polpa dental de cães após pulpotomia e proteção pulpar com agregado de trióxido mineral e cimento Portland branco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Menezes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering previous studies on the similarity between the chemical composition of the mineral trioxide aggregate and the Portland cement, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pulp response of dog's teeth after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with MTA Angelus and white Portland cement. Thirty eight pulp remnants were protected with these materials. One hundred and twenty days after treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histological analysis. Both materials demonstrated the same results when used as pulp capping materials, inducing hard tissue bridge formation and maintaining pulp vitality in all specimens. The MTA Angelus and the white Portland cement showed to be effective as pulp protection materials following pulpotomy.Considerando estudos anteriores sobre a similaridade entre a composição química do agregado de trióxido mineral e o cimento Portland, o objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resposta pulpar de dentes de cães após pulpotomia e proteção pulpar direta com MTA Angelus e cimento Portland branco. Trinta e oito remanescentes pulpares foram recobertos com esses materiais. Cento e vinte dias após o tratamento, os animais foram sacrificados e os espécimes removidos e preparados para análise histológica. Ambos os materiais demonstraram os mesmos resultados quando utilizados como materiais de capeamento pulpar, induzindo a formação de ponte de tecido mineralizado e mantendo a vitalidade pulpar em todos os espécimes. Ambos matérias se mostraram efetivos como protetores pulpares após pulpotomia em dentes de cães.

  6. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  7. Waste Generation Overview, Course 23263

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    This course, Waste Generation Overview Live (COURSE 23263), provides an overview of federal and state waste management regulations, as well as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) policies and procedures for waste management operations. The course covers the activities involved in the cradle-to-grave waste management process and focuses on waste characterization, waste compatibility determinations and classification, and the storage requirements for temporary waste accumulation areas at LANL. When you have completed this course, you will be able to recognize federal, state, and LANL environmental requirements and their impact on waste operations; recognize the importance of the cradle-to-grave waste management process; identify the roles and responsibilities of key LANL waste management personnel (e.g., Waste Generator, Waste Management Coordinator, Waste Stream Profile approver, and Waste Certification Official); characterize a waste stream to determine whether it meets the definition of a hazardous waste, as well as characterize the use and minimum requirements for use of acceptable knowledge (AK) for waste characterization and waste compatibility documentation requirements; and identify the requirements for setting up and managing temporary waste accumulation areas.

  8. Influence of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Sulfate Attack upon Ordinary Portland Cement and Slag-Blended Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta-ur-Rehman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles on the sulfate attack resistance of ordinary Portland cement (OPC and slag-blended mortars were investigated. OPC and slag-blended mortars (OPC:Slag = 50:50 were made with water to binder ratio of 0.4 and a binder to sand ratio of 1:3. TiO2 was added as an admixture as 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% of the binder weight. Mortar specimens were exposed to an accelerated sulfate attack environment. Expansion, changes in mass and surface microhardness were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC tests were conducted. The formation of ettringite and gypsum crystals after the sulfate attack were detected. Both these products had caused crystallization pressure in the microstructure of mortars and deteriorated the mortars. Our results show that the addition of nano-TiO2 accelerated expansion, variation in mass, loss of surface microhardness and widened cracks in OPC and slag-blended mortars. Nano-TiO2 containing slag-blended mortars were more resistant to sulfate attack than nano-TiO2 containing OPC mortars. Because nano-TiO2 reduced the size of coarse pores, so it increased crystallization pressure due to the formation of ettringite and gypsum thus led to more damage under sulfate attack.

  9. Effect of Nanosilica on the Fresh Properties of Cement-Based Grouting Material in the Portland-Sulphoaluminate Composite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of NS particle size and content on the fresh properties of the grouting material based on the portland-sulphoaluminate composite system was analyzed. The experimental results indicated that air content increased and apparent density decreased, with increased NS content, but the NS particle sizes have minimal effect on the air content and apparent density. The setting time of mortar was significantly shortened, with increased NS content; however, NS particle sizes had little influence on the setting time. The effect of fluidity on the mortars adding NS with particle size of 30 nm is larger than NS with particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm and the fluidity decreased with increased NS content, but the fluidity of mortars with the particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm is almost not affected by the NS content. XRD analysis shows that the formation of ettringite was promoted and the process of hydration reaction of cement was accelerated with the addition of NS. At the microscopic level, the interfacial transition zone (ITZ of the grouting material became denser and the formation of C-S-H gel was promoted after adding NS.

  10. Determinants of adequate follow-up of an abnormal Papanicolaou result among Jamaican women in Portland, Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Su Jin; Saroha, Ekta; Knight, Jeremy; Roofe, Michele; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Among Jamaican women, cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality but factors that facilitate follow-up of women receiving abnormal Pap smear results are not known. We examined whether socio-demographic factors, factors reported by the women, and assistance received for follow-up facilitate adequate follow-up of abnormal Pap smears. Methods One hundred-and-twenty-one women who had abnormal Pap results during June 1998–September 2005 in Portland, Jamaica were interviewed to identify determinants of adequate follow-up. Chi-square, t-test and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify determinants. Results Only half of the women in this sample sought adequate follow-up. These women had a lower number of surviving children, higher monthly income, and perceived the cost of services to be inexpensive. Advice about the timing of the follow-up activity and the next step to take by the healthcare workers were significant determinants of adequate follow-up. Women who received advice on the timing of follow-up were almost six times (adjusted OR: 5.99, 95% CI: 1.17, 30.66, p<0.05) more likely to seek adequate follow-up after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions Perceived low cost of services as well as assistance provided by healthcare workers regarding follow-up action helps to facilitate adequate follow-up of abnormal Pap smear results. PMID:20688592

  11. Effect of different mixing methods on the bacterial microleakage of white Portland cement and white Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shahi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mixing methods (ultrasonic, amalgamator, and conventional on the bacterial microleakage of white Portland cement (WPC and white MTA (Tooth-colored Formula, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK. Methods. A hundred human single-rooted permanent teeth were decoronated to obtain 14 mm of root length in all the samples. The root canals were cleaned, shaped and obturated. Three millimeters of each root apex were cut off and randomly divided into 6 groups of 15 each (3 groups for WMTA and 3 groups for WPC, each with 3 different mixing methods and 2 positive and negative control groups (each containing 5 samples. Brain-heart infusion agar (BHI suspension containing the bacterial species Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212 was used for leakage assessment. Statistical analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics and Kaplan Mayer survival analysis with censored data and log rank test using SPSS 18. Statistical significance was set at P0.05. Conclusion. Bacterial microleakage in the studied samples was not significantly different in terms of the type of the mixing method.

  12. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of epoxy resin and Portland cement-based sealers with niobium and zirconium oxide radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, Raqueli; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Hungaro-Duarte, Marco Antonio; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Camilleri, Josette

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize and to evaluate the bioactivity potential of experimental root canal sealers (ES) based on Portland cement, epoxy resin with nano- and micro-particles of niobium or zirconium oxide used as radiopacifiers in comparison to AH Plus and MTA Fillapex. Specimens of the sealers (10 mm in diameter×1 mm thick) were prepared and the radiopacity was evaluated according to ISO 6876 (2012) specifications. Characterization of the sealers was performed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after setting and after immersion for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). In addition X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were also performed. The pH and calcium ion release were measured after 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after completion of seating using a digital pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. The experimental sealers exhibited an average radiopacity of 2.5 mm thickness of aluminum, which was similar to MTA Fillapex (P>0.05) and inferior to AH Plus (Pepoxy resin and radiopacifier exhibited a degree of bioactivity although no evidence of cement hydration was demonstrated on material characterization. The radiopacifier particle size had limited effect on the sealer microstructure and chemical properties. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative evaluation of ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement as a pulpotomy medicament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Bhagat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recently, some studies have compared mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA with portland cement (PC, concluding that the principle ingredients of PC are similar to those of MTA. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of PC as a pulpotomy medicament. Materials and Methods: Thirty premolars that scheduled for extraction for therapeutic reasons were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: ProRoot MTA (PMTA and PC. After isolation and pulp exposure, pulpotomy was carried out and pulps were dressed with PMTA and PC. After 6 months, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histological analysis based on Cox et al. criteria. The data were analyzed by Z-test of proportion with 1% of allowed error. Results: No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to inflammatory response, soft tissue organization, and dentine bridge formation (P > 0.05. Conclusions: PC was associated with similar favorable biological response to pulpotomy treatment as PMTA. The findings of this study support the idea that PC can be considered a cheaper substitute to MTA.

  14. A comparative evaluation of ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement as a pulpotomy medicament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Dipti; Sunder, Ravi Kadur; Devendrappa, Shashikiran Nandihalli; Vanka, Amit; Choudaha, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, some studies have compared mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with portland cement (PC), concluding that the principle ingredients of PC are similar to those of MTA. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of PC as a pulpotomy medicament. Thirty premolars that scheduled for extraction for therapeutic reasons were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: ProRoot MTA (PMTA) and PC. After isolation and pulp exposure, pulpotomy was carried out and pulps were dressed with PMTA and PC. After 6 months, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histological analysis based on Cox et al. criteria. The data were analyzed by Z-test of proportion with 1% of allowed error. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to inflammatory response, soft tissue organization, and dentine bridge formation (P > 0.05). PC was associated with similar favorable biological response to pulpotomy treatment as PMTA. The findings of this study support the idea that PC can be considered a cheaper substitute to MTA.

  15. The evaluation of ordinary Portland cement concrete subject to elevated temperatures in conjunction with acoustic emission and splitting tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hou, Tsung-Chin; Chen, Guan-Ying; Hou, Ping-Ni

    2017-04-01

    The research objective was to evaluate Ordinary Portland Cement concrete subject to various elevated temperatures. Single OPC concrete mixture with water to cementitious (w/c) equal to 0.45 was proportioned. Concrete specimens were cast and placed in the curing tank in which water was saturated with calcium hydroxide. After ninety days of moist-cure, three elevated temperatures, namely 300, 600, and 900-°C, were carried out upon hardened concrete specimens. Furthermore, two post-damaged curing conditions were executed to recover damaged concrete specimens: one was to recure under 23°C with 50% humidity in a controlled environmental chamber and the other was to recure in the same curing tank. Acoustic emission apparatus coupled with the splitting tensile test was utilized and found able to assess damaged concrete. Before concrete subject to elevated temperatures, the development of indirect tensile strength versus displacement diagram fit well with the tendency of AE energy release. It was found there was a large amount of AE energy released when stress and displacement diagram developed about 40-50%. As such could be identified as the onset of first fracture and the plain concrete generally exhibited a quasi-brittle fracture with two major series of AE energy dissipations; however when concrete specimens were subject to elevated temperatures, the damaged concrete specimens displayed neither fracture pattern nor the "double-hump" AE energy dissipation in comparison with those of plain concrete.

  16. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  17. Household Hazardous Waste and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Household wastes that are toxic, corrosive, ignitable, or reactive are known as Household Hazardous Waste (HHW). Household Hazardous Waste may be found during residential demolitions, and thus require special handling for disposal.

  18. Waste management and the workplace*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    . 48 For instance, the City's Solid Waste Department argues that specialised, expensive recycling equipment is required at drop-off centres to recycle garden waste and building rubble. Also, the compactor trucks used for waste collection are ...

  19. Waste management and chemical inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the classification and handling of waste at the Hanford Site. Waste produced at the Hanford Site is classified as either radioactive, nonradioactive, or mixed waste. Radioactive wastes are further categorized as transuranic, high-level, and low-level. Mixed waste may contain both radioactive and hazardous nonradioactive substances. This section describes waste management practices and chemical inventories at the site.

  20. Waste to energy

    CERN Document Server

    Syngellakis, S

    2014-01-01

    Waste to Energy deals with the very topical subject of converting the calorific content of waste material into useful forms of energy. Topics included cover: Biochemical Processes; Conversions by Thermochemical Processes; Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling; Combustion; Pyrolysis; Gasification; Biofuels; Management and Policies.

  1. Radioactive waste storage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Daniel E. [Colorado Christian Univ., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  2. Food-Processing Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Val S; Cummings, Gregg A; Maillacheruvu, K Y; Tang, Walter Z

    2017-10-01

    Literature published in 2016 and early 2017 related to food processing wastes treatment for industrial applications are reviewed. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following food processing industries and applications: general, meat and poultry, fruits and vegetables, dairy and beverage, and miscellaneous treatment of food wastes.

  3. Nuclear waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Darrel D.; Ebra, Martha A.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  4. Waste statistics 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Reports to the ISAG (Information System for Waste and Recycling) for 2001 cover 402 Danish waste treatment plants owned by 295 enterprises. The total waste generation in 2001 amounted to 12,768,000 tonnes, which is 2% less than in 2000. Reductions are primarily due to the fact that sludge for mineralization is included with a dry matter content of 20% compared to 1,5% in previous statistics. This means that sludge amounts have been reduced by 808,886 tonnes. The overall rate of recycling amounted to 63%, which is 1% less than the overall recycling target of 64% for 2004. Since sludge has a high recycling rate, the reduction in sludge amounts of 808,886 tonnes has also caused the total recycling rate to fall. Waste amounts incinerated accounted for 25%, which is 1% more than the overall target of 24% for incineration in 2004. Waste going to landfill amounted to 10%, which is better than the overall landfill target for 2004 of a maximum of 12% for landfilling. Targets for treatment of waste from the different sectors, however, are still not complied with, since too little waste from households and the service sector is recycled, and too much waste from industry is led to landfill. (BA)

  5. Greening waste management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Godfrey, Linda K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Waste Sector, as with many sectors of the economy, is responding to the call to transition to a Green Economy. Globally, waste management is changing from one of ‘collect-transport-dispose’, to one of ‘secondary resource management’, driven...

  6. Radioactive waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  7. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  8. Solid-Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

  9. FOUNDRY WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kosec

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Waste management in foundries is gaining a higher ecological and economical importance. Waste is becoming an increasingly traded product, where excellent profits can be made. Due to the cost reduction and successful business operation in companies, waste has to be regenerated and used again as a material to the maximum possible extent. Such research is long lasting and expensive and is a great challenge for companies. In the frame of our research, a total waste management case study for the Slovenian foundry Feniks was carried out. From the sustainable development point of view, waste management is most suitable, since it ensures the material utilization of waste, reduces the consumption of natural renewable or non-renewable resources and makes efficient production capacity utilization possible. Properly treated ecologically safe waste with a suitable physical characteristic, long-term existence, is a substitute for natural materials. Sand, dust, slag and other mineral waste from foundries are increasingly being used as materials in other industries. The foundry Feniks was awarded with certification of the environmental management system according to the standard SIST EN ISO 14001 and confirmed its environmental credentials.

  10. Waste statistics 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The 2003 reporting to the ISAG comprises 403 plants owned by 273 enterprises. In 2002, reports covered 407 plants owned by 296 enterprises. Waste generation in 2003 is compared to targets from 2008 in the government's Waste Strategy 2005-2008. The following can be said to summarise waste generation in 2003: 1) In 2003, total reported waste arisings amounted to 12,835,000 tonnes, which is 270,000 tonnes, or 2 per cent, less than in 2002. 2) If amounts of residues from coal-fired power plants are excluded from statistics, waste arisings in 2003 were 11,597,000 tonnes, which is a 2 per cent increase from 2002. 3) If amounts of residues from coal-fired power plants and waste from the building and construction sector are excluded from statistics, total waste generation in 2003 amounted to 7,814,000 tonnes, which is 19,000 tonnes, or 1 per cent, less than in 2002. In other words, there has been a fall in total waste arisings, if residues and waste from building and construction are excluded. 4) The overall rate of recycling amounted to 66 per cent, which is one percentage point above the overall recycling target of 65 per cent for 2008. In 2002 the total rate of recycling was 64 per cent. 5) The total amount of waste led to incineration amounted to 26 per cent, plus an additional 1 per cent left in temporary storage to be incinerated at a later time. The 2008 target for incineration is 26 per cent. These are the same percentage figures as applied to incineration and storage in 2002. 6) The total amount of waste led to landfills amounted to 8 per cent, which is one percentage point below the overall landfill target of a maximum of 9 per cent landfilling in 2008. In 2002, 9 per cent was led to landfill. 7) The targets for treatment of waste from individual sectors are still not being met: too little waste from households and the service sector is being recycled, and too much waste from industry is being led to landfill. (au)

  11. Potencial da cinza do bagaço da cana-de-açúcar como material de substituição parcial de cimento Portland Potential of sugarcane bagasse ash as a partial replacement material for Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos O. de Paula

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho, voltado para a avaliação do potencial da cinza do bagaço da cana-de-açúcar (CBC como material de substituição parcial do cimento Portland em argamassa, objetivou apresentar opção viável para a destinação deste resíduo, cuja quantidade gerada aumentará significativamente nos próximos anos, em decorrência da ampliação do setor de produção de álcool combustível; além disso, o emprego da CBC como adição mineral, substituindo parte do cimento em argamassas e concretos, contribui para a redução do impacto ambiental desses materiais, em boa parte decorrente da produção do cimento. O procedimento experimental abordou não só caracterização da CBC mas também a avaliação, através de ensaios físicos e mecânicos, em que os resultados mostraram que o bagaço apresenta rendimento de CBC de 10%, com a cinza sendo composta de 84% de SiO2 e 5% de Carbono. A sílica na CBC apresenta-se na fase amorfa e nas fases cristalinas de cristobalita e quartzo. Os índices de atividade pozolânica comprovam a reatividade da CBC. Do ponto de vista da resistência à compressão, argamassas com teores de CBC entre 0 e 30% indicaram a possibilidade de substituição de até 20% do cimento pela CBC.This study is focused on the evaluation of the effects of the partial replacement of Portland cement by sugarcane bagasse ash (CBC in mortars. The main objective was to find a suitable destination for an agricultural residue generated in an increasing amount in Brazil, as a result of the boom of the use of ethanol as an alternative fuel to gasoline. Also, the use of CBC as a mineral admixture in mortars and concretes contributes to a decrease in the environmental impact of these materials related to cement production. Experimental techniques were applied both for the CBC characterization and for the evaluation of its use as a mineral admixture in mortars, based on mechanical and physical tests. The yield of CBC from sugarcane

  12. An Overview of Organic Waste in Composting

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir Aeslina Abdul; Azhari Nur Wahidah; Jamaludin Siti Noratifah

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviewed studies on the composting process of organic waste. Organic wastes are wastes that easily biodegradable. These wastes are produced from many sources such as agricultural waste, market waste, kitchen waste, urban solid food wastes and municipal solid waste. Without proper management, these waste could create several environment problem. Therefore, composting is the best low cost alternative solution to overcome this problem. Composting method can degrade all types of organi...

  13. A comprehensive review on removal of arsenic using activated carbon prepared from easily available waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Monoj Kumar; Garg, Ravi

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic contamination in water bodies is a serious problem and causes various health problems due to which US Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) set its maximum permissible limit of 10 ppb. The present review article starts with the removal of toxic arsenic using adsorbents prepared from easily available waste materials. Adsorbent either commercial or low-cost adsorbent can be used for arsenic removal but recent research was focused on the low-cost adsorbent. Preparation and activation of various adsorbents were discussed. Adsorption capacities, surface area, thermodynamic, and kinetics data of various adsorbents for As(III) and As(V) removal were compiled. Desorption followed by regeneration and reuse of adsorbents is an important step in adsorption and leads to economical process. Various desorbing and regenerating agents were discussed for arsenic decontamination from the adsorbent surface. Strong acids, bases, and salts are the main desorbing agents. Disposal of arsenic-contaminated adsorbent and arsenic waste was also a big problem because of the toxic and leaching effect of arsenic. So, arsenic waste was disposed of by proper stabilization/solidification (S/S) technique by mixing it in Portland cement, iron, ash, etc. to reduce the leaching effect.

  14. Stabilization/solidification of a municipal solid waste incineration residue using fly ash-based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Galiano, Y; Fernández Pereira, C; Vale, J

    2011-01-15

    The stabilization/solidification (S/S) of a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash containing hazardous metals such as Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn or Ba by means of geopolymerization technology is described in this paper. Different reagents such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, potassium silicate, kaolin, metakaolin and ground blast furnace slag have been used. Mixtures of MSWI waste with these kinds of geopolymeric materials and class F coal fly ash used as silica and alumina source have been processed to study the potential of geopolymers as waste immobilizing agents. To this end, the effects of curing conditions and composition have been tested. S/S solids are submitted to compressive strength and leaching tests to assess the results obtained and to evaluate the efficiency of the treatment. Compressive strength values in the range 1-9 MPa were easily obtained at 7 and 28 days. Concentrations of the metals leached from S/S products were strongly pH dependent, showing that the leachate pH was the most important variable for the immobilization of metals. Comparison of fly ash-based geopolymer systems with classical Portland cement stabilization methods has also been accomplished. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Storing Waste in Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W L; Sickafus, K

    2004-07-20

    Not all the nuclear waste destined for Yucca Mountain is in the form of spent fuel. Some of it will be radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons. This so-called defense waste exists mainly as corrosive liquids and sludge in underground tanks. An essential task of the U.S. high-level radioactive waste program is to process these defense wastes into a solid material--called a waste form. An ideal waste form would be extremely durable and unreactive with other repository materials. It would be simple to fabricate remotely so that it could be safely transported to a repository for permanent storage. What's more, the material should be able to tolerate exposure to intense radiation without degradation. And to minimize waste volume, the material must be able to contain high concentrations of radionuclides. The material most likely to be used for immobilization of radioactive waste is glass. Glasses are produced by rapid cooling of high-temperature liquids such that the liquid-like non-periodic structure is preserved at lower temperatures. This rapid cooling does not allow enough time for thermodynamically stable crystalline phases (mineral species) to form. In spite of their thermodynamic instability, glasses can persist for millions of years. An alternate to glass is a ceramic waste form--an assemblage of mineral-like crystalline solids that incorporate radionuclides into their structures. The crystalline phases are thermodynamically stable at the temperature of their synthesis; ceramics therefore tend to be more durable than glasses. Ceramic waste forms are fabricated at temperatures below their melting points and so avoid the danger of handling molten radioactive liquid--a danger that exists with incorporation of waste in glasses. The waste form provides a repository's first line of defense against release of radionuclides. It, along with the canister, is the barrier in the repository over which we have the most control. When a waste

  16. Radioactive waste material disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  17. ZeroWaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    The ZeroWaste research group at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU Byg) was established two years ago and covers the broad range of expertise, required for turning waste materials into attractive, new materials. Members of the group have, prior to that......, developed methods for removal of heavy metals and phosphorous from waste incineration, sewage sludge and other bio ashes, providing the basis of to make these ash types an attractive, new material for the building sector. Initial results for upgrading and using different types of ashes are presented...

  18. Evaluation of Photocatalytic Properties of Portland Cement Blended with Titanium Oxynitride (TiO2−xNy Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Cohen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic activity of Portland cement pastes blended with nanoparticles of titanium oxynitride (TiO2−xNy was studied. Samples with different percentages of TiO2−xNy (0.0%, 0.5%, 1%, 3% and TiO2 (1%, 3% were evaluated in order to study their self-cleaning properties. The presence of nitrogen in the tetragonal structure of TiO2 was evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD as a shift of the peaks in the 2θ axis. The samples were prepared with a water/cement ratio of 0.5 and a concentration of Rhodamine B of 0.5 g/L. After 65 h of curing time, the samples were irradiated with UV lamps to evaluate the reduction of the pigment. The color analysis was carried out using a Spectrometer UV/Vis measuring the coordinates CIE (Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage L*, a*, b*, and with special attention to the reddish tones (Rhodamine B color which correspond to a* values greater than zero. Additionally, samples with 0.5%, 1%, 3% of TiO2−xNy and 1%, 3% of TiO2 were evaluated under visible light with the purpose of determining the Rhodamine B abatement to wavelengths greater than 400 nm. The results have shown a similar behavior for both additions under UV light irradiation, with 3% being the addition with the highest photocatalytic efficiency obtained. However, TiO2−xNy showed activity under irradiation with visible light, unlike TiO2, which can only be activated under UV light.

  19. Methodologies for measuring the setting times of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement products used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William Nguyen; Nicholson, Timothy; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-12-01

    Objective The current standard used to measure setting time for Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) involves indentation testing with arbitrary weights. This study compared indentation testing against rheological measurements and assessed the influences of particle size and the inclusion of bismuth oxide on the setting time of experimental MTA and Portland cement (PC). Material and methods Two PCs (P1 and P2) of different particle sizes were produced using the same clinker. From these two PCs, two experimental MTAs (M1 and M2) were created with the addition of bismuth oxide. Particle size distributions were assessed using laser diffraction analysis. Indentation setting time tests were performed in accordance to the Gillmore needle test. Elastic modulus was assessed using a strain-controlled rheometer at 1 rad s(-1) and an applied strain of 0.01%. Results P1, P2, M1 and M2 cements had median particle sizes of 6.1, 12.5, 6.5 and 13.0 μm, respectively. Using indentation testing, final setting times were ranked P1 ranking of the final setting time corresponded with the rheological assessment of time required to reach 95% of the elastic modulus plateau. Conclusions The time to reach 95% elastic modulus plateau of 9.3 min corresponds to a time close to the point where the material can be overlaid with another restorative material to give a final restoration. The 95% plateau value for elastic modulus may be a more useful parameter for determining how the setting reaction of PC and MTA cements progress over time.

  20. Perceived and actual diabetes risk in the Chinese and Hispanic/Latino communities in Portland, OR, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maty, S C; Tippens, K M

    2011-06-01

    The burden of diabetes is considerable for racial and ethnic minority populations in many places in the USA and worldwide, often disproportionately affecting immigrant communities. This paper reports findings from a community-based participatory research study that described diabetes risk and awareness, assessed the association between perceived and actual risk (high, two or more diabetes risk factors; low, fewer than two risk factors) and identified factors associated with disease risk among Chinese and Hispanic/Latino immigrant populations in Portland, OR, USA. Cross-sectional, self-reported data were collected from a purposive sample of 324 Chinese (n=159) and Hispanic/Latino (n=165) adults, aged 18-86 years [mean (SD) age, 45.2(17.9) years; 50.7% women). Analyses described differences in variable distributions. Logistic regression estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in pooled and ethnic group-specific samples.   Approximately 43% of participants were at high risk for diabetes, regardless of ethnicity or age. Of those unaware of their risk, or who perceived themselves not to be at risk, 25-53% had two or more risk factors (high risk); these patterns varied by ethnicity. The proportion of participants who reported two or more risk factors and were unaware of their risk status (31.8% Hispanic/Latino; 17% Chinese) or self-identified as not at risk (12.5% Hispanic/Latino; 13.0% Chinese) was substantial. Factors associated with diabetes risk also varied by ethnicity. This study assessed the degree and determinants of diabetes risk and awareness among local Hispanic/Latino and Chinese communities and identified significant variation between groups. The results are important because they highlight substantial diabetes risk among persons who misestimate or are unaware of their risk status, regardless of ethnicity, and, in the USA, the Chinese immigrant population commonly is not considered a high-risk group for Type 2 diabetes. © 2011 The Authors