WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste dye utilization

  1. Formation of shaped barium sulfate-dye hybrids: waste dye utilization for eco-friendly treatment of wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Lin, Jing; Li, Wei-Ying; Hu, Zhang-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Lei

    2010-01-01

    Owing to the present complexity and difficulty of concentrated dye wastewater treatment, this work aimed to synthesize a reproducible waste-sorbing material for the treatment of wastewater by forming the dye-conjugating complex hybrid. The inorganic/organic hybridization was applied to prepare the objective material by immobilizing waster dye-Mordant blue 9 (MB) with barium sulfate (BaSO4). The composition and pattern of the formed material were determined by spectrometry and characterized by SEM and XRD, and their formation process was clarified. The adsorption of cationic dye-basic blue BO (BB) and copper ion was investigated. The hybrid of MB alone into growing BaSO4 formed the pineapple-like particles while that of the MB/BB-conjugating complex was the rhombus material. The adsorption of BB on the MB-BaSO4 hybrid was probably attributed to ion-pair equilibrium and that of Cu2+ may result from the complexation. The treatment of dye and heavy metal wastewaters indicated that the MB hybrid material removed 99.8% BB and 97% Cu2+ and the dye-conjugating hybrid with growing BaSO4 100% MB, 99.5% BB, and 44% Cu2+. The waste MB-BaSO4 hybrid material is efficient to treat cationic dye and Cu2+ wastewater. The dye-conjugating hybridization method is the first to be advanced for in situ wastewater treatment, and it showed a combined effect for the removal of both organic dyes and heavy metals.

  2. Simultaneous utilization of soju industrial waste for silica production and its residue ash as effective cationic dye adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soju industrial waste is an important biomass resource. The present study is aimed to utilize soju industrial waste for silica extraction, and residual ash as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution. High percentage of pure amorphous nanosilica was obtained ...

  3. Plant waste materials from restaurants as the adsorbents for dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Marija D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has demonstrated the valorization of inexpensive and readily available restaurant waste containing most consumed food and beverage residues as adsorbents for methylene blue dye. Coffee, tea, lettuce and citrus waste have been utilized without any pre-treatment, thus the adsorption capacities and dye removal efficiency were determined. Coffee waste showed highest adsorbent capacity, followed by tea, lettuce and citrus waste. The dye removal was more effective as dye concentration increases from 5 up to 60 mg/L. The favorable results obtained for lettuce waste have been especially encouraged, as this material has not been commonly employed for sorption purposes. Equilibrium data fitted very well in a Freundlich isotherm model, whereas pseudo-second-order kinetic model describes the process behavior. Restaurant waste performed rapid dye removal at no cost, so it can be adopted and widely used in industries for contaminated water treatment.

  4. Reactive dye extraction utilizing regenerated bleaching earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite bleaching earth is utilized for purifying used motor oil through a recovery process in order to improve the quality and stability of the final product. Indeed, spent bleaching earth is generated due to adsorbing oil impurities. Polluted spent bleaching earth contains 20-40% (w/w oil and is flammable. Its disposal without pre-treatment leads to loss of oil along with environmental impacts. Accordingly, similar studies have been conducted since 1979 until now. This research was a laboratory study on reactive dye adsorption. Cleaning bleaching clay, thermal remediation and acid washing activation methods were utilized. Response surface methodology was used to design the experiments and determine the optimal parameters in order to run the dye adsorption process. The main experimental parameters have been concluded as temperature (200-800 °C, acid solution concentration (0.1-3 M, dye solution concentration (1-35 ppm, and ratio of activated earth to dye solution (0.1-2 %, w/w. Results revealed that dye adsorption process along with oil removal at a temperature of 650 °C, acid solution concentration of 0.83 M, dye solution concentration of 11.75 ppm and ratio of activated earth to dye solution of 1.52 % (w/w results in an adsorption efficiency of 68.57%. This removal efficiency is a bit higher than activated virgin bleaching earth and much higher than virgin bleaching earth, which has adsorption capacities of 66.75% and 51.56%, respectively. Considering this recycling process, the purified material is quite acceptable technically, environmentally and economically.

  5. Utilization of the Phaseolus vulgaris L. Waste biomass for decolorization of the textile dye Acid Red 57: determination of equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunali, Sibel; Ozcan, Adnan; Kaynak, Zerrin; Ozcan, A Safa; Akar, Tamer

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, biosorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto a waste biomass of Phaseolus vulgaris L. was investigated by varying pH, contact time, biosorbent concentration and temperature, to determine the equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. The AR57 biosorption was fast, and equilibrium was attained within 20 min. Biosorption equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherm model well with high correlation coefficients. According to Langmuir isotherm model the maximum biosorption capacity of Phaseolus vulgaris L. for AR57 dye was determined as 4.09 x 10(- 4) mol g(- 1) or 215.13 mg g(- 1) at 20 degrees C. The thermodynamic parameters (Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy) for the biosorption of AR57 were indicated that the biosorption was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model agrees well with the dynamic behavior of the biosorption of AR57 onto P. vulgaris L., under various temperatures. The removal efficiency of the biomass was also examined in real textile wastewater.

  6. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Disposal § 268.20 Waste specific prohibitions—Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. (a) Effective August...

  7. Synthesis of solvothermal derived TiO2 nanocrystals supported on ground nano egg shell waste and its utilization for the photocatalytic dye degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohini; Kumari, Pooja; Chavan, Prakash Dhondiram; Datta, Sudipta; Dutta, Suman

    2017-11-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles with excellent crystallinity were synthesized via solvothermal method and supported on the ground nano-sized egg shell waste at different loading concentrations. The photocatalytic degradation of the mixture of Methylene blue (MB) and Rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) in aqueous solution utilizing prepared TiO2 nano composite under visible light irradiation was analysed. Different characterizations including UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Field emission scanning electron microscopic (FE-SEM), energy dispersive studies (EDS), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the prepared catalyst. In addition, FE-SEM and EDS analysis of the prepared egg shell support were carried out to confirm the morphology, particle size distribution, and composition. The solvothermal derived TiO2 nanocrystals supported on ground nano-sized egg shell waste exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the as-prepared TiO2 nanoparticles. The synergistic effect of TiO2 nanoparticles and nano egg shell support is attributed to the effective dispersion of TiO2 that offers high specific surface area.

  8. Solid waste utilization: pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Mixon, W.R.; Dean, C.; Lizdas, D.J.

    1977-08-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) Program, a number of technology evaluations are being prepared on various current and emerging sources of energy. This evaluation considers the use of pyrolysis as a method of producing energy from municipal solid waste. The energy can be in the form of a gas, oil, chars, or steam. Pyrolysis, the decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (or in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere), has been used to convert organic matter to other products or fuels. This process is also described as ''destructive distillation''. Four processes are described in detail: the ''Landgard'' System (Monsanto Environ-Chem Systems, Inc.); the Occidental Research Corporation Process (formerly the Garrett Research and Development Company; The ''Purox'' System (Union Carbide Corporation); and the ''Refu-Cycler'' (Hamilton Standard Corporation). ''Purox'' and ''Refu-Cycler'' produce a low-Btu gas; the Occidental process produces an oil, and the ''Landgard'' process produces steam using on-site auxiliary boilers to burn the fuel gases produced by the pyrolysis unit. Also included is a listing of other pyrolysis processes currently under development for which detailed information was not available. The evaluation provides information on the various process flowsheets, energy and material balances, product characteristics, and economics. Pyrolysis of municipal solid waste as an energy source can be considered a potential for the future; however little operational or economic information is available at this time.

  9. Waste Water Treatment of Dye Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Pattana Boonyaprapa

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study tie-dye process data and wastewater characteristics from 60 entrepreneurs, and to study the colour density treatment in pilot scale by using upflow anaerobic filters. From 60 filled-out questionnaires, it was found that all tie-dye entrepreneurs used reactive dyes by a hot method. Ninety-eight percent of the tie-dye enterpreneurs produced wastewater at the rate of not more than 1500 liters per day. All of them lacked tie-dye wastewater treatment s...

  10. Waste Water Treatment of Dye Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattana Boonyaprapa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to study tie-dye process data and wastewater characteristics from 60 entrepreneurs, and to study the colour density treatment in pilot scale by using upflow anaerobic filters. From 60 filled-out questionnaires, it was found that all tie-dye entrepreneurs used reactive dyes by a hot method. Ninety-eight percent of the tie-dye enterpreneurs produced wastewater at the rate of not more than 1500 liters per day. All of them lacked tie-dye wastewater treatment systems. Eighty-five percent of tie-dye entrepreneurs agreed that there must be wastewater treatment before release into the environment. From group discussions, it was found that the entrepreneurs realized the wastewater problem and wanted to carry out environment friendly tie-dyeing. Our study demonstrated that the average value of the colour density, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total dissolved solids (TDS and pH of the wastewater characteristics were 170 SU (space units, 1584 mg/l, 2487 mg/l and 8, respectively. For the upflow anaerobic filter, 5 sets of experiments, with 24 hours retention time, were designed, with 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 % of cow’s feces ferment, respectively (sets 1st-5th. The result showed decreasing colour densities from 170 SU to 160 SU (dark colour, 60 SU (very light colour, 12 SU (no colour, 10 SU (no colour and 10 SU (no colour, respectively. We conclude that the upflow anaerobic filter, containing 2% cow’s feces ferment is an efficient way to reduce colour density of the wastewater. Mixing cow’s feces ferment with tie-dye wastewater increased COD and TDS in wastewater. Mean COD was increased by residual organic matter from 1584 mg/l (before treatment to (after-treatment, sets 2nd- 5th 1600 mg/l, 1680 mg/l, 1710 mg/l and 1750 mg/l, respectively. COD aftertreatment was higher than the industrial effluence standard (400 mg/l. Further treatment COD might include wetland procedures. TDS was increased by some residual organic matter

  11. Waste metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent for a reactive dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvia C R; Vílar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-30

    An industrial waste sludge mainly composed by metal hydroxides was used as a low-cost adsorbent for removing a reactive textile dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue) in solution. Characterization of this waste material included chemical composition, pH(ZPC) determination, particle size distribution, physical textural properties and metals mobility under different pH conditions. Dye adsorption equilibrium isotherms were determined at 25 and 35 degrees C and pH of 4, 7 and 10 revealing reasonably fits to Langmuir and Freundlich models. At 25 degrees C and pH 7, Langmuir fit indicates a maximum adsorption capacity of 91.0mg/g. An adsorptive ion-exchange mechanism was identified from desorption studies. Batch kinetic experiments were also conducted at different initial dye concentration, temperature, adsorbent dosage and pH. A pseudo-second-order model showed good agreement with experimental data. LDF approximation model was used to estimate homogeneous solid diffusion coefficients and the effective pore diffusivities. Additionally, a simulated real effluent containing the selected dye, salts and dyeing auxiliary chemicals, was also used in equilibrium and kinetic experiments and the adsorption performance was compared with aqueous dye solutions.

  12. Utilization of mining and mineral wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Hong, Seung Woong; Choi, Young Yoon; Kim, Byung Gyu; Park, Je Shin [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Up to now, it is estimated that more than 50 million tons of mineral wastes have been generated mining industries and deposited on the land in Korea. Much of cultivated land and hilly areas have been occupied by this wastes, which cause pollution of the environment. Utilization of the mineral wastes is preferable to stabilization because full use would both eliminate the waste and broaden the mineral resource base. Therefore, the development of utilization techniques of mineral wastes is very important not only for improving the environment but also for resource conservation. In countries with high population and poor natural resources like Korea, the utilization of these wastes is essential to decrease the environmental problem and the secure the resources and the study on this field play a important part. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop the utilization techniques of the mineral wastes. In first year's research, the contents and scope of this study are 1) Present condition and Field Survey on the mineral wastes with respect of their utilization, 2) Reviews of Current effects and research to utilize mineral wastes, 3) Characterization of mineral wastes and environmental test, 4) Evaluation and study on the utilization. (author). 67 refs., 25 tabs., 54 figs.

  13. Reactive dye extraction utilizing regenerated bleaching earth

    OpenAIRE

    M. Shahi; M.R. Sabour; G.A. Dezvareh

    2017-01-01

    Bentonite bleaching earth is utilized for purifying used motor oil through a recovery process in order to improve the quality and stability of the final product. Indeed, spent bleaching earth is generated due to adsorbing oil impurities. Polluted spent bleaching earth contains 20-40% (w/w) oil and is flammable. Its disposal without pre-treatment leads to loss of oil along with environmental impacts. Accordingly, similar studies have been conducted since 1979 until now. This research was a lab...

  14. Agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... by wastes from the irrational application of intensive farming methods and the abuse of chemicals used in cultivation, remarkably affecting rural environments in particular and the global environment in general.

  15. Isolation and Screening of Water Microbes for Decolourisation of Textile Dye Waste

    OpenAIRE

    J. K. Singh,; R. Ranjan; Pranay P. Pankaj*

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in textile industry. Unused dyes, consisting mainly non biodegradable released along with waste water streams without any proper pre-treatment which cause nuisance for environment and accumulate in flora as well as fauna. These also exhibit allergic, carcinogenic and mutagenic properties for human beings. Isolation and screening of azo dye degrading bacteria are economic in biodegradation and detoxification. In the present study, 200 waste water samples were collected...

  16. Valorisation of Moringaoleifera waste: treatment and reuse of textile dye effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaseca Vallvé, M. Mercedes; López Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez Bouzán, María Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused on the valorisation of an agricultural waste as natural coagulant to treat wastewater from the textile industry. In this paper, the waste of Moringaoleifera oil extraction is used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. Moringaoleifera shows better results for dye removal than conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl3 and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high...

  17. Review: Utilization of Waste From Coffee Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinová, Lenka; Sirotiak, Maroš; Bartošová, Alica; Soldán, Maroš

    2017-06-01

    Coffee is one of the most valuable primary products in the world trade, and also a central and popular part of our culture. However, coffees production generate a lot of coffee wastes and by-products, which, on the one hand, could be used for more applications (sorbent for the removal of heavy metals and dyes from aqueous solutions, production of fuel pellets or briquettes, substrate for biogas, bioethanol or biodiesel production, composting material, production of reusable cups, substrat for mushroom production, source of natural phenolic antioxidants etc.), but, on the other hand, it could be a source of severe contamination posing a serious environmental problem. In this paper, we present an overview of utilising the waste from coffee production.

  18. Decolorization of a textile vat dye by adsorption on waste ash

    OpenAIRE

    MIODRAG ŠMELCEROVIĆ; DRAGAN ĐORĐEVIĆ; MILE NOVAKOVIĆ; MIRJANA MIZDRAKOVIĆ

    2010-01-01

    An adsorption process using cheap adsorbents could be described as a simple, selective and low cost alternative for the treatment of colored waste water compared to conventional physical and chemical processes. In this study the use of a natural waste adsorbent–ash was investigated for the removal of a textile vat dye Ostanthren blue GCD remaining after the dyeing of cotton textile. The ash obtained as a waste material during the burning of brown coal in the heating station of Leskovac (Serbi...

  19. Waste Water Treatment-Bed of Coal Fly Ash for Dyes and Pigments Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Farman Ali Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly porous power plant waste ashes have been utilized to treat toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. An attempt has been made for the first time in Pakistan, to generate an effective and economically sound treatment facility for the toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. This is an indigenous bed which could replace expensive treatment facilities, such as reverse osmosis (RO, granulated activated carbon (GAC bed, etc. The treatment efficiency was improved by coupling coagulants with fly ash adsorbent bed. The ash was collected from coal fired boilers of power plant at Lakhra Power Generation Company, Jamshoro, Pakistan. The use of this ash resolved the disposal and environmental issues by treating wastewater of chemical, dyes and pigment industry. The treatment bed comprised of briquettes of coal fly ash coupled with commercial coagulant ferrous sulfate-lime reduced COD, color, turbidity and TSS of effluent remarkably. An adsorption capacity and chemical behavior of fly ash bed was also studied. In coagulation treatment, coagulant FeSO4-lime influenced reduction of COD, color, turbidity and TSS by 32%, 48%, 50% and 51%, respectively. The CFAB coupled with coagulant, resulted an excessive removal of color, TSS, COD, and turbidity by 88%, 92%, 67% and89%, respectively.

  20. Waste sizing solution as co-substrate for anaerobic decolourisation of textile dyeing wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, I.; Santos, dos A.B.; Spanjers, H.

    2005-01-01

    Dyeing wastewaters and residual size are textile factory waste streams that can be treated anaerobically. For successful anaerobic treatment of dyeing effluents, a co-substrate has to be added because of their low concentration of easily biodegradable compounds. Starch-based size contains easily

  1. Novel adsorbent from agricultural waste (cashew NUT shell for methylene blue dye removal: Optimization by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Subramaniam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon, prepared from an agricultural waste, cashew nut shell (CNS was utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB dye from aqueous solution. Batch adsorption study was carried out with variables like pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration and time. The response surface methodology (RSM was applied to design the experiments, model the process and optimize the variable. A 24 full factorial central composite design was successfully employed for experimental design and analysis of the results. The parameters pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration, and time considered for this investigation play an important role in the adsorption studies of methylene blue dye removal. The experimental values were in good agreement with the model predicted values. The optimum values of pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration and time are found to be 10, 2.1846 g/L, 50 mg/L and 63 min for complete removal of MB dye respectively.

  2. Current trends of tropical fruit waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheok, Choon Yoong; Mohd Adzahan, Noranizan; Abdul Rahman, Russly; Zainal Abedin, Nur Hanani; Hussain, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Rabiha; Chong, Gun Hean

    2018-02-11

    Recent rapid growth of the world's population has increased food demands. This phenomenon poses a great challenge for food manufacturers in maximizing the existing food or plant resources. Nowadays, the recovery of health benefit bioactive compounds from fruit wastes is a research trend not only to help minimize the waste burden, but also to meet the intensive demand from the public for phenolic compounds which are believed to have protective effects against chronic diseases. This review is focused on polyphenolic compounds recovery from tropical fruit wastes and its current trend of utilization. The tropical fruit wastes include in discussion are durian (Durio zibethinus), mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.), rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), mango (Mangifera indica L.), jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), papaya (Carica papaya), passion fruit (Passiflora edulis), dragon fruit (Hylocereus spp), and pineapple (Ananas comosus). Highlights of bioactive compounds in different parts of a tropical fruit are targeted primarily for food industries as pragmatic references to create novel innovative health enhancement food products. This information is intended to inspire further research ideas in areas that are still under-explored and for food processing manufacturers who would like to minimize wastes as the norm of present day industry (design) objective.

  3. Plastic solid waste utilization technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Shivashankar, Murugesh; Majumder, Suman

    2017-11-01

    Plastics are used in more number of applications in worldwide and it becomes essential part of our daily life. In Indian cities and villages people use the plastics in buying vegetable as a carry bag, drinking water bottle, use of plastic furniture in home, plastics objects uses in kitchen, plastic drums in packing and storage of the different chemicals for industrial use, use plastic utensils in home and many more uses. After usage of plastics it will become part of waste garbage and create pollution due to presence of toxic chemicals and it will be spread diseases and give birth to uncontrolled issues in social society. In current scenario consumption of plastic waste increasing day by day and it is very difficult to manage the plastic waste. There are limited methodologies available for reutilization of plastic waste again. Such examples are recycling, landfill, incineration, gasification and hydrogenation. In this paper we will review the existing methodologies of utilization of plastic waste in current scenario

  4. Constraints to waste utilization and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steadman, E.N.; Sondreal, E.A.; Hassett, D.J.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The value of coal combustion by-products for various applications is well established by research and commercial practice worldwide. As engineering construction materials, these products can add value and enhance strength and durability while simultaneously reducing cost and providing the environmental benefit of reduced solid waste disposal. In agricultural applications, gypsum-rich products can provide plant nutrients and improve the tilth of depleted soils over large areas of the country. In waste stabilization, the cementitious and pozzolanic properties of these products can immobilize hazardous nuclear, organic, and metal wastes for safe and effective environmental disposal. Although the value of coal combustion by-products for various applications is well established, the full utilization of coal combustion by-products has not been realized in most countries. The reasons for the under utilization of these materials include attitudes that make people reluctant to use waste materials, lack of engineering standards for high-volume uses beyond eminent replacement, and uncertainty about the environmental safety of coal ash utilization. More research and education are needed to increase the utilization of these materials. Standardization of technical specifications should be pursued through established standards organizations. Adoption of uniform specifications by government agencies and user trade associations should be encouraged. Specifications should address real-world application properties, such as air entrainment in concrete, rather than empirical parameters (e.g., loss on ignition). The extensive environmental assessment data already demonstrating the environmental safety of coal ash by-products in many applications should be more widely used, and data should be developed to include new applications.

  5. Induction of fungal laccase production under solid state bioprocessing of new agroindustrial waste and its application on dye decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Merve; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2017-06-01

    Lignocellulosic wastes are generally produced in huge amounts worldwide. Peach waste of these obtained from fruit juice industry was utilized as the substrate for laccase production by Pleurotus eryngii under solid state bioprocessing (SSB). Its chemical composition was determined and this bioprocess was carried out under stationary conditions at 28 °C. The effects of different compounds; copper, iron, Tween 80, ammonium nitrate and manganese, and their variable concentrations on laccase production were investigated in detail. The optimum production of laccase (43,761.33 ± 3845 U L(-1)) was achieved on the day of 20 by employing peach waste of 5.0 g and 70 µM Cu(2+), 18 µM Fe(2+), 0.025% (v/v) Tween 80, 4.0 g L(-1) ammonium nitrate, 750 µM Mn(2+) as the inducers. The dye decolorization also researched to determine the degrading capability of laccase produced from peach culture under the above-mentioned conditions. Within this scope of the study, methyl orange, tartrazine, reactive red 2 and reactive black dyes were treated with this enzyme. The highest decolorization was performed with methyl orange as 43 ± 2.8% after 5 min of treatment when compared to other dyes. Up to now, this is the first report on the induction of laccase production by P. eryngii under SSB using peach waste as the substrate.

  6. Toxic Effect Of Azo Dyes On Nitrite-N Utilization By Nitrobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxicity of five azo dyes (toxicants) on Nitrobacter was investigated. The index for toxicity was inhibition of rate of nitrite-N utilization. The rate of nitrite-N utilization decreased with increase in concentration of each toxicant at specific exposure time. However, stimulation of utilization was obtained at low concentrations ...

  7. Solid waste utilization: incineration with heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES) Program, Technology Evaluations, this evaluation considers the potential utilization of municipal solid wastes as an energy source by use of incineration with heat recovery. Subjects covered include costs, design data, inputs and outputs, and operational problems. Two generic types of heat recovery incinerators are evaluated. The first type, called a waterwall incinerator, is one in which heat is recovered directly from the furnace using water circulated through tubes imbedded in the furnace walls. This design normally is used for larger installations (>200 tons/day). The second type, a starved-air incinerator is used mainly in smaller sizes (<100 tons/day). Burning is performed in the incinerator, and heat recovery is obtained by the use of heat exchangers on the flue gases from the incinerator. Currently there are not many installations of either type in the United States; however, interest in this form of solid-waste handling appears to be increasing.

  8. CYCLODEXTRINS TO RECOVER TEXTILE DYES IN WASTE WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCO Esther

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides with a special toroid shape, obtained by the action of glucosyltransferase enzyme (CGTase on starch molecule. Their peculiar structure allows the accommodation of different guest molecules inside their cavity forming molecular inclusion complexes. There are different types depending on the glucose units that are formed, called native. The cyclodextrins can be modified incorporating different groups (hydroxipropyl, methyl... that changes their properties. Due their versatility in size, properties and the variety of inclusion complex can form is employed in many different industries like pharmacy, food or cosmetics to protect the molecule or to reduce their volatility. As the guest molecule is not bond with the cyclodextrin with the appropriate conditions it can release easily. In textile industry had been use in different areas: to remove surfactants from washed textiles, to substitute surfactants, in the dyeing process, in detergents… Due their capacity to fix onto textile allows the functionalization of the fabrics giving them new properties like UV protection, antimicrobial or insect repellents depending on the guest molecule, in. The project DYES4EVER employs the cyclodextrins to encapsulate dyes not fixed during the dye process that remains in the wastewater and aims to go one step further and reuse the dyes recovered as a raw material in new dyeing processes.

  9. A Comparative Study of Cellulose Agricultural Wastes (Almond Shell, Pistachio Shell, Walnut Shell, Tea Waste And Orange Peel) for Adsorption of Violet B Dye from Aqueous Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Saeedeh Hashemian

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of violet B azo dye from aqueous solutions was studied by different cellulose agriculturalwaste materials (almond shell (AS), pistachio shell (PS), walnut shell (WS), Tea waste (TW) and orange peel (OP)). Cellulose agricultural waste sorbents characterized by FTIR and SEM methods. The effects of different parameters such as contact time, pH, adsorbent dosage and initial dye concentration were studied.Maximum removal of dye was obtained at contact time of 90 min and pH 11.The adsorp...

  10. Decolorization of a textile vat dye by adsorption on waste ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIODRAG ŠMELCEROVIĆ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An adsorption process using cheap adsorbents could be described as a simple, selective and low cost alternative for the treatment of colored waste water compared to conventional physical and chemical processes. In this study the use of a natural waste adsorbent–ash was investigated for the removal of a textile vat dye Ostanthren blue GCD remaining after the dyeing of cotton textile. The ash obtained as a waste material during the burning of brown coal in the heating station of Leskovac (Serbia was used for the treatment of waste waters from the textile industry, i.e., waste water after the dyeing process. The effect of ash quantity, initial dye concentration, pH and agitation time on adsorption was studied. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. Based on the analytical expression of the Langmuir model, the adsorption constants, such as adsorption capacity and adsorption energy, were found. Pseudo first and second order kinetic models were studied to evaluate the kinetic data.

  11. A prototype of novel agro-waste based column bed device for removal of textile dye Optilan Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gita, Samchetshabam; Shukla, S P; Choudhury, T G; Prakash, C; Singh, A R

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the potentiality of an agro-waste (sugarcane bagasse) for removal of the textile dye (Optilan Red) using novel column based filtration unit with a packed column of chemically treated sugarcane bagasse. The treated and untreated sugarcane bagasse (biosorbent) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Effect of initial dye concentration on percentage removal of dye, equilibrium adsorption of sugarcane bagasse, kinetic studies, breakthrough point equilibrium and desorption of dye from the column material were studied. An inverse dependence of initial dye concentration on percent removal of dye was observed, whereas the equilibrium adsorption (q e ) showed a direct relationship with dye concentration. The time required for reaching breakthrough point was 120 min. Desorption of dye through alkali wash resulted in complete desorption after 1 h washing of the column for its reuse for next cycle. FT-IR analysis shows vibration in valence bands of the hydrogen bond of OH group, and the bands of intra-molecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which results in interaction of treated bagasse with Optilan Red textile dye. The present study showed that more than 93% removal of the dye can be achieved in the concentration range 10-50 ppm (aqueous solution). The removal efficiency of the column remained almost unchanged for the treatment of dye-house wastewater spiked with the dye. The agro-waste based treatment process shows a considerable potential for a low-cost treatment of dye contaminated water.

  12. Recycling and Utilization of Waste Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yan-chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly introduced the recovery method, classification and comprehensive utilization process of waste glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP. Among the current methods of utilization, the physical method is most promising. After pre-processing of waste GFRP, the short glass fiber can be used in gypsum block to improve the anti-cracking and operation performance of the material; waste GFRP powder can be used in plastic fiber reinforced manhole covers to increase the mechanical strength, and the products conformed to JC 1009-2006. Based on these studies, we also point out some problems concerning the utilization of waste glass fiber reinforced plastics.

  13. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  14. Removal of dyes using agricultural waste as low-cost adsorbents: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, K. S.; Ramesh, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    Color removal from wastewater has been a matter of concern, both in the aesthetic sense and health point of view. Color removal from textile effluents on a continuous industrial scale has been given much attention in the last few years, not only because of its potential toxicity, but also mainly due to its visibility problem. There have been various promising techniques for the removal of dyes from wastewater. However, the effectiveness of adsorption for dye removal from wastewater has made it an ideal alternative to other expensive treatment methods. In this review, an extensive list of sorbent literature has been compiled. The review evaluates different agricultural waste materials as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of dyes from wastewater. The review also outlines some of the fundamental principles of dye adsorption on to adsorbents.

  15. agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Agricultural wastes are non-product outputs of production and processing of agricultural products that may contain material that can benefit man but whose economic values are less than the cost of collection, transportation, and processing for beneficial use. Estimates of agricultural waste arising are rare, ...

  16. Agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural development is usually accompanied by wastes from the irrational application of intensive farming methods and the abuse of chemicals used in cultivation, remarkably affecting rural environments ... Agricultural waste has a toxicity potential to plant, animals and human through many direct and indirect channels.

  17. Biosorption studies on waste cotton seed for cationic dyes sequestration: equilibrium and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivarajasekar, N.; Baskar, R.; Ragu, T.; Sarika, K.; Preethi, N.; Radhika, T.

    2017-07-01

    The immature Gossypium hirsutum seeds—an agricultural waste was converted into a novel adsorbent and its effectiveness for cationic dyes removal was discussed in this study. Characterization revealed that sulfuric acid activated waste Gossypium hirsutum seed (WGSAB) contains surface area 496 m2 g-1. The ability of WGSAB to adsorb basic red 2 (BR2) and basic violet 3 (BV3) from aqueous solutions has been studied. Batch adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations (100-300 mg l-1), contact time (1-5 h), pH (2-12) and temperature (293-323 K) to understand the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Toth adsorption isotherms. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Toth model for both dyes. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 66.69 mg g-1 for BV3 and 50.11 mg g-1 for BR2 at optimum conditions. The near unity value of Toth isotherm constant (BR2: 0.999 and BV3: 1.0) indicates that WGSAB surface is heterogeneous in nature. The maximum adsorption capacity predicted by Toth isotherm of BV3 (66.699 mg g-1) is higher than BR2 (50.310 mg g-1). The kinetic investigation revealed that the BR2 and BV3 were chemisorbed on WGSAB surface following Avrami fractional order kinetics. Further, the fractional order and rate constant values are almost similar for every concentration in both the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters such as Δ H 0, Δ S 0 and Δ G 0 were evaluated. The dye adsorption process was found to be spontaneous and endothermic for the two dyes. Regeneration of WGSAB exhausted by the two dyes could be possible via acetic acid as elutant.

  18. Removal of Orange 16 reactive dye from aqueous solutions by waste sunflower seed shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODOR MALUTAN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the use of an agro-industrial waste, i.e., sunflower seed shells, was investigated as a sorbent for the removal of Orange 16 reactive dye from aqueous environments. Batch experiments were performed as a function of pH, sorbent dose, dye concentration, temperature and contact time. The per­cent dye removal increased with increasing sorbent dose and temperature of the aqueous solution, and decreased with increasing dye concentration; the re­quired contact time was five hours. The Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin–Ra­du­shkevich and Tempkin adsorption isotherms were used to describe the equi­librium sorption data and to determine the corresponding isotherm constants. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔG, ΔH and ΔS, were also determined. These parameters indicated that the sorption of reactive dye onto sunflower seed shells was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropy-driven process. The kinetic data were evaluated by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-par­ticle diffusion kinetic models. The results of the kinetic study indicated that the sorption of Orange 16 reactive dye onto sunflower seed shells is a complex process and both chemical surface sorption and intra-particle diffusion contri­bute to the rate-limiting step. Therefore, the sunflower seed shell showed itself to be a promising cheap sorbent for the decolourization of aqueous coloured solutions or effluents.

  19. Utilizing waste products from the food production and processing industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Winfried; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Waste in the food industry is characterized by a high ratio of product-specific waste. Not only does this mean that the generation of this waste is unavoidable, but also that the amount and kind of waste produced, which consists primarily of the organic residue of processed raw materials, can scarcely be altered if the quality of the finished product is to remain consistent. The utilization and disposal of product-specific waste is difficult, due to its inadequate biological stability, potentially pathogenic nature, high water content, potential for rapid autoxidation, and high level of enzymatic activity. The diverse types of waste generated by various branches of the food industry can be quantified based on each branches' respective level of production. Moreover; the origins of each type of waste and a tabulated overview of the traditional agricultural methods for reusing the waste are discussed. Additionally, alternative methods of waste management have emerged, which target the most important contents of the waste. In conclusion, new possibilities for the utilization of food industry waste are described.

  20. agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    gasification, and hydrolysis. They are used for the preparation of chemicals from agricultural waste as well as for energy recovery. Of particular interest to agriculture are the preparation of alcohols for fuel, ammonia for fertilizers, ...

  1. Reuse of Solid Waste in Adsorption of the Textile Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziti, Chafika; Boukerroui, Abdelhamid

    This work presents the study of the reuse of a regenerated spent bleaching earth (RSBE). The RSBE material was tested in the removal of a basic textile dye presents in aqueous solution. The effect of physicochemical parameters such as stirring speed, initial concentration, contact time and temperature have been invested and thermodynamic nature of the adsorption process was determined by calculating the ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values The results obtained show that the adsorption mechanism was described by the Langmuir model and the adsorption capacity, qmax (72.41 to 82.37 mg.g-1), increases with temperature (20-50 °C). The thermodynamic parameters show a presence of a strong affinity between two phases (liquid-solid) and an endothermic equilibrium adsorption process. However, the phenomenon of the adsorption kinetic follows the pseudo second order kinetic model.

  2. POTENTIAL USE OF WOOL WASTE AS ADSORBENT FOR THE REMOVAL OF ACID DYES FROM WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUCIŞCANU Ingrid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At present, great amounts of raw wool are treated as waste and raise disposal problems. In the sustainable development context , wool is regarded as a biodegradable renewable resource and due to its complex chemical composition and fiber morphology, can find different useful applications. It is the aim of this paper to investigate the potential use of raw wool waste as a non-conventional adsorbent for Acid Red 337(AcR ,currently used for leather and wool dyeing. Two wool-based adsorbents were prepared, namely scoured coarse wool (Wool-S and wool activated with alcoholic solution of sodium hydroxide (Wool-A. Adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, pH and treatment time were factors taken in consideration for the assessment of the sorbate-adsorbent interaction. The removal efficiency (R % is mainly dependent on the solution pH and on the activation treatment applied to wool: at pH 3, the removal efficiency reaches the highest values of 42% on Wool-S and 99% on Wool-A. The adsorption rate is slow and needs almost 6 h to reach equilibrium. The experimental data best fitted the Langmuir equilibrium adsorption model, which proves that the adsorbent possess surface active sites to which the dye sorbate binds in monomolecular layer. Raw wool waste is a potential cheap, biodegradable and effective adsorbent for colored wastewater treatment.

  3. ECONOMIC AND ENERGETICAL ANALYSIS OF IMPROVED WASTE UTILIZATION PLASMA TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei VAMBOL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy and economic evaluation of the improved plasma waste utilization technological process, as well as an expediency substantiation of the use of improved plasma technology by comparing its energy consumption with other thermal methods of utilization. Methodology. Analysis of existing modern and advanced methods of waste management and its impact on environmental safety. Considering of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies. Results. Studies have shown regular gasification ensure greater heating value due to differences, a significant amount of nitrogen than for plasma gasification. From the point of view of minimizing energy and monetary costs and environmental safety more promising is to offer advanced technology for plasma waste. To carry out the energy assessment of the appropriateness of the considered technologies-comparative calculation was carried out at the standard conditions. This is because in the processing of waste produced useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas (94% methane and a fuel gas for heating, suitable for sale that provides cost-effectiveness of this technology. Originality. Shown and evaluated ecological and economic efficiency of proposed improved plasma waste utilization technology compared with other thermal techniques. Practical value. Considered and grounded of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies, namely ordinary gasification and using plasma generators. Proposed plasma waste utilization technology allows to obtain useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas and a fuel gas for heating, which are suitable for sale. Plant for improved plasma waste utilization technological process allows to compensate the daily and seasonal electricity and heat consumption fluctuations by allowing the storage of obtained fuel products.

  4. Utilization of seafood processing wastes for cultivation of the edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to examine the utilization of seafood processing wastes for artificial cultivation of edible mushroom Pleurotus flabellatus in laboratory condition. Utilizing bioconversion technology such as the slow release of nutrients for agricultural based activities like producing mushroom will profitably reduce ...

  5. Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBeck, M.F.

    1981-03-27

    An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

  6. Utilizing waste activated sludge for animal feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beszedits, S.

    1981-01-01

    Activated sludge has a high protein content and is a good source of B-group vitamins and generally also of minerals (Ca, Mg, Fe and K). Propionibacterium freudenreichii can be readily incorporated into the activated sludge to synthesize vitamin B12, particularly high vitamin yields being obtained with sewage mixed with dairy waste. Numerous examples of successful use of activated sludge in animal feeding are given.

  7. Accumulation and subsequent utilization of waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloničný, Jan; Richter, Aleš; Pavloková, Petra

    2016-06-01

    This article aims to introduce a special way of heat accumulation and primary operating characteristics. It is the unique way in which the waste heat from flue gas of biogas cogeneration station is stored in the system of storage tanks, into the heat transfer oil. Heat is subsequently transformed into water, from which is generated the low-pressure steam. Steam, at the time of peak electricity needs, spins the special designed turbine generator and produces electrical energy.

  8. UTILIZATION OF PINEAPPLE WASTE AS CARBON SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Moch Busairi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid pineapple waste contains mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for organic acid fermentation.  The objective of this work is to evaluate the use of pineapple waste as substrate for lactic acid fermentation under variables of aerobic, anaerobic condition and pH controlling. Initial results showed that the liquid pineapple waste can be used as carbon source for lactic acid fermentation using Lactobacillus delbrueckii. In the anaerobic condition growth of bacteria and lactic acid production better than aerobic condition. In the anaerobic condition and the controlled pH  the production of lactic acid are found to be 54.79 g/l  (78.27% yield at  40oC, pH 6, 50 rpm and 70 g/l sugar concentration.  In contrast, only 13.87g/l lactic acid produced if the fermentation pH was not controlled even though the fermentation parameters were kept at the same conditions

  9. Lightweight ceramsites prepared by the solid waste of semiconductor and textile dyeing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Sun, Youbao; Sun, Qingbo; Xiao, Xuejun

    2017-07-01

    High-efficient recycling of solid waste from the semiconductor or textile dyeing industry has been a challenge since these industrial waste not only brings a heavy burden to enterprises but also seriously affects our ecological environment. Here, a feasible method is proposed to recycle this solid waste by transferring it into high value-added ceramsites. They were prepared by using the third grade sand of cutting silicon (TGSCS) and textile dyeing sludge (TDS) as raw materials and composed mainly of SiO2-Al2O3. Through systematic analysis of the experimental results, it was concluded that the optimized ratios of the TGSCS and the TDS should range from 1:1.5 to 1:3, while the sintering temperature should be around 1150∘C. These lightweight ceramsites can have excellent properties of the cylinder compressive strength of 4.65 MPa and bulk density of 477 kg/m3. The potential expansion mechanism was thought to be related to both TGSCS and TDS as they reacted with Fe2O3 impurity to form CO2/CO gases. This work is to prepare lightweight ceramsites and to recycle solid waste.

  10. Kinetics of adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Yunus [Inonu University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)]. E-mail: yonal@inonu.edu.tr

    2006-10-11

    Adsorbent (WA11Zn5) has been prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2}. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption and DFT plus software. Adsorption of three dyes, namely, Methylene Blue (MB), Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV), onto activated carbon in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to contact time, temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of MB, MG and CV have been discussed using six kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the Elovich equation, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Bangham equation, the modified Freundlich equation. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for three dyes. The dyes uptake process was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at earlier stages (before 5 min) and by intraparticle diffusion at later stages (after 5 min). Thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G, {delta}H and {delta}S, have been calculated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient obtained at different temperatures and concentrations. The thermodynamics of dyes-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  11. Dye Removal From Textile Waste Water Through The Adsorption By Pumice Used In Stone Washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körlü Aysegül Ekmekçi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because the waste production is inevitable in almost all industries, the elimination of these wastes is a requirement in terms of environmental regulations and welfare of all the creatures in the future. In this study, the use of the waste pumice stones of a denim washing mill is intended to eliminate the pollutant by a waste material and obtain economic benefits by converting it to the adsorbent. The pollutants in the effluents obtained from three different localisations of waste water treatment system of the same factory were removed through the adsorption. The experimental studies were carried out in three different steps; characterisation of adsorbent before and after adsorption; adsorption isotherm studies and biological oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD measurements. Characterisation studies showed that the waste pumice has almost the same structural properties with unused one except the existence of some organic residues coming from washing process. The results of adsorption studies conducted at the adsorbent concentrations changing from 5 to 35 g/l revealed that the decolourisation was initial dye-concentration dependent. According to the BOD and COD measurements, the supernatants obtained at the end of adsorption could be assumed as somewhat polluted and this result indicates that the organic impurities other than indigo were also removed through the adsorption.

  12. Utilization of cellulosic waste for energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, V.; Mishra, C.; Rao, M.; Seeta, R.; Srinivasan, M. C.; Jagannathan, V.

    1980-01-01

    Bioconversion of cellulose for the production of food or alcohol is of importance for the utilization of a renewable and abundant resource. The hydrolysis of different cellulosic materials by the cellulolytic enzymes produced by Penicillium funiculosum was studied. Fifty to 70% saccharification was obtained from pretreated bagasse, cotton and wood. The effect of different pretreatments to make the cellulose more susceptible to enzyme breakdown was also studied. Alkali pretreatment was found to be effective for most of the substrates. The production of alcohol from the hydrolysates by yeast fermentation without isolation of glucose was studied.

  13. Fermented cassava waste and its utilization in broiler chickens rations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyati

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassava waste is a by-product of cassava flour industry and its amount is increasing following the increasing of cassava flour industry. Its utilization as a feedstuff, is limited by its low protein content. The cassava waste is only utilized as the energy source. One of the alternative technology in improving the utilization of cassava waste as a feedstuff, by improving the nutritive value through fermentation process. Fermentation was carried out by solid substrate fermentation using Aspergillus niger as an inoculant and mixing with urea and ammonium sulphate as inorganic nitrogen sources. The nutritive value of the product was evaluated by feeding trial using 144 “Shaver Stabro” strain 3 days old chicks with 3 treatments i.e. 0 (control, 5.0 and 10.0% fermented cassava waste. The results showed that the true protein content of fermented cassava increased from 2.2 to 18.4%. The inclusion of fermented cassava waste up to 10% in chicken broiler ration for 4 weeks feeding did not affect the feed consumption, bodyweight gain, FCR, weight of liver and gibblets. All parameter results from 10% inclusion were not significantly different (P>0.05 with the control (0% inclusion.

  14. Profitibility analysis of pilot plant utilizing waste cassava peels and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profitibility analysis of pilot plant utilizing waste cassava peels and pulp as substitute for maiz in in animal feed formulation. ... for production of over 2,000 kinds of products, for example, starch syrup, grape sugar, foodstuffs, modified starch, medicaments, cosmetics, shoe polish, dry battery and chemicals for floatation.

  15. A dipeptide-based superhydrogel: Removal of toxic dyes and heavy metal ions from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Nibedita; Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Roy, Subhasish; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    A short peptide-based molecule has been found to form a strong hydrogel at phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.46. The hydrogel has been characterized thoroughly using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), wide angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and rheological analysis. It has been observed from FE-SEM images that entangled nanofiber network is responsible for gelation. Rheological investigation demonstrates that the self-assembly of this synthetic dipeptide results in the formation of mechanically strong hydrogel with storage modulus (G') around 104 Pa. This gel has been used for removing both cationic and anionic toxic organic dyes (Brilliant Blue, Congo red, Malachite Green, Rhodamine B) and metal ions (Co2+ and Ni2+ ) from waste water. Moreover, only a small amount of the gelator is required (less than 1 mg/mL) for preparation of this superhydrogel and even this hydrogel can be reused three times for dye/metal ion absorption. This signifies the importance of the hydrogel towards waste water management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Valorization of Agroindustrial Wastes as Biosorbent for the Removal of Textile Dyes from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Contreras

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to determinate the technical feasibility of using agroindustrial wastes for adsorption of dyes. The pHpzc of Brewer’s spent grains and Orange peel is 5.3 and 3.5, respectively. The equilibrium isotherms of Basic Blue 41, Reactiive Black 5, and Acid Black 1 were carried out without pHs control which ranging between 4 and 5.5. The equilibrium concentrations for both adsorbents were fitted by the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The maximum adsorption capacity measured for Basic Blue 41, Reactive Black 5, and Acid Black 1 was 32.4, 22.3, and 19.8 mg g-1 for Brewer’s spent grains; and 157, 62.6, and 45.5 for orange peel, respectively. The kinetic of process was fitted by the model of pseudo-second order. The constant rate for orange peel decreased to extend the initial concentration of dye increased, obtaining 4.08 * 10−3−0.6 * 10−3 (Basic Blue 41, 2.98 * 10−3−0.36 * 10−3 (Acid Black 1, and 3.40 * 10−3−0.46 * 10−3 g mg−1 min−1 (Reactive Black 5. The best removal efficiency was obtained in orange peel with values started from 63% to 20%. Consequently, according the results obtained there are two positive effects, the reuse of agricultural wastes and its use as low-cost adsorbent of the dyes.

  17. High-throughput screening of PLGA thin films utilizing hydrophobic fluorescent dyes for hydrophobic drug compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Terry W J; Huang, Charlotte L; Kumar, Saranya; Widjaja, Effendi; Chiang Boey, Freddy Yin; Loo, Joachim S C; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2011-10-01

    Hydrophobic, antirestenotic drugs such as paclitaxel (PCTX) and rapamycin are often incorporated into thin film coatings for local delivery using implantable medical devices and polymers such as drug-eluting stents and balloons. Selecting the optimum coating formulation through screening the release profile of these drugs in thin films is time consuming and labor intensive. We describe here a high-throughput assay utilizing three model hydrophobic fluorescent compounds: fluorescein diacetate (FDAc), coumarin-6, and rhodamine 6G that were incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol films. Raman microscopy determined the hydrophobic fluorescent dye distribution within the PLGA thin films in comparison with that of PCTX. Their subsequent release was screened in a high-throughput assay and directly compared with HPLC quantification of PCTX release. It was observed that PCTX controlled-release kinetics could be mimicked by a hydrophobic dye that had similar octanol-water partition coefficient values and homogeneous dissolution in a PLGA matrix as the drug. In particular, FDAc was found to be the optimal hydrophobic dye at modeling the burst release as well as the total amount of PCTX released over a period of 30 days. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Application of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms for the adsorption of azo disperse dye: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianggui

    2012-07-15

    The utilization of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms (BAC) for the removal of Disperse Red 167 (DR167), an azo disperse dye, was investigated. Studies of the properties of the adsorbent, the effect of contact time, the initial pH of the solution, the initial concentration of the dye solution and temperature indicated that a low initial pH or concentration of dye solution favors the adsorption process; temperature exerts a greater effect on the removal of azo disperse red 167 dye from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm data were fitted to five non-linear kinetic and nine non-linear isotherm equations. In addition, the fits were evaluated in terms of the non-linear coefficient, Chi-square test, Marquardt's percent standard deviation error function and small-sample-corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) methodology. The results showed that the AICc analysis was the best statistical tool for analyzing the data, the intra-particle diffusion and the pseudo-first-order models played important roles in the controlling rate step, and the Temkin equation best described the BAC isotherm data. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic, entropy-increasing and physical process. Two types of commercial activated carbon, Filtrasorb 400 and Filtrasorb (F400 and F300), were used as contrast adsorbents. The contrast experiments revealed that BAC exhibits similar properties to F400 and F300. The utilization of bamboo wastes as carbon precursors is feasible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethanol from lignocellulosic wastes with utilization of recombinant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzen, R; Fowler, D E

    1994-01-01

    This article presents the advanced technology that has been developed by BioEnergy International of Gainesville, Florida, utilizing novel recombinant strains of bacteria developed by Lonnie Ingram of the University of Florida. The first commercial applications of these unique fermenting organisms convert 5-carbon sugars, as well as 6-carbon sugars, and oligomers of cellulose (e.g., cellobiose and cellotriose) directly to ethanol. The proposed systems that will be utilized for conversion of agricultural wastes, mixed waste papers, and pulp and paper mill waste in forthcoming commercial installations are now under design. This involves the extensive experience of Raphael Katzen Associates International, Inc. in acid hydrolysis, enzyme production, enzymatic hydrolysis, large-scale fermentation engineering, and distillation/dehydration. Specific examples of this advanced technology will be presented in different applications, namely: 1. Conversion of the hemicellulose content of sugar cane bagasse to 5-carbon sugars by mild-acid prehydrolysis, followed by fermentation of the 5-carbon sugar extract with recombinant Escherichia coli in a commercial installation soon to be under construction in Brazil. This unique process utilizes the surplus hemicellulose fraction of bagasse not required for steam and power generation to produce ethanol, additional to that from the original can juice, which has been converted by conventional sucrose fermentation to ethanol. The process also recovers and converts to ethanol the majority of sucrose normally lost with the bagasse fibers. Resultant beer is enriched in an innovative process to eliminate the need for incremental rectification capacity. 2. Application of this technology to mixed waste paper in Florida, with a moderate loading of newsprint (85% mechanical wood fiber), will involve a mild-acid prehydrolysis, the partial extraction of the 5-carbon sugars produced from hemicellulose as a feedstock for propagation of the recombinant

  20. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Mercè Vilaseca; Víctor López-Grimau; Carmen Gutiérrez-Bouzán

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%–75% of seeds weight) which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. ...

  1. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Mercè; López-Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2014-09-12

    Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%-75% of seeds weight) which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. This waste constitutes a natural coagulant which was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of industrial reactive dyestuff effluents, characterized by alkaline pH, high NaCl content and hydrolyzed dyes. The coagulation yield increased at high NaCl concentration, whereas the pH did not show any significant effect on dye removal. Moringa oleifera showed better results for dye removal than the conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl₃ and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high quality results.

  2. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Vilaseca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%–75% of seeds weight which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. This waste constitutes a natural coagulant which was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of industrial reactive dyestuff effluents, characterized by alkaline pH, high NaCl content and hydrolyzed dyes. The coagulation yield increased at high NaCl concentration, whereas the pH did not show any significant effect on dye removal. Moringa oleifera showed better results for dye removal than the conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl3 and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high quality results.

  3. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Mercè; López-Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%–75% of seeds weight) which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. This waste constitutes a natural coagulant which was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of industrial reactive dyestuff effluents, characterized by alkaline pH, high NaCl content and hydrolyzed dyes. The coagulation yield increased at high NaCl concentration, whereas the pH did not show any significant effect on dye removal. Moringa oleifera showed better results for dye removal than the conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl3 and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high quality results. PMID:28788199

  4. Comparative Studies on Dyeability with Direct, Acid and Reactive Dyes after Chemical Modification of Jute with Mixed Amino Acids Obtained from Extract of Waste Soya Bean Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Nilendu Sekhar; Konar, Adwaita; Roy, Alok Nath; Samanta, Ashis Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Jute fabric was treated with mixed natural amino acids obtained from waste soya bean seed extract for chemical modification of jute for its cataionization and to enhance its dyeability with anionic dyes (like direct, reactive and acid dye) as well enabling soya modified jute for salt free dyeing with anionic reactive dyes maintaining its eco-friendliness. Colour interaction parameters including surface colour strength were assessed and compared for both bleached and soya-modified jute fabric for reactive dyeing and compared with direct and acid dye. Improvement in K/S value (surface colour strength) was observed for soya-modified jute even in absence of salt applied in dye bath for reactive dyes as well as for direct and acid dyes. In addition, reactive dye also shows good dyeability even in acid bath in salt free conditions. Colour fastness to wash was evaluated for bleached and soya-modified jute fabric after dyeing with direct, acid and reactive dyes are reported. Treatment of jute with soya-extracted mixed natural amino acids showed anchoring of some amino/aldemine groups on jute cellulosic polymer evidenced from Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. This amino or aldemine group incorporation in bleached jute causes its cationization and hence when dyed in acid bath for reactive dye (instead of conventional alkali bath) showed dye uptake for reactive dyes. Study of surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of said soya-modified jute as compared to bleached jute was studied and reported.

  5. Comparative Studies on Dyeability with Direct, Acid and Reactive Dyes after Chemical Modification of Jute with Mixed Amino Acids Obtained from Extract of Waste Soya Bean Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Nilendu Sekhar; Konar, Adwaita; Roy, Alok Nath; Samanta, Ashis Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Jute fabric was treated with mixed natural amino acids obtained from waste soya bean seed extract for chemical modification of jute for its cataionization and to enhance its dyeability with anionic dyes (like direct, reactive and acid dye) as well enabling soya modified jute for salt free dyeing with anionic reactive dyes maintaining its eco-friendliness. Colour interaction parameters including surface colour strength were assessed and compared for both bleached and soya-modified jute fabric for reactive dyeing and compared with direct and acid dye. Improvement in K/S value (surface colour strength) was observed for soya-modified jute even in absence of salt applied in dye bath for reactive dyes as well as for direct and acid dyes. In addition, reactive dye also shows good dyeability even in acid bath in salt free conditions. Colour fastness to wash was evaluated for bleached and soya-modified jute fabric after dyeing with direct, acid and reactive dyes are reported. Treatment of jute with soya-extracted mixed natural amino acids showed anchoring of some amino/aldemine groups on jute cellulosic polymer evidenced from Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. This amino or aldemine group incorporation in bleached jute causes its cationization and hence when dyed in acid bath for reactive dye (instead of conventional alkali bath) showed dye uptake for reactive dyes. Study of surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of said soya-modified jute as compared to bleached jute was studied and reported.

  6. Disposal and utilization of broiler slaughter waste by composting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Bharathy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To know the feasibility of hygienic and environmentally safe method of disposal of broiler slaughter house waste with coir pith and caged layer manure. Materials and Methods: Compost bins (4 feet x 4 feet x 4 feet were established with concrete blocks with air holes to facilitate aerobic composting. The broiler slaughter waste and coconut coir pith waste were collected from the local market, free of cost. The caged layer manure available from poultry farms were utilized as manure substrate. Physical properties and chemical composition of ingredients were analyzed and a suitable compost recipe was formulated (USDA-NRCS, 2000. Two control bins were maintained simultaneously, using caged layer manure with coir pith waste and water in a ratio of 0.8:3:1.2 (T and another one bin using caged layer manure alone(T . 2 3 Results: At the end of composting, moisture content, weight and the Volume of the compost were reduced significantly (P<0.01, pH, EC, TDS, total organic carbon and total nitrogen content were also significantly (P<0.01 reduced at the finishing of composting. Calcium, phosphorous and potassium content was progressively increased during composting period. The finished compost contains undetectable level of salmonella. Cowpea and sorghum seeds showed positive germination percentage when this finished compost was used. It indicated that all of the finished compost was free from phytotoxin substances. Conclusion: The results indicated that, composting of slaughter waste combined with coir pith waste may be a hygienic and environmentally safe method of disposal of broiler slaughter house waste [Vet. World 2012; 5(6.000: 359-361

  7. Pretreatment and utilization of waste incineration bottom ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    , however, have had a strong emphasis on lab experiments with little focus on full scale bottom ash upgrading methods. The introduction of regulatory limit values restricting leaching from utilized bottom ashes, has created a need for a better understanding of how lab scale experiences can be utilized....../aging, washing with and without additives, organic matter, sampling techniques, utilization options, and assessment tools. This paper provides an overview of these projects. The main results and experiences are discussed and evaluated with respect to bottom ash upgrading and utilization. Based on this discussion......Within recent years, researchers and authorities have had increasing focus on leaching properties from waste incineration bottom ashes. Researchers have investigated processes such as those related to carbonation, weathering, metal complexation, and leaching control. Most of these investigations...

  8. Enhancing the efficiency of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells utilizing natural dye extracted from Azadirachta indica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahare, Sanjay; Veldurthi, Naresh; Singh, Ranbir; Swarnkar, A. K.; Salunkhe, Manauti; Bhave, Tejashree

    2015-10-01

    The natural dye extracted from Azadirechta indica (neem) was used as a sensitizer in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The fabricated DSSC exhibited open circuit voltage of 0.538 V with 2.81% power conversion efficiency (η) in back-illuminated mode which is higher than that reported in the literature. In order to understand the characteristics of DSSC, systematic study of solar cell component materials was carried out. Anatase TiO2 (30-40 nm) nanoparticles were synthesized by DC arc plasma method and deposited electrophoretically on a flexible titanium (Ti) substrate. A platinum-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate was used as a counter electrode to construct flexible DSSC. The structural and optical behavior of neem-dye sensitized TiO2 thin film has been studied using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy. We have observed that the neem dye gives a very good sensitization effect. In addition, the dye has good prospects as a low-cost and environmental friendly alternative to ruthenium-based sensitizers which are normally used in DSSCs.

  9. Utilization of ash products from combustion of shredded solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, P.F.; Mullen, J.F. (Energy Answers Corp, Albany, NY (US))

    1988-01-01

    One of the major problems with the siting, permitting, construction, and operation of a municipal solid waste-to- energy facility is the disposal of residues. As resource recovery increasingly becomes the disposal option of choice and necessity for municipalities across the country, the foci of environmental concerns has switched from groundwater contamination and inappropriate land use issues associated with landfilling, to air pollution control and residue disposal issues associated with waste combustion. It is suggested that the two separate ash streams can no longer reasonably be considered one and should be analyzed and treated separately, thereby increasing and enhancing the opportunity to recycle from the bottom ash (75 percent) and to focus on a reduced quantity of fly ash material (25 percent) for fixation and reuse or disposal. Such action would conform to the principles of, and the present regulatory trend towards waste minimization. However, there are many regulatory, institutional, and logistical barriers to such promising and seemingly simple waste reduction strategies. While the spirit of solid and hazardous waste legislation may emphasize waste minimization, ambiguities in the regulations have undermined the actual intent, creating an environment of confusion and indecisiveness with respect to treatment and disposal of ash from resource recovery facilities. This book reports on a research and development program to assess the feasibility and possible environmental impacts of utilizing a selected fraction of the bottom ash stream from processed refuse fuel-fired boilers as an aggregate substitute. The purpose of the research program is to develop data on the characteristics of bottom ash during exposure to rain and weathering in proposed applications.

  10. Optimal planning for the sustainable utilization of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santibañez-Aguilar, José Ezequiel [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Ponce-Ortega, José María, E-mail: jmponce@umich.mx [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Betzabe González-Campos, J. [Institute of Chemical and Biological Researches, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Serna-González, Medardo [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Adjunct Faculty at the Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • An optimization approach for the sustainable management of municipal solid waste is proposed. • The proposed model optimizes the entire supply chain network of a distributed system. • A case study for the sustainable waste management in the central-west part of Mexico is presented. • Results shows different interesting solutions for the case study presented. - Abstract: The increasing generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major problem particularly for large urban areas with insufficient landfill capacities and inefficient waste management systems. Several options associated to the supply chain for implementing a MSW management system are available, however to determine the optimal solution several technical, economic, environmental and social aspects must be considered. Therefore, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model for the optimal planning of the supply chain associated to the MSW management system to maximize the economic benefit while accounting for technical and environmental issues. The optimization model simultaneously selects the processing technologies and their location, the distribution of wastes from cities as well as the distribution of products to markets. The problem was formulated as a multi-objective mixed-integer linear programing problem to maximize the profit of the supply chain and the amount of recycled wastes, where the results are showed through Pareto curves that tradeoff economic and environmental aspects. The proposed approach is applied to a case study for the west-central part of Mexico to consider the integration of MSW from several cities to yield useful products. The results show that an integrated utilization of MSW can provide economic, environmental and social benefits.

  11. Parametric and kinetic study of adsorptive removal of dyes from aqueous solutions using an agriculture waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, imane; el hajjaji, souad; abourouh, imane; Kitane, Said; Dahchour, Abdelmalek; El M'Rabet, Mohammadine

    2017-04-01

    Wastewater treatment is the subject of several studies through decades. Interest is continuously oriented to provide cheaper and efficient methods of treatment. Several methods of treatment exit including coagulation flocculation, filtration, precipitation, ozonation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, advanced oxidation process. The use of these methods proved limited because of their high investment and operational cost. Adsorption can be an efficient low-cost process to remove pollutants from wastewater. This method of treatment calls for an solid adsorbent which constitutes the purification tool. Agricultural wastes have been widely exploited in this case .As we know the agricultural wastes are an important source of water pollution once discharged into the aquatic environment (river, sea ...). The valorization of such wastes and their use allows the prevention of this problem with an economic and environment benefits. In this context our study aimed testing the wastewater treatment capacity by adsorption onto holocellulose resulting from the valorization of an agriculture waste. In this study, methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) are selected as models pollutants for evaluating the holocellulose adsorbent capacity. The kinetics of adsorption is performed using UV-visible spectroscopy. In order to study the effect of the main parameters for the adsorption process and their mutual interaction, a full factorial design (type nk) has been used.23 full factorial design analysis was performed to screen the parameters affecting dye removal efficiency. Using the experimental results, a linear mathematical model representing the influence of the different parameters and their interactions was obtained. The parametric study showed that efficiency of the adsorption system (Dyes/ Holocellulose) is mainly linked to pH variation. The best yields were observed for MB at pH=10 and for MO at pH=2.The kinetic data was analyzed using different models , namely , the pseudo

  12. Optimal planning for the sustainable utilization of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibañez-Aguilar, José Ezequiel; Ponce-Ortega, José María; Betzabe González-Campos, J; Serna-González, Medardo; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M

    2013-12-01

    The increasing generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major problem particularly for large urban areas with insufficient landfill capacities and inefficient waste management systems. Several options associated to the supply chain for implementing a MSW management system are available, however to determine the optimal solution several technical, economic, environmental and social aspects must be considered. Therefore, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model for the optimal planning of the supply chain associated to the MSW management system to maximize the economic benefit while accounting for technical and environmental issues. The optimization model simultaneously selects the processing technologies and their location, the distribution of wastes from cities as well as the distribution of products to markets. The problem was formulated as a multi-objective mixed-integer linear programing problem to maximize the profit of the supply chain and the amount of recycled wastes, where the results are showed through Pareto curves that tradeoff economic and environmental aspects. The proposed approach is applied to a case study for the west-central part of Mexico to consider the integration of MSW from several cities to yield useful products. The results show that an integrated utilization of MSW can provide economic, environmental and social benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption of rhodamine B and methylene blue dyes using waste of seeds of Aleurites Moluccana, a low cost adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Luiza Postai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Removal of the cationic dyes rhodamine B (RhB and methylene blue (MB by waste seeds Aleurites moluccana (WAM was studied in a batch system. The adsorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, point of zero charge measurement, and the Boehm titration method. The effects of contact time and pH were investigated for the removal of cationic dyes. An increase in pH from 3 to 9 was accompanied by an approximately three-fold increase in the amount of dye adsorbed. The adsorptions equilibrium values were obtained and analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, and Redlich–Peterson equations, the Sips isotherm being the one that showed the best correlation with the experimental values. The maximum adsorption capacities of the dyes were 178 mg/g for the MB and 117 mg/g for the RhB. The kinetic sorption was evaluated by the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models, where it was observed that sorption follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The study of thermodynamics showed that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results indicate that waste seeds of A. moluccana could be used as a low cost material for the removal of cationic dyes from wastewater.

  14. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM COW WASTE AND UTILIZATION OF BIOGAS WASTE AS ORGANIC FERTILIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Science and technology activities for cattle ranchers and salacca farmers was done with the aim to utilize added-value of cattle waste to energy needs and use of biogas waste as organic fertilizer on salacca crops. Implementation of activities have been done at cattle ranchers in the village of Mlambangan, one of village on Berbah Sub-district at Sleman district in the form of demonstration plots and the salacca of the farmer’s crop in the village of Margososno, one of village on Srumbung Sub-district, at Magelang District, in the form of training and implementation in the field. Results of Demonstration Plot creation digester quite successful, because the material is available in sufficient and sustainable as well as the active force. The results of laboratory tests on the levels of N, P, and K from the waste produced biogas respectively 0.07 percent, 0.29 percent, and 3.21 percent, while for solid waste cow respectively 1.64 percent, 0, 99 percent, and 4.38 percent. Utilization of waste at biogas plants responded positively salacca by farmers, given the limited supply of organic fertilizer in the planting location of salacca, this is due to the limited cattle in the planting location of salacca.

  15. A dye sensitized solar cell using natural counter electrode and natural dye derived from mangosteen peel waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiaugree, Wasan; Lowpa, Seksan; Towannang, Madsakorn; Rutphonsan, Phikun; Tangtrakarn, Apishok; Pimanpang, Samuk; Maiaugree, Prapen; Ratchapolthavisin, Nattawat; Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Jarernboon, Wirat; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-10-01

    Mangosteen peel is an inedible portion of a fruit. We are interested in using these residues as components of a dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Carbonized mangosteen peel was used with mangosteen peel dye as a natural counter electrode and a natural photosensitizer, respectively. A distinctive mesoporous honeycomb-like carbon structure with a rough nanoscale surface was found in carbonized mangosteen peels. The efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell using carbonized mangosteen peel was compared to that of DSSCs with Pt and PEDOT-PSS counter electrodes. The highest solar conversion efficiency (2.63%) was obtained when using carbonized mangosteen peel and an organic disulfide/thiolate (T2/T-) electrolyte.

  16. Utilization of Agricultural Wastes in Stabilization of Landfill Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidzam Rahmat Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA and Rice Husk Ash (RHA are local agricultural waste material from Palm Oil Industry and from Paddy Industry in Malaysia. Currently, the disposal of these ashes from a burning process is a problem to both industries, and hence leads to environmental pollution. The main aim of this research was to investigate the potential of utilizing POFA and RHA as sustainable stabilizer material as partial replacement of traditional one which is lime and Portland Cement (PC. Laboratory investigations were carried out to establish the potential utilization of Malaysian Agricultural wastes POFA and RHA in stabilizing Teluk Kapas Landfill soil. Landfill soil on its own and combination with laterite clay soil were stabilized using POFA or RHA either on its own or in combination with Lime or Portland Cement (PC. The traditional stabilizers of lime or Portland Cement (PC were used as controls. Compacted cylinder test specimens were made at typical stabilizer contents and moist cured for up to 60 days prior to testing for compressive and water absorption tests. The results obtained showed that landfill soil combined with laterite clay (50:50 stabilized with 20% RHA:PC (50:50and POFA: PC (50:50 recorded the highest values of compressive strength compared to the other compositions of stabilizers and soils. However, when the amount of POFA and RHA increased in the system the compressive strength values of the samples tends to increase. These results suggest technological, economic as well as environmental advantages of using POFA and RHA and similar industrial by-products to achieve sustainable infrastructure development with near zero industrial waste.

  17. Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus lamk) wood waste as a textile natural dye by micowave-assisted extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadariyah, Lailatul; Gala, Selfina; Widoretno, Dhaniar Rulandri; Kunhermanti, Delita; Bhuana, Donny S.; Sumarno, Mahfud, Mahfud

    2017-05-01

    The development of technology causes most of textile industries in Indonesia prefer to use synthetic dyes in the fabric dyeing process. In fact, synthetic dyes is able to have negative effect since it is is toxic to the health of workers and environment. To resolve this issues, one way to do is to use natural dyes. One of untapped potential in Indonesia is wood waste of jackfruit from furniture industry. Jackfruit wood itself containing dyestuffs which gives yellow color pigment so that it can be used as an alternative source of natural dyes. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of extraction time, mass to solvent volume ratio, and microwave power to yield of dyes. The extract of dye analyzed by UV-Visible Spectrophotometer and GC-MS, along the coloring and endurance tests of natural dyes on fabric and compare it with synthetic dyes. In this research, material is going to be extracted is the wood of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus lamk) with material size between 35 mesh - 60 mesh. The extraction process is done by using ethanol 96%. Extraction using MAE is carried out at the ratio of materials to solvent of 0,02-0,1 g/mL, the microwave power of 100-800 Watt, and the extraction time of 10-90 minutes. The conclusion is at microwave power of 400 Watt, material to solvent ratio of the 0,02 g/mL, the yield is 3,39% while at microwave power of 600 Watt, material to solvent ratio of the 0,02 g/mL, the yield is 3,67% with extraction time of 30 minutes. The highest recovery from ethanol 96% solvent is 60,41%. The result of UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and GC-MS test show that there is a chromophore compound in the extract of natural dye. The test results show the natural dyes of jackfruit wood can be used to coloring on the textile because it can gives staining result permanently.

  18. Verification of structures for utilization of waste multicomponent electrolytic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suljkanović Midhat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of process structure of thermal utilization of mineral mat­ters from waste streams, is a multi-variant problem. These processes are energy-intensive and it is very important to determine the process structures for realization of the required processes in the starting phases of process development. The structure of the process system, beside the system equilibrium, depends on vector parameters of the feed stream. In this work a newly developed methodology for determination of process variants of thermal utilization of mineral salts from a hypothetical three-component AX-BX-H2O system is presented. The methodology is created on starting synthesis problem for which a set of types of process units for realization process and type of desired crystal product is determined. The methodology includes process decomposition in two subsystems: concentration (saturation subsystem and crystallization subsystem. Concentration of feed stream is realized in isothermal conditions of water evaporation and crystallization process using various techniques: isothermal water evaporation, cooling of solution in vacuum and cooling of solution through contact surface. Determination of physical feasible processes is performed by simulation of the process superstructure in which each particular process structure is a special case of the created process superstructure. Realization of mentioned activity is provided by creating algorithms and programming software (process simulator in which the equation system of the superstructure mathematical model is solved for various variants of set of specified variables. The created methodology and possibilities of the created process simulator are presented in the illustrative case study of waste stream utilization of the NaCl-KCl-H2O system. In addition to this, for conditions of total heat integration of subsystems is demonstrated that a small change of salt concentration of feed stream can require transfer non

  19. The use of waste mussel shells for the adsorption of dyes and heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Chrysi A.; Krey, Grigorios; Stamatis, Nikolaos; Kallaniotis, Argyris

    2016-04-01

    Mussel culture is very important sector of the Greek agricultural economy. The majority of mussel culture activities take place in the area of Central Macedonia, Greece, 60% of total mussel production in Greece producing almost 12 tons of waste mussels shells on a daily basis. Currently there is no legislation concerning the disposal of mussel shells. In the present study the waste shells were used for the removal of dyes and heavy metals from aqueous solutions while powdered mussel shells were added in activated sludge processes for the removal of hexavalent chromium. Mussel shells were cleaned, dried and then crushed in order to form a powder. Powdered mussels shells were used in standard adsorption experiments for the removal of methylene blue and methyl red as well as for the removal of Cr (VI), Cd and Cu. Moreover the powdered mussel shells were added in laboratory scale activated sludge reactors treating synthetic wastewater with hexavalent chromium, in order investigate the effects in activated sludge processes and their potential attribution to the removal of hexavalent chromium. Adsorption experiments indicated almost 100% color removal, while adsorption was directly proportional to the amount of powdered mussel shells added in each case. The isotherms calculated for the case of methylene blue indicated similar adsorption capacity and properties to those of the commercially available activated carbon SAE 2, Norit. High removal efficiencies were observed for the metals, especially in the case of chromium and copper. The addition of powdered mussel shells in the activated sludge processes enhanced the removal of chromium and phosphorus, while enabled the formation of heavier activated sludge flocs and thus enhanced the settling properties of the activated sludge.

  20. Nonspontaneous and multilayer adsorption of malachite green dye by Acacia nilotica waste with dominance of physisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M T; Alazba, A A; Shafiq, M

    2017-10-01

    Adsorption of the hazardous dye malachite green (MG) by Acacia nilotica (AN) waste was investigated. Batch process variables for the adsorption of MG by AN were optimized. The mechanisms involved in the adsorption of MG by AN were explored using isotherms and kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated to determine the spontaneity and thermal nature of the MG adsorption reaction. The maximum equilibrium adsorption capacity of AN was found to be 113.26 mg/g at 30 °C. The MG adsorption data revealed that AN adsorbs MG by multilayer adsorption, as shown by the better fit of the data to the Freundlich and Halsey models (R 2 = 0.99) rather than to the Langmuir model. Multilayer adsorption involves physisorption, which was confirmed by the E value (mean free energy of adsorption) of the Dubinin-Radushkevich model (6.52 kJ/mol). Surface diffusion was found to be the main driving force for MG adsorption by AN. The MG adsorption reaction was endothermic, based on the enthalpy, and was controlled by the entropy of the system in the T 1 temperature range (30 to 40 °C), while the opposite trend was observed in the T 2 range (40 to 50 °C). Moreover, MG adsorption by AN was found to be nonspontaneous at all temperatures.

  1. Utilization of waste heat from aluminium electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Radovan; Gavlas, Stanislav; Lenhard, Richard; Malcho, Milan; Sedlak, Veroslav; Teie, Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    During the aluminium production, 50% of the supplied energy is consumed by the chemical process, and 50% of the supplied energy is lost in form of heat. Heat losses are necessary to maintain a frozen side ledge to protect the side walls, so extra heat has to be wasted. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the process, it is necessary to significantly lower the heat losses dissipated by the furnace's external surface. Goodtech Recovery Technology (GRT) has developed a technology based on the use of heat pipes for utilization energy from the waste heat produced in the electrolytic process. Construction of condenser plays important role for efficient operation of energy systems. The condensation part of the heat pipe is situated on top of the heating zone. The thermal oil is used as cooling medium in the condenser. This paper analyses the effect of different operation condition of thermal oil to thermal performance. From the collected results it is obvious that the larger mass flow and higher temperature cause better thermal performance and lower pressure drop.

  2. Technical and economic aspects of waste heat utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolen Slavomir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the following presentation is the comparison and evaluation of the conditions for waste heat utilization in Germany and in Poland. This paper presents synthetically the results of economic analysis of the different technical variants. The employment of heat pumps and other heat transformers, respectively, can reduce the energy consumption, but using of those technical possibilities depends mainly on the economic aspects. The main parameters of the financial calculations were the energy and equipment costs but beyond it a number of other factors were also considered and compared, for example calculation interests, profit tax level and similar. Four different technical alternatives were analyzed, it is using of absorption heat pump, compression heat pump, heat transformer (absorption, and a special combined system with gas motor to drive of heat pump compressor. The capital value as main result of the investigations is in Poland generally lower because of relatively high investment cost and lower energy prices compared to the situation in Germany and West Europe. The basis for the presented comparative analysis was an industrial project in Germany which effected in development of concepts for waste heat using. .

  3. ECOLOGICAL AND TECHNOLOGYCAL ASPECTS OF ASH AND SLAG WASTES UTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigation focused on the utilization of ash and slag wastes (ASW in Russia including investigation of chemical and physical properties of ASW and processing products. Many factors influence the technological properties of ash and slag materials: naturals, processes and environments. The integrated treatment of ash and slag wastes of both stored and re-formed types will allow obtaining the following commercial products: coal concentrate, iron concentrate, aluminosilicate cenospheres, aluminosilicate product. In this study we have analyzed the methods for separation of ASW iron-containing part using the different types of the magnetic separation from the ash and slag material from one of the combined heat and power plant (CHPP in the Russian Far East Federal District. The greatest interest is the dry magnetic separation with travelling electromagnetic field. The subject of research was a sample taken from one of ash dump of CHPP in the Far East. In the study iron concentrate containing Fetotal = 64% was obtained recovery 68% in the low intensity (up to 5 kOe travelling magnetic field.

  4. Synthesis of low-cost porous ceramic microspheres from waste gangue for dye adsorption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu Yan; Yiming Pan; Lu Wang; Jingjing Liu; Zaijuan Zhang; Wenlong Huo; Jinlong Yang; Yong Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... Effects of calcination temperature on phase and microstructure evolution, specific surface area, pore structure, and dye adsorption mechanism of the microspheres were investigated systematically...

  5. Fabrication of the novel hydrogel based on waste corn stalk for removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongzhuo; Zhu, Baodong; Cao, Bo; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-11-01

    The novel hydrogel based on waste corn stalk was synthetized by aqueous solution polymerization technique with functional monomers in the presence of organic montmorillonite (OMMT) under ultrasonic. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to research the effect of initial dye concentration, the dosage of hydrogel, stirring speed, contact time and temperature on the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) dye. The adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, which confirmed that it should be a chemical process. Furthermore, we ascertained the rate controlling step by establishing the intraparticle diffusion model and the liquid film diffusion model. The adsorption and synthesis mechanisms were vividly depicted in our work as well. Structural and morphological characterizations by virtue of FTIR, FESEM, and Biomicroscope supported the relationship between the adsorption performance and material's microstructure. This research is a valuable contribution for the environmental protection, which not only converts waste corn stalks into functional materials, but improves the removal of organic dye from sewage water.

  6. Textile dyes removal from aqueous solution using Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste as adsorbent and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Cid, A A; Velázquez-Ugalde, I; Herrera-González, A M; García-Serrano, J

    2013-11-30

    For this research, three different adsorbents, one untreated and two chemically activated, were prepared from Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste. By the construction of adsorption isotherms, its adsorption capabilities and the viability of its use in the removal of textile basic and direct type dyes were determined. It was found that the adsorbent with the most adsorption capacity for basic dyes was the one activated with NaClO, and, for direct dyes, it was the one activated with NaOH. Langmuir and Freundlich equations isotherms were applied for the analysis of the experimental data. It was found that the Freundlich model best described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption capacity was improved when the pH of the dye solution had an acid value. The specific surface area of the adsorbents was calculated by means of methylene blue adsorption at 298 K to stay within a range between 348 and 643 m(2) g(-1). The FTIR spectroscopic characterization technique, the SEM, the point of zero charge, and the elemental analysis show the chemical and physical characteristics of the studied adsorbents, which confirm the adsorption results obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recycling food waste to clean water: the use of a biodigester's residual liquid inoculum (RLI) to decolourise textile azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganha de Almeida, A C; Backhaus, J; Corso, C R

    2018-01-01

    A residual liquid inoculum (RLI) was used to decolourise solutions of Acid Yellow 25 (AY25) and Direct Violet 51 (DV51) azo dyes. The RLI was obtained through anaerobic digestion of food waste from a university restaurant. The concentration of bacteria in the RLI was 8.45 × 10 7 CFU mL -1 . Dye solutions (50 μg mL -1 ) were inoculated with the RLI (20% v/v) and incubated at room temperature. The decolourisation studies took place at microaerophilic and in-batch conditions and at pH = 2.50. Initially, the dyes were taken up from solution by biosorption; maximum colour removal was achieved after 3 hours of incubation, with 88.66% for AY25 and 77.65% of DV51. At prolonged incubation times (3-96 hours) decolourisation was mainly attributed to biodegradation of the azo solutions, with breakage of the azo bond, as detected by UV-VIS spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis. Analysis of UV-VIS absorption rates of dyes showed, however, that AY25 was more readily biodegradable whereas DV51 was more recalcitrant to the action of the RLI.

  8. INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

    2005-08-01

    An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never

  9. UTILIZATION OF WASTE PLASTIC BOTTLES IN ASPHALT MIXTURE

    OpenAIRE

    TAHER BAGHAEE MOGHADDAM; MOHAMED REHAN KARIM; MEHRTASH SOLTANI

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, large amounts of waste materials are being produced in the world. One of the waste materials is plastic bottle. Generating disposable plastic bottles is becoming a major problem in many countries. Using waste plastic as a secondary material in construction projects would be a solution to overcome the crisis of producing large amount of waste plastics in one hand and improving the structure’s characteristics such as resistance against cracking on the other hand. This study aimed to i...

  10. Utilization of waste glycerin to fuelling of spark ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmasiak, Z.; Pietras, D.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discusses a possibilities of usage a simple alcohols to fuelling of spark ignition engines. Methanol and blends of methanol with glycerin, being a waste product from production of bio-components to fuels based on rapeseed oil, have been used in course of the investigations. The main objective of the research was to determine possibilities of utilization of glycerin to blending of engine fuels. The investigations have been performed using the Fiat 1100 MPI engine. Parameters obtained with the engine powered by pure methanol and by methanol- glycerin mixtures with 10÷30%vol content of glycerin were compared to parameters of the engine fuelled conventionally with the E95 gasoline. The investigations have shown increase of overall efficiency of the engine run on pure methanol with 2.5÷5.0%, and run on the mixture having 10% addition of glycerin with 2.0÷7.8%. Simultaneously, fuelling of the engine with the investigated alcohols results in reduced concentration of toxic components in exhaust gases like: CO, THC and NOx, as well as the greenhouse gas CO2.

  11. Waste hydrogen utilization project receives $12 M in federal support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-10-01

    This article announced that $12.2 million dollars in federal funding support, over a 3 year period, will be made available to Sacre-Davey Innovations to support the development and demonstration of the Integrated Waste Hydrogen Utilization Project (IWHUP). The IWHUP is a clean energy project that will develop and demonstrate the feasibility of using hydrogen generated as a byproduct of a sodium chlorate manufacturing plant in North Vancouver. Greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuels will be reduced by using purified hydrogen to fuel vehicles. The full hydrogen value chain will also be demonstrated by the IWHUP. This includes the supply, storage, distribution and use of hydrogen. Eight light-duty trucks running on hydrogen will be included in the demonstration, along with 4 public transit buses converted to run on a combination of compressed natural gas and hydrogen, and a fuel cell system operating on hydrogen while providing electrical power to a car wash. The newsletter article discussed the funding leveraged from various sources as well as the names of project participants. The article also mentioned that the IWHUP fuel station in North Vancouver will play a key role in sustainable transportation demonstrations during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Vancouver.

  12. Environmentally and economically efficient utilization of coal processing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2017-11-15

    High concentrations of hazardous anthropogenic emissions (sulfur, nitrogen and carbon oxides) from solid fuel combustion in coal burning plants cause environmental problems that have been especially pressing over the last 20-30 years. A promising solution to these problems is a switch from conventional pulverized coal combustion to coal-water slurry fuel. In this paper, we pay special attention to the environmental indicators characterizing the combustion of different coal ranks (gas, flame, coking, low-caking, and nonbaking coals) and coal-water slurry fuels based on the coal processing waste - filter cakes. There have been no consistent data so far on the acceptable intervals for the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur (SOx), nitrogen (NOx) and carbon (CO, CO2) oxides. Using a specialized combustion chamber and gas analyzing system, we have measured the concentrations of typical coal and filter-cake-based CWS combustion products. We have also calculated the typical combustion heat of the fuels under study and measured the ratio between environmental and energy attributes. The research findings show that the use of filter cakes in the form of CWS is even better than coals in terms of environment and economy. Wide utilization of filter cakes solves many environmental problems: the areas of contaminated sites shrink, anthropogenic emissions decrease, and there is no need to develop new coal mines anymore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorptive removal of dye using biochar derived from residual algae after in-situ transesterification: Alternate use of waste of biodiesel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Piyushi; Subramanian, K A; Dastidar, M G

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this present study was to utilize the residual biomass (DB) of Spirulina platensis algae, left after in-situ transesterification, for biochar preparation. This is a solid waste residue of biodiesel industry. The biochar (BC) prepared was examined for its capacity to adsorb congo red dye from the aqueous solution. The results were compared with other adsorbents used in the study such as commercial activated carbon (AC), original algae biomass (AB) and DB. The results of proximate analysis of BC showed the decrease in the percentage of volatile matter and an increase in fixed carbon content compared to DB. The physico-chemical properties of BC were studied using elemental analysis, SEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. The AC and BC adsorbents showed better performance in removing 85.4% and 82.6% of dye respectively from solution compared to AB (76.6%) and DB (78.1%). The effect of initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and pH of solution on the adsorption phenomena was studied by conducting the batch adsorption experiments. The highest specific uptake for biochar was observed at acidic pH of 2 with 0.2 g/100 ml of adsorbent dosage and 90 mg/l of initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to three isotherms, namely Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin. Freundlich model proved to show the best suited results with value of correlation coefficient of 99.12%. Thus, the application of DB for production of biochar as potential adsorbent supports sustainability of algae biodiesel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Waste printed circuit board recycling techniques and product utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, Pejman; Xu, Meng [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Lin, Carol S.K. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Hui, Chi-Wai [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); McKay, Gordon, E-mail: kemckayg@ust.hk [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Division of Sustainable Development, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • There is a major environmental issue about the printed circuit boards throughout the world. • Different physical and chemical recycling techniques have been reviewed. • Nonmetallic fraction of PCBs is the unwanted face of this waste stream. • Several applications of the nonmetallic fraction of waste PCBs have been introduced. - Abstract: E-waste, in particular waste PCBs, represents a rapidly growing disposal problem worldwide. The vast diversity of highly toxic materials for landfill disposal and the potential of heavy metal vapors and brominated dioxin emissions in the case of incineration render these two waste management technologies inappropriate. Also, the shipment of these toxic wastes to certain areas of the world for eco-unfriendly “recycling” has recently generated a major public outcry. Consequently, waste PCB recycling should be adopted by the environmental communities as an ultimate goal. This article reviews the recent trends and developments in PCB waste recycling techniques, including both physical and chemical recycling. It is concluded that the physical recycling techniques, which efficiently separate the metallic and nonmetallic fractions of waste PCBs, offer the most promising gateways for the environmentally-benign recycling of this waste. Moreover, although the reclaimed metallic fraction has gained more attention due to its high value, the application of the nonmetallic fraction has been neglected in most cases. Hence, several proposed applications of this fraction have been comprehensively examined.

  15. Removal of reagent dyes from textile waste waters by coagulation; Remocion de colorantes reactivos por coagulacion en aguas residuales textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Olmo, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica. Ciudad de La Habana. Cuba (Cuba)

    1998-12-31

    The textile wastes are highly colored, for this reason the coagulation methods are used as a mean of color elimination in some cases. Some coloring reactive (such as vinilsulfonic) are resistant to this process, this fact is imputed to their molecular structure. In this paper, it is shown that reason of the resistance to coagulation process is the presence of the SO{sub 4} ``2- ions, which are generally present in the formulations of the dyeing baths. Also other removal alternative using MgSO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2} is presented. (Author) 7 refs.

  16. Textile dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Guaratini, Cláudia C. I. [UNESP; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin [UNESP

    2000-01-01

    A dye is a colored substance used to impart permanent color to other substances. Its most important use is in coloring textile fibers and fabrics. The removal of colour from dyehouse waste waters is currently a major problem in the textile sector. This paper provides an overview of the treatment technologies that can currently be used by the textile processor and the developments over the past decade with respect to the toxicological and ecotoxicological properties of synthetic organic dyes.

  17. An overview on characterization, utilization and leachate analysis of biomedical waste incinerator ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajor, Anita; Xaxa, Monika; Mehta, Ratika; Kunal

    2012-10-15

    Solid waste management is one of the major global environmental issues, as there is continuous increase in industrial globalization and generation of waste. Solid wastes encompass the heterogeneous mass of throwaways from the urban community as well as the homogeneous accumulations of agricultural, industrial and mineral wastes. Biomedical waste pose a significant impact on health and environment. A proper waste management system should be required to dispose hazardous biomedical waste and incineration should be the best available technology to reduce the volume of this hazardous waste. The incineration process destroys pathogens and reduces the waste volume and weight but leaves a solid material called biomedical waste ash as residue which increases the levels of heavy metals, inorganic salts and organic compounds in the environment. Disposal of biomedical waste ash in landfill may cause contamination of groundwater as metals are not destroyed during incineration. The limited space and the high cost for land disposal led to the development of recycling technologies and the reuse of ash in different systems. In order to minimize leaching of its hazardous components into the environment several studies confirmed the successful utilization of biomedical waste ash in agriculture and construction sector. This paper presents the overview on the beneficial use of ash in agriculture and construction materials and its leachate characteristics. This review also stressed on the need to further evaluate the leachate studies of the ashes and slag for their proper disposal and utilization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Industrial applications study. Volume IV. Industrial plant surveys. Final report. [Waste heat recovery and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence M.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the waste heat recovery and utilization potential in the manufacturing portion of the industrial sector is presented. The scope of this initial phase addressed the feasibility of obtaining in-depth energy information in the industrial sector. Within this phase, the methodology and approaches for data gathering and assessment were established. Using these approaches, energy use and waste heat profiles were developed at the 2-digit level; with this data, waste heat utilization technologies were evaluated. This study represents an important first step in the evaluation of waste heat recovery potential.

  19. Utilization of magnetically responsive cereal by-product for organic dye removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldíková, Eva; Politi, D.; Maděrová, Zdeňka; Pospíšková, K.; Sidiras, D.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2016), s. 2204-2214 ISSN 0022-5142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13709S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : modified rice straw * aqueous-solution * methylene-blue * wheat-straw * activated carbon * cost adsorbents * crystal violet * anionic dyes * adsorption * acid * barley straw * magnetic modification * magnetic adsorbent * microwave-assisted synthesis * organic dyes Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2016

  20. Utilization of Wastes as an Alternative Energy Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-19

    Apr 19, 2013 ... ABSTRACT. Generally, the greater the economic prosperity and the higher percentage of urban population, the greater the amount of solid waste produced. Reduction in the volume and mass of solid waste is a crucial issue especially in the light of limited availability of final disposal sites in many parts of ...

  1. Utilization of Wastes as an Alternative Energy Source for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To meet the rising demand for energy and to address environmental concerns, a conversion from conventional energy systems to renewable resources is essential. For the sustainability of human civilization, an environmentally techno – economically feasible waste treatment method is very important to treat waste. Several ...

  2. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  3. Waste printed circuit board recycling techniques and product utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Pejman; Xu, Meng; Lin, Carol S K; Hui, Chi-Wai; McKay, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    E-waste, in particular waste PCBs, represents a rapidly growing disposal problem worldwide. The vast diversity of highly toxic materials for landfill disposal and the potential of heavy metal vapors and brominated dioxin emissions in the case of incineration render these two waste management technologies inappropriate. Also, the shipment of these toxic wastes to certain areas of the world for eco-unfriendly "recycling" has recently generated a major public outcry. Consequently, waste PCB recycling should be adopted by the environmental communities as an ultimate goal. This article reviews the recent trends and developments in PCB waste recycling techniques, including both physical and chemical recycling. It is concluded that the physical recycling techniques, which efficiently separate the metallic and nonmetallic fractions of waste PCBs, offer the most promising gateways for the environmentally-benign recycling of this waste. Moreover, although the reclaimed metallic fraction has gained more attention due to its high value, the application of the nonmetallic fraction has been neglected in most cases. Hence, several proposed applications of this fraction have been comprehensively examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Utilization of organic resources in paper pulp waste liquid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaojia; Liu, Jinghong; Yang, Guidi; Huang, Biao

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, one hundred percent of condensed sulfate paper pulp waste liquid was used as the raw material of adhesive, and the activation of its lignin as well as the improving effects of phenol formaldehyde resin and polyfunctional aqueous polymer isocyanate (PAPI) were studied. The results showed that adding formaldehyde to the waste liquid could increase the reactivity of contained lignin, and adding 30% phenol formaldehyde resin or 20% PAPI could make the waste liquid in place of pure phenol formaldehyde resin for producing class I plywood. Furthermore, the cost could be reduced by 55.5% and 49.0%, respectively, in comparing with pure phenol formaldehyde resin. This approach fully used the organic resources in paper pulp waste liquid, reduced environment pollution at the same time, and had unexceptionable economic, social and ecological benefits. The feasibility of preparing adhesives from paper pulp waste liquid was also analyzed by infrared spectrum.

  5. Utilization of Aluminum Waste with Hydrogen and Heat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakovskaya, O. A.; Meshkov, E. A.; Vlaskin, M. S.; Shkolnokov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2017-10-01

    A concept of energy generation via hydrogen and heat production from aluminum containing wastes is proposed. The hydrogen obtained by oxidation reaction between aluminum waste and aqueous solutions can be supplied to fuel cells and/or infrared heaters for electricity or heat generation in the region of waste recycling. The heat released during the reaction also can be effectively used. The proposed method of aluminum waste recycling may represent a promising and cost-effective solution in cases when waste transportation to recycling plants involves significant financial losses (e.g. remote areas). Experiments with mechanically dispersed aluminum cans demonstrated that the reaction rate in alkaline solution is high enough for practical use of the oxidation process. In theexperiments aluminum oxidation proceeds without any additional aluminum activation.

  6. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Mixed Waste Utilizing the Oak Ridge Broad Spectrum Contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Heacker, F. K.; Cunningham, J.; Westich, B.

    2003-02-25

    To meet the requirements of the State of Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner's Order for treatment of mixed low level wastes, Oak Ridge has utilized commercial treatment companies to treat and dispose mixed waste. Over the past year, Oak Ridge has shipped organic-contaminated mixed waste for treatment to meet milestones under the Site Treatment Plan. Oak Ridge has established contracts with commercial treatment companies accessible by all DOE sites for treatment of a wide range of mixed wastes. The paper will describe and summarize the activities involved in treating and disposing of organic-contaminated mixed waste utilizing DOE complex-wide contracts and the treatment and disposal activities required. This paper will describe the case history of treatment of several organic-contaminated mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation requiring treatment prior to disposal. The paper will include waste category information, implementation activities, and contract access. The paper will discuss the specifics of the mixed waste treatment including waste characteristics, treatment process and equipment utilized, and treatment results. Additional information will be provided on task order development, waste profiling, treatment pricing, and the disposal process.

  7. UTILIZATION OF WASTE PLASTIC BOTTLES IN ASPHALT MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAHER BAGHAEE MOGHADDAM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, large amounts of waste materials are being produced in the world. One of the waste materials is plastic bottle. Generating disposable plastic bottles is becoming a major problem in many countries. Using waste plastic as a secondary material in construction projects would be a solution to overcome the crisis of producing large amount of waste plastics in one hand and improving the structure’s characteristics such as resistance against cracking on the other hand. This study aimed to investigate the effects of adding plastic bottles in road pavement. Marshall properties as well as specific gravity of asphalt mixture containing different percentages of plastic bottles were evaluated. Besides, Optimum Asphalt Content (OAC was calculated for each percentages of plastic bottles used in the mix. The stiffness and fatigue characteristics of mixture were assessed at OAC value. Results showed that the stability and flow values of asphalt mixture increased by adding waste crushed plastic bottle into the asphalt mixture. Further, it was shown that the bulk specific gravity and stiffness of mixtures increased by adding lower amount of plastic bottles; however, adding higher amounts of plastic resulted in lower specific gravity and mix stiffness. In addition, it was concluded that the mixtures containing waste plastic bottles have lower OAC values compared to the conventional mixture, and this may reduce the amount of asphalt binder can be used in road construction projects. Besides, the mixtures containing waste plastic showed significantly greater fatigue resistance than the conventional mixture.

  8. enhancing pineaple waste utilization as animalfeed through nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rose

    2013-10-23

    Oct 23, 2013 ... The enrichment by microbial fermentation of agro industrial waste to alleviate their nutritional problems .... by the fermenting fungi in an attempt to make use of the .... under solid state and submerged fermentation conditions.

  9. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.; Hahn, J.; Magee, B.; Yuen, N.; Sandefur, K.; Tom, J.; Yap, C.

    1999-09-01

    This ash study investigated the beneficial use of municipal waste combustion combined ash from the H-POWER facility in Oahu. These uses were grouped into intermediate cover for final closure of the Waipahu landfill, daily cover at the Waimanalo Gulch Landfill, and partial replacement for aggregate in asphalt for road paving. All proposed uses examine combined fly and bottom ash from a modern waste-to-energy facility that meets requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments for Maximum Achievable Control Technology.

  10. UTILIZATION OF AGRO-INDUSTRIAL WASTE BY HIGHER MUSHROOMS: MODERN VIEW AND TRENDS

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Barshteyn; Tetiana Krupodorova

    2016-01-01

    Waste management and providing a world population with rich in protein food are two important problems of which the utilization of agro-industrial (agriculture and food industry) waste by higher mushrooms causes the growing interest of researchers around the world. More than 150 individual types of wastes have been investigated last decade as alternative substrates alone or in various compositions (more than 450 substrates) for cultivation of 52 higher mushroom species (about 100 strains) as ...

  11. Utilization of household food waste for the production of ethanol at high dry material content

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matsakas, Leonidas; Kekos, Dimitris; Loizidou, Maria; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    .... In order to minimize the competition between fuels and food production, researchers are focusing their efforts to the utilization of wastes and by-products as raw materials for the production of ethanol...

  12. MERCURY CONTROL IN MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTORS AND COAL-FIRED UTILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of mercury (Hg) emissions from municipal waste combustors (MWCs) and coal-fired utilities has attracted attention due to current and potential regulations. Among several techniques evaluated for Hg control, dry sorbent injection (primarily injection of activated carbon) h...

  13. Operating room waste: disposable supply utilization in neurointerventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Luigi; Moudrous, Walid; de Vries, Joost; Grotenhuis, André J; Boogaarts, Hieronymus D

    2017-12-01

    Operating rooms account for 70% of hospital waste, increasing healthcare costs and creating environmental hazards. Endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular pathologies has become prominent, and associated products highly impact the total cost of care. We investigated the costs of endovascular surgical waste at our institution. Data from 53 consecutive endovascular procedures at the Radboud UMC Nijmegen from May to December 2016 were collected. "Unused disposable supply" was defined as one-time use items opened but not used during the procedure. Two observers cataloged the unused disposable supply for each case. The cost of each item was determined from the center supply catalog, and these costs were summed to determine the total cost of unused supply per case. Thirteen diagnostic cerebral digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) (24.5%) and 40 endovascular procedures (75.5%) were analyzed. Total interventional waste was 27,299.53 € (mean 515.09 € per procedure). While total costs of unused disposable supply were almost irrelevant for DSAs, they were consistent for interventional procedures (mean 676.49 € per case). Aneurysm standard coiling had the highest impact on total interventional waste (mean 1061.55 €). Disposable interventional products had a very high impact on the surgical waste costs in the series of the neurointerventional procedures (95% of total waste). This study shows the impact of neurointerventional waste on the total care costs for cerebrovascular patients. This might reflect the tendency to anticipate needs and emergencies in neurointervention. Responsible use of disposable material can be achieved by educating operators and nurses and creating operator preference cards.

  14. Process development for the removal and recovery of hazardous dye erythrosine from wastewater by waste materials-Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Alok; Mittal, Jyoti; Kurup, Lisha; Singh, A K

    2006-11-02

    Erythrosine is a water-soluble xanthene class of dye. It is widely used as colorant in foods, textiles, drugs and cosmetics. It is highly toxic, causes various types of allergies, thyroid activities, carcinogenicity, DNA damage behaviour, neurotoxicity and xenoestrogen nature in the humans and animals. The photochemical and biochemical degradation of the erythrosine is not recommended due to formation of toxic by-products. The present paper is an attempt to remove erythrosine from wastewater using adsorption over Bottom Ash-a power plant waste and De-Oiled Soya-an agricultural waste. Under the batch studies, effect of concentration of dye, temperature, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents, sieve size of adsorbents, etc., have been studied for the uptake of the dye over both adsorbents. The adsorption process verifies Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms in both the cases and based on the data different thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated. Batch studies also include kinetic measurements, rate constant study, mass transfer behaviour and establishment of mechanistic pathway for both the cases. For the bulk removal of the dye column operations have been carried out and breakthrough capacities of the Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns have been calculated. Attempts have also been made for the recovery of the adsorbed dye from exhausted columns by eluting dilute NaOH and more than 90% of the dye was recovered.

  15. Utilizing waste heat from metal industry for drying of organic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Dobric, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Growing generation of organic waste is a real problem all over the world. This is specifically expressed in the developed countries because the amounts of the waste are larger. Therefore, it implies problem connected with organic waste disposal. In the modern society it is prohibited to dump the waste on landfills. It was necessary to find the solution how to deal with this situation.One of the options is delivering of the organic waste to the burning facilities. In this way it is possible to...

  16. Zinc peroxide nanomaterial as an adsorbent for removal of Congo red dye from waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Sneha; Uppal, Himani; Yadav, Mohit; Bahadur, Nupur; Singh, Nahar

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, various natural byproducts, advanced metal oxide composites and photocatalysts have been reported for removal of dyes from water. Although these materials are useful for select applications, they have some limitations such as use at fixed temperature, ultra violet (UV) light and the need for sophisticated experimental set up. These materials can remove dyes up to a certain extent but require long time. To overcome these limitations, a promising adsorbent zinc peroxide (ZnO 2 ) nanomaterial has been developed for the removal of Congo red (CR) dye from contaminated water. ZnO 2 is highly efficient even in the absence of sunlight to remove CR from contaminated water upto the permissible limits set by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United States- Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA). The adsorbent has a specific property to adjust the pH of the test solution within 6.5-7.5 range irrespective of acidic or basic nature of water. The adsorption capacity of the material for CR dye was 208mgg -1 within 10min at 2-10pH range. The proposed material could be useful for the industries involved in water purification. The removal of CR has been confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The adsorption data followed a second order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decolorization of hair dye by lignocellulosic waste materials from contaminated waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib eZahir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Basic yellow 57 (BY57 was chosen as a model hair dye due to its prevalence in cosmetics wastewaters. This study proposes the use of lignocellulosic materials like spent tea leaves of peppermint (PM, chai tea (CT and chamomile (CM as raw adsorbents for the removal of BY57 from contaminated solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out at room temperature to achieve the maximum adsorption capacity. Results indicate that the highest removal is achieved at pH 6 – 8, with a minimum adsorbent mass of 75 mg and in the absence of salinity, crowding agents and heavy metals. Adsorption equilibria were modeled according to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm theories and reported the following trend: PM>CT>CM, reaching qmax values of 105, 80, and 38 mg of dye per gram of adsorbent, respectively. Desorption experiments showed that diluted solution of HCl is able to desorb the up to 80% of the dye and recover the adsorbent to be used in consecutive cycles. Finally, the adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy, indicating that the adsorbents have a porous and heterogeneous surface, showing pockets and protrusions that are potential adsorption sites for the dye.

  18. Dyes removal using activated carbon from palm oil waste with digital image colorimetry quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, M. Lutfi; Puspita, Melfi; Alwi, Wiwit; Ghufira, Nurhamidah, Elvia, Rina

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, activated carbon prepared from palm oil husk was used as adsorbent to remove synthetic dyes of Reactive Red 120 (RR) and Direct Green 26 (DG) from aqueous solution. The effects of solution pH, contact time, adsorbent weight, dyes concentration, and temperature on adsorption were evaluated based on batch experiments along with determination of the adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics parameters. Visible spectrophotometry was used for the quantification of dyes concentration, in conjunction with digital image colorimetry as a novel quantification method. Compared to visible spectrophotometry, the results of digital image colorimetry were accurate. In addition, improved sensitivity was achieved using this new colorimetry method. At equilibrium, dyes adsorption onto activated carbon followed Freundlich model, with adsorption capacities for RR and DG were 32 and 27 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetics study showed a pseudo-second-order model with thermodynamic parameters of ΔG°, ΔH°, and ΔS° were -1.8 to -3.8 kJ/mol, -13.5 to -24.38 kJ/mol, and 0.001 J/mol, respectively. Therefore, the process of adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous with an increase in the disorder or entropy of the system.

  19. Development of adsorbent from Teflon waste by radiation induced grafting: equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, N K; Kumar, Virendra; Pahan, S; Bhardwaj, Y K; Sabharwal, S

    2011-10-15

    Mutual radiation grafting technique was employed to graft polyacrylic acid (PAA) onto Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) scrap using high energy gamma radiation. Polyacrylic acid-g-Teflon (PAA-g-Teflon) adsorbent was characterized by grafting extent measurement, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and wet ability & surface energy analysis. The PAA-g-Teflon adsorbent was studied for dye adsorption from aqueous solution of basic dyes, namely, Basic red 29 (BR29) and Basic yellow 11 (BY11). The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models, whereas, adsorption kinetics was analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. Equilibrium adsorption of BR29 was better explained by Langmuir adsorption model, while that of BY11 by Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption capacity for BY11 was more than for BR29. Separation factor (R(L)) was found to be in the range 0 0.99) and better agreement between the q(e,cal) and q(e,exp) values suggested that pseudo-second order kinetic model better represents the kinetic adsorption data. The non-linearity obtained for intra-particle diffusion plot indicated, more than one process is involved in the adsorption of basic dyes. The desorption studies showed that ~95% of the adsorbed dye could be eluted in suitable eluent. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. RECIRCULATION OF BIOGAS RESIDUE TO AGRICULTURAL LAND IN NAMIBIA– RISKS AND POTENTIALS IN FULL UTILIZATION OF ORGANIC WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Nehrenheim, Emma; Klintenberg, Patrik; Odlare, Monica

    2011-01-01

    The current situation of waste disposal in Namibia is under developed. The country has a large meat and dairy industry as well as some breweries and wineries and today, none of the organic wastes are reused, recycled or utilized for energy utilization. Little has been done in order to collect and utilize the resources in the organic waste from these industries but there is currently some early stage projects in planning related to biogas production from organic wastes. This study aims at eval...

  1. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions.

  2. Microbial nitrate removal by waste iron shavings from the biological and catalytic ozonation treated dyeing and finishing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jieting; Chen, Yunlu; Luo, Gang; Nie, Jianxin; Guo, Zhigang; Liu, Yan; Ma, Luming

    2017-12-01

    The concentration of total nitrogen (TN) (between 40 and 60 mg/L, mainly nitrate) in the biological and catalytic ozonation treated dyeing and finishing wastewater needs to be reduced before discharge. The present study investigated the feasibility of using waste iron shavings as electron donor for nitrogen removal by biological denitrification. Two anoxic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were continuously operated for more than 100 days. The results showed that the TN removal efficiency increased from 12% in the control reactor (AnSBR-C) to 20% in the reactor with waste iron shavings (AnSBR-Fe). The TN removal was mainly achieved by the reduction of nitrate by heterotrophic denitrification and autotrophic denitrification for AnSBR-Fe. The residual COD (38.4 mg/L) in the effluent of AnSBR-Fe was higher than that (22 mg/L) in the effluent of AnSBR-C, which could be due to that the bacteria preferred to use iron instead of the recalcitrant organics that present in the wastewater. Furthermore, 3DEEM, UHPLC-QTOF and GC-MS analysis were used to characterize the organics in the wastewater, and the results showed that the addition of waste iron shavings affected the degradation of organics during the biological denitrification process.

  3. Ozonation-based decolorization of food dyes for recovery of fruit leather wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenda; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F; Ozsoy, H Duygu; van Leeuwen, J Hans

    2013-08-28

    Commercial manufacture of fruit leathers (FL) usually results in a portion of the product that is out of specification. The disposition of this material poses special challenges in the food industry. Because the material remains edible and contains valuable ingredients (fruit pulp, sugars, acidulates, etc.), an ideal solution would be to recover this material for product rework. A key practical obstacle to such recovery is that compositing of differently colored wastes results in an unsalable gray product. Therefore, a safe and scalable method for decolorization of FL prior to product rework is needed. This research introduces a novel approach utilizing ozonation for color removal. To explore the use of ozonation as a decolorization step, we first applied it to simple solutions of the commonly used food colorants 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (Red 40), tartrazine (Yellow 5), and erioglaucine (Blue 1). Decolorization was measured by UV/vis spectrometry at visible wavelengths and with a Hunter colorimeter. Volatile and semivolatile byproducts from ozone-based colorant decomposition were identified and quantified with solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). Removal of Yellow 5, Red 40 and Blue 1 of about 65%, 80%, and 90%, respectively, was accomplished with 70 g of ozone applied per 1 kg of redissolved and resuspended FL. Carbonyl compounds were identified as major byproducts from ozone-induced decomposition of the food colorants. A conservative risk assessment based on quantification results and published toxicity information of potentially toxic byproducts, determined that ozone-based decolorization of FL before recycling is acceptable from a safety standpoint. A preliminary cost estimate based on recycling of 1000 tons of FL annually suggests a potential of $275,000 annual profit from this practice at one production facility alone.

  4. The use of an agricultural waste material, Jujuba seeds for the removal of anionic dye (Congo red) from aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasekhara Reddy, M.C., E-mail: som16@rediffmail.com [Department of Basic Sciences, G.P.R. Engineering College (Autonomous), Kurnool 518007, A.P. (India); Sivaramakrishna, L., E-mail: svurams@gmail.com [Analytical Division, Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502, A.P. (India); Varada Reddy, A., E-mail: ammireddyv@yahoo.co.in [Analytical Division, Department of Chemistry, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502, A.P. (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have introduced a low-cost, abundantly locally available non-conventional adsorbent in place of activated carbons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The kinetic data were well described by second order kinetic model and intra-particle diffusion model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Langmuir and generalized isotherm models were the best fitting for the isotherm results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Removal capacity of Jujuba seeds is more than so many agricultural wastes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relative cost of Jujuba seeds for the removal of Congo red can be compared with activated carbons - Abstract: The feasibility of using Indian Jujuba Seeds (IJS) (Zizyphus maruritiana), abundantly available in and around the Nallamalla forest in Andhra Pradesh, for the anionic dye (Congo red, CR) adsorption from aqueous solution, has been investigated as low cost and eco-friendly adsorbent. Adsorption studies were conducted on a batch process, to study the effects of contact time, initial concentration of CR, pH and temperature. Maximum colour removal was observed at pH 2. The equilibrium data was analyzed by the Langmuir, the Freundlich and the General isotherms. The data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 55.56 mg g{sup -1}. The pseudo-second-order kinetics was the best for the adsorption of CR, by IJS (Z. maruritiana) with good correlation. Thermodynamic parameters, such as standard free energy change ({Delta}G Degree-Sign ), standard enthalpy change ({Delta}H Degree-Sign ) and standard entropy change ({Delta}S Degree-Sign ), were analyzed. The results suggest that IJS (Z. maruritiana) is a potential low-cost adsorbent for the CR dye removal from synthetic dye wastewater.

  5. Acidity control of plasma-chemical oxidation: applications to dye removal, urban waste abatement and microbial inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Jean-Louis; Benstaali, Baghdad; Moussa, David; Fanmoe, Jean; Njoyim-Tamungang, Estella

    2011-06-01

    Electric discharges burning in humid air at atmospheric pressure over aqueous solutions induce acid effects in the liquid phase resulting from the formation of nitric acid and peroxynitrous acid as transient precursor. These acid effects affect the degradation mechanisms of organic wastes and the relevant kinetic rates; therefore they thus must be controlled (e.g. using buffers). Nitrogen reactive species such as peroxynitrous acid or its salt are directly concerned with both acid effects as precursor to nitric acid, and strong oxidizing properties E°(ONO2H/NO2) = 2.02 V/SHE. Illustrating examples are given in the case of an organic dye (Alizarin S) removal and the gliding discharge treatment of urban wastewaters. Additional arguments are presented to explain the biocidal effect of humid air discharges.

  6. Acidity control of plasma-chemical oxidation: applications to dye removal, urban waste abatement and microbial inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisset, Jean-Louis; Moussa, David; Fanmoe, Jean [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, University of Rouen (France); Benstaali, Baghdad [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Bahrain, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); Njoyim-Tamungang, Estella, E-mail: brissjl@club-internet.fr [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Chemistry Department, University of Yaounde-I, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2011-06-15

    Electric discharges burning in humid air at atmospheric pressure over aqueous solutions induce acid effects in the liquid phase resulting from the formation of nitric acid and peroxynitrous acid as transient precursor. These acid effects affect the degradation mechanisms of organic wastes and the relevant kinetic rates; therefore they thus must be controlled (e.g. using buffers). Nitrogen reactive species such as peroxynitrous acid or its salt are directly concerned with both acid effects as precursor to nitric acid, and strong oxidizing properties E{sup 0}(ONO{sub 2}H/NO{sub 2}) = 2.02 V/SHE. Illustrating examples are given in the case of an organic dye (Alizarin S) removal and the gliding discharge treatment of urban wastewaters. Additional arguments are presented to explain the biocidal effect of humid air discharges.

  7. Optimisation of the recovery of carotenoids from tomato processing wastes: application on textile dyeing and assessment of its antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaka, Noureddine; El Ksibi, Imen; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2017-01-01

    The present study has been focused on the extraction of natural pigments from tomato industry waste. At first, different solvents and solvents mixture were compared to determine which one is the best for extracting carotenoids compounds from tomato by-products. A mixture of hexane and acetone gave the highest carotenoids extraction yield among the others examined. The extraction conditions were optimised using a five-level-five-factor central composite design. Under optimal conditions, solvent solid ratio 90, hexane percentage in the solvent mixture 60, extraction duration 50, number of extractions 4 and extraction temperature 35 °C, the yield of carotenoids was 80.7 μg/g. The coloured extract of tomato by-products was applied on textile fabrics to investigate the dyeing characteristics and antioxidant activities. The results indicate that extract can be applied on textile fabrics (wool, silk and polyamide) to produce coloured clothing with acceptable antioxidant properties.

  8. Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction and Removal of Five Cationic Dyes from Aqueous Solution Using Magnetite Nanoparticle Loaded Platanusorientalis Waste Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Madrakian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on synthesis of a magnetic adsorbent for wastewater treatment purposes. In this regard, platanus orientalis waste leaves were chosen as a cheap material for preparing the magnetic adsorbent by loading magnetite nanoparticles on it. The synthesized adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. Then, it was used for magnetic solid phase extraction and removal of five cationic dyes including methyl violet (MV, methylene blue (MB, malachite green (MG, crystal violet (CV, and neutral red (NR from aqueous solution as a model application. Different important factors affecting the adsorption process were optimized, and the results showed that under the optimized conditions (pH 10 for CV, MV, MB, and MG; pH 6 for NR; adsorbent dosage, 20 mg; agitation time, 25 min efficient removal of the investigated dyes (adsorption capacities between of 89-133 mg g-1 is achievable using the synthesized adsorbent. Furthermore, the reusability experiments showed that the adsorbent could be reused at least ten cycles without any significant loss in its sorption behavior.

  9. ASPEN+ and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASPEN Plus based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for the on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all available Equine Reh...

  10. Thermal waste utilization 2011. Proceedings; Thermische Abfallverwertung 2011. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the VGB conference at 05th to 06th October, 2011, in Merseburg (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (1) The technical conception of TREA Leuna (Michael Hofmann); (2) Implementation of the EU guideline on industrial emissions - Impacts on the waste incineration (Markus Gleis); (3) Increase of the efficiency of SCNR systems engineering (Joerg Krueger); (4) Energy efficient exhaust gas purification (Rudi Karpf); (5) OptiMa, optimization of the energy efficiency at the more than 45 years old waste incineration sie Mannheim (Peter Knapp); (6) Project development in the United Kingdom - an interesting experience (Holger Franke); (7) 12 Years Fuzzi - What's up, what cannot be done? (Christian Gierend); (8) Fire in the bunker. Experiences, tactics, handling (Gerald Wittek).

  11. Effect of Out-of-Plane Alkyl Group's Position in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Efficiency: A Structure-Property Relationship Utilizing Indoline-Based Unsymmetrical Squaraine Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagumalai, Ananthan; M K, Munavvar Fairoos; Vellimalai, Punitharasu; Sil, Manik Chandra; Nithyanandhan, Jayaraj

    2016-12-28

    Squaraine dyes are promising chromophores to harvest visible and near-infrared (NIR) photons. A series of indoline-based unsymmetrical squaraine (SQ) dyes that contain alkyl chains at sp3 C- and N- atoms of indoline moieties with a carboxylic acid anchoring group were synthesized. The optical and electrochemical properties of the SQ dyes in solution were nearly identical as there was no change in the D-A-D SQ framework; however, remarkable changes with respect to the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) were observed depending upon the position of alkyl groups in the dye. Introduction of alkyl groups to the indoline unit that was away from anchoring unit were helped in more dye loading with controlled organization of dyes on surface, increased charge transfer resistance, long electron lifetime, and hence higher PCE than that of the corresponding isomer in which the alkyl groups funtionalized indoline unit contains the carboxylic acid anchoring group. Careful analysis of incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) profiles indicated the presence of aggregated structure on the TiO2 surface that contributes to the charge injection in the presence of a coadsorbent. A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device made out of SQ5 was achieved an efficiency of 9.0%, with an open-circuit potential (Voc) of 660 mV and short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 19.82 mA/cm2, under simulated AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm2). The IPCE profile of SQ5 shows an onset near to 750 nm with a good quantum efficiency (>80%) in the range of 550-700 nm, indicating the importance of self-organization of dyes on the TiO2 surface for an efficient charge injection. This present investigation revealed the importance of position of alkyl groups in the squaraine-based dyes for the better PCE.

  12. Waste utilization for the controlled synthesis of nanosized hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayar, Suprabha, E-mail: Suprabha.nayar@gmail.com [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India); Guha, Avijit [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India)

    2009-05-05

    This work uses biomolecules in waste and medicinally important materials for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Orange and potato peel, eggshell, papaya leaf and calendula flower extracts have varied biomolecules, which exert a significant, control on the in situ synthesis of nanosized hydroxyapatite particles. The biomimetic synthesis of inorganic particles using known matrices is already well established, however, there are only a few reports using compound extracts. The synthesized nanocomposite has been characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy studies. Role of varied biomolecules in controlled inorganic synthesis may have tremendous technological impact.

  13. Utilization of immobilized urease for waste water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using immobilized urease for urea removal from waste water for space system applications is considered, specifically the elimination of the urea toxicity problem in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. Because urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide, control of their concentrations within nontoxic limits was also determined. The results of this study led to the use of free urease in lieu of the immobilized urease for controlling urea concentrations. An ion exchange resin was used which reduced the NH3 level by 94% while reducing the sodium ion concentration only 10%.

  14. Energetic utilize municipal waste – technik combined combustion coal and waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustínová Edita

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The Coal -Waste System (CWS demonstrates how convencional power station steam generation can be intelligently combined with enwironmentally responsible waste disposal. A grate-firing instalation, operated as a plant satellite parallel to a power station steam generator, converts the chemical energy of the household waste into thermal energy in the form of hot flue gas. This flue gas is introduced as a coal substitute into the lower section of the steam generator and supplies a part of the thermal energy reqiured. The application of this process engineering offers a series of economic and ecological advantages.

  15. Utilization of tomato waste as a source of polyphenolic antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savatović Slađana M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the effects of two extraction procedures (using ultrasonic bath and high performance homogenizer on the extraction efficiency of polyphenolics present in the tomato waste. The isolation of flavonoid fraction of obtained extracts was performed by solid-phase extraction. The antioxidant activity of flavonoid fractions was determined using different spectrophotometric tests, including reducing power and 2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assays. The content of total polyphenolics and flavonoids in extract obtained employing homogenizer (E2 was higher than in the extract obtained employing ultrasonic bath (E1, and it was 14.33 mg/g and 7.70 mg/g, respectively. The flavonoid fraction (EF2 of extract E2 showed higher antioxidant activity than flavonoid fraction (EF1 of extract E1. The DPPH free radical scavenging activity of fractions EF1 and EF2, expressed as EC50 value, were 0.78 mg/ml and 0.45 mg/ml, respectively. The obtained results show that tomato wastes can be used as an easily accessible source of antioxidant polyphenolics.

  16. Plastic Bottles Waste Utilization as Modifier for Asphalt Mixture Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hakeem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic Bottles was used as the polymeric waste to investigate performance of asphalt mixture Aggregates obtained from Margalla, Burhan and Karak quarries. 12 samples were prepared for conventional asphalt mixtures and 48 samples were prepared for PB modified asphalt mixture of each quarries at various proportions of PB waste. The PB used for modification according to wet process are 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% by weight of Optimum Bitumen Content (OBC. OBC of 4.2 % was concluded for conventional asphalt mixtures. The stability and flow values of the conventional and modified Asphalt Mixture were compared. The average Stability of the modified Margalla asphalt mixtures when 15% PB was used was much higher as compared to conventional asphalt mixtures. But when PB was used beyond 15%, the Marshall stability showed a decreasing trend for Margalla aggregates, increasing trend for Karak aggregates and decreasing trend for Burhan aggregates. This decline in stability is attributed to a decline in interlocking of aggregates due to lubricating effect. The corresponding flow for the Modified asphalt mixtures first showed a decreasing trend for Margalla aggregates at 15% PB modification but beyond 15%, an increasing trend in flow as compared to conventional asphalt mixtures The decrease in flow or increase in Marshall Stability is attributed to improvement in interlocking and decline in flow or stability is attributed to a decline in interlocking offered by binder and PB coated aggregate particles in modified asphalt.

  17. Optimization of a waste heat utilization network in an eco-industrial park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Song Hwa; Kim, Sang Hun; Yoon, Sung-Geun; Park, Sunwon [Department of Chemical and Bio-molecular Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-06-15

    Development of an eco-industrial park (EIP) has drawn attention as a promising approach seeking for the mutual benefit to the economy and environment. In recent years, the reduction of energy consumption has become a global necessity due to the high oil price and environmental regulations. In order to find energy strategies in an EIP, a framework to investigate waste heat of an industrial complex was proposed. A mathematical model was developed to synthesize a waste heat utilization network, including nearby companies and communities. A case study of an existing petro-chemical complex in Yeosu, South Korea showed that the total energy cost and the amount of waste heat of the region can be reduced by more than 88% and 82% from the present values, respectively, applying the suggested waste heat utilization networks. (author)

  18. Training on Utilization of Plastic Waste and Banana Bark Become an Economical Value Innovation Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry Yohana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this community service is to provide training to communities around the TPA In South Tangerang regarding the utilization of waste to be a product of economic value as an innovative way to help the government in the management of waste as well as increase income for every family The method used is classical method with discussion / question and answer approach, simulation and practice of making the product, with the intention that the material can be accepted by the participants well. Guidance / consultation is done through the last session with participants, as well as by telephone or by mail. The results of the training show the participants so have the knowledge in managing waste and skills in utilizing waste to make products of economic value. It can be concluded that participants want continuous knowledge. It is desirable to provide knowledge in the form of regular training and sustainable.

  19. A Review on Landfill Management in the Utilization of Plastic Waste as an Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayah Nurul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastes from landfills originate from many spheres of life. These are produces as a result of human activities either domestically or industrially. The global plastic production increased over years due to the vast applications of plastics in many sectors. The continuous demand of plastics caused the plastic wastes accumulation in the landfill consumed a lot of spaces that contributed to the environmental. In addition, economic growth and development also increased our demand and dependency on plastics which leads to its accumulation in landfills imposing risk on human health, animals and cause environmental pollution problems such as ground water contamination, sanitary related issues, etc. The management and disposal of plastic waste have become a major concern, especially in developing cities. The idea of waste to energy recovery is one of the promising techniques used for managing the waste of plastic. Hence, this paper aims review at utilizing of plastic as an alternative fuel.

  20. Study utilization of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrianie, Nuniek; Juliastuti, Sri Rachmania; Ar-rosyidah, Fanny Husna; Rochman, Hilal Abdur

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the existence of energy sources of oil and was limited. Therefore, it was important to searching for new innovations of renewable energy sources by utilizing the waste into a source of energy. On the other hand, the process of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation generated sludge that had calorific value and untapped. Because of the need for alternative sources of energy innovation with the concept of zero waste and the fuel potential from extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste, so it was necessary to study the use of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste as the main material for making solid fuel. In addition, sawdust is a waste that had a great quantities and also had a high calorific value to be mixed with extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste. The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of the extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and to determine the potential and a combination of a mixture of extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste and sawdust which has the best calorific value. The variables of this study was the composition of the waste and sawdust as follows 1:1; 1:3; and 3:1 (mass of sawdust : mass of waste) and time of sawdust carbonization was 10, 15 and 20 minutes. Sawdust was carbonized to get the high heating value. The characteristic of main material and fuel analysis performed with proximate analysis. While the calorific value analysis was performed with a bomb calorimeter. From the research, it was known that extractable petroleum hydrocarbons biodegradation waste had a moisture content of 3.06%; volatile matter 19.98%; ash content of 0.56%; fixed carbon content of 76.4% and a calorific value of 717 cal/gram. And a mixture that had the highest calorific value (4286.5 cal/gram) achieved in comparison sawdust : waste (3:1) by carbonization of sawdust for 20 minutes.

  1. Utility and infrastructure needs for private tank waste processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document supports the development of the Draft TWRS Privatization RFP. The document provides summaries of a wide variety of utility infrastructure and support services that are available at the Hanford Site. The needs of the privatization contractors are estimated and compared to the existing infrastructure. Recommendations are presented on the preferred and alternate routes of supplying the identifies requirements.

  2. Utilization of byproducts and waste materials from meat, poultry and fish processing industries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathilakan, K; Sultana, Khudsia; Radhakrishna, K; Bawa, A S

    2012-06-01

    India is bestowed with vast livestock wealth and it is growing at the rate of 6% per annum. The contribution of livestock industry including poultry and fish is increasing substantially in GDP of country which accounts for >40% of total agricultural sector and >12% of GDP. This contribution would have been much greater had the animal by-products been also efficiently utilized. Efficient utilization of by-products has direct impact on the economy and environmental pollution of the country. Non-utilization or under utilization of by-products not only lead to loss of potential revenues but also lead to the added and increasing cost of disposal of these products. Non-utilization of animal by-products in a proper way may create major aesthetic and catastrophic health problems. Besides pollution and hazard aspects, in many cases meat, poultry and fish processing wastes have a potential for recycling raw materials or for conversion into useful products of higher value. Traditions, culture and religion are often important when a meat by-product is being utilized for food. Regulatory requirements are also important because many countries restrict the use of meat by-products for reasons of food safety and quality. By-products such as blood, liver, lung, kidney, brains, spleen and tripe has good nutritive value. Medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of by-product are also highlighted in this review. Waste products from the poultry processing and egg production industries must be efficiently dealt with as the growth of these industries depends largely on waste management. Treated fish waste has found many applications among with which the most important are animal feed, biodiesel/biogas, dietectic products (chitosan), natural pigments (after extraction) and cosmetics (collagen). Available information pertaining to the utilization of by-products and waste materials from meat, poultry and fish and their processing industries has been reviewed here.

  3. Utilizing wood wastes as reinforcement in wood cement composite bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusirat Aderinsola Sadiku

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research work undertaken to study the properties of Wood Cement Composite Bricks (WCCB from different wood wastes and cement / wood content. The WCBBs with nominal density of 1200 kg m-3 were produced from three tropical wood species and at varying cement and wood content of 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 on a weight to weight basis. The properties evaluated were compressive strength, Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV, water absorption (WA and thickness swelling (TS. The Compressive strength values ranged from 0.25 to 1.13 N mm-2 and UPV values ranged from 18753 to 49992 m s-1. The mean values of WA after 672 hours (28 days of water soaking of the WCCBs ranged from 9.50% to 47.13% where there were no noticeable change in the TS of the bricks. The observed density (OD ranged from 627 to 1159 kg m-3. A. zygia from the three wood/cement content were more dimensionally stable and better in compressive strength than the other two species where T. scleroxylon had the best performance in terms of UPV. All the properties improved with increasing cement content. WCCBs at 3.0:1 cement/wood content are suitable for structural application such as panelling, ceiling and partitioning

  4. Microbial contamination level of air in animal waste utilization plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chmielowiec-Korzeniowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Objective.[/b] The aim of this research was evaluation of microbial contamination of air within and in the vicinity of animal waste disposal plants. [b]Materials and method[/b]. Air samples were analyzed to determine total bacterial and fungal counts as well as microbial species composition. Measurements of climate conditions (temperature, humidity, air motion and total dust concentration were also performed. [b]Results.[/b] Total numbers of bacteria and fungi surpassed the threshold limit values for production halls. The most abundant bacteria detected were those consisting of physiological microflora of animal dermis and mucosa. Fungal species composition proved to be most differentiated in the air beyond the plant area. [i]Aspergillus versicolor[/i], a pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus, was isolated only inside the rendering plant processing hall. [b]Conclusions.[/b] The measurement results showed a low sanitary-hygienic state of air in the plant processing halls and substantial air pollution in its immediate vicinity.

  5. Farm waste utilization among farmers in Irepodun Local Government Area, Kwara State, Nigeria: Implication for extension education service delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Oladipo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the utilization of farm waste among farmers in Irepodun Local Government Area of Kwara State, Nigeria. Structured interview schedule was used to elicit data from 120 farmers in the study area. Results revealed that more than half (58.4% of the respondents were crop farmers who grow majorly maize and cassava on a subsistence scale. The major farm wastes generated in the area were maize cobs, husk and stalk (62.5% and cassava stalk and peels (60%. Majority of the farmers got rid of their farm waste through burning while more than half of the respondents do not utilize the waste they generate from their farms. The major constraints militating against farm waste utilization includes inadequate access to extension services, inadequate awareness of benefits of farm waste, inadequate facilities for processing of farm wastes to other products and low knowledge on usage of farm waste. Logistic regression modeling results revealed that farmers who are more likely to utilize their farm waste efficiently are those with higher level of education and more years of experience in farming. It was therefore recommended that extension agencies should embark on enlightenment campaigns and trainings of farmers on various innovative ways of farm wastes utilization in order to facilitate more efficient and environmental friendly farm waste utilization initiatives in the area.

  6. Peptide-based ambidextrous bifunctional gelator: applications in oil spill recovery and removal of toxic organic dyes for waste water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kingshuk; Nandi, Nibedita; Mondal, Biplab; Dehsorkhi, Ashkan; Hamley, Ian W; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-12-06

    A low molecular weight peptide-based ambidextrous gelator molecule has been discovered for efficient control of water pollution. The gelator molecules can gel various organic solvents with diverse polarity, e.g. n-hexane, n-octane, petroleum ether, petrol, diesel, aromatic solvents like chlorobenzene, toluene, benzene, o-xylene and even aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 7.5. These gels have been thoroughly characterized using various techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, small angle X-ray scattering and rheological experiments. Interestingly, hydrogel obtained from the gelator molecule has been found to absorb toxic organic dyes (both cationic and anionic dyes) from dye-contaminated water. The gelator molecule can be reused for several cycles, indicating its possible future use in waste water management. Moreover, this gelator can selectively gel petrol, diesel, pump oil from an oil-water mixture in the presence of a carrier solvent, ethyl acetate, suggesting its efficient application for oil spill recovery. These results indicate that the peptide-based ambidextrous gelator produces soft materials (gels) with dual function: (i) removal of toxic organic dyes in waste water treatment and (ii) oil spill recovery.

  7. Gasification: An alternative solution for energy recovery and utilization of vegetable market waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narnaware, Sunil L; Srivastava, Nsl; Vahora, Samir

    2017-03-01

    Vegetables waste is generally utilized through a bioconversion process or disposed of at municipal landfills, dumping sites or dumped on open land, emitting a foul odor and causing health hazards. The presents study deals with an alternative way to utilize solid vegetable waste through a thermochemical route such as briquetting and gasification for its energy recovery and subsequent power generation. Briquettes of 50 mm diameter were produced from four different types of vegetable waste. The bulk density of briquettes produced was increased 10 to 15 times higher than the density of the dried vegetable waste in loose form. The lower heating value (LHV) of the briquettes ranged from 10.26 MJ kg -1 to 16.60 MJ kg -1 depending on the type of vegetable waste. The gasification of the briquettes was carried out in an open core downdraft gasifier, which resulted in syngas with a calorific value of 4.71 MJ Nm -3 at the gasification temperature between 889°C and 1011°C. A spark ignition, internal combustion engine was run on syngas and could generate a maximum load up to 10 kW e . The cold gas efficiency and the hot gas efficiency of the gasifier were measured at 74.11% and 79.87%, respectively. Energy recovery from the organic vegetable waste was possible through a thermochemical conversion route such as briquetting and subsequent gasification and recovery of the fuel for small-scale power generation.

  8. A comparison of costs associated with utility management options for dry active waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornibrook, C. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The economics of low level waste management is receiving more attention today than ever before. This is due to four factors: (1) the increases in the cost of processing of these wastes; (2) increases in the cost of disposal; (3) the addition of storage costs for those without access to disposal; and (4) the increasing competitive nature of the electric generation industry. These pressures are forcing the industry to update it`s evaluation of the mix of processing that will afford it the best long term economics and minimize it`s risks for unforeseen costs. Whether disposal is available or not, all utilities face the same challenge of minimizing the costs associated with the management of these wastes. There are a number of variables that will impact how a utility manages their wastes but the problem is the uncertainty of what will actually happen, i.e., will disposal be available, when and at what cost. Using the EPRI-developed WASTECOST: DAW code, this paper explores a variety of LLW management options available to utilities. Along with providing the costs and benefits, other technical considerations which play an important part in the management of these wastes are also addressed.

  9. Extraction of dye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effects of different methods of application of selected mordants on dyeing woven cotton with natural dyes from the leaves of ... INTRODUCTION. In Uganda, plants have traditionally been utilized as a source of colorants for dyeing mats, ropes and other home based materials for a long time.

  10. Influence of Wet Soya Waste on Nutrient Utilization by Red Sokoto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of Wet Soya Waste on Nutrient Utilization by Red Sokoto Goats Fed Digitaria ( Digitaria smutsii> ) Hay. ... crude fiber intake which decreases with increase in WSW supplementation. Experimental animals fed the 600g had significantly (P<0.05) lower water intake (240ml) compared to those fed control diet (575ml).

  11. Utilization of rice milling waste (RMW) in local turkey diets: effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of rice milling waste (RMW) in local turkey diets: effect on haematological indices and blood chemistry. ... Nigerian Journal of Animal Production ... Results obtained showed that substituting maize with 50% RMW produced superior blood quality in terms of Hb counts, white blood cell and red blood cells at the ...

  12. Optimizing Nutrient Utilization and Reducing Waste Through Diet Composition and Feeding Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document summarizes the findings of the Southern Regional Aquaculture Center project Optimizing Nutrient Utilization and Reducing Waste through Diet Composition and Feeding Strategies. The primary objectives of the project were to determine the effects of diet composition on fish production, n...

  13. Utilization of Wheat Offal-Carried Pineapple Waste in the Diet of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the processing of wheat offal-carried pineapple waste meal (WCPW) and its utilization in the diet of West African Dwarf (WAD) goats with a view to ascertaining the inclusion level for optimal performance. The WCPW was obtained by evaluating six different combinations of wheat offal (WO) and ...

  14. Plastic waste as a resource. Strategies for reduction and utilization of plastic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqual i Camprubí, Gemma

    2010-01-01

    Plastic materials have experienced a spectacular rate of growth in recent decades, consequently, production of plastics, and likewise their consumption, has increased markedly since 1950. Moreover, they are lightweight and durable, as well as can be moulded into a variety of products that can be manufactured in many different types of plastic and in a wide range of applications. Inevitably, continually increasing amounts of used plastic are originating daily, resulting in a plastic waste prob...

  15. Preparation of dye waste-barium sulfate hybrid adsorbent and application in organic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhang-Jun; Xiao, Yan; Zhao, Dan-Hua; Shen, Yu-Lin; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2010-03-15

    A new hybrid material was developed by the template-free hybridization of weak acidic pink red B (APRB, C.I. 18073) with BaSO(4). The composition and structure of the material were determined and characterized. In contrast to conventional sorbents, the hybrid material has a specific surface area of 0.89 m(2)/g, but it contains lots of negative charges and lipophilic groups as the basis of specific adsorption. The efficient removal of cationic dyes and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) indicates that it has an improved adsorption capacity and selectivity with a short removal time less than 2 min; while the hybrid sorbents fit the Langmuir isotherm model, and follow the octanol-water partition law. Instead of using APRB reagent, an APRB-producing wastewater was reused to prepare the cost-effective sorbent, and the equilibrium adsorption capacities of which reached 222 and 160 mg/g for EV and BPR, respectively. The sorbents was then used to treat three wastewater samples with satisfactory results of over 97% decolonization and 88% COD-decreasing. In addition, the hybrid sorbent was regenerated from sludge over five cycles, and its adsorption capacity was not appreciably changed. This work has developed a simple and eco-friendly method for synthesizing a practical and efficient sorbent. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The potential use of activated carbon prepared from Ziziphus species for removing dyes from waste waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regti, Abdelmajid; Laamari, My Rachid; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; El Haddad, Mohammadine

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the adsorption potential of activated carbon prepared from Ziziphus mauritiana nuts for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution has been investigated using batch mode experiments. The effects of some operating parameters on the removal dye such as, initial pH (2-12), temperature (298-328 K), initial MB concentration (20-100 mg L-1), and contact time (5-70 min) were investigated. Adsorption kinetic showed that the rate adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Four adsorption isotherms models were applied to experimental equilibrium data (Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Fritz-Schlunder) and the different constants were calculated using non-linear equations models. Fritz-Schlunder model was found the best one to describe the adsorption process which suggests that the adsorption of MB onto activated carbon derived from Ziziphus mauritiana is heterogeneous with a multilayer. Thermodynamic adsorption showed that the process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  17. A mechanistic study on Decontamination of Methyl Orange Dyes from Aqueous Phase by Mesoporous Pulp Waste and Polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donglin; Yang, Yonggang; Li, Chaozheng; Liu, Yufang

    2017-04-01

    The dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) is used to investigate the mechanism of mesoporous pulp waste (MPW) and polyaniline (PANI) adsorptive removal methyl orange (MO) dye from their aqueous solutions. The results are absolutely reliable because of the sufficiently accurate method although such big systems are studied. It is demonstrated that hydrogen bond and Van Der Waals interactions play a significant role in MO adsorption by MPW and PANI. For MO adsorption by MPW, hydrogen bond and Van Der Waals interactions are both weakened in S 1 state. In contrast, hydrogen bond and Van Der Waals interactions between PANI and MO are both enhanced in S 1 state. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy and free energy change reveal that the MO adsorption by MPW and PANI are spontaneous and exothermic. The adsorption of MO on MPW is less favorable in S 1 state and the adsorption of MO on PANI is more favorable in S 1 state. Therefore, the photoexcitation should be controlled during the MO adsorption by MPW and applied for MO adsorption by PANI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and σΛ, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, γ and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (fΔμ) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between fΔμs in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of

  19. The suitable of utilization the opening spaces of browncoal and ore mines for the waste deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Viliam

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the conection with the transformation of non economical metal mining in Slovakia nowadays possibilities of secondary utilization of mine underground spaces for unmining purposes are analyzed. This paper presents the technical Aspects and the Possibilities for the undergrounding deposition of waste materials on the slowak mining works on the brown coal and metalic raw materials mines. This problems are in the last year still more solution and with the positive results too. The specific points of the paper addresed in this report deal with charakterization of the waste from the point of view one coal power plant. Are charakterized their preparation and laboratory methods, but the hydrogelogical and geotechnical problems too. Ending this paper is describe one of the possibilty of the Informatik system for underground waste storage (UAE. On the relation of this problem are in the paper described the more technical aspects from point of view one brown coal mining area. Together with the problem of possibilities of storage mining in underground has been the technical consulting system soluted (WBS. Technological and temporary storage of waste and utility materials without the relation to the mining technology are described too. The mining waste management (UAE in metal and brown coal mines may in future be rather perspective industrial area of enterprising which if, it is rigthly orientated, will make possible at least the partial iprovement of the living environment.

  20. Utilization of coal fly ash in solidification of liquid radioactive waste from research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the potential utilization of fly ash was investigated as an additive in solidification process of radioactive waste sludge from research reactor. Coal formations include various percentages of natural radioactive elements; therefore, coal fly ash includes various levels of radioactivity. For this reason, fly ashes have to be evaluated for potential environmental implications in case of further usage in any construction material. But for use in solidification of radioactive sludge, the radiological effects of fly ash are in the range of radioactive waste management limits. The results show that fly ash has a strong fixing capacity for radioactive isotopes. Specimens with addition of 5-15% fly ash to concrete was observed to be sufficient to achieve the target compressive strength of 20 MPa required for near-surface disposal. An optimum mixture comprising 15% fly ash, 35% cement, and 50% radioactive waste sludge could provide the solidification required for long-term storage and disposal. The codisposal of radioactive fly ash with radioactive sludge by solidification decreases the usage of cement in solidification process. By this method, radioactive fly ash can become a valuable additive instead of industrial waste. This study supports the utilization of fly ash in industry and the solidification of radioactive waste in the nuclear industry.

  1. Utilization of agro waste pectin for the production of industrially important polygalacturonase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyar Jahan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a variety of agro-industrial wastes have been utilized for meaningful purpose to produce valuable biocatalyst. All wastes used were low cost and easily accessible while, some available throughout the year. A number of bacterial strains isolated from rotten fruits and vegetables were screened for the production of industrially important polygalacturonase (PGase using pectin present in these agro-industrial wastes. The strain producing maximum PGase was identified as Bacillus licheniformis KIBE-IB3 on the basis of taxonomic studies and 16S rDNA analysis. Among different agro-industrial wastes studied, high yield of PGase was achieved from fermentation broth having wheat bran (1.0% as a substrate in to the medium supplemented with nitrogen sources in combination of NaNO3 and yeast extract while KH2PO4 was selected as suitable micronutrient. After optimizing fermentation parameters it was noticed that Bacillus licheniformis KIBE-IB3 was capable of producing maximum PGase at 37 °C, pH 7.0 and after 48 h of incubation time. From the current research, wheat bran was proven as a cheap and easily available source throughout the year for hyper production of pectinase. The utilization of the waste will also help to minimize the concerned environmental issues.

  2. Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

    2007-04-01

    Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

  3. The evaluation of chosen properties of ashes created by thermal utilization of hazardous and communal wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Krawczykowski

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available One of methods of the waste neutralization is their thermal transformation in suitable installations or devices in order to achieve the state, which is no longer dangerous for the human health and life or for the environment. In effect of the thermal transformation the “new” wastes are created, which, by law are suppose a to be utilized first. These wastes may be utilized if their properties are suitable. In the paper, the process of thermal utilization of hazardous and municipal wastes is presented, together with the investigation results of the grain composition, surface area, density and of the initial chemical analysis of the created ashes. The research of the grain composition was conducted by using the “Fritsch” apparatus. On the base of the grain composition, the surface area of ashes under investigation was determined, whereas the density was determined by using the helium pycnometer. The purpose of the research was to determine how the properties of ashes are changed and if the differences allow to use these ashes in future.

  4. Optimal utilization of waste-to-energy in an LCA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruergaard, T; Astrup, T

    2011-03-01

    Energy production from two types of municipal solid waste was evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA): (1) mixed high calorific waste suitable for production of solid recovered fuels (SRF) and (2) source separated organic waste. For SRF, co-combustion was compared with mass burn incineration. For organic waste, anaerobic digestion (AD) was compared with mass burn incineration. In the case of mass burn incineration, incineration with and without energy recovery was modelled. Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion was evaluated for use both as transportation fuel and for heat and power production. All relevant consequences for energy and resource consumptions, emissions to air, water and soil, upstream processes and downstream processes were included in the LCA. Energy substitutions were considered with respect to two different energy systems: a present-day Danish system based on fossil fuels and a potential future system based on 100% renewable energy. It was found that mass burn incineration of SRF with energy recovery provided savings in all impact categories, but co-combustion was better with respect to Global Warming (GW). If all heat from incineration could be utilized, however, the two alternatives were comparable for SRF. For organic waste, mass burn incineration with energy recovery was preferable over anaerobic digestion in most impact categories. Waste composition and flue gas cleaning at co-combustion plants were critical for the environmental performance of SRF treatment, while the impacts related to utilization of the digestate were significant for the outcome of organic waste treatment. The conclusions were robust in a present-day as well as in a future energy system. This indicated that mass burn incineration with efficient energy recovery is a very environmentally competitive solution overall. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A new morphological approach for removing acid dye from leather waste water: preparation and characterization of metal-chelated spherical particulated membranes (SPMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenay, Raziye Hilal; Gökalp, Safiye Meriç; Türker, Evren; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Aslan, Ahmet; Akgöl, Sinan

    2015-03-15

    In this study, p(HEMA-GMA) poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) spherical particulated membranes (SPMs) were produced by UV-photopolymerization and the synthesized SPMs were coupled with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). Finally the novel SPMs were chelated with Cr(III) ions as ligand and used for removing acid black 210 dye. Characterizations of the metal-chelated SPMs were made by SEM, FTIR and swelling test. The water absorption capacities and acid dye adsorption properties of the SPMs were investigated and the results were 245.0, 50.0, 55.0 and 51.9% for p(HEMA), p(HEMA-GMA), p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA and p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs respectively. Adsorption properties of the p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs were investigated under different conditions such as different initial dye concentrations and pH. The optimum pH was observed at 4.3 and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined as 885.14 mg/g at about 8000 ppm initial dye concentration. The concentrations of the dyes were determined using a UV/Vis Spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 435 nm. Reusability of p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs was also shown for five adsorption-desorption cycles without considerable decrease in its adsorption capacity. Finally, the results showed that the metal-chelated p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA SPMs were effective sorbent systems removing acid dye from leather waste water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alya M. Al-Etaibi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated.

  7. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-06-29

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated.

  8. WATERLESS DYEING [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEVRENT Nalan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is believed to be one of the biggest consumers of water. Water consumption and exhaustion in dyeing textile materials in conventional methods is an important environmental problem. The cost of waste water treatment will cause a prominent problem in the future as it does today. Increasing consideration of ecologic consequences of industrial processes as well as legislation enforcing the avoidance of environmental problems have caused a reorientation of thinking and promoted projects for replacement of conventional technologies. One of these new technologies is dyeing in supercritical fluids. Dyeing with supercritical carbon dioxide is a favourable concept considering the value of water as a natural resource and the cost of waste water treatment. This dyeing method offers many advantages over conventional aqueous dyeing: During this dyeing process no water is used, therefore there is no waste water problem, no other chemicals are required; the carbon dioxide can be recycled; the dystuff which is not adsorbed on the substrate can be collected and reused; The necessary energy consumption in this process is relatively lower than is needed to heat water in conventional methods of dyeing. Due to unnecessary of drying process, it helps to save both energy and time; and dyeing cycle is shorter compared with traditional methods. In addition carbon dioxide is non-toxic and non-flammable. Supercritical fluid, supercritical dyeing, disperse dyestuffs, solid-fluid equilibrium

  9. Cauliflower Leave, an Agricultural Waste Biomass Adsorbent, and Its Application for the Removal of MB Dye from Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Thermodynamic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Seraj Anwar; Khan, Fauzia

    2016-01-01

    Cauliflower leaf powder (CLP), a biosorbent prepared from seasonal agricultural crop waste material, has been employed as a prospective adsorbent for the removal of a basic dye, methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution by the batch adsorption method under varying conditions, namely, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, solution pH, and temperature. Characterization of the material by FTIR and SEM indicates the presence of functional groups and rough coarse surface suitable for the adsorption of methylene blue over it. Efforts were made to fit the isotherm data using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equation. The experimental data were best described by Freundlich isotherm model, with an adsorption capacity of 149.22 mg/g at room temperature. To evaluate the rate of methylene blue adsorption onto CLP, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were employed. The experimental data were best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Evaluation of thermodynamic parameters such as changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' free energy showed the feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic nature of the adsorption process. On the basis of experimental results obtained, it may be concluded that the CLP prepared from agricultural waste has considerable potential as low-cost adsorbent in wastewater treatment for the removal of basic dye, MB. PMID:27974892

  10. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of ethyl cellulose polymer and waste materials for roofing tile production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Suubitaa Spencer; Ng, ChoonAun; Chee, Swee Yong; Habib, NoorZainab; Nadeem, Humayon; Teoh, Wei Ping

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize ethyl cellulose, mixture of waste engine oil and waste vegetable oil as a binder in the environmental friendly roofing tile production. The waste engine-vegetable oil wasmix together with ethyl cellulose, fly ash, coarse aggregates, fine aggregatesand a catalyst. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that the oil mixture added with ethyl cellulose has the relatively high binding effect due to the presence of strong carbonyl group especially after being heat cured at 1900C for 24 hours. The mixed proportion of materials with different amount of ethyl cellulose used was studied in the production of tile specimen. The results showed that the ethyl cellulose composed roofing tile specimens passed the transverse breaking strength, durability, permeabilityand the ultraviolet accelerated test. The shrinkage on the tile can be overcome by adding temperature resistance polymer on the exterior of the tile.

  12. The thermoelectric generators use for waste heat utilization from cement plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztekler Karol

    2017-01-01

    Production often entails the formation of by-product which is waste heat. One of the equipment processing heat into electricity is a thermoelectric generator. Its operation is based on the principle of thermoelectric phenomenon, which is known as a Seebeck phenomenon. The simplicity of thermoelectric phenomena allows its use in various industries, in which the main waste product is in the form of heat with the temperature of several hundred degrees. The study analyses the possibility of the thermoelectric systems use for the waste heat utilization resulting in the cement production at the cement plant. The location and design of the thermoelectric system that could be implemented in cement plant is chosen. The analysis has been prepared in the IPSEpro software.

  13. Characteristics of Vacuum Freeze Drying with Utilization of Internal Cooling and Condenser Waste Heat for Sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Alhamid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum freeze drying is an excellent drying method, but it is very energy-intensive because a relatively long drying time is required. This research investigates the utilization of condenser waste heat for sublimation as a way of accelerating the drying rate. In addition, it also investigates the effect of internal cooling combined with vacuum cooling in the pressure reduction process. Jelly fish tentacles were used as the specimen, with different configurations for condenser heat waste and internal cooling valve opening. The results show that heating with condenser heat waste can accelerate the drying rate up to 0.0035 kg/m2.s. In addition, pre-freezing by internal cooling prevents evaporation until the mass of the specimen is 0.47 g and promotes transition of the specimen into the solid phase.

  14. The methods of management of the local waste utility; Les modes de gestion du service public local des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    In France, the collection and processing of wastes are local public utility activities. These public utilities can be of two type: administrative when their are financed by a local tax, and industrial/commercial when they are financed by a fee. This document presents the different ways of waste management (public corporation, public market or public utility delegation), the management systems in practice, and the criteria for the choice of a management system. (J.S.)

  15. UTILIZATION OF AGRO-INDUSTRIAL WASTE BY HIGHER MUSHROOMS: MODERN VIEW AND TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Barshteyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Waste management and providing a world population with rich in protein food are two important problems of which the utilization of agro-industrial (agriculture and food industry waste by higher mushrooms causes the growing interest of researchers around the world. More than 150 individual types of wastes have been investigated last decade as alternative substrates alone or in various compositions (more than 450 substrates for cultivation of 52 higher mushroom species (about 100 strains as evidenced by the results of more than 130 considered in the review scientific publications. All waste is used as a basis for substrates and supplements thereto, are characteristic of the respective continent and region of the world. Publications containing biochemical studies of substrates and fungi confirm that fungi are grown in rich in biologically active substances unconventional substrates, provide a rich biochemical composition of fungi compared with conventional substrates (sawdust, straw, etc.. The disadvantage of many publications is the lack of mention of examined fungi strains, whereas studies of various strains of the same fungus in the same substrate show different results. The prospect of the study of agricultural residues utilization by higher mushrooms consists in the investigations of: productivity, biological efficiency of the process, morphological and biochemical indices of cultivated mushrooms, depending on the biochemical parameters of substrates and the process conditions; safety of cultivated mushrooms.

  16. Utilization of Waste Materials for the Treatment of Waste Water Contaminated with Sulphamethoxazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Lisha

    2014-01-01

    The activities were carried out to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of hazardous antibacterial, Sulphamethoxazole from the wastewater by adsorption technique. The selection of this method was done because of its economic viability. The method has the potency of eradicating the perilous chemicals which make their appearance in water and directly or indirectly into the whole biological system, through the ejection of effluents by the industries in flowing water. The adsorption technique was used to impound the precarious antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya an agricultural waste and Water Hyacinth a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10% to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents i.e. Deoiled Soya, Alkali treated Deoiled Soya, Water Hyacinth and Alkali treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. Deoiled Soya (DOS) showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali treated Deoiled Soya (ADOS) exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 to 12 kJ/mol which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Various kinetic studies like order of reaction, mass transfer studies, mechanism of diffusion were also performed for the ongoing processes. The mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90% to 98%. Moreover the

  17. The thermoelectric generators use for waste heat utilization from conventional power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztekler Karol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the base of available data, it is estimated that the industrial approx. 20-50% of the energy is removed into the atmosphere as waste heat include in the form of hot flue gases, cooling water, the heat losses from the equipment hot surfaces or heated products. However, according to the data from the US market in 2010, in the form of waste heat is emitted more than 96 · 106 TJ annually (2.7 · 1010 MWh, means more than 57% of the produced energy. According to statistics, currently the energy production in the US amounts to approx. 26% of the world's energy production. Assuming the same indicators, the total annual amount of waste heat in the scale of the world equals 370 · 106 TJ (10.4 · 1010 MWh. One of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes and reducing energy consumption and negative impacts to the environment is the use of waste energy [1,2,3] In this work it was investigated the possibilities of the waste heat utilization from conventional thermal power plant using thermoelectric generators, the operation of which is based on the Seebeck effect.

  18. Utilization of Black Tiger Shrimp Flesh Waste for Pop Shrimp Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Eko Irianto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the utilization of black  tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon flesh waste in the processing of pop shrimp has been carried out.  So far, shrimp flesh waste is used for the production of shrimp paste, and shrimp cracker.   The objective of this study was to develop a fomula for pop shrimp production using shrimp flesh waste. Experimental design applied in this study was three-variables mixture design, in which variables observed were shrimp flesh waste, surimi and tapioca flour. Pop shrimp obtained was evaluated for sensory properties. The best product processed using a selected formula was analysed chemically and microbiologically, particularly for proxymate composition and total plate count respectively. Selected formula of pop shrimp consisted of 50.91% shrimp flesh waste, 18.18% surimi, 3.64% tapioca flour, 10.91% onion, 2.18% garlic, 0.73% pepper powder, 1.45% sugar, 0.36% monosodium glutamate, 0.73% ginger, 1.45% salt, 4.44% butter mix, 1.38% corn flour (maizena and 3.64% bread crumb. Proxymate composition of the best pop shrimp was 70.52% moisture, 0.73% ash, 0.39% fat, and 7.44% protein, while microbiological load in terms of total plate count was 3.3x103 colonies/g.

  19. Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-08-01

    Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

  20. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The exhausted dye bath wastes still contain significant quantities of coloring matter and impart color to the receiving water bodies. In addition to imparting color dye baths also contribute to organic and inorganic load of the receiving streams. Dye bath wastes are typically characterized by residual color, alkaline pH (mostly), ...

  1. Clinical utility of the additional use of blue dye for indocyanine green for sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinan; Luo, Ningbin; Jiang, Yi; Li, Qiuyun; Wei, Wei; Yang, Huawei; Liu, Jianlun

    2017-07-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is widely used as a tracer in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) of patients with breast cancer. Whether SLNB performance can be improved by supplementing ICG with methylene blue dye remains controversial. This study compared the performance of SLNB when ICG was used alone or with blue dye. Consecutive patients with T1-3 primary breast cancer at our hospital were recruited into our study and randomized to undergo SLNB with ICG alone (n = 62) or with the combination of ICG and blue dye (n = 65). We compared the two methods in terms of identification rate, number and detection time of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) removed. SLN identification rate were similar in the absence (95.2%) or presence of blue dye (98.5%, P = 0.578) but significantly, more average nodes were removed when blue dye was used (3.8 ± 1.5 versus 2.7 ± 1.2, P = 0.000), and the average time for detecting each SLN was significantly shorter (3.91 ± 1.87 versus 5.65 ± 2.95 min; P = 0.000). No patient in the study experienced severe adverse reactions or complications. Recurrence of axillary node was detected in one patient (1.6%) using ICG alone but not in any patients using ICG and blue dye. The efficiency and sensitivity of SLNB can be improved by combining ICG with blue dye. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel approach in organic waste utilization through biochar addition in wood/polypropylene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Oisik [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Bhattacharyya, Debes [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Advanced Composite Materials, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Biochar made from waste wood was added with wood polypropylene composites. • 24% biochar gave the best mechanical properties. • 6% biochar had no effect on physico-mechanical properties of composites. • Coupling agent remained unreacted in composites having higher amount of biochar. - Abstract: In an attempt to concurrently address the issues related to landfill gas emission and utilization of organic wastes, a relatively novel idea is introduced to develop biocomposites where biochar made from pyrolysis of waste wood (Pinus radiata) is added with the same wood, plastic/polymer (polypropylene) and maleated anhydride polypropylene (MAPP). Experiments were conducted by manufacturing wood and polypropylene composites (WPCs) mixed with 6 wt%, 12 wt%, 18 wt%, 24 wt%, and 30 wt% biochar. Though 6 wt% addition had similar properties to that of the control (composite without biochar), increasing biochar content to 24 wt% improved the composite’s tensile/flexural strengths and moduli. The biochar, having high surface area due to fine particles and being highly carbonised, acted as reinforcing filler in the biocomposite. Composites having 12 wt% and 18 wt% of biochar were found to be the most ductile and thermally stable, respectively. This study demonstrates that, WPCs added with biochar has good potential to mitigate wastes while simultaneously producing biocomposites having properties that might be suited for various end applications.

  3. Cauliflower waste utilization for sustainable biobutanol production: revelation of drying kinetics and bioprocess development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Chavan, Prakash V; Chendake, Yogesh J; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-07-03

    Efficient yet economic production of biofuel(s) using varied second-generation feedstock needs to be explored in the current scenario to cope up with global fuel demand. Hence, the present study was performed to reveal the use of cauliflower waste for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B 527. The proximate analysis of cauliflower waste demonstrated to comprise 17.32% cellulose, 9.12% hemicellulose, and 5.94% lignin. Drying of cauliflower waste was carried out in the temperature range of 60-120 °C to investigate its effect on ABE production. The experimental drying data were simulated using moisture diffusion control model. The cauliflower waste dried at 80 °C showed maximum total sugar yield of 26.05 g L-1. Furthermore, the removal of phenolics, acetic acid, and total furans was found to be 90-97, 10-40, and 95-97%, respectively. Incidentally, maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.35 g L-1 with 50% sugar utilization.

  4. Lean Six Sigma in Health Care: Improving Utilization and Reducing Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almorsy, Lamia; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare costs have been increasing worldwide mainly due to over utilization of resources. The savings potentially achievable from systematic, comprehensive, and cooperative reduction in waste are far higher than from more direct and blunter cuts in care and coverage. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center inappropriate and over utilization of the glucose test strips used for whole blood glucose determination using glucometers was observed. The hospital implemented a project to improve its utilization. Using the Six Sigma DMAIC approach (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control), an efficient practice was put in place including updating the related internal policies and procedures and the proper implementation of an effective users' training and competency check off program. That resulted in decreasing the unnecessary Quality Control (QC) runs from 13% to 4%, decreasing the failed QC runs from 14% to 7%, lowering the QC to patient testing ratio from 24/76 to 19/81.

  5. Green route for the utilization of chrome shavings (chromium-containing solid waste) in tanning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2002-03-15

    Chromium-containing wastes from various industrial sectors are under critical review. Leather processing is one such industrial activity that generates chromium-bearing wastes in different forms. One of them is chrome shavings, and this contributes to an extent of 10% of the quantum of raw skins/hides processed, amounting to 0.8 million ton globally. In this study, the high protein content of chrome shavings has been utilized for reduction of chromium(VI) in the preparation of chrome tanning agent. This approach has been exploited for the development of two products: one with chrome shavings alone as reducing agent and the other with equal proportion of chrome shavings and molasses. The developed products exhibit more masking due to the formation of intermediate organic oligopeptides. This has been corroborated through the spectral, hydrolysis, and species-wise distribution studies. The formation of these organic masking agents helps in chrome tanning by shifting the precipitation point of chromium to relatively higher pH levels. Hence, the developed products find use as chrome tanning agents for leather processing, thus providing a means for better utilization of chrome shaving wastes.

  6. Study on interim storage system to utilize waste heat from spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aritomi, Masanori [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Kurokawa, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Tsuneyasu

    1997-12-31

    Spent fuels amounting to about 30 tons a year are generated by a 1,000MWe-class light water reactor (LWR). However, the whole amount of spent fuels generated by LWRs cannot be reprocessed. From the viewpoint of energy resources, it is believed in Japan that fast breeder reactors will be introduced as commercial power reactors in the future. In that time, it admits of no doubt that the spent fuel will be a valuable energy resource. It is, therefore, an urgent problem in Japan to establish interim storage systems of spent fuels for LWRs to continue smoothly in operation. In this work, the spent fuel is treated not as unwanted waste but as a heat source. At first, various kinds of interim storage systems of spent fuel are examined from the viewpoint of the utilization of the waste heat, and a pool storage system is dealt with. Next, the possibility of the utilization of the waste heat are examined. Finally, a concept of the interim storage plant, which supplies the heat to a green house where flowers with high value added such as orchids are cultivated, is proposed as a demonstration plant. (author)

  7. Process of optimization of district heat production by utilizing waste energy from metallurgical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovšek, Damjan; Fužir, Miran; Slatinek, Matic; Šepul, Tanja; Plesnik, Kristijan; Lečnik, Samo

    2017-07-01

    In a consortium with SIJ (Slovenian Steel Group), Metal Ravne, the local community of Ravne na Koro\\vskem and the public research Institut Jožef Stefan, with its registered office in Slovenia, Petrol Energetika, d.o.o. set up a technical and technological platform of an innovative energy case for a transition of steel industry into circular economy with a complete energy solution called »Utilization of Waste Heat from Metallurgical Processes for District Heating of Ravne na Koro\\vskem. This is the first such project designed for a useful utilization of waste heat in steel industry which uses modern technology and innovative system solutions for an integration of a smart, efficient and sustainable heating and cooling system and which shows a growth potential. This will allow the industry and cities to make energy savings, to improve the quality of air and to increase the benefits for the society we live in. On the basis of circular economy, we designed a target-oriented co-operation of economy, local community and public research institute to produce new business models where end consumers are put into the centre. This innovation opens the door for steel industry and local community to a joint aim that is a transition into efficient low-carbon energy systems which are based on involvement of natural local conditions, renewable energy sources, the use of waste heat and with respect for the principles of sustainable development.

  8. A novel green and template free approach for the synthesis of gold nanorice and its utilization as a catalyst for the degradation of hazardous dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanur; Ahmaruzzaman, M.

    2015-05-01

    Herein, we describe a simple, green and template free method for the production of rice shaped gold nanostructures using an aqueous extract of the egg shells of Anas platyrhynchos. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED) and FT-IR studies. The UV-visible spectrum of the synthesized gold nanostructures showed a transverse mode surface plasmon resonance peaks (SPR) at around 540 nm and a longitudinal mode at 880 nm. The TEM and SAED pattern confirmed the morphology, size and crystallographic structure of the synthesized gold nanorice. The synthesized gold nanorice was utilized for the removal of a toxic Eosin Y dye by photodegradation. It was observed that the dye was degraded completely within 1 h and the percentage efficiency was found to be 96.1%.

  9. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles by waste tea extract and degradation of organic dye in the absence and presence of H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Weixia; Chen, Kui; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiuhua; Lu, Minghua

    2017-11-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) had been successfully synthesized by using an aqueous extract of waste tea as a stabilizing and reducing agent. The green synthesized AgNPs were characterized by ultraviolet visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and zeta potential. The work focused on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and ethyl violet (EV) in aqueous solution with AgNPs as catalyst in the absence and presence of H2O2. The AgNPs exhibit fast, efficient and stable catalytic activity in the degradation of cationic organic dyes, but it is no catalytic degradation of anionic organic dyes at room temperature. The kinetics of dyes degradation with AgNPs follows the pseudo-second-order model. Meanwhile, the AgNPs also show better antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. The formed highly catalytic active AgNPs can be used as catalyst in industries and water purification.

  10. Taenia taeniaeformis: effectiveness of staining oncospheres is related to both temperature of treatment and molecular weight of dyes utilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Busboom, Jan R; Nelson, Mark L; Hancock, Dale D; Tang, Juming; Jasmer, Douglas P

    2008-02-14

    Methods to determine viability of taeniid oncospheres following treatments with potential lethality have practical application in efforts to control transmission. Here we investigated several methods, in lieu of infectivity studies, to assess oncosphere viability and determine lethal temperature treatment regimens. In the first experiment, a standard treatment to exshell oncospheres with 0.5% hypochlorite was assessed for influence on oncosphere recovery of Taenia taeniaeformis eggs. Recovery of eggs and exshelled oncospheres decreased with increasing time in hypochlorite, which indicated that hypochlorite can damage eggs and oncospheres, translating into potential overestimation of lethality of experimental treatments. Losses in hypochlorite were accentuated when eggs were pretreated at 75 degrees C, but not lower temperatures, including 65 degrees C, indicating a sharp threshhold between 65 degrees C and 75 degrees C where eggs and oncospheres became hypersensitive to subsequent hypochlorite treatment. To further investigate this change in relation to temperature, non-vital (acridine orange, AO) and vital (propidium iodide, PI; trypan blue, TB) dyes were used to assess staining of oncospheres (exshelled or not) under conditions ranging from room temperature up to 95 degrees C. The behaviors of dyes as related to internal staining of oncospheres were described using non-linear regression and a sigmoid four-parametric model to determine the inflection point (T50). Each of the dyes differed significantly in T50 estimates, e.g. AO (69.22+/-0.53), PI (73.89+/-0.52) and TB (79.43+/-0.45). For these dyes, the T50 increased in relation to the increasing molecular weight of the dyes. Collectively, the results suggested that barriers to chemical permeability exist in eggs that breakdown incrementally with increasing temperatures above 65 degrees C. This staining behavior and the likelihood that the temperatures involved are above a lethal threshhold clarify a basic

  11. Fabrication of solid state dye sensitized solar cells utilizing vapor phase polymerized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) hole conducting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorenko, Kenneth H.

    There is a need for sustainable and renewable energy sources that can be used in both grid and off-grid structured systems. Photovoltaic devices have been used to generate electrical energy by capturing and converting photons from the sun. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) have gained attention due to their consistent energy generation during indirect sunlight. Furthermore, DSSC can be applied as a flexible device and gain benefits from the low cost roll to roll manufacturing. With this in mind, we have taken steps toward optimizing a DSSC device for use as a solid state solar cell using conducting polymers. Typically DSSC use a liquid electrolyte as a hole conducting layer used to direct the separation of electron -- hole pairs. This liquid electrolyte comes with problems that can be subverted using conducting polymers. Poly(3,4 -- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), is a conducting thiophene that is tailored to have enhanced conductivity. We show that a vapor phase polymerization (VPP) of PEDOT can be used as a hole conducting layer in a solid state DSSC device. To this end we have investigated the electrical properties of the VPP PEDOT films in order to understand how the morphology and conductive domains relate to a polymers conductivity. Using 4 point probe we have measure the sheet resistance of the film, as well as how the films resistance is altered during stress tests. Scanning electron microscopy has been utilized to compare morphologies of different PEDOT films and see how surface morphology impacts the conductance measured. Using conductive atomic force microscopy we can look at the conductive domains between VPP PEDOT and PEDOT:PSS films. We saw that conductive domains of the VPP PEDOT are not only more conductive but also much larger in size and widespread throughout the film. We show that there is formation of PEDOT through optical spectroscopy and structural characterization such as UV/Vis and Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction. When

  12. Direct utilization of human liquid wastes by plants in a closed ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovsky, G. M.; Gitelson, J. I.; Shilenko, M. P.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Trubachev, I. N.

    1997-01-01

    Model experiments in phytotrons have shown that urea is able to cover 70% of the demand in nitrogen of the conveyer cultivated wheat. At the same time wheat plants can directly utilize human liquid wastes. In this article by human liquid wastes the authors mean human urine only. In a long-term experiment on ``man-higher plants'' system with two crewmen, plants covered 63 m^2, with wheat planted to - 39.6 m^2. For 103 days, complete human urine (total amount - 210.7 l) was supplied into the nutrient solution for wheat. In a month and a half NaCl supply into the nutrient solution stabilized at 0.9-1.65 g/l. This salination had no marked effect on wheat production. The experiment revealed the realistic feasibility to directly involve liquid wastes into the biological turnover of the life support system. The closure of the system, in terms of water, increased by 15.7% and the supply of nutrients for wheat plants into the system was decreased. Closedness of biological turnover of matter in a man-made ``man - higher plants'' ecological system might involve, among other processes, direct utilization of human liquid wastes by plants. The amount of urine comprises 15-20% of the total amount of water cycling within the system including water as part of food, household, hygiene and potable water necessary for man. What is more, it they contains most nitrogen-bearing compounds emitted by man, almost all of the NaCl and some other substances involved in the biological turnover. Human liquid wastes can be utilized either by preliminary physical-chemical treatment (evaporating or freezing out the water, finally oxidizing the organic matter, isolating the mineral components required for plants, etc.) and further involvement of the obtained products or by direct application into the nutrient solution for plants. The challenge of direct utilization is that plants have no need of Na^+ and Cl^-, and also the organic forms of nitrogen emitted by man cannot fully meet the demand of

  13. Activated carbons from waste of oil-palm kernel shells, sawdust and tannery leather scraps and application to chromium(VI), phenol, and methylene blue dye adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Suarez, Sergio; Colpas-Castillo, Fredy; Meza-Fuentes, Edgardo; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Johana; Fernandez-Maestre, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Phenol, chromium, and dyes are continuously dumped into water bodies; the adsorption of these contaminants on activated carbon is a low-cost alternative for water remediation. We synthesized activated carbons from industrial waste of palm oil seed husks (kernel shells), sawdust, and tannery leather scraps. These materials were heated for 24 h at 600, 700 or 800°C, activated at 900°C with CO2 and characterized by proximate analysis and measurement of specific surface area (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Langmuir), and microporosity (t-plot). Isotherms showed micropores and mesopores in activated carbons. Palm seed activated carbon showed the highest fixed carbon content (96%), and Langmuir specific surface areas up to 1,268 m2/g, higher than those from sawdust (581 m2/g) and leather scraps (400 m2/g). The carbons were applied to adsorption of Cr(VI), phenol, and methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions. Phenol adsorption on activated carbons was 78-82 mg/g; on palm seed activated carbons, Cr(VI) adsorption at pH 7 was 0.35-0.37 mg/g, and methylene blue adsorption was 40-110 mg/g, higher than those from sawdust and leather scraps. Activated carbons from palm seed are promising materials to remove contaminants from the environment and represent an alternative application for vegetal wastes instead of dumping into landfills.

  14. Utilization of a new optical sensor unit to monitor the electrochemical elimination of selected dyes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valica, M.; Černá, T.; Hostin, S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents results obtained by developed optical sensor, which consist from multi-wavelength LED light source and two photodetectors capable of measuring the change in optical signal along two different optical paths (absorbance and reflectance measurements). Arduino microcomputer was used for light source management and optical signal data measuring and recording. Analytical validation of developed optical sensor is presented in this paper. The performance of the system has been tested with varying water solution of dyes (malachite green, methyl orange, trypan red). These results show strong correlations between the optical signal response and colour change from the dyes. Sensor was used for continual in-situ monitoring of electrochemical elimination of selected dyes (current density 15.7 mA cm-2, electrolyte volume 4 L and NaCl concentration 2 g L-1). Maximum decolorization level varies with each dye. For malachite green was obtain 92,7 % decolorization (25 min); methyl orange 90,8% (8,5 min) and trypan red 84,7% decolorization after 33 min of electrochemical treatment.

  15. INVESTIGATION ON UTILITY OF PLASTIC WASTE AS AN ADDITIVE FOR BITUMINOUS CONCRETE USING WET PROCESS OF MIXING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Virendra Tiwari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Plastic waste has become a major environmental issue of concern due to its exponential growth due to rapid urbanization. The paper investigates utility of plastic waste as an additive for bituminous concrete using wet process of mixing. Methodology. The methodology for the present paper has been designed with complex research consisting of Marshall mix design of the bituminous mix added with plastic waste for modifying bitumen using wet process of mixing, performing the tests on the samples and analyzing the results in the form of table and figures. In the present paper LDPE and HDPE type of plastic waste are used to modify the bitumen. Finding. The results show that addition of 6 percent of bitumen improves the Marshall properties of the mix. Use of plastic to modify the bitumen not only makes the road surface more durable but also it is an eco-friendly way of proper disposal of plastic waste. Originality. The processes used for mixing the plastic waste to the bitumen are dry process and wet process. Dry process of mixing the plastic waste to the bituminous mix is most common and lot of study is carried out on its application. In the present paper wet process of mixing has not yet been studied much. Practical Value. The practical application of utilizing the plastic waste to modify bitumen in the bituminous mix improves the stability values resulting in the more durable road surface. Also the method ensures the proper disposal of plastic waste in eco-friendly way.

  16. Preparation and Utilization of Corncob Activated Carbon for Dyes Removal from Aqueous Solutions: Batch and Continuous Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abd Muslim AL- Tufaily

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Commercial activated carbon and produced corncob activated carbon were used for the adsorption of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution using batch and continuous processes. Batch processes were conducted to study the effects of solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, agitation speed and initial dye concentration. The optimum values for methylene blue dye adsorption were: solution pHs of 6 and 7, contact times of 8 and 5 hr., adsorbent dosages of 1.5, and 0.5 gm, agitation speeds of 200 and 250 rpm and initial dye concentration of 50 mg/l calculated by commercial activated carbon and corncob activated carbon respectively. Two isotherm models, Freundlich and Langmuir fitted with the experimental data found from batch processes, the Langmuir model fitted well than the Freundlich, with maximum adsorption capacities of 16.21 and 30.95 mg/g and R2 of 0.952 and 0.992 predicted by commercial activated carbon and corncob activated carbon respectively. Radial and vertical flow regime reactors were conducted in column tests for the two adsorbent materials at different three flow rates (0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 L/min and initial dye concentrations 15 mg/l, the same volume of (775 ml from adsorbent materials used for both radial and vertical reactors to make a comparison between the capacity of the adsorbent materials each with another and between the performance of radial and vertical flow regime reactors configurations on breakthrough curves behavior. Radial flow regime reactor showed good results in comparison with vertical flow regime reactor.

  17. Thermal utilization of wastes as a part of an integrated waste management concept of the Balearic Islands; Thermische Abfallbehandlung als Teil des integrierten Abfallwirtschaftskonzepts der Balearen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbermann, Georg [Hitachi Zosen Inova AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    For several years, a rethinking in the tourist paradise Mallorca took place. Due to the limited land resources it was clear to the public authorities that the waste cannot be deposited unlimited and unsorted. An ambitious concept for the waste management has to be developed, and an integrated system has to be planned. The ambiguous goal is zero landfill: In future, as many waste materials as possible should be led back in the product cycle. The non-recyclable materials should be incinerated efficiently and utilized energetically.

  18. An innovative thermal management concept of waste heat utilization in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M.K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an innovative thermal management concept that utilizes the waste heat of electronics to meet both the heater power budget and the thermal requirements of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) payload during the phase-B study at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The phase-B study included trade studies of different orbits. This paper is concerned with the highly elliptical orbit. The total heat dissipation of the electronics is 177.4 W, all at the mid-section of a 3.9-m tall graphite epoxy structure. The innovative thermal management concept uses constant conductance heat pipes to transport the waste heat to interior cold plates which radiate to the structure and aft end of the baffle tubes. It provides uniform temperature to the structure. Variable conductance heat pipes transport the excess waste heat to external radiators to maintain the structure at a constant temperature. This design minimizes the heater power for the graphite epoxy structure and reduces the heater power for the mirrors. The total heater power required at Sun angles in the 45{degree} to 105{degree} range is 58.5 W at a 45{degree} sun angle, 46 W at 90{degree} and 30.4 W at 105{degree}. The optical performance of the payload is optimum at these sun angles. It also provides temperature stability to the structure during science observation at sun angles of 20{degree} to 45{degree} and 105{degree} to 137{degree} when no heater power is available.

  19. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO.

  20. Utilization of different waste proteins to create a novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Li; Zhao, Jianshu; Huang, Rong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    High-quality bio-organic fertilizers (BIOs) cannot be produced without the addition of some proteins, while many waste proteins are haphazardly disposed, causing serious environmental pollution. In this study, several waste proteins were used as additives to assist with the reproduction of the functional microbe (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9) inoculated into matured composts to produce BIOs. An optimized composition of solid-state fermentation (SSF) raw materials was predicted by response surface methodology and experimental validation. The results showed that 7.61% (w/w, DW, the same below) rapeseed meal, 8.85% expanded feather meal, 6.47% dewatered blue algal sludge and 77.07% chicken compost resulted in maximum biomass of strain SQR-9 and the maximum amount of lipopeptides 7 days after SSF. Spectroscopy experiments showed that the inner material structural changes in the novel SSF differed from the control and the novel BIO had higher dissolved organic matter. This study offers a high value-added utilization of waste proteins for producing economical but high-quality BIO. PMID:25586328

  1. Potential Technology for the Advanced Utilization of Construction, Demolition and Industrial Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aid, G. (Royal Institute of Technology KTH, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden))|(EDAB Partnership (Eds Aatervinning), 192 77 Sollentuna (Sweden)). e-mail: grahama@kth.se

    2008-10-15

    Currently, the vast majority of organic construction, demolition and industrial (C, D and I) wastes in Sweden are sent to incineration plants as a (large sized) refuse derived fuel (RDF) for rather inefficient (15-35%) co-heat and power production. The nonmetallic inorganic fractions of these wastes are often deposited in landfills as filler. With recent economic incentives and rising tipping costs commercial research into the use of non-conventional processing techniques for the production of alternative products has become of greater interest. This study, a greatly abridged version of the author's recent thesis research performed in conjunction with the Swedish C, D and I handling partnership EDAB, attempts to give a glimpse of some of the more promising processes for these under used resources. In its compaction this paper is more of a literature review of these processes, rather than a specific case study and market analysis. For the respective waste streams a variety of thermal, mechanical, and biological processes are proving themselves to be more efficient, more profitable, and to have fewer negative environmental effects than conventional alternatives. Although some risks and implementation difficulties are still associated with these emerging technologies; greater resource utilization, improved product mobility, and potentially stronger economic performance will prove strong drivers for companies possessing compatible sets of characteristics to forge previously unconventional paths

  2. Utilization of potato starch processing wastes to produce animal feed with high lysine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Jiang, Cheng; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to utilize wastes from the potato starch industry to produce single-cell protein (SCP) with high lysine content as animal feed. In this work, S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine hydrochloride-resistant Bacillus pumilus E1 was used to produce SCP with high lysine content, whereas Aspergillus niger was used to degrade cellulose biomass and Candida utilis was used to improve the smell and palatability of the feed. An orthogonal design was used to optimize the process of fermentation for maximal lysine content. The optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: temperature of 40°C, substrate concentration of 3%, and natural pH of about 7.0. For unsterilized potato starch wastes, the microbial communities in the fermentation process were determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results showed that the dominant population was Bacillus sp. The protein quality as well as the amino acid profile of the final product was found to be significantly higher compared with the untreated waste product at day 0. Additionally, acute toxicity test showed that the SCP product was non-toxic, indicating that it can be used for commercial processing.

  3. Utilization of fermentation waste (Corynebacterium glutamicum) for biosorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: drkvijy@chonbuk.ac.kr; Yun, Yeoung-Sang [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ysyun@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2007-03-06

    A fermentation waste, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was successfully employed as a biosorbent for Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solution. This paper initially studied the effect of pretreatment on the biosorption capacity of C. glutamicum toward RB5, using several chemical agents, such as HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, NaOH, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, CaCl{sub 2} and NaCl. Among these reagents, 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} gave the maximum enhancement of the RB5 uptake, exhibiting 195 mg/g at pH 1 with an initial RB5 concentration of 500 mg/l. The solution pH and temperature were found to affect the biosorption capacity, and the biosorption isotherms derived at different pHs and temperatures revealed that a low pH (pH 1) and high temperature (35 deg. C) favored biosorption. The biosorption isotherm was well represented using three-parameter models (Redlich-Peterson and Sips) compared to two-parameter models (Langmuir and Freundlich models). As a result, high correlation coefficients and low average percentage error values were observed for three-parameter models. A maximum RB5 uptake of 419 mg/g was obtained at pH 1 and a temperature of 35 deg. C, according to the Langmuir model. The kinetics of the biosorption process with different initial concentrations (500-2000 mg/l) was also monitored, and the data were analyzed using pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models, with the latter describing the data well. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G{sup o}, {delta}H{sup o} and {delta}S{sup o}, were calculated, indicating that the present system was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The use of a 0.1 M NaOH solution successfully desorbed almost all the dye molecules from dye-loaded C. glutamicum biomass at different solid-to-liquid ratios examined.

  4. Phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye: synthesis, characterization, and utilization for pattern recognition of CYFRA 21-1 in whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Yanık, Hülya; Göksel, Meltem; Alexandru, Anghel; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2017-08-29

    Phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye (BODIPY = boron dipyrromethene) was synthesized, fully characterized, and used for molecular recognition of CYFRA 21-1, a lung cancer biomarker, from whole blood samples. Thin films of three magnesium oxides ((MgO) n , where n = 8, 9, or 10)) were deposited on a paper substrate, and they were immersed in a solution of phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye (1.17 × 10(-3) mol/L) for the design of stochastic sensors. Limits of determination of picograms per milliliter magnitude order were recorded for the proposed stochastic sensors. CYFRA 21-1 was reliably identified and determined with recoveries higher than 95% and RSD lower than 1% in whole blood samples.

  5. Wrinkled silica/titania nanoparticles with tunable interwrinkle distances for efficient utilization of photons in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Soo; Lim, Joohyun; Rho, Won-Yeop; Kim, Jin; Moon, Doo-Sik; Jeong, Juwon; Jung, Dongwook; Choi, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Efficient light harvesting is essential for the realization of high energy conversion efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). State-of-the-art mesoporous TiO2 photoanodes fall short for collection of long-wavelength visible light photons, and thus there have been efforts on introduction of scattering nanoparticles. Herein, we report the synthesis of wrinkled silica/titania nanoparticles with tunable interwrinkle distances as scattering materials for enhanced light harvesting in DSCs. These particles with more than 20 times larger specific surface area (>400 m2/g) compared to the spherical scattering particles (<20 m2/g) of the similar sizes gave rise to the dye-loading amounts, causing significant improvements in photocurrent density and efficiency. Moreover, dependence of spectral scattering properties of wrinkled particles on interwrinkle distances, which was originated from difference in overall refractive indices, was observed.

  6. Multiple utilization of energy in buildings. Utilization of waste heat at the Blood Transfusion Service; Energie im Gebaeude mehrfach nutzen. Abwaermenutzung beim Blutspendedienst Nord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaigalat, Jens

    2012-11-01

    For the Blood Transfusion Service North the German Red Cross (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) utilizes the waste heat from production facilities and laboratories for heating offices. By doing this, the VRV technology for the realization of this solution was used.

  7. Influence of particle size and salinity on adsorption of basic dyes by agricultural waste: dried seagrape (Caulerpa lentillifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjongharn, Pimol; Meevasana, Khanidtha; Pavasant, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    Green macroalga Caulerpa lentillifera was found to have reasonable adsorption capacity for basic dyes, Astrazon Blue FGRL (AB), Astrazon Red GTLN (AR), and Astrazon Golden Yellow GL-E (AY). The initial dye concentration was in the range of 100-1,800 mg/L. The dried algal sorbent was ground and sieved into 3 sizes: S (0.1-0.84 mm), M (0.84-2.0 mm), and L sizes (larger than 2.0 mm). For all conditions examined in this work (at 25 degrees C in batch systems), the adsorption reached equilibrium within the first hour. The kinetic data corresponded well with the pseudo second order kinetic model where the rate constant, k2, decreased as the sorbent size increased for all dyes. The adsorption isotherms followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Among three sorbent sizes, S size gave the highest adsorption capacity followed by M and L sizes. A reduction of sorbent size increased the specific surface area for mass transfer, and also increased the total pore volume, thus providing more active sites for adsorption. The adsorption of AB was adversely influenced by the protonation of algal surface at low pH. On the other hand, the adsorption of AR and AY could be due to weak electrostatic interaction, which was not significantly affected by pH. Increasing salinity of the system caused a decrease in adsorption capacity possibly due to the competition between Na+ and the dye cations for the binding sites on algal surface. Moreover, an increase in salinity generated a compressed electrical double layer on the algal surface which exerted repulsive force, retarding the adsorption of positive charged molecules such as the basic dyes.

  8. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen, Xiaoqing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization (China)

    2015-09-15

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: MWCNTs@carbon nanocables has been successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal carbonization method. The as-synthesized novel samples were used as adsorbents and exhibited high adsorption capacity on MB and CV. - Highlights: • A simple, cost-effective and “green” method for the synthesis of the material. • The diameter and length of the material are relatively easy to control. • The surface has large oxygen-containing groups and preferable chemical reactivity. • Compared with raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is much high.

  9. Energy recovery from waste glycerol by utilizing thermal water vapor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamošiūnas, Andrius; Valatkevičius, Pranas; Gimžauskaitė, Dovilė; Jeguirim, Mejdi; Mėčius, Vladas; Aikas, Mindaugas

    2017-04-01

    Glycerol, considered as a waste feedstock resulting from biodiesel production, has received much attention in recent years due to its properties, which offer to recover energy. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a thermal water vapor plasma for waste (crude) glycerol conversion to synthesis gas, or syngas (H2 + CO). In parallel of crude glycerol, a pure glycerol (99.5%) was used as a reference material in order to compare the concentrations of the formed product gas. A direct current (DC) arc plasma torch stabilized by a mixture of argon/water vapor was utilized for the effective glycerol conversion to hydrogen-rich synthesis gas. It was found that after waste glycerol treatment, the main reaction products were gases with corresponding concentrations of H2 50.7%, CO 23.53%, CO2 11.45%, and CH4 3.82%, and traces of C2H2 and C2H6, which concentrations were below 0.5%. The comparable concentrations of the formed gas products were obtained after pure glycerol conversion-H2 46.4%, CO 26.25%, CO2 11.3%, and CH4 4.7%. The use of thermal water vapor plasma producing synthesis gas is an effective method to recover energy from both crude and pure glycerol. The performance of the glycerol conversion system was defined in terms of the produced gas yield, the carbon conversion efficiency, the cold gas efficiency, and the specific energy requirements.

  10. Utilization of Baggase Waste Based Materials as Improvement for Thermal Insulation of Cement Brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminudin Eeydzah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Building materials having low thermal load and low thermal conductivity will provide thermal comforts to the occupants in building. In an effort to reduce the use of high energy and waste products from the agricultural industry, sugarcane bagasse and banana bagasse has been utilize as an additive in the manufacture of cement brick. The aim of this study is to investigate the insulation and mechanical properties of brick that has been mixed with bagasse and its effectiveness as thermal insulation using heat flow meter. Waste bagasse is being treated using sodium hydroxide (NaOH and is characterized using SEM and XRF. The samples produced with two different dimensions of 50 mm × 50 mm × 50 mm and 215mm × 102.5mm × 65mm for thermal conductivity test. Next, the sample varies from 0% (control sample, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% in order to determine the best mix proportion. The compressive strength is being tested for 7, 14 and 28 days of water curing. Results showed that banana bagasse has lower thermal conductivity compared to sugarcane bagasse used, with compressive strength of 15.6MPa with thermal conductivity 0.6W/m.K.

  11. Organic Rankine Cycle Analysis: Finding the Best Way to Utilize Waste Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Chakroun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is a type of power cyclethat uses organic substances such as hydrocarbons orrefrigerants as the working fluid. ORC technology is usedto generate electricity in waste heat recovery applications,because the available heat is not at a high enoughtemperature to operate with other types of cycles. Theoptimum amount of working fluid required for the cycle(i.e., optimum charge level was investigated. Three chargelevels (13, 15, and 18 lbm were tested, and their effect onefficiency and performance of the system was analyzed.The heat source for the fluid was waste steam from thePurdue Power Plant, which had an average temperatureof 120oC. Regular city tap water at a temperature of 15oCwas used as the heat sink. For each charge level, multipletests were performed by measuring the temperaturesand pressures at all state points in the cycle, in order tounderstand any overarching patterns within the data.An important parameter that was analyzed is the 2nd lawefficiency. This efficiency is a measure of the effectivenessof the energy utilization compared to that of an idealcase. The peak efficiency increased from 24% to 27% asthe charge in the system decreased. Therefore, movingforward, this research suggests that a lower charge levelin the system will increase efficiency. However, testingbelow 13 lbm might cause mechanical complications inthe equipment as there may not be enough fluid to flowaround; thus, a compromise had to be made.

  12. Utilization of natural hematite as reactive barrier for immobilization of radionuclides from radioactive liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Afifi, E M; Attallah, M F; Borai, E H

    2016-01-01

    Potential utilization of hematite as a natural material for immobilization of long-lived radionuclides from radioactive liquid waste was investigated. Hematite ore has been characterized by different analytical tools such as Fourier transformer infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal (DT) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET-surface area. In this study, europium was used as REEs(III) and as a homolog of Am(III)-isotopes (such as (241)Am of 432.6 y, (242m)Am of 141 y and (243)Am of 7370 y). Micro particles of the hematite ore were used for treatment of radioactive waste containing (152+154)Eu(III). The results indicated that 96% (4.1 × 10(4) Bq) of (152+154)Eu(III) was efficiently retained onto hematite ore. Kinetic experiments indicated that the processes could be simulated by a pseudo-second-order model and suggested that the process may be chemisorption in nature. The applicability of Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models was investigated. It was found that Langmuir isotherm exhibited the best fit with the experimental results. It can be concluded that hematite is an economic and efficient reactive barrier for immobilization of long-lived radio isotopes of actinides and REEs(III). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. UTILIZATION OF AGARWOOD DISTILLATION WASTE IN OILWELL CEMENT AND ITS EFFECT ON FREE WATER AND POROSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina Sauki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The intent of this research is to utilize the waste produced by distillation process of Agarwood oil and convert it into a profitable oilwell cement additive. Common problem during oilwell cementing is free wáter separation. This problem could weaken cement at the top, gas migration problem and non uniform density of cement slurry that are even worst in cementing deviated well. Another concern on cementing design is the porosity of the hardened cement. If the cement is too porous, it can lead to gas migration and casing corrosion. All tests were conducted according to API Specification-10B. Free water test was determined at different concentrations of Agarwood Waste Additive (AWA, different inclination angles and different temperatures. Based on the findings, it was observed that zero free water was produced when 2% BWOC of AWA was used at all angles. The findings also revealed that AWA can maintain good thermal stability as it could maintain zero free water at increased temperature up to 60˚C.  The porosity of AWA cement was comparable with standard API neat cement as the porosity did not differ much at 2% BWOC of AWA. Therefore, it can be concluded that the AWA is suitable to  be used as an additive in oil well cement (OWC  with 2% BWOC is taken as the optimum concentration.

  14. Column performance of carbon nanotube packed bed for methylene blue and orange red dye removal from waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, G. K.; Mubarak, N. M.; Nizamuddin, S.; Al-Salim, H. S.; Sahu, J. N.

    2017-06-01

    Environmental issues have always been a major issue among human kind for the past decades. As the time passes by, the technology field has grown and has helped a lot in order to reduce these environmental issues. Industries such as metal plating facilities, mining operations and batteries production are a few examples that involves in the environmental issues. Carbon nanotube is proven to possess excellent adsorption capacity for the removal of methylene blue and orange red dyes. The effect of process parameters such as pH and contact time was investigated The results revealed that optimized conditions for the highest removal for methylene blue (MB) (97%) and orange red (94%) are at pH 10, CNTs dosage of 1 grams, and 15 minutes for each dyes removal respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data obtained was best fit to Freundlich model, while kinetic data can be characterized by the pseudo second-order rate kinetics.

  15. Effective utilization of waste water through recycling, reuse, and remediation for sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rajamani; Krishnamoorthy, Renga

    2014-01-01

    Water is vital for human, animal, and plant life. Water is one of the most essential inputs for the production of crops. Plants need it in enormous quantities continuously during their life. The role of water is felt everywhere; its scarcity causes droughts and famines, its excess causes floods and deluge. During the next two decades, water will increasingly be considered a critical resource for the future survival of the arid and semiarid countries. The requirement of water is increasing day by day due to intensive agriculture practices, urbanization, population growth, industrialization, domestic use, and other uses. On the other hand, the availability of water resources is declining and the existing water is not enough to meet the needs. To overcome this problem, one available solution is utilization of waste water by using recycling, reuse, and remediation process.

  16. Method of dye removal for the textile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a method of processing a waste stream containing dyes, such as a dye bath used in the textile industry. The invention comprises using an inorganic-based polymer, such as polyphosphazene, to separate dyes and/or other chemicals from the waste stream. Membranes comprising polyphosphazene have the chemical and thermal stability to survive the harsh, high temperature environment of dye waste streams, and have been shown to completely separate dyes from the waste stream. Several polyphosplhazene membranes having a variety of organic substituent have been shown effective in removing color from waste streams.

  17. A food waste utilization study for removing lead(II) from drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan Ince, Olcay; Ince, Muharrem; Yonten, Vahap; Goksu, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This is the first study about removal of lead (Pb(II)) from energy drinks. In this paper, food waste, namely eggshell (hydroxyapatite) utilization, was used to remove Pb(II) from mineral water and energy drinks. Mineral water and energy drinks were chosen for removal of lead since the latter is severely hazardous to human health even in small amounts. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was performed to optimize the application process by practice of the quadratic model united with the Central Composite Design (CCD) and quadratic combined program was utilized to study the most effective parameters on aforementioned liquids. Through the application of variance analysis (ANOVA) factors critical to removing of lead were identified for each experimental design response. Maximum adsorption capacity of eggshell was achieved as 923mgg(-1) for Pb(II). The obtained optimum conditions were applied to drinks. Results showed that used adsorbent was quite effective in removing Pb(II) from drinks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Material stream management of biomass wastes for the optimization of organic wastes utilization; Stoffstrommanagement von Biomasseabfaellen mit dem Ziel der Optimierung der Verwertung organischer Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knappe, Florian; Boess, Andreas; Fehrenbach, Horst; Giegrich, Juergen; Vogt, Regine [ifeu-Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Dehoust, Guenter; Schueler, Doris; Wiegmann, Kirsten; Fritsche, Uwe [Oeko-Institut, Inst. fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The effective use of the valuable substances found in waste materials can make an important contribution to climate protection and the conservation of fossil and mineral resources. In order to harness the potential contribution of biomass waste streams, it is necessary to consider the potential of the waste in connection with that of the total biomass. In this project, relevant biogenous material streams in the forestry, the agriculture as well as in several industries are studied, and their optimization potentials are illustrated. Scenarios are then developed, while taking various other environmental impacts into considerations, to explore possible optimized utilization of biomass streams and biomass waste substances for the future. Straw that is not needed for humus production and currently left on the field can be used for its energy content. The realisation of this potential would be significant contribution towards climate protection. The energetic use of liquid manure without negatively influencing its application as commercial fertilizer can also be similarly successful because of its large volume. The results of our study also support an increased energetic use of saw residues as fuel (in form of pellets) in small furnaces. For household organic wastes, the report suggests the fermentation with optimized energy use and intensified marketing of the aerobically treated compost as peat substitution. While for waste cooking fat that is currently disposed in the residual waste, a separate collection and direct use in motors that are used as combined heat and power generation are recommended. For meat and bone meal and communal sludge that are not being used substantial currently or in the future, phosphorus can be recovered with promising success from the ash produced when the waste is burnt in mono incinerators. These technical options should however be tested against disposal standard. (orig.)

  19. Treatment of Direct Blending Dye Wastewater and Recycling of Dye Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Li Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new sorbent material, barium sulfate-Direct Blending Yellow D-3RNL hybrid (BSD, was synthesized and characterized by various methods. Both the anionic dyes, Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B and Weak Acid Green GS were hardly adsorbed by the BSD material, while the sorption of Ethyl Violet (EV and Victoria Blue B were extremely obvious. The sorption of cationic dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model, which depended on the electric charge attraction. The saturation amount of EV adsorbed onto the BSD material approached to 39.36 mg/g. The sorption of EV changed little with pH from 3 to 12 while it increased with increasing levels of electrolyte. A dye wastewater sampled from Jinjiang Chemicals was treated, and the color removal rate was more than the COD removal rate. In addition, the cationic dye-BSD sludge was utilized as a colorant fill-in coating. The light stability and thermal stability of the colorant was measured and exhibited good features. This work provided a simple and eco-friendly method for dye wastewater treatment with recycling of waste.

  20. The Effect of the SCAMPER Technique in Raising Awareness Regarding the Collection and Utilization of Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelikler, Dilek; Harman, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the SCAMPER technique in raising awareness among science students regarding the collection and utilization of solid waste. The participants included a total of 65 third-year students. According to the study results, the science students described schools and visual media as their main source of…

  1. From waste to value - direct utilization of limonene from orange peel in a biocatalytic cascade reaction towards chiral carvolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberleitner, N.; Ressmann, A. K.; Bica, K.; Gaertner, P.; Fraaije, M. W.; Bornscheuer, U. T.; Rudroff, F.; Mihovilovic, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    In this proof of concept study we demonstrate direct utilization of limonene containing waste product orange peel as starting material for a biocatalytic cascade reaction. The product of this cascade is chiral carvolactone, a promising building block for thermoplastic polymers. Four different

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF DYEING PARAMETERS TO DYE COTTON WITH CARROT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRALLES Verónica

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural dyes derived from flora and fauna are believed to be safe because of non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and biodegradable nature. Furthermore, natural dyes do not cause pollution and waste water problems. Natural dyes as well as synthetic dyes need the optimum parameters to get a good dyeing. On some occasions, It is necessary the use of mordants to increase the affinity between cellulose fiber and natural dye, but there are other conditions to optimize in the dyeing process, like time, temperature, auxiliary porducts, etc. In addition, the optimum conditions are different depends on the type of dye and the fiber nature. The aim of this work is the use of carrot extract to dye cotton fabric by exhaustion at diverse dyeing conditions. Diffferent dyeing processes were carried out to study the effect of pH condition and the temperature, using 7, 6 and 4 pH values and 95 ºC and 130ºC for an hour. As a result some images of dyed samples are shown. Moreover, to evaluate the colour of each sample CIELAB parameters are analysed obtained by reflexion spectrophotometre. The results showed that the temperature used has an important influence on the colour of the dyed sample.

  3. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Two-Stage Waste Gasification Reactor for Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build, and test a two-stage waste processing reactor for space applications. Our proposed technology converts waste from space missions into...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC BASES OF TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD WASTE UTILIZATION BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Panov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Performed scientific work is directed on creation of technological bases of collection and recycling of waste in place waste generation using the method of anaerobic digestion and receiving socio-economic, ecological and agro-technical effect.

  6. Utility of Rice Bran Mixed with Fermentation Extract of Vegetable Waste Unconditioned as Probiotics from Vegetable Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahya Setya Utama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of the study was to enhance utilization of Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces sp. as starter for fermentation of waste cabbage and green mustard to enhance the utility of rice bran as an ingredient of poultry feed. The first stage of the study was to characterize the extract of fermented wasted vegetable with difference concentration of glucose and different period of time for incubation. Completely randomized design using 3 x 3 factorial with three replications was used for the first stage of the study. The second stage of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the extract of fermented wasted vegetable to improve the quality and utility of rice bran. Completely randomized design with four treatments and 4 replications. The third stage of the study was to obtain the value of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention, as well as metabolic energy of rice bran after fermentation in broiler hatching. The third stage analysis was conducted by t-test analysis. The results of the study showed that the microbial characteristics on the extract of fermented wasted vegetable in two days incubation time and 2% concentration of glucose was able to produce pH of 3.80, log of total lactic acid bacteria 7.38 and types of microbes that grow predominantly were Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces Sp. The effectiveness of the extract fermented wasted vegetable for the fermentation of rice bran were shown in additional concentration of extract wasted vegetable of 40% with a moisture content of  toluene 65.24%, 13.36% ash, 14.93% protein, 7.61% crude fat, 12.39% crude fiber, nitrogen free extract material (NFE 51.59% and 0.07% biomass. The biological value and the availability of fermented rice bran were higher than unfermented rice bran on the broiler chickens after hatching. The values were justified from nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention also metabolic energy. The study concluded that the benefits and utility of rice bran could

  7. Management in the system of waste utilization of production and consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimov, U. I.; Gilmanshin, I. R.; Krainova, D. R.; Galeev, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    The main problems of waste management in accordance with the legislation are considered in the article. The economic benefits of separate waste collection are listed. The necessity of transition to a new level of waste management in the Republic of Tatarstan is determined.

  8. Toward environmentally-benign utilization of nonmetallic fraction of waste printed circuit boards as modifier and precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, Pejman; Ning, Chao; Ouyang, Weiyi; Xu, Meng [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Lin, Carol S.K. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); McKay, Gordon, E-mail: kemckayg@ust.hk [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Division of Sustainable Development, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Hamad bin Khalifa University, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Environmental impacts of electronic waste and specifically waste printed circuit boards. • Review of the recycling techniques of waste printed circuit boards. • Advantages of physico-mechanical recycling techniques over chemical methods. • Utilization of nonmetallic fraction of waste printed circuit boards as modifier/filler. • Recent advances in the use of nonmetallic fraction of waste printed circuit boards as precursor. - Abstract: Electronic waste, including printed circuit boards, is growing at an alarming rate due to the accelerated technological progress and the shorter lifespan of the electronic equipment. In the past decades, due to the lack of proper economic and environmentally-benign recycling technologies, a major fraction of e-waste generated was either destined to landfills or incinerated with the sole intention of its disposal disregarding the toxic nature of this waste. Recently, with the increasing public awareness over their environment and health issues and with the enaction of more stringent regulations, environmentally-benign recycling has been driven to be an alternative option partially replacing the traditional eco-unfriendly disposal methods. One of the most favorable green technologies has been the mechanical separation of the metallic and nonmetallic fraction of the waste printed circuit boards. Although metallic fraction, as the most profitable component, is used to generate the revenue of the separation process, the nonmetallic fraction (NMF) has been left isolated. Herein, the recent developments in the application of NMF have been comprehensively reviewed and an eco-friendly emerging usage of NMF as a value-added material for sustainable remediation has been introduced.

  9. Application of Taguchi method and ANOVA in the optimization of dyeing process on cotton knit fabric to reduce re-dyeing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudin; Kharisma, Angel; Murphiyanto, Richard Dimas Julian; Perdana, Muhammad Kevin; Pirdo Kasih, Tota

    2017-12-01

    In the textile industry, tons of dyes are lost to effluents every year during the dyeing and finishing operations, due to the inefficient processes. As the dyeing process produce tons of effluents, the re-dyeing process multiplies the number. The re-dyeing process will be done when the expected color not reached that caused by the improper setting of parameters. The waste of these processes could threaten the environment. In this paper, we utilize Taguchi methods and ANOVA to obtain the optimum conditions of a dyeing process at XYZ company and to gain the percentage of contributions of each parameter. To confirm the optimum conditions obtained by using the Taguchi Method, verification test was carried out to inspect the similarity between predicted output and five experiments under the optimal conditions and the result was confirmed. The optimum conditions for a dyeing process are dye concentration 3.5%; Na2SO4 concentration 80g/l; Na2CO3 concentration 5.8 g/l; and temperature at 80°C.

  10. Utilization of cellulosic waste from tequila bagasse and production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) bioplastics by Saccharophagus degradans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva Munoz, Luis Esteban; Riley, Mark R

    2008-08-01

    Utilization of wastes from agriculture is becoming increasingly important due to concerns of environmental impact. The goals of this work were to evaluate the ability of an unusual organism, Saccharophagus degradans (ATCC 43961), to degrade the major components of plant cell walls and to evaluate the ability of S. degradans to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, also known as bioplastics). S. degradans can readily attach to cellulosic fibers, degrade the cellulose, and utilize this as the primary carbon source. The growth of S. degradans was assessed in minimal media (MM) containing glucose, cellobiose, avicel, and bagasse with all able to support growth. Cells were able to attach to avicel and bagasse fibers; however, growth on these insoluble fibers was much slower and led to a lower maximal biomass production than observed with simple sugars. Lignin in MM alone did not support growth, but did support growth upon addition of glucose, although with an increased adaptation phase. When culture conditions were switched to a nitrogen depleted status, PHA production commences and extends for at least 48 h. At early stationary phase, stained inclusion bodies were visible and two chronologically increasing infrared light absorbance peaks at 1,725 and 1,741 cm(-1) confirmed the presence of PHAs. This work demonstrates for what we believe to be the first time, that a single organism can degrade insoluble cellulose and under similar conditions can produce and accumulate PHA. Additional work is necessary to more fully characterize these capabilities and to optimize the PHA production and purification. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Aerobic decolourization of two reactive azo dyes under varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... colourants; they are usually not easily biodegraded. Dye colours are visible in water at concentration as low as 1 mg/L, whereas textile processing waste water, normally contain more than 10-200 mg/L dye concentration, resulting in aesthetic problems (O'Neil et al., 1999). The toxicity of dye industrial waste ...

  12. Severe situation of rural nonpoint source pollution and efficient utilization of agricultural wastes in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Ni, Jiupai; Xie, Deti

    2015-11-01

    Rural nonpoint source (NPS) pollution caused by agricultural wastes has become increasingly serious in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA), significantly affecting the reservoir water quality. The grim situation of rural NPS pollution in the TGRA indicated that agrochemicals (chemical fertilizer and pesticide) were currently the highest contributor of rural NPS pollution (50.38%). The harmless disposal rates of livestock excrement, crop straws, rural domestic refuse, and sewage also cause severe water pollution. More importantly, the backward agricultural economy and the poor environmental awareness of farmers in the hinterland of the TGRA contribute to high levels of rural NPS pollution. Over the past decade, researchers and the local people have carried out various successful studies and practices to realize the effective control of rural NPS pollution by efficiently utilizing agricultural wastes in the TGRA, including agricultural waste biogas-oriented utilization, crop straw gasification, decentralized land treatment of livestock excrement technology, and crop straw modification. These technologies have greatly increased the renewable resource utilization of agricultural wastes and improved water quality and ecological environment in the TGRA.

  13. Some methods for human liquid and solid waste utilization in bioregenerative life-support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, S A; Zolotukhin, I G; Tikhomirov, A A; Tikhomirova, N A; Kudenko, Yu A; Gribovskaya, I V; Balnokin, Yu; Gros, J B

    2008-12-01

    Bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS) are studied for developing the technology for a future biological life-support system for long-term manned space missions. Ways to utilize human liquid and solid wastes to increase the closure degree of BLSS were investigated. First, urine and faeces underwent oxidation by Kudenko's physicochemical method. The products were then used for root nutrition of wheat grown by the soil-like substrate culture method. Two means of eliminating sodium chloride, introduced into the irrigation solution together with the products of urine oxidation, were investigated. The first was based on routine electrodialysis of irrigation water at the end of wheat vegetation. Dialysis eliminated about 50% of Na from the solution. This desalinization was performed for nine vegetations. The second method was new: after wheat cultivation, the irrigation solution and the solution obtained by washing the substrate containing mineral elements not absorbed by the plants were used to grow salt-tolerant Salicornia europaea L. plants (saltwort). The above-ground biomass of this plant can be used as a food, and roots can be added to the soil-like substrate. Four consecutive wheat and Salicornia vegetations were cultivated. As a result of this wheat and Salicornia cultivation process, the soil-like substrate salinization by NaCl were considerably decreased.

  14. Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.

    1980-05-01

    The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

  15. Utilization of silica coated waste paper fibre in plastic composite production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Peşman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, utilization of silica coated waste paper fibers as filler in high density polyethylene matrix were investigated. The effects of silica coating pigment in paper on physical, thermal and some mechanical properties of cellulose fiber-plastic composite were examined. The filler used in this study were uncoated cellulose, 6.68%, 12.38%, 18.21% and 24.32% mineral contented cellulose fibers. Each filler type was mixed with high density polyethylene (HDPE at 40% by weight fiber loading. In this case, the ratio of SiO2-CaCO3 in plastic composites were calculated as 0%, 2.67%, 4.95%, 7.28% and 9.73% respectively. Water absorption and thickness swelling of fiber-plastic composites were significantly decreased with the silica and filler concentrations. With increased mineral content, thermal properties of fiber-plastic composites increased slightly. In addition, fibers and fiber-plastic composites were characterized with FTIR-ATR and SEM-EDS.

  16. Framework for evaluating the utility of incentive systems for radioactive waste repository siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, S.A.; Soderstrom, E.J.; Sorensen, J.; Peelle, E.; Reed, J.H.; Bjornstad, D.J.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of social and institutional issues in siting radioactive waste repositories has been recognized in recent years. Within this set of issues, the siting of repositories over the objections of members of potential host communities is viewed as especially problematic. Incentives to potential host communities have been suggested as a means of increasing local support for and offsetting local opposition to such facilities. Incentives are classified according to their function as mitigation, compensation or reward. Our analysis of results of a 1980 survey (conducted by John Kelly, Complex Systems Group, University of New Hampshire) of 420 rural Wisconsin residents indicates that incentives may achieve the purpose of increasing support for and decreasing opposition to accepting a repository. Criteria for evaluating the utility of incentives are identified. They respond to four basic questions: (1) What is absolutely necessary. (2) Will the incentive work. (3) Can the incentive be understood. and (4) What are the consequences of implementing the incentive. It is suggested that meaningful evaluations of incentives can only be performed by members of potential host communities.

  17. Building energy system optimizations with utilization of waste heat from cogenerations by means of genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayo, Genku [Department of Architecture, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ooka, Ryozo [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Distributed energy systems based on cogeneration offer significant potential to save energy since they effectively utilize waste heat from power generators. However, unless there is an appropriate combination of machinery and operations, the planned performance cannot be achieved. Thus, it is quite difficult to determine the optimal combination of machinery and operations. For this, an optimal design approach is needed. In this study, a new optimal design method for building energy systems is proposed. There are an enormous variety of combinations with regard to energy supply and demand. This method designs the most efficient energy system by optimizing the operation of available systems with consideration for the optimal capacity of machinery in the systems. Optimization algorithms known as ''genetic algorithms'' (GAs) with the capacity to deal with non-linear optimization problems have been adopted in this optimization analysis. In this study, a single-building energy system is evaluated. The result shows that the proposed method is sufficiently capable of optimizing the design, and has the potential to be applied to very complex energy systems with appropriate improvements. (author)

  18. The utilization of waste by-products for removing silicate from mineral processing wastewater via chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jianhua; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Zhang, Qingpeng; Liu, Hang; Meng, Xiangsong

    2017-11-15

    This study investigates an environmentally friendly technology that utilizes waste by-products (waste acid and waste alkali liquids) to treat mineral processing wastewater. Chemical precipitation is used to remove silicate from scheelite (CaWO4) cleaning flotation wastewater and the waste by-products are used as a substitute for calcium chloride (CaCl2). A series of laboratory experiments is conducted to explain the removal of silicate and the characterization and formation mechanism of calcium silicate. The results show that silicate removal reaches 90% when the Ca:Si molar ratio exceeds 1.0. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the characterization and formation of calcium silicate. The pH is the key factor for silicate removal, and the formation of polysilicic acid with a reduction of pH can effectively improve the silicate removal and reduce the usage of calcium. The economic analysis shows that the treatment costs with waste acid (0.63 $/m(3)) and waste alkali (1.54 $/m(3)) are lower than that of calcium chloride (2.38 $/m(3)). The efficient removal of silicate is confirmed by industrial testing at a plant. The results show that silicate removal reaches 85% in the recycled water from tailings dam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

    1999-04-01

    The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper.

  20. Utilization possibilites of waste products from fishing and hunting to biogas and bio-oil production in Uummannaq County

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdottir, Ragnhildur; Jørgensen, Marianne Willemoes

    2008-01-01

    the specific conditions that apply in Uummannaq County. The best alternatives were evaluated to be biogas production and utilization of fat from the fish waste to produce bio-oil. The results showed that with the price of energy in Greenland in 2009 of 3,71 DKR per kWh, the waste in Uummannaq County would...... amount to approximately 6 million DKR when using biogas production and 5,7 million DKR when using bio-oil. Compared with the energy used in Uummannaq County today, the biogas production would be able to supply 17 percent of the energy and bio-oil production would cover approximately 16 percent....

  1. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 2, Industrial liquid waste processing, industrial gaseous waste processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarize the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Individual reports are indexed separately.

  2. Proceedings of waste stream minimization and utilization innovative concepts: An experimental technology exchange. Volume 1, Industrial solid waste processing municipal waste reduction/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V.E. [ed.; Watts, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    This two-volume proceedings summarizes the results of fifteen innovations that were funded through the US Department of Energy`s Innovative Concept Program. The fifteen innovations were presented at the sixth Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Austin, Texas, on April 22--23, 1993. The concepts in this year`s fair address innovations that can substantially reduce or use waste streams. Each paper describes the need for the proposed concept, the concept being proposed, and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. The papers are divided into two volumes: Volume 1 addresses innovations for industrial solid waste processing and municipal waste reduction/recycling, and Volume 2 addresses industrial liquid waste processing and industrial gaseous waste processing. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Biosorption of acid dyes from aqueous solution using Curcuma angustifolia scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of even a very small quantity of dye in water bodies is undesirable and affects the water bodies. Dye removal from industrial waste water is significant; hence in this study, a material that is an economical waste product was employed to test its acid dye removing capacity from aqueous solution. Methods: In this study, batch mode experiments were performed in the sorption process of Acid Red 97 (AR 97, Acid Red 114 (AR 114 and Acid Red 151 (AR 151 onto Curcuma angustifolia scales (CS. Also, the effect of process parameters like pH and adsorbent dosage was studied. The experimental data of AR 97, AR 114 and AR 151 sorption was fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Kinetic results in AR 97, AR 114 and AR 151 sorption were fitted at various concentrations to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and Intra-particle diffusion model. Results: The monolayer sorption capacity of the acid dyes was found to be AR 97 (350.87 mg/g, AR 114 (202.42 mg/g and AR 151 (168.91 mg/g. The Pseudo-second order model proved to be the best fit for the acid dyes. Boyd plot, confirms film diffusion in all acid dye sorption processes. Conclusion: The results showed higher dye removal for acid dyes at pH 2. The isotherm data, demonstrated good sorption capacity with AR 97>AR 114>AR 151. Employing the CS material in this study proves to be a potential alternative to costlier adsorbents, utilized for the treatment of dye containing industrial waste water.

  4. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and column operations for the removal of hazardous dye, Tartrazine from aqueous solutions using waste materials--Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Alok; Mittal, Jyoti; Kurup, Lisha

    2006-08-25

    Adsorbents, Bottom Ash (a power plant waste) and De-Oiled Soya (an agricultural waste) exhibit good efficacy to adsorb a highly toxic dye, Tartrazine. Through the batch technique equilibrium uptake of the dye is observed at different concentrations, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents and sieve size of adsorbents. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms are successfully employed on both the adsorbents and on the basis of these models the thermodynamic parameters are evaluated. Kinetic investigations reveal that more than 50% adsorption of dye is achieved in about 1h in both the cases, whereas, equilibrium establishment takes about 3-4h. The linear plots obtained in rate constant and mass transfer studies further confirm the applicability of first order rate expression and mass transfer model, respectively. The kinetic data treated to identify rate controlling step of the ongoing adsorption processes indicate that for both the systems, particle diffusion process is predominant at higher concentrations, while film diffusion takes place at lower concentrations. The column studies reveal that about 96% saturation of both the columns is attained during their exhaustion, while about 88 and 84% of the dye material is recovered by eluting dilute NaOH solution through exhausted Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns, respectively.

  5. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and column operations for the removal of hazardous dye, Tartrazine from aqueous solutions using waste materials-Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Alok [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India)]. E-mail: aljymittal@yahoo.co.in; Mittal, Jyoti [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India); Kurup, Lisha [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India)

    2006-08-25

    Adsorbents, Bottom Ash (a power plant waste) and De-Oiled Soya (an agricultural waste) exhibit good efficacy to adsorb a highly toxic dye, Tartrazine. Through the batch technique equilibrium uptake of the dye is observed at different concentrations, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents and sieve size of adsorbents. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms are successfully employed on both the adsorbents and on the basis of these models the thermodynamic parameters are evaluated. Kinetic investigations reveal that more than 50% adsorption of dye is achieved in about 1 h in both the cases, whereas, equilibrium establishment takes about 3-4 h. The linear plots obtained in rate constant and mass transfer studies further confirm the applicability of first order rate expression and mass transfer model, respectively. The kinetic data treated to identify rate controlling step of the ongoing adsorption processes indicate that for both the systems, particle diffusion process is predominant at higher concentrations, while film diffusion takes place at lower concentrations. The column studies reveal that about 96% saturation of both the columns is attained during their exhaustion, while about 88 and 84% of the dye material is recovered by eluting dilute NaOH solution through exhausted Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns, respectively.

  6. Preparation and characterization of clay bonded high strength silica refractory by utilizing agriculture waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Bhardwaj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clay bonded silica refractory was prepared by utilizing agriculture waste called rice husk ash (RHA and refractory grog. Various samples were prepared with different compositions based upon partial replacement of quartz by RHA. Rectangular samples were prepared by following semi dry process prior to pressing in a uniaxial hydraulic press and sintering at a temperature of 1200 °C in air atmosphere. Various physical, mechanical and thermal characterizations were done like X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, apparent porosity (AP, bulk density (BD, cold crushing strength (CCS, refractoriness and thermal conductivity measurement. The sample utilizing 30% of RHA was considered most optimum composition which produced cold crushing strength of 38 MPa and thermal conductivity of 2.08 W/m K at 800 °C with a considerable good refractoriness. Enhancement in the mechanical as well as thermal properties may be considered as attributed to the amorphous silica which has reacted more easily and efficiently with other material surrounding giving rise to the densification and produced stable crystalline phase to the refractory material. These promising characteristics suggests that the RHA may lead to be used as a potential material for the preparation of clay bonded high strength silica refractories. Resumen: Se preparó sílice refractaria unida a arcilla con residuos agrícolas conocidos como ceniza de cascarilla de arroz (rice husk ash [RHA] y grog refractario. Se prepararon varias muestras con diferentes composiciones basadas en la sustitución parcial de cuarzo por RHA. Las muestras rectangulares se prepararon siguiendo un proceso semiseco antes de prensarlas en una prensa hidráulica uniaxial y sinterizarlas a una temperatura de 1.200 °C en atmósfera de aire. Se realizaron diversas caracterizaciones físicas, mecánicas y térmicas, como la difracción de rayos X, el microscopio electrónico de barrido, la porosidad

  7. Optimal utilization of waste-to-energy in an LCA perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy production from two types of municipal solid waste was evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA): (1) mixed high calorific waste suitable for production of solid recovered fuels (SRF) and (2) source separated organic waste. For SRF, co-combustion was compared with mass burn incineration....... For organic waste, anaerobic digestion (AD) was compared with mass burn incineration. In the case of mass burn incineration, incineration with and without energy recovery was modelled. Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion was evaluated for use both as transportation fuel and for heat and power production...... alternatives were comparable for SRF. For organic waste, mass burn incineration with energy recovery was preferable over anaerobic digestion in most impact categories. Waste composition and flue gas cleaning at co-combustion plants were critical for the environmental performance of SRF treatment, while...

  8. Utilization of red mud for the purification of waste waters from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luka, Mikelic; Visnja, Orescanin; Stipe, Lulic [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Lab. for radioecology, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Sorption of the radionuclides and heavy metals from low level liquid radioactive waste on the coagulant produced from bauxite waste (red mud and waste base) was presented. Research was conducted on composite annual samples of waste water collected in the Waste Monitor Tank (W.M.T.) from Kro Nuclear Power Plant during each month. Activities of radionuclide in W.M.T. were measured before and after purification using high purity germanium detector. Also, elemental concentrations in W.M.T. before and after purification were measured by source excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (E.D.X.R.F.). It has been showed that activated red mud is excellent purification agent for the removal of radionuclides present in low level liquid radioactive waste. Removal efficiency was 100% for the radionuclides {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co 100%, and over 60% for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. (authors)

  9. Waste Utilization and Biodiesel Production by the Green Microalga Scenedesmus obliquus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shovon; Mallick, Nirupama

    2011-01-01

    Scenedesmus obliquus was cultivated in three types of waste discharges to couple waste treatment with biodiesel production. The lipid pool accumulation was boosted to 1.0 g liter−1 against 0.1 g liter−1 for the control. The waste-grown S. obliquus showed an increase in the content of the saturated fatty acid pool, which is desirable for good-quality biodiesel. PMID:21057012

  10. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of In Vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Richard Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (fΔμ)were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that Δμ values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of single cells is

  11. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of in vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Richard Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (fΔμ) were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that Δμ values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of single cells is

  12. Performance of a large-scale melter off-gas system utilizing simulated SRP DWPF waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, J L; Randall, C T

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy and the DuPont Company have begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive waste now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of the process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, two large-scale glass melter systems have been designed and operated with simulated waste. Experimental data from these operations show that process requirements will be met. 6 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Leaching tests as a tool in waste management to evaluate the potential for utilization of waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloot, H.A. van der [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Kosson, D.S. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Several waste materials from large scale industrial processes possess technical properties that would allow their use in certain construction applications, e.g. coal fly ash, slags from large scale industrial melting and ore processing, and incinerator residues. The disposal of such materials requires space and controlled landfills to minimize long term environmental risks. The beneficial use of such bulk materials is an attractive alternative, if it can be shown that such applications are environmentally acceptable. For this management of wastes and the decision to either dispose or use, information on the environmental properties of materials is needed. Leaching tests have been developed to assess such properties. These have been designed typically in relation to regulatory tools, not as instruments to guide the management of wastes and the possibilities to improve material properties. New methods have been designed to address this aspect, in which maximum benefit can be derived from knowledge of the systematic behaviour of materials and the already existing knowledge in other countries producing similar residues. After initial detailed characterization, concise procedures can be used for control purposes focused on the typical aspects of a certain residue stream. Examples of existing knowledge in this field will be presented.

  14. Central composite design for the optimization of removal of the azo dye, methyl orange, from waste water using fenton reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azami Mahsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the degradation of Methyl Orange, using Fenton reaction was studied and optimized using central composite design as a response surface methodology. The effects of various experimental parameters in this reaction were investigated using central composite design. 28 experiments, with 4 factors and 5 levels for each factor were designed. These factors (or variables were: initial concentration of Fe (II, initial concentration of H2O2, initial concentration of oxalate and the reaction time. A full-quadratic polynomial equation between the percentage of dye degradation (as a response and the studied parameters was established. After removing the non-significant variables from the model, response surface method was used to obtain the optimum conditions. The optimum ranges of variables were: 0.25 - 0.35 mM for initial concentration of Fe (II, 5-17 mM for initial concentration of H2O2, 4-9 mM for initial concentration of oxalate, and 50-80 min for the reaction time. Also the results of extra experiments showed that these optimized values can be used for real samples and yield to a high value for the response.

  15. Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

  16. Utilization of a waste glycerol fraction using and reusing immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans ATCC 621 cell extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Stasiak-Różańska

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: The method proposed in this work is based on the conversion of waste glycerol to dihydroxyacetone in a reaction catalyzed by immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans cell extract with glycerol dehydrogenase activity, and it could be an effective way to convert waste glycerol into a valuable product.

  17. Utilization of various industrial wastes for the production of poly-b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Considering the industrial interest of poly-b-hydroxy butyrate (PHB) and its high production cost, work has been undertaken for the production of PHB by Alcaligenes eutrophus. Different industrial wastes (malt, soya, sesame, molasses, bagasse and pharmaceutical waste) were used as a cheap substrate to minimize the ...

  18. Utilization of biodiesel waste as a feedstock for the production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... interested in the improvement of fermentation process for the production of biopolymer from biodiesel wastes due to the current situation about global environment and solid waste management problems. Among various classes of biopolymer, polyhydro- xyalkanoates (PHAs) have played much attention.

  19. Combined energy production and waste management in manned spacecraft utilizing on-demand hydrogen production and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitzur, Shani; Rosenband, Valery; Gany, Alon

    2016-11-01

    Energy supply and waste management are among the most significant challenges in human spacecraft. Great efforts are invested in managing solid waste, recycling grey water and urine, cleaning the atmosphere, removing CO2, generating and saving energy, and making further use of components and products. This paper describes and investigates a concept for managing waste water and urine to simultaneously produce electric and heat energies as well as fresh water. It utilizes an original technique for aluminum activation to react spontaneously with water at room temperature to produce hydrogen on-site and on-demand. This reaction has further been proven to be effective also when using waste water and urine. Applying the hydrogen produced in a fuel cell, one obtains electric energy as well as fresh (drinking) water. The method was compared to the traditional energy production technology of the Space Shuttle, which is based on storing the fuel cell reactants, hydrogen and oxygen, in cryogenic tanks. It is shown that the alternative concept presented here may provide improved safety, compactness (reduction of more than one half of the volume of the hydrogen storage system), and management of waste liquids for energy generation and drinking water production. Nevertheless, it adds mass compared to the cryogenic hydrogen technology. It is concluded that the proposed method may be used as an emergency and backup power system as well as an additional hydrogen source for extended missions in human spacecraft.

  20. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE UTILIZATION OF THE FLY ASH FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary study of the utilization of the fly ash from coal-fired power plant for immobilizing simulated radioactive waste has been done. The objective of this research was to study characteristics of pozzolanic material of the fly ash from coal-fired power plant as substitute of compactor material for immobilizing simulated radioactive waste. The experiment was carried out by mixing of the compactor materials such as (cement + lime, (cement + fly ash, (cement + fly ash + lime, (fly ash + lime with Na2SO4 225 g/L and KCl 4.6 g/L as simulation of evaporator concentrate according to reference waste form no. 1 on characterization of low and medium-level radioactive waste forms in the EUR 9423-EN. Each mixture of compactor materials solidified for 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days. Solidified result was monolith, and then its compressive strength, water absorption, and porosity were tested. The experiment result showed that the best of the compactor materials on the immobilizing simulated radioactive waste was cement of 30% (wt, fly ash of 20% (wt, and lime of 20% (wt with compressive strength of monolith of 1512.7 N/cm2. The condenser substance on the weight ratio of fly ash/lime of 20/50 - 60/10 % (wt as pozzolanic substance could be used for immobilizing simulated radioactive waste by compressive strength of monoliths of 345 - 610.4 N/cm2. Minimum compressive strength of monolith from radioactive waste cementation according to IAEA is 320 N/cm2, hence compressive strength of monoliths from this experiment can be expressed enough well.

  1. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities...... and Parabacteroides, which showed a delayed contribution to the extracellular electron transport leading to a slow cascade utilization of WAS. Conclusions: Efficient pretreatment could supply more short-chain fatty acids and higher conductivities in the fermentative liquid, which facilitated mass transfer in anodic...

  2. Synergistic Utilization of Coal Fines and Municipal Solid Waste in Coal-Fired Boilers. Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Zamansky; P. Maly; M. Klosky

    1998-06-12

    A feasibility study was performed on a novel concept: to synergistically utilize a blend of waste coal fines with so-called E-fuel for cofiring and reburning in utility and industrial boilers. The E-fuel is produced from MSW by the patented EnerTech's slurry carbonization process. The slurry carbonization technology economically converts MSW to a uniform, low-ash, low-sulfur, and essentially chlorine-free fuel with energy content of about 14,800 Btu/lb.

  3. The Utilization of Banana Peel in the Fermentation Liquid in Food Waste Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, A. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Azhari, N. W.

    2016-07-01

    Municipal solid waste in Malaysia contains a high amount of organic matters, particularly food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% from the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Food waste can be converted into useful materials such as compost. However, source separation of food waste for recycling is not commonly practiced in Malaysia due to various constraints. These constraints include low awareness among the waste generators and low demand of the products produced from the food waste such as composts. Composting is one of the alternatives that can be used in food waste disposal from Makanan Ringan Mas. The aim of the study is to convert food waste generated from Makanan Ringan Mas which is a medium sale industry located at Parit Kuari Darat, Batu Pahat by using composting method. The parameters which include temperature, pH value, NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium) values has been examined. Banana peel is being used as the fermentation liquid whilst soil and coconut husk were used as the composting medium. Based on the results during the composting process, most of the pH value in each reactor is above 5 and approximately at neutral. This shown that the microbial respiration in the well controlled composting reactor was inhibited and had approached the mature phase. On the other hand, during the period of composting, the overall temperature range from 25 °C to 47 °C which shown the active phase for composting will occoured. As for NPK content Nitrogen value range is 35325 mg/L to 78775 mg/L, Phosphorus, 195.83 mg/L to 471 mg/L and potassium is 422.3 mg/L to 2046 mg/L which is sufficient to use for agricultural purpose. The comparison was made with available organic compost in the market and only showed slightly difference. Nevertheless, in comparison with common fertilizer, the NPK value of organic compost are considerably very low.

  4. Development of a method utilizing drum headspace VOC concentration as a waste characterization tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    Pretest waste characterization for the bin-scale tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) required sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from within transuranic (TRU) waste drums. Although the bin-scale tests have been postponed, the development and demonstration of accurate waste characterization methods continues. The objectives of extensive sampling of waste drums are to obtain a representative sample from each layer of confinement to identify volatile and gaseous constituents, verify process knowledge of the drum contents, and demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. A method to estimate the VOC concentration between layers of confinement from a single headspace sample collected beneath the drum filter of a vented waste drum is investigated. This method of characterizing the void space within a drum could eventually lead to a significant reduction in sampling time and cost. A model based on fundamental principles of transport phenomena is developed to estimate the VOC concentration throughout a waste drum based on the knowledge of the transport properties and the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model and experimental results are compared.

  5. UTILIZATION OF HAZELNUT HUSKS, TEA AND TOBACCO WASTES, AS RAW MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ş. İsmail KIRBAŞLAR

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, moisture, ash, oil and cellulose of hazelnut husks, tea and tobacco wastes were analyzed. The amounts of pentosan, pentose and furfural were determined in the hazelnut husks, tea and tobacco wastes. Furfural was produced from each three waste products by a steam distillation method. IR spectra of each furfural product were measured and compared with standard furfural. Activated carbon prepared from the hazelnut husks at the different temperature, and organic and inorganic pollutants were removed by using the adsorbent obtained from hazelnut husk.

  6. SOLID AND LIQUID PINEAPPLE WASTE UTILIZATION FOR LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION USING Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid and solid  pineapple wastes contain mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for fermentation to produce organic acid. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were  carried out in batch fermentation using  the  liquid and solid pineapple wastes to produce lactic acid. The anaerobic fermentation of lactic acid were performed at 40 oC, pH 6, 5% inocolum and  50 rpm. Initially  results show that the liquid pineapple waste by  using Lactobacillus delbrueckii can be used as carbon source  for lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid  are found to be 79 % yield, while only  56% yield was produced by using solid waste

  7. Productive utilization of pig farm wastes: A case study for developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polprasert, Chongrak; Kongsricharoern, Noppadol; Kanjanaprapin, Wilai (Environmental Engineering Div., Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)); Yang, P.Y. (Dept. of Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States))

    1994-06-30

    This paper presents a case study on pig farm waste management in which pig manure is stabilized in two-stage anaerobic reactors (to produce methane), while pig farm wastewater is treated in water hyacinth ponds from which the harvested water hyacinth plants are used in the production of silage (animal feed) or compost fertilizer. The results suggest the technical feasibility of applying these technologies to treat and recycle pig farm wastes. Cost/benefit analysis reveals the option to produce methane gas and silage to be financially viable after 15 years of operation. A management concept of waste recycling programs is presented, including relationships among objectives, constraints and implementation plan. Decision on a waste recycling program should not be based only on cost/benefit analysis, but also on the pollution control and public health improvement to be gained

  8. Proceedings of the DOE residue and waste fuels utilization program contract or review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    Commercialization of wood combustion was discussed at this meeting. The use of agricultural and wood wastes as energy sources was also discussed. Separate abstracts were written for individual items. (DC)

  9. Utilizing waste materials to enhance mechanical and durability characteristics of concrete incorporated with silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction and demolition wastes are increasing significantly due to augmented boom of modern construction. Although the partial cement replacement materials do promote the idea of sustainable construction, the use of construction and demolition waste can also be considered to be viable option to advance the sustainability in modern construction practices. This paper investigates the use of industrial waste materials namely marble dust and crushed bricks as replacement of natural fine aggregates along with the use of silica fume as a partial cement replacement on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. Partial replacement levels of waste materials were 10 and 20 percent by volume while the partial replacement level of silica fume was kept to 20 percent at all concrete samples. The results reported in this paper show that the use of marble dust as a replacement material to the natural fine aggregates resulted in an increase in the mechanical properties of concrete. However, the use of crushed bricks did not substantially contribute in the development of strength. Water permeability of concrete incorporated with both silica fume and waste materials (marble dust and crushed bricks decreased significantly. The decrease in water permeability of concrete was attributed to the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume with calcium hydroxide of cement and the filler effect of the waste materials of marble dust and crushed bricks. The use of waste materials also enhance the freeze and thaw resistance of concrete. Authors strongly suggest that the pozzolanic reaction and the development of the microstructure of the concrete through the use of waste materials are largely responsible from the advances in the durability of concrete.

  10. UTILIZATION OF POULTRY, COW AND KITCHEN WASTES FOR BIOGAS PRODUCTION: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Animasahun

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The amount of solid wastes generated in developing countries such as Nigeria has steadily increased over the last two decades as a result of population explosion and continuous growth of industries and agricultural practices. In agriculture, particularly cattle rearing, large quantities of cow wastes are generated, which could be used as biogas inputs to compliment the fuel usage alternative. In addition, a large number of families generate heavy wastes in the kitchen on a daily basis, which could be converted to economic benefits. In this work, a comparative study of biogas production from poultry droppings, cattle dung, and kitchen wastes was conducted under the same operating conditions. 3kg of each waste was mixed with 9L of water and loaded into the three waste reactors. Biogas production was measured for a period of 40 days and at an average temperature of 30.5oC. Biogas production started on the 7th day, and attained maximum value on the 14th days for reactor 1. Production reached its peak on the 14th day with 85´10-3dm3 of gas produced in reactor 2. For reactor 3, biogas production started on the 8th day and production reached a peak value on the 14th day. The average biogas production from poultry droppings, cow dung and kitchen waste was 0.0318dm3/day, 0.0230dm3/day and 0.0143dm3/day, respectively. It is concluded that the wastes can be managed through conversion into biogas, which is a source of income generation for the society.

  11. Using tobacco waste extract in pre-culture medium to improve xylose utilization for l-lactic acid production from cellulosic waste by Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuxi; Wang, Yuanliang; Zhang, Jianrong; Pan, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the high-titer l-lactic acid production from cellulosic waste using Rhizopus oryzae. The tobacco waste water-extract (TWE) added with 5g/L glucose and 0.1g/L vitamin C was optimized as pre-culture medium for R. oryzae. Results found that compared to traditional pre-culture medium, it improved xylose consumption rate up to 2.12-fold and enhanced l-lactic acid yield up to 1.73-fold. The highest l-lactic acid concentration achieved was 173.5g/L, corresponding to volumetric productivity of 1.45g/Lh and yield of 0.860g/g total reducing sugar in fed-batch fermentation. This process achieves efficient production of polymer-grade l-lactic acid from cellulosic feedstocks, lowers the cost of fungal cell pre-culture and provides a novel way for re-utilization of tobacco waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bioremediation of direct dyes in simulated textile effluents by a paramorphogenic form of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, C R; Almeida, E J R; Santos, G C; Morão, L G; Fabris, G S L; Mitter, E K

    2012-01-01

    Azo dyes are extensively used for coloring textiles, paper, food, leather, drinks, pharmaceutical products, cosmetics and inks. The textile industry consumes the largest amount of azo dyes, and it is estimated that approximately 10-15% of dyes used for coloring textiles may be lost in waste streams. Almost all azo dyes are synthetic and resist biodegradation, however, they can readily be reduced by a number of chemical and biological reducing systems. Biological treatment has advantages over physical and chemical methods due to lower costs and minimal environmental effect. This research focuses on the utilization of Aspergillus oryzae to remove some types of azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The fungus, physically induced in its paramorphogenic form (called 'pellets'), was used in the dye biosorption studies with both non-autoclaved and autoclaved hyphae, at different pH values. The goals were the removal of dyes by biosorption and the decrease of their toxicity. The dyes used were Direct Red 23 and Direct Violet 51. Their spectral stability (325-700 nm) was analyzed at different pH values (2.50, 4.50 and 6.50). The best biosorptive pH value and the toxicity limit, (which is given by the lethal concentration (LC(100)), were then determined. Each dye showed the same spectrum at different pH values. The best biosorptive pH was 2.50, for both non- autoclaved and autoclaved hyphae of A. oryzae. The toxicity level of the dyes was determined using the Trimmed Spearman-Karber Method, with Daphnia similis in all bioassays. The Direct Violet 51 (LC(100) 400 mg · mL(-1)) was found to be the most toxic dye, followed by the Direct Red 23 (LC(100) 900 mg · mL(-1)). The toxicity bioassays for each dye have shown that it is possible to decrease the toxicity level to zero by adding a small quantity of biomass from A. oryzae in its paramorphogenic form. The autoclaved biomass had a higher biosorptive capacity for the dye than the non-autoclaved biomass. The results show that

  13. Carbon/Attapulgite Composites as Recycled Palm Oil-Decoloring and Dye Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyan Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated clay minerals have been widely used in the edible oil refining industry for decolorization of crude oil by adsorption, and so far many methods have been used to improve their decolorization efficiency. Herein, we successfully prepared a series of carbon/attapulgite (C/APT composite adsorbents by a one-step in-situ carbonization process with natural starch (St as the carbon source. It has been revealed that the adsorbent had better decolorization efficiency for crude palm oil than acid-activated APT. However, more than a million tons of decolorized waste is produced every year in the oil-refining industry, which was often treated as solid waste and has not yet been reutilized effectively. In order to explore a viable method to recycle and reuse the decolorant, the waste decolorant was further prepared into new C/APT adsorbents for the removal of dyes from wastewater, and then the dyes adsorbed on the adsorbent were used as the carbon sources to produce new C/APT adsorbents by a cyclic carbonization process. The results showed that the adsorbents prepared from the decolorized waste could remove more than 99.5% of the methylene blue (MB, methyl violet (MV, and malachite green (MG dyes from the simulated wastewater with the dye concentration of 200 mg/L, and the C/APT–Re adsorbent consecutively regenerated five times using the adsorbed dyes as a carbon source still exhibit good adsorption efficiency for dyes. As a whole, this process opens a new avenue to develop efficient decolorants of palm oil and achieves recyclable utilization of decolored waste.

  14. Influence of regulation on the productivity of waste utilities. What can we learn with the Portuguese experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Pedro; Marques, Rui Cunha

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the merits and the perverse effects of quality of service regulation in the performance of urban waste services when implemented alone and compares the performance of different economic regulatory methods. By means of a productivity analysis, we investigate the influence of a five-year period of regulation on the performance of Portuguese urban waste utilities using an unbalanced panel data for the period 2001-2008. Different non-parametric methods were applied to estimate the productivity change, all leading to similar outcomes. We observed a tendency of productivity decline in the urban waste utilities and concluded that in spite of the unequivocal improvements in the quality of service induced by sunshine regulation, more should be done as far as economic regulation is concerned. We also found that the use of sunshine regulation together with low incentive economic regulatory methods is not positive, leading to overinvestment rather than to value for money. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Preliminary Modified Volumetric Mix Design for Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC by Utilizing Asphalt Dust Waste (ADW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Isham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of asphalt roads has been commonly used as for infrastructure development since ancient times. The production of asphalt using drum mix plants has created powder waste in the premix batching plant industry. It consists of very fine powders and causesproblems to the environment today. However, powder waste can be successfully and economically utilized in the development of self-compacting concrete (SCC. The aim of this study is to evaluate the fresh properties and the compressive strength of SCC containing asphalt dust waste (ADW. For this purpose, a simple modified volumetric mix design approach based on the Okumura Method was adapted to produce SCC mixes. In order to obtain this SCC, a series of SCC mixes with a specific water/binder ratio (0.3, superplasticizer ratio (2% as well as different amounts of aggregate, sand and ADW were prepared. Fresh properties of the SCC mix were tested using tests such as slump-flow, J-Ring, L-box and V-funnel which showed satisfactory results for MD840 and MD850. The compressive strength for MD840 and MD850 after 28 days was 40.8 MPa and 34.7 MPa respectively. In conclusion, the simple modified volumetric mix design method by utilizing ADW in SCC can be suggested for the development of SCC.

  16. WATERLESS DYEING [REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    DEVRENT Nalan

    2015-01-01

    The textile industry is believed to be one of the biggest consumers of water. Water consumption and exhaustion in dyeing textile materials in conventional methods is an important environmental problem. The cost of waste water treatment will cause a prominent problem in the future as it does today. Increasing consideration of ecologic consequences of industrial processes as well as legislation enforcing the avoidance of environmental problems have caused a reorientation of thinking and promote...

  17. Carbonaceous adsorbents derived from textile cotton waste for the removal of Alizarin S dye from aqueous effluent: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanassi, Béchir; Hariz, Ichrak Ben; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vaulot, Cyril; Hassen, Mohamed Ben; Jeguirim, Mejdi

    2017-04-01

    Recycling cotton waste derived from the textile industry was used as a low-cost precursor for the elaboration of an activated carbon (AC) through carbonization and zinc chloride chemical activation. The AC morphological, textural, and surface chemistry properties were determined using different analytical techniques including Fourier transform infrared, temperature programmed desorption-mass spectroscopy, nitrogen manometry and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the AC was with a hollow fiber structure in an apparent diameter of about 6.5 μm. These analyses indicate that the AC is microporous and present a uniform pore size distributed centered around 1 nm. The surface area and micropore volume were 292 m2.g-1 and 0.11 cm3.g-1, respectively. Several types of acidic and basic oxygenated surface groups were highlighted. The point of zero charge (pHPZC) of theca was 6.8. The AC performance was evaluated for the removal of Alizarin Red S (ARS) from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacity was 74 mg.g-1 obtained at 25 °C and pH = 3. Kinetics and equilibrium models were used to determine the interaction nature of the ARS with the AC. Statistical tools were used to select the suitable models. The pseudo-second order was found to be the most appropriate kinetic model. The application of two and three isotherm models shows that Langmuir-Freundlich (n = 0.84, K = 0.0014 L.mg-1, and q = 250 mg.g-1) and Sips (n = 0.84, K = 0.003 L.mg-1, and q = 232.6 mg.g-1) were the suitable models. The results demonstrated that cotton waste can be used in the textile industry as a low-cost precursor for the AC synthesis and the removal of anionic dye from textile wastewater.

  18. A Low-Cost Wheat Bran Medium for Biodegradation of the Benzidine-Based Carcinogenic Dye Trypan Blue Using a Microbial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Environmental release of benzidine-based dyes is a matter of health concern. Here, a microbial consortium was enriched from textile dye contaminated soils and investigated for biodegradation of the carcinogenic benzidine-based dye Trypan Blue using wheat bran (WB) as growth medium. The PCR-DGGE analysis of enriched microbial consortium revealed the presence of 15 different bacteria. Decolorization studies suggested that the microbial consortium has high metabolic activity towards Trypan Blue as complete removal of 50 mg∙L−1 dye was observed within 24 h at 30 ± 0.2 °C and pH 7. Significant reduction in TOC (64%) and COD (88%) of dye decolorized broths confirmed mineralization. Induction in azoreductase (500%), NADH-DCIP reductase (264%) and laccase (275%) proved enzymatic decolorization of dye. HPLC analysis of dye decolorized products showed the formation of six metabolites while the FTIR spectrum indicated removal of diazo bonds at 1612.30 and 1581.34 cm−1. The proposed dye degradation pathway based on GC-MS and enzyme analysis suggested the formation of two low molecular weight intermediates. Phytotoxicity and acute toxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of the dye degradation products. These results provide experimental evidence for the utilization of agricultural waste as a novel low-cost growth medium for biodegradation of benzidine-based dyes, and suggested the potential of the microbial consortium in detoxification. PMID:25815522

  19. A Low-Cost Wheat Bran Medium for Biodegradation of the Benzidine-Based Carcinogenic Dye Trypan Blue Using a Microbial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental release of benzidine-based dyes is a matter of health concern. Here, a microbial consortium was enriched from textile dye contaminated soils and investigated for biodegradation of the carcinogenic benzidine-based dye Trypan Blue using wheat bran (WB as growth medium. The PCR-DGGE analysis of enriched microbial consortium revealed the presence of 15 different bacteria. Decolorization studies suggested that the microbial consortium has high metabolic activity towards Trypan Blue as complete removal of 50 mg∙L−1 dye was observed within 24 h at 30 ± 0.2 °C and pH 7. Significant reduction in TOC (64% and COD (88% of dye decolorized broths confirmed mineralization. Induction in azoreductase (500%, NADH-DCIP reductase (264% and laccase (275% proved enzymatic decolorization of dye. HPLC analysis of dye decolorized products showed the formation of six metabolites while the FTIR spectrum indicated removal of diazo bonds at 1612.30 and 1581.34 cm−1. The proposed dye degradation pathway based on GC-MS and enzyme analysis suggested the formation of two low molecular weight intermediates. Phytotoxicity and acute toxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of the dye degradation products. These results provide experimental evidence for the utilization of agricultural waste as a novel low-cost growth medium for biodegradation of benzidine-based dyes, and suggested the potential of the microbial consortium in detoxification.

  20. Utilization of industrial dairy waste as microalgae cultivation medium : a potential study for sustainable energy resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmayani, S.; Sugiarti, Y.; Putra, R. H.

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae is one of biodiesel resources and call as third generation biofuel. Biodiesel is one alternative energy that being developed. So study about resource of biodiesel need a development, for the example is development the basic material such as microalgae. In this paper we explain the potential use of dairy waste from industry as a cultivation medium of microalgae for biodiesel production. Dairy waste from dairy industry contains 34.98% protein, 4.42% lactose, 9.77% fiber, 11.04% fat, 2.33% calcium, 1.05% phosfor, and 0.4 % magnesium, meaning that the dairy waste from dairy industry has a relatively high nutrient content and complete from a source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus as macro nutrients. The method in this paper is literature review to resulting a new conclusion about the potency of waste water from dairy industry as microalgae cultivation medium. Based on the study, the dairy waste from dairy industry has potency to be used as cultivation medium of Botryococcus braunii in the production of biodiesel, replacing the conventional cultivation medium.

  1. Utilization of food industry wastes for the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, S; Grosso, J P; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2014-10-15

    The proper disposal of the several types of wastes produced in industrial activities increases production costs. As a consequence, it is common to develop strategies to reuse these wastes in the same process and in different processes or to transform them for use in other processes. This work combines the needs for new synthesis methods of nanomaterials and the reduction of production cost using wastes from citrine juice (orange, lime, lemon and mandarin) to produce a new added value product, green zero-valent iron nanoparticles that can be used in several applications, including environmental remediation. The results indicate that extracts of the tested fruit wastes (peel, albedo and pulp fractions) can be used to produce zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs). This shows that these wastes can be an added value product. The resulting nZVIs had sizes ranging from 3 up to 300 nm and distinct reactivities (pulp>peel>albedo extracts). All the studied nanoparticles did not present a significant agglomeration/settling tendency when compared to similar nanoparticles, which indicates that they remain in suspension and retain their reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilization of waste cooking oil as an alternative fuel for Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ridvan; Ulusoy, Yahya

    2017-04-03

    This study is based on three essential considerations concerning biodiesel obtained from waste cooking oil: diesel engine emissions of biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil, its potential in Turkey, and policies of the Turkish government about environmentally friendly alternative fuels. Emission tests have been realized with 35.8 kW, four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection diesel tractor engine. Test results are compared with Euro non-road emission standards for diesel fuel and five different blends of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. The results of the experimental study show that the best blends are B10 and B20 as they show the lowest emission level. The other dimensions of the study include potential analysis of waste cooking oil as diesel fuels, referring to fuel price policies applied in the past, and proposed future policies about the same issues. It was also outlined some conclusions and recommendations in connection with recycling of waste oils as alternative fuels.

  3. The utilization of waste clay from coal basin in the wall tile body formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, I.; Gocmez, H.; Yanik, G. [Dumlupinar Univ., Dept. of Ceramics Engineering, Kutahya (Turkey); Ceylantekin, R. [Anadolu Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the waste clays extracted from coal basin were used as a wall tile ingredient instead of the clay materials of the standardized biscuit formulation of the wall tile. XRD data show that waste clay contains major clay minerals such as illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite. It was found that clay-size particles (equal or less than 2{mu}m) distributed between 19.85 and 47%. The green and dry strength of the specimen containing illite and/or montmorillonite were increased 35% compared with the standard biscuit specimen. The fired strength of the samples having alkaline Earth oxides has been improved 20%, whereas water absorption reduced 28%. It was also found that the substitution of 5% waste clay in the wall tile biscuit formulation has revealed relatively better physical properties. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the

  5. Aspen Plus® and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nicole L; Boateng, Akwasi A; Mullen, Charles A; Wheeler, M Clayton

    2013-10-15

    Aspen Plus(®) based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all the available waste from the site's 41 horses requires a 6 oven dry metric ton per day (ODMTPD) pyrolysis system but it will require a 15 ODMTPD system for waste generated by an additional 150 horses at the expanded area including the College and its vicinity. For this a dual fluidized bed combustion reduction integrated pyrolysis system (CRIPS) developed at USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was identified as the technology of choice for pyrolysis oil production. The Aspen Plus(®) model was further used to consider the combustion of the produced pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in the existing boilers that generate hot water for space heating at the Equine Center. The model results show the potential for both the equine facility and the College to displace diesel fuel (fossil) with renewable pyrolysis oil and alleviate a costly waste disposal problem. We predict that all the heat required to operate the pyrolyzer could be supplied by non-condensable gas and about 40% of the biochar co-produced with bio-oil. Techno-economic Analysis shows neither design is economical at current market conditions; however the 15 ODMTPD CRIPS design would break even when diesel prices reach $11.40/gal. This can be further improved to $7.50/gal if the design capacity is maintained at 6 ODMTPD but operated at 4950 h per annum. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. CO2Mineralization and Utilization using Steel Slag for Establishing a Waste-to-Resource Supply Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ho, Chang-Ching; Hou, Chin-Jen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2017-12-08

    Both steelmaking via an electric arc furnace and manufacturing of portland cement are energy-intensive and resource-exploiting processes, with great amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission and alkaline solid waste generation. In fact, most CO 2 capture and storage technologies are currently too expensive to be widely applied in industries. Moreover, proper stabilization prior to utilization of electric arc furnace slag are still challenging due to its high alkalinity, heavy metal leaching potentials and volume instability. Here we deploy an integrated approach to mineralizing flue gas CO 2 using electric arc furnace slag while utilizing the reacted product as supplementary cementitious materials to establish a waste-to-resource supply chain toward a circular economy. We found that the flue gas CO 2 was rapidly mineralized into calcite precipitates using electric arc furnace slag. The carbonated slag can be successfully utilized as green construction materials in blended cement mortar. By this modulus, the global CO 2 reduction potential using iron and steel slags was estimated to be ~138 million tons per year.

  7. Utilization of agroindustrial waste for biosurfactant production by native bacteria from chiapas

    OpenAIRE

    Yañez-Ocampo Gustavo; Somoza-Coutiño Gilberto; Blanco-González Cristina; Wong-Villarreal Arnoldo

    2017-01-01

    In this work, two agro-industrial wastes, namely Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) and Coffee Wastewater (CW) have been used as the carbon source for the production of biosurfactants, due to their low cost and high availability. Biosurfactant-producing bacterial isolates from the Mexican state of Chiapas were used. The selected biosurfactant-producer strains were evaluated in a liquid medium with 2% (v/v) of WCO as the carbon source. The assay was conducted in an Erlenmeyer flask containing 300 mL aliq...

  8. Dye lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuder, J.E.; McGinnis, J.L.; Goldberg, H.A.; Hart, T.R.; Che, T.M.

    1989-10-31

    This patent describes a dye laser. It consists of a composite composition of an inorganic oxide glass monolith with a microporous structure containing an incorporated solution comprising a solvent component and a lasable dye component. Wherein the glass monolith has sealed outer surfaces.

  9. Recent advances in heterogeneous photocatalytic decolorization of synthetic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bagheri, Samira; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    During the process and operation of the dyes, the wastes produced were commonly found to contain organic and inorganic impurities leading to risks in the ecosystem and biodiversity with the resultant impact on the environment. Improper effluent disposal in aqueous ecosystems leads to reduction of sunlight penetration which in turn diminishes photosynthetic activity, resulting in acute toxic effects on the aquatic flora/fauna and dissolved oxygen concentration. Recently, photodegradation of various synthetic dyes has been studied in terms of their absorbance and the reduction of oxygen content by changes in the concentration of the dye. The advantages that make photocatalytic techniques superior to traditional methods are the ability to remove contaminates in the range of ppb, no generation of polycyclic compounds, higher speed, and lower cost. Semiconductor metal oxides, typically TiO2, ZnO, SnO, NiO, Cu2O, Fe3O4, and also CdS have been utilized as photocatalyst for their nontoxic nature, high photosensitivity, wide band gap and high stability. Various process parameters like photocatalyst dose, pH and initial dye concentrations have been varied and highlighted. Research focused on surface modification of semiconductors and mixed oxide semiconductors by doping them with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag) and organic matter (C, N, Cl, and F) showed enhanced dye degradation compared to corresponding native semiconductors. This paper reviews recent advances in heterogeneous photocatalytic decolorization for the removal of synthetic dyes from water and wastewater. Thus, the main core highlighted in this paper is the critical selection of semiconductors for photocatalysis based on the chemical, physical, and selective nature of the poisoning dyes.

  10. Recent Advances in Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Decolorization of Synthetic Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayatullaili Muhd Julkapli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process and operation of the dyes, the wastes produced were commonly found to contain organic and inorganic impurities leading to risks in the ecosystem and biodiversity with the resultant impact on the environment. Improper effluent disposal in aqueous ecosystems leads to reduction of sunlight penetration which in turn diminishes photosynthetic activity, resulting in acute toxic effects on the aquatic flora/fauna and dissolved oxygen concentration. Recently, photodegradation of various synthetic dyes has been studied in terms of their absorbance and the reduction of oxygen content by changes in the concentration of the dye. The advantages that make photocatalytic techniques superior to traditional methods are the ability to remove contaminates in the range of ppb, no generation of polycyclic compounds, higher speed, and lower cost. Semiconductor metal oxides, typically TiO2, ZnO, SnO, NiO, Cu2O, Fe3O4, and also CdS have been utilized as photocatalyst for their nontoxic nature, high photosensitivity, wide band gap and high stability. Various process parameters like photocatalyst dose, pH and initial dye concentrations have been varied and highlighted. Research focused on surface modification of semiconductors and mixed oxide semiconductors by doping them with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag and organic matter (C, N, Cl, and F showed enhanced dye degradation compared to corresponding native semiconductors. This paper reviews recent advances in heterogeneous photocatalytic decolorization for the removal of synthetic dyes from water and wastewater. Thus, the main core highlighted in this paper is the critical selection of semiconductors for photocatalysis based on the chemical, physical, and selective nature of the poisoning dyes.

  11. Recent Advances in Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Decolorization of Synthetic Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Bagheri, Samira; Bee Abd Hamid, Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    During the process and operation of the dyes, the wastes produced were commonly found to contain organic and inorganic impurities leading to risks in the ecosystem and biodiversity with the resultant impact on the environment. Improper effluent disposal in aqueous ecosystems leads to reduction of sunlight penetration which in turn diminishes photosynthetic activity, resulting in acute toxic effects on the aquatic flora/fauna and dissolved oxygen concentration. Recently, photodegradation of various synthetic dyes has been studied in terms of their absorbance and the reduction of oxygen content by changes in the concentration of the dye. The advantages that make photocatalytic techniques superior to traditional methods are the ability to remove contaminates in the range of ppb, no generation of polycyclic compounds, higher speed, and lower cost. Semiconductor metal oxides, typically TiO2, ZnO, SnO, NiO, Cu2O, Fe3O4, and also CdS have been utilized as photocatalyst for their nontoxic nature, high photosensitivity, wide band gap and high stability. Various process parameters like photocatalyst dose, pH and initial dye concentrations have been varied and highlighted. Research focused on surface modification of semiconductors and mixed oxide semiconductors by doping them with noble metals (Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag) and organic matter (C, N, Cl, and F) showed enhanced dye degradation compared to corresponding native semiconductors. This paper reviews recent advances in heterogeneous photocatalytic decolorization for the removal of synthetic dyes from water and wastewater. Thus, the main core highlighted in this paper is the critical selection of semiconductors for photocatalysis based on the chemical, physical, and selective nature of the poisoning dyes. PMID:25054183

  12. Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Robert L.

    2005-04-20

    The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

  13. Utilizing environmental management information systems to monitor chemical usage and facilitate waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazer, T.L.; Kinney, R.W. [Modern Technologies Corporation, Dayton, OH (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention activities have proven to be valuable to the chemical industry`s and the chemical user`s bottom line. Many companies have found that, with a modest initial capital investment and product modifications, mounds of bureaucratic liability can be removed and substantial cost savings can be realized.

  14. Utilization of noodle waste as replacement for maize in the diets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize is a major source of energy. It is expensive because of competition between man, animal and a strong demand for it by the manufacturing/industrial sector. Noodle waste (NW) (a by-product from the wheat noodle processing industry) which attracts little/ almost zero cost was used to replace the maize fraction of the ...

  15. Selection of Thai starter components for ethanol production utilizing malted rice from waste paddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirilux Chaijamrus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of mixed herbs in Thai rice wine starter (Loog-pang were investigated in order to directly maintain theefficiency of the microbial community (Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Amylomyces sp., Gluconobacter sp. and Pediocccuspentosaceus. The optimum formula was galanga, garlic, long pepper, licorice, and black pepper at the ratio of 0.5:8:1:4:1,respectively. Previously, waste paddy has been used directly as a renewable resource for fuel ethanol production using solidstate fermentation (SSF with Loog-pang. In this study, hydrolyzed malted rice starch was used as the sole nutrient source insubmerged fermentation (SmF to enhance the process yield. The maximum ethanol productivity (4.08 g/kg waste paddy h-1and the highest ethanol concentration (149±7.0 g/kg waste paddy were obtained after 48 hrs of incubation. The resultsindicated that starch saccharification provided a higher ethanol yield (48.38 g/100g sugar consumed than SSF. In addition,the efficiency of ethanol fermentation was 67% which is similar to that of the malted rice made from normal paddy (68%.This result suggests that waste paddy could be used as an alternative raw material for ethanol production.

  16. Phytoremediation: a novel approach for utilization of iron-ore wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Dhal, Nabin Kumar; Patra, Parikshita; Das, Bisweswar; Reddy, Palli Sita Rama

    2010-01-01

    Large quantities of iron-ore tailings are being generated annually in the world from mining and processing of iron ores. It has been estimated that around 10-15% of the iron ore mined in India has remained unutilized and discarded as slimes during mining and subsequent processing. Soil contamination resulting from mining activities affects surrounding flora and fauna and presents a large clean-up challenge to the mining industry. Innovative new methodologies have been proposed and among the most promising are those that rely on new phytoremediation technology. In this paper we address and review the status of phytoremediation as a technology to reduce and control contaminated mine wastes. Several different approaches and different plant species are used to remove environmentally toxic metals from mine waste sites. Such approaches have the objective of restoring mining waste sites to human and animal use, or at least, to curtail or eliminate the off-site movement of toxic entities that potentially could reach humans. How well phytoremediation performs as an alternative soil restoration technology depends on several factors, including the composition of soil, toxicity level of the contaminant, degree to which plant species fit natural local growth patterns and type of concentration of metal/contaminant in such plants. Phytoremediation has opened prospects for less costly, yet practicable approaches to clean-up contaminated waste sites, particularly those associated with mineral extraction mining. We discuss several plant species that are capable of phytoextracting and/or phytostabilizing harmful elements from contaminated soil and water; such processes are prospectively effective for addressing waste problems that derive from mining and processing activities, as well as those that derive from mitigating the threat posed by waste that surrounds mining sites. Unfortunately, phytoremediation is still in the embryonic stage, and more research is needed to find the plant

  17. Production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid by using waste biomass of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM generated after degradation of textile dye Direct Red 5B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jadhav, Mital U; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. The isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM was found to decolorize dye Direct Red 5B (DR5B) and simultaneously it produced polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DR5B at 500mgl(-1) concentration within 24h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The medium contains carbon source as a molasses which was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates obtained revealed the compound as a polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid. The activity of PHA synthase was found more at 24h after dye addition. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation include veratrol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase and azo reductase was found to be induced during decolorization process. The FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DR5B. The GC-MS analysis of product obtained led to the identification of two metabolites after biotransformation of dye as p-amino benzenesulfonic acid and naphthalene-1-ol. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mixed ZnO-TiO2 Suspended Solution as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Decolonization of a Textile Dye from Waste Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mooji

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile industries produce large volume of colored dye effluents which are toxic and removal of dyes from wastewater is a significant environmental issue. Advanced oxidation process (AOPs is alternative method for the complete degradation many organic pollutants. ZnO and TiO2 are important photocatalysts with high catalytic activity that have attracted much research attention. Material and Methods: Mixed ZnO/TiO2 was prepared with mixing of ZnO and TiO2 (20, 40, 60, 80 % (w/w. 20 mL of dye solution (80 mgL-1 for DB71 containing the appropriate quantity of photocatalyst was magnetically stirred under UV irradiation. Photocatalytic study was carried out to evaluate the effect of UV (400 W, ZnO/TiO2 weight percent (20, 40, 60, 80 % (w/w, pH (2.3 – 9.2, irradiation time of (10 – 70 min, initial dye concentration of (10, 40, 80 mg/L and ZnO/TiO2 dosage of (0.2 – 1.6 g/L on removal of dye. Dye concentration was monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the dye absorbance at 285 nm. Results: In comparison with TiO2 or ZnO as photocatalyst, mixed photocatalyst (ZnO/TiO2 is more efficient catalyst for degradation of dye under UV irradiation Results show that approximately 90 % of Direct Blue 71 has been eliminated after 70 minutes and optimized condition ((pH = 6.4, ZnO/TiO2 (50% w/w, 1.25 g/L. Experiments showed, the noticeable decolorization of dye solution can be done without any oxidation agent with mixed ZnO/TiO2 photocatalyst.

  19. Removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by a non-conventional and low cost agricultural waste: adsorption on ash of Aloe Vera plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyes are an important class of pollutants and disposal of them in precious water resources must be avoided. Among various methods adsorption occupies a prominent place in dye removal. The aim of this study is to evaluate adsorption of dye Reactive Red 198 and Blue 19 (RR-198 & RB-19 (on to Aloe Vera plant ash from aqueous solutions. In this research Aloe Vera ash was prepared at laboratory conditions and then after shredding, screened by ASTM standard sieve with 60 -200 mesh sizes and the effects of pH (3-12, adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g/L, contact time (10-60 min, initial dye concentration (10-160 mg/L and temperature were investigated in the experiment. In different samples Dye concentration was measured by spectrophotometer at 592 nm and 520 nm wavelength for RR198 and RB19 respectively. Also the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were determined in order to describe the relations between the colored solutions and the adsorbent. The results of this study showed that acidic conditions were more conducive to enhance the hydrolysis rate than basic ones as the decomposition was optimum at pH 3. The adsorption rate of RR-198 and RB-19 dyes was increased by increasing of initial dye concentration, increasing of adsorbent dose in 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L. Dye solution was decolorized in a relatively short time (20 min. The efficiencies for RR-198 and RB- 19 reactive dyes were 82.68% and 90.42% respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax has been found to be 80.152 mg/g for RR-198 reactive dye and 88.452 mg/g for Blue 19 reactive dye. Adsorption isotherms were examined by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm that finally showed the Freundlich multilayer isotherm has better accordance with dates. The results indicate that Aloe Vera ash plant as a natural and inexpensive adsorbent is a suitable adsorbent for the adsorption of textile dyes.

  20. Influence of Compressor Station Waste-Heat Recovery Section on Operational Efficiency of Gas Turbine Drive with Isobaric Heat Supply and Regenerative Heat Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nesenchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to utilize existing secondary energy resources for heat supply of an industrial enterprise has been proposed on the basis of the analysis on operation of compressor stations of a cross-country gas pipe-line. The paper considers an influence of waste heat recovery section on operational efficiency of gas turbine drive with regenerative heat utilization.

  1. Utilization of agricutural wastes (Cocoa Pod Husk) in the diet of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inclusion of agricultural waste (cocoa pod husk) in the diet of Clarias gariepinus was investigated in a feeding trial. Clarias gariepinus with a mean weight of 3.53±0.23g was placed on 5 test diets at inclusion levels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% cocoa pod husk (CPH) for 56 days. At the end of the feeding trial, the result ...

  2. Utilization of waste heat from rotary kiln for burning clinker in the cement plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztekler Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement subsector next to the glass industry is counted among one of the most energy-intensive industries, which absorbs approx. 12-15% of the total energy consumed by the industry. In the paper various methods of energy consumption reduction of in the cement industry are discussed. Cement production carries a very large emissions of greenhouse gases, where CO2 emissions on a global scale with the industry than approx. 5%. Great opportunity in CO2 emissions reduction in addition to the recovery of waste heat is also alternative fuels co-firing in cement kilns [1], [2]. In the cement sector interest in fitting-usable waste energy is growing in order to achieve high rates of savings and hence the financial benefits, as well as the environment ones [3]. In the process of cement production is lost irretrievably lot of energy and reduction of these losses on a global scale gives a visible saving of consumed fuel. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of waste heat use in Rudniki Cement Plant near to Czestochowa. After analyzing of all waste heat sources will be analyzed the heat emitted by radiation from the surface of the rotary kiln at the relevant facility. On the basis of thermal-flow calculations the most favorable radiative heat exchanger will be designed. The calculations based on available measurements provided by the cement plant, a thermal power of the heat exchanger, the heat exchange surface, the geometry of the heat exchanger, and other important parameters will be established. In addition the preliminary calculations of hydraulic losses and set directions for further work will be carried out. Direct benefits observed with the introduction of the broader heat recovery technology, is a significant increase in energy efficiency of the industrial process, which is reflected in the reduction of energy consumption and costs. Indirectly it leads to a reduction of pollution and energy consumption.

  3. Performance Analysis of Organic Rankine-vapor Compression Ice Maker Utilizing Food Industry Waste Heat

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Hu; Yuanshu Cao; Weibin Ma

    2015-01-01

    To develop the organic Rankine-vapor compression ice maker driven by food industry exhaust gases and engine cooling water, an organic Rankine-vapor compression cycle system was employed for ice making and a thermodynamic model was developed and the effects of working fluid types, hot water temperature and condensation temperature on the system performance were analyzed and the ice making capacity from unit mass hot water and unit power waste heat were evaluated. The calculated results show th...

  4. Complex processing and utilization of waste as the basis for sustainable economic development district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.М. Ilchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main environmental problems of Ukraine. The problems that are connected with complex processing and recycling, the example Dnieper economic paradise-one, which allows more detailed present environmental situation of the country at this stage. The article is used and analyzed recent environmental performance and the basic problems of on-disposal and recycling. Basic research methods: observation, analysis and comparison. The aim was to find ways to overcome the ecological crisis in Ukraine. As a result of the research, it was determined that most types of waste-tion prevail in Ukraine and found the best solutions to problems related to waste and their processing. It was possible to find the main problem that has caused serious environmental situation, and the main task for the country at this stage. The main problems and tasks Dnieper economic region. Also indicate how to save, due to complex processing waste. The article is very relevant and important because it is here that the basic problems and tasks of Ukraine concerning the ecological situation. It also focuses on eco-logical problems, which the government does not pay enough attention.

  5. Feasibility study on utilization of palm fibre waste into fired clay brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, A. A.; Sarani, N. A.; Zaman, N. N.; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-04-01

    Malaysia is the second largest of palm oil producer after Indonesia, which contribute to 50 % of palm oil production. With this demand, the increasing of palm oil plantation over the years has led to the large production of agricultural waste, for example palm fibre waste. This study investigates different percentages of palm fibre (0 %, 1 %, 5 % and 10 %) to be incorporated into fired clay brick. Manufactured bricks were fired at 1 °C/min heating rate up to 1050 °C. The effects of manufacture bricks on the physical and mechanical properties of manufactured brick were also determined. All brick samples were tested due to the physical and mechanical properties which include dry density, firing shrinkage, initial rate of suction (IRS), water absorption, porosity and compressive strength. Findings show that increasing palm fibre waste affected the properties of brick, which decreased their density, besides increased firing shrinkage, IRS, water absorption, porosity and compressive strength. However, all the manufactured brick still followed the requirement.

  6. Utilization of vegetable dumplings waste from industrial production by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarska, Agnieszka A.; Pilarski, Krzysztof; Ryniecki, Antoni; Tomaszyk, Kamila; Dach, Jacek; Wolna-Maruwka, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides the analysis of results of biogas and methane yield for vegetable dumplings waste: dough with fat, vegetable waste, and sludge from the clarifier. Anaerobic digestion of food waste used in the experiments was stable after combining the substrates with a digested pulp composed of maize silage and liquid manure (as inoculum), at suitable ratios. The study was carried out in a laboratory scale using anaerobic batch reactors, at controlled (mesophilic) temperature and pH conditions. The authors present the chemical reactions accompanying biodegradation of the substrates and indicate the chemical compounds which may lead to acidification during the anaerobic digestion. An anaerobic digestion process carried out with the use of a dough-and-fat mixture provided the highest biogas and methane yields. The following yields were obtained in terms of fresh matter: 242.89 m3 Mg-1 for methane and 384.38 m3 Mg-1 for biogas, and in terms of volatile solids: 450.73 m3 Mg-1 for methane and 742.40 m3 Mg-1 for biogas. Vegetables and sludge from the clarifier (as fresh matter) provided much lower yields.

  7. Utilization of molasses spentwash for production of bioplastics by waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Vaidya, Atul N; Kumar, M Suresh; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2009-09-01

    Present study describes the treatment of molasses spentwash and its use as a potential low cost substrate for production of biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by waste activated sludge. Fluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of PHB granules in sludge biomass which was further confirmed by fourier transform-infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The processing of molasses spentwash was carried out for attaining different ratios of carbon and nitrogen (C:N). Highest chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and PHB accumulation of 60% and 31% respectively was achieved with raw molasses spentwash containing inorganic nitrogen (C:N ratio=28) followed by COD removal of 52% and PHB accumulation of 28% for filtered molasses containing inorganic nitrogen (C:N ratio=29). PHB production yield (Y(p/s)) was highest (0.184 g g(-1) COD consumed) for deproteinized spentwash supplemented with nitrogen. In contrast, the substrate consumption and product formation were higher in case of raw spentwash. Though COD removal was lowest from deproteinized spentwash, evaluation of kinetic parameters suggested higher rates of conversion of available carbon to biomass and PHB. Thus the process provided dual benefit of conversion of two wastes viz. waste activated sludge and molasses spentwash into value-added product-PHB.

  8. Desulfurization of chemical waste gases and flue gases with economic utilization of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1983-09-01

    The technological state of recovery of sulfur dioxide from waste and flue gases in the GDR is discussed. Two examples of plants are presented: a pyrosulfuric acid plant in Coswig, recovering sulfur dioxide from gases by absorption with sodium hydroxide, followed by catalytic oxidation to sulfur trioxide, and a plant for waste sulfuric acid recovery from paraffin refining, where the diluted waste acid is sprayed into a furnace and recovered by an ammonium-sulfite-bisulfite solution from the combustion gas (with 4 to 10% sulfur dioxide content). Investment and operation costs as well as profits of both plants are given. Methods employed for power plant flue gas desulfurization in major industrial countries are further assessed: about 90% of these methods uses wet flue gas scrubbing with lime. In the USA flue gas from 25,000 MW of power plant capacity is desulfurized. In the USSR, a 35,000 m/sup 3//h trial plant at Severo-Donetzk is operating using lime, alkali and magnesite. At the 150 MW Dorogobush power plant in the USSR a desulfurization plant using a cyclic ammonia process is under construction.

  9. Utilization of Construction Waste Composite Powder Materials as Cementitious Materials in Small-Scale Prefabricated Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuizhen Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction and demolition wastes have increased rapidly due to the prosperity of infrastructure construction. For the sake of effectively reusing construction wastes, this paper studied the potential use of construction waste composite powder material (CWCPM as cementitious materials in small-scale prefabricated concretes. Three types of such concretes, namely, C20, C25, and C30, were selected to investigate the influences of CWCPM on their working performances, mechanical properties, and antipermeability and antifrost performances. Also the effects of CWCPM on the morphology, hydration products, and pore structure characteristics of the cement-based materials were analyzed. The results are encouraging. Although CWCPM slightly decreases the mechanical properties of the C20 concrete and the 7 d compressive strengths of the C25 and C30 concretes, the 28 d compressive strength and the 90 d flexural strength of the C25 and C30 concretes are improved when CWCPM has a dosage less than 30%; CWCPM improves the antipermeability and antifrost performances of the concretes due to its filling and pozzolanic effects; the best improvement is obtained at CWCPM dosage of 30%; CWCPM optimizes cement hydration products, refines concrete pore structure, and gives rise to reasonable pore size distribution, therefore significantly improving the durability of the concretes.

  10. Investigating the Utility of Iron Ore Waste in Preparing Non-fired Bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamani, Shreekant R.; Mangalpady, Aruna; Vardhan, Harsha

    2017-10-01

    Iron ore waste is a major problem for mine owners due to the difficulty involved in its storage, handling and other environmental related issues. An alternative solution to this is utilisation of iron ore waste (IOW) as some value added product in construction industry. An attempt has been made in this paper in examining the possibility of making non-fired bricks from iron ore waste with some additives like cement and fly-ash. Each of the additives were mixed with IOW in different ratios and different sets of bricks were prepared. The prepared IOW bricks were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days and their respective compressive strength and percentage of water absorption were determined. The results show that IOW bricks prepared with 9% and above cement and with 28 days of curing are suitable for brick making and meet the IS specifications. It was also observed that the weight of the prepared bricks with 9% cement with 28 days of curing varies between 2.35 and 2.45 kg whereas the weight of compressed fire clay bricks varies from 2.80 to 2.89 kg. Results also show that the cost of bricks prepared with cement ranging from 9 to 20% is comparable to that of commercially available compressed bricks.

  11. Energy and Exergy Analysis of Kalina Cycle for the Utilization of Waste Heat in Brine Water for Indonesian Geothermal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasruddin Nasruddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of waste heat in a power plant system—which would otherwise be released back to the environment—in order to produce additional power increases the efficiency of the system itself. The purpose of this study is to present an energy and exergy analysis of Kalina Cycle System (KCS 11, which is proposed to be utilized to generate additional electric power from the waste heat contained in geothermal brine water available in the Lahendong Geothermal power plant site in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. A modeling application on energy and exergy system is used to study the design of thermal system which uses KCS 11. To obtain the maximum power output and maximum efficiency, the system is optimized based on the mass fraction of working fluid (ammonia-water, as well as based on the turbine exhaust pressure. The result of the simulation is the optimum theoretical performance of KCS 11, which has the highest possible power output and efficiency. The energy flow diagram and exergy diagram (Grassman diagram was also presented for KCS 11 optimum system to give quantitative information regarding energy flow from the heat source to system components and the proportion of the exergy input dissipated in the various system components.

  12. An Experimental Investigation on Utilization of Waste Plastic as a Modifier in Rigid Pavements for Improving Strength

    OpenAIRE

    M.Chandu; Dr.N.C.Anil; P.Hanitha

    2016-01-01

    The percent study investigates the effective use of waste plastic as a modifier for cement concrete roads. Civilization produces waste products disposals issue of the waste products is a challenge. Solid waste management is the thrust area. The various waste materials, plastic waste and principle solid waste are of great concern these leads to disposal crisis and environmental pollution. On the other side, road traffic is increasing. The load bearing capacity of the roads are to be increased....

  13. An efficient removal of crystal violet dye from waste water by adsorption onto TLAC/Chitosan composite: A novel low cost adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasantha Kumari, H; Krishnamoorthy, P; Arumugam, T K; Radhakrishnan, S; Vasudevan, D

    2017-03-01

    A composite of Typha latifolia activated carbon (TLAC) (a novel, low cost absorbent) and chitosan (TLAC/Chitosan composite) was prepared. The composite was characterised using IR spectra, XRD, FESEM and Pore size studies. Its effectivity was tested for the removal of crystal violet dye from aqueous solutions. The effect of pH, dose rate and initial dye concentration was evaluated. The adsorption isotherm, kinetics and thermodynamic parameters were studied. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were found fit effectively for the dye adsorption data in the present study. The adsorption followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters show a spontaneous and exothermic reaction. Overall, this study indicates TLAC/Chitosan composite as an effective adsorbent for the removal of crystal violet dye from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of Controlled Low Strength Material Utilizing Waste Paper Sludge Ash and Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the best method to make the concrete industry more sustainable was using the waste materials to replace the natural resources. Currently waste paper sludge is a major economic and environmental problem in this country. In this research, the alternative method is to dwindle the usage of natural resources and the usage of cement in the construction. This method is to replace the usage of cement with the waste paper sludge ash (WPSA and to use the recycle aggregate collected from the construction is used. The WPSA has ingredient likely cement such as self-cementation but for a low strength. The research was conducted at heavy laboratory UITM Pulau Pinang. Meanwhile, the WPSA is collected at MNI Industries at Mentakab, Pahang. The recycle aggregate is a separated half, which were fine aggregate and the coarse aggregate with the specific size. In this research, the ratio is divided into two (2 which is 1:1 and 1:2 for the aggregate and difference percentage levels of WPSA. The percentage levels of WPSA that use in this research are 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60%. A total of 36 cubes were prepared. Aim of this research is to develop a simple design approach for the mixture proportioning of WPSA and recycle concrete aggregate (RCA within the concrete and to assess the effect of concrete mix with different percentage of WPSA and RCA ratio on the properties. It is found that the best design mix that achieves control low strength material (CLSM is on 30% of WPSA with the ratio 1:2 on day 28 of compression test.

  15. Utilization of logging waste from mechanical spruce dominated final cuttings; Koneellisen puunkorjuun hakkuutaehteiden hyoedyntaeminen biopolttoaineena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebeling, J [Jaakko Poeyry Consulting Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of the project has been to improve the economy of collecting logging waste from spruce dominated mechanised final felling. This section of the biomass is regarded as the most promising alternative biofuel source. The project compared different systems of collecting this raw material and concluded, that the most economical way to do this was (1) to integrate the transport of logging waste from the forest to the road side with the transport of logs using the equipment already at the site. The use of a separate tractor proved uneconomical compared to the integrated system. (2) Chip the logging waste at the road side with an integrated chipping and transport lorry (truck) equipped with three 20 feet standard or modified containers. The total cargo space in the lorry is thus around 100 m{sup 3} loose volume. The economical transport distance of this equipment is around under 100 km one way distance. The report contains also detailed drawings of the technical solution arrived at. The main idea is to use a module structure, where the chipper - the Bruks 803CT - is located together with most of the hydraulics, crane and the control equipment. The only outside connections needed are the hydraulic pressure from the pump and the operational unit with the necessary electrical panel. Thus the assembly and installation of the module on the lorry is rapid and the quality of the work can be maintained high. The operation is designed on the basis of one man operation and in such away that the need to for the driver-operator to step down from the controls is minimised. In normal situation the operation can be fully accomplished from the drivers cab - even when changing the containers

  16. Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

    2000-02-07

    This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed

  17. APPLICATION OF PHYTOREMEDIATION FOR HERBAL MEDICINE WASTE AND ITS UTILIZATION FOR PROTEIN PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Soetrisnanto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Herbal industry in Indonesia is progressing very rapidly. Increasing number of herbal medicineindustries lead to an increase of the waste which are normally processed in anaerobic ponds by usingchemical and biological process. However this process are not economical feasible and therefore analternative method by using natural resource is required. Phytoremediation is an environmentalfriendly method to reduce contaminant using aquatic plant. This method uses water plant to reduceCOD and nutrients content in the waste. Since the waste still high content of nutrient, therefore it ispotential for medium growth of algae Spirulina. This study was aimed to evaluate the use of variousplant species (water hyacinth and lotus in decreasing contaminant and to determine optimal nutrientcomposition of the growth media. The phytoremediation was performed in 3-8 days and height ofliquid in the tank was maintained constant at 5 cm. The effluent of first phytoremediation wastransferred to second stage for cultivation of Spirulina with 15 days of cultivation time. The externalnutrients were added each 2 days and the concentration of biomass was measured for its opticaldensity. Spirulina grow well in herbal medicine waste that has been phytoremediation with lotus for 3days and had a CNP ratio amounted to 57.790 : 9.281 : 1 with a growth rate of 0.271/day. Industri obat di Indonesia tumbuh sangat cepat. Pertumbuhan inimengakibatkan meningkatnya limbah yang umumnya dilakukan dalam kolam anaerobik denganmenggunakan proses kimia dan biologi. Namun demikian, proses tersebut belum menunjukkan hasilekonomis sehingga diperlukan metode lain yang relatif aman dan ekonomis. Salah satu cara yangdapat digunakan adalah phytoremediasi mengguanakn tanaman air untuk mengurangi kandunganCOD dalam limbah dan nutrient. Dikarenakan limbah masih mengandung nutrient yang cukup banyak,maka limbah tersebut juga sangat potensial untuk digunakan sebagai medium mikroalga. Penelitianini

  18. Viability of utilization of waste materials from ceramic products in precast concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Rojas, M. I.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The recycled and re-valuation process of waste materials involves studies lead to a deep acknowledges of them, finding applications for their intended use. The waste materials from ceramic products can be recycled into the construction sector, as arid or pozzolanic materials. The current work deals with the incorporation of ceramic materials in these two different ways, checking the behaviour of the elaborated mortar by mean of laboratory tests. Also, tests are developed in factory, using these as components for precast concrete tiles.

    Todo proceso de reciclado y revalorización de residuos implica estudios encaminados a un conocimiento profundo de los mismos, de forma que se busquen aplicaciones concretas de uso. Los materiales de desecho procedentes de productos cerámicos pueden ser reciclados dentro del sector de la construcción, ya sea como áridos o como materiales puzolánicos. El presente trabajo aborda la incorporación de materiales cerámicos desde estas dos vertientes, comprobando, en cada caso, el comportamiento de los morteros elaborados mediante ensayos de laboratorio. También se llevan a cabo pruebas en fábrica, siendo utilizados como componentes en prefabricados de hormigón.

  19. The Utilization of Waste Date Seed as Bio-Oil and Activated Carbon by Pyrolysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Uzzal Hossain Joardder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The renovation of biomass waste in the form of date seed waste into activated carbon and biofuel by fixed bed pyrolysis reactor has been focused in this study to obtain gaseous, liquid, and solid products. The date seed in particle form is pyrolysed in an externally heated fixed bed reactor with nitrogen as the carrier gas. The reactor is heated from 400°C to 600°C. A maximum liquid yield of 50 wt.% and char of 30 wt.% are obtained at a reactor bed temperature of 500°C with a running time of 120 minutes. The oil is found to possess favorable flash point and reasonable density and viscosity. The higher calorific value is found to be 28.636 MJ/kg which is significantly higher than other biomass derived. Decolonization of 85–97% is recorded for the textile effluent and 75–90% for the tannery effluent, in all cases decreasing with temperature increase. Good adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon in case of diluted textile and tannery effluent was found.

  20. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioethanol Production By Utilizing Cassava Peels Waste Through Enzymatic And Microbiological Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witantri, R. G.; Purwoko, T.; Sunarto; Mahajoeno, E.

    2017-07-01

    Cassava peels waste contains, cellulose which is quite high at 43.626%, this is a potential candidate as a raw for bioethanol production. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the enzymatic hydrolysis, microbiological (Effective microbe) and fermentation in cassava peel waste is known from the results of quantitative measurement of multiple ethanol parameters (DNS Test, pH, ethanol concentration). This research was carried out in stages, the first stage is hydrolysis with completely randomized design with single factor variation of the catalyst, consisting of three levels ie cellulase enzymes, multienzyme and effective microbial EM4. The second stage is fermentation with factorial randomized block design, consisting of three groups of variations of catalyst, and has two factors: variations of fermipan levels 1, 2, 3% and the duration of fermentation, 2,4,6 days. The parameters in the test is a reducing sugar, pH and concentration of ethanol. The results showed that variation of hydrolysis treatment, fermentation time, and fermipan levels has real effect on the fermentation process. On average the highest ethanol content obtained from the treatment with multienzyme addition, with the addition of 2% fermipan levels and on the 2nd day of fermentation that is equal to 3.76%.

  2. Utilization of agroindustrial waste for biosurfactant production by native bacteria from chiapas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yañez-Ocampo Gustavo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two agro-industrial wastes, namely Waste Cooking Oil (WCO and Coffee Wastewater (CW have been used as the carbon source for the production of biosurfactants, due to their low cost and high availability. Biosurfactant-producing bacterial isolates from the Mexican state of Chiapas were used. The selected biosurfactant-producer strains were evaluated in a liquid medium with 2% (v/v of WCO as the carbon source. The assay was conducted in an Erlenmeyer flask containing 300 mL aliquots of mineral salt media (MSM + residue and incubated at 100 rpm at room temperature for 96 hours. The biosurfactant produced in the samples reduced the surface tension from 50 to 30-29 mN/m. Strains A and 83 showed the maximum emulsification index at 58-59%. Strain A showed the highest biosurfactant yield with a production of 3.7 g/L in comparison with strains B, 83 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853. Our results suggest that the biosurfactant produced by strain A has great potential in the treatment of wastewater with a high content of fatty acids, and of soils contaminated by pesticides or oil hydrocarbons.

  3. The possibilities of the microwave utilization of wastes on the example of materials containing the asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pigiel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper introduce some of the results of the investigations in the utilization of the materials containing asbestos in the existingin Wroclaw University of Technology Institute’s of Technology of Machines and the Automation Foundry and Automation Group themicrowave reactor. In the reactor’s heating chamber there is possible to recycle from 3 up to 5 kg of the batch at once. The temperaturewith which is possible to receive in it is approx. 1400 oC. The time of it’s achievement (in dependence from utilized material can take outfrom 25 up to 40 minutes.

  4. Sophisticated plant engineering. New construction of a decoupling station. Waste heat is utilized for district heating; Anspruchsvoller Anlagenbau. Neubau einer Auskoppelstation. Abwaerme wird fuer Fernwaerme genutzt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulbatzki, Katrin [HSE Technik GmbH und Co. KG, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    During a construction period of approximately six months, HSE Technik GmbH (Darmstadt, Federal Republic of Germany) has set up a complete district heating decoupling station with the associated equipment, piping as well as instrumentation and control technology for the waste incineration plant in Hamm (Westphalia) and put into operation. Thus, additionally to power generation the waste heat from combustion processes is utilized for district heating.

  5. Investigation of the Stability of the Ruthenium based Dye (N719) Utilizing the Polarization Properties of Dispersive Raman Modes and/or of the Fluorescent Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Phuong, Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) offer intriguing new possibilities with the integration of these into, e.g., power generating windows or facade applications. For the DSCs to constitute a viable investment, the thermal appliance with respect to the working conditions typically encountered must...

  6. Asbestos Utilization Costs on the Example of Functioning Landfill of Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polek, Daria

    2017-12-01

    Asbestos is a trademark of mineral fibres, which are the natural minerals found in nature. Products containing asbestos fibres, in accordance with the national and EU legislation, are covered by the production prohibition and forced to be removed. In Poland, the asbestos removal process started with the adaptation of the EU law by the Council of Ministers Treatment Program of the National Asbestos for the years 2009-2032. The purpose of the dissertation was to analyse the costs associated with the disposal of the costs of collection, transport and disposal of waste. Methodology consisted in obtaining information on the raw materials needed to produce asbestos sheets. The analysis allowed us to determine the asbestos removal cost and include state subsidies in the calculations.

  7. GRANULATION TRIALS OF WASTE THE DUST SILICON CARBIDE FOR UTILIZATION IN METALLURGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Borowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of laboratory granulation tests of dust silicon carbide and the results of research on the selection of the binder and the properties of the granules obtained. The research material was a waste of the silicon carbide powder with a high fragmentation, mixed with a cement or an organic modified starch specimen. Six tests were performed in a disc granulator with 100 cm in diameter. In each series of trial specified: the type and share of the binder, the diameter of the granules, tenderness, type of structure and mechanical properties. Good granules of silicon carbide obtained with the addition of cement binder with 4% of the mass fraction and at least 24 hours of seasoning. The binder should be added twice by powdering, first in a stirred granulator, and again after manufacture. It was found that the resulting granules may be used as a replacement of ferrosilicon in the process of steelmaking.

  8. Utilization of cast seaweed and waste from pectin production for anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Christensen, Thomas Budde; Kjær, Tyge

    2011-01-01

    (app. 80,000 tons year-1) and manure (app. 50,000 tons year-1) and other materials in lesser amounts. Methane potentials of the two “new” biomass fractions were measured to predict their contribution to the biogas production. Measured methane potentials were: Pectin waste: 370 to 460 ml CH4 g VS-1...... and cast seaweed (winter sample): 118 ml CH4 g VS-1. The predicted annual biogas production of the plant was 5.4 million m3 CH4. An environmental assessment concluded that a biogas plant using the aforementioned organic materials will reduce greenhouse gas emissions between 25,000 tons CO2 year-1 and 40...

  9. Utilization of winery wastes for Trichoderma viride biocontrol agent production by solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhihui; Jin, Bo; Li, Yuejie; Chen, Jian; Li, Zuming

    2008-01-01

    Biocontrol agents are safe and environmental friendly alternatives for pesticides in agriculture application. Trichoderma viride WEBL0703 performed a high level of antagonistic activity toward a broad spectrum of phytopathogens and was determined as a biocontrol agent, which was produced by solid state fermentation using grape marc and wine lees. The maximum yield of T. viride conidia was up to 6.65 x 10(9) CFU/g initial dry substrate (IDS) after 10 d fermentation. As important enzymes for protecting plants from disease, chitinase, beta-glucanase, and pectinase yields were 47.8 U/g IDS, 8.32 U/g IDS and 9.83 U/g IDS, respectively. These results show that it is feasible to convert winery wastes to a value-added and environmental friendly biocontrol agent.

  10. Utilization of Shrimp Skin Waste (Sea Lobster) As Raw Material for the Membrane Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyoman Rupiasih, Ni; Sumadiyasa, Made; Suyanto, Hery; Windari, Putri

    2017-05-01

    In view of the increasing littering of the sea banks by shells of crustaceans, a study was carried out to investigate the extraction and characterization of chitosan from skin waste of sea lobster i.e. ‘Bamboo Lobster’ (Panulirus versicolor). Chitosan was extracted using conventional methods such as pretreatment, demineralization, deprotienization, and deacetylation. The result showed that the degree of deacetylation of chitosan obtained is 70.02%. The FTIR spectra of the chitosan gave a characteristic of -NH2 band at 3447 cm-1 and carbonyl group band at 1655 cm-1. This chitosan has been used to prepare membrane. The chitosan membrane 2% has been prepared using phase inversion method with precipitation by solvent evaporation. The membranes were characterized by FTIR spectrophotometer, Nova 1200e using BJH method, and filtration method. The results show that thickness of the membrane is about 134 μm. The FTIR spectra show that functional groups present in the membrane are -NH, -CH, C=O, and -OH. Using BJH method obtained that the pore diameter is 3.382 nm with pore density is 8.95 x 105 pores/m3. By filtration method obtained that pure water flux (PWF) of the membrane are 386.662 and 489.627 1/m2.h at pressure 80-85 kPa and 90-100 kPa, respectively. These results show that skin waste of sea lobster was discovered as a raw material to prepare chitosan membrane. The membrane obtained is belonged to mesoporous group which may use in microfiltration process.

  11. Effective utilization of waste ash from MSW and coal co-combustion power plant: Zeolite synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhengang

    2008-05-01

    The solid by-product from power plant fueled with municipal solid waste and coal was used as a raw material to synthesize zeolite by fusion-hydrothermal process in order to effectively use this type of waste material. The effects of treatment conditions, including NaOH/ash ratio, operating temperature and hydrothermal reaction time, were investigated, and the product was applied to simulated wastewater treatment. The optimal conditions for zeolite X synthesis were: NaOH/ash ratio=1.2:1, fusion temperature=550 degrees C, crystallization time=6-10 h and crystallization temperature=90 degrees C. In the synthesis process, it was found that zeolite X tended to transform into zeolite HS when NaOH/ash ratio was 1.8 or higher, crystallization time was 14-18 h, operating temperature was 130 degrees C or higher. The CEC value, BET surface area and pore volume for the synthesized product at optimal conditions were 250 cmol kg(-1), 249 m(2) g(-1) and 0.46 cm(3) g(-1) respectively, higher than coal fly ash based zeolite. Furthermore, when applied to Zn(2+) contaminated wastewater treatment, the synthesized product presented larger adsorption capacity and bond energy than coal fly ash based zeolite, and the adsorption isotherm data could be well described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. These results demonstrated that the special type of co-combustion ash from power plant is suitable for synthesizing high quality zeolite, and the products are suitable for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

  12. Utilization of oil palm empty bunches waste as biochar-microbes for improving availibity of soil nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G . I . Ichriani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are about 23% waste oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB of total waste generated from the production of crude palm oil in oil palm plantations. Pyrolysis technology can be used to convert waste into biochar and further can be utilized for the improvement of soil. Biochar-microbes of OPEFB are biochar from OPEFB biomass that enriched with soil microbes. Biochar-microbes is expected to be used for the improvement of the soil and plants. Therefore the purpose of this research was to study the ability of biochar-microbes OPEFB to increase availability of the nutrients in sandy soils. The process of making biochar done by using slow pyrolysis technology by heating 300oC and 400oC for 2 and 3 hours, and with sizes 40 and 80 mesh, as well as indigenous microbial Bulkhorderia nodosa G.52.Rif1 and Trichoderma sp. added. The biochar production and research were conducted in the Department of Forestry Laboratory and in the Department of Agronomy Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture, Palangka Raya University. In general, the study showed that biochar-microbes could maintain the soil pH value and tends to increase the soil pH, increasing the holding capacity of sandy soil to the elements of P and K as well as increasing the availability of nutrients N, P and K. Furthermore, this study showed that the biochar process by 400oC heating for 3 hours and 40 mesh with microbes or without microbes were the best effect on the improvement of the quality of holding capacity and the nutrients supply in sandy soils.

  13. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deyi; Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia

    2012-11-30

    In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm × 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F(-)/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mineralogical-chemical characteristics and feasibility studies of utilizing waste materials that accompany coal at the Bogdanka mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazda, L.; Oleszczynski, B.; Pollo, I.

    1988-11-01

    Technological waste material from the coal preparation plant at the Bogdanka mine (Lublin-Chelm Mine Group) was mineralogically and chemically investigated and assessed as to its usefulness as a valuable, kaolinite type raw material for the cement, ceramic and foundry industries. The LW rock and sludges from the Bogdanka mine were investigated. Their mineralogical composition is given. Feasibility studies of utilization of these materials were conducted at the Lublin Polytechnical in the years 1982-1987 and it was found that they can replace 10% of marl, clay and cement rock. They can also be added (12-13%) to moulding sands and replace 10-30% of kaolin clays. They can also serve as raw material for production of building ceramics. With proper preparation they can improve the domestic raw material supply and reduce imports. Investigations revealed that coal residues in them can be removed by sintering. Higher temperatures are required for firing. 16 refs.

  15. Laser-induced removal of a dye C.I. Acid Red 87 using n-type WO{sub 3} semiconductor catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qamar, M. [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 741, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gondal, M.A., E-mail: magondal@kfupm.edu.sa [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 741, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Laser Research Laboratory, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Hayat, K. [Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Yamani, Z.H. [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 741, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Laser Research Laboratory, Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hooshani, K. [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 741, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-10-30

    Water contamination by organic substances such as dyes is of great concern worldwide due to their utilization in many industrial processes and environmental concerns. To cater the needs for waste water treatment polluted with organic dyes, laser-induced photocatalytic process was investigated for removal of a dye derivative namely Acid Red 87 using n-type WO{sub 3} semiconductor catalyst. The degradation was investigated in aqueous suspensions of tungsten oxide under different experimental conditions using laser instead of conventional UV lamp as an irradiation source. The degradation process was monitored by measuring the change in dye concentration as a function of laser irradiation time by employing UV spectroscopic analysis. The degradation of dye was studied by varying different parameters such as laser energy, reaction pH, substrate concentration, catalyst concentration, and in the presence of electron acceptors such as hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), and potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}). The degradation rates were found to be strongly dependent on all the above-mentioned parameters. Our experimental results revealed that the dye degradation process was very fast (within few minutes) under laser irradiation as compared to conventional setups using broad spectral lamps (hours or days) and this laser-induced photocatalytic degradation method could be an effective means to eliminate the pollutants present in liquid phase. The experience gained through this study could be beneficial for treatment of waste water contaminated with organic dyes and other organic pollutants.

  16. Low-Cost Biodegradation and Detoxification of Textile Azo Dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 by Providencia rettgeri Strain HSL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Lade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study focuses on exploitation of agricultural waste wheat bran (WB as growth medium for degradation of textile azo dye C.I. Reactive Blue 172 (RB 172 using a single bacterium P. rettgeri strain HSL1 (GenBank accession number JX853768.1. The bacterium was found to completely decolorize 50 mg L−1 of dye RB 172 within 20 h at 30 ± 0.2°C under microaerophilic incubation conditions. Additionally, significant reduction in COD (85% and TOC (52% contents of dye decolorized medium was observed which suggested its mineralization. Induction in the activities of azoreductase (159% and NADH-DCIP reductase (88% provided an evidence for reductive cleavage of dye RB 172. The HPLC, FTIR, and GC-MS analysis of decolorized products confirmed the degradation of dye into various metabolites. The proposed metabolic pathway for biodegradation of RB 172 has been elucidated which showed the formation of 2 intermediate metabolites, namely, 4-(ethenylsulfonyl aniline and 1-amino-1-(4-aminophenyl propan-2-one. The acute and phytotoxicity evaluation of degraded metabolites suggests that bacterial strain favors the detoxification of dye RB 172. Thus, WB could be utilized as a low-cost growth medium for the enrichment of bacteria and their further use for biodegradation of azo dyes and its derivatives containing wastes into nontoxic form.

  17. RE-UTILIZATION OF INORGANIC SOLID WASTE (LIME MUD AS FOREST ROAD STABILIZER FROM THE CHEMICAL RECOVERY PROCESS IN KRAFT PULP MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habip Eroğlu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Waste handling is a concern in all pulp and paper mills. Best available techniques for reducing waste is to minimize the generation of solid waste and/or reuse these materials, wherever practicable. One of the most important solid wastes is lime mud which is generated from the kraft pulping in its chemical recovery process. This paper explores the composition of lime mud resulting from the chemical recovery unite of kraft pulp mill and investigation of this waste for re-using beneficially on sub grade and pavement of forest road as a alternative disposal method. Lime mud obtained from the re-causticising process in SEKA pulp mill that utilizes wheat straw and reed as the principal raw material was supplied with % 47 water content and its chemical and physical characterisations was performed according to standard methods. Dried waste to environmental condition was mixed with certain amount to composite cement for using on pavement and sandy clay, loamy clay and clay soils for enriching forest road sub grade properties. In order to investigate the lime mud addition on pavement and sub grade properties necessary physical tests were performed. As a consequence this study reveals that while waste of lime mud causes environmental and economical problem with conventional disposal techniques and/or abandoning to environment, this waste can be used as good stabilisation materials on forest road sub-grade and pavement without any environmental problem.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF HETEROGENEOUS UTILIZATION OF THORIUM IN PWRS TO ENHANCE PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND REDUCE WASTE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TODOSOW,M.; KAZIMI,M.

    2004-08-01

    Issues affecting the implementation, public perception and acceptance of nuclear power include: proliferation, radioactive waste, safety, and economics. The thorium cycle directly addresses the proliferation and waste issues, but optimization studies of core design and fuel management are needed to ensure that it fits within acceptable safety and economic margins. Typical pressurized water reactors, although loaded with uranium fuel, produce 225 to 275 kg of plutonium per gigawatt-year of operation. Although the spent fuel is highly radioactive, it nevertheless offers a potential proliferation pathway because the plutonium is relatively easy to separate, amounts to many critical masses, and does not present any significant intrinsic barrier to weapon assembly. Uranium 233, on the other hand, produced by the irradiation of thorium, although it too can be used in weapons, may be ''denatured'' by the addition of natural, depleted or low enriched uranium. Furthermore, it appears that the chemical behavior of thoria or thoria-urania fuel makes it a more stable medium for the geological disposal of the spent fuel. It is therefore particularly well suited for a once-through fuel cycle. The use of thorium as a fertile material in nuclear fuel has been of interest since the dawn of nuclear power technology due to its abundance and to potential neutronic advantages. Early projects include homogeneous mixtures of thorium and uranium oxides in the BORAX-IV, Indian Point I, and Elk River reactors, as well as heterogeneous mixtures in the Shippingport seed-blanket reactor. However these projects were developed under considerably different circumstances than those which prevail at present. The earlier applications preceded the current proscription, for non-proliferation purposes, of the use of uranium enriched to more than 20 w/o in {sup 235}U, and has in practice generally prohibited the use of uranium highly enriched in {sup 235}U. They were designed when

  19. Synthesis of Biomass and Utilization of Plant Wastes in a Physical Model of a Biological Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Lisovsky, G. M.; Kudenko, Yu A.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gribovksaya, I. V.; Tirranen, L. S.; Zolotukkhin, I. G.; Gros, J. B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    Biological life support systems (LSS) with highly closed intrasystem mass ex change mass ex change hold much promise for long-term human life support at planetary stations (Moon, Mars, etc.). The paper considers problems of biosynthesis of higher plants' biomass and "biological incineration" of plant wastes in a working physical model of biological LSS. The plant wastes are "biologically incinerated" in a special heterotroph block involving Californian worms, mushrooms and straw. The block processes plant wastes (straw, haulms) to produce soil-like substrate (SLS) on which plants (wheat, radish) are grown. Gas ex change in such a system consists of respiratory gas ex change of SLS and photosynthesis and respiration of plants. Specifics of gas ex change dynamics of high plants -SLS complex has been considered. Relationship between such a gas ex change and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and age of plants has been established. SLS fertility has been shown to depend on its thickness and phase of maturity. The biogenic elements (potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen) in Liebig minimum have been found to include nitrogen which is the first to impair plants' growth in disruption of the process conditions. The SLS microflora has been found to have different kinds of ammonifying and denitrifying bacteria which is indicative of intensive transformation of nitrogen-containing compounds. The number of physiological groups of microorganisms in SLS was, on the whole, steady. As a result, organic substances -products of ex change of plants and microorganisms were not accumulated in the medium, but mineralized and assimilated by the biocenosis. Experiments showed that the developed model of a man-made ecosystem realized complete utilization of plant wastes and involved them into the intrasystem turnover. In multiple recycle of the mat ter (more than 5 cycles) under the irradiance intensity of 150 W/m2 PAR and the SLS mass (dry weight) of 17.7 -19.9 kg/m2 average total harvest of

  20. A novel route to utilize waste engine oil by blending it with water and coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Cao, Qing; Jin, Li'e; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-06-15

    Coal-oil-water slurry (COWS) synfuel can be prepared successfully by waste engine oil (WEO), water and coal in the existence of Tween 80 and SL. The effects of coal type, coal particle size distribution, and WEO blending proportion (α) on the slurryability of COWS were investigated, and certain essential properties, such as slurryability, rheology, thixotropy, and stability of COWS were examined. The results show that the maximum coal content of COWS decreases with an increment in α, ranging from 60wt.% at α=0 to 48wt.% at α=15wt.%. The apparent viscosity of COWS becomes high when the amount of WEO is increased for the same coal content. The lower heating value (19.15kJ/g) of 48wt.% COWS (α=15wt.%) is equivalent to that of CWS with 67.88wt.% coal. The mass ratio of separated supernatant to oil-water emulsion for COWS with 49wt.% coal decreases by 1.12% while the amount of WEO is increased to 15wt.% from 10wt.%. COWS exhibits the non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluid behavior. Its pseudoplasticity and thixotropy are also promoted as the coal content of COWS is increased. And the dispersion and stabilization mechanism of COWS is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Slope Reinforcement with the Utilization of the Coal Waste Anthropogenic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwóźdź-Lasoń, Monika

    2017-10-01

    The protection of the environment, including waste management, is one of the pillars of the policy of the Europe. The application which is presented in that paper tries to show a trans-disciplinary way to design geotechnical constructions – slope stability analysis. The generally accepted principles that the author presents are numerous modelling patterns of earth retaining walls as slope stabilization system. The paper constitutes an attempt to summarise and generalise earlier researches which involved FEM numeric procedures and the Z_Soil package. The design of anthropogenic soil used as a material for reinforced earth retaining walls, are not only of commercial but of environmental importance as well and consistent with the concept of sustainable development and the need to redevelop brownfield. This paper tries to show conceptual and empirical modelling approaches to slope stability system used in anthropogenic soil formation such as heaps, resulting from mining, with a special focus on urban areas of South of Poland and perspectives of anthropogenic materials application in geotechnical engineering are discussed.

  2. Recent developments in biochar utilization as an additive in organic solid waste composting: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ran; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Li, Ronghua; Park, Jonghwan; Pensky, Scott M; Wang, Quan; Wang, Jim J; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, considerable studies have been devoted to investigating the effect of biochar application on organic solid waste composting. This review provides an up-to-date overview of biochar amendment on composting processes and compost quality. Biochar production, characteristics, and its application coupled with the basic concepts of composting are briefly introduced before detailing the effects of biochar addition on composting. According to recent studies, biochar has exhibited great potential for enhancing composting. It is evident that biochar addition in composting can: (1) improve compost mixture physicochemical properties, (2) enhance microbial activities and promote organic matter decomposition, (3) reduce ammonia (NH 3 ) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and (4) upgrade compost quality by increasing the total/available nutrient content, enhancing maturity, and decreasing phytotoxicity. Despite that, further research is needed to explore the mechanism of biochar addition on composting and to evaluate the agricultural and environmental performances of co-composted biochar compost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Analysis of Heat Exchangers Geometry in Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borcuch Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the analysis and comparison of the hot-side heat exchangers (HHXs dedicated for the thermoelectric generators (TEGs. Efficient operation of TEG depends on, i.a. proper design of the HHX. Six geometries of the heat exchangers’ cross-section have been investigated and analysed in view of heat transfer effectiveness (ηTH and pressure drop (ΔP. As an assumption, useful heat exchange surface has been set up as 2400 cm2, maintaining heat exchanger (HX length as 30 cm, which is enough for the placement of the 32 thermoelectric modules able to generate at least 160 W of the electrical power. The source of waste heat are flue gases, in the analysis approximate as an air. Cold-side heat exchanger (CHX has been simplified and calculated as a water flow around the casing of the HHX to achieve comparable results. As a base, circular profile has been presented. Numerical calculations provide results suggesting which shape is most suitable for specified application. Results could be the first guidelines for selecting and designing the HX for the TEG. Further investigation will focus on optimization of the chosen HX in view of increasing ηTH and minimizing ΔP.

  4. Reduction of colorants in nylon flock dyeing effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qinguo; Hoskote, Sunil; Hou, Yuejun

    2001-02-01

    The batch dyeing of fiber materials such as staple fibers and flock is usually carried out by exhaustion methods. However, the dyeing of flock fibers, either nylon, PET or acetate, with acid or disperse dyes is not 100 percent efficient in terms of dye utilization. Optimally, only about 80 to 85% of the dyes used for dark shade in a dye bath can be exhausted onto the target fibers. Therefore, the remaining dyes in the spent dye bath are generally not reused and are usually discharged with minimum treatment, together with the dyeing chemicals into the sewage wastewater system causing environmental pollution. We are presenting technical solutions to reduce the colorants and chemical auxiliaries in the fiber dyeing effluents by: (1) optimizing the acid dyeing conditions such as salt addition and pH control; (2) reuse of the spent dye bath that remain after the original dyeing process. In the lab scale trials, we have successfully raised the acid dye exhaustion to over 90% by optimizing the dyeing conditions. The reuse of the spent acid dye bath also showed promising results with dye exhaustion ranging from 91 to 93% after 4 times reuse.

  5. An Analysis of Waste Management Policies on Utilizing Biosludge as Material Resources in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biosludge is a by-product of secondary wastewater treatment processes. Due to its high contents of organic carbon and plant nutrients, this bioresource can be practically reused as raw feedstock for making organic fertilizers and building materials. The objective of this paper was to provide a preliminary analysis of biosludge utilization in Taiwan, including food processing sludge, wine brewery sludge, textile sludge, pulp sludge and agricultural sludge. The discussion focused on the status of biosludge generation in recent years (2004–2010, and its sustainable management principle. This paper also presents updated information about the governmental regulations and policies for promoting these biosolids as material resources, as well as validating the regulatory levels of toxic constituents in the biosludge and its derived product (e.g., organic fertilizer. Based on the preliminary benefit analysis of utilizing biosludge as raw material for organic fertilizer, reusing biosludge, being a beneficial resource, should be superior to those by traditional treatments (i.e., incineration and sanitary landfill.

  6. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE DYE AND PIGMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This risk assessment calculates the maximum loadings of constituents found in dyes and pigment industries waste streams which can be disposed in different types of waste management units without causing health benchmarks to be exceeded at plausible receptor locations. The assessment focuses on potential risks from volatilization and leaching to groundwater of constituents disposed in surface impoundments and landfills with either clay liners or composite liners. This product will be used by EPA decision makers to assist in determining whether certain waste streams generated by the dyes and pigments industries should be designated as hazardous.

  7. Utilization of bagasse and coconut fibers waste as fillers of sandwich composite for bridge railway sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehardjo, K. A.; Basuki, A.

    2017-07-01

    The bridge railway sleepers is an essential component in the construction of railways, as the foundation of the rail support in order to withstand the load a train that runs above it. Sleepers used in bridge construction are expected to have a longer service life, lighter weight and durable so that can be used more efficient. This research was carried out to create a model of bridges railway sleepers made of sandwich structured composite from fiber glass, epoxy resin with fillers waste of bagasse (sugar cane pulp mill) or coconut fiberboard (copra industry) that using polyurethane as an adhesive. The process of making was conditioned for small and medium industrial applications. Railway sleepers’ specifications adapted to meet the requirements of end user. The process steps in this research include; lay-up fiberglass combined with bagasse/coconut fiberboard (as fillers), gluing with epoxy resin, molded it with pressure to be solid, curing after solidification process. The specimens of composite, bagasse and coconut fiber board were tested for tensile and compressive strength. The prototype were tested of mechanical test: flexural moment test to the stand rail, flexural moment test to the middle of the sleepers and tensile strength test on one side of the sleepers, in accordance to SNI 11-3388-1994 Method testing of single block concrete sleepers and bearing single rail fastening systems. The results of mechanical testing all variations meet the technical specifications of end user such as test results for flexural moment on all prototypes, after load test, there is no visible crack. While in the tensile strength test, it seem the prototype with coconut fiberboard filler, shows better performance than bagasse fiberboard filler, the decisions is just depended on techno economic and lifetime.

  8. Waste utilization of red snapper (Lutjanus sp.) fish bone to improve phosphorus contents in compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhani, S.; Iswanto, B.; Purwaningrum, P.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to get the idea that bone waste will be the P content enhancer in compost so that the compost produced meets the standard P levels specified in SNI 19-7030-2004 which regulating compost quality standard. Nutrient levels were obtained in fish bone meal (FBM) are C (3.35%), N (0.48%), P (30.90%) and K (0.02%). Effects of fish bone meal to the rising levels of P in the compost has been known. P levels of compost B, C, D, and E increased at 428.57; 542.85; 657.14 and 914.28% against the compost A (blank). FBM ideal addition indicated in compost B, as much as 15 gr, with a P content of 0.37% and has been passed according standards (0.10% for P). C/N ratio decreased over the 21 days period of composting, with the greatest decline was compost E with a ratio of 16:1. Highest nitrogen (N) levels recorded respectively in compost B and C with value of 1.09% and the lowest of recorded N content was compost A, D and E (1.08%). N content in all samples of compost were eligible minimum N of 0.40%. Carbon (C) is the highest recorded in compost B; 20.20% and the lowest in the compost E; 17.34%. Highest and lowest C levels on the compost has met the minimum C of 9.80%. Composting is done in a bucket as an aerobic composter (with air holes), compost pile turnover for each sample is controlled as much as once/2 days. Mesophilic period (23-450C) occurs during the 21-day period of composting. Compost B has P content of 0.37%, so it has fulfilled the provisions of SNI 19-7030-2004 about the recommended compost standard.

  9. Environmental waste site characterization utilizing aerial photographs, remote sensing, and surface geophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, P.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Rofer, C.; Baldridge, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferguson, J. [Univ. of Texas, Richardson, TX (United States); Jiracek, G. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States); Balick, L. [Bechtel Remote Sensing Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Josten, N.; Carpenter, M. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-04-18

    Six different techniques were used to delineate 40 year old trench boundary at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Data from historical aerial photographs, a magnetic gradient survey, airborne multispectral and thermal infra-red imagery, seismic refraction, DC resistivity, and total field magnetometry were utilized in this process. Each data set indicated a southern and northern edge for the trench. Average locations and 95% confidence limits for each edge were determined along a survey line perpendicular to the trench. Trench edge locations were fairly consistent among all six techniques. Results from a modeling effort performed with the total magnetic field data was the least consistent. However, each method provided unique and complementary information, and the integration of all this information led to a more complete characterization of the trench boundaries and contents.

  10. Hair Dye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cosmetics, temporary tattoos, photographic development and lithography plates, photocopying and printing inks, black rubber, oils, greases and gasoline [2]. PPD is the most common constituent of hair dye formulations. It is often the key ingredient but can also be used for color enhancement. PPD is commonly used.

  11. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 9. Laser Dyes. G S Shankarling K J Jarag. General Article Volume 15 Issue 9 September ... Author Affiliations. G S Shankarling1 K J Jarag1. Dyestuff Technology, Department Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga Mumbai 400 019, India.

  12. The program for reduction of energy wasting under the electric power utilities viewpoint; O programa de combate ao desperdicio de energia eletrica sob a otica das concessionarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacellar, Fernando L.B. [Elektro Brasil, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the Elektro utility viewing on the program for reduction of electric power wasting, considering the aspects of productivity, the particularities of the commercial, residential and rural sectors. The Elektro, former ELETROPAULO, is responsible by the electric power distribution covering 223 municipal districts in the State of Sao Paulo, and 5 in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul.

  13. UTILIZATION OF AREN (Arenga pinnata Merr. SAWMILLING WASTE FOR EDIBLE MUSHROOM CULTIVATION MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djarwanto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aren (Arenga pinnata Merr. is a multipurpose tree that can be utilized for palm sugar, alcoholic drinks, beverages and construction wood. The use of aren sawdust has not been studied intensively. This study examines the utilization of aren sawdust as cultivation media for edible mushrooms. Aren sawdust was mixed with rice bran, CaCO3, gypsum, fertilizers and distilled water before sterilization in 30 minutes pressurized autoclave at 1210C and 1.5atm. The mixed media was inoculated with pure cultures containing four mushrooms species (Pleurotus flabellatus, P. ostreatus, P. sajor-caju and Lentinula edodes and incubated for five weeks to allow mycelium growth producing fruit bodies. The fruit bodies were harvested everyday within four months and examined for its gained mushroom-weight and biological conversion efficiency/BE. The core part of aren trunk was cut into smaller pieces of 10 cm (width by 5 cm (thickness, by 120 cm (length. Each core sample was bored from the surface inward, creating holes with a particular distance apart. Each hole was inoculated with pure cultures containing 6 mushroom species (four species above, P. cystidiosus and Auricularia polytricha. The inoculated samples were slanted on bamboo support, and placed in a bamboo hut. Harvesting was carried out everyday after the fruiting body became mature and examined for its gained mushroom weight. Results show that the use of sawdust supplemented with nutritious material is more likely to improve the mushroom yield than that of aren sawn-timber core. In this case, the BE values with aren-sawdust media were 21.97-89.45% (P. flabellatus, 15.36-105.36% (P. ostreatus, 63.88-76.86% (P. sajor-caju, and up to 62.88% (L. edodes. Meanwhile, the yields (gained mushroom weight with aren sawn-timber media were 210g (P. ostreatus, 368g (P. flabellatus, 331g (P. sajor-caju and 48g (A. polytricha; however, P. cystidiosus and L. edodes inoculated on aren stem core failed to grow.

  14. Utilization of biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of agro-industrial waste: Energy, economic and environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublin, Andrea; Schneider, Daniel Rolph; Džodan, Janko

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of agro-industrial waste is of significant interest in order to facilitate a sustainable development of energy supply. Using of material and energy potentials of agro-industrial waste, in the framework of technical, economic, and ecological possibilities, contributes in increasing the share of energy generated from renewable energy sources. The paper deals with the benefits arising from the utilization of biogas produced by co-digestion of whey and cow manure. The advantages of this process are the profitability of the plant and the convenience in realizing an anaerobic digestion plant to produce biogas that is enabled by the benefits from the sale of electric energy at favorable prices. Economic aspects are related to the capital cost (€ 2,250,000) of anaerobic digestion treatment in a biogas plant with a 300 kW power and 510 kW heating unit in a medium size farm (450 livestock units). Considering the optimum biogas yield of 20.7 dm(3) kg(-1) of wet substrate and methane content in the biogas obtained of 79%, the anaerobic process results in a daily methane production of 2,500 kg, with the maximum power generation of 2,160,000 kWh y(-1) and heat generation of 2,400,000 kWh y(-1) The net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period for implementation of profitable anaerobic digestion process is evaluated. Ecological aspects related to carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission reduction are assessed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Effects of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil supplementation on feed intake, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen utilization of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanjula, Pin; Pongprayoon, Sahutaya; Kongpan, Sirichai; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    This experiment was evaluation of the effects of increasing concentrations of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil (CGWVO) in diets on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen balance of goats. Four crossbred male (Thai Native × Anglo Nubian) goats, with an average initial body weight (BW) of 31.5 ± 1.90 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments contained 0, 2, 4, and 6 % of dietary dry matter (DM) of CGWVO. Based on this experiment, there were significantly different (P > 0.05) among treatment groups regarding DM intake and digestion coefficients of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, EE, NDF, and ADF), which goats receiving 6 % of CGWVO had lower daily DMI and nutrient intake than those fed on 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO. Ruminal pH, NH3-N, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration were unchanged by dietary treatments, except that for 6 % of CGWVO supplementation, NH3-N, and BUN were lower (P < 0.05) than for the diets 0 % of CGWVO, while the differences between the diets 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO were not significant. The amounts of N absorption and retention were similar among treatments, except that for 6 % of CGWVO which N absorption was lower (P < 0.05) than among treatments while the difference between the diets 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO were not significant. Based on this study, CGWVO levels up to 4 % in total mixed ration could be efficiently utilized for goats. This study was a good approach in exploiting the use of biodiesel production from waste vegetable oil for goat production.

  16. Utilization of chemically treated municipal solid waste (spent coffee bean powder) as reinforcement in cellulose matrix for packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagamani, Senthil Muthu Kumar; Nagarajan, Rajini; Jawaid, Mohammad; Anumakonda, Varadarajulu; Siengchin, Suchart

    2017-11-01

    As the annual production of the solid waste generable in the form of spent coffee bean powder (SCBP) is over 6 million tons, its utilization in the generation of green energy, waste water treatment and as a filler in biocomposites is desirable. The objective of this article is to analyze the possibilities to valorize coffee bean powder as a filler in cellulose matrix. Cellulose matrix was dissolved in the relatively safer aqueous solution mixture (8% LiOH and 15% Urea) precooled to -12.5°C. To the cellulose solution (SCBP) was added in 5-25wt% and the composite films were prepared by regeneration method using ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. Some SCBP was treated with aq. 5% NaOH and the composite films were also prepared using alkali treated SCBP as a filler. The films of composites were uniform with brown in color. The cellulose/SCBP films without and with alkali treated SCBP were characterized by FTIR, XRD, optical and polarized optical microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. The maximum tensile strength of the composite films with alkali treated SCBP varied between (106-149MPa) and increased with SCBP content when compared to the composites with untreated SCBP. The thermal stability of the composite was higher at elevated temperatures when alkali treated SCBP was used. Based on the improved tensile properties and photo resistivity, the cellulose/SCBP composite films with alkali treated SCBP may be considered for packaging and wrapping of flowers and vegetables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Utilization as peptone for glycerol production of ram horn waste with a new process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurbanoglu, Esabi Basaran E-mail: ekurbanoglu@yahoo.com; Kurbanoglu, Namudar Izzet

    2004-01-01

    A major component of the horns is protein. Peptones are defined as protein hydrolysates. The potential use of ram horn peptone (RHP) as a nitrogen source for glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. For this purpose, first, RHP was produced. Ram horns were hydrolyzed by treating with acids (6 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 6 N HCl) and neutralizing the solutions. The amounts of protein, nitrogen, ash, some minerals, total sugars, total lipids and amino acids of the RHP were determined. The RHP was compared with a bacto-tryptone from casein and other peptones. With the addition of RHP to the fermentation medium with a final concentration of 4% (optimal concentration), the glycerol value for 4 days reached a maximum value (8.5 g l{sup -1}), which is 25% higher than that of the bacto-tryptone (6.8 g l{sup -1}), 32% higher than that of bacto-peptone (6.4 g l{sup -1}) and 49% higher than that of fish peptone (5.7 g l{sup -1}). The results show that RHP can be utilized as a peptone and may be a valuable supplement in biotechnology.

  18. Production of Enzymes From Agricultural Wastes and Their Potential Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathiraja, S; Suriya, J; Krishnan, M; Manivasagan, P; Kim, S-K

    Enzymatic hydrolysis is the significant technique for the conversion of agricultural wastes into valuable products. Agroindustrial wastes such as rice bran, wheat bran, wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, and corncob are cheapest and plentifully available natural carbon sources for the production of industrially important enzymes. Innumerable enzymes that have numerous applications in industrial processes for food, drug, textile, and dye use have been produced from different types of microorganisms from agricultural wastes. Utilization of agricultural wastes offers great potential for reducing the production cost and increasing the use of enzymes for industrial purposes. This chapter focuses on economic production of actinobacterial enzymes from agricultural wastes to make a better alternative for utilization of biomass generated in million tons as waste annually. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Waterless Textile Dyeing

    OpenAIRE

    ODABAŞOĞLU, Hakkı Yasin; AVİNÇ, Osman Ozan; YAVAŞ, Arzu

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO), having liquid-like densities, hereby provides hydrophobic dyes an advantage on dissolving. Their gas-like low viscosities and diffusion properties can lead to shorter dyeing durations compared to conventional water dyeing process. Supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing, a novel dyeing process, is an anhydrous dyeing and this process involves the use of less energy and chemicals than conventional water dyeing processes resulting in a potential of up to 50% low...

  20. Utilization of waste materials, non-refined materials, and renewable energy in in situ remediation and their sustainability benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favara, Paul; Gamlin, Jeff

    2017-12-15

    In the ramp-up to integrating sustainability into remediation, a key industry focus area has been to reduce the environmental footprint of treatment processes. The typical approach to integrating sustainability into remediation projects has been a top-down approach, which involves developing technology options and then applying sustainability thinking to the technology, after it has been conceptualized. A bottom-up approach allows for systems thinking to be included in remedy selection and could potentially result in new or different technologies being considered. When using a bottom-up approach, there is room to consider the utilization of waste materials, non-refined materials, and renewable energy in remediation technology-all of which generally have a smaller footprint than processed materials and traditional forms of energy. By integrating more systems thinking into remediation projects, practitioners can think beyond the traditional technologies typically used and how technologies are deployed. To compare top-down and bottom-up thinking, a traditional technology that is considered very sustainable-enhanced in situ bioremediation-is compared to a successful, but infrequently deployed technology-subgrade biogeochemical reactors. Life Cycle Assessment is used for the evaluation and shows the footprint of the subgrade biogeochemical reactor to be lower in all seven impact categories evaluated, sometimes to a significant degree. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilization of inulin-containing waste in industrial fermentations to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Qureshi, Nasib; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jones, Marjorie A; Jarodsky, Joshua M; Galindo-Leva, Luz Ángela; Lindquist, Mitchell R

    2017-04-01

    Inulins are polysaccharides that belong to an important class of carbohydrates known as fructans and are used by many plants as a means of storing energy. Inulins contain 20 to several thousand fructose units joined by β-2,1 glycosidic bonds, typically with a terminal glucose unit. Plants with high concentrations of inulin include: agave, asparagus, coffee, chicory, dahlia, dandelion, garlic, globe artichoke, Jerusalem artichoke, jicama, onion, wild yam, and yacón. To utilize inulin as its carbon and energy source directly, a microorganism requires an extracellular inulinase to hydrolyze the glycosidic bonds to release fermentable monosaccharides. Inulinase is produced by many microorganisms, including species of Aspergillus, Kluyveromyces, Penicillium, and Pseudomonas. We review various inulinase-producing microorganisms and inulin feedstocks with potential for industrial application as well as biotechnological efforts underway to develop sustainable practices for the disposal of residues from processing inulin-containing crops. A multi-stage biorefinery concept is proposed to convert cellulosic and inulin-containing waste produced at crop processing operations to valuable biofuels and bioproducts using Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as thermochemical treatments.

  2. New Insight into Sugarcane Industry Waste Utilization (Press Mud) for Cleaner Biobutanol Production by Using C. acetobutylicum NRRL B-527.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Khedkar, Manisha A; Gaikwad, Shashank G; Chavan, Prakash V; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, press mud, a sugar industry waste, was explored for biobutanol production to strengthen agricultural economy. The fermentative production of biobutanol was investigated via series of steps, viz. characterization, drying, acid hydrolysis, detoxification, and fermentation. Press mud contains an adequate amount of cellulose (22.3%) and hemicellulose (21.67%) on dry basis, and hence, it can be utilized for further acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production. Drying experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 60-120 °C to circumvent microbial spoilage and enhance storability of press mud. Furthermore, acidic pretreatment variables, viz. sulfuric acid concentration, solid to liquid ratio, and time, were optimized using response surface methodology. The corresponding values were found to be 1.5% (v/v), 1:5 g/mL, and 15 min, respectively. In addition, detoxification studies were also conducted using activated charcoal, which removed almost 93-97% phenolics and around 98% furans, which are toxic to microorganisms during fermentation. Finally, the batch fermentation of detoxified press mud slurry (the sample dried at 100 °C and pretreated) using Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B-527 resulted in a higher butanol production of 4.43 g/L with a total ABE of 6.69 g/L.

  3. A novel method of utilization of hot dip galvanizing slag using the heat waste from itself for protection from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mengge; Xue, Xiangxin; Kumar, Ashok; Yang, He; Sayyed, M I; Liu, Shan; Bu, Erjun

    2018-02-15

    A novel, unconventional, low cost, eco-friendly and effective shielding materials have been made utilizing the hot dip galvanizing slag using the heat waste from itself, thereby saving the natural resources and preventing the environmental pollution. SEM-EDS of shielding materials indicates that the other elements are distributed in Zn element. The mass attenuation properties of shielding materials were measured using a narrow beam geometrical setup at 0.662MeV, 1.17MeV and 1.33MeV. The half value thickness layer, effective atomic number, and electron density were used to analyze the shielding performance of the materials. The EBFs and EABFs for the prepared shielding materials were also studied with incident photon energy for penetration depths upto 40mfp. The shielding effectiveness has been compared with lead, iron, zinc, some standard shielding concretes, different glasses and some alloys. The shielding effectiveness of the prepared samples is almost found comparable to iron, zinc, selected alloys and glasses while better than some standard shielding concretes. In addition, it is also found that the bending strength of all shielding materials is more than 110MPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential of solid waste utilization as source of refuse derived fuel (RDF) energy (case study at temporary solid waste disposal site in West Jakarta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrawati, D.; Lindu, M.; Denita, P.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to measure the volume of solid waste generated as well asits density, composition, and characteristics, to analyze the potential of waste in TPS to become RDF materials and to analyze the best composition mixture of RDF materials. The results show that the average of solid waste generation in TPS reaches 40.80 m3/day, with the largest percentage of its share is the organic waste component of 77.9%, while the smallest amount of its share is metal and rubber of 0.1%. The average water content and ash content of solid waste at the TPS is 27.7% and 6.4% respectively, while the average calorific potential value is 728.71 kcal/kg. The results of solid waste characteristics comparison at three TPS indicate thatTPS Tanjung Duren has the greatest waste potential to be processed into RDF materials with a calorific value of 893.73 kcal/kg, water content level of 24.6%, andlow ash content of 6.11%. This research has also shown that the best composition for RDF composite materials is rubber, wood, and textile mixtureexposed to outdoor drying conditions because it produced low water content and low ash content of 10.8% and 9.6%, thus optimizedthe calorific value of 4,372.896 kcal/kg.

  5. Release Control of Dye from Agar Ball

    OpenAIRE

    板屋, 智之; 山村, 俊貴; 唐澤, 有太朗

    2013-01-01

    Agar is a special product of Nagano prefecture. To utilize agar gel as adsorbing or releasing material of dyes or drugs, spherical agar gel “agar ball” was prepared by dropping aqueous agar solution into salad oil. And releasing behavior of a dye (rhodamine B) from agar ball was studied. The dye is released easily from agar ball, but the release can be controlled by hybiridazation of agar and galatin. In addition, it was found that agar ball could extract the dye from oil phase containing the...

  6. Nano-dyeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Cui-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyeing nanofibers is a frontier of both modern textile engineering and nanotechnology. This paper suggest a feasible method for dyeing nanofibers with a natural red (Roselle Calyx by bubble electrospinning. Reactive dye (Red S3B and acid dye (Red 2B were also used in the experiment for comparison. The dyeing process was finished during the spinning process.

  7. Biogas production liquid and solid waste for power generation. Total concept for utilization of wastes; Biogasherstellung aus Abwasser und Feststoffen dient zur Stromerzeugung. Gesamtkonzept zur Nutzung von Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, Stephan [Aerzener Maschinenfabrik GmbH, Aerzen (Germany)

    2010-06-14

    Processing of vegetables and potatoes uses produces large amounts of liquid and solid waste materials every day. These can be used for biogas production and for electric power generation in a cogeneration unit. The liquid waste is processed and then discharged into a nearby streamlet and/or into a public sewage plant. The waste heat of the process can be used for heating. A plant working by this principle was constructed at Twistringen in the German state of Niedersachsen. The system incorporates two biogas blowers and two oil-free compressing rotary piston blowers by Aerzener Maschinenfabrik. (orig.)

  8. 17 EFFECTS OF MORDANTING METHODS OF DYE FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frederick Iraki

    dyeing woven cotton with natural dyes from the leaves of Vernonia amygdalina. The effects analyzed are color fastness ... INTRODUCTION. In Uganda, plants have traditionally been utilized as a source of colorants for dyeing mats, ropes and other home based materials for a long time. These plants are a potential source of ...

  9. Hair dye poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002703.htm Hair dye poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair dye poisoning occurs when someone swallows dye or tint ...

  10. Utilization of Waste Clay from Boron Production in Bituminous Geosynthetic Barrier (GBR-B) Production as Landfill Liner

    OpenAIRE

    Müfide Banar; Yücel Güney; Aysun Özkan; Zerrin Günkaya; Eren Bayrakcı; Derya Ulutaş

    2016-01-01

    Bituminous geomembranes, one type of geosynthetics, include a hot bituminous mixture with mineral filler and reinforcement. In this study, boron production waste clay (CW) was used as filler to produce a geosynthetic barrier with bentonite, waste tire, and bitumen. Bentonite and waste tires were used as auxiliary fillers and bitumen as the binder. CW/bitumen, CW/bentonite/bitumen, and CW/waste tire/bitumen mixtures were prepared by using a laboratory mixer at 100°C. Hot mixtures were extruded...

  11. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanilav

    2016-11-15

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and the electronic waste as a real waste. The process of polyethylene decomposition showed that the operation of the device is correct because 99.74% of carbon moles contained in the PE samples was detected in the gas after the process. Thus, the PE samples practically were pyrolyzed completely to hydrocarbons, which were completely oxidized in the plasma reactor. It turned out that the device is useful for decomposition of the electronic waste. The conditions in the plasma reactor during the oxidation process of the pyrolysis products did not promote the formation of PCDD/Fs despite the presence of the oxidizing conditions. An important parameter determining the efficiency of the oxidation of the pyrolysis products is gas temperature in the plasma reactor. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ENERGY RECOVERY FOR CONTINUOUS DYEING PROCESS IN TEXTILE INDUSTRY ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper ascertains and presents alteration in the energy consumption as a consequence of utilizing the low-temperature waste streams commonly used in the lines of continuous dyeing at the finishing shops of textile enterprises of Belarus. The utilization realizes through the engagement of lithium-bromide absorption heat pumps with various energy characteristics such as the heating coefficient (relative conversion ratio COPhp = 1,15; 1,7; 2,2 and the heating capacity. The latter associates with the converted heat-flow energy utilization variant with the heat-transfer medium heating system scheme (one-, twoand multistage heating. The article considers transition to previously not applied service-water preheating due to the technological acceptance of feeding higher temperature water into the dyeing machine and widening specification of the heattransfer media. The authors adduce variants of internal and external energy use and their evaluation based on the relative energy and exergy characteristics. With results of the thermodynamic analysis of the modernized production effectiveness the researchers prove that alongside with traditional and apparent interior utilization of the energy associated with the stream heat recuperation, it is advisable to widen the range of applied heat-transfer media. The transition to the service water twoand multi-stage preheating is feasible. The study shows that the existing energy supply efficiency extremely low index-numbers improve by one or two degrees. Since they are conditioned, inter alia, by the machinery design, traditional approach to energy supply and heat-medium usage as well as the enterprise whole heating system answering requirements of the bygone era of cheap energy resources. The authors examine the continuous dyeing line modernization options intending considerable investments. Preliminary economic assessment of such inevitable modernization options for the enterprise entire heat-and-power system

  13. Catalytic ozonation of organic pollutants from bio-treated dyeing and finishing wastewater using recycled waste iron shavings as a catalyst: Removal and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Ma, Luming; Chen, Yunlu; Cheng, Yunqin; Liu, Yan; Zha, Xiaosong

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic ozonation of organic pollutants from actual bio-treated dyeing and finishing wastewater (BDFW) with iron shavings was investigated. Catalytic ozonation effectively removed organic pollutants at initial pH values of 7.18-7.52, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) level decreased from 142 to 70 mg·L(-1) with a discharge limitation of 80 mg·L(-1). A total of 100% and 42% of the proteins and polysaccharides, respectively, were removed with a decrease in their contribution to the soluble COD from 76% to 41%. Among the 218 organic species detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, 58, 77, 79 and 4 species were completely removed, partially removed, increased and newly generated, respectively. Species including textile auxiliaries and dye intermediates were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The inhibitory effect decreased from 51% to 33%, suggesting a reduction in the acute toxicity. The enhanced effect was due to hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation, co-precipitation and oxidation by other oxidants. The proteins were removed by OH oxidation (6%), by direct ozonation, co-precipitation and oxidation by other oxidants (94%). The corresponding values for polysaccharides were 21% and 21%, respectively. In addition, the iron shavings behaved well in successive runs. These results indicated that the process was favorable for engineering applications for removal of organic pollutants from BDFW. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Mississippi University Research Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass: Production of Alternative Fuels from Waste Biomass Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drs. Mark E. Zapp; Todd French; Lewis Brown; Clifford George; Rafael Hernandez; Marvin Salin (from Mississippie State University); Drs. Huey-Min Hwang, Ken Lee, Yi Zhang; Maria Begonia (from Jackson State University); Drs. Clint Williford; Al Mikell (from the University of Mississippi); Drs. Robert Moore; Roger Hester (from the University of Southern Mississippi).

    2009-03-31

    The Mississippi Consortium for the Utilization of Biomass was formed via funding from the US Department of Energy's EPSCoR Program, which is administered by the Office of Basic Science. Funding was approved in July of 1999 and received by participating Mississippi institutions by 2000. The project was funded via two 3-year phases of operation (the second phase was awarded based on the high merits observed from the first 3-year phase), with funding ending in 2007. The mission of the Consortium was to promote the utilization of biomass, both cultured and waste derived, for the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. These scientific efforts, although generally basic in nature, are key to the development of future industries within the Southeastern United States. In this proposal, the majority of the efforts performed under the DOE EPSCoR funding were focused primarily toward the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks and biogas from waste products. However, some of the individual projects within this program investigated the production of other products from biomass feeds (i.e. acetic acid and biogas) along with materials to facilitate the more efficient production of chemicals from biomass. Mississippi is a leading state in terms of raw biomass production. Its top industries are timber, poultry production, and row crop agriculture. However, for all of its vast amounts of biomass produced on an annual basis, only a small percentage of the biomass is actually industrially produced into products, with the bulk of the biomass being wasted. This situation is actually quite representative of many Southeastern US states. The research and development efforts performed attempted to further develop promising chemical production techniques that use Mississippi biomass feedstocks. The three processes that were the primary areas of interest for ethanol production were syngas fermentation, acid hydrolysis followed by hydrolyzate fermentation, and

  15. Open-cycle heat pumps for industrial waste-heat utilization. Project technical report, May 12, 1980-October 10, 1980. Phase I. Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Open-Cycle Industrial Process Heat Pumps (IPHP) are potentially a cost-effective method of utilizing an industrial plant's waste heat. The objective of Phase I of the work was to determine the feasibility of an open-cycle industrial process heat pump. This was accomplished by the evaluation of four potential sites for the installation of open-cycle industrial process heat pump equipment. While it was the original plan to evaluate only three sites, the need for a fourth site became apparent upon completion of studies of the Amstar applications. On the basis of initial screening, it was decided to concentrate on the large waste stream at General Electric's NORYL facility (Selkirk, NY) and a smaller waste stream at the Schoeller Paper Company (Pulaski, NY). These two sites provided opportunities to exploit the features of the open-cyle IPHP without major site constraints. Site studies were conducted to obtain process information such as flow rates, process temperatures, dynamic behavior of the process streams, process control functions, and capacity/time schedules. Information relating to structure and utilities, floor loadings, physical space constraints, electric service, piping runs between equipment location, and waste water tapping points was gathered. These data were analyzed and resulted in the selection of two applications with acceptable thermodynamic performance.

  16. Physicochemical and adsorptive characteristics of activated carbons from waste polyester textiles utilizing MgO template method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihua; Zhang, Daofang; Yuan, Zhihang; Chen, Weifang; Zhang, Tianqi; Tian, Danqi; Deng, Haixuan

    2017-10-01

    Activated carbons with high specific surface areas were produced, utilizing waste polyester textiles as carbon precursor by magnesium oxide (MgO) template method. Magnesium chloride (MgCl2), magnesium citrate (MgCi), and MgO were employed as MgO precursors to prepare activated carbons (AC-MgCl2, AC-MgCi, and AC-MgO). Thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry was conducted to investigate the pore-forming mechanism, and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, XRD, SEM-EDS, TEM, FTIR and pHpzc were achieved to analyze physicochemical characteristics of the samples. The specific surface areas of AC-MgCl2 (1173 m2/g) and AC-MgCi (1336 m2/g) were much higher than that of AC-MgO (450 m2/g), and the pores sizes of which were micro-mesoporous, mesoporous, and macropores, respectively, due to the formation of MgO crystal with different sizes. All activated carbons had abundant acidic oxygen groups. In addition, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorptive characteristics of the prepared activated carbons toward Cr(VI). The adsorption kinetics fitted well with the pseudo-second order, and the adsorptive capacity of AC-MgCl2 (42.55 mg/g) was higher than those of AC-MgCi (40.93 mg/g) and AC-MgO (35.87 mg/g).

  17. Enhanced hydrogen production from waste activated sludge by cascade utilization of organic matter in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Liu, Bingfeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-03-15

    Fermentative hydrogen production from waste activated sludge (WAS) has low H2 yield because WAS contains limited amounts of carbohydrate suitable for use by hydrogen-producing bacteria. Here, augmentation of hydrogen production from WAS by microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) was implemented. H2 yields of 3.89±0.39 mg-H2/g-DS (5.67±0.61 mg-H2/g-VSS) from raw WAS and 6.78±0.94 mg-H2/g-DS (15.08±1.41 mg-H2/g-VSS) from alkaline-pretreated WAS were obtained in the two-chamber MECs (TMECs). This was several times higher than yields obtained previously by fermentation. Single-chamber MECs (SMECs) with low internal resistance showed a H2 production rate that 13 times that of TMECs with similar H2 yield when alkaline-pretreated WAS was used. However, methanogenesis was detected after several batch cycles. A yield balance calculation revealed that carbohydrates were not the only substrates for electrohydrogenesis. Protein and its acidification products, such as volatile fatty acids are also responsible for a portion of H2 generation in MEC. Characterization of WAS in TMECs by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis indicated that electrohydrogenesis reacted on the extracellular polymeric substances and intracellular substances of WAS. Cascade utilization of organic matter in MECs increased hydrogen production from WAS. MECs showed high hydrogen yield from WAS, fewer H2 sinks, and insensitivity to temperature. Optimizing MEC configurations and operation conditions and improving the pretreatment processes of WAS are necessary before practical application can take place on a large scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilization of Waste Clay from Boron Production in Bituminous Geosynthetic Barrier (GBR-B Production as Landfill Liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müfide Banar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous geomembranes, one type of geosynthetics, include a hot bituminous mixture with mineral filler and reinforcement. In this study, boron production waste clay (CW was used as filler to produce a geosynthetic barrier with bentonite, waste tire, and bitumen. Bentonite and waste tires were used as auxiliary fillers and bitumen as the binder. CW/bitumen, CW/bentonite/bitumen, and CW/waste tire/bitumen mixtures were prepared by using a laboratory mixer at 100°C. Hot mixtures were extruded into strips by using a lab-scale corotating twin screw extruder (L/D: 40 followed by die casting (2 mm × 100 mm. Glass fleece or nonwoven polyester was used as reinforcement material and while die casting, both sides of the reinforcement materials were covered with bituminous mixture. Thickness, mass per unit area, tensile strength, elongation at yield, and hydraulic conductivity were used to characterize the geomembranes. Among all geomembranes, nonwoven polyester covered with 30% bitumen-70% boron waste clay mixture (PK-BTM30CW70 was found to be the most promising in terms of structure and mechanical behaviour. After that, consequences of its exposure to distilled water (DW, municipal solid waste landfill leachate (L-MSW, and hazardous waste landfill leachate (L-HW were examined to use for an innovative impermeable liner on solid waste landfills.

  19. THE UTILIZATION OF Fe(III WASTE OF ETCHING INDUSTRY AS QUALITY ENHANCHEMENT MATERIAL IN CERAMIC ROOFTILE SYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Vaulina Yulistia Delsy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Waste is produced from various industrial activities. FeCl3 used in this study as an addition to the material quality in synthesis of ceramic rooftile from Kalijaran village clay, Purbalingga. Etching industrial waste FeCl3 contacted with clay. Waste being varied waste as diluted and undiluted while clay grain size varied as 60, 80, 100, 140, and 230 mesh. Both clay and waste are contacted at 30-100 minutes. The results showed that the optimum of time and grain size variation is clay with 80 mesh grain size within 70 minutes. While physical properties of the rooftile contained Fe meet all ISO standards and are known to tile, the best quality is to use clay that has been in contact with the waste that is created 1000 times dilution. The stripping test of Fe (III by rain water and sea water showed that the average rate of Fe-striped of the tile body that is made with soaked with diluted waste are 0.068 ppm/day and 0.055 ppm/day while for tile bodies soaked with waste is not diluted are 0.0722 ppm/day and 0.0560 ppm/day.

  20. Utilization of inorganic industrial wastes in producing construction ceramics. Review of Russian experience for the years 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltakova, N V; Faseeva, G R; Kabirov, R R; Nafikov, R M; Zakharov, Yu A

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyzes the significant scientific publications worldwide for the last 15years concerning construction ceramics (predominantly brick) made with various inorganic industrial wastes added to the ceramic raw material for the improvement of properties and for eco-friendly disposal. The information gap resulting from the lack of mentions of the Russian publications on this subject in English-language reviews is filled. The paper includes brief summaries of 34 dissertations and 29 patents issued in Russia since 2000. The waste additives described in these summaries are grouped by origin type (mining industry waste, ore enrichment waste, metallurgical waste, sludge, ashes, cullet, large-capacity building wastes and waste from various chemical production processes) with the ceramic mixture compositions, molding and firing conditions, final strength, water absorption and other parameters of the final ceramic samples reported. Russian scientists have expanded the nomenclature of each group of wastes significantly upon addition to the list described in English-language reviews for 2000-2015. References to the recent Russian developments in the field of ecological management in ceramic industry are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilization of Stone Waste in the Development of Value Added Products: A State of the Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Lakhani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilisation of stone waste, in the form of mineral admixture as a pozzolanic and non-pozzolanic material for mortar and concrete has received considerable attention in recent years. This interest is part of the widely spread attention directed towards the utilisation of wastes and industrial by-products in order to minimise Portland cement (PC and sand consumption, the utilisationof which being environmentally damaging. Another reason is that mortar and concrete, which contain pozzolanic as well as non-pozzolanic materials, exhibit considerable enhancement in durability properties. This paper reviews work carried out on the use of stone waste as a partial non-pozzolanic replacement for sand in mortar and concrete and in the containment of hazardous wastes. The literature demonstrates that different stone wastes is an effective inert filler which causes great improvement in the pore structure and hence the resistance of the concrete to the action of harmful solutions.

  2. Preparation and characterization of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) nanoparticle decorated graphene sheets and their utilization for the elimination of basic fuchsin and indigo carmine dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Belma Zengin; Durmus, Zehra; Durmus, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this study, graphene nano sheets, prepared with chemical oxidation and reduction routes via modified-Hummer method, were successfully decorated with platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles. Structural and morphological features of resulted graphene-metal nanocomposites were characterized with FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TEM methods. Anti-oxidant activity (AOA) values of nanocomposites were determined. The IC50 values of Pt-graphene and Pd-graphene nanocomposites were found to be 46.1 and 90.2 μg/mL, respectively based on the ABTS method and 80.2 and 143.7 μg/mL according to the DPPH method. It was found that the graphene-metal nanocomposites exhibited superior free radical scavenging activity compared to several types of noble metal nano particles although the nanocomposites consist of much lower amount of active metal sites than the nano-crystalline metal powders. It was consequently reported that the graphene-metal nanocomposites could be successfully used for the photocatalytic elimination of fuchsin and indigo carmine dyes under light irradiation.

  3. Decolorization of irgalite dye by immobilized Pseuodomonas putida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A carbon sorbent derived from an agriculture waste, mustard straw was applied to study the removal of irgalite dye from aqueous solution. Comparative study on adsorption and simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (+) of irgalite dye using Pseuodomonas putida (MTCC 1194) with activated carbon prepared from ...

  4. Aerobic decolourization of two reactive azo dyes under varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacillus cereus isolated from dye industrial waste, that is, effluent and soil samples was screened for its ability to decolourize two reactive azo dye – cibacron black PSG and cibacron red P4B under aerobic conditions at pH 7 and incubated at 35°C over a five day period. Different carbon and nitrogen sources were used for ...

  5. Dyeing of hydrophobic fabrics with disperse dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VITHAL SOMA PATEL

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of disperse dyes has been synthesized by diazotisation of 2,6-dibromo-4-nitroaniline and coupled with various N-arylmaleimides. The dyes were characterized by IR spectral studies, visible absorption spectroscopy and elemental analysis. All the dyes were applied as disperse dyes on nylon, cellulose triacetate and polyester fabrics. These dyeswere found to give yellowish orange to deep brown shades with very good depth, levelness and brightness on different fabrics. The percentage dye bath exhaustion and fixation on fabrics were found to be very good. The light, washing, rubbing, perspiration and sublimation fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were found to be good to excellent.

  6. Ideal Point Design and Operation of CO2-Based Transcritical Rankine Cycle (CTRC System Based on High Utilization of Engine’s Waste Heats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research conducted a study specially to systematically analyze combined recovery of exhaust gas and engine coolant and related influence mechanism, including a detailed theoretical study and an assistant experimental study. In this research, CO2-based transcritical Rankine cycle (CTRC was used for fully combining the wastes heats. The main objective of theoretical research was to search an ‘ideal point’ of the recovery system and related influence mechanism, which was defined as operating condition of complete recovery of two waste heats. The theoretical methodology of this study could also provide a design reference for effective combined recovery of two or multiple waste heats in other fields. Based on a kW-class preheated CTRC prototype that was designed by the ‘ideal point’ method, an experimental study was conducted to verify combined utilization degree of two engine waste heats by the CTRC system. The operating results showed that the prototype can gain 44.4–49.8 kW and 22.7–26.7 kW heat absorption from exhaust gas and engine coolant, respectively. To direct practical operation, an experimental optimization work on the operating process was conducted for complete recovery of engine coolant exactly, which avoided deficient or excessive recovery.

  7. Waste heat utilization in the thermal spa of Lavey-les-Bains; Etude de la valorisation des rejets thermiques des Bains de Lavey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy looks at the possibilities for improved waste water utilization in the Lavey-les-Bains thermal spa, Switzerland. According to the regulations in force, the temperature of the waste water rejected into the Rhone river shall not exceed 30 {sup o}C, what is currently not the case. Also the operational cost shall be reduced and the waste water quality improved. The installations are presented. From the two geothermal wells, mineral water comes out at an average flow rate of 940 l/min and a temperature of 63 {sup o}C. Actual waste water data are reported. The measured thermal water consumption data, including seasonal variations, are analysed by computerized simulation and measures to reduce the consumed volume by the optimization of internal procedures are evaluated. Measures to reduce the quantity of the rejected free chlorine are discussed. Several possible adaptations of the existing space heating, domestic water heating and pools' heating are evaluated, including cost. In addition, extensions of the thermal spa center to recreational activities are discussed, as the construction of a tropical greenhouse is.

  8. Utilization of concrete as a construction material in the concept of Radioactive Waste Storage in Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Hudoba

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear power energy for the production of electricity seems to be, along with the alterantive ways like the wind, solar and geothermal energy, the only possibility how to cover the increasing needs for the energy in the human population. The adoption of nuclear power energy concept for the production of electricity is always a hot topic of discussion not only on the professional, but also on the political level. The join of problem of the electricity production in nuclear power plants is the disposal and storing of radioactive waste. The increasing amount of low and medium radioactive waste needs a serious concept of a long term policy in the radioactive waste management. In general, a period of 300 years is a minimum time span in which the storing facilities have to guarantie the safety of human population and environment against radiation and radiation-chemical danger. A correct design of the storage place for the radioactive waste is a challenge for experts in the fields of material science, geoscience, construction etc. This paper is dealing with the basic information about the concept, material and construction basis of the low a medium radioactive waste storage in Slovak Republic.

  9. Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-08-01

    Nuclear byproducts are a major national resource that has yet to be incorporated into the economy. The current Defense Byproducts Program is designed to match specific military and commercial needs with the availability of valuable products which are currently treated as waste at considerable expense in waste management costs. This program plan focuses on a few specific areas with the greatest potential for near-term development and application. It also recognizes the need for a continuing effort to develop new applications for byproducts and to continue to assess the impacts on waste management. The entire program has been, and will continue to be structured so as to ensure the safety of the public and maintain the purity of the environment. Social and institutional concerns have been recognized and will be handled appropriately. A significant effort will be undertaken to inform the public of the benefits of byproduct use and of the care being taken to ensure safe, efficient operation.

  10. Synthesis of PHB nanoparticles from optimized medium utilizing dairy industrial waste using Brevibacterium casei SRKP2: a green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Kumar Pandian, Sureshbabu; Deepak, Venkatraman; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Rameshkumar, Neelamegam; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2009-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are natural, biodegradable polymers accumulated by bacteria under nutritional exhausted condition where carbon source is in excess. A gram positive bacterium (designated strain SRKP2) that potentially accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was isolated from dairy industrial waste. From its morphological and physiological properties and nucleotide sequence of its 16S rRNA, it was suggested that strain SRKP2 was similar to Brevibacterium casei. PHAs were synthesized from a medium containing dairy waste, yeast extract and sea water. The synthesized PHAs were characterized by FT-IR as Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the production of PHB. From the optimized medium the yield of PHB was found to be 2.940 g/L. Here we report the direct use of dairy waste and sea water as potential sources for the production of PHB. Produced PHB was used to synthesize nanoparticles using solvent displacement technique.

  11. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

  12. Agricultural Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  13. Biotransformation and Detoxification of Xylidine Orange Dye Using Immobilized Cells of Marine-Derived Lysinibacillus sphaericus D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Prabha; Wahidullah, Solimabi; Sheikh, Farhan; Pereira, Rochelle; Narkhede, Niteen; Amonkar, Divya; Tilvi, Supriya; Meena, Ram Murthy

    2017-02-08

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus D3 cell-immobilized beads in natural gel sodium alginate decolorized the xylidine orange dye 1-(dimethylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid sodium salt in the laboratory. Optimal conditions were selected for decolorization and the products formed were evaluated for toxicity by disc diffusion assay against common marine bacteria which revealed the non-toxic nature of the dye-degraded products. Decolorization of the brightly colored dye to colorless products was measured on an Ultra Violet-Vis spectrophotometer and its biodegradation products monitored on Thin Layer Chromatographic plate and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Finally, the metabolites formed in the decolorized medium were characterized by mass spectrometry. This analysis confirms the conversion of the parent molecule into lower molecular weight aromatic phenols and sulfonic acids as the final products of biotransformation. Based on the results, the probable degradation products of xylidine orange were naphthol, naphthylamine-6-sulfonic acid, 2-6-dihydroxynaphthalene, and bis-dinaphthylether. Thus, it may be concluded that the degradation pathway of the dye involved (a) reduction of its azo group by azoreductase enzyme (b) dimerization of the hydrazo compound followed by (c) degradation of monohydrazo as well as dimeric metabolites into low molecular weight aromatics. Finally, it may be worth exploring the possibility of commercially utilizing L. sphaericus D3 for industrial applications for treating large-scale dye waste water.

  14. Biotransformation and Detoxification of Xylidine Orange Dye Using Immobilized Cells of Marine-Derived Lysinibacillus sphaericus D3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Devi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysinibacillus sphaericus D3 cell-immobilized beads in natural gel sodium alginate decolorized the xylidine orange dye 1-(dimethylphenylazo-2-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid sodium salt in the laboratory. Optimal conditions were selected for decolorization and the products formed were evaluated for toxicity by disc diffusion assay against common marine bacteria which revealed the non-toxic nature of the dye-degraded products. Decolorization of the brightly colored dye to colorless products was measured on an Ultra Violet-Vis spectrophotometer and its biodegradation products monitored on Thin Layer Chromatographic plate and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Finally, the metabolites formed in the decolorized medium were characterized by mass spectrometry. This analysis confirms the conversion of the parent molecule into lower molecular weight aromatic phenols and sulfonic acids as the final products of biotransformation. Based on the results, the probable degradation products of xylidine orange were naphthol, naphthylamine-6-sulfonic acid, 2-6-dihydroxynaphthalene, and bis-dinaphthylether. Thus, it may be concluded that the degradation pathway of the dye involved (a reduction of its azo group by azoreductase enzyme (b dimerization of the hydrazo compound followed by (c degradation of monohydrazo as well as dimeric metabolites into low molecular weight aromatics. Finally, it may be worth exploring the possibility of commercially utilizing L. sphaericus D3 for industrial applications for treating large-scale dye waste water.

  15. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  16. Green synthesis of copper nanoparticles for the efficient removal (degradation) of dye from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanur; Ahmaruzzaman, M

    2015-12-01

    The present work reports the utilization of a common household waste material (fish scales of Labeo rohita) for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles. The method so developed was found to be green, environment-friendly, and economic. The fish scale extracts were acting as a stabilizing and reducing agents. This method avoids the use of external reducing and stabilizing agents, templates, and solvents. The compositional abundance of gelatin may be envisaged for the effective reductive as well as stabilizing potency. The mechanisms for the formation of nanoparticles have also been presented. The synthesized copper nanoparticles formed were predominantly spherical in nature with an average size of nanoparticles in the range of 25-37 nm. The copper nanoparticles showed characteristic Bragg's reflection planes of fcc which was supported by both selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction pattern and showed surface plasmon resonance at 580 nm. Moreover, the energy dispersive spectroscopy pattern also revealed the presence of only elemental copper in the copper nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were used for the remediation of a carcinogenic and noxious textile dye, Methylene blue, from aqueous solution. Approximately, 96 % degradation of Methylene blue dye was observed within 135 min using copper nanoparticles. The probable mechanism for the degradation of the dye has been presented, and the degraded intermediates have been identified using the liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique. The high efficiency of nanoparticles as photocatalysts has opened a promising application for the removal of hazardous dye from industrial effluents contributing indirectly to environmental cleanup process.

  17. Toward environmentally-benign utilization of nonmetallic fraction of waste printed circuit boards as modifier and precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Pejman; Ning, Chao; Ouyang, Weiyi; Xu, Meng; Lin, Carol S K; McKay, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Electronic waste, including printed circuit boards, is growing at an alarming rate due to the accelerated technological progress and the shorter lifespan of the electronic equipment. In the past decades, due to the lack of proper economic and environmentally-benign recycling technologies, a major fraction of e-waste generated was either destined to landfills or incinerated with the sole intention of its disposal disregarding the toxic nature of this waste. Recently, with the increasing public awareness over their environment and health issues and with the enaction of more stringent regulations, environmentally-benign recycling has been driven to be an alternative option partially replacing the traditional eco-unfriendly disposal methods. One of the most favorable green technologies has been the mechanical separation of the metallic and nonmetallic fraction of the waste printed circuit boards. Although metallic fraction, as the most profitable component, is used to generate the revenue of the separation process, the nonmetallic fraction (NMF) has been left isolated. Herein, the recent developments in the application of NMF have been comprehensively reviewed and an eco-friendly emerging usage of NMF as a value-added material for sustainable remediation has been introduced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Municipal Solid Waste Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a source of biomass material that can be utilized for bioenergy production with minimal additional inputs. MSW resources include mixed commercial and residential garbage such as yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, plastics, rubber, leather, textiles, and food wastes. Waste resources such as landfill gas, mill residues, and waste grease are already being utilized for cost-effective renewable energy generation. MSW for bioenergy also represents an opportunity to divert greater volumes of residential and commercial waste from landfills.

  19. Optofluidic ring resonator dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuze; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-02-01

    We overview the recent progress on optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) dye lasers developed in our research group. The fluidics and laser cavity design can be divided into three categories: capillary optofluidic ring resonator (COFRR), integrated cylindrical optofluidic ring resonator (ICOFRR), and coupled optofluidic ring resonator (CpOFRR). The COFRR dye laser is based on a micro-sized glass capillary with a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The capillary circular cross-section forms the ring resonator and supports the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) that interact evanescently with the gain medium in the core. The laser cavity structure is versatile to adapt to the gain medium of any refractive index. Owing to the high Q-factor (>109), the lasing threshold of 25 nJ/mm2 is achieved. Besides directly pump the dye molecules, lasing through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor and acceptor dye molecules is also studied in COFRR laser. The energy transfer process can be further controlled by designed DNA scaffold labeled with donor/acceptor molecules. The ICOFRR dye laser is based on a cylindrical ring resonator fused onto the inner surface of a thick walled glass capillary. The structure has robust mechanical strength to sustain rapid gain medium circulation. The CpOFRR utilizes a cylindrical ring resonator fused on the inner surface of the COFRR capillary. Since the capillary wall is thin, the individual WGMs of the cylindrical ring resonator and the COFRR couples strongly and forms Vernier effect, which provides a way to generate a single mode dye laser.

  20. Utilization of Sago Waste as an Adsorbent for the Removal of Cu(II Ion from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Maheswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of activated carbon (AC from sago industry waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Cu(II removal, as well as dispose of sago industry waste. The AC was prepared using sago industry waste with H2SO4 and (NH42S2O8 and physico-chemical properties of AC were investigated. The specific surface area of the activated carbon was determined and its properties studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II from aqueous solution onto AC prepared from sago industry waste has been studied under varying conditions of agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose and pH to assess the kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Adsorption equilibrium was obtained in 60min for 20 to 50mg/L of Cu(II concentrations. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models were found to provide an excellent fitting of the adsorption data. In Freundlich equilibrium isotherm, the RL values obtained were in the range of 0 to 1 (0.043 to 0.31 for Cu(II concentration of 10 to 100mg/L, which indicates favorable adsorption of Cu(II onto Sago waste carbon. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II (Qo obtained from the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm model was found to be 32.467 mg/g at pH 4 ± 0.2 for the particle size range of 125–250u. The percent removal increased with an increase in pH from 2 to 4. This adsorbent was found to be effective and economically attractive.

  1. Effect of Mixing Dyes and Solvent in Electrolyte Toward Characterization of Dye Sensitized Solar Cell Using Natural Dyes as The Sensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Nurrisma; Nurul Amalia, Silviyanti S.; Yudoyono, Gatut; Endarko

    2017-07-01

    Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) using natural dyes (chlorophyll, curcumin from turmeric extract, and anthocyanin from mangosteen extract) have been successfully fabricated for determining the effect of variation natural dyes, mixing dyes and acetonitrile in electrolyte toward characterization of DSSC. DSSC consists of five parts namely ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) as a substrate; TiO2 as semiconductor materials; natural dyes as an electron donor; electrolyte as electron transfer; and carbon as a catalyst that can convert light energy into electric energy. Two types of gel electrolyte based on PEG that mixed with liquid electrolyte have utilized for analyzing the lifetime of DSSC. Type I used distilled water as a solvent whilst type II used acetonitrile as a solvent with addition of concentration of KI and iodine. The main purpose of study was to investigate influence of solvent in electrolyte, variation of natural dyes and mixing dyes toward an efficiency that resulted by DSSC. The result showed that electrolyte type II is generally better than type I with efficiency 0,0556 and 0,0456 %, respectively. An efficiency values which resulted from a variation of mixed three natural dyes showed the greatest efficiency compared to mixed two natural dyes and one dye, with an efficiency value can be achieved at 0,0194 % for chlorophyll; 0,111 % for turmeric; 0,0105 % for mangosteen; 0,0244% (mangosteen and chlorophyll); 0,0117 % (turmeric and mangosteen); 0,0158 % (turmeric and chlorophyll); and 0.0566 % (mixed three natural dyes).

  2. The other side of utilization. Unwanted radioactivity in wastes and scrap metal; Die andere Seite des Gebrauchs. Ungewollte Radioaktivitaet in Abfaellen und Altmetallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Robert [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Niederzier (Germany); Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Natural radionuclides in industrial wastes and mining residues cannot be neglected in the frame of radiation protection and are therefore part of the radiation protection system in the sense of the IAEA definition. In case of purposely added uranium or thorium or utilization of ionizing radiation these products are also part of the radiation protection system since 2001. The historically grown radiation protection system is incomplete with respect to radiation sources, contaminated objects or materials with enriched natural radioactivity. These materials are detected by radiation monitoring systems that are targeted to find lost technical radiation sources. Experiences with the survey of respective incidents show the multifaceted image of utilization and consumption if natural radionuclide containing products.

  3. Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Hazem [Farmingdale State College, NY (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Recent concerns over the security and reliability of the world’s energy supply has caused a flux towards the research and development of renewable sources. A leading renewable source has been found in the biomass gasification of biological materials derived from organic matters such as wood chips, forest debris, and farm waste that are found in abundance in the USA. Accordingly, there is a very strong interest worldwide in the development of new technologies that provide an in-depth understanding of this economically viable energy source. This work aims to allow the coupling of biomass gasification and fuel cell systems as well as Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) to produce high-energy efficiency, clean environmental performance and near-zero greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass gasification is a process, which produces synthesis gas (syngas) that contains 19% hydrogen and 20% carbon monoxide from inexpensive organic matter waste. This project main goal is to provide cost effective energy to the public utilizing remote farms’ waste and landfill recycling area.

  4. Utilization of composite membrane polyethyleneglycol-polystyrene-cellulose acetate from pineapple leaf fibers in lowering levels of methyl orange batik waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsy, E. V. Y.; Irmanto; Kazanah, F. N.

    2017-02-01

    Pineapple leaves are agricultural waste from the pineapple that the fibers can be utilized as raw material in cellulose acetate membranes. First, made pineapple leaf fibers into pulp and then converted into cellulose acetate by acetylation process in four stages consisting of activation, acetylation, hydrolysis and purification. Cellulose acetate then used as the raw material to manufacture composite membrane with addition of polystyrene and poly (ethylene glycol) as porogen. Composite membrane is made using phase inversion method with dichloromethane-acetone as a solvent. The result of FTIR analysis (Fourier transform infra-red) showed that the absorption of the carbonyl group (C=O) is at 1643.10 cm-1 and acetyl group (C-O ) at 1227.01 cm-1, with a molecular weight of 8.05 x 104 g/mol and the contents (rate) of acetyl is 37.31%. PS-PEG-CA composite membrane had also been characterized by measuring the water flux values and its application to decrease methyl orange content (level) in batik waste. The results showed that the water flux value is of 25.62 L/(m2.hour), and the decrease percentage of methyl orange content in batik waste is 71.53%.

  5. Benzidine Dyes Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Action Plan addresses the use of benzidine-based dyes and benzidine congener-based dyes, both metalized and non-metalized, in products that would result in consumer exposure, such as for use to color textiles.

  6. Summary report on the wood waste utilization project under the US Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Small Grants Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, D.P.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes activities to promote the use of wood waste as energy within the seven-county Southeast Missouri Region. The history of wood waste projects within the Region is reviewed, the actual activities undertaken are summarized, and a set of lessons learned and conclusions are presented. The primary conclusion is that projects such as this are valuable for rural America in general. These contracts can allow for professional staff to be available to assist in developing alternative energy projects. Such contracts can be reasonably inexpensive for the federal government and can have far reaching effects on the national energy picture by promoting alternate fuels in rural parts of the country. Discussion is presented under the headings: energy audits; barge refitting operation; pellet mill; charcoal operation; wood gasifier project; wood-fired transportation project; municipal electric generation project; and county landfill incineration project.

  7. Energy and economic analysis of total energy systems for residential and commercial buildings. [utilizing waste heat recovery techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, W. L.; Bollenbacher, G.

    1974-01-01

    Energy and economic analyses were performed for an on-site power-plant with waste heat recovery. The results show that for any specific application there is a characteristic power conversion efficiency that minimizes fuel consumption, and that efficiencies greater than this do not significantly improve fuel consumption. This type of powerplant appears to be a reasonably attractive investment if higher fuel costs continue.

  8. Chemistry of Natural Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    animals have been identified as potentially rich in natural dye contents, and some of them have been used for natural dyeing for quite some time. Various parts of plants like roots, stems, barks, leaves, fruits and seeds may contain colouring matter which can be exploited. Normally natural dyes are extracted from the roots ...

  9. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Maria Dellamatrice

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black, and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds.

  10. Degradation of textile dyes by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamatrice, Priscila Maria; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo de; Fiore, Marli Fátima; Monteiro, Regina Teresa Rosim

    Dyes are recalcitrant compounds that resist conventional biological treatments. The degradation of three textile dyes (Indigo, RBBR and Sulphur Black), and the dye-containing liquid effluent and solid waste from the Municipal Treatment Station, Americana, São Paulo, Brazil, by the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae UTCC64, Phormidium autumnale UTEX1580 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was evaluated. The dye degradation efficiency of the cyanobacteria was compared with anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic systems in terms of discolouration and toxicity evaluations. The discoloration was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy. Toxicity was measured using the organisms Hydra attenuata, the alga Selenastrum capricornutum and lettuce seeds. The three cyanobacteria showed the potential to remediate textile effluent by removing the colour and reducing the toxicity. However, the growth of cyanobacteria on sludge was slow and discoloration was not efficient. The cyanobacteria P. autumnale UTEX1580 was the only strain that completely degraded the indigo dye. An evaluation of the mutagenicity potential was performed by use of the micronucleus assay using Allium sp. No mutagenicity was observed after the treatment. Two metabolites were produced during the degradation, anthranilic acid and isatin, but toxicity did not increase after the treatment. The cyanobacteria showed the ability to degrade the dyes present in a textile effluent; therefore, they can be used in a tertiary treatment of effluents with recalcitrant compounds. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of solid and liquid waste generated during ethanol fermentation process for production of gaseous fuel through anaerobic digestion--a zero waste approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, Madhuri; Balasubramanian, Velmurugan

    2015-03-01

    Preliminary investigations were performed in the laboratory using batch reactors at 10% solid concentration for the assessment of the biogas production at thermophilic and mesophilic temperatures using solid residues generated during ethanol fermentation process. One kg of solid residues (left after enzyme extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis) from thermophilic reactors (TR1 and TR2) produced around 131 and 84L of biogas, respectively, whereas biogas production from mesophilic reactors (MR1 and MR2) was 86 and 62L, respectively. After 20 and 35days of retention time, the TS and VS reductions from TR1, TR2 and MR1, MR2 were found to be 39.2% and 35.0%, 67.3% and 61.0%, 21.0% and 18.0%, 34.7% and 27.8%, respectively. Whereas the liquid waste was treated using four laboratory anaerobic hybrid reactors (AHRs) with two different natural and synthetic packing media at 15-3days HRTs. AHRs packed with natural media showed better COD removal efficiency and methane yield. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Supercritical water oxidation of colored smoke, dye, and pyrotechnic compositions. Final report: Pilot plant conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Chan, Jennifer P.; Raber, T.N.; Macmillan, D.C.; Rice, S.F.; Tschritter, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    The existing demilitarization stockpile contains large quantities of colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. For many years, these munitions have been stored in magazines at locations within the continental United States awaiting completion of the life-cycle. The open air burning of these munitions has been shown to produce toxic gases that are detrimental to human health and harmful to the environment. Prior efforts to incinerate these compositions have also produced toxic emissions and have been unsuccessful. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly developing hazardous waste treatment method that can be an alternative to incineration for many types of wastes. The primary advantage SCWO affords for the treatment of this selected set of obsolete munitions is that toxic gas and particulate emissions will not occur as part of the effluent stream. Sandia is currently designing a SCWO reactor for the US Army Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC) to destroy colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. This report summarizes the design status of the ARDEC reactor. Process and equipment operation parameters, process flow equations or mass balances, and utility requirements for six wastes of interest are developed in this report. Two conceptual designs are also developed with all process and instrumentation detailed.

  13. Removal of basic dyes from solution using coconut shell charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisorrachatr Siriwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to use agricultural waste as an adsorbent for dye removal from textile wastewater. Coconut shell charcoal (CSC, an agricultural waste, was used as dye adsorbent whilst basic yellow13 (BY13 and basic red14 (BR14 were used as representative dye used in textile manufactory. The removal of BY13 and BR14 from aqueous solution by CSC was investigated in batch adsorption at room temperature. Two parameters investigated in this research were pH of dyes solution; pH 2, 7, and 11, and particle size of adsorbents; 510-700 μm and 1000-2000 μm. The adsorption model, Langmuir and Freundlich were also examined. It was found that by CSC, BY13 and BR14 had maximum removal percentage of 23.6 and 55.7 at pH 11. Size of adsorbent had also shown the effect on dye removal, i.e.; increasing size with decreasing removal capability. The dye removal experimental data were fitted to Langmuir adsorption model for both dyes with maximum adsorption capacity (qm for BY13 and BR14 of 19.76 and 22.93 mg/g, respectively. It can be implied that the adsorption is monolayer. It can conclude that CSC can be used as adsorbent for basic dye removal from aqueous solution.

  14. Utilization of the waste from the marble industry for application in transport infrastructure: mechanical properties of cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prošek, Zdeněk; Trejbal, Jan; Topič, Jaroslav; Plachý, Tomáš; Tesárek, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    This article is focused on the mechanical testing of cement-based samples containing a micronized waste marble powder used as replacement of standard binders. Tested materials consisted of cement CEM I 42.5 R (Radotín, Czech Republic) and three different amounts of the marbles (25, 50 and 70 wt. %). Standard bending and compressive tests of the prismatic samples having dimensions equal to 40 × 40 × 160 mm were done in order to reveal an influence of marble amount on flexural and compressive strength, respectively. Moreover, the dynamic modulus of elasticity and dynamic shear modulus were examined and compared after 7 and 28 days of mixture curing.

  15. Yield, nutrient utilization and soil properties in a melon crop amended with wine-distillery waste compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Villena Gordo, Raquel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; Jesús Cabello Cabello, María; Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    In Spain, large quantities of wine are produced every year (3,339,700 tonnes in 2011) (FAO, 2011) with the consequent waste generation. During the winemaking process, solid residues like grape stalks are generated, as well as grape marc and wine lees as by-products. According to the Council Regulation (EC) 1493/1999 on the common organization of the wine market, by-products coming from the winery industry must be sent to alcohol-distilleries to generate exhausted grape marc and vinasses. With an adequate composting treatment, these wastes can be applied to soils as a source of nutrients and organic matter. A three-year field experiment (2011, 2012 and 2013) was carried out in Ciudad Real (central Spain) to study the effects of wine-distillery waste compost application in a melon crop (Cucumis melo L.). Melon crop has been traditionally cultivated in this area with high inputs of water and fertilizers, but no antecedents of application of winery wastes are known. In a randomized complete block design, four treatments were compared: three compost doses consisted of 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 t compost ha-1 (D3), and a control treatment without compost addition (D0). The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs) with a depth of 0.60 m and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.60 and 0.70 m, slightly basic (pH 8.4), poor in organic matter (0.24%), rich in potassium (410 ppm) and with a medium level of phosphorus (22.1 ppm). During each growing period four harvests were carried out and total and marketable yield (fruits weighting <1 kg or visually rotten were not considered), fruit average weight and fruit number per plant were determined. At the end of the crop cycle, four plants per treatment were sampled and the nutrient content (N, P and K) was determined. Soil samplings (0-30 cm depth) were carried before the application of compost and at the end of each growing season and available N and P, as well as exchangeable K content were analyzed

  16. Toxicology of food dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylewski, Sarah; Jacobson, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Food dyes, synthesized originally from coal tar and now petroleum, have long been controversial because of safety concerns. Many dyes have been banned because of their adverse effects on laboratory animals or inadequate testing. This review finds that all of the nine currently US-approved dyes raise health concerns of varying degrees. Red 3 causes cancer in animals, and there is evidence that several other dyes also are carcinogenic. Three dyes (Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6) have been found to be contaminated with benzidine or other carcinogens. At least four dyes (Blue 1, Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6) cause hypersensitivity reactions. Numerous microbiological and rodent studies of Yellow 5 were positive for genotoxicity. Toxicity tests on two dyes (Citrus Red 2 and Orange B) also suggest safety concerns, but Citrus Red 2 is used at low levels and only on some Florida oranges and Orange B has not been used for several years. The inadequacy of much of the testing and the evidence for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and hypersensitivity, coupled with the fact that dyes do not improve the safety or nutritional quality of foods, indicates that all of the currently used dyes should be removed from the food supply and replaced, if at all, by safer colorings. It is recommended that regulatory authorities require better and independent toxicity testing, exercise greater caution regarding continued approval of these dyes, and in the future approve only well-tested, safe dyes.

  17. Hair dye contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, Heidi; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2004-01-01

    Colouring of hair can cause severe allergic contact dermatitis. The most frequently reported hair dye allergens are p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and toluene-2,5-diamine, which are included in, respectively, the patch test standard series and the hairdressers series. The aim of the present study...... was to identify dye precursors and couplers in hair dyeing products causing clinical hair dye dermatitis and to compare the data with the contents of these compounds in a randomly selected set of similar products. The patient material comprised 9 cases of characteristic clinical allergic hair dye reaction, where...... exposure history and patch testing had identified a specific hair dye product as the cause of the reaction. The 9 products used by the patients were subjected to chemical analysis. 8 hair dye products contained toluene-2,5-diamine (0.18 to 0.98%). PPD (0.27%) was found in 1 product, and m-aminophenol (0...

  18. Utilization of rice husk waste for Cd(II) adsorbent and its analysis using solid-phase spectrophotometry (sps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputro, S.; Masykuri, M.; Mahardiani, L.; Arini, S.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2017-04-01

    This research aims to know the use of rice husk waste for metal ion adsorbent of Cd(II), the optimum mass which are needed, the sensitivity of SPS as a method to determine the reduction level of Cd(II) metal ions in the level of μg/L. This research was conducted by using an experimental method in the laboratory. The used adsorbent in this research is rice husk charcoal which activated using ZnCl2 10% solution. Determination of the optimum adsorbent mass was done with reacted 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; and 2.5 g of adsorbent and 20 mL Cd(II) which have concentration 75.27 μg/L during 30 minutes. Analysis the levels of Cd(II) used SPS method and characterization of adsorbent used FTIR. The result showed that activated rice husk charcoal can be used as adsorbent for Cd(II) metal ions in the simulated liquid waste with the adsorption capacity of 0.58 μg/g, the optimum mass was 2.0 gram with percentage of the adsorbed Cd(II) of 77.87%, SPS is a sensitive method to determine the reduction levels of Cd(II) metal ions in the level of μg/L with the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.06 μg/L.

  19. Utilization of eggshell waste as low-cost solid base catalyst for biodiesel production from used cooking oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, N. P.; Podjojono, B.; Fujiani, R.; Nuraini

    2017-05-01

    A solid CaO-based catalyst of waste eggshell was developed for biodiesel production from used cooking oil. The waste eggshell powder was calcined in air at 90° C for 4 h to convert calcium species in the eggshells into active CaO catalysts. The characterization of CaO catalyst was done by XRD and BET analysis. The CaO catalyst was then introduced for transesterification of used cooking oil (UCO) for testing of its catalytic activity. The experiment was conducted in batch type reactor that consists of three-neck glass equipped by reflux condenser and magnetic stirrer. Before tranesterification process, the UCO was treated by coconut coir powder in order to reduce the free fatty acid content. The result showed that the catalyst was potentially use for transesterification of used cooking oil into biodiesel with relatively high yield of 75.92% was achieved at reaction temperature, reaction time, molar ratio UCO to methanol and catalyst amount of 65° C, 7 h, 1:15 and 6%, respectively.

  20. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry.

  1. Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes (Reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-15

    Aug 15, 2013 ... Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes. (Reactive Red RB, Reactive Black B, ... Keywords: Rhizopus arrhizus, wastewater treatment, decolourisation, textile dye. INTRODUCTION. Dyeing effluents ... as bacteria, yeasts, algae and fungi, are able to remove differ- ent classes of dyes (Fu and ...

  2. Preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-05-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and to obtain a broad overview of the physical and economic factors which would have an effect on the suitability of the oil shale formations for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. These physical and economic factors are discussed in sections on magnitude of the oil shales, waste disposal relations with oil mining, cavities requirements, hydrological aspects, and study requirements. (JRD)

  3. Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Semi-annual report, No. 2, 1 November 1977--1 June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, C.R.; Godfriaux, B.L.

    1978-06-01

    The principal objective is to evaluate, at proof-of-concept scale, the potential of intensive aquaculture operations using power plant thermal discharges to enhance productivity. The field experiments involve the rearing of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and American eel (Anguilla rostrata) for successive periods (semi-annual) in accordance with the temperature of the thermal effluents. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and the freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) are also being tested in smaller, laboratory size culture systems. The above mentioned species were selected because of their economic importance. They will be evaluated for food quality and marketability with the cooperation of potential commercial users. Aquaculture facilities were constructed at a steam electric generating plant for studies determining use for waste heat released into condenser cooling water. Growth rates, food conversion ratios, disease problems and mortality rates are being studied in the project. (Color illustrations reproduced in black and white) (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

  4. Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Volume III. Final report, 1 November 1976-1 November 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmanfarmaian, A.

    1980-03-01

    This report is part of a three year research study on the constructive use of electric generating station waste heat in cooling water effluents for fish production. It describes procedures and methods for the commercial culture of the giant fresh water shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, and the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, in the thermal discharge water of the Mercer Power Plant in Trenton, New Jersey. Discharge water from this plant was used in a preliminary assessment of the survival, growth, and food conversion ratio of these species. It was shown that acute or chronic exposure to power plant intake and discharge water; discharge with or without coal particles; and discharge with or without slurry overflow mix does not significantly affect metabolism, short-term survival, growth, or conversion efficiency of shrimp or trout.

  5. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bioelectrochemical systems have been considered a promising novel technology that shows an enhanced energy recovery, as well as generation of value-added products. A number of recent studies suggested that an enhancement of carbon conversion and biogas production can be achieved...... in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities...... investigated the interaction of fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities in an integrated system of WAS fermentation and MEC for hydrogen recovery. A high energy recovery was achieved in the MECs feeding WAS fermentation liquid through alkaline pretreatment. Some anaerobes belonging...

  6. A sustainable process to utilize ferrous sulfate waste from titanium oxide industry by reductive decomposition reaction with pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Penghui; Deng, Shaogang; Zhang, Zhiye; Wang, Xinlong; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Xiushan; Yang, Lin, E-mail: 18980632893@163.com

    2015-11-20

    Highlights: • A newly developed treating process of ferrous sulfate was proposed. • The reaction process was discussed by thermodynamic analysis. • Thermodynamic analysis was compared with experiments results. • The kinetic model of the decomposition reaction was determined. • The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions was explored. - Abstract: Ferrous sulfate waste has become a bottleneck in the sustainable development of the titanium dioxide industry in China. In this study, we propose a new method for the reductive decomposition of ferrous sulfate waste using pyrite. Thermodynamics analysis, tubular reactor experiments, and kinetics analysis were performed to analyze the reaction process. The results of the thermodynamic simulation showed that the reaction process and products were different when molar ratio of FeSO{sub 4}/FeS{sub 2} was changed. The suitable molar ratio of FeSO{sub 4}/FeS{sub 2} was 8–12. The reaction temperature of ferrous sulfate with pyrite was 580–770 K and the main products were Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and SO{sub 2}. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results. The desulphurization rate reached 98.55% and main solid products were Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at 823.15 K when mole ratio of FeSO{sub 4}/FeS{sub 2} was 8. Nano-sized magnetite was obtained at this condition. The kinetic model was investigated by isoconversional methods. The average E value was 244.34 kJ mol{sup −1}. The ferrous sulfate decomposition process can be treated as autocatalytic reaction mechanism, which corresponded to the expanded Prout–Tompson (Bna) model. The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions during the process of ferrous sulfate decomposition were explored, the products of Fe oxide substances are the catalyst components.

  7. Utilization of Waste Extracts Residual Tobacco Cigarette Manufacturing and Leaves of Mahkota Dewa as a Natural Pesticide for Pest Control Armyworms in Chili Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahyati Cahyati Cahyati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticides is still considered behind a great benefit for increasing agricultural production. Quite high negative impact of the use of synthetic pesticides to encourage efforts to pursue the empowerment of natural pesticide as alternative to synthetic pesticides. On tobacco and leaves of mahkota dewa found a substance alkaloid that can help ward off attacks, especially armyworm. Has conducted research utilization of waste residual tobacco cigarette manufacturing at a company and leaves of mahkota dewa as a natural pesticide to eradicate the armyworm. The residual tobacco cigarette manufacturing and leaves of mahkota dewa isolated manner extracted with an organic solvent so that the resulting crude extract alkaloids. The resulting crude alkaloid used as a pesticide solution sprayed on the leaves of chili to eradicate the pest armyworms. Test result showed that the insecticidal activity of alkaloid extract concentration of 1,6 ppm has the highest insecticidal activity. However, engaging both the alkaloid extract provides insecticidal activity is lower than the alkaloid extract of leaves of mahkota dewa so that the most effective in the use of alkaloid extract of leaves of mahkota dewa. Identification of the alkaloid compounds have been analyzed by TLC. This analysis showed that compound in waste of tobacco cigarette manufacture is nicotine and triterpenoids whereas the alkaloid extract of the leaves of mahkota dewa form of narcotic

  8. Optimization and fed-batch production of PHB utilizing dairy waste and sea water as nutrient sources by Bacillus megaterium SRKP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Sureshbabu RamKumar; Deepak, Venkatraman; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Rameshkumar, Neelamegam; Jeyaraj, Muniyandi; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    A gram positive bacterium (designated strain SRKP-3) that potentially accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) was isolated from brackish water. From its morphological and physiological properties and nucleotide sequence of its 16S rRNA, it was suggested that strain SRKP-3 was similar to Bacillus megaterium. A four-factor central composite rotary design (CCRD) was employed to optimize the medium and to find out the interactive effects of four variables, viz. concentrations of dairy waste, rice bran, sea water and pH on PHB production. Using response surface methodology (RSM), a second-order polynomial equation was obtained by multiple regression analysis and a yield of 6.37 g/L of PHB dry weight was achieved from the optimized medium at pH 9. The same medium was utilized for fermentor studies by fed-batch culture. The dairy waste is fed at three different time intervals at 0 th, 12th and 24th hour to keep the carbon source as excess and PHB production was checked for every 3h. Maximum production of PHB (11.32 g/L) occurred at 36th hour. Dissolved oxygen was found to be major limiting nutrient that affected the PHB synthesis.

  9. Method for sequestering CO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 utilizing a plurality of waste streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yee [Monroeville, PA; Allen, Douglas E [Salem, MA; Zhu, Chen [Monroe County, IN

    2011-04-12

    A neutralization/sequestration process is provided for concomitantly addressing capture and sequestration of both CO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 from industrial gas byproduct streams. The invented process concomitantly treats and minimizes bauxite residues from aluminum production processes and brine wastewater from oil/gas production processes. The benefits of this integrated approach to coincidental treatment of multiple industrial waste byproduct streams include neutralization of caustic byproduct such as bauxite residue, thereby decreasing the risk associated with the long-term storage and potential environmental of storing caustic materials, decreasing or obviating the need for costly treatment of byproduct brines, thereby eliminating the need to purchase CaO or similar scrubber reagents typically required for SO.sub.2 treatment of such gasses, and directly using CO.sub.2 from flue gas to neutralize bauxite residue/brine mixtures, without the need for costly separation of CO.sub.2 from the industrial byproduct gas stream by processes such as liquid amine-based scrubbers.

  10. Sustainable utilization of waste palm oil and sulfonated carbon catalyst derived from coconut meal residue for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thushari, Indika; Babel, Sandhya

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an inexpensive, environmental benign acid catalyst is prepared using coconut meal residue (CMR) and employed for biodiesel production from waste palm oil (WPO). The total acid density of the catalyst is found to be 3.8mmolg -1 . The catalyst shows a unique amorphous structure with 1.33m 2 g -1 of surface area and 0.31cm 3 g -1 of mean pore volume. Successful activation is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The highest biodiesel yield of 92.7% was obtained from WPO in an open reflux system using the catalyst. Results show that biodiesel yield increases with increasing methanol:oil (molar ratio) and reaction time up to an optimum value. It is found that the catalyst can be reused for at least four cycles for >80% biodiesel yield. Fuel properties of the produced biodiesel meet international biodiesel standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of waste fruit-peels to inhibit aflatoxins synthesis by Aspergillus flavus: a biotreatment of rice for safer storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, R; Sultana, Bushra; Khan, M Z; Naseer, D; Nigam, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Antifungal activity in lemon and pomegranate peels was considerable against Aspergillus flavus, higher in pomegranate (DIZ 37mm; MIC 135μg/mL). Powdered peels (5, 10, 20% w/w) were mixed in inoculated rice. The inhibitory effect on fungal-growth and production of aflatoxins by A. flavus was investigated at storage conditions - temperature (25, 30°C) and moisture (18%, 21%) for 9months. The maximum total aflatoxins accumulated at 30°C, 21% moisture and at 25°C, 18% moisture were 265.09 and 163.45ng/g, respectively in control. Addition of pomegranate-peels inhibited aflatoxins production to 100% during four month-storage of rice at 25°C and 18% moisture, while lemon-peels showed similar inhibitory effect for 3months at same conditions. However a linear correlation was observed in aflatoxins level with temperature and moisture. Studies showed that both fruit-wastes are potent preventer of aflatoxin production in rice, useful for a safer and longer storage of rice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cellulolytic enzymes production by utilizing agricultural wastes under solid state fermentation and its application for biohydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, Ganesh D; Kshirsagar, Siddheshwar D; Sampange, Vilas T; Saratale, Rijuta G; Oh, Sang-Eun; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2014-12-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium was evaluated for cellulase and hemicellulase production using various agricultural wastes under solid state fermentation. Optimization of various environmental factors, type of substrate, and medium composition was systematically investigated to maximize the production of enzyme complex. Using grass powder as a carbon substrate, maximum activities of endoglucanase (188.66 U/gds), exoglucanase (24.22 U/gds), cellobiase (244.60 U/gds), filter paperase (FPU) (30.22 U/gds), glucoamylase (505.0 U/gds), and xylanase (427.0 U/gds) were produced under optimized conditions. The produced crude enzyme complex was employed for hydrolysis of untreated and mild acid pretreated rice husk. The maximum amount of reducing sugar released from enzyme treated rice husk was 485 mg/g of the substrate. Finally, the hydrolysates of rice husk were used for hydrogen production by Clostridium beijerinckii. The maximum cumulative H2 production and H2 yield were 237.97 mL and 2.93 mmoL H2/g of reducing sugar, (or 2.63 mmoL H2/g of cellulose), respectively. Biohydrogen production performance obtained from this work is better than most of the reported results from relevant studies. The present study revealed the cost-effective process combining cellulolytic enzymes production under solid state fermentation (SSF) and the conversion of agro-industrial residues into renewable energy resources.

  13. RE-UTILIZATION OF INORGANIC SOLID WASTE (LIME MUD) AS FOREST ROAD STABILIZER FROM THE CHEMICAL RECOVERY PROCESS IN KRAFT PULP MILL

    OpenAIRE

    Habip Eroğlu; Sami İmamoğlu; H. Hulusi Acar

    2005-01-01

    Waste handling is a concern in all pulp and paper mills. Best available techniques for reducing waste is to minimize the generation of solid waste and/or reuse these materials, wherever practicable. One of the most important solid wastes is lime mud which is generated from the kraft pulping in its chemical recovery process. This paper explores the composition of lime mud resulting from the chemical recovery unite of kraft pulp mill and investigation of this waste for re-using beneficial...

  14. Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Semi-annual report No. 1, 1 November 1976-1 April 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, C.R.; Godfriaux, B.L.; Eble, A.F.

    1977-05-01

    A pilot aquaculture facility utilizing heated river water from condenser cooling (Mercer Generating Station, Trenton, New Jersey) is being used to culture the freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and American eel (Anguilla rostrata) during the warmer months of the year and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) during the colder months. Laboratory tests are also being conducted at Rutgers University to develop shrimp feeds with supplemented amino acids in order to reduce feed costs. Most of the work during the first six months of the proof-of-concept phase of the Mercer Aquaculture Project has been concerned with facility design, groundwater well construction and trials of the groundwater on trout.

  15. Box-Behnken design for optimizing the acid blue dye adsorption on flower wastes Diseño Box-Behnken para la optimización de la adsorción del colorante azul ácido sobre residuos de flores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Jaramillo Madrid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we identified the best conditions for the removal of Acid Blue 9 dye (AB9 using ower wastes (FW as an adsorbent were determined using a full factorial 23 and a Box-Behnken design for further optimization. Adsorbent dose (D, dye concentration (C and contact time (t, were the assessed variables. The dye content was quantied by UV-Vis spectrometry. The statistical model presented an adequate adjustment coecient (R2 = 99,18%, allowing to achieve a removal of 98,5% with a dosage of 7,8 gL-1, dye concentration of 7,11 mgL-1 and contact time of 104 min. These results suggest that owers wastes are an alternative and potential adsorbent material for the treatment of dissolved acid dyes. En este artículo se determinaron las mejores condiciones para la remoción del colorante Azul Ácido 9 (AA9 a través de un diseño factorial completo 23 y su posterior optimización mediante un diseño de superficie Box-Behnken utilizando tallos de flores (TF como material adsorbente. Las variables evaluadas fueron dosis de adsorbente (D, concentración de colorante (C y tiempo de contacto (t. El contenido del colorante se cuantificó por espectrometría UV-Vis. El modelo estadístico presentó un adecuado coeficiente de ajuste (R2 = 99,18 %, permitiendo alcanzar una remoción del 98,5% con una dosificación de 7,8 gL-1, concentración de colorante de 11,7 mgL-1 y tiempo de contacto de 104 min. Estos resultados sugieren que los residuos de flores constituyen un material adsorbente alternativo y potencial para el tratamiento de colorantes ácidos disueltos.

  16. Boosting TAG Accumulation with Improved Biodiesel Production from Novel Oleaginous Microalgae Scenedesmus sp. IITRIND2 Utilizing Waste Sugarcane Bagasse Aqueous Extract (SBAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Neha; Patel, Alok; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    This investigation utilized sugarcane bagasse aqueous extract (SBAE), a nontoxic, cost-effective medium to boost triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in novel fresh water microalgal isolate Scenedesmus sp. IITRIND2. Maximum lipid productivity of 112 ± 5.2 mg/L/day was recorded in microalgae grown in SBAE compared to modified BBM (26 ± 3 %). Carotenoid to chlorophyll ratio was 12.5 ± 2 % higher than in photoautotrophic control, indicating an increase in photosystem II activity, thereby increasing growth rate. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profile revealed presence of C14:0 (2.29 %), C16:0 (15.99 %), C16:2 (4.05 %), C18:0 (3.41 %), C18:1 (41.55 %), C18:2 (12.41), and C20:0 (1.21 %) as the major fatty acids. Cetane number (64.03), cold filter plugging property (-1.05 °C), and oxidative stability (12.03 h) indicated quality biodiesel abiding by ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 fuel standards. Results consolidate the candidature of novel freshwater microalgal isolate Scenedesmus sp. IITRIND2 cultivated in SBAE, aqueous extract made from copious, agricultural waste sugarcane bagasse to increase the lipid productivity, and could further be utilized for cost-effective biodiesel production.

  17. Utilization of red mud and Pb/Zn smelter waste for the synthesis of a red mud-based cementitious material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Cheng; Min, Xiao-Bo; Ke, Yong; Chai, Li-Yuan; Shi, Mei-Qing; Tang, Chong-Jian; Wang, Qing-Wei; Liang, Yan-Jie; Lei, Jie; Liu, De-Gang

    2018-02-15

    A new method in which Pb/Zn smelter waste containing arsenic and heavy metals (arsenic sludge), red mud and lime are utilized to prepare red mud-based cementitious material (RCM) is proposed in this study. XRD, SEM, FTIR and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were employed to assess the physicochemical properties of RCM. In addition, ettringite and iron oxide-containing ettringite were used to study the hydration mechanism of RCM. The results show that the UCS of the RCM (red mud+arsenic sludge+lime) was higher than that of the binder (red mud+arsenic sludge). When the mass ratio of m (binder): m (lime) was 94:6 and then maintained 28days at ambient temperature, the UCS reached 12.05MPa. The red mud has potential cementitious characteristics, and the major source of those characteristics was the aluminium oxide. In the red mud-arsenic sludge-lime system, aluminium oxide was effectively activated by lime and gypsum to form complex hydration products. Some of the aluminium in ettringite was replaced by iron to form calcium sulfoferrite hydrate. The BCR and leaching toxicity results show that the leaching concentration was strongly dependent on the chemical speciation of arsenic and the hydration products. Therefore, the investigated red mud and arsenic sludge can be successfully utilized in cement composites to create a red mud-based cementitious material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Perspective on the Prowaste Concept: Efficient Utilization of Plastic Waste through Product Design and Process Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Frigione, Mariaenrica; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Marseglia, Alessandro; Passaro, Alessandra

    2014-07-23

    This work is aimed to present an innovative technology for the reinforcement of beams for urban furniture, produced by in-mold extrusion of plastics from solid urban waste. This material, which is usually referred to as "recycled plastic lumber", is characterized by very poor mechanical properties, which results in high deflections under flexural loads, particularly under creep conditions. The Prowaste project, founded by the EACI (European Agency for Competitiveness and Innovation) in the framework of the Eco-Innovation measure, was finalized to develop an innovative technology for selective reinforcement of recycled plastic lumber. Selective reinforcement was carried out by the addition of pultruded glass rods in specific positions with respect to the cross section of the beam, which allowed optimizing the reinforcing efficiency. The reinforcement of the plastic lumber beams with pultruded rods was tested at industrial scale plant, at Solteco SL (Alfaro, Spain). The beams obtained, characterized by low cost and weight, were commercialized by the Spanish company. The present paper presents the most relevant results of the Prowaste project. Initially, an evaluation of the different materials candidates for the reinforcement of recycled plastic lumber is presented. Plastic lumber beams produced in the industrial plant were characterized in terms of flexural properties. The results obtained are interpreted by means of beam theory, which allows for extrapolation of the characteristic features of beams produced by different reinforcing elements. Finally, a theoretical comparison with other approaches which can be used for the reinforcement of plastic lumber is presented, highlighting that, among others, the Prowaste concept maximizes the stiffening efficiency, allowing to significantly reduce the weight of the components.

  19. A Perspective on the Prowaste Concept: Efficient Utilization of Plastic Waste through Product Design and Process Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed to present an innovative technology for the reinforcement of beams for urban furniture, produced by in-mold extrusion of plastics from solid urban waste. This material, which is usually referred to as “recycled plastic lumber”, is characterized by very poor mechanical properties, which results in high deflections under flexural loads, particularly under creep conditions. The Prowaste project, founded by the EACI (European Agency for Competitiveness and Innovation in the framework of the Eco-Innovation measure, was finalized to develop an innovative technology for selective reinforcement of recycled plastic lumber. Selective reinforcement was carried out by the addition of pultruded glass rods in specific positions with respect to the cross section of the beam, which allowed optimizing the reinforcing efficiency. The reinforcement of the plastic lumber beams with pultruded rods was tested at industrial scale plant, at Solteco SL (Alfaro, Spain. The beams obtained, characterized by low cost and weight, were commercialized by the Spanish company. The present paper presents the most relevant results of the Prowaste project. Initially, an evaluation of the different materials candidates for the reinforcement of recycled plastic lumber is presented. Plastic lumber beams produced in the industrial plant were characterized in terms of flexural properties. The results obtained are interpreted by means of beam theory, which allows for extrapolation of the characteristic features of beams produced by different reinforcing elements. Finally, a theoretical comparison with other approaches which can be used for the reinforcement of plastic lumber is presented, highlighting that, among others, the Prowaste concept maximizes the stiffening efficiency, allowing to significantly reduce the weight of the components.

  20. Oxazine laser dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  1. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der F.P.

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also

  2. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields, solvent-polarity- dependent fluorescence behavior, susceptibility to quenching by certain chemical species, and/or two-photon fluorescence, none of them has the combination of all of these attributes. Because the present dyes do have all of these attributes

  3. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on research and development of high level waste glass utilization system of CO2 emission suppression type; 2000 nendo CO2 haishutsu yokuseigata hai glass kodo riyo system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho (kokaiyo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective to establish a waste glass recycling system of low cost and requiring less CO2 emission amount and energy consumption, research and development has been made on classification of waste glasses into particle composition that is required in regenerated commercial products. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000. In the research of a waste glass reusing and supplying system designed by using LCA, discussions were given on items required in circulating and recycling waste glass resources, and quality control on raw materials and products. Evaluations of product quality control items were made on crystallized glass, sintered glasswool, automotive window glass, electric bulbs, fluorescent lamp glass, and quartz glass. Utilization tests were carried out for Mashiko porcelain china clay with an intention of expanding the application of waste glass, whereas the relationship between waste glass addition amount and optimal sintering temperature range was verified, disclosing that the limit of the waste glass addition is 10%. In the research on multi-functional hybrid materials, discussions were given on light-weight tiles and water permeating blocks with regard to the manufacturing technology, facility specifications, product quality, effects of the functions, and durability. (NEDO)

  4. A study of dyes sorption on biobased cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobritoiu, Rodica; Patachia, Silvia, E-mail: st.patachia@unitbv.ro

    2013-11-15

    Three types of biopolymers based materials were synthesized and tested as adsorbents for the dyes from aqueous solutions. Blends based on poly (vinyl alcohol) [PVA] and scleroglucan [Scl], cellulose micro-fibres [cel] and zein, respectively, have been prepared by repeated freezing–thawing cycles. Methylene blue [MB] was selected as a model dye in order to evaluate the capacity of the prepared materials to remove the dyes from aqueous solutions. The effects of the initial dye concentration, contact time and the composition of materials on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of sorption were discussed. The pseudo-second-order kinetics was found to better fit the experimental data thus being able to consistently predict the amount of dye adsorbed over the entire sorption period. The sorption equilibrium data obey Freundlich isotherm. Sorption capacity was evaluated both by dye solution and cryogel analysis by using VIS spectrometry and image analysis with CIELAB system. The sorption of monomer or aggregated dye molecules was identified and correlated with the type and morphology of the gel. The highest efficiency in MB removal was obtained for Scl/PVA cryogels in 1:9 weight ratio (9.5279 mg/g MB for an initial concentration by 8 × 10{sup −5} mol/L in MB). These materials are suitable as sorbents for the advanced removal of dyes from waste water.

  5. A multiattribute utility analysis of sites nominated for characterization for the first radioactive-waste repository: A decision-aiding methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In December 1984, the Department of Energy (DOE) published draft environmental assessments (EAs) to support the proposed nomination of five sites and the recommendation of three sites for characterization for the first radioactive-waste repository. A chapter common to all the draft EAs (Chapter 7) presented rankings of the five sites against the postclosure and the preclosure technical siting guidelines. To determine which three sites appeared most favorable for recommendation for characterization, three simple quantitative methods were used to aggregate the rankings assigned to each site for the various technical guidelines. In response to numerous comments on the methods, the DOE has undertaken a formal application of one of them (hereafter referred to as the decision-aiding methodology) for the purpose of obtaining a more rigorous evaluation of the nominated sites. The application of the revised methodology is described in this report. The method of analysis is known as multiattribute utility analysis; it is a tool for providing insights as to which sites are preferable and why. The decision-aiding methodology accounts for all the fundamental considerations specified by the siting guidelines and uses as source information the data and evaluations reported or referenced in the EAs. It explicitly addresses the uncertainties and value judgments that are part of all siting problems. Furthermore, all scientific and value judgments are made explicit for the reviewer. An independent review of the application of the decision-aiding methodology has been conducted by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management of the National Academy of Sciences; the comments of the Board are included as an appendix to this report.

  6. Utilization of agro-resources by radiation treatment -production of animal feed and mushroom from oil palm wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Hashimoto, Shoji; Awang, Mat Rasol; Hamdini, Hassan; Saitoh, Hideharu

    1993-10-01

    The production of animal feeds and mushrooms from oil palm cellulosic wasres by radiation and fermentation has been investigated in order to utilize the agro-resources and to reduce the smoke pollution. The process is as follows: decontamination of microorganisms in fermentation media of empty fruit bunch of oil palm (EFB) by irradiation, inoculation of useful fungi, and subsequently production of proteins and edible mushrooms. The dose of 25 kGy was required for the sterilization of contaminating bacteria whereas the dose of 10 kGy was enough to eliminate the fungi. Among many kinds of fungi tested, C. cinereus and P. sajor-caju were selected as the most suitable microorganism for the fermentation of EFB. The protein content of the product increased to 13 % and the crude fiber content decreased to 20% after 30 days of incubation with C. cinereus at 30°C in solid state fermentation. P. sajor-caju was suitable for the mushroom production on EFB with rice bran.

  7. Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Annual report No. 1, 1 November 1976-31 October 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A pilot aquaculture facility utilizing heated river water from condenser cooling (PSEandG's Mercer Generating Station, Trenton, New Jersey) is being used to culture the freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) and American eel (Anguilla rostrata) during the warmer months of the year, and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) during the colder months near Trenton, New Jersey. Twelve thousand trout were harvested from the last grow-out season. During June, 1977, juvenile shrimp 4.5 cm long were stocked at 31/sq m of total surface area in an outdoor raceway. By the end of September, 1977, the shrimp reached an average length of 7.9 cm at 11/sq m and suffered a high mortality of 58 percent. The density of 11/sq m confirms previous results in preceding years. Laboratory tests are also being conducted at Rutgers University to develop shrimp feeds with supplemented amino acids, and improve existing commercial shrimp feeds by incorporating better food binders which do not allow these food pellets to disintegrate in water as quickly.

  8. A fermentative approach towards optimizing directed biosynthesis of fumaric acid by Rhizopus oryzae 1526 utilizing apple industry waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Verma, Mausam

    2015-12-01

    The present research account deals with the bioproduction of fumaric acid (FA) from apple pomace ultrafiltration sludge (APUS) and apple pomace (AP) through fermentation. The filamentous fungus Rhizopus oryzae 1526 was used as a biocatalyst and its morphological impact on FA production was analysed in detail. For submerged fermentation, 40 g L(-1) of total solids concentration of APUS, pH 6.0, 30 °C, 200 rpm flask shaking speed and 72 h of incubation were found to be optimum for FA production (25.2 ± 1.0 g L(-1), 0.350 g (L(-1) h(-1))). Broth viscosity (cP), residual reducing sugar (g L(-1)) and ethanol (g L(-1)) produced as by-product, were also analysed. Plastic trays were used for solid state fermentation and at optimized level of moisture and incubation period, 52 ± 2.67 g FA per kg dry weight of AP was obtained. Changes in the total phenolic content (mg g(-1) dry weight of AP) were monitored at regular intervals. Utilization of APUS and AP for the directed synthesis of the high-value platform chemical FA by the fungal strain R. oryzae 1526 was an excellent display of fungal physiological and morphological control over a fermentative product. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineered Osmosis for Energy Efficient Separations: Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT DOE F 241.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NATHAN HANCOCK

    2013-01-13

    The purpose of this study is to design (i) a stripper system where heat is used to strip ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a diluted draw solution; and (ii) a condensation or absorption system where the stripped NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} are captured in condensed water to form a re-concentrated draw solution. This study supports the Industrial Technologies Program of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and their Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge award solicitation. Results from this study show that stimulated Oasys draw solutions composed of a complex electrolyte solution associated with the dissolution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} gas in water can successfully be stripped and fully condensed under standard atmospheric pressure. Stripper bottoms NH{sub 3} concentration can reliably be reduced to < 1 mg/L, even when starting with liquids that have an NH{sub 3} mass fraction exceeding 6% to stimulate diluted draw solution from the forward osmosis membrane component of the process. Concentrated draw solution produced by fully condensing the stripper tops was show to exceed 6 M-C with nitrogen-to-carbon (N:C) molar ratios on the order of two. Reducing the operating pressure of the stripper column serves to reduce the partial vapor pressure of both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} in solution and enables lower temperature operation towards integration of industrial low-grade of waste heat. Effective stripping of solutes was observed with operating pressures as low as 100 mbar (3-inHg). Systems operating at reduced pressure and temperature require additional design considerations to fully condense and absorb these constituents for reuse within the Oasys EO system context. Comparing empirical data with process stimulation models confirmed that several key parameters related to vapor-liquid equilibrium and intrinsic material properties were not accurate. Additional experiments and refinement of material property databases within the

  10. Cleaner production options for reducing industrial waste: the case of batik industry in Malang, East Java-Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirait, M.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to conduct cleaner production options for improving the environmental performance during the production of batik industry, the case of UKM batik, Malang, East Java. Batik industry is one of small and medium textile industry which has contribution to economic growth in Malang. However, during production the batik, it generates wastewater that has potential to decrease the environmental performance. Wastewater from Celaket batik industry has BOD, COD, TSS, and pH level is far larger than the threshold of water quality standard as a result of use chemical substance during the dyes processing. In order to prevent generating wastewater, this study utilized cleaner production options, such as substitution of input material.Substitution of input material for dyes process was implemented by replacement chemical dyes (e.g.indigosol, nafthol, rapid) with natural dyes (e.g. Indigofero Tintoria). Modifying of technology/equipment was conducted by developing wastewater treatment equipment to reduce waste of batik production. The implementation of this strategy was carried out by changing input material from chemical dyes with natural dyes. The CP uptake could reduce significantly the environmental impact in term of reduction of COD, BOD, and TSS.

  11. Nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation, microbial abundances, and milk yield and composition in dairy goats fed diets including tomato and cucumber waste fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Huelva, M; Ramos-Morales, E; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2012-10-01

    The effects of replacing 35% of cereals-based concentrate with feed blocks (FB) containing waste fruits of tomato, cucumber, or barley grain in diets for lactating goats on nutrient utilization, ruminal fermentation, microbial N flow to the duodenum, milk yield and quality, methane emissions, and abundances of total bacteria and methanogens were studied. Eight Murciano-Granadina goats (39.4 ± 5.39 kg of body weight, mean ± SD) in the middle of the third lactation were used and 4 diets were studied in a replicated 4×4 Latin square experimental design. Diets consisted of alfalfa hay (A) plus concentrate (C) in a 1:1 ratio (diet AC) or diets in which 35% of the concentrate was replaced with FB including wastes of tomato fruit, cucumber, or barley. In each period, 2 goats were randomly assigned to 1 of the dietary treatments. Intakes of FB including tomato, cucumber, and barley were 208 ± 65, 222 ± 52, and 209 ± 83 g of dry matter per animal and day, respectively. The replacement of 35% of concentrate with FB did not compromise nutrient apparent digestibility, total purine derivative urinary excretion, milk yield and composition, and total bacteria and methanogen abundances. Digestible energy and that in methane and urine were higher for AC than for FB-containing diets, whereas the metabolizable energy value was not affected by diet. The inclusion of tomato and cucumber fruits in FB decreased N in urine and CH(4) emissions compared with AC, which is environmentally relevant. However, tomato-based FB decreased microbial N flow in the rumen, whereas goats fed cucumber-based FB had the highest values for this measurement. Moreover, FB containing barley or tomato and cucumber led to lower rumen volatile fatty acid and NH(3)-N concentrations, respectively. Milk from goats fed diets including tomato and cucumber-based FB had higher linoleic, linolenic, and total polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations than that from goats fed AC. Overall, our study suggests that

  12. Equilibrium studies on sorption of an anionic dye onto acid activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISHIOMA

    Textile industry (and especially its part focused on the dyeing process) belongs among important sources of contamination responsible for the continuous pollution of the environ- ment. The production of textile industry, as well as the volume of waste water containing processed textile dyes, steadily increases. The release of ...

  13. Comparison of effects of cryopreservation diluents on the ability of Ram sperm to reduce resazurin dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resazurin dye is an effective way to test the metabolism of sperm. As sperm move, they create metabolic waste which is detected by the dye. Another way sperm are evaluated is by Computer-Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA). CASA detects motility, progression, curvilinear velocity, lateral head amplitude,...

  14. Factor Affecting Textile Dye Removal Using Adsorbent From Activated Carbon: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Razi Mohd Adib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial company such as textile, leather, cosmetics, paper and plastic generated wastewater containing large amount of dye colour. The removal of dye materials are importance as the presence of this kind of pollutant influence the quality of water and makes it aesthetically unpleasant. As their chemical structures are complicated, it is difficult to treat dyes with municipal waste treatment operations. Even a small quantity of dye does cause high visibility and undesirability. There have been various treatment technique reviewed for the removal of dye in wastewater. However, these treatment process has made it to another expensive treatment method. This review focus on the application of adsorbent in dye removal from textile wastewater as the most economical and effective method, adsorption has become the most preferred method to remove dye. The review provides literature information about different basis materials used to produce activated carbon like agricultural waste and industrial waste as well as the operational parameters factors in term of contact time, adsorbent dosage, pH solution and initial dye concentration that will affect the process in removing textile dye. This review approach the low cost and environmental friendly adsorbent for replacing conventional activated carbon.

  15. Removal of acid red 88 from wastewater by adsorption on agrobased waste material. A case study of Iranian golden Sesamum indicum hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Zarei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colors are very useful in different industries such as textile and leather but when they enter water, can cause many biological and environmental problems. In the present research, a waste agricultural material which is freely available is employed to analyze its efficiency for removing acid dye from contaminated wastewaters. Methods: In this study, batch adsorption experiments were performed in the treatment process of acid red 88 (AR88 by Iranian golden Sesamum indicum (IGSI seeds hull which is produced abundantly in some countries and especially in Iran up to 1100 kg/ha. Also, the effect of operational parameters like adsorption time, pH, dye concentration and adsorbent dosage was studied on pollutant removing efficiency. The experimental data of AR88 adsorption was fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM images for the IGSI were taken before and after adsorption process. Results: The efficiency of dye adsorption on adsorbent was found to be 98.2%. The optimum pH for treatment was 4.5 which is in the acidic range. Enhancing the adsorbent dosage from 0.5 to 2.5 g caused increasing in removal efficiency from 73.85% to 95.85%. Decreasing in dye concentration from 70 to 30 mg/L caused increasing in removal efficiency from 79.73% to 95.83%. The process of adsorption was best fitted to Langmuir model and the amount of dye adsorbed on adsorbent, qe, was found to be 25 mg/g. Comparison between SEM images before and after dye adsorption, showed the significant difference that was due to the dye loading on adsorbent. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrated higher dye removal efficiency for AR88 in acidic pHs. Employing the IGSI material in this study proves to be a potential alternative to expensive adsorbents, utilized for the treatment of contaminated industrial waste waters.

  16. Unsymmetrical Heptamethine Dyes for NIR Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geiger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven unsymmetrical heptamethine dyes with carboxylic acid functionality were synthesized and characterized. These near-infrared dyes exhibit outstanding photophysical properties depending on their heterocyclic moieties and molecular structure. As proof of principle, the dyes were used as photosensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the most promising dye, an overall conversion efficiency of 1.22% and an almost colorless solar cell were achieved.

  17. Database of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled with CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kazuyasu; Kondo, Tadashi; Yokoo, Hideki; Okano, Tetsuya; Yamada, Masayo; Yamada, Tesshi; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2006-03-01

    CyDye DIGE Fluor saturation dye (saturation dye, GE Healthcare Amersham Biosciences) enables highly sensitive 2-D PAGE. As the dye reacts with all reduced cysteine thiols, 2-D PAGE can be performed with a lower amount of protein, compared with CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dye (GE Healthcare Amersham Biosciences), the sensitivity of which is equivalent to that of silver staining. We constructed a 2-D map of the saturation dye-labeled proteins of a liver cancer cell line (HepG2) and identified by MS 92 proteins corresponding to 123 protein spots. Functional classification revealed that the identified proteins had chaperone, protein binding, nucleotide binding, metal ion binding, isomerase activity, and motor activity. The functional distribution and the cysteine contents of the proteins were similar to those in the most comprehensive 2-D database of hepatoma cells (Seow et al.., Electrophoresis 2000, 21, 1787-1813), where silver staining was used for protein visualization. Hierarchical clustering on the basis of the quantitative expression profiles of the 123 characterized spots labeled with two charge- and mass-matched saturation dyes (Cy3 and Cy5) discriminated between nine hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and primary cultured hepatocytes from five individuals, suggesting the utility of saturation dye and our database for proteomic studies of liver cancer.

  18. Application of solid waste from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter in Agrocybe aegerita cultivation: mushroom production, lignocellulolytic enzymes activity and substrate utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Mikiashvili, Nona A; Kelkar, Vinaya

    2009-06-01

    The degradation and utilization of solid waste (SW) from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter by Agrocybe aegerita was evaluated through mushroom production, loss of organic matter (LOM), lignocellulolytic enzymes activity, lignocellulose degradation and mushroom nutrients content. Among the substrate combinations (SCs) tested, substrates composed of 10-20% SW, 70-80% wheat straw and 10% millet was found to produce the highest mushroom yield (770.5 and 642.9 g per 1.5 kg of substrate). LOM in all SCs tested varied between 8.8 and 48.2%. A. aegerita appears to degrade macromolecule components (0.6-21.8% lignin, 33.1-55.2% cellulose and 14-53.9% hemicellulose) during cultivation on the different SCs. Among the seven extracellular enzymes monitored, laccase, peroxidase and CMCase activities were higher before fruiting; while xylanase showed higher activities after fruiting. A source of carbohydrates (e.g., millet) in the substrate is needed in order to obtain yield and biological efficiency comparable to other commercially cultivated exotic mushrooms.

  19. Utilization of the waste water of the steaming and boiling water on the tea processing; Cha seizo kotei ni okeru haishutsusui no yukoriyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezuka, M.; Doi, S. [Shizuoka Industrial Research Institute of Shizuoka prefecture, Shizuoka (Japan); Kuramoto, M.

    1995-09-01

    To utilize the waste water of the steaming water on the green tea processing and the boiling water on the caffeine-less tea processing, the antibacterial and anti odor effects of the water condensate were investigated. The results were as follows; (1) The volume of the steaming water and the boiling water obtained on the tea processing was 0.02 t and 8.4t per a day. (2) The amount of catechism in the steaming water and boiling water was 193 ppm and 87 ppm. (3) To concentrate the steaming water, a rotary evaporating method was better than a hotplating and an ultrafiltrating methods. (4) The antibacterial effect of the boiling water condensate was indicated at a concentration of 1% catechism in a laboratory experiment. (5) In a fish processing industry, the antibacterial effect was not recognized at a concentration of 1% catechism flooded with the condensate on the floor. (6) The antiodor effect the condensate was not recognized at a concentration of 1% catechism above the floor in the fish processing industry. (7) The antiodor effect was expressed at a concentration of O.5% catechism sprayed with the condensate in a space of a pet food processing industry. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Dyes removal from textile wastewater using graphene based nanofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Rizki, Z.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-05-01

    Wastewater produced from textile industry is having more strict regulation. The major pollutant of wastewater from textile industry is Dyes. Dyes have several harsh properties i.e toxic, volatile, complexing easily with mineral ions that are dissolved in water (decreasing the amount of important mineral ions in water), and hard to disintegrate, therefore it must be removed from the waste stream. There are several methods and mechanisms to remove dyes such as chemical and physical sorption, evaporation, biological degradation, and photocatalytic system that can be applied to the waste stream. Membrane-based separation technology has been introduced in dyes removal treatment and is well known for its advantages (flexibility, mild operating condition, insensitive to toxic pollutant). Graphene and its derivatives are novel materials which have special properties due to its ultrathin layer and nanometer-size pores. Thus, the materials are very light yet strong. Moreover, it has low cost and easy to fabricate. Recently, the application of graphene and its derivatives in nanofiltration membrane processes is being widely explored. This review investigates the potentials of graphene based membrane in dyes removal processes. The operating conditions, dyes removal effectiveness, and the drawbacks of the process are the main focus in this paper.

  1. Acne vulgaris in the context of complex medical co-morbities: the management of severe acne vulgaris in a female with retinitis pigmentosa - utilizing pulse dye laser in conjunction with medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Ayesha; Keck, Laura; Zlotoff, Barrett

    2014-03-17

    Acne vulgaris is a pervasive inflammatory disorder of the skin, with multiple etiologies and treatment options. Although first-line therapies exist, it is often the case that a patient will present with an underlying disorder that prohibits the use of most currently accepted treatment modalities. We present a patient with severe acne vulgaris and a history of retinitis pigmentosa who was treated with 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser therapy, in conjunction with therapeutic alternatives to first-line acne medications. Our patient exhibited a significant and sustained improvement with the combined use of 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser, Yaz (drospirenone-ethinyl estradiol), dapsone, topical metronidazole, sodium-sulfacetamide wash, and topical azelaic acid. The positive results in this case, suggest that this combined treatment modality may serve as an example of a safe and effective treatment alternative in the management of acne vulgaris complicated by medical co-morbidities that contraindicate the use of most first-line treatment options.

  2. Removal of Congo Red Dye from Aqueous Solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-01-08

    Jan 8, 2013 ... adsorbents for dye effluent treatment. Keywords: Bambara groundnut shell, Congo red, Sugarcane ... drawback of commercial activated carbon and considering the huge quantities of wastewater to be ..... Removal of Congo red from wastewater by adsorption onto waste red mud Chemosphere,. 34:401-417 ...

  3. Decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes using a sulphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes was achieved in a biosulphidogenic batch reactor using biodigester sludge from a local municipality waste treatment plant as a source of carbon and microflora that augmented a sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. Orange II (O II) was decolourised by ...

  4. Decolourisation and degradation of textile dyes using a sulphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other azo dyes, Reactive black 5 (RB 5), Reactive red 120 ... successfully degraded with the exception of Amido black 10B (AB 10B). The Orange II ... Therefore bioremediation of textile effluent with sludge and SRB can concomitantly treat two wastes while providing a cheaper alternative of the carbon source. However, the ...

  5. Removal of basic dye methylene blue by using bioabsorbents Ulva ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Dyes are widely use in textile, paper, plastic, food and cosmetic industries. The wastes coming from these in- dustries can effect on our atmosphere ... with tap water, then distilled water and dried in oven at 60 ± 2°C for over night in order to remove moisture and physiosorbed species. The dry constant was ...

  6. Decolorization of irgalite dye by immobilized Pseuodomonas putida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMPAQ

    waste and wastewater treatment has been represented by (Pollard et al., 1992; .... The determination of concentration of dye was done by finding out .... Ferrous Sulphate. 0.002 gm/l. Calcium chloride. 0.002 gm/l. Effect of pH on biodegradation of irgalite in batch mode. Figure 7 gives a comparative picture of effect of various.

  7. Time dependent – density functional theory characterization of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hilal, Rifaat

    2017-06-19

    We aim at providing better insight into the parameters that govern the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and photo-injection processes in dyes for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations are utilized to study the geometry, electronic structure, electrostatic potential (ESP) and absorption spectrum, for a representative donor-π bridge-acceptor (D–π–A) dye for DSSC. The coplanar geometry of the dye (D1) facilitates strong conjugation and considerable delocalization originating the π CT interaction from donor to acceptor orbitals and the hyper-conjugative interactions involving Rydberg states. A model simulating the adsorption of the dye on the TiO surface is utilized to estimate binding energies. The effect of fluorine substituents in the π-spacer on the quantum efficiency of DSSCs was investigated. Gibb’s free energy values, redox potentials, excited state lifetime, non-linear optical properties (NLO) and driving forces for D1 and its fluorinated derivatives were computed.

  8. Integration of thermal and food processing residuals into a system for commercial culture of freshwater shrimp. (power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture). Volume II. Final report Jul 74--Oct 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that all life-cycle stages of the tropical freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, can be cultured successfully using waste-heat effluents of the Mercer Generating Station, Trenton, N.J. Further, high-density culture of the prawn is possible and practical. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) culture has also been successfully demonstrated utilizing the waste-heat discharges of an electric generating station. Efficient systems have been designed for intensive annual two-crop production. Postlarval prawns are grown in indoor heated nurseries in early spring, and placed in outdoor ponds in mid-May at sizes of 5 to 6cm and harvested in late October as 11 to 12cm adults. Experiments culturing the American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in waste-heat discharge waters of the generating system have been successful. Presented in Volume 2 is the research work conducted in this study. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

  9. Incorporation of Kojic Acid-Azo Dyes on TiO2 Thin Films for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolynne Zie Wei Sie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization of heavy metal free organic dyes onto TiO2 thin films has gained much attention in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. A series of new kojic acid based organic dyes KA1–4 were synthesized via nucleophilic substitution of azobenzene bearing different vinyl chains A1–4 with kojyl chloride 4. Azo dyes KA1–4 were characterized for photophysical properties employing absorption spectrometry and photovoltaic characteristic in TiO2 thin film. The presence of vinyl chain in A1–4 improved the photovoltaic performance from 0.20 to 0.60%. The introduction of kojic acid obtained from sago waste further increases the efficiency to 0.82–1.54%. Based on photovoltaic performance, KA4 achieved the highest solar to electrical energy conversion efficiency (η = 1.54% in the series.

  10. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH BULU AYAM MENJADI BAHAN PAKAN IKAN DENGAN FERMENTASI Bacillus subtilis (Utilization of Waste Chicken Feather to Fish Feed Ingredients Material with Fermentation of Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Siswani Mulia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memanfaatkan limbah bulu ayam menjadi bahan pakan ikan dengan fermentasi Bacillus subtilis. Penelitian menggunakan metode eksperimen dengan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL 4 perlakuan, 3 kali ulangan, yaitu P0 : tepung bulu ayam non fermentasi; P1 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 5 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam; P2 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 10 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam; P3 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 15 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam. Parameter yang diamati adalah hasil uji proksimat meliputi kadar protein kasar, kadar air, kadar abu, kadar lemak kasar, kadar serat kasar, dan parameter pendukung yaitu uji organoleptik, berupa sifat fisik tepung bulu ayam, meliputi warna, tekstur, dan bau. Data berupa hasil uji proksimat dianalisis menggunakan ANAVA dan Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT dengan taraf uji 5%, sedangkan untuk data hasil organoleptik dianalisis secara deskriptif kualitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemanfaatan limbah bulu ayam menjadi bahan pakan ikan dapat dilakukan dengan fermentasi B. subtilis. Fermentasi tepung bulu ayam menggunakan B. subtillis dapat meningkatkan kualitas bahan baku pakan ikan. Perlakuan P2 (inokulum 10 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayamadalah perlakuan yang paling efektif karena menghasilkan protein tertinggi yaitu 80,59%, dengan perubahan sifat fisik menjadi putih sampai putih kekuningan (warna, lembut (tekstur, dan khas kurang menyengat (bau.   ABSTRACT This study aims to utilize waste chicken feathers into fish feed ingredients by fermentation of Bacillus subtilis. The research has done by experimental methods with completely randomized design (CRD 4 treatments, 3 repetitions, ie P0: non-fermented chicken feather meal; P1: fermentation with B. subtilis 5 mL inoculum/2 g chicken feather meal; P2: 10 mL/2 g chicken feather meal; P3: 15 mL/2 g chicken feather meal. Parameters measured were the proximate test results include the levels of crude protein

  11. Report on the research cooperation promoting project in fiscal 1998. Research cooperation related to the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biomass; 1998 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku suishin jigyo hokokusho. Bio riyo ni yoru kohaisui shori gijutsu ni kansuru kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes the achievement in relation with the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biomass, from among the promotion projects for research cooperation with China. Waste water is converted into ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}), which precipitates at low pH, by utilizing iron oxidizing bacteria which use ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in the waste water as the energy source, and is precipitated and removed by using low-cost calcium carbonate as a neutralizing agent. Fiscal 1998 has performed eight site surveys with 47 persons in total. The main survey items are the study and guidance of pilot plant operation and the survey on measures to prevent occurrence of contamination by heavy metals in Wushan Mine. Additional site surveys were made at Dexing Mine and Yinshan Lead/Zinc Mine. Continued from fiscal 1997, consumables required for the pilot plant were purchased, and items of the bench-scale testing equipment used by Japan for domestic researches (an oxidation and neutralization testing equipment and a copper recovering and testing equipment) were transported to China. The operation research data of the pilot plant were put in order and analyzed. This paper summarizes the concept design of the shaft waste water treatment facilities for the north mine in Wushan Mine, and the surveys on measures for heavy metal contamination sources. (NEDO)

  12. Sustainable utilization of ressources. Production of ethanol from dairy waste streams; Nachhaltige Verwertung von Wertstoffstroemen. Gewinnung von Ethanol aus einem Reststoff der Molkeverarbeitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benecke, Christian

    2011-07-01

    The worldwide increasing demand for cheese and dairy products leads to a steady increase of whey production. Today, whey is no more considered as waste, but serves as source for materials like lactose and proteins. At the end of this process a whey concentrate is released, which contains still a significant content of lactose. This lactose could not be obtained in the desired quality. This thesis describes a method to increase added value from the utilization-process of whey. To achieve this intent, methods where evaluated, to use the remaining lactose as a substrate for the fermentation to ethanol. Yeasts of the strain Kluyveromyces marxianus were evaluated for the use in this process. The degradation rate of the substrate and a maximized conversion were the main objectives. For the growth of the yeast cells, a method was developed, which uses only whey concentrate as substrate and avoids the usage of other materials for nutrition. The method was optimized in consideration of initial substrate concentration and degradation rate. The high content of salts in the whey concentrate leads to the further investigations of inhabitating or proliferating effects of different anions and cations on the used yeast cells. It becomes obvious, that a desalting or dilution of the used whey concentrate is mandatory. For that purpose, the nanofiltration was applied successfully to this process. The usage of not desalted whey concentrate is also possible. With an adequate dilution of the whey concentrate, relative yields of ca. 90% could be achieved. With a significant increase of the initial biomass, the duration of the fermentation process could be halved to ca. 25 h. (orig.)

  13. Annual report on the cost and the quality of the wastes disposal utility; Rapport annuel sur le prix et la qualite du service public d'elimination des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of the Barnier law in favor of the environment protection, each EPCI (public enterprise of inter communal cooperation) has to present an annual report on the cost and the quality of the domestic waste disposal utility. This guideline aims to help this document redaction. The first and the second parts present respectively the technical and the financial indicators, illustrated by examples and opinions. (A.L.B.)

  14. Mordant dyes as sensitisers in dye-sensitised solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millington, Keith R.; Fincher, Keith W.; King, A. Lee [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Textile and Fibre Technology, P.O. Box 21, Belmont, Vic. 3216 (Australia)

    2007-10-15

    Many mordant dyes commonly used in the textile industry form coordination complexes at the surface of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}. Dyes having a salicylate chelating group are particularly effective. Forty-nine commercial mordant dyes were studied as sensitisers in a non-optimised dye-sensitised solar cell (DSSC) and their performance compared to the N3 ruthenium complex. Although N3 produced the highest output, six mordant dyes produced photocurrents >0.2 mA. UV-visible spectra of the dye-complexed photoanodes suggest that some mordant dyes are more strongly bound to the TiO{sub 2} surface than N3. Photocatalytic oxidation of these dyes does not appear to occur in a DSSC environment. (author)

  15. Lunar Organic Waste Reformer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Organic Waste Reformer (LOWR) utilizes high temperature steam reformation to convert all plastic, paper, and human waste materials into useful gases. In...

  16. System analysis of energy utilization from waste - evaluation of energy, environment and economy. Summary report; Systemanalys av energiutnyttjande fraan avfall - utvaerdering av energi, miljoe och ekonomi. Oeversiktsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Granath, Jessica [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst. Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden); Frostell, Bjoern; Bjoerklund, Anna; Eriksson, Ola [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology; Thyselius, Lennart; Baky, Andras [Swedish Inst. of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden); Carlsson, Marcus [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Economics

    1999-12-01

    Energy, environmental, and economic consequences of different management systems for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. In the systems analysis, different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of easily degradable organic waste, were studied and also compared to landfilling. In the study a computer model (ORWARE) based on LCA methodology was used. Case studies were performed for three different municipalities: Uppsala, Stockholm, and Aelvdalen. The following parameters were used for evaluating the different waste management options: consumption of energy resources, global warming potential, acidification, eutrophication, photo oxidant formation, heavy metal flows, financial economy and welfare economy, where welfare economy is the sum of financial economy and environmental economy. The study shows that reduced landfilling to the benefit of an increased use of energy and material from waste is positive from an environmental and energy as well as economic aspect. This is mainly due to the fact that the choice of waste management method affects processes outside the waste management system, such as production of district heating, electricity, vehicle fuel, plastic, cardboard, and fertiliser. This means that landfilling of energy-rich waste should be avoided as far as possible, both because of the the environmental impact, and because of the low recovery of resources. Incineration should constitute a basis in the waste management systems of the three municipalities studied, even if the waste has to be transported to a regional facility. Once the waste is collected, longer regional transports are of little significance, as long as the transports are carried out in an efficient manner. Comparing materials recycling and incineration, and biological treatment and incineration, no unambiguous conclusions can be drawn. There are

  17. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH BIOMASSA CANGKANG KAKAO DAN KEMIRI SEBAGAI BAHAN BAKAR BRIKET (Utilization of Biomass Wastes from Cocoa and Candlenut Shells as Fuel Briquette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harwin Saptoadi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK  Biomassa adalah sumber energi utama jutaan manusia di dunia, akan tetapi penggunaannya menurun ketika batubara, minyak dan gas tersedia cukup melirnpah. Namun akhir-akhir ini perhatian muncul kembali karena terjadinya krisis energi dan isu-isu lingkungan. Pemanfaatan biomassa untuk menggantikan bahan bakar fosil dapat menurunkan persoalan emisi CO2 global. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji alternatif sumber energi terbarukan dengan pemanfaatan limbah biomassa cangkang kakao dan kemiri. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menghaluskan biomassa dengan ukuran partikel kurang dari I mm. Kemudian 5 gram campuran bahan baku dengan bahan pengikat gel tepung kanji dengan perbandingan 70:30 untuk kakao dan 80:20 untuk kemiri dibriket dalarn cetakan berdiarneter l6 mm. Setelah dibriket kemudian dikeringkan dengan oven pada suhu 50 oC selama 5 jam. Pembakaran dilakukan dalam ruang bakar pada temperatur dinding 350 oC dan laju aliran udara bervariasi antara 0,1 - 0,4 m/s. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa cangkang kakao dan kemiri mempunyai nilai kalor masing-masing 16.998 dan 21.960 kJ/kg. Emisi CO cukup signifikan pada tahap devolatilisasi. Cangkang kakao memberikan total emisi CO lebih tinggi dibandingkan dengan cangkang kemiri. Laju aliran udara juga berpengaruh terhadap emisi CO yang dihasilkan. Penambahan laju aliran udara akan mengurangi emisi CO, hal ini karena adanya penambahan suplai oksigen sehingga pemnbakaran dapat berlangsung lebih sempurna.   ABSTRACT  Biomass was the  primary source of energy for millions of people in the world, but when coal, oil, and gas became widely available, its use was declined. However, in recent years interest in biomass utilization increases because of energy crisis and environmental issues. Utilization of biomass for substituting fossil fuel can reduce global CO2 emission problem. The objective of this research is to study alternative energy sources that utilize biomass waste from cocoa and candlenut

  18. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the product. ...

  19. Effects of feeding polyphenol‐rich winery wastes on digestibility, nitrogen utilization, ruminal fermentation, antioxidant status and oxidative stress in wethers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishida, Kyohei; Kishi, Yosuke; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Four wethers were used in a 4 × 4 L atin square design experiment to evaluate the availability of two types of winery wastes, winery sediment and grape pomace, as ruminant feeds possessing antioxidant activities...

  20. Cosensitization of Ruthenium–Polypyridyl Dyes with Organic Dyes in Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Numata, Youhei; Zhang, Shufang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2013-01-01

    Cosensitization, a technique involving sensitization of a metal-oxide semiconductor electrode with two or more different dyes, is a promising strategy to enhance light-harvesting capabilities of dye...

  1. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-09-20

    Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively

  2. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  3. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  4. for aqueous dye lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... polar molecule and possesses larger dipole moment at the excited state (S1), and stabi- lizes its energy by interacting with the polar and protic water solvent. The measured fluorescence spectra of RhB dye in ethanol, water and water with CB[7] (molar ratio. 1:5) in the temperature range 279–298 K were ...

  5. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  6. Role of the South African Waste Information System in improving waste management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Godfrey, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . Interviews with officials from municipalities and private waste companies highlighted that certain organizations, typically private waste companies have been successful in collecting waste data. Through a process of learning, these organizations have utilized...

  7. Dye laser principles with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Frank J; Liao, Peter F; Kelley, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A tutorial introduction to the field of dye lasers, Dye Laser Principles also serves as an up-to-date overview for those using dye lasers as research and industrial tools. A number of the issues discussed in this book are pertinent not only to dye lasers but also to lasers in general. Most of the chapters in the book contain problem sets that expand on the material covered in the chapter.Key Features* Dye lasers are among the most versatile and successful laser sources currently available in use Offering both pulsed and continuous-wave operation and tunable from the near ultraviole

  8. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles: An easily recoverable effective photo-catalyst for the degradation of rose bengal and methylene blue dyes in the waste-water treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Amit Kumar; Maji, Swarup Kumar; Adhikary, Bibhutosh, E-mail: bibhutoshadhikary@yahoo.in

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs from a single-source precursor and characterized by XRD, TEM, UV–vis spectra. • The NPs were tested as effective photocatalyst toward degradation of RB and MB dyes. • The possible pathway of the photocatalytic decomposition process has been discussed. • The active species, OH·, was detected by TA photoluminescence probing techniques. - Abstract: γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from a single-source precursor complex [Fe{sub 3}O(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COO){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]NO{sub 3} by a simple thermal decomposition process and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopic techniques. The NPs were highly pure and well crystallized having hexagonal morphology with an average particle size of 35 nm. The prepared γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite) NPs show effective photo-catalytic activity toward the degradation of rose bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB) dyes under visible light irradiation and can easily be recoverable in the presence of magnetic field for successive re-uses. The possible photo-catalytic decomposition mechanism is discussed through the detection of hydroxyl radical (OH·) by terephthalic acid photo-luminescence probing technique.

  9. Dermatotoxicologic clinical solutions: textile dye dermatitis patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas; Edwards, Ashley; Maibach, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The authors provide a framework for working up and counseling a patient with suspected textile dermatitis, focusing on identifying which textile materials are most likely to be the cause of the eczematous lesions, the current clinical guidelines, the utility and appropriateness of patch testing, the limitations of these guidelines, and our pro tempore recommendations. While there are many challenges to correctly identify and counsel patients on how to avoid the offending textile products in a patient with suspected textile dye dermatitis, there is value in following the guidelines set forth to help identify the causative textile(s). Although patch tests can be useful, dermatologists should understand the limitations of standardized patch testing for patients with suspected textile dye-induced dermatitis. These guidelines are expected to increase the likelihood of identifying the causative textile(s), so that patch testing can be supplemented with swatch testing and chemical dye extraction to help discover the allergenic dye.

  10. Coastal circulation off Bombay in relation to waste water disposal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Josanto, V.; Sarma, R.V.

    Flow patterns in the coastal waters of Bombay were studied using recording current meters, direct reading current meters, floats and dye in relation to the proposed waste water disposal project of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Bombay from...

  11. Plantas Tintureiras Dye Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Serrano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe uma vasta bibliografia, até ao séc. XVIII, sobre plantas produtoras de corantes naturais, sendo que apenas um número limitado foi utilizado no tingimento de têxteis antigos, devido à capacidade de resistência à lavagem e ao desvanecimento. O cultivo de plantas ou a sua existência no mundo silvestre tiveram uma enorme importância sócio-económica para muitas comunidades espalhadas pelo mundo e pelas intensas trocas comerciais que geraram. A extracção dos corantes era feita a partir de diferentes partes de plantas ou árvores. Nalgumas plantas eram utilizadas as folhas, enquanto noutras se aproveitavam as flores, as raízes, os frutos, troncos ou sementes. Os corantes podiam ser extraídos através de processos complexos que envolviam diversas operações como maceração, destilação, fermentação, decantação, precipitação, filtração, etc. Neste âmbito, são apresentadas algumas das plantas cultivadas em Portugal e em muitos outros países europeus e que foram usadas em tinturaria. Este trabalho pretende ser um contributo para obstar à perda de conhecimentos das condições de cultivo e da forma como se maximizava a produção de corantes.A vast bibliography exists, until the 18th cen-tury, on natural dyes obtained from plants, but only one limited number was used in the dyeing of old textiles, due to capacity of resistance to wash and light fading. The culture of plants or its existence in the wild world had an enormous economical importance for many communities spread for the world, and the intense commercial exchanges that had generated. The extraction of dyes was done from different parts of plants or trees. In some plants was used the leaves, others, only the roots, the fruits, trunks or seeds. The dyes could be extracted through complex processes that involved various operations as maceration, distillation, fermentation, decantation, precipitation, filtration, etc. In this scope, some of the plants cultivated in

  12. MODELING OF TUBULAR ELECTROCHEMICAL REACTOR FOR DYE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. VIJAYAKUMAR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to model a tubular electrochemical reactor for the treatment of synthetic dye wastewater. The tubular reactor was modeled and solved by finite difference method. For the model solution, the column was divided into 11 nodes in the axial direction and the variation in the radial direction has been neglected. An initial dye concentration of 200 mg L-1was taken in the reservoir. The reactor was operated in a batch with recirculation operation. Based on preliminary experiments all parameters have been optimized. The model simulation is compared with the experimental value and it is observed that the model fairly matches well with the experiment. The modeling of tubular electrochemical reactors for dye waste water treatment could be useful in the design and scale up of electrochemical process.

  13. Combined Anaerobic-Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wilfred Sugumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewaters from the dye baths of a non-formal textile-dyeing unit containing C.I. Acid Orange 7 and C.I. Reactive Red 2 were subjected to degradation in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic treatment process based on mixed culture of bacteria. The technical samples of the dyestuffs and the dye bath wastes were treated in an anaerobic reactor, using an adapted mixed culture of anaerobic microorganisms. The dyestuffs were biotransformed into colourless substituted amine metabolites in the reactor. The biotransformation was assisted by co-metabolic process. The amine metabolites did not undergo further degradation in the anaerobic reactor. The effluent from the anaerobic reactor was treated in an aerobic rotating biological contactor and the amine metabolites were found to undergo complete mineralization. This two stage treatment resulted in 94% elimination of dissolved organic carbon. In addition, 85% of organic nitrogen was converted into nitrate in the aerobic reactor during nitrification process.

  14. Equilibrium studies on sorption of an anionic dye onto acid activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Present investigation deals with the utilization of water hyacinth roots (collected from the ponds) as adsorbent for the removal of anionic dye from its aqueous solutions. Batch studies were conducted to evaluate the adsorption capacity of the dye, Congo red on the sorbent with respect to the variations in initial pH, contact ...

  15. Dye purity and dye standardization for biological staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2002-01-01

    This review starts with a short discussion of what is meant by a pure dye and a brief description of how dyes are produced. A listing of the types of impurities encountered in dyes is made, followed by technical investigations and assessments of dyes and their impurities including methods...... for separating, identifying and assaying dye components. In the second part of the review, descriptions are given of the standardized staining method approach using standard staining methods for assessing stains, and practical responses to stain impurity including commercial quality control, third-party quality...... control and standardization of reagents, protocols and documentation. Finally, reference is made to the current state of affairs in the dye field....

  16. Synthesis of azo pyridone dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50% of all colorants which are used nowdays are azo dyes and pigments, and among them arylazo pyridone dyes (and pigments have became of interest in last several decades due to the high molar extinction coefficient, and the medium to high light and wet fastness properties. They find application generally as disperse dyes. The importance of disperse dyes increased in the 1970s and 1980s due to the use of polyester and nylon as the main synthetic fibers. Also, disperse dyes were used rapidly since 1970 in inks for the heat-transfer printing of polyester. The main synthetic route for the preparation of azo dyes is coupling reaction between an aromatic diazo compound and a coupling component. Of all dyes manufactured, about 60% are produced by this reaction. Arylazo pyridone dyes can be prepared from pyridone moiety as a coupling component, where substituent can be on nitrogen, and diazonim salts which can be derived from different substituted anilines or other heterocyclic derivatives. In addition, arylazo dyes containing pyridone ring can be prepared from arylazo diketones or arylazo ketoesters (obtained by coupling β-diketones or β-ketoesters with diazonim salts by condensation with cyanoacetamide. Disazo dyes can be prepared by tetrazotizing a dianiline and coupling it with a pyridone or by diazotizing aniline and coupling it with a dipyridone. Trisazo dyes can be also prepared by diazotizing of aniline and coupling it with a tripyridone or by hexazotizing a trianiline and coupling it with a pyridone. The main goal of this paper is to give a brief review on the synthesis of arylazo pyridone dyes due to the lack of such reviews. In addition, some properties of arylazo pyridone dyes as light fastness and azo-hydrazon tautomerism are disccused.

  17. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  18. HYDROXYANTHRAQUINONE DYES FROM PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Caro, Yanis; Petit, Thomas; Grondin, Isabelle; Fouillaud, Mireille; Dufossé, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In the plant kingdom, numerous pigments have already been identified, but only a minority of them is allowed by legal regulations for textile dyeing, food coloring or cosmetic and pharmaceutics’ manufacturing. Anthraquinones, produced as secondary metabolites in plants, constitute a large structural variety of compounds among the quinone family. Derivatives that contain hydroxyl groups, namely hydroxy-anthraquinones, are colored. They have attracted the attention of ma...

  19. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  20. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.