WorldWideScience

Sample records for warming trusted information

  1. Information Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Atele-Williams , Tosan; Marsh , Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Part 7: IFIPTM 2017 Graduate Symposium; International audience; Information has been an essential element in the development of collaborative and cooperative models, from decision making to the attainmentof varying goals, people are adept at making judgment on the trustworthiness of information, based on knowledge and understanding of a normative model of information. Contemporary narrative especially in high-impact contexts like politics, health, business, government and technology, is erodi...

  2. Trust metrics in information fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasch, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Trust is an important concept for machine intelligence and is not consistent across many applications. In this paper, we seek to understand trust from a variety of factors: humans, sensors, communications, intelligence processing algorithms and human-machine displays of information. In modeling the various aspects of trust, we provide an example from machine intelligence that supports the various attributes of measuring trust such as sensor accuracy, communication timeliness, machine processing confidence, and display throughput to convey the various attributes that support user acceptance of machine intelligence results. The example used is fusing video and text whereby an analyst needs trust information in the identified imagery track. We use the proportional conflict redistribution rule as an information fusion technique that handles conflicting data from trusted and mistrusted sources. The discussion of the many forms of trust explored in the paper seeks to provide a systems-level design perspective for information fusion trust quantification.

  3. Consumer Trust in Information Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Love

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trust is essential to understanding public reaction to innovative issues. This research focuses on trust in information sources by explicating the construct of trust and testing a comprehensive model on several information sources about genetically modified foods. Results from a survey of 369 participants reveal the significance of projecting competence and the role of the environment in which a target public receives information. Perceptions of regulatory, social, business, and technical environments affect how likely individuals are to follow advice from institutions like the Food and Drug Administration and the news media. Future research should incorporate knowledge levels and personal relevance as variables likely to influence trusting relationships.

  4. Online health information - what can you trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000869.htm Online health information - what can you trust? To use the sharing features on this page, ... the difference? To find health information you can trust, you have to know where and how to ...

  5. An attack on science? Media use, trust in scientists, and perceptions of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmielowski, Jay D; Feldman, Lauren; Myers, Teresa A; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Maibach, Edward

    2014-10-01

    There is a growing divide in how conservatives and liberals in the USA understand the issue of global warming. Prior research suggests that the American public's reliance on partisan media contributes to this gap. However, researchers have yet to identify intervening variables to explain the relationship between media use and public opinion about global warming. Several studies have shown that trust in scientists is an important heuristic many people use when reporting their opinions on science-related topics. Using within-subject panel data from a nationally representative sample of Americans, this study finds that trust in scientists mediates the effect of news media use on perceptions of global warming. Results demonstrate that conservative media use decreases trust in scientists which, in turn, decreases certainty that global warming is happening. By contrast, use of non-conservative media increases trust in scientists, which, in turn, increases certainty that global warming is happening. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Matthias; Benbasat, Izak; Gefen, David; Leimeister, Jan Marco; Pavlou, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Trust is the enabler of social interaction. Although the origins of research on trust traditionally lie outside the Information Systems (IS) domain, the importance of trust for IS research rapidly grew in the late 1990s, and it is still growing with the increasing ubiquity and advancement of technology in organizations, virtual teams, online markets, and user-technology interactions. Theoretically, the central role of trust is tied to the growing social change that Information and Communicati...

  7. Social information influences trust behaviour in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nikki C; Jolles, Jelle; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Trust plays an integral role in daily interactions within adolescents' social environment. Using a trust game paradigm, this study investigated the modulating influence of social information about three interaction partners on trust behaviour in adolescents aged 12-18 (N = 845). After receiving information about their interaction partners prior to the task, participants were most likely to share with a 'good' partner and rate this partner as most trustworthy. Over the course of the task all interaction partners showed similar levels of trustworthy behaviour, but overall participants continued to trust and view the good partner as more trustworthy than 'bad' and 'neutral' partners throughout the game. However, with age the ability to overcome prior social information and adapt trust behaviour improved: middle and late adolescents showed a larger decrease in trust of the good partner than early adolescents, and late adolescents were more likely to reward trustworthy behaviour from the negative partner. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Obtaining corporate information from NHS foundation trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Valerie; Endacott, Ruth; Sheaff, Rod; Jones, Ray

    Foundation trusts have boards of directors that are responsible for the day-to-day running of the organisation, planning services and developing strategy. Unlike non-foundation trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs), foundation trusts are not obliged to hold directors' board meetings in public. This article describes the online availability and accessibility of the minutes of such meetings in a number of foundation trusts, non-foundation trusts and PCTs. The implications for transparency in the NHS are also discussed.

  9. Globalization and Trust: Non-financial Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Banda Lefaure

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the way of doing business that have resulted from globalization of markets have enabled countless benefits, but also a significant number of risks, that have been evident as since 2001 revelations about financial scandals around the world have occurred one after another. These unfortunate events showed the vulnerability to which investors (and other stakeholders are exposed for not having timely, clear and accurate information of the business progress in which they invest, and therefore not being able to take precautions. In addition, these business disasters have shown how the most unscrupulous executives do not hesitate to act illegally to hide their shady financial and accounting manoeuvres, in order to promote their personal benefit. Then the executive compensations policy lies behind. At this juncture, the importance of migrating to a new model of disclosure where the global financial community can take shelter of these malpractices and trust the board controls and the management stablishes has been increasing. This new model of disclosure has one of its pillars in non-financial information reports. This is not an alchemist solution, but is one of many efforts to be undertaken by companies to recover damaged trust. The international financial crisis affecting the world economy at the moment is another example of the need to give greater trust to the stakeholders –through transparency in the information they provide–. Only then, their participation in the capital market will be maintained and increased, and the costs that brings widespread lack of trust in which we live will be reduced.

  10. A Layered Trust Information Security Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; García Villalba, Luis Javier; Sandoval Orozco, Ana Lucila; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed. PMID:25470490

  11. A layered trust information security architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; Villalba, Luis Javier García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Buiati, Fábio; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA) and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed.

  12. A Layered Trust Information Security Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson de Oliveira Albuquerque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Information can be considered the most important asset of any modern organization. Securing this information involves preserving confidentially, integrity and availability, the well-known CIA triad. In addition, information security is a risk management job; the task is to manage the inherent risks of information disclosure. Current information security platforms do not deal with the different facets of information technology. This paper presents a layered trust information security architecture (TISA and its creation was motivated by the need to consider information and security from different points of view in order to protect it. This paper also extends and discusses security information extensions as a way of helping the CIA triad. Furthermore, this paper suggests information representation and treatment elements, operations and support components that can be integrated to show the various risk sources when dealing with both information and security. An overview of how information is represented and treated nowadays in the technological environment is shown, and the reason why it is so difficult to guarantee security in all aspects of the information pathway is discussed.

  13. Information pricing based on trusted system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zehua; Zhang, Nan; Han, Hongfeng

    2018-05-01

    Personal information has become a valuable commodity in today's society. So our goal aims to develop a price point and a pricing system to be realistic. First of all, we improve the existing BLP system to prevent cascading incidents, design a 7-layer model. Through the cost of encryption in each layer, we develop PI price points. Besides, we use association rules mining algorithms in data mining algorithms to calculate the importance of information in order to optimize informational hierarchies of different attribute types when located within a multi-level trusted system. Finally, we use normal distribution model to predict encryption level distribution for users in different classes and then calculate information prices through a linear programming model with the help of encryption level distribution above.

  14. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: A Measure of System Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jodyn E; Jacobson, Peter D; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2018-04-01

    To measure public trust in a health information sharing in a broadly defined health system (system trust), inclusive of health care, public health, and research; to identify individual characteristics that predict system trust; and to consider these findings in the context of national health initiatives (e.g., learning health systems and precision medicine) that will expand the scope of data sharing. Survey data (n = 1,011) were collected in February 2014. We constructed a composite index of four dimensions of system trust-competency, fidelity, integrity, and trustworthiness. The index was used in linear regression evaluating demographic and psychosocial predictors of system trust. Data were collected by GfK Custom using a nationally representative sample and analyzed in Stata 13.0. Our findings suggest the public's trust may not meet the needs of health systems as they enter an era of expanded data sharing. We found that a majority of the U.S. public does not trust the organizations that have health information and share it (i.e., the health system) in one or more dimensions. Together, demographic and psychosocial factors accounted for ~18 percent of the observed variability in system trust. Future research should consider additional predictors of system trust such as knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs to inform policies and practices for health data sharing. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Health literacy, information seeking, and trust in information in Haitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubetkin, Erica I; Zabor, Emily C; Isaac, Kathleen; Brennessel, Debra; Kemeny, M Margaret; Hay, Jennifer L

    2015-05-01

    To assess heath literacy, health information seeking, and trust in health-related information among Haitian immigrants seen in primary care. Health literacy was measured by the Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS); items on health information use were from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. BHLS scores differed according to age, education, and survey language. Participants with lower levels of health literacy tended to be more likely to place "a lot" or "some" trust in family and friends and religious organizations and leaders as sources of information about health or medical topics. Constructing a culturally-tailored and appropriate intervention regarding health promotion requires understanding how the population accesses and conveys health information.

  16. ComTrustO: Composite Trust-Based Ontology Framework for Information and Decision Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    11] presents a methodological approach for ontology management allowing development of extensible ontologies and the mapping from ontologies to...ComTrustO: Composite Trust-based Ontology Framework for Information and Decision Fusion Alessandro Oltramari Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh... ontology -based framework for information fusion, as a support system for human decision makers. In particular, we build upon the concept of composite

  17. Trust in health information websites: A systematic literature review on the antecedents of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeolib

    2016-06-01

    Health websites are important sources of information for consumers. In choosing websites, trust in websites largely determines which website to access and how to best utilize the information. Thus, it is critical to understand why consumers trust certain websites and distrust others. A systematic literature review was conducted with the goal of identifying the antecedents of trust in health information websites. After four rounds of screening process, 20 articles between 2000 and 2013 were harvested. Factors that determine trust are classified into individual difference antecedents, website-related antecedents, and consumer-to-website interaction-related antecedents. The most frequently studied antecedents were socio-demographics, information quality, appearance, and perceived reputation of the website. Each antecedent of trust are discussed in detail and future research directions are proposed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Patterns of trust in sources of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rob; Forbes, Sarah; Williams, John

    2011-01-21

    To understand the different patterns of trust that exist regarding different sources of information about health issues. Data from a large national health lifestyles survey of New Zealanders was examined using a factor analysis of trust toward 24 health information sources (HIS). Differences in trust are compared across a range of demographic variables. Factor analysis identified six different groupings of health information. Variations in trust in sources for health information are identified by age, employment status, level of education, income, sex and ethnic group. Systematic variations exist in the trust that people report with respect to different sources of health information. Understanding these variations may assist policymakers and other agencies which are responsible for planning the dissemination of health information.

  19. Perceived Information Security, Information Privacy, Risk and Institutional Trust on Consumer€™s Trust in E-commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Parengkuan, Frane Maorets

    2014-01-01

    E-commerce is widely being used in nowadays generation where the business entrepreneur from small to large institution, has widely taken advantage on the internet to promote business and deliver information about their product. Consumer trust is an important aspect of e-commerce, and understanding its antecedents and consequences is a prime concern. This research designed to find out the influence of Perceived Information Security, Privacy, Risk and Institutional Trust on Consumers Trust in E...

  20. Trust-based information system architecture for personal wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Nykänen, Pirkko; Seppälä, Antto; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Modern eHealth, ubiquitous health and personal wellness systems take place in an unsecure and ubiquitous information space where no predefined trust occurs. This paper presents novel information model and an architecture for trust based privacy management of personal health and wellness information in ubiquitous environment. The architecture enables a person to calculate a dynamic and context-aware trust value for each service provider, and using it to design personal privacy policies for trustworthy use of health and wellness services. For trust calculation a novel set of measurable context-aware and health information-sensitive attributes is developed. The architecture enables a person to manage his or her privacy in ubiquitous environment by formulating context-aware and service provider specific policies. Focus groups and information modelling was used for developing a wellness information model. System analysis method based on sequential steps that enable to combine results of analysis of privacy and trust concerns and the selection of trust and privacy services was used for development of the information system architecture. Its services (e.g. trust calculation, decision support, policy management and policy binding services) and developed attributes enable a person to define situation-aware policies that regulate the way his or her wellness and health information is processed.

  1. CONSUMER BIOTECHNOLOGY FOOD AND NUTRITION INFORMATION SOURCES: THE TRUST FACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ekanem, Enefiok P.; Muhammad, Safdar; Tegegne, Fisseha; Singh, Surendra P.

    2004-01-01

    Although much has been written on consumer attitudes toward genetically modified foods, not much is known about how or where consumers get the information for the decisions they make about genetically modified foods. This paper reports on the media used by consumers in acquiring information about biotech food and nutrition issues, and examines how much trust consumers put in selected information sources. The paper also discusses how socio-economic variables affect level of trust in selected s...

  2. Institutional trust, information, and risk perceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushkatel, A.H.; Pijawka, K.D.

    1992-09-01

    This study reports on the preliminary results of a survey of attitudes and perceptions of Las Vegas area residents regarding the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository. The survey's focus was to examine the various dimensions of trust and confidence in government's efforts to develop the country's nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  3. Clustering recommenders in collaborative filtering using explicit trust information

    KAUST Repository

    Pitsilis, Georgios; Zhang, Xiangliang; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we explore the benefits of combining clustering and social trust information for Recommender Systems. We demonstrate the performance advantages of traditional clustering algorithms like k-Means and we explore the use of new ones like

  4. Information Sharing for Computing Trust Metrics on COTS Electronic Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMillon, William J

    2008-01-01

    .... It is challenging for the DoD to determine whether and how much to trust in COTS components, given uncertainty and incomplete information about the developers and suppliers of COTS components as well...

  5. Trust Your Boss or Listen to the Union? Information, Social Identification, Trust, and Strike Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Marieke J.; Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, René

    2013-01-01

    We investigate two questions regarding the effect of information on participation in labor strikes: First, how are social identification and trust used as filters for information? Second, we investigate how cross-pressures affect willingness to participate. Using a dataset of 468 union members, we

  6. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Fojtů, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    This rigorous thesis is focused on a status of trust in an application practise in a Czech legislation with a context of historical aspects of institutes similar to trusts as well as actual legislation. The thesis includes also analyses of more difficult provisions concerning the trust, including economic impacts representing accounting and tax consequences. Also comparison with established modifications trusts in Europe and their possible utilization of the Czech point of view of the settlor...

  7. Clustering recommenders in collaborative filtering using explicit trust information

    KAUST Repository

    Pitsilis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we explore the benefits of combining clustering and social trust information for Recommender Systems. We demonstrate the performance advantages of traditional clustering algorithms like k-Means and we explore the use of new ones like Affinity Propagation (AP). Contrary to what has been used before, we investigate possible ways that social-oriented information like explicit trust could be exploited with AP for forming clusters of high quality. We conducted a series of evaluation tests using data from a real Recommender system Epinions.com from which we derived conclusions about the usefulness of trust information in forming clusters of Recommenders. Moreover, from our results we conclude that the potential advantages in using clustering can be enlarged by making use of the information that Social Networks can provide. © 2011 International Federation for Information Processing.

  8. Trust information-based privacy architecture for ubiquitous health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka Sakari; Blobel, Bernd; Seppälä, Antto; Nykänen, Pirkko

    2013-10-08

    Ubiquitous health is defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems that offers health services independent of time and location to a data subject (DS). The network takes place in open and unsecure information space. It is created and managed by the DS who sets rules that regulate the way personal health information is collected and used. Compared to health care, it is impossible in ubiquitous health to assume the existence of a priori trust between the DS and service providers and to produce privacy using static security services. In ubiquitous health features, business goals and regulations systems followed often remain unknown. Furthermore, health care-specific regulations do not rule the ways health data is processed and shared. To be successful, ubiquitous health requires novel privacy architecture. The goal of this study was to develop a privacy management architecture that helps the DS to create and dynamically manage the network and to maintain information privacy. The architecture should enable the DS to dynamically define service and system-specific rules that regulate the way subject data is processed. The architecture should provide to the DS reliable trust information about systems and assist in the formulation of privacy policies. Furthermore, the architecture should give feedback upon how systems follow the policies of DS and offer protection against privacy and trust threats existing in ubiquitous environments. A sequential method that combines methodologies used in system theory, systems engineering, requirement analysis, and system design was used in the study. In the first phase, principles, trust and privacy models, and viewpoints were selected. Thereafter, functional requirements and services were developed on the basis of a careful analysis of existing research published in journals and conference proceedings. Based on principles, models, and requirements, architectural components and their interconnections were developed using system

  9. The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Information Richness on Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeah Mat Saat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a concept that describes the relationship between company  and society. The way a company portrays corporate ethics and social initiatives can evoke strong positive reactions among consumers. The emergence of Internet creates a new communicating culture and gives an idea for a company to deliver their CSR message. Applying Media Richness Theory (MRT in CSR message is believed could facilitate trust among consumer. Thus, this study aims to examine the impact of different level of CSR information richness with consumers trust towards the company. This study divides trust into three components that are competence, benevolence and integrity. An experimental design consisting of different levels of CSR information is selected (rich CSR information, lean CSR information and no CSR information as a control condition. The finding shows that rich CSR information has impacted on competence and integrity but not on benevolence. Result from this study is believed can assist companies in setting up their CSR communicating strategy in engaging consumers’ trust.

  10. Trust Account Fraud And Effective Information Security Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Mubarak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of lawyers trust accounts has come under scrutiny in the last few years. There are strong possibilities of information technology security breaches happening within the firms, either accidental or deliberate. The damage caused by these security breaches could be extreme. For example, a trust account fund in an Australian law firm was misused in a security breach in which Telstra charged. A$50,000 for phone usage, mainly for ISD calls to Hong Kong.Our study involved interviewing principles of ten law companies to find out solicitors attitudes to computer security and the possibility of breaches of their trust accounts. We simultaneously carried out a survey to see if the trends identified in our case-studies could be backed up with broader quantitative data. We have also conducted in-depth interviews of 5 trust account regulators from the Law society of South Australia to know their view points on security threats on trust accounts. An overall finding highlights that law firms were not current with technology to combat computer crime, and inadequate access control was a major concern in safeguarding account data. Our conclusions revealed the urgent need for law firms to adopt security controls, implement information security policies and procedures and obtain cooperation from management to communicate these policies to staff.

  11. The issue of trust and modern information and communication technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Tulchinsky G. L.; Lisenkova A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors study the problem of balance of trust and mistrust associated with the turbulence of modern society, redundancy, and heterogeneity of information and communication flows creating a contradictory picture of the world. Social networks are considered as one of the basic modern information resources creating previously unavailable opportunities for communication, interaction, information sharing, and commonality construction. Social networks users broadcast the experi...

  12. 78 FR 26649 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Trusted Traveler Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... keepers from the collection of information (total capital/startup costs and operations and maintenance... to the traveler is less time spent in line waiting to be processed. These Trusted Traveler programs... reflect a revised estimated time to complete the Global Entry application. The burden hours also reflect...

  13. Ethnic divisions, trust, and the size of the informal sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between ethnic fractionalization and the size of the informal, or hidden, economy. Recent experimental and empirical research links, in turn, ethnicity and trust, and trust and tax compliance. In addition, recent empirical studies have identified...... an unwillingness to contribute to public goods benefiting other ethnic groups. Combining these insights, we argue that increasing ethnic fractionalization decreases voluntary tax compliance, and we present empirical evidence at the macro level in a cross-section of more than 50 countries that more ethnically...

  14. Influence of trust in the spreading of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongrun; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The understanding and prediction of information diffusion processes on networks is a major challenge in network theory with many implications in social sciences. Many theoretical advances occurred due to stochastic spreading models. Nevertheless, these stochastic models overlooked the influence of rational decisions on the outcome of the process. For instance, different levels of trust in acquaintances do play a role in information spreading, and actors may change their spreading decisions during the information diffusion process accordingly. Here, we study an information-spreading model in which the decision to transmit or not is based on trust. We explore the interplay between the propagation of information and the trust dynamics happening on a two-layer multiplex network. Actors' trustable or untrustable states are defined as accumulated cooperation or defection behaviors, respectively, in a Prisoner's Dilemma setup, and they are controlled by a memory span. The propagation of information is abstracted as a threshold model on the information-spreading layer, where the threshold depends on the trustability of agents. The analysis of the model is performed using a tree approximation and validated on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The results show that the memory of previous actions has a significant effect on the spreading of information. For example, the less memory that is considered, the higher is the diffusion. Information is highly promoted by the emergence of trustable acquaintances. These results provide insight into the effect of plausible biases on spreading dynamics in a multilevel networked system.

  15. New information and social trust: asymmetry and perseverance of attributions about hazard managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, George; Siegrist, Michael; Murray, Rachel; Tragesser, Sarah

    2002-04-01

    It has been argued that news about negative events has a much stronger effect on decreasing social trust than does news about positive events on increasing it. This asymmetry principle of trust was investigated in two surveys that also investigated the perseverance of trust. The possibility that established trust attributions persevere in the face of new information raises questions about the limits of trust asymmetry. The two studies yielded evidence that both type of news (good versus bad) and initial general trust in the nuclear power industry or the food supply industry affected level of trust. Compared to individuals trusting the industry, those distrusting the industry exhibited less trust following both bad and good news events. Study I also found that judged informativeness and judged positiveness of news events were affected by type of news and general trust of the industry. Individuals low in general trust of the nuclear power industry judged both bad news and good news as less positive than did those high in general trust. Those low in general trust judged bad news as more informative than good news and than did those high in general trust. An important implication of the perseverance of trust is to focus attention on including not only the effects of information about specific events and actions, but also on the judgment processes underlying social trust. The Salient Value Similarity model is suggested as one way of accounting for these psychological processes.

  16. Correlates of consumer trust in online health information: findings from the health information national trends survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yinjiao

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumers seeking health information online. However, the quality of such information remains questionable, and the trustworthiness of online health information has become a hot topic, whereas little attention has been paid to how consumers evaluate online health information credibility. This study builds on theoretical perspectives of trust such as personal-capital-based, social-capital-based, and transfer-based, and it examines various correlates of consumer trust in online health information. The author analyzed the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data (N = 7,674). Results showed that consumer trust in online health information did not correlate with personal capital such as income, education, and health status. Social capital indicated by visiting social networking Web sites was not associated with trust in online health information either. Nevertheless, trust in online health information transferred from traditional mass media and government health agencies to the Internet, and it varied by such information features as easiness to locate and to understand. Age appeared to be a key factor in understanding the correlates of trust in online health information. Theoretical and empirical implications of the results are discussed.

  17. How Trust in Financial Supplier Information Impacts Young Adults' Financial Information Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Although consumers' risk-taking, supplier trust, social norms and information involvement are central to much of thought in the financial market and consumer economic literature, it is not known how the interplay between consumers' trust in supplier information, risk-taking behaviour and social n...... managers should especially consider investing additional resources in developing information trust for high-risk savings products and should also take social norms into account when considering young adults' high-risk-taking behaviour.......Although consumers' risk-taking, supplier trust, social norms and information involvement are central to much of thought in the financial market and consumer economic literature, it is not known how the interplay between consumers' trust in supplier information, risk-taking behaviour and social...... norm may influence information involvement. This research contributes to the consumer economic literature by investigating how product savings risk and social norm affect the relationship between young adults' trust in supplier information and their information involvement. On the basis of two samples...

  18. Factors Influencing Trust in Agencies That Disseminate Tobacco Prevention Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Leah M; Jarman, Kristen L; Baker, Hannah M; Vu, Maihan; Noar, Seth M; Goldstein, Adam O

    2018-04-01

    Several health-related agencies administer national and targeted public education campaigns to provide health information and change health-related behaviors. The trust the public has in these agencies as the source of the message impacts the effectiveness of their communication campaigns. In this study, we explore the perceived trust of agencies that communicate health messages in the tobacco control field. As part of a larger tobacco regulatory science study, we conducted six 90-min focus groups comprising 41 participants. Five main themes emerged pertinent to the agency: (1) its integrity, (2) its competence, (3) its motives, (4) how it is portrayed in the media, and (5) skepticism and mistrust about it. Given the significant resources spent on health messaging to the public and potential benefits offered by this communication, an understanding of public trust in the agencies as the source of health messages is important. Findings suggest health information may be ignored or discounted when there is mistrust in the agency sending those messages.

  19. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Bentham, R

    2016-01-01

    Rachel Bentham's 'Let All Tongues Flower' won her many new admirers for its 'openness to form' and 'strong yet subtle feminine sensibility'. It was also a Top 3 selling book on Amazon Kindle Women's Poetry. Here, in her new book 'Trust', she shows she is equally at home with the increasingly popular haiku form - using both classic 5-7-5 and free form haiku, she gives us more treasured and crafted glimpses into her 'unhindered and mostly joyful life'.

  20. Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Carro, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Il lavoro eseguito ha per oggetto il trust, istituto, come noto, estraneo alla nostra cultura giuridica, tipico dei sistemi di common law, riconosciuto e regolato dalla Convenzione dell’ Aja, firmata il 1°luglio 1985, ratificata in Italia con L. 16 ottobre 1989, n. 364, ed entrata in vigore il 1° giugno 1992. La ricerca svolta ha, in primo luogo, esaminato la fattispecie, con un approccio comparatistico, analizzando, nella prima parte, il contenuto e la controversa natura giuridica della c...

  1. A survey of trust, control and information in networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten

    This paper focuses on which characteristics managers take into account when they choose and evaluate business partners, and the interrelationship between the constructs trust, control and information. The paper is based on a survey which includes 101 small and middle-sized manufacturing companies...... and information is found. The findings indicate that the three constructs are relevant, and the level of embeddedness is found to influence both the absolute and the relative importance of the three constructs, and thereby the role of management accounting at different development stages of relationships....

  2. The Social Costs of Ubiquitous Information: Consuming Information on Mobile Phones Is Associated with Lower Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushlev, Kostadin; Proulx, Jason D E

    2016-01-01

    In an age already saturated with information, the ongoing revolution in mobile computing has expanded the realm of immediate information access far beyond our homes and offices. In addition to changing where people can access information, mobile computing has changed what information people access-from finding specific directions to a restaurant to exploring nearby businesses when on the go. Does this ability to instantly gratify our information needs anytime and anywhere have any bearing on how much we trust those around us-from neighbors to strangers? Using data from a large nationally representative survey (World Values Survey: Wave 6), we found that the more people relied on their mobile phones for information, the less they trusted strangers, neighbors and people from other religions and nationalities. In contrast, obtaining information through any other method-including TV, radio, newspapers, and even the Internet more broadly-predicted higher trust in those groups. Mobile information had no bearing on how much people trusted close others, such as their family. Although causality cannot be inferred, these findings provide an intriguing first glimpse into the possible unforeseen costs of convenient information access for the social lubricant of society-our sense of trust in one another.

  3. The Social Costs of Ubiquitous Information: Consuming Information on Mobile Phones Is Associated with Lower Trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadin Kushlev

    Full Text Available In an age already saturated with information, the ongoing revolution in mobile computing has expanded the realm of immediate information access far beyond our homes and offices. In addition to changing where people can access information, mobile computing has changed what information people access-from finding specific directions to a restaurant to exploring nearby businesses when on the go. Does this ability to instantly gratify our information needs anytime and anywhere have any bearing on how much we trust those around us-from neighbors to strangers? Using data from a large nationally representative survey (World Values Survey: Wave 6, we found that the more people relied on their mobile phones for information, the less they trusted strangers, neighbors and people from other religions and nationalities. In contrast, obtaining information through any other method-including TV, radio, newspapers, and even the Internet more broadly-predicted higher trust in those groups. Mobile information had no bearing on how much people trusted close others, such as their family. Although causality cannot be inferred, these findings provide an intriguing first glimpse into the possible unforeseen costs of convenient information access for the social lubricant of society-our sense of trust in one another.

  4. A Hybrid Artificial Reputation Model Involving Interaction Trust, Witness Information and the Trust Model to Calculate the Trust Value of Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Singh Ransi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Agent interaction in a community, such as the online buyer-seller scenario, is often uncertain, as when an agent comes in contact with other agents they initially know nothing about each other. Currently, many reputation models are developed that help service consumers select better service providers. Reputation models also help agents to make a decision on who they should trust and transact with in the future. These reputation models are either built on interaction trust that involves direct experience as a source of information or they are built upon witness information also known as word-of-mouth that involves the reports provided by others. Neither the interaction trust nor the witness information models alone succeed in such uncertain interactions. In this paper we propose a hybrid reputation model involving both interaction trust and witness information to address the shortcomings of existing reputation models when taken separately. A sample simulation is built to setup buyer-seller services and uncertain interactions. Experiments reveal that the hybrid approach leads to better selection of trustworthy agents where consumers select more reputable service providers, eventually helping consumers obtain more gains. Furthermore, the trust model developed is used in calculating trust values of service providers.

  5. Preschoolers show less trust in physically disabled or obese informants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eJaffer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examined whether preschool-aged children show less trust in physically disabled or obese informants. In Study 1, when learning about novel physical activities and facts, 4- and 5-year-olds preferred to endorse the testimony of a physically abled, non-obese informant rather than a physically disabled or obese one. In Study 2, after seeing that the physically disabled or obese informant was previously reliable whereas the physically abled, non-obese one was unreliable, 4- and 5-year-olds did not show a significant preference for either informant. We conclude that in line with the literature on children’s negative stereotypes of physically disabled or obese others, preschoolers are biased against these individuals as potential sources of new knowledge. This bias is robust in that past reliability might undermine its effect on children, but cannot reverse it.

  6. Can centralized sanctioning promote trust in social dilemmas? A two-level trust game with incomplete information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond Yu; Ng, Cho Nam

    2015-01-01

    The problem of trust is a paradigmatic social dilemma. Previous literature has paid much academic attention on effects of peer punishment and altruistic third-party punishment on trust and human cooperation in dyadic interactions. However, the effects of centralized sanctioning institutions on decentralized reciprocity in hierarchical interactions remain to be further explored. This paper presents a formal two-level trust game with incomplete information which adds an authority as a strategic purposive actor into the traditional trust game. This model allows scholars to examine the problem of trust in more complex game theoretic configurations. The analysis demonstrates how the centralized institutions might change the dynamics of reciprocity between the trustor and the trustee. Findings suggest that the sequential equilibria of the newly proposed two-level model simultaneously include the risk of placing trust for the trustor and the temptation of short-term defection for the trustee. Moreover, they have shown that even a slight uncertainty about the type of the newly introduced authority might facilitate the establishment of trust and reciprocity in social dilemmas.

  7. Can centralized sanctioning promote trust in social dilemmas? A two-level trust game with incomplete information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The problem of trust is a paradigmatic social dilemma. Previous literature has paid much academic attention on effects of peer punishment and altruistic third-party punishment on trust and human cooperation in dyadic interactions. However, the effects of centralized sanctioning institutions on decentralized reciprocity in hierarchical interactions remain to be further explored. This paper presents a formal two-level trust game with incomplete information which adds an authority as a strategic purposive actor into the traditional trust game. This model allows scholars to examine the problem of trust in more complex game theoretic configurations. The analysis demonstrates how the centralized institutions might change the dynamics of reciprocity between the trustor and the trustee. Findings suggest that the sequential equilibria of the newly proposed two-level model simultaneously include the risk of placing trust for the trustor and the temptation of short-term defection for the trustee. Moreover, they have shown that even a slight uncertainty about the type of the newly introduced authority might facilitate the establishment of trust and reciprocity in social dilemmas.

  8. Thai Youths and Global Warming: Media Information, Awareness, and Lifestyle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokriensukchai, Kanchana; Tamang, Ritendra

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the exposure of Thai youths to media information on global warming, the relationship between exposure to global warming information and awareness of global warming, and the relationship between that awareness and lifestyle activities that contribute to global warming. A focus group of eight Thai youths provided information that…

  9. Information richness and trust in V-commerce: implications for services marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Chesney, Thomas; Chuah, Swee Hoon; Dobele, A.; Hoffmann, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The potential for e-commerce is limited by a trust deficit when traders do not interact in a physical, bricks-and-mortar context. The theory of information richness posits that equivocal interactions, such as ones requiring trust, can be facilitated through communication media that transmit multiple cues interactively. We examine the potential of information-rich virtual worlds to reduce this trust deficit compared with more traditional web-based e-tailing environments.\\ud \\ud Design...

  10. Misplaced Trust: Racial Differences in Use of Tobacco Products and Trust in Sources of Tobacco Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Sharif, Mienah Z; Morey, Brittany N

    2017-10-01

    Recently, the rates of utilization of alternative tobacco products have increased. Providing health information about tobacco products from trustworthy sources may help decrease the popularity of these products. Using a nationally representative study of adults, we fill the current gap in research on racial and ethnic disparities in utilization of alternative tobacco products as well as in trust of sources of health information about tobacco products. Data came from the Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 3738), which was collected in 2015. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds of use of seven different tobacco product (eg, hookah, e-cigarettes, etc.), trust in seven different sources of e-cigarette health information (eg, family or friends, health care providers, etc.), and trust in six different sources of tobacco health information, adjusting for control variables. There were disparities in utilization of alternative tobacco products and in trust, in tobacco companies across racial and ethnic groups. Blacks and Asians were far more likely than whites to trust tobacco (adjusted odds ratios = 8.67 and 4.34) and e-cigarette companies (adjusted odds ratios = 6.97 and 3.13) with information about the health effects of e-cigarettes than whites. The popularity of alternative tobacco products appears to be high and may offset recent observed decreases in cigarette use. Blacks and Asians appear to trust tobacco companies as sources of information when compared to whites. Higher levels of trust in tobacco companies among Asians and blacks may translate to greater susceptibility to utilize tobacco products among these groups, thereby increasing disparities. There is a need for social marketing and education efforts focused on increasing awareness of adverse health effects of using alternative tobacco products as well as on the untrustworthiness of tobacco and e-cigarette companies, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. © The Author

  11. Learning together, growing apart. Global warming, energy policy and international trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kydd, Andrew H. [Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, 110 North Hall, 1050 Bascom Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Standard models of uncertainty in economics imply that sharing information can reduce uncertainty and help identify welfare improving policies. In international relations, 'epistemic communities' of scientists are thought to help provide information for these purposes. However, conflicting preferences can frustrate the transmission of information and prevent effective information sharing. In addition, opportunities for information sharing can deepen distrust as actors observe each other's reaction to what to them is credible information. A model that assumes uncertainty both about the state of the world and the parties' motivations is applied to international climate change negotiations. (author)

  12. Learning together, growing apart: Global warming, energy policy and international trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kydd, Andrew H., E-mail: akydd@sas.upenn.ed [Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, 110 North Hall, 1050 Bascom Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Standard models of uncertainty in economics imply that sharing information can reduce uncertainty and help identify welfare improving policies. In international relations, 'epistemic communities' of scientists are thought to help provide information for these purposes. However, conflicting preferences can frustrate the transmission of information and prevent effective information sharing. In addition, opportunities for information sharing can deepen distrust as actors observe each other's reaction to what to them is credible information. A model that assumes uncertainty both about the state of the world and the parties' motivations is applied to international climate change negotiations.

  13. Learning together, growing apart. Global warming, energy policy and international trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kydd, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of uncertainty in economics imply that sharing information can reduce uncertainty and help identify welfare improving policies. In international relations, 'epistemic communities' of scientists are thought to help provide information for these purposes. However, conflicting preferences can frustrate the transmission of information and prevent effective information sharing. In addition, opportunities for information sharing can deepen distrust as actors observe each other's reaction to what to them is credible information. A model that assumes uncertainty both about the state of the world and the parties' motivations is applied to international climate change negotiations. (author)

  14. Framework model and principles for trusted information sharing in pervasive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Blobel, Bernd; Nykänen, Pirkko; Seppälä, Antto; Sorvari, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Trustfulness (i.e. health and wellness information is processed ethically, and privacy is guaranteed) is one of the cornerstones for future Personal Health Systems, ubiquitous healthcare and pervasive health. Trust in today's healthcare is organizational, static and predefined. Pervasive health takes place in an open and untrusted information space where person's lifelong health and wellness information together with contextual data are dynamically collected and used by many stakeholders. This generates new threats that do not exist in today's eHealth systems. Our analysis shows that the way security and trust are implemented in today's healthcare cannot guarantee information autonomy and trustfulness in pervasive health. Based on a framework model of pervasive health and risks analysis of ubiquitous information space, we have formulated principles which enable trusted information sharing in pervasive health. Principles imply that the data subject should have the right to dynamically verify trust and to control the use of her health information, as well as the right to set situation based context-aware personal policies. Data collectors and processors have responsibilities including transparency of information processing, and openness of interests, policies and environmental features. Our principles create a base for successful management of privacy and information autonomy in pervasive health. They also imply that it is necessary to create new data models for personal health information and new architectures which support situation depending trust and privacy management.

  15. The role of renewable energy in global warming mitigation - A critique of trusted assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rader, N.; Hamrin, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two recent Congressionally-commissioned studies - one by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the other by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) - support the position that action should be taken now to reduce emissions causing global warming, and find that significant reductions can be achieved at relatively low cost. The authors accept these general conclusions, but take issue with the mix of energy options judged to be the most promising for reacting reduction targets. Specifically, they challenge the impression given in both reports that renewable energy will be, at best, an insignificant element in achieving greenhouse gas reductions. The OTA and NAS studies are important because it is generally assumed that they are based on rigorous, objective analysis and do not contain significant biases. Upon inspection of the recent greenhouse mitigation studies, however, several shortcomings are apparent, the most egregious of which was a general failure to re-evaluate renewables based on recent evidence. Over the last decade, advances in technology have reduced the costs of solar and wind electricity by 60-75% and increased reliability to the point where these resources, along with geothermal and biomass, can now compete with conventional electric plants in some markets, especially those in which environmental benefits are considered. These resources must be accurately valued to optimize carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) reduction strategies. This article identifies the various ways in which these reports have failed in this task

  16. 78 FR 19004 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Acquisition of Trust Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your.... Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0100. Title: Acquisition of Trust Land, 25 CFR 151. Brief Description of... Acquisition of Trust Land AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request for comments...

  17. Epistemic Trust and Education: Effects of Informant Reliability on Student Learning of Decimal Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Kelley; Shafto, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The epistemic trust literature emphasizes that children's evaluations of informants' trustworthiness affects learning, but there is no evidence that epistemic trust affects learning in academic domains. The current study investigated how reliability affects decimal learning. Fourth and fifth graders (N = 122; M[subscript age] = 10.1 years)…

  18. Students’ Trust Formation and Credibility Judgements in Online Health Information – A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Khosrowjerdi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health information is a frequent subject for online information seeking. Research on the phenomenon has to a certain extent included students. This review, based on an analysis of 61 articles, shows the current state of the art of research on students’ trust in online health information. The review covers methodological approaches and findings of previous previous empirical studies: research design; trustworthy health information sources; credibility assessment; and factors impacting on trust formation. The analysis of research designs reveals that the survey method was most frequent, but small qualitative studies were also occurring. More than half of the studies were administered in the USA, while only a smaller part concerned ‘non-Western’ countries. Female subjects were more frequent than male.The concept of trust was not always explicitly defined in the studies. The students' actual propensity to use internet was generally taken as an expression of trust. The antecedents of trust identified in the studies can be summarized as the perceived quality of the information, the perceived credibility of the source or source provider, the users’ general inclination to trust, the actual use of information, and the perceived intelligibility of the information. The findings show that Internet was among the main sources for health information, but parents or other family members, friends, schools, health professionals were also frequent sources of health information, and students were not immediately accepting online information as trustworthy. The students’ trust and credibility judgments were influenced by social and demographic, cultural, psychological, knowledge and skills-related, and source, system and content-related factors. Governmental and organizational websites were reported as the most trustful sources, although some issues regarding website features and presentation of content were reported as barriers. Easy access were of

  19. Public trust in sources of information about radiation risks in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, S.; Frewer, L.J.; Shepherd, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: perceptions of trust have been identified as crucial to successful risk communication. This research is concerned with establishing the degree of trust the public places in various sources of information about radiation hazards, and identifying a maximally trusted source for communicating risks about these hazards. Participants were asked directly about the degree to which they would trust information about radiation risks from a variety of sources. They were also asked about the putative components of trust: the degree of 'vested interest' they believed each source had in misinforming the public about radiation risks, and the 'degree of knowledge' they believed each source had about these risks. The results indicated that while perceptions of low 'vested interest' and high 'degree of knowledge' are important elements in determining positive trust ratings, neither alone is sufficient to guarantee a high trust rating. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of a maximally, trusted source for risk communication that could achieve optimal 'vested interest' and 'degree of knowledge' ratings, the principal features for which are identified as independence of government and commercial organisations; high level of technical expertise; and being specifically dedicated to the interests of the public. (authors)

  20. INFORMATION SECURITY: Weak Controls Place DC Highway Trust Fund and Other Data at Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed information system general controls over the financial systems that process and account for the financial activities of the District of Columbia Highway Trust Fund as part of our annual...

  1. Isolated and Skeptical: Social Engagement and Trust in Information Sources Among Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Finney Rutten, Lila J.; Blake, Kelly; Hesse, Bradford W.; Ackerson, Leland K.

    2011-01-01

    Our study compared indicators of social engagement and trust among current, former, and never smokers. Multinomial regression analyses of data from the 2005 U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (n=5586) were conducted to identify independent associations between social engagement, trust in health information sources, and smoking status. Never smokers (odds ratio (OR)=2.08) and former smokers (OR=2.48) were significantly more likely to belong to community organizations than current s...

  2. Supply chain coordination with information sharing in the presence of trust and trustworthiness: a behavioral model

    OpenAIRE

    Guido Voigt

    2009-01-01

    The strategic use of private information causes efficiency losses in traditional principal-agent settings. One stream of research states that these efficiency losses cannot be overcome if all agents use their private information strategically. Yet, another stream of research highlights the importance of communication, trust and trustworthiness in supply chain management. The underlying work links the concepts of communication, trust and trustworthiness to a traditional principal-agent setting...

  3. How Do Personality Traits Shape Information-Sharing Behaviour in Social Media? Exploring the Mediating Effect of Generalized Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengli; Lin, Yanqing; Liu, Yong; Chen, Xiaoyu; Li, Hongxiu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Personality and trust have been found to be important precursors of information-sharing behaviour, but little is known about how these factors interact with each other in shaping information-sharing behaviour. By integrating both trust and user personality into a unified research framework, this study examines how trust mediates the…

  4. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodyn Platt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447. We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making.

  5. Trust and Credibility in Web-Based Health Information: A Review and Agenda for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaffi, Laura; Rowley, Jennifer

    2017-06-19

    Internet sources are becoming increasingly important in seeking health information, such that they may have a significant effect on health care decisions and outcomes. Hence, given the wide range of different sources of Web-based health information (WHI) from different organizations and individuals, it is important to understand how information seekers evaluate and select the sources that they use, and more specifically, how they assess their credibility and trustworthiness. The aim of this study was to review empirical studies on trust and credibility in the use of WHI. The article seeks to present a profile of the research conducted on trust and credibility in WHI seeking, to identify the factors that impact judgments of trustworthiness and credibility, and to explore the role of demographic factors affecting trust formation. On this basis, it aimed to identify the gaps in current knowledge and to propose an agenda for future research. A systematic literature review was conducted. Searches were conducted using a variety of combinations of the terms WHI, trust, credibility, and their variants in four multi-disciplinary and four health-oriented databases. Articles selected were published in English from 2000 onwards; this process generated 3827 unique records. After the application of the exclusion criteria, 73 were analyzed fully. Interest in this topic has persisted over the last 15 years, with articles being published in medicine, social science, and computer science and originating mostly from the United States and the United Kingdom. Documents in the final dataset fell into 3 categories: (1) those using trust or credibility as a dependent variable, (2) those using trust or credibility as an independent variable, and (3) studies of the demographic factors that influence the role of trust or credibility in WHI seeking. There is a consensus that website design, clear layout, interactive features, and the authority of the owner have a positive effect on trust or

  6. Mutual trust method for forwarding information in wireless sensor networks using random secret pre-distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsueh Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks, sensing information must be transmitted from sensor nodes to the base station by multiple hopping. Every sensor node is a sender and a relay node that forwards the sensing information that is sent by other nodes. Under an attack, the sensing information may be intercepted, modified, interrupted, or fabricated during transmission. Accordingly, the development of mutual trust to enable a secure path to be established for forwarding information is an important issue. Random key pre-distribution has been proposed to establish mutual trust among sensor nodes. This article modifies the random key pre-distribution to a random secret pre-distribution and incorporates identity-based cryptography to establish an effective method of establishing mutual trust for a wireless sensor network. In the proposed method, base station assigns an identity and embeds n secrets into the private secret keys for every sensor node. Based on the identity and private secret keys, the mutual trust method is utilized to explore the types of trust among neighboring sensor nodes. The novel method can resist malicious attacks and satisfy the requirements of wireless sensor network, which are resistance to compromising attacks, masquerading attacks, forger attacks, replying attacks, authentication of forwarding messages, and security of sensing information.

  7. Perceptions of climate change and trust in information providers in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Laurie; Aird, Rosemary; van Megen, Kimberley; Miller, Evonne; Sommerfeld, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Disagreement within the global science community about the certainty and causes of climate change has led the general public to question what to believe and whom to trust on matters related to this issue. This paper reports on qualitative research undertaken with Australian residents from two rural areas to explore their perceptions of climate change and trust in information providers. While overall, residents tended to agree that climate change is a reality, perceptions varied in terms of its causes and how best to address it. Politicians, government, and the media were described as untrustworthy sources of information about climate change, with independent scientists being the most trusted. The vested interests of information providers appeared to be a key reason for their distrust. The findings highlight the importance of improved transparency and consultation with the public when communicating information about climate change and related policies.

  8. Isolated and Skeptical: Social Engagement and Trust in Information Sources Among Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Kelly; Hesse, Bradford W.; Ackerson, Leland K.

    2014-01-01

    Our study compared indicators of social engagement and trust among current, former, and never smokers. Multinomial regression analyses of data from the 2005 U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (n=5586) were conducted to identify independent associations between social engagement, trust in health information sources, and smoking status. Never smokers (odds ratio (OR)=2.08) and former smokers (OR=2.48) were significantly more likely to belong to community organizations than current smokers. Never (OR=4.59) and former smokers (OR=1.96) were more likely than current smokers to attend religious services. Never smokers (OR=1.38) were significantly more likely than current smokers to use the Internet. Former smokers (OR=1.41) were more likely than current smokers to be married. Compared to current smokers, never smokers were significantly more likely to trust health care professionals (OR=1.52) and less likely to trust the Internet (OR=0.59) for health information. Current smokers are less socially engaged and less trusting of information resources than non-smokers. PMID:21340632

  9. Effects of Information Availability on Command-and-Control Decision Making: Performance, Trust, and Situation Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusich, Laura R; Bakdash, Jonathan Z; Onal, Emrah; Yu, Michael S; Schaffer, James; O'Donovan, John; Höllerer, Tobias; Buchler, Norbou; Gonzalez, Cleotilde

    2016-03-01

    We investigated how increases in task-relevant information affect human decision-making performance, situation awareness (SA), and trust in a simulated command-and-control (C2) environment. Increased information is often associated with an improvement of SA and decision-making performance in networked organizations. However, previous research suggests that increasing information without considering the task relevance and the presentation can impair performance. We used a simulated C2 task across two experiments. Experiment 1 varied the information volume provided to individual participants and measured the speed and accuracy of decision making for task performance. Experiment 2 varied information volume and information reliability provided to two participants acting in different roles and assessed decision-making performance, SA, and trust between the paired participants. In both experiments, increased task-relevant information volume did not improve task performance. In Experiment 2, increased task-relevant information volume reduced self-reported SA and trust, and incorrect source reliability information led to poorer task performance and SA. These results indicate that increasing the volume of information, even when it is accurate and task relevant, is not necessarily beneficial to decision-making performance. Moreover, it may even be detrimental to SA and trust among team members. Given the high volume of available and shared information and the safety-critical and time-sensitive nature of many decisions, these results have implications for training and system design in C2 domains. To avoid decrements to SA, interpersonal trust, and decision-making performance, information presentation within C2 systems must reflect human cognitive processing limits and capabilities. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  10. Trust in marketing's use of information from sales : the moderating role of power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszey, Tamara; Biemans, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to improve marketing managers' use of information from sales. The authors propose and empirically test the link between cross-functional trust and marketing's use of information from sales, and whether this effect is contingent on marketing's power within the firm.

  11. Can I Trust You? Profile Elements that Inform First Impressions of Trustworthiness in Virtual Project Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter; Valcke, Martin; Koper, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Rusman, E., Van Bruggen, J., Sloep, P. B., Valcke, M., & Koper, R. (2012). Can I Trust You? Profile Elements that Inform First Impressions of Trustworthiness in Virtual Project Teams. International Journal of Information Technology Project Management (IJITPM), 3(1), 15-35.

  12. Fishers' information in governance-a matter of trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Petter; Soma, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Informational governance is an analytical concept that addresses the role of recent rapidly increasing information activities in governance processes and institutions. Scientific information no longer has the status as the only source of relevant information in organizational and public decision

  13. New Grounds for Ontic Trust: Information Objects and LIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veer Martens, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    The information ethics of Luciano Floridi's well-known Philosophy of Information (PI) project are explored as potential foundations for a deepening sense of stewardship in library and information studies (LIS) practice. The implications of PI's world view of "information objects" as having intrinsic value and resulting moral rights…

  14. Informed use of patients' records on trusted health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahama, Tony; Miller, Evonne

    2011-01-01

    Health care is an information-intensive business. Sharing information in health care processes is a smart use of data enabling informed decision-making whilst ensuring. the privacy and security of patient information. To achieve this, we propose data encryption techniques embedded Information Accountability Framework (IAF) that establishes transitions of the technological concept, thus enabling understanding of shared responsibility, accessibility, and efficient cost effective informed decisions between health care professionals and patients. The IAF results reveal possibilities of efficient informed medical decision making and minimisation of medical errors. Of achieving this will require significant cultural changes and research synergies to ensure the sustainability, acceptability and durability of the IAF.

  15. Who trusts scientists for information about climate change? Nuclear power? Vaccines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, L.

    2015-12-01

    US public acceptance/rejection of science on the topic of climate change has become highly polarized, with a demographic profile well established through survey research. Trust in scientists for information about climate change tends to increase with education, decrease with age, and is higher among self-identified liberals and moderates than among conservatives. Demographic profiles of people who do or do not trust scientists regarding other disputed topics are less well established. Some observers have argued that certain domains such as vaccines, nuclear power or genetically modified organisms (GMOs) could present a mirror image of climate change, with liberals instead of conservatives disproportionately rejecting science on that topic. Evidence for this mirror-image hypothesis has been mainly anecdotal, however. Here we test it systematically using statewide survey data on more than 1200 interviews, comparing five similarly worded questions that ask respondents whether they trust, don't trust, or are unsure about scientists as a source of information about ... climate change, vaccines, evolution, nuclear power safety, or GMOs. Climate change proves to be the most polarized of these topics, but all five exhibit roughly similar age, education and ideological effects -- contrary to the mirror-image hypothesis. The common patterns across five science domains, chosen for their hypothetical contrasts, map out an unexpectedly cohesive picture of who trusts scientists for information, and who does not. Implications of these survey results for public outreach and science communication are explored.

  16. Informal interpreting in general practice: Are interpreters' roles related to perceived control, trust, and satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendedel, Rena; Schouten, Barbara C; van Weert, Julia C M; van den Putte, Bas

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this observational study was twofold. First, we examined how often and which roles informal interpreters performed during consultations between Turkish-Dutch migrant patients and general practitioners (GPs). Second, relations between these roles and patients' and GPs' perceived control, trust in informal interpreters and satisfaction with the consultation were assessed. A coding instrument was developed to quantitatively code informal interpreters' roles from transcripts of 84 audio-recorded interpreter-mediated consultations in general practice. Patients' and GPs' perceived control, trust and satisfaction were assessed in a post consultation questionnaire. Informal interpreters most often performed the conduit role (almost 25% of all coded utterances), and also frequently acted as replacers and excluders of patients and GPs by asking and answering questions on their own behalf, and by ignoring and omitting patients' and GPs' utterances. The role of information source was negatively related to patients' trust and the role of GP excluder was negatively related to patients' perceived control. Patients and GPs are possibly insufficiently aware of the performed roles of informal interpreters, as these were barely related to patients' and GPs' perceived trust, control and satisfaction. Patients and GPs should be educated about the possible negative consequences of informal interpreting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Do information systems meet the needs of primary care trusts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Jones

    2003-06-01

    The paper concludes that although PCG/Ts and general practices have made substantial progress, there is a long way to go before information providers generate high-quality information to support the needs of PCTs.

  18. Saudis trust and confidence in information sources about chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    To communicate information on chemical pollution health risks effectively, policy makers must know .... opinions, and perception of environmental health risks,. (ii) know their .... information on health risks from multiple sources. Similarly when ...

  19. Global Warming: Implications for Library and Information Professionals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major finding is that global warming is an issue that cannot be resolved overnight or with any one policy. It is an intergenerational problem which needs to be addressed by ensuring that how people live on this planet takes climate change seriously into account. The major recommendation is that library buildings should ...

  20. Factual accuracy and trust in information: the role of expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, T.; Schraagen, Johannes Martinus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    In the past few decades, the task of judging the credibility of information has shifted from trained professionals (e.g., editors) to end users of information (e.g., casual Internet users). Lacking training in this task, it is highly relevant to research the behavior of these end users. In this

  1. Factual Accuracy and Trust in Information: The Role of Expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, T.; Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few decades, the task of judging the credibility of information has shifted from trained professionals (e.g., editors) to end users of information (e.g., casual Internet users). Lacking training in this task, it is highly relevant to research the behavior of these end users. In this

  2. "A Gentleman's Handshake": The Role of Social Capital and Trust in Transforming Information into Usable Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the role of various social ties in building trust and providing opportunities for information acquisition and knowledge exchange (IAKE). Social capital is used as a vehicle to explore the relationships between farmers and their advisors using bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a major disease facing the English cattle industry, as a…

  3. Risk, Information, and Trust in the Food Chain: Factors Explaining Consumer Willingness to Pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi Latvala

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysed factors contributing to consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP for increased quality information. The empirical scope of the study was restricted to beef, because the beef labelling system enables reliable tracing of quality attributes. The results showed that consumer perceptions of specific risks in food partly explain their WTP. Also negative experiences heard from other people increased the probability of WTP. Trust seems to be extremely significant factor in WTP models. This study implies that the majority of the respondents trust the food safety authorities and the co-operation of all stakeholders in the food chain.

  4. The role of similarity cues in the development of trust in sources of information about GM Food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnders, A.L.; Midden, C.J.H.; Öhman, S.; Matthes, J.

    2009-01-01

    In evaluating complex new technologies, people are usually dependent on information provided by others, for example, experts or journalists, and have to determine whether they can trust these information sources. This article focuses on similarity as the basis for trust. The first experiment (N =

  5. 25 CFR 115.801 - How often will a tribe receive information about its trust account(s)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a tribe receive information about its trust account(s)? The OTFM is required to provide each tribe... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How often will a tribe receive information about its trust account(s)? 115.801 Section 115.801 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  6. TRUST MODEL FOR INFORMATION SECURITY OF MULTI-AGENT ROBOTIC SYSTEMS WITH A DECENTRALIZED MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Zikratov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues on protection of multi-agent robotic systems against attacks by robots-saboteurs. The operation analysis of such systems with decentralized control is carried out. Concept of harmful information impact (attack from a robot-saboteur to the multi-agent robotic system is given. The class of attacks is considered using interception of messages, formation and transfer of misinformation to group of robots, and also carrying out other actions with vulnerabilities of multiagent algorithms without obviously identified signs of invasion of robots-saboteurs. The model of information security is developed, in which robots-agents work out trust levels to each other analyzing the events occurring in the system. The idea of trust model consists in the analysis of transferred information by each robot and the executed actions of other members in a group, comparison of chosen decision on iteration step k with objective function of the group. Distinctive feature of the trust model in comparison with the closest analogue - Buddy Security Model in which the exchange between the agents security tokens is done — is involvement of the time factor during which agents have to "prove" by their actions the usefulness in achievement of a common goal to members of the group. Variants of this model realization and ways of an assessment of trust levels for agents in view of the security policy accepted in the group are proposed.

  7. Saudis trust and confidence in information sources about chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of toxic chemicals in the environment has drawn increasing concern in Saudi Arabia in recent years. Public health officials recognize a direct link between health problems and exposure to these chemicals. To communicate information on chemical pollution health risks effectively, policy makers must know ...

  8. Trust-Based Information Risk Management in a Supply Chain Network

    OpenAIRE

    Yanjun Zuo; Wen-Chen Hu

    2009-01-01

    Information risk management is crucial for an organization operating in an increasingly integrated and intensively communicated environment to mitigate risks and ensure core business functions. Given the open and dynamic nature of a supply chain network, information risk management is challenging and various factors must be considered. This article introduces a trust-based approach to facilitate supply chain participants to perform effective risk management. The major components of the propos...

  9. Domainwise Web Page Optimization Based On Clustered Query Sessions Using Hybrid Of Trust And ACO For Effective Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Suruchi Chawla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper hybrid of Ant Colony OptimizationACO and trust has been used for domainwise web page optimization in clustered query sessions for effective Information retrieval. The trust of the web page identifies its degree of relevance in satisfying specific information need of the user. The trusted web pages when optimized using pheromone updates in ACO will identify the trusted colonies of web pages which will be relevant to users information need in a given domain. Hence in this paper the hybrid of Trust and ACO has been used on clustered query sessions for identifying more and more relevant number of documents in a given domain in order to better satisfy the information need of the user. Experiment was conducted on the data set of web query sessions to test the effectiveness of the proposed approach in selected three domains Academics Entertainment and Sports and the results confirm the improvement in the precision of search results.

  10. The Role of Information Professionals in Reducing the Effects of Global Warming through Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lect. Ph. D. Priti Jain

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available As a result of global environmental change, global warming is the greatest environmental challenge in the 21st century. It could lead to the ultimate end of existence of earth and man. Potential catastrophic effects on the environment and for human life are one of the biggest concerns and most widely discussed issues in the world. This paper will explore how Information Professionals can build knowledge management related to global warming and thus make their contribution towards a sustainable environment. With a brief discussion of causes, effects, solutions and challenges related to global warming, the conclusion suggests a way forward for librarians and information professionals.

  11. How change information influences attitudes toward change and turnover intention : The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Sjoerd; Freese, Charissa; Schalk, René; van Assen, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  12. How change information influences attitude toward change and turnover intention : The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, S.R.H.; Schalk, R.; Freese, C.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  13. How Change Information Influences Attitudes towards Change and Turnover Intention: The role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment, and trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjoerd van den Heuvel; Charissa Freese; René Schalk; Marcel van Assen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how the quality of change information influences employees’ attitude toward organizational change and turnover intention. Additionally, the role of engagement, psychological contract fulfillment and trust in the relationship between change information

  14. HPV vaccine awareness and the association of trust in cancer information from physicians among males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Dexter L; Hernandez, Natalie D; Rollins, Latrice; Akintobi, Tabia Henry; McAllister, Calvin

    2017-05-09

    Black and Hispanic men are diagnosed with more HPV-related cancers and at later stages compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Physician communication with men about HPV vaccination may be beneficial to increasing HPV vaccinations and decreasing HPV transmission. The purpose of this study was to examine HPV and HPV vaccine awareness among men by race, and the association between trust in cancer information from physicians and ever hearing about HPV and the HPV vaccine. U.S. adult males (age 18+) were identified from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) (n=1203). Binomial logistic regression models assessed the influences of race/ethnicity and trust of cancer information from physicians on men having heard of HPV and the HPV vaccination. Approximately 50% of the sample had never heard of HPV and 53% had never heard of the vaccine. Black men were less likely to know that HPV is sexually transmitted compared to White and Hispanic men (pcancer information compared to White and Black men (pawareness about HPV among men. Furthermore, statistically significant racial/ethnic differences were found in HPV vaccine knowledge and trust in receiving cancer information from physicians. Future interventions should include community-based approaches and improved physicians' HPV-related communication to increase knowledge and uptake of the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 78 FR 35048 - Notice of Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... and Individual Indians AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of the Special Trustee for American... information for ``Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians, 25 CFR 115,'' OMB Control No. 1035-0004. This... . Individuals providing comments should reference ``Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians, 25 CFR 115...

  16. A Method to Increase Drivers' Trust in Collision Warning Systems Based on Reliability Information of Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Shigeyoshi; Wada, Takahiro; Akita, Tokihiko; Doi, Shun'ichi

    Driver's workload tends to be increased during driving under complicated traffic environments like a lane change. In such cases, rear collision warning is effective for reduction of cognitive workload. On the other hand, it is pointed out that false alarm or missing alarm caused by sensor errors leads to decrease of driver' s trust in the warning system and it can result in low efficiency of the system. Suppose that reliability information of the sensor is provided in real-time. In this paper, we propose a new warning method to increase driver' s trust in the system even with low sensor reliability utilizing the sensor reliability information. The effectiveness of the warning methods is shown by driving simulator experiments.

  17. Mobile Location-Based Services for Trusted Information in Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragia, Lemonia; Deriaz, Michel; Seigneur, Jean-Marc

    The goal of the present chapter is to provide location-based services for disaster management. The application involves services related to the safety of the people due to an unexpected event. The current prototype is implemented for a specific issue of disaster management which is road traffic control. The users can ask requests on cell phones or via Internet to the system and get an answer in a display or in textual form. The data are in a central database and every user can input data via virtual tags. The system is based on spatial messages which can be sent from any user to any other in a certain distance. In this way all the users and not a separate source provide the necessary information for a dangerous situation. To avoid any contamination problems we use trust security to check the input to the system and a trust engine model to provide information with a considerable reliability.

  18. Examining trust factors in online food risk information: The case of unpasteurized or 'raw' milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillence, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Medeiros, Lydia C; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    The internet has become an increasingly important way of communicating with consumers about food risk information. However, relatively little is known about how consumers evaluate and come to trust the information they encounter online. Using the example of unpasteurized or raw milk this paper presents two studies exploring the trust factors associated with online information about the risks and benefits of raw milk consumption. In the first study, eye-tracking data was collected from 33 pasteurised milk consumers whilst they viewed six different milk related websites. A descriptive analysis of the eye-tracking data was conducted to explore viewing patterns. Reports revealed the importance of images as a way of capturing initial attention and foregrounding other features and highlighted the significance of introductory text within a homepage. In the second, qualitative study, 41 consumers, some of whom drank raw milk, viewed a selection of milk related websites before participating in either a group discussion or interview. Seventeen of the participants also took part in a follow up telephone interview 2 weeks later. The qualitative data supports the importance of good design whilst noting that balance, authorship agenda, the nature of evidence and personal relevance were also key factors affecting consumers trust judgements. The results of both studies provide support for a staged approach to online trust in which consumers engage in a more rapid, heuristic assessment of a site before moving on to a more in-depth evaluation of the information available. Findings are discussed in relation to the development of trustworthy online food safety resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. European consumers' use of and trust in information sources about fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieniak, Zuzanna; Verbeke, Wim; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on identifying segments of consumers based on their use of and trust in information sources about fish. Cross-sectional data were collected through the SEAFOODplus pan-European consumer survey (n = 4786) with samples representative for age and region in Belgium, the Netherlands......, knowledge and behaviour towards fish, and socio-demographic profile. Recommendations for the use of multiple sources targeted to a particular audience's interest and behavioural profile were formulated....

  20. Information Technology Convergence, Secure and Trust Computing, and Data Management ITCS 2012 & STA 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jongsung; Zou, Deqing; Lee, Yang

    2012-01-01

    ITCS 2012 and STA 2012 address the various theories and practical applications of information technology convergence, secure and trust computing, and data management in future environments. It will present important results of significant value to solve the application services and various problems within the scope of ITCS 2012 & STA 2012. In addition, we expect it will trigger further related research and technology developments which will improve our lives in the future.

  1. Trust in online prescription drug information among internet users: the impact on information search behavior after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ajit M; Deshpande, Aparna D; Perri, Matthew; Zinkhan, George M

    2002-01-01

    The proliferation of both manufacturer-controlled and independent medication-related websites has aroused concern among consumers and policy-makers concerning the trustworthiness of Web-based drug information. The authors examine consumers' trust in on-line prescription drug information and its influence on information search behavior. The study design involves a retrospective analysis of data from a 1998 national survey. The findings reveal that trust in drug information from traditional media sources such as television and newspapers transfers to the domain of the Internet. Furthermore, a greater trust in on-line prescription drug information stimulates utilization of the Internet for information search after exposure to prescription drug advertising.

  2. Social Support, Trust in Health Information, and Health Information-Seeking Behaviors (HISBs): A Study Using the 2012 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinghua; Chen, Yixin; Wendorf Muhamad, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    We proposed a conceptual model to predict health information-seeking behaviors (HISBs) from three different sources (family, the Internet, doctors). To test the model, a structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted using data from the 2012 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS) (N = 3,285). Findings suggest higher social support from family predicts higher trust in health information from family members (abbreviated as trust in this article). Trust is positively related to HISBs from all three sources, with the path linking trust to HISB from family being the strongest. The effect of social support on HISB from family is partially mediated by trust, while effect of social support on HISBs from the Internet/doctors is fully mediated by trust. Implications of the study are discussed.

  3. The role of similarity cues in the development of trust in sources of information about GM food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijnders, Anneloes; Midden, Cees; Olofsson, Anna; Ohman, Susanna; Matthes, Jörg; Bondarenko, Olha; Gutteling, Jan; Rusanen, Maria

    2009-08-01

    In evaluating complex new technologies, people are usually dependent on information provided by others, for example, experts or journalists, and have to determine whether they can trust these information sources. This article focuses on similarity as the basis for trust. The first experiment (N = 261) confirmed that a journalist writing about genetically modified (GM) food was trusted more when his attitude was congruent with that of his readers. In addition, the experiment showed that this effect was mediated by the perceived similarity of the journalist. The second experiment (N = 172) revealed that trust in a journalist writing about the focal domain of GM food was even influenced by him expressing a congruent attitude in an unrelated domain. This result supports a general similarity account of the congruence effect on trust, as opposed to a confirmatory bias account.

  4. Sustainable Regulation of Information Sharing with Electronic Data Interchange by a Trust-Embedded Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghua Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the risks in demand information sharing applications by electronic soft-orders using electronic data interchange (EDI systems in e-commerce and aims to suggest a sustainable regulation mechanism with a trust-embedded contract. In a supply chain with one retailer and one supplier, the retailer solicits private forecasted demand and places soft-orders via EDI to the supplier. To ensure abundant supply, the retailer has an incentive to inflate her soft-orders, which potentially harms the credible information sharing and sustainability of business cooperation. Normally, the degree to which the supplier relies on the retailer’s order information is specified by trust, which is evaluated according to the retailer’s reputation and supplier’s intuition in this study. Based on standard game theory, we find that both the retailer’s order and the quantity of supplier prepared materials are independent of the retailer’s forecast. Therefore, EDI based information sharing in e-commerce without a regulation mechanism leads to inefficient demand information sharing. Since both the supplier and retailer are proved to faces huge of potential profit losses due to the failure of information sharing, the commerce by EDI based information sharing is full of risk and unsustainable. Therefore, a regulation mechanism that leaded by the retailer is proposed to establish ‘win-win’ sustainable cooperation. Numerical experiments highlight the value of trust, the impact of reputation and intuition in decisions, and the effectiveness of the regulation mechanism by a cost-sharing contract.

  5. Enabling information sharing by establishing trust in supply chains: A case study in the South African automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Piderit

    2011-10-01

    Objectives: This paper explored the relationship between trust and information sharing in South African automotive supply chains, and establishes the importance of nurturing a cyclical relationship between these two factors. In addition, the role of information technology (IT in supporting this relationship was considered. By improving both trust and information sharing, the performance and competitiveness of the supply chain can be improved. Method: An examination of the effects of a lack of trust in a supply chain relationship, and the consequential lack of information flow, was conducted by means of a case study of an Eastern Cape-based automotive supplier. A case study research method was followed for this study, which made use of multiple data collection methods, including document survey and participant observations. The case selected is an East London based subsidiary of a larger multinational automotive component supplier to both local and international automotive original equipment manufacturers. Results: The findings led to the conclusion that the way forward for competitive supply chains is to build trust in the supply chain in order to improve information flow, and vice versa. Information technology can be used to nurture this cyclical relationship between trust and information sharing. Conclusion: It is proposed that simultaneously improving information flow and trust in an interorganisational relationship leads to improved supply chain performance and competitiveness.

  6. Trust in the source of received information as a factor related to public perception of shale gas drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Mrozowska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three studies were carried out to examine whether trust in sources of information on technology is related to positive attitudes toward shale gas drilling. Factors we controlled for included: scientific knowledge, universalism and security as personal values, attitudes towards science, personal and group identity fusion, political views, and valence of the media information people received. We assumed hypothesis 1, that trust in the source of the information would be a significant predictor of positive attitudes toward shale gas, above and beyond other variables we controlled for (study 1. Also, we stated hypothesis 2, that trust in the source of information on technology in question would be related to more positive attitudes toward shale gas when more positive information is provided, and to more negative perception of gas drilling when less positive information is presented. Thus, we expected an interaction effect between trust and valence of information presented to participants (studies 2 and 3. Participants completed questionnaires in Poland (studies 1 and 2 and the USA (study 3. They where recruited from communities in regions where shale gas industry could potentially be developed (study 2 or has been developed (study 3. The results showed: (a a significant relationship between trust in negative information on shale gas and negative attitudes toward extraction; (b a significant interaction between trust and valence of information on shale gas. That is, trust in the source of information was related to more positive attitudes toward shale gas when a positive view is provided, and to more negative attitudes when undesirable information is presented.

  7. Climate Velocity Can Inform Conservation in a Warming World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Morales, Isaac; García Molinos, Jorge; Schoeman, David S; Burrows, Michael T; Poloczanska, Elvira S; Brown, Christopher J; Ferrier, Simon; Harwood, Tom D; Klein, Carissa J; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Moore, Pippa J; Pandolfi, John M; Watson, James E M; Wenger, Amelia S; Richardson, Anthony J

    2018-06-01

    Climate change is shifting the ranges of species. Simple predictive metrics of range shifts such as climate velocity, that do not require extensive knowledge or data on individual species, could help to guide conservation. We review research on climate velocity, describing the theory underpinning the concept and its assumptions. We highlight how climate velocity has already been applied in conservation-related research, including climate residence time, climate refugia, endemism, historic and projected range shifts, exposure to climate change, and climate connectivity. Finally, we discuss ways to enhance the use of climate velocity in conservation through tailoring it to be more biologically meaningful, informing design of protected areas, conserving ocean biodiversity in 3D, and informing conservation actions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trust in Health Information Sources: Survey Analysis of Variation by Sociodemographic and Tobacco Use Status in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Johnson, Cati G; Boeckman, Lindsay M; White, Ashley H; Burbank, Andrea D; Paulson, Sjonna; Beebe, Laura A

    2018-02-12

    Modern technology (ie, websites and social media) has significantly changed social mores in health information access and delivery. Although mass media campaigns for health intervention have proven effective and cost-effective in changing health behavior at a population scale, this is best studied in traditional media sources (ie, radio and television). Digital health interventions are options that use short message service/text messaging, social media, and internet technology. Although exposure to these products is becoming ubiquitous, electronic health information is novel, incompletely disseminated, and frequently inaccurate, which decreases public trust. Previous research has shown that audience trust in health care providers significantly moderates health outcomes, demographics significantly influence audience trust in electronic media, and preexisting health behaviors such as smoking status significantly moderate audience receptivity to traditional mass media. Therefore, modern health educators must assess audience trust in all sources, both media (traditional and digital) and interpersonal, to balance pros and cons before structuring multicomponent community health interventions. We aimed to explore current trust and moderators of trust in health information sources given recent changes in digital health information access and delivery to inform design of future health interventions in Oklahoma. We conducted phone surveys of a cross-sectional sample of 1001 Oklahoma adults (age 18-65 years) in spring 2015 to assess trust in seven media sources: traditional (television and radio), electronic (online and social media), and interpersonal (providers, insurers, and family/friends). We also gathered information on known moderators of trust (sociodemographics and tobacco use status). We modeled log odds of a participant rating a source as "trustworthy" (SAS PROC SURVEYLOGISTIC), with subanalysis for confounders (sociodemographics and tobacco use). Oklahomans showed

  9. Information, trust and the limits of “intelligent accountability” in investment decision making: insights from the Madoff case

    OpenAIRE

    Stolowy, Hervé; Baker, Richard; Jeanjean, Thomas; Messner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use the investment fraud of Bernard Madoff to inquire into the possibilities and limits of an “intelligent accountability” in the context of financial decision making. Drawing primarily upon data related to U.S. Individual investors (interviews and letters), we investigate the role of information and trust in investment decisions. We find that trust played an important role in the Madoff case. We also find that, in face-to-face encounters with the investors, Madoff successfu...

  10. Influence of health literacy and trust in online information on food allergy quality of life and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Nicholas; Greenhawt, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Health literacy among caregivers of food allergic individuals (FAIs) is poorly described, as are the information sources sought regarding food allergy. To assess the association among health literacy, trust in online sources of information, and food allergy quality of life (QoL) and self-efficacy. An online survey was administered to caregivers of FAIs assessing health literacy (Newest Vital Sign [NVS] and the eHeals Internet health literacy index), trust in online information (Hargittai Internet credibility index and Annenberg National Health Communication Survey [ANHCS]), QoL (Food Allergy Quality of Life Parental Burden), and self-efficacy (Food Allergy Self-Efficacy Questionnaire [FASEQ]). Among 1562 respondents, 94.6% (NVS) and 61.1% (eHeals) had good health literacy, and 58% had high levels of trust in online information (both indexes). The NVS correlated poorly with the eHeals and Hargittai indexes. Hargittai and eHeals scores were moderately correlated (r = 0.37, P information (both indexes), worsening FASEQ score, blog readership, advocacy group membership, caring for multiple FAIs, and having milk or egg allergy were associated with worse FAQL-PB scores. In this sample, health literacy and trust in online information sources were high, with high trust in online information sources negatively associated with QoL. Advocacy group membership had an independent negative association with QoL. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Think Warm Thoughts: Plan Ahead for Summertime Information Literacy Programs! The College Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasowitz-Scheer, Abby

    2009-01-01

    It's winter! While it is frosty outside, one can at least think warm thoughts by starting now to plan ahead for summer information literacy programs. This article is designed to provide some ideas for planning next summer's reading, sleuthing, and research programs. It features a variety of programs organized by academic librarians this past…

  12. A Geographic Information System (GIS-Based Analysis of Social Capital Data: Landscape Factors That Correlate with Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The field of community sociology has yielded rich insights on how neighborhoods and individuals foster social capital and reap the benefits of interpersonal relationships and institutions alike. Traditionally, institutions and cultural factors have been lauded as catalysts of community social life and cohesion. Yet, the built environment and configuration of the landscape, including infrastructure, amenities and population density, may also contribute to community social capital. In this article, we embedded zip code-level responses from Harvard University’s Saguaro Seminar’s 2006 Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey with a geographic information system. Specifically, we correlated responses on residents’ general trust, trust of one’s neighbors, and trust of members of other racial groups with local urban environmental factors and infrastructural indicators such as housing and street conditions, land use, city form, amenity access (e.g., libraries and schools, home vacancy rates, and home value. We conducted these tests at the national level and for Rochester, NY, due to its many survey responses. We found that housing vacancies drive down levels of social trust, as captured by homeownership rates and tenure, yielding higher levels of social trust, and that certain urban facilities correlate with high trust among neighbors. Results can inform urban planners on the amenities that support sustainable community ties.

  13. Build Trust Index for Volunteered Geographic Information: A Case Study of Safecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Y.; Cervone, G.

    2017-12-01

    Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI), defined as geographic information contributed voluntarily by amateurs, have grown exponentially nowadays with the aid of ubiquitous GPS-enabled telecommunication technologies. VGI projects, like Wikimapia, OpenStreetMap, Flickr and Safecast have shown remarkable success on leveraging citizen science to increase our knowledge about the geographic world. However, in spite of its growing popularity, VGI is still facing the most challenging problem of ensuring data quality. In this study, we proposed a methodology to filter outliers in Safecast measurements through cross-reference among volunteers. Based on the outliers filtered, a trust index is generated for each volunteer. The results are validated using official radiation measurements surveyed by Department of Energy. The validation shows that removing the outliers filtered by our methodology, Safecast measurements yield a better correlation with official measurements.

  14. Worldviews and trust of sources for health information on electronic nicotine delivery systems: Effects on risk perceptions and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Weaver

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Public health agencies, the news media, and the tobacco/vapor industry have issued contradictory statements about the health effects of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS. We investigated the levels of trust that consumers place in different information sources and how trust is associated with cultural worldviews, risk perceptions, ENDS use, and sociodemographic characteristics using a nationally representative sample of 6051 U.S. adults in 2015. Seventeen percent of adults were uncertain about their trust for one or more potential sources. Among the rest, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, health experts, and the Food & Drug Administration (FDA elicited the highest levels of trust. In contrast, tobacco and vapor manufacturers, vape shop employees, and, to a lesser extent, the news media were distrusted. Adults who had higher incomes and more education or espoused egalitarian and communitarian worldviews expressed more trust in health sources and the FDA, whereas those identifying as non-Hispanic Black or multiracial reported less trust. Current smokers, those who identified as non-Hispanic Black or other race, had lower incomes, and espoused hierarchy and individualism worldviews expressed less distrust toward the tobacco and vapor industry. Greater trust (or less distrust toward the tobacco and vapor industry and an individualism worldview were associated with perceptions of lower risk of premature death from daily ENDS use, greater uncertainty about those risks, and greater odds of using ENDS. Public health and the FDA should consider consumer trust and worldviews in the design and regulation of public education campaigns regarding the potential health risks and benefits of ENDS.

  15. Worldviews and trust of sources for health information on electronic nicotine delivery systems: Effects on risk perceptions and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott R; Jazwa, Amelia; Popova, Lucy; Slovic, Paul; Rothenberg, Richard B; Eriksen, Michael P

    2017-12-01

    Public health agencies, the news media, and the tobacco/vapor industry have issued contradictory statements about the health effects of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). We investigated the levels of trust that consumers place in different information sources and how trust is associated with cultural worldviews, risk perceptions, ENDS use, and sociodemographic characteristics using a nationally representative sample of 6051 U.S. adults in 2015. Seventeen percent of adults were uncertain about their trust for one or more potential sources. Among the rest, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), health experts, and the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) elicited the highest levels of trust. In contrast, tobacco and vapor manufacturers, vape shop employees, and, to a lesser extent, the news media were distrusted. Adults who had higher incomes and more education or espoused egalitarian and communitarian worldviews expressed more trust in health sources and the FDA, whereas those identifying as non-Hispanic Black or multiracial reported less trust. Current smokers, those who identified as non-Hispanic Black or other race, had lower incomes, and espoused hierarchy and individualism worldviews expressed less distrust toward the tobacco and vapor industry. Greater trust (or less distrust) toward the tobacco and vapor industry and an individualism worldview were associated with perceptions of lower risk of premature death from daily ENDS use, greater uncertainty about those risks, and greater odds of using ENDS. Public health and the FDA should consider consumer trust and worldviews in the design and regulation of public education campaigns regarding the potential health risks and benefits of ENDS.

  16. The Role of Trust as an Informal Institution in the Informal Sector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-21

    Nov 21, 2014 ... on the informal sector focused on the towns and cities of Africa. Later, the ... The methodology used for this analysis follows a small-N case study .... informal sector plays a significant role in economic development by providing .... a requirement for collaboration and networking in the sector (Pedersen 2001).

  17. Trust Creation in the Informal Economy: The Case of Plastic Bag ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-17

    Dec 17, 2013 ... challenge for maintaining networks of trust within their own ... In order to gather evidence on the interpersonal development of trusting- .... of the populations of Ilema and Nyamanga Districts of Mwanza Region, which is where the city of Mwanza is located. ... Particularly, by engaging in a detailed case study,.

  18. Much ado about flu: A mixed methods study of parental perceptions, trust and information seeking in a pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Catherine L; Chow, Maria Y K; Wiley, Kerrie E; Leask, Julie

    2018-02-13

    Effective public health messaging is essential in both the planning phase and duration of a pandemic. This study aimed to gain an understanding of parental information seeking, trusted sources and needs in relation to pandemic influenza A 2009 (pH1N1) to inform future policy planning and resource development. We conducted a mixed methods study; parents from 16 childcare centres in Sydney, Australia, were surveyed between 16 November and 9 December 2009, and interviews were conducted with participants from six childcare centres between June 2009 and May 2011. From 972 surveys distributed, 431 were completed; a response rate of 44%. Most parents (90%) reported that doctors were "trusted a lot" as a source of influenza information, followed by nurses (59%), government (56%) and childcare centres (52%). Less trusted sources included media (7% selected "trusted a lot"), antivaccination groups (6%) and celebrities (1%). Parents identified a range of key search terms for influenza infection and vaccine. From 42 in-depth interviews, key themes were as follows: "Action trigger," "In an emergency, think Emergency," "Fright to hype" and "Dr Google and beyond." Parents relied heavily on media messages, but cynicism emerged when the pandemic was milder than expected. Parents viewed a range of information sources as trustworthy, including doctors, authoritative hospital or government websites, and childcare centres and schools. A user-centred orientation is vital for pandemic communications including tailored information provision, via trusted sources based on what parents want to know and how they can find it. © 2018 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Enacting trust: contract, law and informal economic relationships in a Spanish border enclave in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Campbell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and removed from the Spanish mainland, the Enclave of Ceuta has always depended on flows of goods and labour out of the Moroccan hinterland, with individuals from different ethnic and religious groups forming informal, flexible and personal economic bonds based on mutual ‘confianza’ (trust. Since its entry into the European Union in 1986,the Spanish government has erected a border-wall around the enclave, and introduced new migration policies branding many informal workers within its borders as a threat to Spanish society. Based on my preliminary months of research, this paper compares the Ceutancontext with other research recently conducted on the topics of migration and borders in the Mediterranean region. It brings into focus key theoretical issues and assumptions that constantly emerge in such literature, particularly regarding the role of ‘a-cultural’ personal ties between migrants and locals in undermining State categories and ideology. This paper observes how the Ceutan case encourages us to expand our focuses and consequently problematise our understanding of crucial concepts such as ‘trust’ and ‘integration’.

  20. Personal efficacy, the information environment, and attitudes toward global warming and climate change in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellstedt, Paul M; Zahran, Sammy; Vedlitz, Arnold

    2008-02-01

    Despite the growing scientific consensus about the risks of global warming and climate change, the mass media frequently portray the subject as one of great scientific controversy and debate. And yet previous studies of the mass public's subjective assessments of the risks of global warming and climate change have not sufficiently examined public informedness, public confidence in climate scientists, and the role of personal efficacy in affecting global warming outcomes. By examining the results of a survey on an original and representative sample of Americans, we find that these three forces-informedness, confidence in scientists, and personal efficacy-are related in interesting and unexpected ways, and exert significant influence on risk assessments of global warming and climate change. In particular, more informed respondents both feel less personally responsible for global warming, and also show less concern for global warming. We also find that confidence in scientists has unexpected effects: respondents with high confidence in scientists feel less responsible for global warming, and also show less concern for global warming. These results have substantial implications for the interaction between scientists and the public in general, and for the public discussion of global warming and climate change in particular.

  1. Summary of global warming uncertainties and the value of information: An analysis using CETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors investigate the sensitivity of optimal carbon control strategies to parameters of the Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment (CETA) Model, and they use CETA in a simple decision tree framework to estimate the value of information about global warming uncertainties. They find that if an optimal control policy is used under uncertainty, the eventual resolution of uncertainty has high value relative to current research budgets, and resolving uncertainty about the costs of warming is nearly as important as resolving uncertainty about the extent of warming. In addition, the authors find that there is not a high premium on immediate resolution of uncertainty, if resolution would otherwise occur within, say, twenty years; this implies that time is available to plan and execute a carefully designed research program. On the other hand, they find that if the real-world political process would result in a suboptimal control policy being chosen under uncertainty, and this choice could be prevented by early resolution of uncertainty, the benefit of early resolution may be as much as three orders of magnitude greater

  2. Global warming uncertainties and the value of information: an analysis using CETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.C.; Teisberg, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigated the sensitivity of optimal carbon control strategies to parameters of the Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment (CETA) Model, and CETA is used in a simple decision tree framework to estimate the value of information about global warming uncertainties. We find that if an optimal control policy is used under uncertainty, the eventual resolution of uncertainty has high value relative to current research budgets, and resolving uncertainty about the costs of warming is nearly as important as resolving uncertainty about the extent of warming. In addition, we find that there is not a high premium on immediate resolution of uncertainty, if resolution would otherwise occur within, say, twenty years; this implies that time is available to plan and execute a carefully designed research program. On the other hand, we find that if the real world political process would result in a suboptimal control policy being chosen under uncertainty, and this choice could be prevented by early resolution of uncertainty, the benefit of early resolution may be as much as three orders of magnitude greater. 26 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  3. The Effectiveness of Health Care Information Technologies: Evaluation of Trust, Security Beliefs, and Privacy as Determinants of Health Care Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background The diffusion of health information technologies (HITs) within the health care sector continues to grow. However, there is no theory explaining how success of HITs influences patient care outcomes. With the increase in data breaches, HITs’ success now hinges on the effectiveness of data protection solutions. Still, empirical research has only addressed privacy concerns, with little regard for other factors of information assurance. Objective The objective of this study was to study the effectiveness of HITs using the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model (DMISSM). We examined the role of information assurance constructs (ie, the role of information security beliefs, privacy concerns, and trust in health information) as measures of HIT effectiveness. We also investigated the relationships between information assurance and three aspects of system success: attitude toward health information exchange (HIE), patient access to health records, and perceived patient care quality. Methods Using structural equation modeling, we analyzed the data from a sample of 3677 cancer patients from a public dataset. We used R software (R Project for Statistical Computing) and the Lavaan package to test the hypothesized relationships. Results Our extension of the DMISSM to health care was supported. We found that increased privacy concerns reduce the frequency of patient access to health records use, positive attitudes toward HIE, and perceptions of patient care quality. Also, belief in the effectiveness of information security increases the frequency of patient access to health records and positive attitude toward HIE. Trust in health information had a positive association with attitudes toward HIE and perceived patient care quality. Trust in health information had no direct effect on patient access to health records; however, it had an indirect relationship through privacy concerns. Conclusions Trust in health information and belief in the effectiveness of

  4. The Effectiveness of Health Care Information Technologies: Evaluation of Trust, Security Beliefs, and Privacy as Determinants of Health Care Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisekka, Victoria; Giboney, Justin Scott

    2018-04-11

    The diffusion of health information technologies (HITs) within the health care sector continues to grow. However, there is no theory explaining how success of HITs influences patient care outcomes. With the increase in data breaches, HITs' success now hinges on the effectiveness of data protection solutions. Still, empirical research has only addressed privacy concerns, with little regard for other factors of information assurance. The objective of this study was to study the effectiveness of HITs using the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model (DMISSM). We examined the role of information assurance constructs (ie, the role of information security beliefs, privacy concerns, and trust in health information) as measures of HIT effectiveness. We also investigated the relationships between information assurance and three aspects of system success: attitude toward health information exchange (HIE), patient access to health records, and perceived patient care quality. Using structural equation modeling, we analyzed the data from a sample of 3677 cancer patients from a public dataset. We used R software (R Project for Statistical Computing) and the Lavaan package to test the hypothesized relationships. Our extension of the DMISSM to health care was supported. We found that increased privacy concerns reduce the frequency of patient access to health records use, positive attitudes toward HIE, and perceptions of patient care quality. Also, belief in the effectiveness of information security increases the frequency of patient access to health records and positive attitude toward HIE. Trust in health information had a positive association with attitudes toward HIE and perceived patient care quality. Trust in health information had no direct effect on patient access to health records; however, it had an indirect relationship through privacy concerns. Trust in health information and belief in the effectiveness of information security safeguards increases

  5. Trust Creation in the Informal Economy: The Case of Plastic Bag ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article presents an embedded account of the social status and economic ... presenting a tough challenge for maintaining networks of trust within their own ... in order to make a sale ignites participation and cooperation with goods sellers, ...

  6. Linkages Between Informal and Formal Social Capital and Their Relations with Forums of Trust. A focus on Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura NISTOR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, we investigate the structure of social capital based on several indicators selected on the basis of the European Social Survey’s 2006 wave for Romania. Secondly, the role of informal social interaction and some individual-level sociodemographical variables in determining formal, informal and community level volunteering is analyzed. The third part of the analysis investigates the role of these types of social capital in producing various forms of trust. The results of the analyses resulted in two specific variables, for informal and informal social capital: the former consists in variables accounting for informal networking with closer ties, while the latter consists in variables accounting for different kinds of voluntary activities. Regarding the cognitive dimension of social trust, we succeeded to separate specific types of trust. Once controlling for socio-demographics and religiosity, schmoozing exercises significant, positive influence only on formal volunteering. Our results suggest that the profile of those involved in the specific forms of volunteering is quite similar in at least two aspects: it seems that compared to the youngest age category, middle aged individuals are less involved in volunteering; compared to the lower educated respondents those who are medium and upper level educated people are the most involved in each types of volunteering.

  7. Modelling End-User of Electronic-Government Service: The Role of Information quality, System Quality and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witarsyah Jacob, Deden; Fudzee, Mohd Farhan Md; Aizi Salamat, Mohamad; Kasim, Shahreen; Mahdin, Hairulnizam; Azhar Ramli, Azizul

    2017-08-01

    Many governments around the world increasingly use internet technologies such as electronic government to provide public services. These services range from providing the most basic informational website to deploying sophisticated tools for managing interactions between government agencies and beyond government. Electronic government (e-government) aims to provide a more accurate, easily accessible, cost-effective and time saving for the community. In this study, we develop a new model of e-government adoption service by extending the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) through the incorporation of some variables such as System Quality, Information Quality and Trust. The model is then tested using a large-scale, multi-site survey research of 237 Indonesian citizens. This model will be validated by using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). The result indicates that System Quality, Information Quality and Trust variables proven to effect user behavior. This study extends the current understanding on the influence of System Quality, Information Quality and Trust factors to researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.

  8. The Informal Institutions and the Knowledge Sharing: The Mediating Effect of the Social Identity and the Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erendira Fierro Moreno

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is to determine the extent to which social identity and organizational trust mediate the relationship between informal institutions and the exchange of knowledge. Based on a review of literature and relying on the theoretical perspective of new institutionalism and on the resource based-view the research hypotheses were formulated. Using a cross-sectional and with Mexican public sector organizations and through the perceptions of 252 public servants the hypotheses were tested. Multivariate analysis (SEM was performed. The results confirm the importance of informal institutions that legitimize the performance of organizations but do not guarantee its real efficiency. However, research shows that intervening valuable resources management (social identity and organizational trust helps to exploit opportunities and neutralize threats from the environment generating new capabilities: the exchange of knowledge.

  9. The discursive construction of risk and trust in patient information leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary

    2011-01-01

    . This paper aims to analyse how risk is discursively constructed in PILs, and to identify and analyse discourses that are associated with trust-generation. The corpus (nine PILs chosen from the British online PIL bank, www.medicines.org.uk) is analysed using Foucauldian (1972) discourse analysis: specifically......, this involves identifying the functions of the statements of the potential harm that may be caused by taking the medication, whilst trust is constructed through three discourses: the discourses that relate to competence and care, in accordance with the trust theories of Poortinga/Pidgeon (2003) and Earle (2010......), and a third discourse, corporate accountability, which functions to construct an ethical (trustworthy) identity for the company. The paper contributes to PIL literature in the following ways: it introduces a methodology that has not been used before in relation to these texts, namely, Foucauldian discourse...

  10. Trust Trust Me (The Additivity)

    OpenAIRE

    Mano , Ken; Sakurada , Hideki; Tsukada , Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Part 4: Trust Metrics; International audience; We present a mathematical formulation of a trust metric using a quality and quantity pair. Under a certain assumption, we regard trust as an additive value and define the soundness of a trust computation as not to exceed the total sum. Moreover, we point out the importance of not only soundness of each computed trust but also the stability of the trust computation procedure against changes in trust value assignment. In this setting, we define tru...

  11. 75 FR 63194 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Comment Request Housing Trust Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Housing Finance Regulatory Reform Act of 2008, as amended, established the Housing Trust Fund (HTF... of total new business for Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae to be allocated as a dedicated source of annual funding for the HTF, unless allocations are suspended by the Director of the Federal Housing Finance...

  12. Information and Reputation in the 17th Century: Establishing Trust in the Social Networks of Portuguese Businessmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro SÁNCHEZ DURÁN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role played by diverse social and cultural practices in the establishment of interpersonal trust during the Early Modern period. Based on qualitative analysis of social interactions within the ego-centered networks of five Portuguese businessmen living in Madrid during the 17th Century, studied thanks to their epistolary correspondence. Letters allow historians to assess the role of the transmission of information and diverse cultural values in forging trust. Moreover, they also document the crucial importance of personal reputation as a form of subjective valuation of the aptitudes of economic actors, and how these assessments were produced thanks to epistolary interactions. Finally, attention is drawn to how reputations served as a means of selecting and recruiting agents.

  13. Addressing Library Anxiety (LA) in student nurses: a study in an NHS Foundation Trust Hospital library and information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    Library anxiety is a concept which has been recognised in academic library circles since the early 1990s. It can result in students actively avoiding the library for the duration of their studies. Madeleine Still is Trust Librarian at North Tees & Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and while studying for an MSc, recognised that some student nurses were exhibiting signs of library anxiety. She decided to make it the focus of her MSc dissertation, and this article discusses her research project as well as highlighting the measures she has taken to address the issues she uncovered. Madeleine graduated in July 2013 with an MSc in Information & Library Studies from Robert Gordon University. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  14. Trusting Social Media as a Source of Health Information: Online Surveys Comparing the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Omori, Kikuko; Kim, Jihyun; Tenzek, Kelly E; Morey Hawkins, Jennifer; Lin, Wan-Ying; Kim, Yong-Chan; Jung, Joo-Young

    2016-03-14

    The Internet has increasingly become a popular source of health information by connecting individuals with health content, experts, and support. More and more, individuals turn to social media and Internet sites to share health information and experiences. Although online health information seeking occurs worldwide, limited empirical studies exist examining cross-cultural differences in perceptions about user-generated, experience-based information compared to expertise-based information sources. To investigate if cultural variations exist in patterns of online health information seeking, specifically in perceptions of online health information sources. It was hypothesized that Koreans and Hongkongers, compared to Americans, would be more likely to trust and use experience-based knowledge shared in social Internet sites, such as social media and online support groups. Conversely, Americans, compared to Koreans and Hongkongers, would value expertise-based knowledge prepared and approved by doctors or professional health providers more. Survey questionnaires were developed in English first and then translated into Korean and Chinese. The back-translation method ensured the standardization of questions. Surveys were administered using a standardized recruitment strategy and data collection methods. A total of 826 participants living in metropolitan areas from the United States (n=301), Korea (n=179), and Hong Kong (n=337) participated in the study. We found significant cultural differences in information processing preferences for online health information. A planned contrast test revealed that Koreans and Hongkongers showed more trust in experience-based health information sources (blogs: t451.50=11.21, Psocial networking sites [SNS]: t466.75=11.36, P<.001) and also reported using blogs (t515.31=6.67, P<.001) and SNS (t529.22=4.51, P<.001) more frequently than Americans. Americans showed a stronger preference for using expertise-based information sources (eg, Web

  15. Measuring Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Glaeser, Edward Ludwig; Laibson, David I.; Scheinkman, Jose A.; Soutter, Christine L.

    2000-01-01

    We combine two experiments and a survey to measure trust and trustworthiness—two key components of social capital. Standard attitudinal survey questions about trust predict trustworthy behavior in our experiments much better than they predict trusting behavior. Trusting behavior in the experiments is predicted by past trusting behavior outside of the experiments. When individuals are closer socially, both trust and trustworthiness rise. Trustworthiness declines when partners are of differen...

  16. Enacting Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Small and removed from the Spanish mainland, the Enclave of Ceuta has always depended\\ud on flows of goods and labour out of the Moroccan hinterland, with individuals from\\ud different ethnic and religious groups forming informal, flexible and personal economic\\ud bonds based on mutual ‘confianza’ (trust). Since its entry into the European Union in 1986,\\ud the Spanish government has erected a border-wall around the enclave, and introduced new\\ud migration policies branding many informal work...

  17. Weighing the Risks of Nuclear Energy and Climate Change: Trust in Different Information Sources, Perceived Risks, and Willingness to Pay for Alternatives to Nuclear Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Annukka; Paloniemi, Riikka; Varho, Vilja

    2017-03-01

    We examined how individuals perceive nuclear energy in the context of climate change mitigation and how their perceptions are associated with trust in different risk information sources. We analyzed the interrelationships between trust, perceived risk of nuclear power, climate change concern, perception of nuclear energy as an acceptable way to mitigate climate change, and willingness to pay (WTP) for alternatives to nuclear power. A nationwide survey (N = 967) collected in Finland was analyzed with structural equation modeling. The associations between trust and perceived risk of nuclear power, climate change concern, and perception of nuclear power as a way to mitigate climate change varied by the type of information source. Political party support and other background variables were associated with trust in different information sources. The effect of trust in information sources on WTP was mediated by perceived risks and benefits. The results will increase our understanding of how individuals perceive nuclear energy as a way to cut CO 2 emissions and the role of trust in different information sources in shaping nuclear risk perceptions and energy choices. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. The impact of a vaccine scare on parental views, trust and information needs: a qualitative study in Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine safety scares can undermine public confidence in vaccines and decrease immunisation rates. Understanding and addressing parental concerns arising during such scares can assist in lessening their impact. In Australia in April 2010 there was a temporary suspension of influenza vaccine for children under 5 years of age after reports of an increase in the rate of adverse events following vaccination. This qualitative study aimed to explore the impact of the vaccine suspension on parental knowledge, attitudes, trust, information needs, and intent related to influenza vaccination and broader immunisation programs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 parents of children attending childcare centres in Sydney, Australia, between June 2010 and May 2011. Centres were selected to include parents from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds. Interview transcripts were coded and analysed using an approach informed by grounded theory. Results Findings indicated that, for those who recalled the vaccine suspension, there was a lasting sense of uncertainty and confusion and a perceived lack of information. Parents had distinct information needs following the vaccine suspension, especially in regards to vaccine safety, testing and recommendations. For many, influenza vaccination intent was conditional on receipt of information from a trusted, authoritative source allaying safety concerns. Importantly, the impact of the scare was contained to influenza vaccines only, and not other vaccine programs. Conclusions Parental concerns and information gaps following a vaccine safety scare need to be actively addressed. We provide policy and practice suggestions for proactively managing such incidents, particularly in relation to communication of timely, targeted information to parents and immunisation providers.

  19. 25 CFR 115.802 - May a tribe make a request to OTFM to receive information about its trust account more frequently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 115.802 May a tribe make a request to OTFM to receive information about its trust account more frequently? Yes, a tribe may contact OTFM at any time to: (a) Request information about account transactions and balances; (b) Make arrangements to access account information electronically; or (c) Receive a...

  20. Perceived Threat and Corroboration: Key Factors That Improve a Predictive Model of Trust in Internet-based Health Information and Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Peter R; Briggs, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Background How do people decide which sites to use when seeking health advice online? We can assume, from related work in e-commerce, that general design factors known to affect trust in the site are important, but in this paper we also address the impact of factors specific to the health domain. Objective The current study aimed to (1) assess the factorial structure of a general measure of Web trust, (2) model how the resultant factors predicted trust in, and readiness to act on, the advice found on health-related websites, and (3) test whether adding variables from social cognition models to capture elements of the response to threatening, online health-risk information enhanced the prediction of these outcomes. Methods Participants were asked to recall a site they had used to search for health-related information and to think of that site when answering an online questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of a general Web trust questionnaire plus items assessing appraisals of the site, including threat appraisals, information checking, and corroboration. It was promoted on the hungersite.com website. The URL was distributed via Yahoo and local print media. We assessed the factorial structure of the measures using principal components analysis and modeled how well they predicted the outcome measures using structural equation modeling (SEM) with EQS software. Results We report an analysis of the responses of participants who searched for health advice for themselves (N = 561). Analysis of the general Web trust questionnaire revealed 4 factors: information quality, personalization, impartiality, and credible design. In the final SEM model, information quality and impartiality were direct predictors of trust. However, variables specific to eHealth (perceived threat, coping, and corroboration) added substantially to the ability of the model to predict variance in trust and readiness to act on advice on the site. The final model achieved a satisfactory fit: χ2 5 = 10

  1. NOAA's Regional Climate Services Program: Building Relationships with Partners and Customers to Deliver Trusted Climate Information at Usable Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E. L.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Federal agencies across multiple sectors from transportation to health, emergency management and agriculture, are now requiring their key stakeholders to identify and plan for climate-related impacts. Responding to the drumbeat for climate services at the regional and local scale, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) formed its Regional Climate Services (RCS) program to include Regional Climate Services Directors (RCSD), Regional Climate Centers, and state climatologists in a partnership. Since 2010, the RCS program has engaged customers across the country and amongst many of the nation's key economic sectors to compile information requirements, deliver climate-related products and services, and build partnerships among federal agencies and their regional climate entities. The talk will include a sketch from the Eastern Region that may shed light on the interaction of the multiple entities working at the regional scale. Additionally, we will show examples of our interagency work with the Department of Interior, the Department of Agriculture, and others in NOAA to deliver usable and trusted climate information and resources. These include webinars, print material, and face-to-face customer engagements to gather and respond to information requirements. NOAA/National Centers for Environmental Information's RCSDs work on-the-ground to learn from customers about their information needs and their use of existing tools and resources. As regional leads, the RCSDs work within NOAA and with our regional partners to ensure the customer receives a broad picture of the tools and information from across the nation.

  2. The Norwegian National Summary Care Record: a qualitative analysis of doctors' use of and trust in shared patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyb, Kari; Warth, Line Lundvoll

    2018-04-06

    among doctors is based on their preference to place their trust in - and therefore more often utilise - automatically updated information. In addition, the doctors' lack of trust in manually updated information might have severe implications for the future success of the SCR and for similar digital tools for sharing patient information.

  3. Information needs, acceptability of risk, trust, and reliance: The case of National Predictive Services customers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Heidi. Bigler-Cole

    2010-01-01

    Making complex risk-related decisions involves a degree of uncertainty. How that uncertainty is addressed or presented in reports or data tables can be tailored to meet information users’ needs and preferences. Involving the recipients of risk-related information in the design of information to be delivered (including the types of information delivered, format, and...

  4. Information needs, acceptability of risk, trust, and reliance: the case of national predictive services customers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Heidi Bigler-Cole

    2010-01-01

    Making complex risk-related decisions involves a degree of uncertainty. How that uncertainty is addressed or presented in reports or data tables can be tailored to meet information users’ needs and preferences. Involving the recipients of risk-related information in the design of information to be delivered (including the types of information delivered, format, and...

  5. Alberta's Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society : voluntary property purchase program information booklet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Alberta's industrial heartland is home to one of Canada's largest concentrations of petroleum, refining, petrochemical and chemical production facilities. To date, more than $25 billion has been invested in major industrial plants in the heartland and adjacent Strathcona industrial regions by major corporations, and more investment is expected in the future. The Industrial Heartland Collaboration to Address Resident Interests is a process in which area residents, municipalities, industries and the provincial government are working collaboratively to resolve concerns related to the cumulative operations and expansion of industry. This paper presented details of the Alberta Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society's voluntary purchase program, which was initiated to provide an equitable, efficient and economical process of acquiring properties of rural landowners currently located within region who voluntarily wish to relocate outside of the policy area. Application and eligibility details were presented, as well as an outline of the property appraisal process. Details of the compliance and real property report required by the program were presented. Issues concerning relocation and moving expenses were discussed, as well as details of the program's flat rate inconvenience payment.

  6. Alberta's Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society : voluntary property purchase program information booklet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Alberta's industrial heartland is home to one of Canada's largest concentrations of petroleum, refining, petrochemical and chemical production facilities. To date, more than $25 billion has been invested in major industrial plants in the heartland and adjacent Strathcona industrial regions by major corporations, and more investment is expected in the future. The Industrial Heartland Collaboration to Address Resident Interests is a process in which area residents, municipalities, industries and the provincial government are working collaboratively to resolve concerns related to the cumulative operations and expansion of industry. This paper presented details of the Alberta Industrial Heartland Land Trust Society's voluntary purchase program, which was initiated to provide an equitable, efficient and economical process of acquiring properties of rural landowners currently located within region who voluntarily wish to relocate outside of the policy area. Application and eligibility details were presented, as well as an outline of the property appraisal process. Details of the compliance and real property report required by the program were presented. Issues concerning relocation and moving expenses were discussed, as well as details of the program's flat rate inconvenience payment

  7. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Lünser, Gabriele; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a trust game. If trustees are anonymous, outcomes are poor: trustees are not trustworthy, and trustors do not trust. If trustees are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples but is still at only a third of the first...... best. Adding more information by granting trustors access to all trustees' complete history has, somewhat surprisingly, no effect. On the other hand, we find that competition, coupled with some minimal information, eliminates the trust problem almost completely...

  8. Trust and Influence in the Information Age: Operational Requirements for Network Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blatt, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    ...) based on information technology. This thesis will show that the Information RMA not only exists, but will also reshape how we plan, operate, educate, organize, train, and equip forces for the 21st century...

  9. The Determinants of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    , in particular emphasizing the role of social trust. This is in turn defined as the confidence people have that strangers, i.e. fellow citizens on whom they have no specific information, will not take advantage of them (Uslaner, 2002; Bjørnskov, 2006). Using the answers to the World Values Survey question “In...... general, do you think that most people can be trusted?”, the by now quite substantial literature has found that social trust is associated with a set of different macroeconomic outcomes: economic growth, the rule of law and overall quality of governance, corruption, education, the extent of violent crime...... and subjective well-being are all influenced by the propensity of people within any nation to trust each other. The questions are therefore where trust comes from and whether or not it can be affected by public policy. The answers to these questions seem to divide researchers into two camps: the optimists...

  10. Social relationships and trust

    OpenAIRE

    Binzel, Christine; Fehr, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    While social relationships play an important role for individuals to cope with missing market institutions, they also limit individuals' range of trading partners. This paper aims at understanding the determinants of trust at various social distances when information asymmetries are present. Among participants from an informal housing area in Cairo we find that the increase in trust following a reduction in social distance comes from the fact that trustors are much more inclined to follow the...

  11. Trust us Trust Thorp Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, John

    1995-01-01

    board, achieved through regular news releases, organized letter writing to the relevant authorities and the collection of signatures for petitions. Once the workforce was behind the campaign, TRUST US was taken to the west Cumbrian community, providing quality information through news releases, media advertisements and a specially produced brochure which highlighted the reasons behind TRUST US. This was sent to all MPs, MEPs, councils and Trade Unions throughout the UK and Ireland. The campaign also targeted MPs and MEPs with specific letters setting out the case for THORP. However, the organised opposition' to THORP did not come from the local area, but from the rest of the UK, Ireland and Europe, lead by nuclear free local authorities and green pressure groups, which severely limited the effectiveness of the campaign. It was decided that yet another new approach was needed. On 2 August 1993, proposals for a national tour of the- campaign were presented to the Sellafield Trade Unions. The tour objectives were to take the TRUST US campaign to the rest of the UK, demonstrating that the plant had strong support with two key areas: the workforce and the local community. The overriding tone of the entire tour was to 'trust us' as workers in the nuclear industry, which was backed up by the tour message: W e, the Sellafield workers and the west Cumbrian community have trust in THORP. The new plant is economically and environmentally sound. We have the work; let us get on with that work. The tour would target the media centres of the UK, he Nuclear Free Local Authority (NFLA) areas and Sellafield's suppliers within these areas. A group of five workers plus a member of the clerks committee would make up the tour messengers, each to be given extensive media training. The tour would be given a high profile with a specific logo, designed to ensure that the tour aid its message of 'trust us' was given image prominence. Posters, leaflets and badges would also carry the logo. Given

  12. Exploring trust in online health information: a study of user experiences of patients.co.uk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anna; Johnson, Frances

    2016-12-01

    This feature has been co-authored by Anna Cunningham and her supervisor Frances Johnson. It is based on the research Anna conducted for her dissertation, which she completed as part of her MA in Library and Information Management at Manchester Metropolitan University. The study explored how people assess the trustworthiness of online health information, and the participants were asked to talk aloud whilst viewing information on the consumer health information website patients.co.uk. The study confirmed that their assessment was based on the information usefulness and credibility as well as identifying the factors relating to information quality and website design that helped to form these judgements. A. M. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Pharma Websites and "Professionals-Only" Information: The Implications for Patient Trust and Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark Alan; Hershkop, Eliyakim; Graber, Rachel Ilana

    2017-05-24

    Access to information is critical to a patient's valid exercise of autonomy. One increasingly important source of medical information is the Internet. Individuals often turn to drug company ("pharma") websites to look for drug information. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is information on pharma websites that is embargoed: Is there information that is hidden from the patient unless she attests to being a health care provider? We discuss the implications of our findings for health care ethics. We reviewed a convenience sample of 40 pharma websites for "professionals-only" areas and determined whether access to those areas was restricted, requiring attestation that the user is a health care professional in the United States. Of the 40 websites reviewed, 38 had information that was labeled for health care professionals-only. Of these, 24 required the user to certify their status as a health care provider before they were able to access this "hidden" information. Many pharma websites include information in a "professionals-only" section. Of these, the majority require attestation that the user is a health care professional before they can access the information. This leaves patients with two bad choices: (1) not accessing the information or (2) lying about being a health care professional. Both of these outcomes are unacceptable. In the first instance, the patient's access to information is limited, potentially impairing their health and their ability to make reasonable and well-informed decisions. In the second instance, they may be induced to lie in a medical setting. "Teaching" patients to lie may have adverse consequences for the provider-patient relationship. ©Mark Alan Graber, Eliyakim Hershkop, Rachel Ilana Graber. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 24.05.2017.

  14. The israeli virtual national health record: a robust national health information infrastructure based on a firm foundation of trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiag, Esther

    2005-01-01

    In many developed countries, a coordinated effort is underway to build national and regional Health Information Infrastructures (HII) for the linking of disparate sites of care, so that an access to a comprehensive Health Record will be feasible when critical medical decisions are made [1]. However, widespread adoption of such national projects is hindered by a series of barriers- regulatory, technical, financial and cultural. Above all, a robust national HII requires a firm foundation of trust: patients must be assured that their confidential health information will not be misused and that there are adequate legal remedies in the event of inappropriate behavior on the part of either authorized or unauthorized parties[2].The Israeli evolving National HII is an innovative state of the art implementation of a wide-range clinical inter-organizational data exchange, based on a unique concept of virtually temporary sharing of information. A logically connection of multiple caregivers and medical organizations creates a patient-centric virtual repository, without centralization. All information remains in its original format, location, system and ownership. On demand, relevant information is instantly integrated and delivered to the point of care. This system, successfully covering more than half of Israel's population, is currently evolving from a voluntary private-public partnership (dbMOTION and CLALIT HMO) to a formal national reality. The governmental leadership, now taking over the process, is essential to achieve a full potential of the health information technology. All partners of the Israeli health system are coordinated in concert with each other, driven with a shared vision - realizing that a secured, private, confidential health information exchange is assured.

  15. Social capital, trust in health information, and acceptance of Measles-Rubella vaccination campaign in Tamil Nadu: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, B; Gopichandran, V; Kosalram, K

    2018-06-18

    Parents' decision about vaccination of children is influenced by social relationships and sources of information. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of social capital and trust in health information on the status of Measles-Rubella (MR) vaccination campaign in Tamil Nadu. This was a case-control study carried out in Kancheepuram district in Tamil Nadu where the MR vaccination campaign offered by Government of Tamil Nadu had poor acceptance. Cases were parents of children who had refused the MR vaccine and controls were parents having children in the same age group who had accepted the vaccine. Data on social capital and trust in health information were collected by using social capital scale developed by the researchers and trust in the source of information was measured by using simple questions on the level of trust in the information source. Nonadministration of MR vaccine was high among young parents and parents of younger children. Vaccine acceptance was higher when it was offered at school (P social media and WhatsApp information. Greater levels of health-related physical social capital led to greater vaccine hesitancy. Multivariate analysis revealed that greater the age of the child, better parental attitudes toward vaccination, poorer health-related physical social capital, and greater trust in health information provided by school teachers led to overall greater acceptance of the MR vaccine. Strong homogeneous bonding social capital had a negative influence on MR vaccine acceptance. Schools and school teachers played a vital role in influencing parental decision to vaccinate.

  16. Youth-Driven Information Privacy Education Campaign 2015-16: Digital Trust Foundation Final Grant Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristen L.; Kiesler, Tina; Malone, Summer

    2016-01-01

    This project involved the development of a comprehensive and educational social marketing communications plan designed to help educate middle-school-aged youth about information use and abuse online. We achieved our goal of enhancing digital information literacy while developing critical thinking and creative communication skills for…

  17. Trust in Testimony about Strangers: Young Children Prefer Reliable Informants Who Make Positive Attributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseovski, Janet J.

    2012-01-01

    Young children have been described as critical consumers of information, particularly in the domain of language learning. Indeed, children are more likely to learn novel words from people with accurate histories of object labeling than with inaccurate ones. But what happens when informant testimony conflicts with a tendency to see the world in a…

  18. Students' Approaches to the Evaluation of Digital Information: Insights from Their Trust Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Frances; Sbaffi, Laura; Rowley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to an understanding of the role of experience in the evaluation phase of the information search process. A questionnaire-based survey collected data from 1st and 3rd-year undergraduate students regarding the factors that influence their judgment of the trustworthiness of online health information. Exploratory and…

  19. Information, trust and pesticide overuse: Interactions between retailers and cotton farmers in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, S.; Bluemling, B.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of adequate extension services, retailers have become the major information source for farmers’ pesticide use in rural China. Pesticide application for smallholders is rather complex, and mistakes can lead to significant crop losses. Farmers, therefore, seek sources of information

  20. User Resistance and Trust in a Clinical RFID Employee Location Tracking Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    User resistance has been identified as a factor in information systems implementation failures in the health care industry. RFID, radio frequency identification, is being incorporated into new health care information systems in order to effect cost reductions by tracking, identifying and monitoring individuals and medical items. This is the first…

  1. 77 FR 50175 - Submission for Review: Information Collection 3206-NEW; Questionnaire for Public Trust Positions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... by continuous evaluation. OSD-HR recommended that the Personal Interview area of the instructions... instructions that inform the applicant that the scope of a personal interview may exceed the time covered by... respondent's personal history. The burden on the respondent will vary depending upon how the information...

  2. Rethinking trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  3. From transformative learning to social change? Using action research to explore and improve informal complaints management in an NHS trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anki Odelius

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of complaints from patients and/or carers concerning aspects of care has increased over time. Yet, in spite of a growing body of national and international literature on healthcare complaints, there is a lack of knowledge around how nurses and midwives manage informal complaints at ward level, or staff needs in relation to this. Aim: Using an action research approach with mixed methods, four phases and four cycles, the aim was to explore informal complaints management by nurses and midwives at ward level. We discuss the action research process primarily in connection with learning and service change, drawing from the qualitative data in this paper. Findings: The analysis of the collected qualitative data resulted in three main themes, related to the complexities of complaints and complaints management, staff support needs and the existing ambiguous complaints systems, which are hard for staff and service users to negotiate. The action research approach facilitated learning and change in participants in relation to complaints management, in the collaborating trust. Conclusions: The extant body of research on complaints does not sufficiently recognise the complexity of complaints and informal complaints management, or the complaints systems that are in place. Needs-based staff training can help support staff to manage informal complaints more effectively. Implications for practice: • There needs to be recognition of the complexities involved in complaints management • Complaints systems need to be clearer for the benefit of service users and staff • Staff need training and support that is tailored to their needs to improve their response to complaints, leading to a better patient experience • Limited interventions, informed by staff needs, can lead to change and act as a catalyst for a wider change in informal complaints management

  4. Coordinating collaborative joint efforts with suppliers: the effects of trust transaction specific investment and information network in the Dutch flower industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claro, D.P.; Oliveira Claro, de P.B.; Hagelaar, J.L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: It is the aim of this paper to discuss the value of trust and the effects of transaction specific investments for the relative degree of collaborative joint efforts, and also to assess the moderating effect of the information network on such joint efforts. Design/methodology/approach: The

  5. Does a Well-Informed Employee Have a More Positive Attitude Toward Change? The Mediating Role of Psychological Contract Fulfillment, Trust, and Perceived Need for Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Sjoerd; Schalk, René; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of psychological contract fulfillment, trust, and perceived need for change in the relationship between change information and employee attitude toward organizational change. As one of the first studies in organizational change research, attitude toward change

  6. Filtering and Trust as Tools for the Operational Commander in the Information Age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Alan D

    2006-01-01

    ... has. An analysis of this environment points to the impact of network centric warfare, information superiority, shared situational awareness, adaptability, and transparency on the commander's decision-making process...

  7. Trust and Involvement in Tourism Social Media and Web-Based Travel Information Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; KR. Steen Jacobsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    -based information. The study also examines tourists' involvement in developing and sharing of virtual content. It critically analyses technological mediation through electronic word-of-mouth and involvement factors related to virtual dissemination of travel narratives. Moreover, the paper discusses information......While utilisation of electronic social media is increasingly relevant as tourism practices, there is still a deficiency of empirical research on tourists' creation and use of various types of online content. This study maps and explores Scandinavian tourists' perceptions of Web 1.0 and Web 2.......0 information sources and scrutinises influence of electronic social media on holidaymakers' information sharing, based on a summer season survey in the mature and well-known destination of Mallorca, Spain. Empirical evidence is presented on perceived trustworthiness of social media platforms and other Internet...

  8. 77 FR 28543 - Nationwide Health Information Network: Conditions for Trusted Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... This request for information (RFI) reflects ONC's current thinking regarding the approach ONC should... the States or covered entities (as a matter of organizational policy) are free to expand.\\6\\ \\6\\ (2000...

  9. Blockchain Technology: A Data Framework to Improve Validity, Trust, and Accountability of Information Exchange in Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Eric; Riddell, Jeff; Ankel, Felix; Cabrera, Daniel

    2018-06-12

    Health professions educators face multiple challenges, among them the need to adapt educational methods to new technologies. In the last decades multiple new digital platforms have appeared in the learning arena, including massive open online courses and social media-based education. The major critique of these novel methods is the lack of the ability to ascertain the origin, validity, and accountability of the knowledge that is created, shared, and acquired. Recently, a novel technology based on secured data storage and transmission, called blockchain, has emerged as a way to generate networks where validity, trust, and accountability can be created. Conceptually blockchain is an open, public, distributed, and secure digital registry where information transactions are secured and have a clear origin, explicit pathways, and concrete value. Health professions education based on the blockchain will potentially allow improved tracking of content and the individuals who create it, quantify educational impact on multiple generations of learners, and build a relative value of educational interventions. Furthermore, institutions adopting blockchain technology would be able to provide certification and credentialing of healthcare professionals with no intermediaries. There is potential for blockchain to significantly change the future of health professions education and radically transform how patients, professionals, educators, and learners interact around safe, valid, and accountable information.

  10. Dewey Redux: Virtual Dewey Resources Deliver Trusted, Familiar 21st-Century Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamich, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Where do school librarians go to find out the latest on how the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system is being used (and will be used) in the 21st-century virtual-knowledge world? The answer is two great websites containing: (1) the most current information on both Dewey and linked data at dewey.info>; (2) Dewey here-and-now…

  11. In search of informed discretion: an experimental investigation of fairness and trust reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, V.; van Rinsum, M.; Towry, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates managerial discretion in compensation decisions in a team setting, in which a measure of the team's aggregate performance is readily available from the accounting system. Specifically, we examine the willingness of managers to obtain additional, costly information that would

  12. Developing Trusting Relationships Through Communication

    OpenAIRE

    YOKOYAMA, Izumi; OBARA, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the formation of trusting relationships between people through communication. To foster trusting relationships, individuals should disclose private and personal information. However, disclosing such information has both costs and benefits; therefore, both parties must decide on the optimal level of self-disclosure based on a variety of factors, such as the existing level of relationship and the benefits of deepening the trust level. We construct an economics model th...

  13. TRUST: A Successful Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership Designed to Improve and Promote Urban Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, H.; Drantch, K.; Steenhuis, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present an NSF-funded collaborative formal-informal partnership for urban Earth science teacher preparation and professional development. This model brings together The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and Brooklyn and Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY) to address science-impoverished classrooms that lack highly qualified teachers by focusing on Earth science teacher certification. Project design was based on identified needs in the local communities and schools, careful analysis of content knowledge mastery required for Earth science teacher certification, and existing impediments to certification. The problem-based approach required partners to push policy envelopes and to invent new ways of articulating content and pedagogy at both intra- and inter-institutional levels. One key element of the project is involvement of the local board of education, teachers, and administrators in initial design and ongoing assessment. Project components include formal Earth systems science courses, a summer institute primarily led and delivered by AMNH scientists through an informal series of lectures coupled to workshops led by AMNH educators, a mechanism for assigning course credit for informal experiences, development of new teaching approaches that include teacher action plans and an external program of evaluation. The principal research strand of this project focuses on the resulting model for formal-informal teacher education partnership, the project's impact on participating teachers, policy issues surrounding the model and the changes required for its development and implementation, and its potential for Earth science education reform. As the grant funded portion of the project draws to a close we begin to analyze data collected over the past 3 years. Third-year findings of the project's external evaluation indicate that the problem-based approach has been highly successful, particularly its impact on participating teachers. In addition

  14. Can consumers trust web-based information about celiac disease? Accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and readability of information on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C; Newton, Kimberly P; Ogletree, Sandra P; Conner, Kristen K; Ingegneri, Sarah E; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2012-04-04

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1% of the US population. Disease is characterized by damage to the small intestinal lining and malabsorption of nutrients. Celiac disease is activated in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary exposure to gluten in wheat and gluten-like proteins in rye and barley. Symptoms are diverse and include gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment requires strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The Internet is a major source of health information about celiac disease. Nonetheless, information about celiac disease that is available on various websites often is questioned by patients and other health care professionals regarding its reliability and content. To determine the accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and readability of information on 100 of the most widely accessed websites that provide information on celiac disease. Using the search term celiac disease, we analyzed 100 of the top English-language websites published by academic, commercial, nonprofit, and other professional (nonacademic) sources for accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and reading grade level. Each site was assessed independently by 3 reviewers. Website accuracy and comprehensiveness were probed independently using a set of objective core information about celiac disease. We used 19 general criteria to assess website transparency. Website readability was determined by the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level. Results for each parameter were analyzed independently. In addition, we weighted and combined parameters to generate an overall score, termed website quality. We included 98 websites in the final analysis. Of these, 47 (48%) provided specific information about celiac disease that was less than 95% accurate (ie, the predetermined cut-off considered a minimum acceptable level of accuracy). Independent of whether the information posted was accurate, 51 of 98 (52%) websites contained less than

  15. Knowing when to trust a teacher: The contribution of category status and sample composition to young children's judgments of informant trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Chris A

    2018-09-01

    Two experiments examined the extent to which category status influences children's attention to the composition of evidence samples provided by different informants. Children were told about two informants, each of whom presented different samples of evidence, and then were asked to judge which informant they would trust to help them learn something new. The composition of evidence samples was manipulated such that one sample included either a large number (n = 5) or a diverse range of exemplars relative to the other sample, which included either a small number (n = 2) or a homogeneous range of exemplars. Experiment 1 revealed that participants (N = 37; M age = 4.76 years) preferred to place their trust in the informant who presented the large or diverse sample when each informant was labeled "teacher" but exhibited no preference when each informant was labeled "child." Experiment 2 revealed developmental differences in responses when labels and sample composition were pitted against each other. Younger children (n = 32; M age = 3.42 years) consistently trusted the "teacher" regardless of the composition of the sample the informant was said to have provided, whereas older children (n = 30; M age = 5.54 years) consistently trusted the informant who provided the large or diverse sample regardless of whether it was provided by a "teacher" or a "child." These results have important implications for understanding the interplay between children's category knowledge and their evaluation of evidence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Trust and Political Information: Attitudinal Change in Participants in the Youth Parliament in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Fuks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the impact of socializing experiences on the political attitudes of youngsters. More specifically, our goal is to evaluate the impact of the Youth Parliament program on youngsters’ confidence levels in the Minas Gerais State Assembly (MGSA. The analysis focuses on the cognitive foundations of attitudes and results show a substantial increase in confidence levels in MGSA, an increase associated with the acquisition of information on the institution. It is asserted that the increase in confidence in MGSA represents and attitudinal “gain”. The study design involves quasi-experimental research on a non-random sample. We conducted two rounds of interviews in 2008, prior and subsequent to the program, with 335 participants (167 in the treatment group; and 168 in the control group.

  17. Beyond informed choice: Prenatal risk assessment, decision-making and trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nete Schwennesen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2004 prenatal risk assessment (PRA was implemented as a routine offer to all pregnant women in Denmark. It was argued that primarily the new programme would give all pregnant women an informed choice about whether to undergo prenatal testing. On the basis of ethnographic fieldwork in an ultrasound clinic in Denmark and interviews with pregnant women and their partners, we call into question the assumption underlying the new guidelines that more choice and more objective information is a source of empowerment and control. We focus on one couple's experience of PRA. This case makes it evident how supposed choices in the context of PRA may not be experienced as such. Rather, they are experienced as complicated processes of meaning-making in the relational space between the clinical setting, professional authority and the social life of the couples. PRA users are reluctant to make choices and abandon health professionals as authoritative experts in the face of complex risk knowledge. When assumptions about autonomy and self-determination are inscribed into the social practice of PRA, authority is transferred to the couple undergoing PRA and a new configuration of responsibility evolves between the couple and their relationship to the foetus. It is argued that al-though the new programme of prenatal testing in Denmark presents itself in opposition to quasi-eugenic and paternalistic forms of governing couples' decisions it represents another form of government that works through the notion of choice. An ethics of a shared responsibility of PRA and its outcome would be more in agreement with how decisions are actually made.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v2i1.1687

  18. Can Consumers Trust Web-Based Information About Celiac Disease? Accuracy, Comprehensiveness, Transparency, and Readability of Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C; Newton, Kimberly P; Ogletree, Sandra P; Conner, Kristen K; Ingegneri, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1% of the US population. Disease is characterized by damage to the small intestinal lining and malabsorption of nutrients. Celiac disease is activated in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary exposure to gluten in wheat and gluten-like proteins in rye and barley. Symptoms are diverse and include gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment requires strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The Internet is a major source of health information about celiac disease. Nonetheless, information about celiac disease that is available on various websites often is questioned by patients and other health care professionals regarding its reliability and content. Objectives To determine the accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and readability of information on 100 of the most widely accessed websites that provide information on celiac disease. Methods Using the search term celiac disease, we analyzed 100 of the top English-language websites published by academic, commercial, nonprofit, and other professional (nonacademic) sources for accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and reading grade level. Each site was assessed independently by 3 reviewers. Website accuracy and comprehensiveness were probed independently using a set of objective core information about celiac disease. We used 19 general criteria to assess website transparency. Website readability was determined by the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level. Results for each parameter were analyzed independently. In addition, we weighted and combined parameters to generate an overall score, termed website quality. Results We included 98 websites in the final analysis. Of these, 47 (48%) provided specific information about celiac disease that was less than 95% accurate (ie, the predetermined cut-off considered a minimum acceptable level of accuracy). Independent of whether the information posted was accurate, 51 of

  19. Factors that hinder organ donation: religio-cultural or lack of information and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Noh, Abdillah; Jajri, Idris; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Manikam, Rishya; Abdullah, Nawi

    2013-06-01

    This paper examines factors that influence Malaysian persons with a tertiary level of education on their willingness to donate organs. A survey was done in the Klang Valley (Kuala Lumpur and its suburbs) at several designated locations. A total of 1420 people were approached, and we focused the sample of 688 respondents with a tertiary level of education. Respondents were given 2 sets of answers: (1) a religio-cultural category and (2) a structural category. They were allowed to choose more than 1 reason. Our findings revealed that only 47.5 percent of respondents declined becoming organ donors. The highest frequency recorded was "I am not convinced that my body part will be used beneficially " (30.1%), followed by "I do not have enough access to information " (29.2%), "I want my body to remain intact after death " (16.9%), and "It is against my religion " (9.9%). Our study revealed that religio-cultural factors are not a prime explanation for the lack of organ donation in the Malaysian case. This study suggests that better procurement methods used by dedicated agencies, as well as better education, could reduce the shortage between organ supply and demand.

  20. Trust matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lise Rosendal

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a contribution to the debate about health service utilisation and the role of trust in fostering demand for health services in sub-Saharan Africa. It is framed as a narrative literature review based on a thematic analysis of nine empirical, qualitative studies. For the purposes...... of this article trust is defined as a voluntary course of action, which involves the optimistic expectation that the trustee will do no harm to the trustor and is increasingly perceived as an important influence on health system functioning. The article looks at trust issues in interpersonal, intergroup...... and institutional situations. The findings of the review point to four elements that are important for trust to develop in health sector relationships: the sensitive use of discretionary power by health workers, perceived empathy by patients of the health workers, the quality of medical care and workplace...

  1. An Empirical Study on Exploring Relationship among Information Quality, E-satisfaction, E-trust and Young Generation’s Commitment to Chinese Online Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaullah Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among online retailing information quality, e-satisfaction, e-trust and young generation customer’s commitment in mainland China. The study variables have considerable importance in e-tailers performance. The data were collected based on a sample of 383 students from Chinese universities during the first quarter of 2014. We used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation modeling (SEM to evaluate the hypotheses about the relationship among model constructs. Thus, all the hypotheses developed in the study were positively confirmed except one. Therefore, the investigated variables are reinforcing the theory and previous research in this field. This study reveals interesting implications of information quality, e-satisfaction, e-trust and customers commitment that are useful to both academicians and practitioners.

  2. Building trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Meriel

    1995-01-01

    'Activate' is the energy magazine for secondary schools and is part of the Education Programme which is managed on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum by AEA Technology. activate is the flagship communication device between the British Nuclear Industry Forum's Education Programme and secondary schools in the UK. It was developed from a previous publication, Nuclear Bulletin. There is a need for the nuclear industry to build trust with teachers and students in the UK, where for a long time, everything that the industry has said, written or printed has been disregarded by school teachers as propaganda. Over the last few years the industry has put in a great deal of effort to position itself as a provider of educationally sound and socially acceptable information. 'Activate' was an evolution of this idea and there was a hole in the market for a lively, activity and article based magazine that could be used in the classroom. The target audience is principally teachers of science, mathematics and geography, but also includes teachers of art,, English and history with students of between 11 and 18. The results were very positive in that teachers appreciated the colourful and lively nature of activate and they felt that it provided information and opinions in an un biased and non-propagandist way. Their comments about layout, number of activities style of presentation were taken into account and during the summer of 1994 activate was remodelled ready for re launch in September. The feedback so far is good with more teachers signing up every week to receive their own free copy

  3. "That Should Be Left to Doctors, That's What They are There For!"-Exploring the Reflexivity and Trust of Young Adults When Seeking Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Álvaro; Abreu, Liliana; Vilar-Correia, Maria Rui; Borlido-Santos, Júlio

    2017-09-01

    This paper explores the health information-seeking practices of healthy young adults and how they assess and rank sources of information through a qualitative study. The findings show that participants (a) are strongly committed to searching for information about health and lifestyle, especially via the Internet; (b) healthcare professionals were perceived as the most reliable source of health information and advice; (c) online health information, although frequently accessed and experienced as empowering, is seen as a potentially unreliable source. Findings evidence how becoming better informed about health-related topics plays a pivotal role in individuals' lives, most notably by using the Internet. Participants were able to reflect about what it means to know about health. The construction of trust regarding health information involved a heuristic process vis-à-vis source reliability and perceived credibility that places doctors as the most trustworthy medium of medical advice and health information. We conclude that participants' trust toward professionals suggests the preference and need for more personalized care; and it is a response to the ambiguity and uncertainty that permeates the health information landscape, particularly that which is web-based.

  4. Competition Fosters Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Ruchala, Gabriele K.; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We study the effects of reputation and competition in a stylized market for experience goods. If interaction is anonymous, such markets perform poorly: sellers are not trustworthy, and buyers do not trust sellers. If sellers are identifiable and can, hence, build a reputation, efficiency quadruples...... but is still at only a third of the first best. Adding more information by granting buyers access to all sellers’ complete history has, somewhat surprisingly, no effect. On the other hand, we find that competition, coupled with some minimal information, eliminates the trust problem almost completely...

  5. "Hot", "Cold" and "Warm" Information and Higher Education Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, K.; Mangan, J.; Hughes, A.; Davies, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on the notions of "hot" and "cold" knowledge in analysing the responses of students to the relevance of different information and sources of such information in university choice. Analysis of questionnaire and focus group data from prospective and first-year undergraduate students provides evidence that many…

  6. Can we trust robots?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is

  7. Low-Level Evidence Suggests that Perceived Ability to Evaluate and Trust Online Health Information is Associated with Low Health Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Alcock

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To review, based on research evidence, the correlation between low health literacy and four outcomes of interest: (1 the ability to evaluate online health information based on (2 perceived reliability and accuracy, (3 trust in the Internet as an information source, and (4 the application of established evaluation criteria. Design – Systematic review and narrative synthesis. Setting –MEDLINE, PsycInfo, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete as well as articles discovered through the snowball method. Subjects – 38 studies identified through a systematic literature search. Methods – An exhaustive list of potential articles was gathered through searching five online databases and Google Scholar, and hand searching of references. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied in a two-phase screening process in which two researchers participated to address reliability. Data, including study characteristics and metadata, predictors, assessment methods, and outcomes, were extracted from relevant studies, and then synthesized narratively. Main Results – Following duplication removal 13,632 records were retrieved, 254 of which were identified for full-text assessment. Thirty-eight studies met the eligibility criteria. All studies were non-experimental and therefore graded as a low level of evidence; 35 were cross-sectional designs, 1 a focus group, and 2 were observational studies. Studies varied widely in population definition and sample size and were published between 2001 and 2013, primarily in North America. Overall, a positive association was identified between health literacy and outcomes related to the ability to evaluate or trust Internet health information, while findings were inconsistent related to perceived quality of information and the application of evaluative criteria. Four studies examined the impact of health literacy levels on one or more of the outcomes of interest. The most prevalent

  8. Application of Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Method in Trust Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunan Ma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Trust can play an important role for the sharing of resources and information in open network environments. Trust quantification is thus an important issue in dynamic trust management. By considering the fuzziness and uncertainty of trust, in this paper, we propose a fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method to quantify trust along with a trust quantification algorithm. Simulation results show that the trust quantification algorithm that we propose can effectively quantify trust and the quantified value of an entity's trust is consistent with the behavior of the entity.

  9. How information technology can help sustainability and aid in combating global warming[ACI SP-234-44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratova, I.L.; Goldfarb, I. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Information Technology

    2006-07-01

    This presentation addressed the need to reduce the environmental impact of concrete production. Unit based carbon dioxide emissions in cement production vary from 0.73 to 0.99 kg carbon dioxide per kg of cement. As such, annual cement manufacturing contributes significantly to global warming. The challenge facing the concrete industry regarding sustainable growth was discussed. It was suggested that sustainable development in the cement industry can be accomplished not only by making an industry wide shift to conservation of energy and materials, but by making greater use of the Internet for information technology on sustainable construction materials such as lightweight aggregates and lightweight concrete. The paper outlined the evolution of various methods of disseminating research results on the durability of concrete at the United States Army Corps of Engineers Treat Island marine exposure site. The results indicated that structural lightweight and semi-lightweight concrete provides long-term durability in a marine environment. It was noted that knowledge utilization includes technology transfer, information dissemination and utilization, research utilization, innovation, and organizational change. The paper emphasized the use of web portals as a tool for improving access to practical information on a full range of sustainable industry practices, products and resources. These tools allow side-by side comparison of testing results for different concrete mixtures and support decision-making on the choice of environmentally sound and durable concrete. The authors demonstrated by advantages of using modern information technology tools by suggesting that with the development of a full scale Portal, the Expanded Shale, Clay, and Slate Institute (ESCSI) could become a global source of credible information and expertise in the area of lightweight concrete. As such ESCSI could be in a position to influence innovation and technology transfer to the industry. The paper

  10. Trust arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Public Information Centre of JSC Mashinastroitelny Zavod ('Elemash ' was founded in 1990. Before that any information about the enterprise (being, by the way' manufacturer of nuclear fuel for 20 NPPs, of Russia and a number of foreign countries) were forbidden to be given in mass medial conventional conversations outside the factory and even in the families of the employees. This caused the most fantastic ideas about materials and technologies used here as well as their impact on the environment in Electrostal (50 km on the east of Moscow) where the enterprise is situated. Since the moment of its creation the Centre is not only informing the population about the technological and ecological peculiarities of nuclear fuel manufacturing, but also forms positive attitude both, towards the activity of the enterprise atomic energy as a whole. During the 4 years of its existence te Center was visited by more than 5.000 people; the majority of them are schoolchildren students with whom we are in close contact because we realize that the 'pro-nuclear' orientation of the mentality should be founded in the early age when humans world outlook is-formed. In the more aged group the majority are the workers of the factories nearby, military and retired people and reporters of te town's newspapers. We've good amount of demonstration materials, which speak in favour of the atomic energy and enterprises of the nuclear fuel cycle engaged in it. These are NPPs schemes, mock-ups of nuclear reactors, assemblies manufactured by the factory and a wide variety of films on nuclear energy. Video films made in the main workshops are of peculiar interest; automation of the technology process, providing not only for nuclear fuel quality but also for high level of nuclear and radiation safety during its production. We pay attention not only to traditional arguments in favour of the atomic energy, but draw attention of the public to the fact that a factory engaged in the nuclear fuel

  11. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...

  12. Trusted Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMPBELL, PHILIP L.; PIERSON, LYNDON G.; WITZKE, EDWARD L.

    1999-01-01

    In the world of computers a trusted object is a collection of possibly-sensitive data and programs that can be allowed to reside and execute on a computer, even on an adversary's machine. Beyond the scope of one computer we believe that network-based agents in high-consequence and highly reliable applications will depend on this approach, and that the basis for such objects is what we call ''faithful execution.''

  13. Local Purchasing of Journals is Required in Addition to a Nationally Purchased Collection to Meet the Information Needs of NHS Staff. A review of: Glover, Steven William, John Addison, Colette Gleghorn, and John Bramwell. “Journal Usage in NHS Hospitals: A Comparison Report of Total Usage at an Acute NHS Trust and a Specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England.” Health Information and Libraries Journal 24.3 (2007: 193‐9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Kelson

    2008-03-01

    electronic table of contents alert for journals in their area of specialty. An A‐Z list of journals was accessible via the Trusts’ intranet and internet sites, and direct links to electronic journals were added to the NHS Dialog/Datastar databases and on PubMed.Main results ‐ The libraries at both Trusts in the study provide the majority of their journals in electronic‐only format. In addition to the National Core Content titles, the cancer specialist Trust provides access to an additional five journal collections: Science Direct Health Sciences, Blackwell Synergy Medical and Nursing collection, five journals selected from Nature Publishing Group, selected society journals via HighWire Press and Oxford University Press titles. Staff members of the acute Trust have access to an additional three journal collections: Science Direct Health Sciences, the BMJ Publishing Group (BMJPG collection and 16 LWW titles via Ovid. During the study period, a total of 93,376 articles were downloaded or copied. Of these, 47,079 articles were downloaded or copied by staff of the cancer specialist NHS Trust and 46,297 articles were downloaded or copied by staff of the acute NHS Trust. The usage of each of the journal collections during the study period for each Trust is shown in the table below with the most used resource shown in bold. (See article for table General information regarding some of the commonly used journal titles by staff of each Trust was included in the commentary, but levels of use were not enumerated. Staff of the cancer specialist NHS Trust favoured cancer‐related titles, whilst staff of the acute NHS Trust accessed journal titles over a greater range of subject areas. Details of the top titles accessed from the National Core Content collection were not provided for either Trust. A possible reason given for the lower usage level of the National Core Content collection by the cancer specialist NHS Trust compared to the acute NHS Trust was the presence of embargoes

  14. Effect Of Perception Use Of Information Technology Safety And Perception Of Interest Trust Online Trading System Using Internet Banking Study Empris In Bri Bank Branch Office Tangerang 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endraria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine and analyze the influence of the perception of the use of information technology to transact online interests perceptions of comfort against the interest of transacting online trust in transacting online interest the perception of the use of information technology the perception of comfort and confidence simultaneously affect the interest of transacting online using internet system banking Empris Studies at Bank BRI Branch Office Tangerang 2014. With usability Theoretical where research results can be used to enrich the study of accounting keprilakuan in particular and science in general accounting uses for which the Bank can enrich the concept or theory in its contribution to the development of science so useful as a reference for those who need both from within Bank and outside the institution itself and able to provide input to what extent the perception of the use of information technology the perception of comfort and confidence can give a positive contribution to the interests transact online using internet banking system Study Empris at Bank BRI Branch Office Tangerang 2014 and usability for the Government where the results of this study are expected to be used as a correction and input the extent to which the perception of the use of information technology the perception of comfort and confidence can give a positive contribution to the interests transact online using internet banking system Study Empris at Bank BRI Branch Office Tangerang 2014 especially in the City Tangerang. The hypothesis proposed in this study in which there is significant influence use of information technology to transact interest perceptions of comfort on the interest on the interest of trust online transacting online transactions simultaneous perception of the use of information technology the perception of comfort and confidence in the interests transact online using Internet Banking System Study Empris Bank BRI

  15. Equilibrium Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Anderlini; Daniele Terlizzese

    2009-01-01

    We build a simple model of trust as an equilibrium phenomenon, departing from standard "selfish" preferences in a minimal way. Agents who are on the receiving end of an other to transact can choose whether to cheat and take away the entire surplus, taking into account a "cost of cheating." The latter has an idiosyncratic component (an agent's type), and a socially determined one. The smaller the mass of agents who cheat, the larger the cost of cheating suffered by those who cheat. Depending o...

  16. Trusting the state, trusting each other?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Dinesen, Peter Thisted

    2016-01-01

    Trust in state institutions is a prominent explanation of social trust. However, previous—mainly cross-sectional—analyses provide limited causal evidence regarding the relationship between institutional trust and social trust and it is thus essentially unknown whether an observed relationship...... reflects reverse causality (social trust forming institutional trust), or both forms of trust reflecting deep-seated dispositions (common confounding). Against the backdrop of the shortcomings of previous cross-sectional analyses, this paper utilizes two Danish panel surveys containing measures of both...... types of trust for the same individuals surveyed at multiple points in time over a long time-span (up to 18 years) to address the potentially reverse and/or spurious relationship. Using individual fixed effects and cross-lagged panel models, the results provide strong evidence of trust in state...

  17. Trust dynamics in a large system implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    outcomes, but largely ignored the dynamics of trust relations. Giddens, as part of his study of modernity, theorises trust dynamics in relation to abstract social systems, though without focusing on information systems. We use Giddens’ concepts to investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal......A large information systems implementation (such as Enterprise Resource Planning systems) relies on the trust of its stakeholders to succeed. Such projects impact diverse groups of stakeholders, each with their legitimate interests and expectations. Levels of stakeholder trust can be expected...... case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered a serious breakdown, but the project was able to recover and meet its goals. We develop six theoretical propositions theorising the relationship between trust and project outcomes...

  18. Learning to Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, B.

    2005-01-01

    Trust is full of puzzle and paradox.Trust is both rational and emotional. Trust can go beyond calculative self-interest, but has its limits.People may want to trust, while they may also feel threatened by it.If trust is not in place prior to a relationship, on the basis of institutions, prior

  19. Global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Canada's Green Plan strategy for dealing with global warming is being implemented as a multidepartmental partnership involving all Canadians and the international community. Many of the elements of this strategy are built on an existing base of activities predating the Green Plan. Elements of the strategy include programs to limit emissions of greenhouse gases, such as initiatives to encourage more energy-efficient practices and development of alternate fuel sources; studies and policy developments to help Canadians prepare and adapt to climate change; research on the global warming phenomenon; and stimulation of international action on global warming, including obligations arising out of the Framework Convention on Climate Change. All the program elements have been approved, funded, and announced. Major achievements to date are summarized, including improvements in the Energy Efficiency Act, studies on the socioeconomic impacts of global warming, and participation in monitoring networks. Milestones associated with the remaining global warming initiatives are listed

  20. From Focus on Price to the Pyramid of Innovation, Information, Cooperation, Value and Trust: A Success Story of Five Swedish Building Material Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Sundquist

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a reprint from vol 8 no 2 which has not previously beeen available electronically.In the building sector, value for the customer, is often regarded as being value for money and this, in turn, is achieved by means of competitive tendering. However, there are companies that also focus on innovation as a competitive parameter in their contribution; hereafter referred to as innovative companies. Five managing directors from innovative companies in Sweden were interviewed about how innovation is dealt with in their respective companies. As well as the importance of information, this study points to two additional important factors for innovation, namely cooperation with a carefully chosen partner and the transference of values to the employees. Those innovative companies made careful choices and use means of information, cooperation, value and vision to create innovation in order to build trust for the company and for its products and services.

  1. From Focus on Price to the Pyramid of Innovation, Information, Cooperation, Value and Trust: A Success Story of Five Swedish Building Material Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Sundquist

    2010-07-01

    In the building sector, value for the customer, is often regarded as being value for money and this, in turn, is achieved by means of competitive tendering. However, there are companies that also focus on innovation as a competitive parameter in their contribution; hereafter referred to as innovative companies. Five managing directors from innovative companies in Sweden were interviewed about how innovation is dealt with in their respective companies. As well as the importance of information, this study points to two additional important factors for innovation, namely cooperation with a carefully chosen partner and the transference of values to the employees. Those innovative companies made careful choices and use means of information, cooperation, value and vision to create innovation in order to build trust for the company and for its products and services.

  2. An extension of trust and TAM model with IDT in the adoption of the electronic logistics information system in HIS in the medical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Feng-Cheng; Chang, Su-Chao; Chou, Chi-Min

    2008-05-01

    Ever since National Health Insurance was introduced in 1995, the number of insurants increased to over 96% from 50 to 60%, with a continuous satisfaction rating of about 70%. However, the premium accounted for 5.77% of GDP in 2001 and the Bureau of National Health Insurance had pressing financial difficulties, so it reformed its expenditure systems, such as fee for service, capitation, case payment and the global budget system in order to control the rising medical costs. Since the change in health insurance policy, most hospitals attempted to reduce their operating expenses and improve efficiency. Introducing the electronic logistics information system is one way of reducing the cost of the department of central warehouse and the nursing stations. Hence, the study proposes a technology acceptance research model and examines how nurses' acceptance of the e-logistics information system has been affected in the medical industry. This research combines innovation diffusion theory, technology acceptance model and added two research parameters, trust and perceived financial cost to propose a new hybrid technology acceptance model. Taking Taiwan's medical industry as an experimental example, this paper studies nurses' acceptance of the electronic logistics information system. The structural equation modeling technique was used to evaluate the causal model and confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model. The results of the survey strongly support the new hybrid technology acceptance model in predicting nurses' intention to use the electronic logistics information system. The study shows that 'compatibility', 'perceived usefulness', 'perceived ease of use', and 'trust' all have great positive influence on 'behavioral intention to use'. On the other hand 'perceived financial cost' has great negative influence on behavioral intention to use.

  3. Trust in Digital Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yakel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ISO 16363:2012, Space Data and Information Transfer Systems - Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories (ISO TRAC, outlines actions a repository can take to be considered trustworthy, but research examining whether the repository’s designated community of users associates such actions with trustworthiness has been limited. Drawing from this ISO document and the management and information systems literatures, this paper discusses findings from interviews with 66 archaeologists and quantitative social scientists. We found similarities and differences across the disciplines and among the social scientists. Both disciplinary communities associated trust with a repository’s transparency. However, archaeologists mentioned guarantees of preservation and sustainability more frequently than the social scientists, who talked about institutional reputation. Repository processes were also linked to trust, with archaeologists more frequently citing metadata issues and social scientists discussing data selection and cleaning processes. Among the social scientists, novices mentioned the influence of colleagues on their trust in repositories almost twice as much as the experts. We discuss the implications our findings have for identifying trustworthy repositories and how they extend the models presented in the management and information systems literatures.

  4. Building trusted national identity management systems: Presenting the privacy concern-trust (PCT) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Joseph K.; Olesen, Henning

    This paper discusses the effect of trust and information privacy concerns on citizens’ attitude towards national identity management systems. We introduce the privacyconcerns- trust model, which shows the role of trust in mediating and moderating citizens’ attitude towards identity management...... systems. We adopted a qualitative research approach in our analysis of data that was gathered through a series of interviews and a stakeholder workshop in Ghana. Our findings indicate that, beyond the threshold level of trust, societal information privacy concern is low; hence, trust is high, thereby...

  5. Avian influenza A/H7N9 risk perception, information trust and adoption of protective behaviours among poultry farmers in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bin; Liao, Qiuyan; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Liu, Zong Ping; Fielding, Richard

    2017-05-18

    Poultry farmers are at high-risk from avian influenza A/H7N9 infection due to sustained occupational exposures to live poultry. This study examined factors associated with poultry farmers' adoption of personal protective behaviours (PPBs) based on Protection Motivation Theory (PMT). Totally, 297 poultry farmers in three cities of Jiangsu Province, China were interviewed during November 2013-January 2014. Data on PMT constructs, perceived trustworthiness of A/H7N9 information from mass media (formal sources), friends and family (informal sources), intention to adopt and actual adoption of PPBs and respondents' demographics were collected. Structural equation modeling (SEM) identified associations between demographic factors and PMT constructs associated with A/H7N9-oriented PPB intention. Moderated mediation analysis examined how demographics moderated the effects of information trust on PPB intention via risk perceptions of A/H7N9. Respondents generally perceived low vulnerability to A/H7N9 infection. The SEM found that male respondents perceived lower severity of (β = -0.23), and lower vulnerability to (β = -0.15) A/H7N9 infection; age was positively associated with both perceived personal vulnerability to (β = 0.21) and perceived self-efficacy (β = 0.24) in controlling A/H7N9; education was positively associated with perceived response efficacy (β = 0.40). Furthermore, perceived vulnerability (β = 0.16), perceived self-efficacy (β = 0.21) and response efficacy (β = 0.67) were positively associated with intention to adopt PPBs against A/H7N9. More trust in informal information (TII) was only significantly associated with greater PPB intention through its positive association with perceived response efficacy. Age significantly moderated the associations of TII with perceived Self-efficacy and perceived response efficacy, with younger farmers who had greater TII perceiving lower self-efficacy but higher response efficacy. Poultry farmers

  6. Avian influenza A/H7N9 risk perception, information trust and adoption of protective behaviours among poultry farmers in Jiangsu Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Cui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poultry farmers are at high-risk from avian influenza A/H7N9 infection due to sustained occupational exposures to live poultry. This study examined factors associated with poultry farmers’ adoption of personal protective behaviours (PPBs based on Protection Motivation Theory (PMT. Methods Totally, 297 poultry farmers in three cities of Jiangsu Province, China were interviewed during November 2013-January 2014. Data on PMT constructs, perceived trustworthiness of A/H7N9 information from mass media (formal sources, friends and family (informal sources, intention to adopt and actual adoption of PPBs and respondents’ demographics were collected. Structural equation modeling (SEM identified associations between demographic factors and PMT constructs associated with A/H7N9-oriented PPB intention. Moderated mediation analysis examined how demographics moderated the effects of information trust on PPB intention via risk perceptions of A/H7N9. Results Respondents generally perceived low vulnerability to A/H7N9 infection. The SEM found that male respondents perceived lower severity of (β = −0.23, and lower vulnerability to (β = -0.15 A/H7N9 infection; age was positively associated with both perceived personal vulnerability to (β = 0.21 and perceived self-efficacy (β = 0.24 in controlling A/H7N9; education was positively associated with perceived response efficacy (β = 0.40. Furthermore, perceived vulnerability (β = 0.16, perceived self-efficacy (β = 0.21 and response efficacy (β = 0.67 were positively associated with intention to adopt PPBs against A/H7N9. More trust in informal information (TII was only significantly associated with greater PPB intention through its positive association with perceived response efficacy. Age significantly moderated the associations of TII with perceived Self-efficacy and perceived response efficacy, with younger farmers who had greater TII perceiving lower self

  7. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  8. What information do people use, trust, and find useful during a disaster? Evidence from five large wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toddi A. Steelman; Sarah M. McCaffrey; Anne-Lise Knox Velez; Jason Alexander. Briefel

    2015-01-01

    The communication system through which information flows during a disaster can be conceived of as a set of relationships among sources and recipients who are concerned about key information characteristics. The recipient perspective is often neglected within this system. In this article, we explore recipient perspectives related to what information was used, useful,...

  9. Trust in Scientific Publishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummels, Harry; Roosendaal, Hans E.

    2001-01-01

    Trust is an important phenomenon to reduce organisational complexity and uncertainty. In the literature many types of trust are distinguished. An important framework to understand the variety and development of trust in organisations is provided by Zucker. She distinguishes three types of trust:

  10. Trust and Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The concept and phenomenon of trust and its relation to leadership has recently come into focus. What role does trust play? Can trust be created strategically? Questions like these are often raised. How we conceive of and conceptualize trust is not as often discussed. Among those conceptualizations...... flexibility of form for example, the idea that one with leadership tools can consciously bring forth trust. In the conclusion, the question about trust communication is addressed. In this section I argue that trust is positively value-laden, becausesincerity is a functional and pragmatic condition...

  11. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    This paper focuses on the leadership challenge of balancing trust and control. The relation between trust and control has for a long time been a puzzling issue for management researchers. In the paper I first show that there has been a dramatic change in the way the relation between trust...... and control has been conceptualized in trust research. While the relation between trust and control earlier was conceptualized as a more or less stable balance between trust and control, more recent research conceptualizes the relation between trust and control more as a dynamical process that involves...... an ongoing process of balancing the relation between trust and control. Second, taking the departure in the recent conceptualization of the balance between trust and control as an interactive process I discuss the challenges for management in handling this more subtle balancing of trust and control...

  12. A cue or two and I'll trust you: determinants of trust in government organizations in terms of their processing and usage of citizens' personal information disclosed online

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldad, Ardion Daroca; van der Geest, Thea; de Jong, Menno D.T.; Steehouder, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a large-scale Internet survey (with 1156 respondents) that investigated the cues and factors that could positively influence Dutch Internet users' trust in government organizations in terms of their usage and processing of citizens' personal data. Confidence in

  13. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety professionals and the public are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in central New Jersey and Jersey shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47% vs. 13%), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs. 6 d), and longer periods without Internet (29 vs. 6 d). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends, and Web/e-mail. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the Web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the Web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered Web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas.

  14. Trust in vehicle technology

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Guy, H.; Stanton, Neville, A.; Salmon, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Driver trust has potentially important implications for how vehicle technology is used and interacted with. In this paper it will be seen how driver trust functions and how it can be understood and manipulated by insightful vehicle design. It will review the theoretical literature to define steps that can be taken establish trust in vehicle technology in the first place, maintain trust in the long term, and even re-establish trust that has been lost along the way. The implication throughout i...

  15. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  16. 77 FR 67029 - Arden Investment Series Trust and Arden Asset Management LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... Investment Series Trust and Arden Asset Management LLC; Notice of Application November 2, 2012. AGENCY... disclosure requirements. Applicants: Arden Investment Series Trust (the ``Trust'') and Arden Asset Management... Company Regulation, Division of Investment Management). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following is a...

  17. A Model of Trust for Developing Trustworthy Systems From Untrustworthy Actors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ray, Indrajit; Ray, Indrakshi

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop a new model of trust that allowed one to reason about trust relationships in information systems with special emphasis on trust as it related to integrity and availability...

  18. Exploring trust relationships during times of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Von der Ohe

    2010-10-01

    Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the impact of different variables such as demographics on trust relationships in South African organisations. Motivation for the study: Anecdotal evidence and preliminary data collected for a national trust indicator seemed to suggest a shift in trust levels in organisations. Research design: A trust questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 307 respondents in all economic sectors. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were used to determine significant differences among economic sectors, job levels and sample periods. Main findings: No significant differences were found for job levels or the different sample periods. However, significant differences were found for the economic sectors and, specifically, between government participants and other sectors for the dimensions of change, team management, organisational trust, information sharing and credibility. Practical implications: In times of change, leadership in organisations need to be aware of the impact on trust levels. It is therefore important that leaders in government focus more on trust-enhancing behaviours needed to repair mistrust in organisations. Contribution: Although the effect of time on trust levels is inconclusive, the clearly differing levels of trust in various economic sectors point to the importance of appropriate and fitting approaches to building trust and not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ attitude.

  19. Trust for intelligent recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuiyan, Touhid

    2013-01-01

    Recommender systems are one of the recent inventions to deal with the ever-growing information overload in relation to the selection of goods and services in a global economy. Collaborative Filtering (CF) is one of the most popular techniques in recommender systems. The CF recommends items to a target user based on the preferences of a set of similar users known as the neighbors, generated from a database made up of the preferences of past users. In the absence of these ratings, trust between the users could be used to choose the neighbor for recommendation making. Better recommendations can b

  20. Calculativeness and trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Williamson’s characterisation of calculativeness as inimical to trust contradicts most sociological trust research. However, a similar argument is found within trust phenomenology. This paper re-investigates Williamson’s argument from the perspective of Løgstrup’s phenomenological theory of trust....... Contrary to Williamson, however, Løgstrup’s contention is that trust, not calculativeness, is the default attitude and only when suspicion is awoken does trust falter. The paper argues that while Williamson’s distinction between calculativeness and trust is supported by phenomenology, the analysis needs...... to take actual subjective experience into consideration. It points out that, first, Løgstrup places trust alongside calculativeness as a different mode of engaging in social interaction, rather conceiving of trust as a state or the outcome of a decision-making process. Secondly, the analysis must take...

  1. Dimensions of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Georg Simmel is the seminal author on trust within sociology, but though inspired by Simmel, subsequent studies of intersubjective trust have failed to address Simmel’s suggestion that trust is as differentiated as the social relations of which it is part. Rather, trust has been studied within...... limited sets of exchange or work relations. This article revisits Simmel’s concept of trust as social form in order to investigate this differentiation. From an interview study, the differentiation and limits of trust are analysed within different types of social relations. Trust is found to vary greatly...... in scope and mode influenced by the intersecting dimensions of relations, objects and situations. Furthermore, trust exists between an outer threshold of expected deceit and an inner threshold of confident reliance. The findings from the qualitative study contribute new knowledge on the diversity of trust...

  2. Trust in prescription drug brand websites: website trust cues, attitude toward the website, and behavioral intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jisu; Shin, Wonsun

    2014-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug brand websites, as a form of DTC advertising, are receiving increasing attention due to the growing number and importance as an ad and a consumer information source. This study examined consumer trust in a DTC website as an important factor influencing consumers' attitude toward the website and behavioral intention. Applying the conceptual framework of website trust, the particular focus of investigation was the effect of the website trust cue factor on consumers' perceived DTC website trust and subsequent attitudinal and behavioral responses. Results show a significant relation between the website trust cue factor and consumers' perceived DTC website trust. Perceived DTC website trust, in turn, was found to be significantly associated with consumers' attitude toward the DTC website and behavioral intention.

  3. On Propagating Interpersonal Trust in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Cai-Nicolas

    The age of information glut has fostered the proliferation of data and documents on the Web, created by man and machine alike. Hence, there is an enormous wealth of minable knowledge that is yet to be extracted, in particular, on the Semantic Web. However, besides understanding information stated by subjects, knowing about their credibility becomes equally crucial. Hence, trust and trust metrics, conceived as computational means to evaluate trust relationships between individuals, come into play. Our major contribution to Semantic Web trust management through this work is twofold. First, we introduce a classification scheme for trust metrics along various axes and discuss advantages and drawbacks of existing approaches for Semantic Web scenarios. Hereby, we devise an advocacy for local group trust metrics, guiding us to the second part, which presents Appleseed, our novel proposal for local group trust computation. Compelling in its simplicity, Appleseed borrows many ideas from spreading activation models in psychology and relates their concepts to trust evaluation in an intuitive fashion. Moreover, we provide extensions for the Appleseed nucleus that make our trust metric handle distrust statements.

  4. Overview of royalty trusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panarites, P.

    1996-01-01

    The nature of royalty trusts as a means of financing exploration, development, production, and refining of oil sand and heavy oil to produce competitively marketable petroleum products, was reviewed. Attributes of the two distinct classes of royalty trusts - reflexive class and the fundamental class royalty trusts - and the considerations underlying each one, were summarized. The overall conclusion was that the future performance of conventional oil and gas royalty trusts (reflexive class) will depend heavily on interest rate levels and management's ability to complete acquisitions financed with new trust unit issues. Fundamental class royalty trusts also offer long term pure exposure to the underlying business, in addition to yield

  5. Looking for Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge, Ask Risom; Lauritsen, Peter

    Trust and surveillance are often seen as opposites. Trust is regularly characterized as the glue that holds society together, while surveillance is seen as corrosive. However, in Scandinavia high levels of trust and surveillance coexist. It is therefore interesting to investigate...... if there is a connection between these phenomena and ask what is the role of trust in the spread of surveillance in Scandinavia? The aim of this paper is: 1) to investigate the role of trust in the history of the Danish DNA database and 2) to experiment with Actor-Network-Theory (ANT) as an ap-proach in studies of trust....

  6. Modelling security and trust with Secure Tropos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgini, P.; Mouratidis, H.; Zannone, N.; Mouratidis, H.; Giorgini, P.

    2006-01-01

    Although the concepts of security and trust play an important issue in the development of information systems, they have been mainly neglected by software engineering methodologies. In this chapter we present an approach that considers security and trust throughout the software development process.

  7. Warm Bodies: A Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schario, Tracy A.

    A participant in forensic tournament competition presents her perspective as well as overall student reaction to the function of "warm bodies," competitors who are entered in a tournament by the coach or tournament director only to meet qualifying requirements. Overall, participants in an informal survey believed that the warm body…

  8. Global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, John

    2005-01-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources

  9. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2010-01-01

    of balancing trust and control becomes an issue that deserve ongoing attention. This paper adds to the discussion on the relation between trust and control by showing that the process perspective reframes the problem of balancing trust and control. More generally, by demonstrating the importance of the process......The purpose of this paper is to show that conceptualizing trust and control as interactively related processes, as opposed to more static conceptualizations of the two concepts and the relations between them, adds importantly towards understanding the challenges involved in balancing of trust...... on trust and control made the problem of finding a balance between trust and control a once and for all decision the process perspective introduced here implies that balancing trust and control is an ongoing process of balancing and rebalancing. The implication for management is that the problem...

  10. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  11. Fording Canadian Coal Trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowich, J.; Millos, R. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This is the first of five slide/overhead presentations presented at the Fording Canadian Coal Trust and Tech Cominco Ltd. investor day and mine tour. The Fording Canadian Coal Trust is described. The Trust's assets comprise six Elk Valley metallurgical coal mines and six wollastonite operations (in the NYCO Group). Trust structure, corporate responsibility, organizational structure, reserves and resources, management philosophy, operating strategies, steel market dynamics, coal market, production expansion, sales and distribution are outlined. 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Trust and controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka; Zabłocka-Kluczka Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controll...

  13. Trust Drives Internet Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    This paper estimates the effect of trust on internet use by studying the general population as well as second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 87 nations. There is a significant positive effect of trust on internet use. The positive trust effect is not universal...

  14. The productivity of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Méon, Pierre-Guillaume

    This paper returns to one of the early questions of the literature on social trust, whether trust affects total factor productivity (TFP). Using both development and growth accounting, we find strong evidence of a causal effect of trust on the level and growth of TFP. Using a three-stage least...

  15. Trust Management V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    from 42 submissions. The papers feature both theoretical research and real-world case studies from academia, business and government focusing on areas such as: trust models, social and behavioral aspects of trust, trust in networks, mobile systems and cloud computation, privacy, reputation systems...

  16. 5 CFR 2634.405 - Certification of trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Qualified Trusts § 2634.405... documents and responses to requests for information, including a statement that any interested party who will be a party to a certified trust instrument has read and understands the overview of executive...

  17. The emergence of trust in clinics of alternative medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Hansen, Vibeke Holm; Grünenberg, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    qualitative studies and informing the empirical findings with a sociological concept of trust, this article provides new empirical insights on how trust emerges in Danish clinics of acupuncture, reflexology and homeopathy. The analysis demonstrates how trust is situational and emerges through both clients...

  18. Social trust and ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadd, E. [Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The linkages that exist between the environmental risks associated with nuclear energy production (both perceived and real) and the myriad of social and political issues and processes that influence social trust are a current issue in literature, but are not well explored, particularly for the Canadian context. This paper will examine one particular issue and its relationship with social trust: ionizing radiation and public health. Social trust is defined for this paper as including interpersonal trust, but having a much broader focus, extending to public trust in governments, institutions, corporations, and the power elite, and across whole societies. Of particular interest for the nuclear energy issue is how waning social trust may impact the functioning of democratic decision-making processes, particularly those associated with the siting of waste facilities. Social trust is a central issue in the management of environmental risks, particularly those related to high technology; its absence is seen as a major cause of intractable conflict in decisions related to nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Understanding the dynamics of social trust is important if a resolution is to be found to the nuclear waste management debate in Canada, that is, one that involves broad public, or social, support. For instance, what factors cause distrust to emerge, and when distrust emerges, what authorities do members of affected communities seek out for information and support? This paper begins to examine social trust in relation to human health and ionizing radiation, particularly low dose radiation from radioactive wastes resulting from uranium and radium processing activities in Port Hope, Ontario. These activities date back to the 1930s and are of great concern to community members. This paper looks at some of the roots of public concern, for example, scientific uncertainty around whether or not human health is compromised by exposure to low dose ionizing radiation

  19. Social trust and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadd, E.

    2002-01-01

    The linkages that exist between the environmental risks associated with nuclear energy production (both perceived and real) and the myriad of social and political issues and processes that influence social trust are a current issue in literature, but are not well explored, particularly for the Canadian context. This paper will examine one particular issue and its relationship with social trust: ionizing radiation and public health. Social trust is defined for this paper as including interpersonal trust, but having a much broader focus, extending to public trust in governments, institutions, corporations, and the power elite, and across whole societies. Of particular interest for the nuclear energy issue is how waning social trust may impact the functioning of democratic decision-making processes, particularly those associated with the siting of waste facilities. Social trust is a central issue in the management of environmental risks, particularly those related to high technology; its absence is seen as a major cause of intractable conflict in decisions related to nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Understanding the dynamics of social trust is important if a resolution is to be found to the nuclear waste management debate in Canada, that is, one that involves broad public, or social, support. For instance, what factors cause distrust to emerge, and when distrust emerges, what authorities do members of affected communities seek out for information and support? This paper begins to examine social trust in relation to human health and ionizing radiation, particularly low dose radiation from radioactive wastes resulting from uranium and radium processing activities in Port Hope, Ontario. These activities date back to the 1930s and are of great concern to community members. This paper looks at some of the roots of public concern, for example, scientific uncertainty around whether or not human health is compromised by exposure to low dose ionizing radiation

  20. [Crises of trust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Thai-Form; Tseng, Hsing-Chau

    2006-02-01

    Extensive media coverage is warning of a crisis of trust that has emerged as a serious issue in our society. This article explores the meaning of "crisis," concepts of crisis management, mechanisms for building trust, and the underlying significance of trust and distrust. Evidence is adduced to testify to the erosion of trust and factors in our society that reflect the potential for crises of trust. Organizational decision makers, including hospital managers, are urged to identify and reflect upon weaknesses in their organizations in order that remedial action can be taken to preempt such crises.

  1. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  2. Trusted computing platforms TPM2.0 in context

    CERN Document Server

    Proudler, Graeme; Dalton, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this book the authors first describe the background of trusted platforms and trusted computing and speculate about the future. They then describe the technical features and architectures of trusted platforms from several different perspectives, finally explaining second-generation TPMs, including a technical description intended to supplement the Trusted Computing Group's TPM2 specifications. The intended audience is IT managers and engineers and graduate students in information security.

  3. 36 CFR 1012.2 - What is the Presidio Trust's policy on granting requests for employee testimony or Presidio Trust...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Presidio Trust's policy on granting requests for employee testimony or Presidio Trust records? 1012.2 Section 1012.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST LEGAL PROCESS: TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND PRODUCTION OF RECORDS General Information § 1012.2 What...

  4. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  5. Do Americans Understand That Global Warming Is Harmful to Human Health? Evidence From a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W; Kreslake, Jennifer M; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Rosenthal, Seth; Feinberg, Geoff; Leiserowitz, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Global warming has significant negative consequences for human health, with some groups at greater risk than others. The extent to which the public is aware of these risks is unclear; the limited extant research has yielded discrepant findings. This paper describes Americans' awareness of the health effects of global warming, levels of support for government funding and action on the issue, and trust in information sources. We also investigate the discrepancy in previous research findings between assessments based on open- versus closed-ended questions. A nationally representative survey of US adults (N = 1275) was conducted online in October 2014. Measures included general attitudes and beliefs about global warming, affective assessment of health effects, vulnerable populations and specific health conditions (open- and closed-ended), perceived risk, trust in sources, and support for government response. Most respondents (61%) reported that, before taking the survey, they had given little or no thought to how global warming might affect people's health. In response to a closed-ended question, many respondents (64%) indicated global warming is harmful to health, yet in response to an open-ended question, few (27%) accurately named one or more specific type of harm. In response to a closed-ended question, 33% indicated some groups are more affected than others, yet on an open-ended question only 25% were able to identify any disproportionately affected populations. Perhaps not surprising given these findings, respondents demonstrated only limited support for a government response: less than 50% of respondents said government should be doing more to protect against health harms from global warming, and about 33% supported increased funding to public health agencies for this purpose. Respondents said their primary care physician is their most trusted source of information on this topic, followed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health

  6. Trust management for e-transactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    medium for disseminating information, doing commerce and business. ..... intensity of effect on individual's decision making is subjective. In next section .... that takes into account all the factors in trust formation, enhancement and enforcement.

  7. Local warming: daily temperature change influences belief in global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Johnson, Eric J; Zaval, Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment with a simple, more accessible one is known as attribute substitution. In three studies, we asked residents of the United States and Australia to report their opinions about global warming and whether the temperature on the day of the study was warmer or cooler than usual. Respondents who thought that day was warmer than usual believed more in and had greater concern about global warming than did respondents who thought that day was colder than usual. They also donated more money to a global-warming charity if they thought that day seemed warmer than usual. We used instrumental variable regression to rule out some alternative explanations.

  8. Do professional boundaries limit trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth; Hennessy, Julia; Abbott, Max; Hughes, Frances

    2018-02-01

    The present study uses stories of mental health support workers talking about their relationship with clients to wonder about how trust might be limited by the professional boundaries of nursing. The writing arose out of an appreciative inquiry study looking at the role of mental health support workers. Participants talked about how they worked with their clients. As researchers, we were struck by the depth of trust that was built between worker and client. We have brought a phenomenological lens to wonder about the nature of trust, as shown in the data. The original research sought to identify what was working well for mental health support workers. The present study brings a phenomenological interpretive approach to four stories from the discovery phase of the study, with our thinking informed by Heidegger and van Manen. Interviews were conducted with 26 mental health support workers and six stakeholders in 2012-2103. For this paper, we drew from those transcripts stories of three mental health support workers and one stakeholder. Through a process of talking together, writing, and rewriting, we wondered about the meaning within these stories, with a strong focus on how trust was enacted. We saw that mental health support workers in this study, by not carrying the boundaries of being 'professional', seemed free to grow a stronger relationship of trust which was therapeutic. We ask: Is it time to rethink how professional boundaries limit the level of trust achieved with clients to the detriment of impactful care? © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. Toward designing for trust in database automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duez, P. P.; Jamieson, G. A. [Cognitive Engineering Laboratory, Univ. of Toronto, 5 King' s College Rd., Toronto, Ont. M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Appropriate reliance on system automation is imperative for safe and productive work, especially in safety-critical systems. It is unsafe to rely on automation beyond its designed use; conversely, it can be both unproductive and unsafe to manually perform tasks that are better relegated to automated tools. Operator trust in automated tools mediates reliance, and trust appears to affect how operators use technology. As automated agents become more complex, the question of trust in automation is increasingly important. In order to achieve proper use of automation, we must engender an appropriate degree of trust that is sensitive to changes in operating functions and context. In this paper, we present research concerning trust in automation in the domain of automated tools for relational databases. Lee and See have provided models of trust in automation. One model developed by Lee and See identifies three key categories of information about the automation that lie along a continuum of attributional abstraction. Purpose-, process-and performance-related information serve, both individually and through inferences between them, to describe automation in such a way as to engender r properly-calibrated trust. Thus, one can look at information from different levels of attributional abstraction as a general requirements analysis for information key to appropriate trust in automation. The model of information necessary to engender appropriate trust in automation [1] is a general one. Although it describes categories of information, it does not provide insight on how to determine the specific information elements required for a given automated tool. We have applied the Abstraction Hierarchy (AH) to this problem in the domain of relational databases. The AH serves as a formal description of the automation at several levels of abstraction, ranging from a very abstract purpose-oriented description to a more concrete description of the resources involved in the automated process

  10. Toward designing for trust in database automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duez, P. P.; Jamieson, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate reliance on system automation is imperative for safe and productive work, especially in safety-critical systems. It is unsafe to rely on automation beyond its designed use; conversely, it can be both unproductive and unsafe to manually perform tasks that are better relegated to automated tools. Operator trust in automated tools mediates reliance, and trust appears to affect how operators use technology. As automated agents become more complex, the question of trust in automation is increasingly important. In order to achieve proper use of automation, we must engender an appropriate degree of trust that is sensitive to changes in operating functions and context. In this paper, we present research concerning trust in automation in the domain of automated tools for relational databases. Lee and See have provided models of trust in automation. One model developed by Lee and See identifies three key categories of information about the automation that lie along a continuum of attributional abstraction. Purpose-, process-and performance-related information serve, both individually and through inferences between them, to describe automation in such a way as to engender r properly-calibrated trust. Thus, one can look at information from different levels of attributional abstraction as a general requirements analysis for information key to appropriate trust in automation. The model of information necessary to engender appropriate trust in automation [1] is a general one. Although it describes categories of information, it does not provide insight on how to determine the specific information elements required for a given automated tool. We have applied the Abstraction Hierarchy (AH) to this problem in the domain of relational databases. The AH serves as a formal description of the automation at several levels of abstraction, ranging from a very abstract purpose-oriented description to a more concrete description of the resources involved in the automated process

  11. Trust Management for Public Key Infrastructures: Implementing the X.509 Trust Broker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Samer Wazan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Public Key Infrastructure (PKI is considered one of the most important techniques used to propagate trust in authentication over the Internet. This technology is based on a trust model defined by the original X.509 (1988 standard and is composed of three entities: the certification authority (CA, the certificate holder (or subject, and the Relying Party (RP. The CA plays the role of a trusted third party between the certificate holder and the RP. In many use cases, this trust model has worked successfully. However, we argue that the application of this model on the Internet implies that web users need to depend on almost anyone in the world in order to use PKI technology. Thus, we believe that the current TLS system is not fit for purpose and must be revisited as a whole. In response, the latest draft edition of X.509 has proposed a new trust model by adding new entity called the Trust Broker (TB. In this paper, we present an implementation approach that a Trust Broker could follow in order to give RPs trust information about a CA by assessing the quality of its issued certificates. This is related to the quality of the CA’s policies and procedures and its commitment to them. Finally, we present our Trust Broker implementation that demonstrates how RPs can make informed decisions about certificate holders in the context of the global web, without requiring large processing resources themselves.

  12. 36 CFR 1011.4 - What notice will the Presidio Trust send to a debtor when collecting a debt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PRESIDIO TRUST DEBT COLLECTION Procedures To Collect Presidio Trust Debts § 1011.4 What notice will the Presidio Trust send to a debtor when collecting a debt? (a) Notice requirements. The Presidio Trust will aggressively collect debts. The Presidio Trust will send at least one written notice to a debtor informing the...

  13. Building Trust in High-Performing Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Soudunsaari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Facilitation of growth is more about good, trustworthy contacts than capital. Trust is a driving force for business creation, and to create a global business you need to build a team that is capable of meeting the challenge. Trust is a key factor in team building and a needed enabler for cooperation. In general, trust building is a slow process, but it can be accelerated with open interaction and good communication skills. The fast-growing and ever-changing nature of global business sets demands for cooperation and team building, especially for startup companies. Trust building needs personal knowledge and regular face-to-face interaction, but it also requires empathy, respect, and genuine listening. Trust increases communication, and rich and open communication is essential for the building of high-performing teams. Other building materials are a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, willingness for cooperation, and supporting and encouraging leadership. This study focuses on trust in high-performing teams. It asks whether it is possible to manage trust and which tools and operation models should be used to speed up the building of trust. In this article, preliminary results from the authors’ research are presented to highlight the importance of sharing critical information and having a high level of communication through constant interaction.

  14. Terrorism, Trust and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2017-01-01

    How does terrorism affect social trust and tourism? The rising number of terrorist attacks in Western Europe has caused safety problems not only for local citizens but also for tourists. In fact, terrorists challenge the formal violence monopoly of the state thus creating a sense of anarchy...... and distrust. Social trust is about trusting strangers, so when less predictable behaviour occurs in, a given country, people become more careful as they tend to trust most other people less. An interesting case for future research is Scandinavia as the level of terrorism is still low and, at the same time......, Scandinavia can record most social trust in the world meaning a competitive advantage when attracting tourists. Arguably, a double dividend is created from fighting terrorism, namely more social trust accumulated and more tourists attracted. Future research should therefore try to further test our model...

  15. Trust in Strategic Alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of trust in strategic alliances. Adopting a co-evolutionary approach, I developed a framework to show how trust, conceptualised in different forms, plays distinct roles at various evolutionary stages of the alliance relationship....... Emphasising the multi-dimensional and dynamic role of trust, the framework illustrates how initial levels of a particular type of trust may co-evolve with the alliance and influence subsequent phases of the relationship – either on its own or in combination with other types or dimensions of trust....... The theoretical distinction between trust as antecedent, moderator and outcome during the evolution of the alliance relationship leads to research questions that may guide future empirical research....

  16. Trust and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    the behavior or attitudes of others). LIST SUB-AREAS IN PORTFOLIO: Science of Reliance • Trust in Autonomous Systems/ Autonomy – identify the...error •Humans have trust biases (Lyons & Stokes, 2012) •Little is known about how human trust principles apply to autonomy /robotics...for the model in western context (Colquitt et al., 2007) • Some evidence that benevolence is favored by collectivist culture (Branzei et al., 2007

  17. Governance, Trust, and Taxes

    OpenAIRE

    Schrøter Joensen, Juanna; Weihe, Guðrið

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role of social capital (trust) vis-à-vis the propensity of a country to be a tax haven. The empirical analysis corroborates that better governed countries have a higher ceteris paribus probability to be tax havens. However, social capital counteracts the effect of governance quality. This effect is so strong that the partial effect of governance quality is reversed for countries with the trust index in the top quartile – making these high trust countries le...

  18. Trust and Social Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Internet commerce has transformed the marketing of goods and services. The separation between point of sale and seller, and the presence of geographically dispersed sellers who do not engage in repeated transactions with the same customers challenge traditional mechanisms for building the trust required for commercial exchanges. In this changing environment, legal rules and institutions play a diminished role in building trust. Instead, new systems and methods are emerging to foster trust in ...

  19. Suspicion, Trust, and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-08

    Pool (IPIP; Goldberg et al., 2006; 87). A sample item is “I trust others.” Each propensity to trust item was assessed on a 7-point scale from 1...1754-6 Goldberg , L. R., Johnson, J. A., Eber, H. W., Hogan, R., Ashton, M. C., Cloninger, C. R., & Gough, H. C. (2006). The International...trust decision. When examining software inspections, Porter, et al. [6] identified one of the causes of variation in the outcome of the inspection

  20. A question of trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Trust lies at the heart of modern science. As scientists, we trust that the papers we read are honest and correct as far as the data, results, techniques and theories in them are concerned. We trust that our colleagues and collaborators are acting properly and ethically - and not being devious, secretive or sloppy. But perhaps even more important is the public's trust in science. After all, much research is funded by taxpayers, who, quite rightly, want to know that the work will not harm them and, preferably, do them some good.

  1. Trust Discovery in Online Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, John

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to discover interpersonal trust in online communities. Two novel trust models are built to explain interpersonal trust in online communities drawing theories and models from multiple relevant areas, including organizational trust models, trust in virtual settings, speech act theory, identity theory, and common bond theory. In…

  2. THE ROLE OF TRUST AND PERCEIVED RISK IN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICULA DANA LAURA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trust and risk are very important in consumers' electronic commerce purchasing decisions. How do trust and risk affect an Internet consumer's purchasing decision? To answer this question I’ve developed a theoretical framework describing the trust-based decision-making process a consumer uses when making a purchase from a given site. Consumer disposition to trust, reputation, privacy concerns, security concerns, the information quality of the Website, and the company's reputation, have strong effects on Internet consumers' trust in the Website.

  3. A Matter of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jill Harrison; Connolly, Christine; Lee, Abda; Fairley, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    Educators at a turnaround school in Boston describe how they built a foundation for achievement gains by building and safeguarding relational trust among staff. The school, Henry Grew Elementary, focused in particular on fostering educators' readiness to trust, clarifying roles, and solidifying routines to support connection and risk-taking.

  4. Trust in regulatory regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Six, Frédérique; Verhoest, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Within political and administrative sciences generally, trust as a concept is contested, especially in the field of regulatory governance. This groundbreaking book is the first to systematically explore the role and dynamics of trust within regulatory regimes. Conceptualizing, mapping and analyzing

  5. Being pragmatic about trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickel, P.J.; Faulkner, P.; Simpson, T.

    2017-01-01

    Trust remains an ambiguous and contested concept. A way to help settle some of the disagreements about it is to appeal to an Explanatory Constraint, according to which trust should (a) be explained as the outcome of central concerns or interests of the relevant actors, and (b) explain the emergence

  6. Towards trusted tradelanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulstijn, Joris; Hofman, W.; Zomer, G.; Tan, Yao-Hua; Scholl, H. J.; Glassey, O.; Janssen, M.

    Customs administrations are exploring system-based approaches to regulatory supervision, taking the entire set of controls in a process into account. In addition to Trusted Traders, which are recognized by a certification process, customs are considering to identify so called Trusted Trade Lanes:

  7. Neither Trust nor Distrust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the politicised notions of trust and social cohesion in urban spaces through a focus on practices of everyday relations in a mixed neighbourhood. Quantitative studies maintain that ethnically diverse neighbourhoods lack in trust and solidarity. However, the very meaning an...

  8. Trust and controlling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieńkowska Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to discuss the trust within and towards an organisation in the context of implementation of controlling therein. In this context the essence of trust and its importance in organisation management was presented, as well as trust in the contemporary management methods and concepts. Controlling as a trust-building factor inside an organisation was pointed out. Especially controlling and control were described. Moreover management by considering deviations in controlling and the teamwork in controlling were described. The role of controlling in process of trust-building to an organisation was presented. Establishing relations with the environment and systems of measurement of organisation’s achievements were presented, too.

  9. Trust, trustworthiness and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Trust is an essential component of good healthcare. If patients trust their physicians, then the relationship between them can be a richer and more meaningful one. The patient is more likely to feel confident and able to disclose symptoms, helping diagnosis and future care. If public health and community workers are trusted, not only is it likely that their work will be easier, in that their actions will be respected and accepted, but their advice will also be sought spontaneously. Trust, can, therefore, be thought of as something that is of benefit to all: healthcare workers, individuals and communities. Trust is, generally, something to be prized and we need to do anything we can to strengthen it.

  10. Predators and the public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Adrian; Chapron, Guillaume; López-Bao, Jose V; Shoemaker, Chase; Goeckner, Apollonia R; Bruskotter, Jeremy T

    2017-02-01

    Many democratic governments recognize a duty to conserve environmental resources, including wild animals, as a public trust for current and future citizens. These public trust principles have informed two centuries of U.S.A. Supreme Court decisions and environmental laws worldwide. Nevertheless numerous populations of large-bodied, mammalian carnivores (predators) were eradicated in the 20th century. Environmental movements and strict legal protections have fostered predator recoveries across the U.S.A. and Europe since the 1970s. Now subnational jurisdictions are regaining management authority from central governments for their predator subpopulations. Will the history of local eradication repeat or will these jurisdictions adopt public trust thinking and their obligation to broad public interests over narrower ones? We review the role of public trust principles in the restoration and preservation of controversial species. In so doing we argue for the essential roles of scientists from many disciplines concerned with biological diversity and its conservation. We look beyond species endangerment to future generations' interests in sustainability, particularly non-consumptive uses. Although our conclusions apply to all wild organisms, we focus on predators because of the particular challenges they pose for government trustees, trust managers, and society. Gray wolves Canis lupus L. deserve particular attention, because detailed information and abundant policy debates across regions have exposed four important challenges for preserving predators in the face of interest group hostility. One challenge is uncertainty and varied interpretations about public trustees' responsibilities for wildlife, which have created a mosaic of policies across jurisdictions. We explore how such mosaics have merits and drawbacks for biodiversity. The other three challenges to conserving wildlife as public trust assets are illuminated by the biology of predators and the interacting

  11. Trust-aware Privacy Control for Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Na; Najafian-Razavi, Maryam; Gillet, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Due to the huge exposure of personal information in social media, a challenge now is to design effective privacy mechanisms that protect against unauthorized access to social data. In this paper, a trust model for social media is first presented. Based on the trust model, a trust-aware privacy control protocol is proposed, that exploits the underlying inter-entity trust information. The objective is to design a fine-grained privacy scheme that ensures a user’s online information is disclosed ...

  12. Recommendation based on trust diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recommender system is emerging as a powerful and popular tool for online information relevant to a given user. The traditional recommendation system suffers from the cold start problem and the data sparsity problem. Many methods have been proposed to solve these problems, but few can achieve satisfactory efficiency. In this paper, we present a method which combines the trust diffusion (DiffTrust) algorithm and the probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF). DiffTrust is first used to study the possible diffusions of trust between various users. It is able to make use of the implicit relationship of the trust network, thus alleviating the data sparsity problem. The probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) is then employed to combine the users' tastes with their trusted friends' interests. We evaluate the algorithm on Flixster, Moviedata, and Epinions datasets, respectively. The experimental results show that the recommendation based on our proposed DiffTrust + PMF model achieves high performance in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE), Recall, and F Measure.

  13. The siting of a research centre on clean coal combustion and CO{sub 2} capture in Spain: Some notes on the relationship between trust and lack of public information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prades, A.; Espluga, J.; Real, M.; Sola, R. [University of Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to gain a better understanding of the role played by trust in the context of scarcity of public information, vis-a-vis the installation of a Centre for Investigation in Advanced Technologies (Centro de Investigacion de Tecnologias Avanzadas, CITA) to be located in a coal-rich region of Spain. Data from semi-structured interviews (n = 15), a questionnaire survey (n = 400) and focus group sessions (2) are drawn together to reveal how the local community perceives the proposed CITA scheme, and how this relates to the level of trust placed in the project promoters. Results illustrate how a lay community gives meaning to an unknown technological project, trying to place it within its appropriate economic, social and political context, and relating it to prior knowledge and experiences. Results also show that, in contrast to certain risk communication theories, the public is able to place trust in a technological activity and their promoters despite a general lack of knowledge on either.

  14. The Types of Trust Involved in American Muslim Healthcare Decisions: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Pruitt, Liese; Mallick, Saleha

    2017-08-01

    Trust in physicians and the healthcare system underlies some disparities noted among minority populations, yet a descriptive typology of different types of trust informing healthcare decisions among minority populations is limited. Using data from 13 focus groups with 102 American Muslims, we identified the types and influence of trust in healthcare decision-making. Participants conveyed four types of trust implicating their health-seeking behaviors-(I) trust in allopathic medicine, (II) trust in God, (III) trust in personal relationships, and (IV) trust in self. Healthcare disparity research can benefit from assessing how these types of trust are associated with health outcomes among minority populations so as to inform intervention programs that seek to enhance trust as a means to improve community health.

  15. The Effects of Perceived Value, Website Trust and Hotel Trust on Online Hotel Booking Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Seo Yeon Kim; Jong Uk Kim; Sang Cheol Park

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of information technology in hotel booking context, it is no doubt that many hotels consequently enhance the needs of integrating information technologies into their overall business operations. In this study, we developed a research model which consists of perceived value, trust toward a third party online booking site, and trust toward hotels, and tested it by using partial least square techniques. Survey data were collected from 307 individuals who have prior exp...

  16. Autonomy, Trust, and Respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article seeks to explore and analyze the relationship between autonomy and trust, and to show how these findings could be relevant to medical ethics. First, I will argue that the way in which so-called "relational autonomy theories" tie the notions of autonomy and trust together is not entirely satisfying Then, I will introduce the so-called Encapsulated Interest Account as developed by Russell Hardin. This will bring out the importance of the reasons for trust. What good reasons do we have for trusting someone? I will criticize Hardin's business model as insufficiently robust, especially in the context of health care, and then turn to another source of trust, namely, love. It may seem that trust-through-love is much better suited for the vulnerability that is often involved in health care, but I will also show that it has its own deficiencies. Good health care should therefore pay attention to both models of trust, and I will offer some tentative remarks on how to do this. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. How warm days increase belief in global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Keenan, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-02-01

    Climate change judgements can depend on whether today seems warmer or colder than usual, termed the local warming effect. Although previous research has demonstrated that this effect occurs, studies have yet to explain why or how temperature abnormalities influence global warming attitudes. A better understanding of the underlying psychology of this effect can help explain the public's reaction to climate change and inform approaches used to communicate the phenomenon. Across five studies, we find evidence of attribute substitution, whereby individuals use less relevant but available information (for example, today's temperature) in place of more diagnostic but less accessible information (for example, global climate change patterns) when making judgements. Moreover, we rule out alternative hypotheses involving climate change labelling and lay mental models. Ultimately, we show that present temperature abnormalities are given undue weight and lead to an overestimation of the frequency of similar past events, thereby increasing belief in and concern for global warming.

  18. Trust vs. Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable...... to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968), Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967), and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma...

  19. Trust vs. Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Mogensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968, Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967, and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma & Collective Memory (1998.

  20. Trust and Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    The present paper is an answer to the question, how did trust and credit emerge. The systems of trust and credit reduce the environmental and contextual complexities in which trust and credit are embedded. The paper analyses the forms of this reduction in a number of stages in the evolution...... of history from the present risk of modern systems back to early modernity, the Reformation and the high medieval Revolutions in law, organization and theology. It is not a history of economics, but a history of the conditions of some communication codes used in economic systems....

  1. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  2. Governance, Trust and Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Guri; Joensen, E. Juanna Schröter

    This paper examines the role of social capital (trust) vis-à-vis the propensity of a country to be a tax haven. The empirical analysis corroborates that better governed countries have a higher ceteris paribus probability to be tax havens. However, social capital counteracts the effect of governance...... quality. This effect is so strong that the partial effect of governance quality is reversed for countries with the trust index in the top quartile – making these high trust countries less likely to be tax havens – even as governance quality is increased. Thus it is crucial to consider the interaction...

  3. Trust and Estate Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Brooke

    2012-01-01

    looks at the ways professionals participate in the creation of stratification regimes. Trust and estate planners do this by sheltering their clients' assets from taxation, thereby preserving private wealth for future generations. Using tools such as trusts, offshore banks, and shell corporations......, these professionals keep a significant portion of the world’s private wealth beyond the reach of the state. Trust and estate planning thus contributes to creating and maintaining socioeconomic inequality on a global scale. The significance of the profession has grown as wealth itself has become more fungible...

  4. Quantifying and Qualifying Trust: Spectral Decomposition of Trust Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovic, Dusko; Degano, Pierpaolo; Etalle, Sandro; Guttman, Joshua

    In a previous FAST paper, I presented a quantitative model of the process of trust building, and showed that trust is accumulated like wealth: the rich get richer. This explained the pervasive phenomenon of adverse selection of trust certificates, as well as the fragility of trust networks in

  5. Education and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Sven; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Dawes, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    One of the clearest results in previous studies on social trust is the robust positive relationship with educational attainment. The most common interpretation is that education has a causal effect on social trust. The theoretical argument and empirical results in this article suggest a different...... interpretation. We argue that common preadult factors such as cognitive abilities and personality traits rooted in genes and early-life family environment may confound the relationship between educational attainment and social trust. We provide new evidence on this question by utilizing the quasi......-experiment of twinning. By looking at the relationship between education and social trust within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs, we are able to avoid potential confounders rooted in genetic factors and common environmental influences because the monozygotic twins share both. The results suggest that when controlling...

  6. Balancing trust and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm-Jørgensen, Marie; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Reventlow, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how strategies of retaining patients are acted out by general practitioners (GPs) in the clinical encounter. With this study, we apply Grimens’ (2009) analytical connection between trust and power to explore how trust and power appear in preventive health checks...... of clinical encounters. Results: From the empirical data, we identified three dimensions of respect: respect for the patient’s autonomy, respect for professional authority and respect as a mutual exchange. A balance of respect influenced trust in the relationship between GP and patients and the transfer...... of power in the encounter. The GPs articulated that a balance was needed in preventive health checks in order to establish trust and thus retain the patient in the clinic. One way this balance of respect was carried out was with the use of humour. Conclusions: To retain patients without formal education...

  7. A formalization of computational trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güven - Ozcelebi, C.; Holenderski, M.J.; Ozcelebi, T.; Lukkien, J.J.

    2018-01-01

    Computational trust aims to quantify trust and is studied by many disciplines including computer science, social sciences and business science. We propose a formal computational trust model, including its parameters and operations on these parameters, as well as a step by step guide to compute trust

  8. Assess and enhance public trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Winter; James Absher; Alan Watson

    2007-01-01

    Trust is a form of social capital, facilitating effective land management, communication and collaboration. Although trust in the Forest Service is at least moderately high for most publics, evidence of a lack of trust and outright distrust has been found in some communities. However, the amount, types, and conditions of trust necessary for effective management to...

  9. Trust and virtual worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles; Thorseth, May

    2011-01-01

    We collect diverse philosophical analyses of the issues and problems clustering around trust online with specific attention to establishing trust in virtual environments. The book moves forward important discussions of how virtual worlds and virtuality are to be defined and understood; the role o...... by virtuality, such as virtual child pornography. The introduction further develops a philosophical anthropology, rooted in Kantian ethics, phenomenology, virtue ethics, and feminist perspectives, that grounds a specific approach to ethical issues in virtual environments....

  10. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    concerning the interaction with strangers through the platform. Putting trust in an online sharing community seems to be the biggest obstacle that influences whether people draw away rather than move closer together and start collaborating in the sharing community. Here, we report on the main issues...... involving other participants in the hope to find appropriate ways to create trustful sharing environments that reassure potential participants rather than play into their fears....

  11. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  12. Improving the effectiveness of communication about climate science: Insights from the "Global Warming's Six Americas" audience segmentation research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, E.; Roser-Renouf, C.

    2011-12-01

    That the climate science community has not been entirely effective in sharing what it knows about climate change with the broader public - and with policy makers and organizations that should be considering climate change when making decisions - is obvious. Our research shows that a large majority of the American public trusts scientists (76%) and science-based agencies (e.g., 76% trust NOAA) as sources of information about climate change. Yet, despite the widespread agreement in the climate science community that the climate is changing as a result of human activity, only 64% of the public understand that the world's average temperature has been increasing (and only about half of them are sure), less than half (47%) understand that the warming is caused mostly by human activity, and only 39% understand that most scientists think global warming is happening (in fact, only 13% understand that the large majority of climate scientists think global warming is happening). Less obvious is what the climate science community should do to become more effective in sharing what it knows. In this paper, we will use evidence from our "Global Warming's Six Americas" audience segmentation research project to suggest ways that individual climate scientists -- and perhaps more importantly, ways in which climate science agencies and professional societies -- can enhance the effectiveness of their communication efforts. We will conclude by challenging members of the climate science community to identify and convey "simple, clear messages, repeated often, by a variety of trusted sources" - an approach to communication repeatedly shown to be effective by the public health community.

  13. Social Collaborative Filtering by Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Lei, Yu; Liu, Jiming; Li, Wenjie

    2017-08-01

    Recommender systems are used to accurately and actively provide users with potentially interesting information or services. Collaborative filtering is a widely adopted approach to recommendation, but sparse data and cold-start users are often barriers to providing high quality recommendations. To address such issues, we propose a novel method that works to improve the performance of collaborative filtering recommendations by integrating sparse rating data given by users and sparse social trust network among these same users. This is a model-based method that adopts matrix factorization technique that maps users into low-dimensional latent feature spaces in terms of their trust relationship, and aims to more accurately reflect the users reciprocal influence on the formation of their own opinions and to learn better preferential patterns of users for high-quality recommendations. We use four large-scale datasets to show that the proposed method performs much better, especially for cold start users, than state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms for social collaborative filtering based on trust.

  14. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  15. Trust and trust relations from the providers' perspective: the case of the healthcare system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sumit; Calnan, Michael; Radkar, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Commentators suggest that there is an erosion of trust in the relations between different actors in the health system in India. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of the situation of providers in an urban setting in western India, the nature of their relations in terms of trust and what influences these relations. The data on relationships of trust were collected through interviews and focus group discussions with key informants, including public and private providers, regulators, managers and societal actors, such as patients/citizens, politicians and the media.

  16. A Survey on Trust Management for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    expects, trust is dangerous implying the possible betrayal of trust. In his comments on Lagerspetz’s book titled Trust: The Tacit Demand, Lahno [24...AODV Zouridaki et al. (2005 ) [79] (2006) [80] Secure routing Direct observation [79][80] Reputation by secondhand information [80] Packet dropping...areas of signal processing, wireless communications, sensor and mobile ad hoc networks. He is co-editor of the book Wireless Sensor Networks: Signal

  17. Transparency in Supply Chains: Is Trust a Limiting Factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Frentrup, Mechthild; Theuvsen, Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    Transparency has gained much relevance in food chains. This paper summarizes the determinants of transparency and points out that transparency in the sense of effective information exchange needs trust as a mediator in order to become a powerful tool in supply chain management. In addition to that this paper analyses the characteristics of trust and highlights the reciprocal and dynamic mechanisms of trust on transparency and vice versa. It is argued that both constructs should be enhanced at...

  18. Trade, trust and the rule of law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Shu; Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; de Haan, Jakob

    Well-functioning institutions, both formal (i.e. rule of law) and informal (i.e. trust), facilitate economic exchange. To investigate the nature of the relationship between formal and informal institutions, we analyze bilateral trade patterns in a sample of 16 European countries between 1996-2009.

  19. Trust, values and false consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Jeffrey V.; Giuliano, Paola; Guiso, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Trust beliefs are heterogeneous across individuals and, at the same time, persistent across generations. We investigate one mechanism yielding these dual patterns: false consensus. In the context of a trust game experiment, we show that individuals extrapolate from their own type when forming trust beliefs about the same pool of potential partners – i.e., more (less) trustworthy individuals form more optimistic (pessimistic) trust beliefs - and that this tendency continues to color trust beli...

  20. A general definition of trust

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Kieron

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a definition and conceptual analysis of trust is given in terms of trustworthiness. Its focus will be as wide as possible, and will not be restricted to any particular type of trust. The aim is to show the key parameters that enable us to investigate and understand trust, thereby facilitating the development of systems, institutions and technologies to support, model or mimic trust. The paper will also show the strong connection between trust and trustworthiness, showing how the...

  1. Do you trust? Whom do you trust? When do you trust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, C.C.P.; Keren, G.; Thye, S.R.; Lawler, E.J.; Macy, M.W.; Walker, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    We try to provide a broader view on the factors that infiuence the decision to trust and honor trust. Using the "Trust Game" as our experimental paradigm, we consider three classes offactors that may he related to trust issues. The first one considers individual differences with regard to the

  2. The Impact of Satisfaction and Trust on Loyalty of E-Commerce Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochammad Auditya Brilliant

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of Internet users in Indonesia and e-commerce sales is growing. However, Indonesia is less active in e-commerce research compared to other Asian countries, and existing studies cover limited area. The purpose of this study is identifying the impact of customer satisfaction and trust on loyalty in e-commerce and identifying the factors that influence satisfaction. The results are that information quality affects trust and that trust affects loyalty. E-commerce websites should focus on delivering trusted information on product quality, which will lead to greater customer trust, and greater trust will lead to greater loyalty to the websites

  3. Capturing Trust in Social Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, John

    The Social Web constitutes a shift in information flow from the traditional Web. Previously, content was provided by the owners of a website, for consumption by the end-user. Nowadays, these websites are being replaced by Social Web applications which are frameworks for the publication of user-provided content. Traditionally, Web content could be `trusted' to some extent based on the site it originated from. Algorithms such as Google's PageRank were (and still are) used to compute the importance of a website, based on analysis of underlying link topology. In the Social Web, analysis of link topology merely tells us about the importance of the information framework which hosts the content. Consumers of information still need to know about the importance/reliability of the content they are reading, and therefore about the reliability of the producers of that content. Research into trust and reputation of the producers of information in the Social Web is still very much in its infancy. Every day, people are forced to make trusting decisions about strangers on the Web based on a very limited amount of information. For example, purchasing a product from an eBay seller with a `reputation' of 99%, downloading a file from a peer-to-peer application such as Bit-Torrent, or allowing Amazon.com tell you what products you will like. Even something as simple as reading comments on a Web-blog requires the consumer to make a trusting decision about the quality of that information. In all of these example cases, and indeed throughout the Social Web, there is a pressing demand for increased information upon which we can make trusting decisions. This chapter examines the diversity of sources from which trust information can be harnessed within Social Web applications and discusses a high level classification of those sources. Three different techniques for harnessing and using trust from a range of sources are presented. These techniques are deployed in two sample Social Web

  4. The Effects of Perceived Value, Website Trust and Hotel Trust on Online Hotel Booking Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Yeon Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of information technology in hotel booking context, it is no doubt that many hotels consequently enhance the needs of integrating information technologies into their overall business operations. In this study, we developed a research model which consists of perceived value, trust toward a third party online booking site, and trust toward hotels, and tested it by using partial least square techniques. Survey data were collected from 307 individuals who have prior experiences on making a reservation using third-party online booking sites. Based upon our findings, we found that the perceived value, which was affected by both price and quality, was positively related to individuals’ intention to book. We also found that both trust toward third-party online booking sites and trust toward hotels, which was influenced by online review, have positive impacts on individuals’ intention to book. The implications of these findings for both research and practice are discussed.

  5. Trust to mass-media: micro- and macrolevel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kavyerina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Trust is the basic element of civil society.For the last decades Ukrainian social institutions, including mass media, suffering of the crisis of trust. Public informing, socialization, formation of public opinion are the main functions of mass media. Mass media takes part in a lot of social processes and spheres of society. Accuracy of the information, compliance with standards,objectivity and trust of the audience are very important because of the influence of the mass media. The paper deals with various interpretations of trust and theories of N.Luhmann, P. Sztompka and A. Seligmen, thatemphasize the importance of trust during the transformation of society. Also author considers the approaches to defining levels of trust. Attention was focused on two levels – the micro-level which represents personal trust and the macro-level with institutional trust. Author analyzes mass media as a social institution and considers social media as a type of mass media, which has its own unique characteristics such as high level of the informational participation, lack of the law regulation and the organizational structure. These characteristics bring to the foreground figure of the author. So the social media covers both levels of forming a trusting relationship with audience – micro and macrolevel.

  6. Global warming-setting the stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Most of us have heard or read about global warming. However, the messages we receive are often in conflict, raising more questions than answer. Is global warming a good or a bad thing? has it already started or is it part of our future? Are we, or are we not doing anything about it? Should we be concerned? This primer on Global Warming is designed to clear up some of this confusion by providing basic scientific information on global warming issue. It is clear that there is still much to learn about global warming. However, it is also clear that there is a lot that we already know - and that dose provide cause for concern. We must understand the global warming issue if we are to make wise decisions and take responsible actions in response to the challenges and opportunities posed by global warming. Chapter 1 of 'the primer on global Warming' set the stage with a brief overview of science of global warming within the context of climate change. In addition, it introduces the specific issues that surround the global warming problem. As far as the science of global warming is concerned the following questions are discussed. What is global climate? Is climate change natural? What causes climate to vary on a global scale? How does the composition of the atmosphere relate to climate change. but there are also certain issues discussed here which surround the global warming such as: If climate varies naturally, why is there a concern about 'global warming'? What are the potential consequences of 'global warning'. What human activities contribute to 'global warming'. (Author)

  7. A Model of Trusted Measurement Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Zhili; Wang Zhihao; Dai Liang; Zhu Xiaoqin

    2017-01-01

    A model of Trusted Measurement supporting behavior measurement based on trusted connection architecture (TCA) with three entities and three levels is proposed, and a frame to illustrate the model is given. The model synthesizes three trusted measurement dimensions including trusted identity, trusted status and trusted behavior, satisfies the essential requirements of trusted measurement, and unified the TCA with three entities and three levels.

  8. Review of Interorganizational Trust Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    mais les résultats de la recherche se sont avérés relativement maigres. Bien que nous ayons trouvé de nombreux modèles de confiance...rooted in common values, including a common concept of moral obligation. This type of trust typically takes a long time to develop, and is the type of...Perspectives on relationship repair and implications (Dirks et al., 2009, p. 72) Attributional theories propose that one party uses information about a

  9. Trust transitivity in social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Richters

    Full Text Available Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected "fringe" nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its "fringe" peers.

  10. Trust Transitivity in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected “fringe” nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its “fringe” peers. PMID:21483683

  11. Decoupling, re-Engaging: managing trust relationships in implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2012-01-01

    , and the complex demands of managing those fluctuations. We investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered various breakdowns, but the project was able to recover and eventually meet...... its goals. Based on concepts from Giddens’ later work on modernity, we develop two approaches for managing dynamic trust relationships in implementation projects: decoupling and re-engaging.......An important aspect of the successful implementation of large information systems (such as ERP systems) is trust. These implementations impact the legitimate interests of many groups of stakeholders, and trust is a critical factor for success. Trust in the project is contingent upon many factors...

  12. Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden Stratospheric Warming Compendium (SSWC) data set documents the stratospheric, tropospheric, and surface climate impacts of sudden stratospheric warmings. This...

  13. A Chinese sky trust?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, Mark [Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)]. E-mail: brenner@econs.umass.edu; Riddle, Matthew [Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)]. E-mail: mriddle@econs.umass.edu; Boyce, James K. [Political Economy Research Institute and Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)]. E-mail: boyce@econs.umass.edu

    2007-03-15

    The introduction of carbon charges on the use of fossil fuels in China would have a progressive impact on income distribution. This outcome, which contrasts to the regressive distributional impact found in most studies of carbon charges in industrialized countries, is driven primarily by differences between urban and rural expenditure patterns. If carbon revenues were recycled on an equal per capita basis via a 'sky trust,' the progressive impact would be further enhanced: low-income (mainly rural) households would receive more in sky-trust dividends than they pay in carbon charges, and high-income (mainly urban) households would pay more than they receive in dividends. Thus a Chinese sky trust would contribute to both lower fossil fuel consumption and greater income equality.

  14. Impact Through Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Juan A.

    of its rulings and legal mandates in national judiciaries and legal systems? This question is crucial if we understand that national courts are the key decentralised enforcers of the European Union (EU) law responsible for ensuring the effectiveness of EU law and the rulings and mandates imposed...... by the Court. EU scholars have already offered several legalist and institutionalist responses to why national courts participate in this process of legal integration in the EU and, most importantly, why the follow the mandates and rulings from the CJEU. This chapter innovates in this regard by introducing...... trust between judges as a new mechanism for enhancing the cooperation and compliance by national courts with the CJEU jurisprudence and EU legal mandates. The chapter describes the conditions under which national judges trust the CJEU to identify how the Court can promote trust in its role as a supreme...

  15. Trusts and Financialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Brooke

    2017-01-01

    the global spread of financialization: by privileging the rentier–investor within the 15 world economy; by perpetuating a distinctively Anglo-American approach to finance internationally; and by increasing the autonomy of finance vis-a-vis the nation-state. This study shares the primarily descriptive......This article identifies trusts as a legal structure associated with the global spread of financialization. Although trusts originated in Medieval England, they have acquired a new significance in contemporary finance by virtue of their advantages in terms of 10 profit maximization and capital...... and conceptual intent of Krippner’s work on financialization, but extends it in two ways: by comparing trusts to the better- known corporate form of organizing financial activity, and by showing how private 20 capital is implicated in the financialized economy alongside corporate wealth....

  16. Trust in Diverse Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    , maintaining team cohesiveness in multicultural teams to collaborate effectively presents a number of challenges. The present study employs the concept of trust to explore influences on team collaboration in high performing teams. The study is based on observation of teams in seven multinational corporations...... and interviews with managers from the US, Europe, China and Japan. The study presents a conceptual framework - a ‘trust buffer’ – which enables analysis and exemplification of the dynamics and challenges of teams as drivers of change. Each team has strategically important tasks, unique capacities and deal...... with change in particular ways: Each team is analyzed in relation to its global (HQ) mandate, local (national) stakeholders and organizational context. It is found that communication energy, resources and team mandate underscore the sense of trust in high performing teams. Diversity is understood...

  17. A Chinese sky trust?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, Mark; Riddle, Matthew; Boyce, James K.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of carbon charges on the use of fossil fuels in China would have a progressive impact on income distribution. This outcome, which contrasts to the regressive distributional impact found in most studies of carbon charges in industrialized countries, is driven primarily by differences between urban and rural expenditure patterns. If carbon revenues were recycled on an equal per capita basis via a 'sky trust,' the progressive impact would be further enhanced: low-income (mainly rural) households would receive more in sky-trust dividends than they pay in carbon charges, and high-income (mainly urban) households would pay more than they receive in dividends. Thus a Chinese sky trust would contribute to both lower fossil fuel consumption and greater income equality

  18. Trust Models in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Krukow, Karl; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-01-01

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.......We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models....

  19. Property-Based Anonymous Attestation in Trusted Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Hu Ning

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the remote attestation on Trusted Computer (TC computing mode TCCP, the trusted computer TC has an excessive burden, and anonymity and platform configuration information security of computing nodes cannot be guaranteed. To overcome these defects, based on the research on and analysis of current schemes, we propose an anonymous proof protocol based on property certificate. The platform configuration information is converted by the matrix algorithm into the property certificate, and the remote attestation is implemented by trusted ring signature scheme based on Strong RSA Assumption. By the trusted ring signature scheme based on property certificate, we achieve the anonymity of computing nodes and prevent the leakage of platform configuration information. By simulation, we obtain the computational efficiency of the scheme. We also expand the protocol and obtain the anonymous attestation based on ECC. By scenario comparison, we obtain the trusted ring signature scheme based on RSA, which has advantages with the growth of the ring numbers.

  20. Using isotopes for global warming observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namata, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper, based on a literature review, discusses the main aspects of using isotopic techniques to obtain information about global warming. The rapid increase concentration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ) in the atmosphere will result in global warming by the greenhouse effect, and the isotopic techniques constitute an efficient tool to explain this complex environmental phenomenon. (author)

  1. Sensory Metrics of Neuromechanical Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Softky, William; Benford, Criscillia

    2017-09-01

    Today digital sources supply a historically unprecedented component of human sensorimotor data, the consumption of which is correlated with poorly understood maladies such as Internet addiction disorder and Internet gaming disorder. Because both natural and digital sensorimotor data share common mathematical descriptions, one can quantify our informational sensorimotor needs using the signal processing metrics of entropy, noise, dimensionality, continuity, latency, and bandwidth. Such metrics describe in neutral terms the informational diet human brains require to self-calibrate, allowing individuals to maintain trusting relationships. With these metrics, we define the trust humans experience using the mathematical language of computational models, that is, as a primitive statistical algorithm processing finely grained sensorimotor data from neuromechanical interaction. This definition of neuromechanical trust implies that artificial sensorimotor inputs and interactions that attract low-level attention through frequent discontinuities and enhanced coherence will decalibrate a brain's representation of its world over the long term by violating the implicit statistical contract for which self-calibration evolved. Our hypersimplified mathematical understanding of human sensorimotor processing as multiscale, continuous-time vibratory interaction allows equally broad-brush descriptions of failure modes and solutions. For example, we model addiction in general as the result of homeostatic regulation gone awry in novel environments (sign reversal) and digital dependency as a sub-case in which the decalibration caused by digital sensorimotor data spurs yet more consumption of them. We predict that institutions can use these sensorimotor metrics to quantify media richness to improve employee well-being; that dyads and family-size groups will bond and heal best through low-latency, high-resolution multisensory interaction such as shared meals and reciprocated touch; and

  2. Trusted cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krcmar, Helmut; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This book documents the scientific results of the projects related to the Trusted Cloud Program, covering fundamental aspects of trust, security, and quality of service for cloud-based services and applications. These results aim to allow trustworthy IT applications in the cloud by providing a reliable and secure technical and legal framework. In this domain, business models, legislative circumstances, technical possibilities, and realizable security are closely interwoven and thus are addressed jointly. The book is organized in four parts on "Security and Privacy", "Software Engineering and

  3. Time and Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    current Africa strategies as part of a long history of a variety of stakeholders on the African continent. I argue that trust and lack of trust based on long term relations influence choices on aid distribution made by African and partner countries. The analysis is based on a reading of OECD statistics...... on aid distribution in combination with select interviews with stakeholders in foreign aid, and archival findings on the historical presence of Japanese, Chinese, Indian, European, and North American people on the African continent. By looking at the impact of historical networks on ODA distribution...

  4. Trust in Anonymity Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassone, Vladimiro; Hamadou, Sardaouna; Yang, Mu

    Anonymity is a security property of paramount importance, as we move steadily towards a wired, online community. Its import touches upon subjects as different as eGovernance, eBusiness and eLeisure, as well as personal freedom of speech in authoritarian societies. Trust metrics are used in anonymity networks to support and enhance reliability in the absence of verifiable identities, and a variety of security attacks currently focus on degrading a user's trustworthiness in the eyes of the other users. In this paper, we analyse the privacy guarantees of the Crowds anonymity protocol, with and without onion forwarding, for standard and adaptive attacks against the trust level of honest users.

  5. A game theory-based trust measurement model for social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingjie; Cai, Zhipeng; Yin, Guisheng; Gao, Yang; Tong, Xiangrong; Han, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    In social networks, trust is a complex social network. Participants in online social networks want to share information and experiences with as many reliable users as possible. However, the modeling of trust is complicated and application dependent. Modeling trust needs to consider interaction history, recommendation, user behaviors and so on. Therefore, modeling trust is an important focus for online social networks. We propose a game theory-based trust measurement model for social networks. The trust degree is calculated from three aspects, service reliability, feedback effectiveness, recommendation credibility, to get more accurate result. In addition, to alleviate the free-riding problem, we propose a game theory-based punishment mechanism for specific trust and global trust, respectively. We prove that the proposed trust measurement model is effective. The free-riding problem can be resolved effectively through adding the proposed punishment mechanism.

  6. Banking system trust, bank trust, and bank loyalty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esterik-Plasmeijer, P.; van Raaij, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to test a model of banking system trust as an antecedent of bank trust and bank loyalty. Six determinants of trust and loyalty are included: competence, stability, integrity, customer orientation, transparency, and value congruence. The study provides insights

  7. CONTEXTUAL DIFFERENCES IN THE DYNAMIC MEASUREMENT OF TRUST IN WEB SITES ACROSS DOMAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Asan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to better understand user trust in web sites designed for different contexts; commerce, health and news. This research evaluated changes in trust ratings as users interacted with website elements. Differences in user trust ratings were observed between websites, which suggests that these changes in trust ratings are likely related to the website context. Therefore, people may develop different thresholds for trust based on concepts of usability, privacy, and content that are related to the website context. Finally, these results can also be used to inform the design of web sites to foster user trust in websites designed for different contexts.

  8. Public trust in Dutch health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straten, G F M; Friele, R D; Groenewegen, P P

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument to measure different dimensions of public trust in health care in the Netherlands. This instrument is needed because the concept was not well developed, or operationalized in earlier research. The new instrument will be used in a research project to monitor trust and to predict behaviour of people such as consulting "alternative practitioners". The idea for the research was suggested by economic research into public trust. In the study, a phased design was used to overcome the operationalization problem. In the first phase, a qualitative study was conducted; and, in the second, a quantitative study. In the first phase, more than 100 people were interviewed to gain insight into the issues they associated with trust. Eight categories of issues that were derived from the interviews were assumed to be possible dimensions of trust. On the basis of these eight categories and the interviews, a questionnaire was developed that was used in the second phase. In this phase, the questionnaire was sent to 1500 members of a consumer panel; the response was 70 percent. The analysis reveals that six of the eight possible dimensions appear in factor analysis. These dimensions are trust in: the patient-focus of health care providers; macro policies level will have no consequences for patients; expertise of health care providers; quality of care; information supply and communication by care providers and the quality of cooperation. The reliability of most scales is higher than 0.8. The validity of the dimensions is assessed by determining the correlation between the scales on the one hand, and people's experience and a general mark they would assign on the other. We conclude that public trust is a multi-dimensional concept, including not only issues that relate to the patient-doctor relationship, but also issues that relate to health care institutions. The instrument appears to be reliable and valid.

  9. Understanding Trust in Financial Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Although the financial crisis has elevated the interest for factors such as consumer financial healthiness, broad-scope trust, financial knowledge, and consumer relationship satisfaction, no existing model describes how these factors may influence consumer financial relationship trust...... healthiness, broad-scope trust, knowledge, and satisfaction positively affect narrow-scope trust in financial services. Furthermore, it is found that broad-scope trust negatively moderates the relationships between financial healthiness and narrow-scope trust and between satisfaction and narrow-scope trust....... This research extends prior research by developing a conceptual framework explaining how these constructs affect consumers' trust in their financial service provider. Based on two surveys comprising 764 pension consumers and 892 mortgage consumers, respectively, the results of this study indicate that financial...

  10. The Process of Trust Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren; Højland, Jeppe

    in management among employees. Trust is found to be higher among employees interacting regularly with managers, as in the project coordination group. It is found that personal relations are very important for the development of trust. The success of the project may be explained by the involvement of an ‘elite...... and discuss with colleagues from other departments and develop personal knowledge of each other....... by high trust and co-operation? In this paper we explore the process of trust development during an organisational change project in a Danish SME by looking at two kinds of trust relations: employee trust in management and trust relations among employees. We find substantial differences in trust...

  11. Trust and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinig, John

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses the tension between trust, as an expression of interpersonal commitment, and critical thinking, which includes a demand for reasons. It explores the importance of each for individual flourishing, and then seeks to establish some ways in which they intersect, drawing on ideas of authority and trustworthiness. It argues that…

  12. Researching trust in Wikipedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, T.; Schraagen, Johannes Martinus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    As the use of collaborative online encyclopedias such as Wikipedia grows, so does the need for research on how users evaluate its credibility. In this paper we compare three experimental approaches to study trust in Wikipedia, namely think aloud, eye-tracking, and online questionnaires. The

  13. Know what you trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiessens, F.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Etalle, Sandro; Degano, P.; Guttman, J. D.; Martinelli, F.

    2009-01-01

    In Decentralized Trust Management (DTM) authorization decisions are made by multiple principals who can also delegate decisions to each other. Therefore, a policy change of one principal will often affect who gets authorized by another principal. In such a system of influenceable authorization a

  14. Initial Formation of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schärfe, Henrik; Dougerthery, Elizabeth Ann

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of how touch may be used as a way of inducing trust in the meeting with a teloperated android, the Geminoid-DK. The use of hapics with Gestalt-based 'Balance Theory' is used as a persuasive desing of the interaction between human and robot. Balance theory includes...

  15. Trust-distrust Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jukka, Minna; Blomqvist, Kirsimarja; Li, Peter Ping

    2017-01-01

    notion of "guanxi" as personal ties. In contrast, the Finnish managers' view of trustworthiness was more associated with depersonalized organizational attributes. They emphasized the dimension of integrity, especially promise-keeping. In addition, tentative signs of trust ambivalence, as a balance...... opposites constitute a duality to be managed from the perspective of yin-yang balancing....

  16. Trust in agile teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Gitte; Fransgård, Mette; Skalkam, Signe

    2012-01-01

    actions influenced this. We see two important lessons from the analysis. First the agile practices of daily Scrum and self organizing team can empower DSD teams to manage their own development of trust and thereby alleviate the obstacles of DSD. Second if management fails to support the development...

  17. Trust Transitivity in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical...

  18. Constitutional Verbosity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Voigt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A common argument in the trust literature is that high-trust cultures allow efficient commercial contracts to be shorter, covering fewer contingencies. We take this idea to the topic of social contracts. Specifically, we ask whether social trust affects the length and detail of constitutions. Cross......-country estimates suggest that national trust levels are indeed robustly and negatively associated with the length of countries’ constitutions....

  19. Problems in Cross Cultural Trust Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Based on an explorative study of the Danish Public Diplomacy activities in Pakistan this paper brings to attention a number of issues related to cross cultural trust building. The empirical data includes information from the communication consultant at the Danish Embassy in Islamabad, and other...

  20. Learning to trust : network effects through time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera, D.; Bunt, G. van de

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of information originating from social networks on the development of interpersonal trust relations in the context of a dialysis department of a Dutch medium-sized hospital. Hypotheses on learning effects are developed from existing theories and tested using

  1. Learning to trust: network effects through time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera, D.; van de Bunt, G

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of information originating from social networks on the development of interpersonal trust relations in the context of a dialysis department of a Dutch medium-sized hospital. Hypotheses on learning effects are developed from existing theories and tested using

  2. MULTILEVEL AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALE FOR ONLINE TRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarnación González-Vázquez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the nature of the construct of consumers’ trust toward the electronic channel of their financial institution. Through a study of a total of 372 individual users of Internet banking in Spain, we have managed to develop a third-order measuring instrument that integrates a total of seven dimensions. The exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the validation and reliability of the proposed scale. Findings provide useful information to professionals who seek to identify how customer's trust is formed in the online channel and in the financial sector.

  3. Introduction to Hardware Security and Trust

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Cliff

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of a globalized, horizontal semiconductor business model raises a set of concerns involving the security and trust of the information systems on which modern society is increasingly reliant for mission-critical functionality. Hardware-oriented security and trust issues span a broad range including threats related to the malicious insertion of Trojan circuits designed, e.g.,to act as a ‘kill switch’ to disable a chip, to integrated circuit (IC) piracy,and to attacks designed to extract encryption keys and IP from a chip. This book provides the foundations for understanding hardware security and trust, which have become major concerns for national security over the past decade.  Coverage includes security and trust issues in all types of electronic devices and systems such as ASICs, COTS, FPGAs, microprocessors/DSPs, and embedded systems.  This serves as an invaluable reference to the state-of-the-art research that is of critical significance to the security of,and trust in, modern society�...

  4. Trust It or Trash It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trust It or Trash It? About | Contact | Español Tab 1 Tab 2 What is Trust It or Trash It? This is a tool ... be true, it may be. (See the second “Trust it” statement above). Click on each element below ...

  5. Creating trust through narrative strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbay, SM; Leenders, RTAJ

    In the rational model of trust, an actor's level of trust is a function of the expected gain and loss involved. As a consequence, if A can influence the gain and loss perceived by B, A can influence B's level of trust. In this article we study how A can do this through the strategic use of

  6. Incremental Trust in Grid Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkløv, Michael Hvalsøe; Sharp, Robin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative simulation study of some incremental trust and reputation algorithms for handling behavioural trust in large distributed systems. Two types of reputation algorithm (based on discrete and Bayesian evaluation of ratings) and two ways of combining direct trust and ...... of Grid computing systems....

  7. Creating trust through narrative strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabbay, SM; Leenders, RTAJ

    2003-01-01

    In the rational model of trust, an actor's level of trust is a function of the expected gain and loss involved. As a consequence, if A can influence the gain and loss perceived by B, A can influence B's level of trust. In this article we study how A can do this through the strategic use of

  8. Trusting Relationships in International Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keating, Vincent Charles; Ruzicka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    How can trusting relationships be identified in international politics? The recent wave of scholarship on trust in International Relations answers this question by looking for one or the combination of three indicators – the incidence of cooperation; discourses expressing trust; or the calculated...

  9. Social Capital, Institutions and Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relations between social capital, institutions and trust.These concepts are full of ambiguity and confusion.This paper attempts to dissolve some of the confusion, by distinguishing trust and control, and analyzing institutional and relational conditions of trust.It presents a

  10. Trust models in ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukow, Karl; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-10-28

    We recapture some of the arguments for trust-based technologies in ubiquitous computing, followed by a brief survey of some of the models of trust that have been introduced in this respect. Based on this, we argue for the need of more formal and foundational trust models.

  11. Modelling biased human trust dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, M.; Jaffry, S.W.; Maanen, P.P. van; Treur, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Within human trust related behaviour, according to the literature from the domains of Psychology and Social Sciences often non-rational behaviour can be observed. Current trust models that have been developed typically do not incorporate non-rational elements in the trust formation

  12. Trust, Endangerment and Divine Vulnerability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mikkel Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Faith is trusting God in the midst of endangerment. Yet, human experience of excessive suffering has challenged any spontaneous trust in God. In this article, I reconsider the idea of faith as trust in God, adding an emphasis on the divine vulnerability in the incarnation, and I develop a more...

  13. Social Trust, Safety and the Choice of Tourist Destination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2016-01-01

    Does social trust influence safety and tourists’ destination choice? Our claim is that the roots of safety may take two forms: either formal institutions or informal institutions. Formal institutions concern how society can build up control mechanisms through the legal system, police authority...... and military. The problem is that high visibility of police and military in public spaces may give the tourist the impression of an unsafe and insecure destination. Instead, social trust through self-enforcements of social norms for behaviour may be important because the informal institutions guarantee...... the safety of tourists (and locals) without signalling a problem with safety. Building social trust may further enhance the feeling of safety and thereby attract even more tourists. Thus, our trust-safety theory may guide the active use of social trust by tourist officials and policy makers....

  14. The Double-System Architecture for Trusted OS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Yu; Zhan, Jing

    With the development of computer science and technology, current secure operating systems failed to respond to many new security challenges. Trusted operating system (TOS) is proposed to try to solve these problems. However, there are no mature, unified architectures for the TOS yet, since most of them cannot make clear of the relationship between security mechanism and the trusted mechanism. Therefore, this paper proposes a double-system architecture (DSA) for the TOS to solve the problem. The DSA is composed of the Trusted System (TS) and the Security System (SS). We constructed the TS by establishing a trusted environment and realized related SS. Furthermore, we proposed the Trusted Information Channel (TIC) to protect the information flow between TS and SS. In a word, the double system architecture we proposed can provide reliable protection for the OS through the SS with the supports provided by the TS.

  15. Application of the Reina Trust and Betrayal Model to the experience of pediatric critical care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda Hylton; Reina, Michelle L; Francovich, Christopher; Naumann, Phyllis; Reina, Dennis S

    2010-07-01

    Trust is essential in the workplace, yet no systematic studies of trust among pediatric critical care professionals have been done. To determine the feasibility of measuring trust in a pediatric intensive care unit by using established scales from the corporate world and to determine what behaviors build, break, and rebuild trust. The Reina Trust and Betrayal Model was used to explore contractual, competence, and communication trust. Nurses and physicians in a pediatric intensive care unit completed online surveys to measure organizational, team, and patient trust. Quantitative data from 3 standard survey instruments and qualitative responses to 3 open-ended questions were analyzed and compared. Quantitative data from all 3 instruments indicated moderate to high levels of trust; scores for competence and contractual trust were higher than scores for communication trust. Scores indicated agreement on behaviors that build trust, such as pointing out risky situations to each other, actively striving to build supportive and productive relationships, and giving and receiving constructive feedback. Foremost among trust-breaking behaviors was gossip, which was more troublesome to respondents with longer experience in critical care. Responses to the open-ended questions underscored these themes. The most frequently cited items included encouraging mutually serving intentions, sharing information, and involving and seeking the input of others. The Reina trust scales and open-ended questions are feasible and applicable to pediatric critical care units, and data collected with these instruments are useful in determining what behaviors build, break, and rebuild trust among staff.

  16. Trust and credibility: measured by multidimensional scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warg, L.E.; Bodin, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: in focus of much of today's research interest in risk communication, is the fact that the communities do not trust policy and decision makers such as politicians, government or industry people. This is especially serious in the years to come when we are expecting risk issues concerning for example the nuclear industry, global warming and hazardous waste, to be even higher on the political and social agenda all over the world. Despite the research efforts devoted to trust, society needs an in depth understanding of trust for conducting successful communication regarding environmental hazards. The present abstract is about an experimental study in psychology where focus has been on the possibility to use the multidimensional scaling technique to explore the characteristics people consider to be of importance when they say that certain persons are credible. In the study, a total of 61 students of the University of Oerebro, Sweden, were required to make comparisons of the similarity between 12 well-known swedish persons from politics science, media, industry, 'TV-world' and literature (two persons at a time), regarding their credibility when making statements about risks in society. In addition, the subjects were rating the importance of 19 factors for the credibility of a source. These 61 persons comprised three groups of students: pedagogists, business economists, and chemists. There were 61 % women and 39% men and the mean age was 23 years. The results will be analyzed using multidimensional scaling technique. Differences between the three groups will be analyzed and presented as well as those between men and women. In addition, the 19 factors will be discussed and considered when trying to label the dimensions accounted for by the multidimensional scaling technique. The result from this study will contribute to our understanding of important factors behind human judgments concerning trust and credibility. It will also point to a

  17. Redefining genomic privacy: trust and empowerment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Erlich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fulfilling the promise of the genetic revolution requires the analysis of large datasets containing information from thousands to millions of participants. However, sharing human genomic data requires protecting subjects from potential harm. Current models rely on de-identification techniques in which privacy versus data utility becomes a zero-sum game. Instead, we propose the use of trust-enabling techniques to create a solution in which researchers and participants both win. To do so we introduce three principles that facilitate trust in genetic research and outline one possible framework built upon those principles. Our hope is that such trust-centric frameworks provide a sustainable solution that reconciles genetic privacy with data sharing and facilitates genetic research.

  18. Redefining genomic privacy: trust and empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Yaniv; Williams, James B; Glazer, David; Yocum, Kenneth; Farahany, Nita; Olson, Maynard; Narayanan, Arvind; Stein, Lincoln D; Witkowski, Jan A; Kain, Robert C

    2014-11-01

    Fulfilling the promise of the genetic revolution requires the analysis of large datasets containing information from thousands to millions of participants. However, sharing human genomic data requires protecting subjects from potential harm. Current models rely on de-identification techniques in which privacy versus data utility becomes a zero-sum game. Instead, we propose the use of trust-enabling techniques to create a solution in which researchers and participants both win. To do so we introduce three principles that facilitate trust in genetic research and outline one possible framework built upon those principles. Our hope is that such trust-centric frameworks provide a sustainable solution that reconciles genetic privacy with data sharing and facilitates genetic research.

  19. Modelling Users` Trust in Online Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob Cătoiu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies (McKnight, Lankton and Tripp, 2011; Liao, Lui and Chen, 2011 have shown the crucial role of trust when choosing to disclose sensitive information online. This is the case of online social networks users, who must disclose a certain amount of personal data in order to gain access to these online services. Taking into account privacy calculus model and the risk/benefit ratio, we propose a model of users’ trust in online social networks with four variables. We have adapted metrics for the purpose of our study and we have assessed their reliability and validity. We use a Partial Least Squares (PLS based structural equation modelling analysis, which validated all our initial assumptions, indicating that our three predictors (privacy concerns, perceived benefits and perceived risks explain 48% of the variation of users’ trust in online social networks, the resulting variable of our study. We also discuss the implications and further research opportunities of our study.

  20. 'One also needs a bit of trust in the doctor ... ': a qualitative interview study with pancreatic cancer patients about their perceptions and views on information and treatment decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, J; Ritter, P; Salloch, S; Uhl, W; Vollmann, J

    2013-09-01

    Information about diagnosis, treatment options and prognosis has been emphasized as a key to empower cancer patients to make treatment decisions reflecting their values. However, surveys indicate that patients' preferences regarding information and treatment decision-making differ. In this qualitative interview study, we explored pancreatic cancer patients' perceptions and preferences on information and treatment decision-making. Qualitative in-depth interviews with patients with pancreatic cancer. Purposive sampling and qualitative analysis were carried out. We identified two stages of information and treatment decision-making. Patients initially emphasize trust in their physician and indicate rather limited interest in details about surgical and medical treatment. In the latter stage of disease, patients perceive themselves more active regarding information seeking and treatment decision-making. All patients discuss their poor prognosis. Reflecting on their own situation, all patients interviewed pointed out that hope was an important driver to undergo further treatment also in advanced stages of the disease. Interviewees unanimously emphasized the difficulty of anticipating the time at which stopping cancer treatment would be the right decision. The findings can serve as starting point for reflection on professional decision-making in pancreatic cancer and larger representative surveys on ethical issues in treatment decision-making in pancreatic cancer.

  1. 25 CFR 115.709 - Will an annual audit be conducted on trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will an annual audit be conducted on trust funds? 115.709... FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Trust Fund Accounts: General Information § 115.709 Will an... will be conducted on trust funds. Each tribe and IIM account holder will be notified when the Secretary...

  2. Relationship between trust and usability in virtual environments: An ongoing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salanitri, Davide; Hare, Chrisminder; Borsci, Simone; Lawson, Glyn; Sharples, Sarah; Water Fi Eld, Brian; Kurosu, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Usability and trust have been observed to be related in several domains including web retail, information systems, and e-health. Trust in technology reflects beliefs about the attributes of a technology. Research has shown that trust is a key factor for the success of different systems – e.g.,

  3. Robust Trust in Expert Testimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dahlman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The standard of proof in criminal trials should require that the evidence presented by the prosecution is robust. This requirement of robustness says that it must be unlikely that additional information would change the probability that the defendant is guilty. Robustness is difficult for a judge to estimate, as it requires the judge to assess the possible effect of information that the he or she does not have. This article is concerned with expert witnesses and proposes a method for reviewing the robustness of expert testimony. According to the proposed method, the robustness of expert testimony is estimated with regard to competence, motivation, external strength, internal strength and relevance. The danger of trusting non-robust expert testimony is illustrated with an analysis of the Thomas Quick Case, a Swedish legal scandal where a patient at a mental institution was wrongfully convicted for eight murders.

  4. The Condition for Generous Trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obayashi Shinya

    Full Text Available Trust has been considered the "cement" of a society and is much studied in sociology and other social sciences. Most studies, however, have neglected one important aspect of trust: it involves an act of forgiving and showing tolerance toward another's failure. In this study, we refer to this concept as "generous trust" and examine the conditions under which generous trust becomes a more viable option when compared to other types of trust. We investigate two settings. First, we introduce two types of uncertainties: uncertainty as to whether trustees have the intention to cooperate, and uncertainty as to whether trustees have enough competence to accomplish the entrusted tasks. Second, we examine the manner in which trust functions in a broader social context, one that involves matching and commitment processes. Since we expect generosity or forgiveness to work differently in the matching and commitment processes, we must differentiate trust strategies into generous trust in the matching process and that in the commitment process. Our analytical strategy is two-fold. First, we analyze the "modified" trust game that incorporates the two types of uncertainties without the matching process. This simplified setting enables us to derive mathematical results using game theory, thereby giving basic insight into the trust mechanism. Second, we investigate socially embedded trust relationships in contexts involving the matching and commitment processes, using agent-based simulation. Results show that uncertainty about partner's intention and competence makes generous trust a viable option. In contrast, too much uncertainty undermines the possibility of generous trust. Furthermore, a strategy that is too generous cannot stand alone. Generosity should be accompanied with moderate punishment. As for socially embedded trust relationships, generosity functions differently in the matching process versus the commitment process. Indeed, these two types of generous

  5. Four Essential Practices for Building Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Julie Peterson; Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    The presence of trust can enhance an organization's efforts to fulfill its mission, and the lack of trust can constrict those efforts. The authors offer four essential guidelines to help school leaders communicate in a way that builds trust. Build trust by understanding trust. Trusted leaders demonstrate care, character, and competence in their…

  6. Homo economicus belief inhibits trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Xin

    Full Text Available As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners' benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals' homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people's increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust.

  7. Trust and Sensemaking in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars; Jagd, Søren; Olsen, Poul Bitsch

    The literature on trust and the literature on sensemaking constitute two separate streams of literature that are both seen as highly relevant to understanding organisational processes in modern complex high-trust organisations. However, though a few studies have argued for the relevance of linkin...... help furthering the understanding of trust processes in organizations. The variety of links between sensemaking and trust processes is illustrated by the intertwining of trust and four processes of sensemaking: arguing, expecting, committing and manipulation identified by Karl Weick....

  8. Modeling trust context in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Adali, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    We make complex decisions every day, requiring trust in many different entities for different reasons. These decisions are not made by combining many isolated trust evaluations. Many interlocking factors play a role, each dynamically impacting the others.? In this brief, 'trust context' is defined as the system level description of how the trust evaluation process unfolds.Networks today are part of almost all human activity, supporting and shaping it. Applications increasingly incorporate new interdependencies and new trust contexts. Social networks connect people and organizations throughout

  9. Homo Economicus Belief Inhibits Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ziqiang; Liu, Guofang

    2013-01-01

    As a foundational concept in economics, the homo economicus assumption regards humans as rational and self-interested actors. In contrast, trust requires individuals to believe partners’ benevolence and unselfishness. Thus, the homo economicus belief may inhibit trust. The present three experiments demonstrated that the direct exposure to homo economicus belief can weaken trust. And economic situations like profit calculation can also activate individuals’ homo economicus belief and inhibit their trust. It seems that people’s increasing homo economicus belief may serve as one cause of the worldwide decline of trust. PMID:24146907

  10. ReputationPro: The Efficient Approaches to Contextual Transaction Trust Computation in E-Commerce Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haibin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Lim, Ee-Peng

    2013-01-01

    In e-commerce environments, the trustworthiness of a seller is utterly important to potential buyers, especially when the seller is unknown to them. Most existing trust evaluation models compute a single value to reflect the general trust level of a seller without taking any transaction context information into account. In this paper, we first present a trust vector consisting of three values for Contextual Transaction Trust (CTT). In the computation of three CTT values, the identified three ...

  11. What factors influence online brand trust: evidence from online tickets buyers in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Alam, Syed; Mohd Yasin, Norjaya

    2010-01-01

    This study examines online brand trust and its influencing factors in the specific context of online air ticket buyers in Malaysia. Summarizing academic literature on online brand trust drivers, it was found that there is a need to conduct research on online brand trust. Accordingly our hypotheses is that word-of-mouth, online experience, security/privacy, perceived risk, brand reputation and quality information have significant influence on online brand trust. Our hypothesis is being tested ...

  12. Trusted Bytecode Virtual Machine Module: A Novel Method for Dynamic Remote Attestation in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhu Mei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing bring a tremendous complexity to information security. Remote attestation can be used to establish trust relationship in cloud. TBVMM is designed to extend the existing chain of trust into the software layers to support dynamic remote attestation for cloud computing. TBVMM uses Bayesian network and Kalman filter to solve the dynamicity of the trusted relationship. It is proposed to fill the trust gap between the infrastructure and upper software stacks.

  13. Public trust: Struggle and regain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Tadao

    1999-01-01

    The after-effect of Monju and Tokai accidents has been much larger than expected. It struck PNC a fierce blow and the damage did not stop there but extended to the nuclear community at large. As a result, PNC was reformed into a new corporate, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). JNC has been given a new body but its mind must be cultivated so as to be able to regain public trust. This presentation summarizes the struggle to regain public trust in case of Monju. After five and a half years of construction work, Monju began pre-operation tests in May 1991, achieved initial criticality in April 1994 and the first connection to the grid in August 1995, and the accident occurs in December 1995. Until then, there was confidence, perhaps overconfidence, and it was taken for granted that the public was always in favour of 'nuclear'. The struggle to regain the public confidence involved: (1) Improvement of safety measures and emergency management; (2) Cultivation of a new corporate culture; (3) Open information; (4) Public communication (i.e. 'Door-to-door visit', 'Public meeting', 'Come-and-see', Weekly press conference. The struggle may continue for some time

  14. HMM-based Trust Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ElSalamouny, Ehab; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2010-01-01

    Probabilistic trust has been adopted as an approach to taking security sensitive decisions in modern global computing environments. Existing probabilistic trust frameworks either assume fixed behaviour for the principals or incorporate the notion of ‘decay' as an ad hoc approach to cope...... with their dynamic behaviour. Using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) for both modelling and approximating the behaviours of principals, we introduce the HMM-based trust model as a new approach to evaluating trust in systems exhibiting dynamic behaviour. This model avoids the fixed behaviour assumption which is considered...... the major limitation of existing Beta trust model. We show the consistency of the HMM-based trust model and contrast it against the well known Beta trust model with the decay principle in terms of the estimation precision....

  15. Problems of judiciary trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Slobodan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Topic of the article is problem of trust in judiciary as a most important part of legal system. For all empirical researches so far have shown very law degree of this trust many authors were searching for the causes of this phenomenon. Among multifold causes some are special worth while to be mentioned here: historical inheritance, political pressures, delaying of judiciary decisions, respect of the laws, transferring of responsibility from political power to the judiciary, public comments of judiciary decisions, media pressures, efficiency of judiciary and police. Among inner factors author pays attention to competency of judges, modes of penal policy, modes of judges’ entitlement, problems of communication, involvement into criminal and corruptional affairs, etc.

  16. Trust and Corruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeff, Peter; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2013-01-01

    Why are the Scandinavian countries in the European Union significantly richer than South-ern/Eastern European countries? We try to answer this question from an empirical social capital perspective. In particular, we are interested in the interplay of social trust as a positive and corruption...... capital by applying a path model that accounts for Granger-like causal effects. Our empirical results, referring to a sample of up to 25 EU countries, show that corruption might harm poor European countries but is not able to affect social trust. However, corruption in itself means that resources end up...... in the wrong places and not in socioeconomically optimal investments. There is, therefore, a direct damaging effect of corruption on wealth. This implies that economic actors have to invest higher transaction and control costs which will bind resources to non-productive purposes and thus destroy economic...

  17. Trust in Internet Election

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Ronquillo, Lorena; Schürmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the Decryption and Counting Ceremony held in conjunction with the internet voting trial on election day in the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development of Norway in 2013. We examine the organizers' ambition of making the decryption and counting of electronic votes...... public in order to sustain trust in internet voting. We introduce a pragmatic approach to trust that emphasises the inseparability of truth from witnessing it. Based on this and on a description of how the event was made observable and how the complexities in the counting process were disclosed, we...... discuss what we term economy of truth from the perspective of the IT community involved in the ceremony. We claim that broadening the economy of truth by including more explicitly social and political perspectives in the ceremony, and in internet elections in general, and how witnessing is brought about...

  18. Free Riding or Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard; Nilsson, Jerker

    2011-01-01

    It is often observed that members have little interest in monitoring their cooperatives. One explanation is that the members are free-riders, hoping that others will perform the task. Another explanation is that the weak member interest is a consequence of members having trust in the leadership....... These competing explanations refer to the theory of collective action and the social capital paradigm, respectively, and may be linked to the classical Gesellschaft and Gemeinschaft concepts. Hence, one may expect free-rider behavior when conditions of Gesellschaft exist and trustful behavior when Gemeinschaft...... conditions rule. These propositions get support from five studies of members’ readership of their cooperatives’ annual reports. In large and heterogeneous memberships there is free-riding behavior, which explains the members’ low interest in governing their cooperatives. To a limited extent a membership may...

  19. Trust - Essential Requirement and Basis for pHealth Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, Pekka; Blobel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Trust is a social code and glue between persons and organizations in any business domain including health. pHealth is a complex concept that is built around health service providers, individuals and artefacts such as sensors, mobile devices, networks, computers, and software applications. It has many stakeholders such as organizations, persons, patients, customers, and tele-operators. pHealth services are increasingly offered in insecure information space, and used over organizational, geographical and jurisdictional borders. This all means that trust is an essential requirement for successful pHealth services. To make pHealth a successful business, organizations offering pHealth services should establish inter-organizational trust and trusted relationship between their customers. Before starting to use services, the pHealth user should have a possibility to define how much it trusts on the service provider and on the surrounding information infrastructure. The authors' analysis show that trust models used in today's health care and e-commerce are insufficient for networked pHealth. Calculated trust as proposed by the authors is stronger than the predefined dispositional trust model currently used in health care, other's recommendations used in e-commerce and risk assessment. Until now, caused by the lack of business incentive, lack of regulatory and political pressure, pHealth providers have not demonstrated meaningful interest in moving from the current unsatisfactory situation to trust calculation by making information necessary for this methodology available. To make pHealth successful, a combination of legal, political, organizational, technological and educational efforts is needed to initiate the paradigm change and start the era of trust-based pHealth services.

  20. Interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ m α ρ e β form, where ρ m and ρ e are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w m and w e of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used

  1. Trust Management - Building Trust for International Cross Disciplinary Collaboration on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, K. V.; Gurney, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Successful communication and collaboration entails mutual understanding, and transfer, of information. The risk of misunderstanding and/or miscommunication between collaborating groups is tackled in different ways around the globe; some are well documented whereas others may be unknown outside particular groups, whether defined geographically or by specialism. For example; in some countries legally binding contracts define the terms of collaboration. Some regions place greater emphasis on developing trust relationships, and sometimes an official agreement is implied, such as many electronic data transfers on the web. International collaboration on climate change increasingly involves electronic data exchange (e.g. open access publications, shared documents, data repositories etc.) and with this increased reliance on electronic data a need has arisen for scientists to collaborate both internationally and cross-disciplinarily particularly with information technology and data management specialists. Trust of data and metadata on the internet (e.g. privacy, legitimacy etc.) varies, possibly due to a lack of internationally agreed standards for data governance and management, leaving many national, regional and institutional practices tailored to the needs of that group only. It is proposed that building trust relationships between cross-disciplinary and international groups could help facilitate further communication, understanding and benefits from the relationship, while still maintaining independence as separate groups. Complex international cross-disciplinary group relationship dynamics are not easily mapped and producing a set of trust building rules that can be applied to any current and future collaboration with equal validity may be unfeasible. An alternative to such a set of rules may be found in a Trust Manager, whose role is to improve mutually beneficial knowledge exchange between groups, build trust and increase future collaborative potential. This

  2. An Examination of the Value of Overall Trust and Commitment Associated with Service Complexity in Higher Education Information Technology Outsourcing Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Monica I.

    2012-01-01

    Enterprise information systems (EIS) governance provides guidance, structure, and rules for companies within industry who use information technology (IT) support services, and in particular, for outsourced IT support. This study focuses on outsourcing from the client perspective for higher education and uses the qualitative methodology with a…

  3. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Smith, David; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2010-10-27

    Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating) does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  4. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei Saavedra

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  5. Trust-aware recommendation for improving aggregate diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haifeng; Bai, Xiaomei; Yang, Zhuo; Tolba, Amr; Xia, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Recommender systems are becoming increasingly important and prevalent because of the ability of solving information overload. In recent years, researchers are paying increasing attention to aggregate diversity as a key metric beyond accuracy, because improving aggregate recommendation diversity may increase long tails and sales diversity. Trust is often used to improve recommendation accuracy. However, how to utilize trust to improve aggregate recommendation diversity is unexplored. In this paper, we focus on solving this problem and propose a novel trust-aware recommendation method by incorporating time factor into similarity computation. The rationale underlying the proposed method is that, trustees with later creation time of trust relation can bring more diverse items to recommend to their trustors than other trustees with earlier creation time of trust relation. Through relevant experiments on publicly available dataset, we demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the baseline method in terms of aggregate diversity while maintaining almost the same recall.

  6. The Role of a Multidimensional Concept of Trust in the Performance of Global Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodensteiner, Nan Muir; Stecklein, Jonette M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the concept of trust as an important ingredient of effective global virtual team performance. Definitions of trust and virtual teams are presented. The concept of trust is developed from its unilateral application (trust, absence of trust) to a multidimensional concept including cognitive and affective components. The special challenges of a virtual team are then discussed with particular emphasis on how a multidimensional concept of trust impacts these challenges. Propositions suggesting the multidimensional concept of trust moderates the negative impacts of distance, cross cultural and organizational differences, the effects of electronically mediated communication, reluctance to share information and a lack of hi story/future on the performance of virtual teams are stated. The paper concludes with recommendations and a set of techniques to build both cognitive and affective trust in virtual teams.

  7. Respect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, James; Beach, Mary Catherine; Haywood, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    Background/objectives Qualitative interview studies suggest that adult patients’ experiences of hospital treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain reflect an absence of respect by providers for patients, and an absence or breakdown of trust. Systematic comparisons between treatment settings could help identify contextual influences on respect and trust. Design Quantitative comparison of concern-raising behaviors (pain treatment outcomes indicating breakdowns of trust) among adult SCD patients in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and London, UK, followed by analysis of potential explanations for differences, including socio-cultural and behavioral factors, with a preliminary model of the processes leading to concern-raising behaviors. Results Rates of concern-raising behaviors were significantly higher in Baltimore than London. The model identifies respect and trust as key factors which could be targeted in efforts to improve the quality of SCD pain management in hospital. Conclusion An agenda for international, interdisciplinary research to improve the treatment of SCD pain in hospital should include: comparative analyses between countries and treatment settings of factors that could influence respect and trust; research to test hypotheses derived from models about the roles of respect and trust in the treatment of pain; studies of the impact of healthcare structures and policy on patients’ experiences of care; research focusing on developmental and interpersonal processes related to respect and trust; applications of attribution and other social psychology theories; and development and evaluation of interventions to improve the hospital treatment of SCD pain by increasing respect and trust. PMID:21797726

  8. Beyond Trust: Plagiarism and Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart

    2018-03-01

    Academic misconduct distorts the relationship between scientific practice and the knowledge it produces. The relationship between science and the knowledge it produces is, however, not something universally agreed upon. In this paper I will critically discuss the moral status of an act of research misconduct, namely plagiarism, in the context of different epistemological positions. While from a positivist view of science, plagiarism only influences trust in science but not the content of the scientific corpus, from a constructivist point of view both are at stake. Consequently, I argue that discussions of research misconduct and responsible research ought to be explicitly informed by the authors' views on the relationship between science and the knowledge it produces.

  9. Warm Mix Asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-17

    State of Alaska State of Alaska - Warm Mix Project Warm Mix Project: Location - Petersburg, Alaska which is Petersburg, Alaska which is located in the heart of Southeast Alaska located in the heart of Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage at the tip of M...

  10. Collaborative Trust Networks in Engineering Design Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Simon Reay; Maier, Anja; Caldwell, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    ); applying the Change Prediction Method (CPM) tool. It posits the idea of the ‘Networks-in-Being’ with varying individual and collective characteristics. [Social] networks are considered to facilitate information exchange between actors. At the same time, networks failing to provide trusted-information can...... hinder effective communication and collaboration. Different combinations of trust may therefore improve or impair the likelihood of information flow, transfer and subsequent action (cause and effect). This paper investigates how analysing different types of network-structures-in-being can support......Within organisations, decision makers have to rely on collaboration with other actors from different disciplines working within highly dynamic and distributed associated networks of varying size and scales. This paper develops control and influence networks within Design Structure Matrices (DSM...

  11. Trust on the Ratee: A Trust Management System for Social Internet of Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyu Gai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of social networking concepts with Internet of Vehicles (IoV has led to the novel paradigm “Social Internet of Vehicles (SIoV,” which enables vehicles to establish social relationships autonomously to improve traffic conditions and service discovery. There is a growing requirement for effective trust management in the SIoV, considering the critical consequences of acting on misleading information spread by malicious nodes. However, most existing trust models are rater-based, where the reputation information of each node is stored in other nodes it has interacted with. This is not suitable for vehicular environment due to the ephemeral nature of the network. To fill this gap, we propose a Ratee-based Trust Management (RTM system, where each node stores its own reputation information rated by others during past transactions, and a credible CA server is introduced to ensure the integrality and the undeniability of the trust information. RTM is built based on the concept of SIoV, so that the relationships established between nodes can be used to increase the accuracy of the trustworthiness. Experimental results demonstrate that our scheme achieves faster information propagation and higher transaction success rate than the rater-based method, and the time cost when calculating trustworthiness can meet the demand of vehicular networks.

  12. Development-based Trust: Proposing and Validating a New Trust Measurement Model for Buyer-Seller Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mauro da Costa Hernandez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes and validates a trust measurement model for buyer-seller relationships. Baptized as development-based trust, the model encompasses three dimensions of trust: calculus-based, knowledge-based and identification-based. In addition to recognizing that trust is a multidimensional construct, the model also assumes that trust can evolve to take on a different character depending on the stage of the relationship. In order to test the proposed model and compare it to the characteristic-based trust measurement model, the measure most frequently used in the buyer-seller relationship literature, data were collected from 238 clients of an IT product wholesaler. The results show that the scales are valid and reliable and the proposed development-based trust measurement model is superior to the characteristic-based trust measurement model in terms of its ability to explain certain variables of interest in buyer-seller relationships (long-term relationship orientation, information sharing, behavioral loyalty and future intentions. Implications for practice, limitations and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  13. Regulatory focus and generalized trust: the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on trusting others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Johannes; Mayo, Ruth; Greifeneder, Rainer; Pfattheicher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals' responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals' habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1), and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3). Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4). Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (versus control condition) in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5). In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  14. Regulatory Focus and Generalized Trust: The Impact of Prevention-focused Self-regulation on Trusting Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eKeller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals’ responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals’ habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1, and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3. Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4. Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (vs. control condition in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5. In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed.

  15. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    Trust is the cornerstone of clinical trial recruitment and retention. Efforts to decrease barriers and increase clinical trial participation among diverse populations have yielded modest results. There is an urgent need to better understand the complex interactions between trust and clinical trial participation. The process of trust-building has been a focus of intense research in the business community. Yet, little has been published about trust in oncology clinical trials or the process of building trust in clinical trials. Both clinical trials and business share common dimensions. Business strategies for building trust may be transferable to the clinical trial setting. This study was conducted to understand and utilize contemporary thinking about building trust to develop an Integrated Model of Trust that incorporates both clinical and business perspectives. A key word-directed literature search of the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane, and Google Search databases for entries dated between 1 January 1985 and 1 September 2015 was conducted to obtain information from which to develop an Integrated Model of Trust. Successful trial participation requires both participants and clinical trial team members to build distinctly different types of interpersonal trust to effect recruitment and retention. They are built under conditions of significant emotional stress and time constraints among people who do not know each other and have never worked together before. Swift Trust and Traditional Trust are sequentially built during the clinical trial process. Swift trust operates during the recruitment and very early active treatment phases of the clinical trial process. Traditional trust is built over time and operates during the active treatment and surveillance stages of clinical trials. The Psychological Contract frames the participants' and clinical trial team members' interpersonal trust relationship. The "terms" of interpersonal trust are negotiated through the psychological

  16. Pricing and Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Ruchala, Gabriele K.; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    -competitive (monopolistic) markets. We then introduce a regulated intermediate price above the oligopoly price and below the monopoly price. The effect in monopolies is more or less in line with standard intuition. As price falls volume increases and so does quality, such that overall efficiency is raised by 50%. However......We experimentally examine the effects of flexible and fixed prices in markets for experience goods in which demand is driven by trust. With flexible prices, we observe low prices and high quality in competitive (oligopolistic) markets, and high prices coupled with low quality in non...

  17. Trust and Social Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagishi , Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Extended Abstracts for Keynote Speakers; International audience; One of the strongest expression of generalized distrust – i.e., distrust of human nature in general – can be found in a Japanese proverb, “Its best to regard everyone as a thief” (hito wo mitara dorobo to omoe). An expression of the other extreme, generalized trust, can also be found in another Japanese proverb, “you will never meet a devil as you walk through the social world” (wataru seken ni oni ha nai). I asked about...

  18. Introduction matters: Manipulating trust in automation and reliance in automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Moritz; Baseler, Eva; Bengler, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Trust in automation is a key determinant for the adoption of automated systems and their appropriate use. Therefore, it constitutes an essential research area for the introduction of automated vehicles to road traffic. In this study, we investigated the influence of trust promoting (Trust promoted group) and trust lowering (Trust lowered group) introductory information on reported trust, reliance behavior and take-over performance. Forty participants encountered three situations in a 17-min highway drive in a conditionally automated vehicle (SAE Level 3). Situation 1 and Situation 3 were non-critical situations where a take-over was optional. Situation 2 represented a critical situation where a take-over was necessary to avoid a collision. A non-driving-related task (NDRT) was presented between the situations to record the allocation of visual attention. Participants reporting a higher trust level spent less time looking at the road or instrument cluster and more time looking at the NDRT. The manipulation of introductory information resulted in medium differences in reported trust and influenced participants' reliance behavior. Participants of the Trust promoted group looked less at the road or instrument cluster and more at the NDRT. The odds of participants of the Trust promoted group to overrule the automated driving system in the non-critical situations were 3.65 times (Situation 1) to 5 times (Situation 3) higher. In Situation 2, the Trust promoted group's mean take-over time was extended by 1154 ms and the mean minimum time-to-collision was 933 ms shorter. Six participants from the Trust promoted group compared to no participant of the Trust lowered group collided with the obstacle. The results demonstrate that the individual trust level influences how much drivers monitor the environment while performing an NDRT. Introductory information influences this trust level, reliance on an automated driving system, and if a critical take-over situation can be

  19. Designing High-Trust Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    The specific problem considered in this paper is what are the key issues to consider for managers involved in designing high-trust organizations, a design problem still not properly explored. This paper intends to take the first step in filling this lacuna. In the paper, I first present...... the existing management and research literature on building high-trust organizations. Then I explore Alan Fox’s (1974) analysis of low-trust vs. high-trust dynamics which, I argue, may serve as a theoretically stronger basis for understanding the issues management have to consider when designing hightrust...... organizations...

  20. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust.......Mass mediated risk communication can contribute to perceptions of threats and fear of “others” and/or to perceptions of trust in fellow citizens and society to overcome problems. This paper outlines a cross-disciplinary holistic framework for research in mediated trust building during an acute...

  1. Attack-Resistant Trust Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levien, Raph

    The Internet is an amazingly powerful tool for connecting people together, unmatched in human history. Yet, with that power comes great potential for spam and abuse. Trust metrics are an attempt to compute the set of which people are trustworthy and which are likely attackers. This chapter presents two specific trust metrics developed and deployed on the Advogato Website, which is a community blog for free software developers. This real-world experience demonstrates that the trust metrics fulfilled their goals, but that for good results, it is important to match the assumptions of the abstract trust metric computation to the real-world implementation.

  2. Trust as a Critical Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordum, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In this articlei I will argue that trust is a fundamental and critical concept because trust is the direct or transcendental constitutive ground of most social phenomena, as well as applicable as an operational method in critical theory. There are two different but overlapping positions on trust I...... address in this article. One is the standpoint we find in business strategy, that trust is naïve to show, and control or contracts are presumed better. In the strategy game the idealistic good guys seems to lose (Arrow 1974), (Williamson 1975). The other position is the position taken by systems theory...

  3. Here's my location, for your information: The impact of trust, benefits, and social influence on location sharing application use among Indonesian university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldad, Ardion Daroca; Citra Kusumadewi, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    As mobile phones have become nearly ubiquitous, mobile phone applications are also becoming almost indispensable. Applications that enable people to share location information are becoming increasingly popular. What remains unknown, however, are the factors that influence the use of a location

  4. Don't trust trust : a dynamic approach towards controlling supplier involvement in NPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, L.P.M.; Oorschot, van K.E.; Langerak, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prior literature stresses the importance for manufacturers to use formal and informal controls to coordinate collaborative new product development activities with suppliers. In doing so, the existence of trust between manufacturers and suppliers is believed to play a key role because it enables

  5. Social Trust Prediction Using Heterogeneous Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, JIN; NIE, FEIPING; HUANG, HENG; TU, YI-CHENG; LEI, YU

    2014-01-01

    Along with increasing popularity of social websites, online users rely more on the trustworthiness information to make decisions, extract and filter information, and tag and build connections with other users. However, such social network data often suffer from severe data sparsity and are not able to provide users with enough information. Therefore, trust prediction has emerged as an important topic in social network research. Traditional approaches are primarily based on exploring trust graph topology itself. However, research in sociology and our life experience suggest that people who are in the same social circle often exhibit similar behaviors and tastes. To take advantage of the ancillary information for trust prediction, the challenge then becomes what to transfer and how to transfer. In this article, we address this problem by aggregating heterogeneous social networks and propose a novel joint social networks mining (JSNM) method. Our new joint learning model explores the user-group-level similarity between correlated graphs and simultaneously learns the individual graph structure; therefore, the shared structures and patterns from multiple social networks can be utilized to enhance the prediction tasks. As a result, we not only improve the trust prediction in the target graph but also facilitate other information retrieval tasks in the auxiliary graphs. To optimize the proposed objective function, we use the alternative technique to break down the objective function into several manageable subproblems. We further introduce the auxiliary function to solve the optimization problems with rigorously proved convergence. The extensive experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real- world data. All empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. PMID:24729776

  6. 25 CFR 115.708 - How quickly will trust funds received by the Secretary on behalf of tribes or individual Indians...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How quickly will trust funds received by the Secretary on behalf of tribes or individual Indians be deposited into a trust account? 115.708 Section 115.708 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Trust Fund Accounts: General Information § 115.708 How quickly will trust funds received...

  7. Forms, Sources and Processes of Trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, B.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key points in the analysis of trust, based on Nooteboom (2002)i.The following questions are addressed.What can we have trust in?What is the relation between trust and control?What are the sources of trust? And what are its limits?By what process is trust built up and broken

  8. TrustRank: a Cold-Start tolerant recommender system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haitao; Gong, Zhiguo; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Jingzhi

    2015-02-01

    The explosive growth of the World Wide Web leads to the fast advancing development of e-commerce techniques. Recommender systems, which use personalised information filtering techniques to generate a set of items suitable to a given user, have received considerable attention. User- and item-based algorithms are two popular techniques for the design of recommender systems. These two algorithms are known to have Cold-Start problems, i.e., they are unable to effectively handle Cold-Start users who have an extremely limited number of purchase records. In this paper, we develop TrustRank, a novel recommender system which handles the Cold-Start problem by leveraging the user-trust networks which are commonly available for e-commerce applications. A user-trust network is formed by friendships or trust relationships that users specify among them. While it is straightforward to conjecture that a user-trust network is helpful for improving the accuracy of recommendations, a key challenge for using user-trust network to facilitate Cold-Start users is that these users also tend to have a very limited number of trust relationships. To address this challenge, we propose a pre-processing propagation of the Cold-Start users' trust network. In particular, by applying the personalised PageRank algorithm, we expand the friends of a given user to include others with similar purchase records to his/her original friends. To make this propagation algorithm scalable to a large amount of users, as required by real-world recommender systems, we devise an iterative computation algorithm of the original personalised TrustRank which can incrementally compute trust vectors for Cold-Start users. We conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the consistently improvement provided by our proposed algorithm over the existing recommender algorithms on the accuracy of recommendations for Cold-Start users.

  9. Generalized Trust and Trust in Institutions in Confucian Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Soo Jiuan; Tambyah, Siok Kuan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines generalized trust and trust in institutions in Confucian Asia, covering six countries namely, China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and one dependent region, Hong Kong. Using data from the 2006 AsiaBarometer Survey, our study affirms the reliability and validity of using a two-item scale to measure…

  10. TrustBuilder2: A Reconfigurable Framework for Trust Negotiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adam J.; Winslett, Marianne; Perano, Kenneth J.

    To date, research in trust negotiation has focused mainly on the theoretical aspects of the trust negotiation process, and the development of proof of concept implementations. These theoretical works and proofs of concept have been quite successful from a research perspective, and thus researchers must now begin to address the systems constraints that act as barriers to the deployment of these systems. To this end, we present TrustBuilder2, a fully-configurable and extensible framework for prototyping and evaluating trust negotiation systems. TrustBuilder2 leverages a plug-in based architecture, extensible data type hierarchy, and flexible communication protocol to provide a framework within which numerous trust negotiation protocols and system configurations can be quantitatively analyzed. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of TrustBuilder2, study its performance, examine the costs associated with flexible authorization systems, and leverage this knowledge to identify potential topics for future research, as well as a novel method for attacking trust negotiation systems.

  11. Recovering from trust breakdowns in large system implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rerup Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Andersen, Povl Erik Rostgård

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of experiences from the Faroese large-scale implementation of integrated healthcare information systems and insights into dynamic aspects of trust, we offer the following lessons learned for the successful management and recovery of trust (breakdowns) in large system implementations......: restore relations by turning towards face-to-face events and procedures, assure a well-functioning and available support organization, demonstrate trust in actors to enhance their own self-confidence and celebrate successes, even the smallest or ones injected by yourself. The propositions are based on a 6...

  12. 'Trust my doctor, trust my pancreas': trust as an emergent quality of social practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Simon

    2015-06-11

    Growing attention is being paid to the importance of trust, and its corollaries such as mistrust and distrust, in health service and the central place they have in assessments of quality of care. Although initially focussing on doctor-patient relationships, more recent literature has broadened its remit to include trust held in more abstract entities, such as organisations and institutions. There has consequently been growing interest to develop rigorous and universal measures of trust. Drawing on illustrative ethnographic material from observational research in a UK diabetes clinic, this paper supports an approach that foregrounds social practice and resists conceiving trust as solely a psychological state that can be divorced from its context. Beyond exploring the less-than-conscious nature of trust, the interpretations attend to the extent to which trust practices are distributed across a range of actors. Data from clinical encounters reveal the extent to which matters of trust can emerge from the relationships between people, and sometimes people and things, as a result of a wide range of pragmatic concerns, and hence can usefully be conceived of as an extended property of a situation rather than a person. Trust is rarely explicitly articulated, but remains a subtle feature of experience that is frequently ineffable. A practice approach highlights some of the problems with adopting a general psychological or intellectualist conception of trust. In particular, assuming it is a sufficiently stable internal state that can be stored or measured not only transforms a diffuse and often ephemeral quality into a durable thing, but ultimately presents it as a generic state that has meaning independent of the specific relationships and context that achieve it. Emphasising the context-specific nature of trust practices does not dismiss the potential of matters of trust, when they emerge, to be transposed to other contexts. But it does highlight how, on each occasion

  13. Measuring physicians' trust: A scoping review with implications for public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Adam S; Platt, Jodyn E

    2016-09-01

    Increasingly, physicians are expected to work in productive, trusting relationships with other health system stakeholders to improve patient and system outcomes. A better understanding of physicians' trust is greatly needed. This study assesses the state of the literature on physicians' trust in patients, other health care providers, institutions, and data systems or technology, and identifies key themes, dimensions of trust considered, quantitative measures used, and opportunities for further development via a scoping review. Peer-reviewed, English-language research articles were identified for inclusion in this study based on systematic searches of the Ovid/Medline, Pubmed, Proquest, Scopus, Elsevier, and Web of Science databases. Search terms included "trust" along with "physician," "doctor," "primary care provider," "family practitioner," "family practice," "generalist," "general practitioner," "general practice," "internist," "internal medicine," or "health professional," and plausible variants. Among the relevant articles identified (n = 446), the vast majority focused on patient trust in physicians (81.2%). Among articles examining physicians' trust, rigorous investigations of trust are rare, narrowly focused, and imprecise in their discussion of trust. Robust investigations of the effects of trust or distrust-as opposed to trust's determinants-and studies using validated quantitative trust measures are particularly rare. Studies typically measured trust using the language of confidence, effective communication, or cooperation, rarely or never capturing other important dimensions of trust, such as fidelity, the trustee's reputation, social capital, vulnerability, and acceptance. Research employing new, validated measures of physicians' trust, especially trust in institutions, may be highly informative to health system leaders and policymakers seeking to hone and enhance tools for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care system

  14. Toward a Trust Evaluation Mechanism in the Social Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Nguyen Binh; Lee, Hyunwoo; Askwith, Bob; Lee, Gyu Myoung

    2017-06-09

    In the blooming era of the Internet of Things (IoT), trust has been accepted as a vital factor for provisioning secure, reliable, seamless communications and services. However, a large number of challenges still remain unsolved due to the ambiguity of the concept of trust as well as the variety of divergent trust models in different contexts. In this research, we augment the trust concept, the trust definition and provide a general conceptual model in the context of the Social IoT (SIoT) environment by breaking down all attributes influencing trust. Then, we propose a trust evaluation model called REK, comprised of the triad of trust indicators (TIs) Reputation, Experience and Knowledge. The REK model covers multi-dimensional aspects of trust by incorporating heterogeneous information from direct observation (as Knowledge TI), personal experiences (as Experience TI) to global opinions (as Reputation TI). The associated evaluation models for the three TIs are also proposed and provisioned. We then come up with an aggregation mechanism for deriving trust values as the final outcome of the REK evaluation model. We believe this article offers better understandings on trust as well as provides several prospective approaches for the trust evaluation in the SIoT environment.

  15. Toward a Trust Evaluation Mechanism in the Social Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Binh Truong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the blooming era of the Internet of Things (IoT, trust has been accepted as a vital factor for provisioning secure, reliable, seamless communications and services. However, a large number of challenges still remain unsolved due to the ambiguity of the concept of trust as well as the variety of divergent trust models in different contexts. In this research, we augment the trust concept, the trust definition and provide a general conceptual model in the context of the Social IoT (SIoT environment by breaking down all attributes influencing trust. Then, we propose a trust evaluation model called REK, comprised of the triad of trust indicators (TIs Reputation, Experience and Knowledge. The REK model covers multi-dimensional aspects of trust by incorporating heterogeneous information from direct observation (as Knowledge TI, personal experiences (as Experience TI to global opinions (as Reputation TI. The associated evaluation models for the three TIs are also proposed and provisioned. We then come up with an aggregation mechanism for deriving trust values as the final outcome of the REK evaluation model. We believe this article offers better understandings on trust as well as provides several prospective approaches for the trust evaluation in the SIoT environment.

  16. Redefining Genomic Privacy: Trust and Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Erlich, Yaniv; Williams, James B.; Glazer, David; Yocum, Kenneth; Farahany, Nita; Olson, Maynard; Narayanan, Arvind; Stein, Lincoln D.; Witkowski, Jan A.; Kain, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Fulfilling the promise of the genetic revolution requires the analysis of large datasets containing information from thousands to millions of participants. However, sharing human genomic data requires protecting subjects from potential harm. Current models rely on de-identification techniques in which privacy versus data utility becomes a zero-sum game. Instead, we propose the use of trust-enabling techniques to create a solution in which researchers and participants both win. To do so we int...

  17. The Need to Trust and to Trust More Wisely in Academe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Where trust is an issue, there is no trust. Trust in diverse organizations has never been lower. A shadow of doubt stalks one's every decision to trust collegially and institutionally. Still, colleagues sense intuitively that institutions cannot function optimally without a bedrock level of trust. In academic life, trust is a form of social…

  18. 26 CFR 26.2654-1 - Certain trusts treated as separate trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trusts under local law, treatment of a single trust as separate trusts under this paragraph (a)(1) does... applicable state law, then each resulting trust is treated as a separate trust for purposes of Chapter 13... Internal Revenue Code, if those portions are not treated as separate trusts under local law. Also...

  19. De jure versus de facto institutions: trust, information, and collective efforts to manage the invasive mile-a-minute weed (Mikania micrantha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Sullivan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Differences in governance relationships and community efforts to remove an exotic, rapidly spreading invasive plant, the-mile-a-minute weed (Mikania micrantha, are explored in five case study community forests in the subtropical region of Chitwan, Nepal. An institutional analysis informs an examination of the de jure (formal versus de facto (on the ground institutions and actor relationships relevant to Mikania removal efforts. Contrary to the expectations set by the de jure situation, we find heterogeneous governance relationships and norms related to Mikania management across community forests. Content analysis of interview data illuminates reoccurring themes and their implications for social and ecological outcomes in the communities. Complex governance relationships and regular discussion of distrust of government and non-government officials help explain collective action efforts and management decisions. The content analysis suggests that Mikania is impacting people’s daily lives but the degree of severity and the response to the disruption varies substantially and is heavily affected by other problems experienced by community forest members. Our results indicate that understanding how the de facto, or on the ground situation, differs from the de jure institutions may be vital in structuring successful efforts to manage invasive species and understanding collective action problems related to other social-ecological threats. We present data-informed propositions about common pool resource management and invasive species. This study contributes to a better scientific understanding of how institutions mediate social-ecological challenges influencing common pool resources more broadly.

  20. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Global Warming: A Myth? - Credibility of Climate Scenarios Predicted by Systems Simulations. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 13-21 ...

  1. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  2. A longitudinal and experimental study of the impact of knowledge on the bases of institutional trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PytlikZillig, Lisa M; Kimbrough, Christopher D; Shockley, Ellie; Neal, Tess M S; Herian, Mitchel N; Hamm, Joseph A; Bornstein, Brian H; Tomkins, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a knowledge-centered theory of institutional trust development. In the context of trust in water regulatory institutions, the moderating impact of knowledge was tested to determine if there were longitudinal changes in the bases of institutional trust as a function of increases in knowledge about a target institution. We hypothesized that as people learn about an institution with which they were previously unfamiliar, they begin to form more nuanced perceptions, distinguishing the new institution from other institutions and relying less upon their generalized trust to estimate their trust in that institution. Prior to having specific, differential information about a new institution, we expected institutional trust to be a function of generalized trust variables such as dispositional trust and trust in government. The longitudinal experiment involved 185 college students randomly assigned to one of three information conditions. Every 3 months for 15 months, participants read information about water regulatory institutions or a control institution. At each time point, participants reported their trust in and perceptions of the trust- and distrust-worthiness of the water regulatory institutions. Participants also completed measures of knowledge of water regulatory institutions, dispositional trust, and governmental trust. Our manipulation check indicated that, as expected, those in the experimental group increased in subjective knowledge of water regulatory institutions to a greater extent than those in the control condition. Consistent with our hypotheses, there was some evidence that, compared to the control group, the experimental group relied less on their general trust in government as a basis for their trust in water regulatory institutions. However, contrary to our hypotheses, there was no evidence the experimental group relied less on dispositional trust as a basis for institutional trust. There also was some evidence the experimental

  3. A longitudinal and experimental study of the impact of knowledge on the bases of institutional trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M PytlikZillig

    Full Text Available This study examined a knowledge-centered theory of institutional trust development. In the context of trust in water regulatory institutions, the moderating impact of knowledge was tested to determine if there were longitudinal changes in the bases of institutional trust as a function of increases in knowledge about a target institution. We hypothesized that as people learn about an institution with which they were previously unfamiliar, they begin to form more nuanced perceptions, distinguishing the new institution from other institutions and relying less upon their generalized trust to estimate their trust in that institution. Prior to having specific, differential information about a new institution, we expected institutional trust to be a function of generalized trust variables such as dispositional trust and trust in government. The longitudinal experiment involved 185 college students randomly assigned to one of three information conditions. Every 3 months for 15 months, participants read information about water regulatory institutions or a control institution. At each time point, participants reported their trust in and perceptions of the trust- and distrust-worthiness of the water regulatory institutions. Participants also completed measures of knowledge of water regulatory institutions, dispositional trust, and governmental trust. Our manipulation check indicated that, as expected, those in the experimental group increased in subjective knowledge of water regulatory institutions to a greater extent than those in the control condition. Consistent with our hypotheses, there was some evidence that, compared to the control group, the experimental group relied less on their general trust in government as a basis for their trust in water regulatory institutions. However, contrary to our hypotheses, there was no evidence the experimental group relied less on dispositional trust as a basis for institutional trust. There also was some evidence

  4. International trust and public diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    National leaders struggle to communicate in ways that are perceived as trustworthy by citizens of other nations because trust is linked to efficiency, business opportunities, and political influence. In this article, four recent public diplomacy activities are analyzed from a trust...

  5. Towards trusted trade-lanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulstijn, J.; Hofman, W.; Zomer, G.; Tan, Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Customs administrations are exploring system-based approaches to regulatory supervision, taking the entire set of controls in a process into account. In addition to Trusted Traders, which are recognized by a certification process, customs are considering to identify so called Trusted Trade Lanes:

  6. Global warming yearbook: 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arris, L. [ed.

    1999-02-01

    The report brings together a year`s worth of global warming stories - over 280 in all - in one convenient volume. It provides a one-stop report on the scientific, political and industrial implications of global warming. The report includes: detailed coverage of negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol; scientific findings on carbon sources and sinks, coral bleaching, Antarctic ice shelves, plankton, wildlife and tree growth; new developments on fuel economy, wind power, fuel cells, cogeneration, energy labelling and emissions trading.

  7. Media Pembelajaran Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tham, Fikri Jufri; Liliana, Liliana; Purba, Kristo Radion

    2016-01-01

    Computer based learning media is one of the media has an important role in learning. Learning media will be attractive when packaged through interactive media , such as interactive media created in paper manufacture " instructional media global warming" . The advantage gained is that it can increase knowledge, generally educate people to be more concerned about the environment , and also can be a means of entertainment. This application is focused to learn about global warming and packaged in...

  8. Research of Trust Chain of Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjiao; Tian, Xiuxia

    Trust chain is one of the key technologies in designing secure operating system based on TC technology. Constructions of trust chain and trust models are analyzed. Future works in these directions are discussed.

  9. Social Network Culture Needs the Lens of Critical Trust Research

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer , Natasha; Marsh , Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Part 2: Full Papers; International audience; Trust is essential to the success of the social networks that are aggregating and applying masses of information about us. In this position paper, we argue that a critical approach to exploring trust and social networks is required; this entails genuinely working in the interests of users and acknowledging the power relations and wider social context of this form of technology that is impacting more and more of our everyday life. Without a critical...

  10. Refrigeration and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Some aspects of global warming in general, and the implications for refrigerants and refrigerator efficiency in particular, are briefly considered in a question and answer format. The concepts of Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) are explained. GWP is an index which allows a simple comparison to be make between the warming effects of different gases on a kg to kg basis relative to carbon. The GWP depends both on the lifetime of a substance in the atmosphere and its infra-red absorption capacity. The overall warming effect of operating a refrigeration system for its entire life is measured by its TEWI. Chloroflourocarbons (CFCs) which have been widely used as refrigerants are powerful greenhouse gases with high GWPs. Because of the bank of CFCs in refrigerating systems, their levels in the atmosphere are still increasing and it will be some time before refrigerant changes will be effective in reducing the warming effects of refrigerant releases. Hydrocarbons, hydroflourocarbons and ammonia all have a part to play as substitute refrigerants. Refrigerator efficiency is very important in terms of reducing CO 2 emissions. (UK)

  11. Organizational trust or beyond appearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dromereschi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available People and organizations to whom I am giving life to have an enormous need to trust and be trustworthy. Trust represents a fragile asset who needs to be invested in, which is difficult to obtain and takes time to obtain it, but which can be easily broken. Paradoxically, it is a universal trade currency, world-widely understood and appreciated. The relations based on trust are those which determine a company to grow and create a competitive advantage. Trust generates trust. It is the one that inspires and motivates, requires the preservation of a certain set of values, mainly sincerity, fairness, perseverance and a real preoccupation for meeting the needs of other people.

  12. Trusted computing strengthens cloud authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Eghbal; Zamani, Mazdak; Ab Manan, Jamalul-lail; Alizadeh, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model.

  13. Trusted Computing Strengthens Cloud Authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eghbal Ghazizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM. Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model.

  14. Trusted Computing Strengthens Cloud Authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new generation of technology which is designed to provide the commercial necessities, solve the IT management issues, and run the appropriate applications. Another entry on the list of cloud functions which has been handled internally is Identity Access Management (IAM). Companies encounter IAM as security challenges while adopting more technologies became apparent. Trust Multi-tenancy and trusted computing based on a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) are great technologies for solving the trust and security concerns in the cloud identity environment. Single sign-on (SSO) and OpenID have been released to solve security and privacy problems for cloud identity. This paper proposes the use of trusted computing, Federated Identity Management, and OpenID Web SSO to solve identity theft in the cloud. Besides, this proposed model has been simulated in .Net environment. Security analyzing, simulation, and BLP confidential model are three ways to evaluate and analyze our proposed model. PMID:24701149

  15. Trust Building Mechanisms for Electronic Business Networks and Their Relation to eSkills

    OpenAIRE

    Radoslav Delina; Michal Tkáč

    2010-01-01

    Globalization, supported by information and communication technologies, changes the rules of competitiveness and increases the significance of information, knowledge and network cooperation. In line with this trend, the need for efficient trust-building tools has emerged. The absence of trust building mechanisms and strategies was identified within several studies. Through trust development, participation on e-business network and usage of network services will increase a...

  16. TANDEM: A Trust-Based Agent Framework for Networked Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    selective (20–80 %), while the rest are good citizens, trust acts as a method to isolate misbehaving agents. If the majority of the agents have high...competence and low selectivity, then they can use trust to isolate route information around the misbehaving agents, improving Comm and Steps. The impact is...more dramatic when only 20–40 % of the agents are misbehaving . However, using trust results in reduced SA as the information available at the

  17. Trust and the sociology of the professions.

    OpenAIRE

    Groenewegen, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    There is a fast-growing literature on trust in health care, especially interpersonal trust, reflecting the growing awareness in both the research and policy communities of the importance of trust. At a general level, trust as part of the broader concept of social capital is related to people's health and well-being. Trust within provider-patient relations is important for its non-specific treatment effects. Finally, trust is also important for the snooth functioning of societal institutions.(...

  18. Cancer patients’ trust in their oncologist

    OpenAIRE

    Hillen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we aimed to unravel cancer patients’ trust in their oncologist. We investigated patients’ explanations of trust in-depth, and developed an oncology-specific questionnaire to assess trust. Using the resulting Trust in Oncologist Scale, we experimentally established the influence of oncologist communication on trust. Specifically, patients report stronger trust if the oncologist expresses medical competence, communicates in an open and honest manner, and conveys involvement and c...

  19. Study on Cloud Security Based on Trust Spanning Tree Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yingxu; Liu, Zenghui; Pan, Qiuyue; Liu, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Attacks executed on Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) expose the weakness of link layer protocols and put the higher layers in jeopardy. Although the problems have been studied for many years and various solutions have been proposed, many security issues remain. To enhance the security and credibility of layer-2 network, we propose a trust-based spanning tree protocol aiming at achieving a higher credibility of LAN switch with a simple and lightweight authentication mechanism. If correctly implemented in each trusted switch, the authentication of trust-based STP can guarantee the credibility of topology information that is announced to other switch in the LAN. To verify the enforcement of the trusted protocol, we present a new trust evaluation method of the STP using a specification-based state model. We implement a prototype of trust-based STP to investigate its practicality. Experiment shows that the trusted protocol can achieve security goals and effectively avoid STP attacks with a lower computation overhead and good convergence performance.

  20. Never trust a croup…

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickinson, Andrew; Minhas, Jatinder Singh; Bhalla, Minak; Anwuzia-Iwegbu, Charles; Chapman, John

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to the James Paget University Hospitals Trust with croup-like symptoms and was later discharged with dexamethasone syrup. The patient re-presented 6 h later following maternal concern with signs of acute respiratory distress. After a period of clinical stability, she acutely decompensated without any prior signs of a life-threatening deterioration. She was managed using nebulised epinephrine and showed signs of clinical improvement. Although improvement persisted, the child showed signs of exhaustion following the preceding events and was later intubed with an endotracheal tube and transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit at Addenbrooke’s University Hospital, Cambridge. Endotracheal aspiration later grew parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus and Staphylococcus aureus and the patient was diagnosed with the exceptionally rare life threatening complications of croup, bacterial tracheitis. The patient was discharged from intensive care 7 days later and has since made a full recovery. PMID:22689599

  1. A matter of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Sinne; Andersen, Laura Mørch; Kærgård, Niels

    2013-01-01

    production are found not to have no significant causual effect on actual behaviour, whereas concern for artificial additives and low price sensitivity have. Even when differences in time varying attitudes have been controlled for there is still a rather large heterogeneity in the organic purchasing behaviour...... in 2002 and again in 2007. The results point towards that the most efficient way of increasing organic consumption seems to be to continuously increasing the trust in the organic label and/or to document the positive health effects of organic food by e.g. focussing on measurable things such as a lower...... frequency of findings of pesticide residues in organic foods compared to conventional foods....

  2. A Matter of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach-Ørsten, Mark; Hartley, Jannie Møller; Wittchen, Maria Bendix

    ; Hindman, 2005), we find that the Danish news media tried to distance themselves from the journalists involved in the scandals and describe them as ‘bad apples’ (Cecil, 2002). But, in both scandals, we also find that the Danish news media went to great lengths to investigate the accusations, document......In 2015 two major journalistic scandals hit the Danish news media. One was a plagiarism scandal in which a freelance foreign correspondent was found to have plagiarized parts of the stories she had filed from other international news media. The other scandal involved a sports journalist who...... was found to have invented a large number of the sources that were quoted in his stories and had made up false co-bylines. In a time of diminishing trust in the news media (Blach-Ørsten & Burkal, 2013; Reuters, 2016) these scandals represented a significant and acute credibility problem for the news media...

  3. Towards Trust Engineering for Opportunistic Cloud Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The systematic review methodology has been employed to review trust related studies in cloud computing. It was observed that trusted computing technologies and reputation based approaches are the main approaches to trust engineering in cloud computing. Also, trusted third party approaches...... and the deployment model play a significant role in enhancing trust between service providers and consumers. It was observed that the concept of trust is used loosely without any formal specification in cloud computing discussions and trust engineering in general. As a first step towards addressing this problem, we...... have contextualized the formal trust specification in multi-agent environments for cloud computing....

  4. Global warming on trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeker, W.S.

    1992-01-01

    Jim Hansen, a climatologist at NASA's Goddard Space Institute, is convinced that the earth's temperature is rising and places the blame on the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Unconvinced, John Sununu, former White House chief of staff, doubts that the warming will be great enough to produce serious threat and fears that measures to reduce the emissions would throw a wrench into the gears that drive the Unites States' troubled economy. During his three years at the White House, Sununu's view prevailed, and although his role in the debate has diminished, others continue to cast doubt on the reality of global warming. A new lobbying group called the Climate Council has been created to do just this. Burning fossil fuels is not the only problem; a fifth of emissions of carbon dioxide now come from clearing and burning forests. Scientists are also tracking a host of other greenhouse gases that emanate from a variety of human activities; the warming effect of methane, chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide combined equals that of carbon dioxide. Although the current warming from these gases may be difficult to detect against the background noise of natural climate variation, most climatologists are certain that as the gases continue to accumulate, increases in the earth's temperature will become evident even to skeptics. If the reality of global warming were put on trial, each side would have trouble making its case. Jim Hansen's side could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have warmed the planet. But neither could John Sununu's side prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the warming expected from greenhouse gases has not occurred. To see why each side would have difficulty proving its case, this article reviews the arguments that might be presented in such a hearing

  5. Long range global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth's steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth's temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic

  6. Do clinicians receive adequate training to identify trafficked persons? A scoping review of NHS Foundation Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Charles Dr; Mahay, Arun; Stuckler, David; Steele, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    We investigate whether physicians in secondary care in the English NHS receive adequate training to recognise and appropriately refer for services those persons suspected to be victims of human trafficking. Freedom of Information requests were sent to the 105 England's NHS Trusts delivering acute care in England. NHS Trusts providing secondary care in England. English NHS Trusts. We requested data about the training provided on human trafficking to clinicians, including the nature, delivery, and format of any education, and any planned training. A total of 89.5% of the 105 Trusts responded. Of these Trusts, 69% provide education to physicians on human trafficking, and a further 6% provide training but did not specify who received it. The majority of Trusts providing training did so within wider safeguarding provision (91%). Only one trust reported that it provides stand-alone training on trafficking to all its staff, including physicians. Within training offered by Trusts, 54% observed best practice providing training on the clinical indicators of trafficking, while 16% referenced the National Referral Mechanism. Amongst those not providing training, 39% of Trusts report provision is in development. Our results find that 25% of NHS Foundation Trusts appear to lack training for physicians around human trafficking. It is also of concern that of the Trusts who currently do not provide training, only 39% are developing training or planning to do so. There is an urgent need to review and update the scope of available training and bring it into alignment with current legislation.

  7. Trust management in cloud services

    CERN Document Server

    Noor, Talal H; Bouguettaya, Athman

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design and implementation of Cloud Armor, a novel approach for credibility-based trust management and automatic discovery of cloud services in distributed and highly dynamic environments. This book also helps cloud users to understand the difficulties of establishing trust in cloud computing and the best criteria for selecting a service cloud. The techniques have been validated by a prototype system implementation and experimental studies using a collection of real world trust feedbacks on cloud services.The authors present the design and implementation of a novel pro

  8. Trust and New Communication Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ess, Charles

    2010-01-01

    I approach philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication, beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication (CMC) of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to more directly...... the perspective of virtue ethics and phenomenological approaches to how we know and navigate the world as embodied beings - I then take up three major arguments in recent work in favor of the possibilities of trust online, followed by three vicious circles that run counter to more optimistic views. I close...

  9. In the CJEU Judges Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    . A theory is offered in the article, which links national judges' trust in the CJEU to their corporatist identification and profile, to their attitudes towards the EU, and to their beliefs about the CJEU's ability to provide decisions that: 1) offer a clear guidance on European Union law, and 2......This article aims to highlight the relevance of judicial trust in international courts, focusing on national judges' trust in the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). EU scholars have put a great deal of effort into explaining how legal and political factors affect the use of preliminary...

  10. G-warm inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramón, E-mail: ramon.herrera@pucv.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2017-05-01

    A warm inflationary universe in the context of Galileon model or G-model is studied. Under a general formalism we study the inflationary dynamics and the cosmological perturbations considering a coupling of the form G (φ, X )= g (φ) X . As a concrete example, we consider an exponential potential together with the cases in which the dissipation and Galilean coefficients are constants. Also, we study the weak regime given by the condition R <1+3 gH φ-dot , and the strong regime in which 1< R +3 gH φ-dot . Additionally, we obtain constraints on the parameters during the evolution of G-warm inflation, assuming the condition for warm inflation in which the temperature T > H , the conditions or the weak and strong regimes, together with the consistency relation r = r ( n {sub s} ) from Planck data.

  11. G-warm inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ramón

    2017-05-01

    A warm inflationary universe in the context of Galileon model or G-model is studied. Under a general formalism we study the inflationary dynamics and the cosmological perturbations considering a coupling of the form G(phi,X)=g(phi) X. As a concrete example, we consider an exponential potential together with the cases in which the dissipation and Galilean coefficients are constants. Also, we study the weak regime given by the condition RR+3gHdot phi. Additionally, we obtain constraints on the parameters during the evolution of G-warm inflation, assuming the condition for warm inflation in which the temperature T>H, the conditions or the weak and strong regimes, together with the consistency relation r=r(ns) from Planck data.

  12. The global warming problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter, a discussion is presented of the global warming problem and activities contributing to the formation of acid rain, urban smog and to the depletion of the ozone layer. Globally, about two-thirds of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions arise from fossil-fuel burning; the rest arise primarily from deforestation. Chlorofluorocarbons are the second largest contributor to global warming, accounting for about 20% of the total. The third largest contributor is methane, followed by ozone and nitrous oxide. A study of current activities in the US that contribute to global warming shows the following: electric power plants account for about 33% of carbon dioxide emissions; motor vehicles, planes and ships (31%); industrial plants (24%); commercial and residential buildings (11%)

  13. Temporal stability of the psychological determinants of trust: Implications for communication about food risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.; Miles, S.

    2003-01-01

    There has been much debate about the role of trust in information sources in risk communication. Recent food scares have highlighted the need for both the development of effective risk communication strategies and investigation into whether trust differs between different information sources. In the

  14. Managing Trust in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Touhid; Josang, Audun; Xu, Yue

    In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect, discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social networks attracts the attention of the researchers about the importance of managing trust in online environment. Users of the online social networks may share their experiences and opinions within the networks about an item which may be a product or service. The user faces the problem of evaluating trust in a service or service provider before making a choice. Recommendations may be received through a chain of friends network, so the problem for the user is to be able to evaluate various types of trust opinions and recommendations. This opinion or recommendation has a great influence to choose to use or enjoy the item by the other user of the community. Collaborative filtering system is the most popular method in recommender system. The task in collaborative filtering is to predict the utility of items to a particular user based on a database of user rates from a sample or population of other users. Because of the different taste of different people, they rate differently according to their subjective taste. If two people rate a set of items similarly, they share similar tastes. In the recommender system, this information is used to recommend items that one participant likes, to other persons in the same cluster. But the collaborative filtering system performs poor when there is insufficient previous common rating available between users; commonly known as cost start problem. To overcome the cold start problem and with the dramatic growth of online social networks, trust based approach to recommendation has emerged. This approach assumes a trust network among users and makes recommendations

  15. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...

  16. Trusted counsellor retires

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    His astute counsel, knowing smile and distinguished eloquence will be missed by many. With a pang of regret, the man himself admits that 'CERN was like a drug for me'. Last week, Jean-Daniel Mandica retired, after 40 years of loyal service. He was the trusted counsellor of every Director of the Administration and Director-General for eighteen years, from 1986 to 2003. Head of the planning unit for the Directorate and the Administration from 1986 to 1996, he was then named Head of the Directorate Services Unit in 1996, a position he held until the end of 2003. Throughout that time, he conducted key tasks for the Organization, such as restructuring the Administration and carrying out audits. His role in the creation of Microcosm and his commitment to CERN's participation in the Universal Exposition at Seville in 1992 contributed in no small part to the spread of the Laboratory's fame. Jean-Daniel Mandica's incomparable knowledge of the Administration, sense of diplomacy and great ability to listen made him a v...

  17. The transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks: disruption, reconstruction, and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Yu. Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Food safety issues in China have received much scholarly attention, yet few studies systematically examined this matter through the lens of trust. More importantly, little is known about the transformation of different types of trust in the dynamic process of food production, provision, and consumption. We consider trust as an evolving interdependent relationship between different actors. We used the Beijing County Fair, a prominent ecological farmers' market in China, as an example to examine the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. We argue that although there has been a disruption of institutional trust among the general public since 2008 when the melamine-tainted milk scandal broke out, reconstruction of individual trust and development of organizational trust have been observed, along with the emergence and increasing popularity of alternative food networks. Based on more than six months of fieldwork on the emerging ecological agriculture sector in 13 provinces across China as well as monitoring of online discussions and posts, we analyze how various social factors - including but not limited to direct and indirect reciprocity, information, endogenous institutions, and altruism - have simultaneously contributed to the transformation of trust in China's alternative food networks. The findings not only complement current social theories of trust, but also highlight an important yet understudied phenomenon whereby informal social mechanisms have been partially substituting for formal institutions and gradually have been building trust against the backdrop of the food safety crisis in China.

  18. TEE-Based Trusted Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Javier; Bonnet, Philippe

    Today, it is safe to assume that any program or data can be compromised, if they are not protected by hardware within a secure area. Systems based on crypto-processors (e.g., a trusted platform module, a smart card or a hardware security module) rely on the properties of tamper resistant hardware...... to establish a tight security parameter around a reduced set of predefined functionalities. Such systems are very secure, but they impose strong constraints on the functionalities, the connectivity or the resources available within the secure area. They have not proven versatile enough to provide mainstream...... trusted storage for personal data. We believe that this role can be taken over by systems equipped with Trusted Execution Environments (TEE), such as ARM’s TrustZone. Indeed, even if TEEs provide weaker security guarantees than crypto-processors, they already provide a secure area on many personal devices...

  19. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2015-01-01

    We argue that residential exposure to ethnic diversity reduces social trust. Previous within-country analyses of the relationship between contextual ethnic diversity and trust have been conducted at higher levels of aggregation, thus ignoring substantial variation in actual exposure to ethnic......, whereas the effect vanishes in larger contextual units. This supports the conjecture that interethnic exposure underlies the negative relationship between ethnic diversity in residential contexts and social trust....... diversity. In contrast, we analyze how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context—where interethnic exposure is inevitable—affects trust. We do this using Danish survey data linked with register-based data, which enables us to obtain precise measures of the ethnic diversity of each individual...

  20. Ethnic Diversity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2018-01-01

    Due to its wide-ranging implications for social cohesion in diversifying Western countries, the question of the potential negative consequences of ethnic diversity for social trust is arguably the most contentious question in the literature on social trust. In this chapter we critically review...... the empirical evidence for a negative relationship between contextual ethnic diversity (measured locally within countries) and social trust. We cautiously conclude that there are indications of a negative relationship, although with important variations across study characteristics including national setting......, context unit analyzed, and conditioning on moderating influences. Building on the review, we highlight a number of paths for theoretical and methodological advances, which we argue would advance the literature on the relationship between ethnic diversity and social trust....

  1. To Trust or Not to Trust? What Drives Public Trust in Science in Social Media Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwong, Y. L.; Oliver, C.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The erosion of public trust in science is a serious concern today. This climate of distrust has real consequences, from the anti-vaccination movement to climate change denials. The age of social media promises opportunities for improved interactivity between scientists and the public, which experts hope will help improve public confidence in science. However, evidence linking social media engagement and public attitude towards science is scarce. Our study aimed to help fill this gap. We examined Twitter engagement and its impact on public trust in science, focusing on two related science issues: space science and climate change. Our datasets comprised of 10,000 randomly sampled tweets over a month's period in 2016. We used human annotation and machine learning to analyse the tweets. Results revealed the level of distrust was significantly higher in the climate change tweets. However, in the climate change network, people who engaged with science personalities trust science more than those who did not. This difference in trust levels was not present in the space science network. There the two clusters of people displayed similar levels of trust in science. Additionally, we used machine learning to predict the trust labels of tweets and conducted feature analysis to find the properties of trust-inspiring tweets. Our supervised learning algorithm was able to predict trust in science in our sample tweets with 84% accuracy. The strongest predictors of trust in science (as conveyed by tweets) were similarity, presence of URL and authenticity. Contrast this with the findings of our previous study investigating the features of highly engaging space science related social media messages, authenticity is the only feature that also inspires trust. This indicates that what works to promote engagement (e.g. `retweets', `Likes') does not necessarily build trust in science. Social media science communication is not as simple as `we engage, therefore they trust'. We suggest that

  2. Trust, Behavior, and High School Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on student trust and to examine the relationship between student trust, behavior, and academic outcomes in high school. It asks, first, does trust have a positive effect on high school outcomes? Second, does trust influence student behavior, exerting an indirect effect on…

  3. Trust and the sociology of the professions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    There is a fast-growing literature on trust in health care, especially interpersonal trust, reflecting the growing awareness in both the research and policy communities of the importance of trust. At a general level, trust as part of the broader concept of social capital is related to people's

  4. The Complex Relationship between Cyberbullying and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieschl, Stephanie; Porsch, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Theoretically, there are strong arguments for a relationship between cyberbullying and trust. On the one hand, trust is built on experiences; thus, experiences of malevolence such as cyberbullying might contribute to low trust. On the other hand, high trust may lead to risky online behavior such as self-disclosures that could increase the risk of…

  5. 26 CFR 301.7701-4 - Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... remediation trust if the organization is organized under state law as a trust; the primary purpose of the... federal, state, or local environmental laws; all contributors to the trust have (at the time of... federal, state, or local environmental laws for environmental remediation of the waste site; and the trust...

  6. 12 CFR 7.2022 - Voting trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices § 7.2022 Voting trusts. The shareholders of a national bank may establish a voting trust under the applicable law of a state selected by the participants and designated in the trust agreement, provided the... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting trusts. 7.2022 Section 7.2022 Banks and...

  7. Metadata trust in a personal video recorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boertjes, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Trust is the belief or confidence in someone that their recommendations will work for you, i.e. that you will like the TV-programs (or other content) that they recommend. Many systems incorporate some notion of trust. Trust is more than similarity in taste, which makes trust a broader concept than

  8. Cancer patients’ trust in their oncologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we aimed to unravel cancer patients’ trust in their oncologist. We investigated patients’ explanations of trust in-depth, and developed an oncology-specific questionnaire to assess trust. Using the resulting Trust in Oncologist Scale, we experimentally established the influence of

  9. Understanding the Role of Trust in Virtual Communities of Practice: Perspectives from Members and Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thu Pho, Hang; Saustrup, Nina; Tambo, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Trust has different connotations characterized by various aspects such as sociology, psychology and economics. However, the focus of this paper is on trust within virtual context in the field of digital information, where trust reflects human-computer interaction. Virtual communities have extended...... the reach of our interactions beyond the geographical limitations of traditional communities, forming new kinds of communities based on shared practice (Wenger 2006). On this basis, we emphasize trust in virtual communities of practice (VCoPs) where online groups exchange information, knowledge...... and experience. This paper is qualitative based on literature studies and employs a comparative methodology in studying trust, trust perception and psycho-social relations to VCoPs. This paper investigates three case studies of virtual community providers (VCPs) (Facebook, LinkedIn and Experts-Exchange) grounded...

  10. [Trust in the care relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureau, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    A relationship of trust is an expression often used by caregivers, to such an extent that it almost seems self-evident. It is nevertheless important to give some thought to this aspect in order to construct a reliable, authentic and ethical care relationship. Indeed, trust is not automatic. It requires reciprocity, a deliberate choice on the part of the caregiver and the patient. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Trust and Privacy in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Peter; Kalra, Dipak

    This paper considers issues of trust and privacy in healthcare around increased data-sharing through Electronic Health Records (EHRs). It uses a model structured around different aspects of trust in the healthcare organisation’s reasons for greater data-sharing and their ability to execute EHR projects, particularly any associated confidentiality controls. It reflects the individual’s personal circumstances and attitude to use of health records.

  12. Trust Revision for Conflicting Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    strategy is to first revise a priori trust assignments as a function of the degree of conflict, before the evidence is fused. This paper focuses on the...practical trust transitivity seems to be idiosyncratic for humans and animals, with no true analogue among non- living forms (and in the physical world ...visiting a foreign country Alice is looking for a restaurant where the locals go, because she would like to avoid places overrun by tourists. She meets a

  13. Trust, but verify: social media models for disaster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amisha M; Bruns, Axel; Newton, Judith

    2017-07-01

    A lack of trust in the information exchanged via social media may significantly hinder decisionmaking by community members and emergency services during disasters. The need for timely information at such times, though, challenges traditional ways of establishing trust. This paper, building on a multi-year research project that combined social media data analysis and participant observation within an emergency management organisation and in-depth engagement with stakeholders across the sector, pinpoints and examines assumptions governing trust and trusting relationships in social media disaster management. It assesses three models for using social media in disaster management-information gathering, quasi-journalistic verification, and crowdsourcing-in relation to the guardianship of trust to highlight the verification process for content and source and to identify the role of power and responsibilities. The conclusions contain important implications for emergency management organisations seeking to enhance their mechanisms for incorporating user-generated information from social media sources in their disaster response efforts. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  14. Online Consumer Trust: Trends in Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Bauman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the literature review of studies published in 2004-2014 (Web 2.0 period in the area of consumer online trust. Based on the content analysis of 138 papers, this study highlights three major research themes: (1 trust models, (2 technological, and (3 social factors impacting online trust. It also explores topics in each major theme found in direct studies of online consumer trust. Since this literature review uses the concept-centric approach, it points out not only the major trends in research but also three understudied areas: (1 green trust, (2 trust recovery, and (3 the role of ethics in developing online trust.

  15. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Işık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significant relationships between communication, openness to innovation, participation-trust in teamwork and organizational trust, trust in management, trust in co-workers, and trust in workplace.

  16. Trust is a must: What is involved in trusting those who manage forest fires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Liljeblad; Bill Borrie; Alan Watson

    2010-01-01

    Trust is a complicated emotion. In the past, many social scientists have studied trust. They discovered that trust involves a number of beliefs and emotions. The scientists in this study were interested in learning more about trust. They believed that forest managers can do a better job if people trust them to do what is best for citizens and the environment (figure 1...

  17. An Operational Semantics for Trust Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krukow, Karl Kristian

    2005-01-01

    In the trust-structure model of trust management, principals specify their trusting relationships with other principals in terms of trust policies. In their paper on trust structures, Carbone et al. present a language for trust policies, and provide a suitable denotational semantics. The semantics...... ensures that for any collection of trust policies, there is always a unique global trust-state, compatible with all the policies, specifying everyone's degree of trust in everyone else. However, as the authors themselves point out, the language lacks an operational model: the global trust-state is a well......-defined mathematical object, but it is not clear how principals can actually compute it. This becomes even more apparent when one considers the intended application environment: vast numbers of autonomous principals, distributed and possibly mobile. We provide a compositional operational semantics for a language...

  18. Warm pre-stressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedner, G.

    1983-01-01

    Literature survey and critical evaluation of the phenomenon of warm pre-stressing (WPS) is presented. It is found that the cause of it is not clear and a calculated control is missing. The effect of irradiation is unknown, and the influence of WPS on the behaviour of reactor vessels is discussed. (G.B.)

  19. Being Warm-Hearted

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李函; 任汉鼎

    2017-01-01

    Good morning,ladies and gentlemen.It’s my honor to address[向……致辞] you.My English name is Isabella.I’m a high school student of 17.I have some good personality traits[特点],including being warm-hearted.So here comes my topic:Being

  20. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  1. The global warming scare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunavala, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the present propaganda about the global warming with its disastrous consequences is a scare spread by some First World countries, especially the United States, to prevent the rapid industrialization of developing third world countries. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  2. Paralyzed warming world

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ač, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 81-86 ISSN 1876-8156 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : global warming * climate Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://ojs.ubvu.vu.nl/alf/article/view/134/250

  3. An Analysis of Behavioral Intention to use Thai Internet Banking with Quality Management and Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Namahoot KS; Laohavichien T

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the effects of quality management and trust towards behavioural intention of Thai consumers to use internet banking. It specifically investigates whether the quality management dimensions of information quality, system quality and service quality affect the level of trust of Thai consumers towards internet banking, and whether this trust correspondingly affect their intention to use the system. This study has been conducted in Thailand and focused on the users of intern...

  4. The Impact of Satisfaction and Trust on Loyalty of E-Commerce Customers

    OpenAIRE

    Mochammad Auditya Brilliant; Adrian Achyar

    2013-01-01

    The number of Internet users in Indonesia and e-commerce sales is growing. However, Indonesia is less active in e-commerce research compared to other Asian countries, and existing studies cover limited area. The purpose of this study is identifying the impact of customer satisfaction and trust on loyalty in e-commerce and identifying the factors that influence satisfaction. The results are that information quality affects trust and that trust affects loyalty. E-commerce websites should focus ...

  5. 76 FR 10627 - Assumption Buster Workshop: Trust Anchors Are Invulnerable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... day-long workshop on the pros and cons of the use and implementation of trust anchors. The workshop... National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development... Coordination Office for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program on...

  6. Market Mavenism: Its Contribution in Building Consumer’s Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofi Puspa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In globalization era, firms have to deal with multifaceted challenges. Dynamic changes in consumers’ demands and desires, technology, and new knowledge and innovative movement of competitors are some examples of the important tasks to be managed in order to be able to survive in the market. The role of communications and the presence of market maven cannot be ignored because both are salient elements for establishing a firm’s marketing strategy. Market maven has been well defined and studied. However, the participation of market maven in improving a consumer’s knowledge and trust in certain object is unclear. Therefore, this study aims to: (1 investigate the role of inherent personal knowledge in affecting trust, (2 investigate as to whether mavens play a role in improving a recipient’s knowledge level and trust. The authors conducted a study that involved a total of 134 students as respondents. The correlation between subjective knowledge and trust attains a medium level, while objective knowledge is related to trust at a very low level. Trust in the low maven group is the lowest compared to that in medium and high mavens. This study indicates that there are different results in terms of effects of information provided by three different maven groups.

  7. Loss of Trust as Disconnection in John Updike’s Trust Me

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian DUFFY

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tandis que le titre du recueil de nouvelles de John Updike, Trust Me (1987, et le thème de la confiance trahie dans la première nouvelle, éponyme, donnent au recueil sa cohérence thématique, une lecture des textes qui se limiterait au seul sujet de la confiance trahie menant à l’affaiblissement des liens humains serait restrictive. Le recueil donne une expression plus large au thème de la confiance, celle d’un mode de rapport des êtres humains au monde, à leur vie et aux autres. Les protagonistes des nouvelles “The City” and “The Wallet” subissent la perte de confiance comme la perte d’un tel rapport, ce qui engendre, dans les deux cas, un malaise existentiel. Cet article étudie la nature de ces crises existentielles dans le cadre de l’utilisation par Updike du motif de la chute. L’article examine ensuite la manière dont le malaise existentiel récurrent chez John Updike lui-même influence le thème de la crise existentielle dans ces deux nouvelles, une démarche qui se justifie par la dimension autobiographique avouée des nouvelles d’Updike.   While the title of John Updike’s short-story collection, Trust Me (1987, and the theme of betrayed trust of the first story (“Trust Me” offer a thematic coherence to the collection, it would be restrictive to read the stories through the simple thematic filter of betrayed trust leading to weakened human attachments. Trust is given a wider articulation in the collection, that of a mode of connection for human beings to their world, their lives, and to others. The loss of trust for the protagonists in the stories, “The City” and “The Wallet,” is undergone as just such a loss of connection, engendering in both cases an existential disquiet. The article explores the nature of these existential crises, situating them within Updike’s wider deployment of the motif of the fall in his collection. The article goes on to consider the manner in which the existential

  8. Qualitative models of global warming amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milošević, U.; Bredeweg, B.; de Kleer, J.; Forbus, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest from ecological experts to create qualitative models of phenomena for which numerical information is sparse or missing. We present a number of successful models in the field of environmental science, namely, the domain of global warming. The motivation behind the effort is

  9. 25 CFR 1000.354 - What is a trust evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... that the functions are performed in accordance with trust standards as defined by Federal law. Trust... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a trust evaluation? 1000.354 Section 1000.354... Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.354 What is a trust evaluation? A trust...

  10. Trust, Privacy, and Frame Problems in Social and Business E-Networks, Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Buechner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Privacy issues in social and business e-networks are daunting in complexity—private information about oneself might be routed through countless artificial agents. For each such agent, in that context, two questions about trust are raised: Where an agent must access (or store personal information, can one trust that artificial agent with that information and, where an agent does not need to either access or store personal information, can one trust that agent not to either access or store that information? It would be an infeasible task for any human being to explicitly determine, for each artificial agent, whether it can be trusted. That is, no human being has the computational resources to make such an explicit determination. There is a well-known class of problems in the artificial intelligence literature, known as frame problems, where explicit solutions to them are computationally infeasible. Human common sense reasoning solves frame problems, though the mechanisms employed are largely unknown. I will argue that the trust relation between two agents (human or artificial functions, in some respects, is a frame problem solution. That is, a problem is solved without the need for a computationally infeasible explicit solution. This is an aspect of the trust relation that has remained unexplored in the literature. Moreover, there is a formal, iterative structure to agent-agent trust interactions that serves to establish the trust relation non-circularly, to reinforce it, and to “bootstrap” its strength.

  11. Trust-based collective view prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Tiejian; Xu, Guandong; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Collective view prediction is to judge the opinions of an active web user based on unknown elements by referring to the collective mind of the whole community. Content-based recommendation and collaborative filtering are two mainstream collective view prediction techniques. They generate predictions by analyzing the text features of the target object or the similarity of users' past behaviors. Still, these techniques are vulnerable to the artificially-injected noise data, because they are not able to judge the reliability and credibility of the information sources. Trust-based Collective View

  12. Reconstructing warm inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    The reconstruction of a warm inflationary universe model from the scalar spectral index n_S(N) and the tensor to scalar ratio r( N) as a function of the number of e-folds N is studied. Under a general formalism we find the effective potential and the dissipative coefficient in terms of the cosmological parameters n_S and r considering the weak and strong dissipative stages under the slow roll approximation. As a specific example, we study the attractors for the index n_S given by nS-1∝ N^{-1} and for the ratio r∝ N^{-2}, in order to reconstruct the model of warm inflation. Here, expressions for the effective potential V(φ ) and the dissipation coefficient Γ (φ ) are obtained.

  13. Thinking About Global Warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.

    2006-01-01

    Attitudes toward global warming are influenced by various heuristics, which may distort policy away from what is optimal for the well-being of people. These possible distortions, or biases, include: a focus on harms that we cause, as opposed to those that we can remedy more easily; a feeling that those who cause a problem should fix it; a desire to undo a problem rather than compensate for its presence; parochial concern with one's own group (nation); and neglect of risks that are not available. Although most of these biases tend to make us attend relatively too much to global warming, other biases, such as wishful thinking, cause us to attend too little. I discuss these possible effects and illustrate some of them with an experiment conducted on the World Wide Web

  14. Climate change - global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciconkov, Risto

    2001-01-01

    An explanation about climate, weather, climate changes. What is a greenhouse effect, i.e. global warming and reasons which contribute to this effect. Greenhouse gases (GHG) and GWP (Global Warming Potential) as a factor for estimating their influence on the greenhouse effect. Indicators of the climate changes in the previous period by known international institutions, higher concentrations of global average temperature. Projecting of likely scenarios for the future climate changes and consequences of them on the environment and human activities: industry, energy, agriculture, water resources. The main points of the Kyoto Protocol and problems in its realization. The need of preparing a country strategy concerning the acts of the Kyoto Protocol, suggestions which could contribute in the preparation of the strategy. A special attention is pointed to the energy, its resources, the structure of energy consumption and the energy efficiency. (Author)

  15. Warm natural inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Hiranmaya; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2012-01-01

    In warm inflation models there is the requirement of generating large dissipative couplings of the inflaton with radiation, while at the same time, not de-stabilising the flatness of the inflaton potential due to radiative corrections. One way to achieve this without fine tuning unrelated couplings is by supersymmetry. In this Letter we show that if the inflaton and other light fields are pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons then the radiative corrections to the potential are suppressed and the thermal corrections are small as long as the temperature is below the symmetry breaking scale. In such models it is possible to fulfil the contrary requirements of an inflaton potential which is stable under radiative corrections and the generation of a large dissipative coupling of the inflaton field with other light fields. We construct a warm inflation model which gives the observed CMB-anisotropy amplitude and spectral index where the symmetry breaking is at the GUT scale.

  16. Slowing global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1990-01-01

    According to the authors, global warming promises to be one of the central environmental issues of the nineties. After a decade of scientific concern but popular neglect, the eighties ended with a growing political as well as scientific consensus that the world can no longer afford to procrastinate about this issue. This paper reports on coping with global warming which, according to the author, will force societies to move rapidly into uncharted terrain, reversing powerful trends that have dominated the industrial age. This challenge cannot be met without a strong commitment on the part of both individual consumers and governments. In terms of the earth's carbon balance, the unprecedented policy changes that have now become urgent include a new commitment to greater energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, a carbon tax on fossil fuels, a reversal of deforestation in tropical countries, and the rapid elimination of CFCs

  17. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-20

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  18. 信息内容呈现对消费者在线信任的影响——以C2C网上商店为例%Information Content Display and Trust of C2C Online Store

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖以臣

    2012-01-01

    网上商店呈现给消费者信息是为了引导消费者信任网上商店、促成消费者进行网上购物。本文将C2C网上商店呈现给消费者的信息分为事实性信息、承诺性信息和担保性信息,将产品类别分为搜索型产品、体验型产品和信任型产品,通过模拟淘宝网网上商店研究了不同产品类别下C2C网上商店信息内容呈现与消费者在线信任之间的关系。126名男性、76名女性参与了研究。研究结论显示,C2C网上商店的信息内容呈现影响消费者对网上商店的信任,特别是事实性信息对消费者的影响较大;消费者的在线信任受多个方面信息内容呈现的综合影响,对不同类型的产品而言,不同类型的信息内容呈现方式对消费者在线信任的影响程度是不同的。%With developing of Internet, more and more people do their shopping online. The total transaction volume in china's online shopping (including B2C and C2C) was 52. 31 billion RMB in 2010. It was 3.3 percent of the total volume of retail sales. In the past ten years, the C2C electronic market has been growing very rapidly in China. The number of individual network business reached 65 million in June of 2010. The C2C has been a vital part of online retail market. Trust is very crucial for consumers shopping. Consumers can get enough information to reach the trust level, and buy in traditional retail stores. Consumers not only cancollect information with their eyes, but also can feel by touching, smelling or tasting the goods in retail stores. There are many different features between traditional retail stores and online stores. Consumers can't feel goods by touching, smelling and tasting in online stores. They got major information from displays of online stores and trusted online stores. We are very interested in finding the influence of trust and later towards purchasing online from the customer perspectives. This article studied the

  19. Effect of perceived Price, Brand Image, perceived Quality and Trust on Consumer’s buying Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Afsar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the effect of factors such as perceived price, brand image, perceived quality and trust on consumers' evaluative judgments for beautification products. Results showed that brand image has positive and significant impact on consumer trust. Increase in perceived quality and trust depicted increase in a particular brand preference. Decrease in perceived price showed significant and positive impact on brand preference. This study measured the effect of brand image, price, quality and consumer trust information on how individuals subjectively evaluate a brand.

  20. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Basanti Jain

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal increase in the concentration of the greenhouse gases is resulting in higher temperatures. We call this effect is global warming. The average temperature around the world has increased about 1'c over 140 years, 75% of this has risen just over the past 30 years. The solar radiation, as it reaches the earth, produces "greenhouse effect" in the atmosphere. The thick atmospheric layers over the earth behaves as a glass surface, as it permits short wave radiations from coming in, but ...