WorldWideScience

Sample records for warm molecular gas

  1. Warm Molecular Gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, N; Xu, C K; Gao, Y; Armus, L; Mazzarella, J M; Isaak, K G; Petric, A O; Charmandaris, V; Diaz-Santos, T; Evans, A S; Howell, J; Appleton, P; Inami, H; Iwasawa, K; Leech, J; Lord, S; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; Surace, J; van der Werf, P P

    2014-01-01

    We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the $J$ to $J$$-$1 transitions from $J=4$ up to $13$ from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at $J \\le 4$ to a broad distribution peaking around $J \\sim\\,$6$-$7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 um color, $C(60/100)$, increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, $L_{\\rm IR}$, show the smallest variation for $J$ around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-$J$ regime ($5 \\lesssim J \\lesssim 10$). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5$-$4), (6$-$5), (7$-$6), (8$-$7) and (10$-$9) transitions to $L_{\\rm IR}$, $\\log R_{\\rm midCO}$, remain largely independent of $C(60/100)$, ...

  2. Rotation of the Warm Molecular Gas Surrounding Ultracompact HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Keto, E R; Zhang, Q

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular line and 1.4 mm continuum observations towards five massive star forming regions at arcsecond resolution using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We find that the warm molecular gas surrounding each HII region (as traced by SO_2 and OCS) appears to be undergoing bulk rotation. From the molecular line emission and thermal component of the continuum emission, we independently derived gas masses for each region which are consistent with each other. From the free-free component of the continuum emission we estimate the minimum stellar mass required to power the HII region and find that this mass, when added to the derived gas mass, is a significant fraction of the dynamical mass for that region.

  3. Glitters of warm H2 in cold diffuse molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falgarone, Edith; Beichman, Chaz; Boulanger, Francois; Combes, Francoise; Gry, Cecile; Helou, Georges; Laureijs, Rene; Pineau Des Forets, Guillaume; Valentijn, Edwin; Verstraete, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Cold molecular hydrogen, a possibly dominant gas fraction in galaxies, does not radiate due to the symmetry and small moment of inertia of the molecule. The only tracers of cold H2, the rotational lines of CO and dust thermal emission operate only in metal-rich environments. By detecting the lowest

  4. The warm molecular gas and dust of Seyfert galaxies: two different phases of accretion?

    CERN Document Server

    Mezcua, M; Fernández-Ontiveros, J A; Tristram, K; Neumayer, N

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of warm molecular gas (1000--3000 K), traced by the near-IR H$_2$ 2.12 $\\mu$m line, has been imaged with a resolution $<0.5$ arcsec in the central 1 kpc of seven nearby Seyfert galaxies. We find that this gas is highly concentrated towards the central 100 pc and that its morphology is often symmetrical. Lanes of warm H$_2$ gas are observed only in three cases (NGC\\,1068, NGC\\,1386 and Circinus) for which the morphology is much wider and extended than the dust filaments. We conclude that there is no one-to-one correlation between dust and warm gas. This indicates that, if the dust filaments and lanes of warm gas are radial streaming motions of fueling material, they must represent \\textit{two different phases of accretion}: the dust filaments represent a colder phase than the gas close to the nucleus (within $\\sim$100 pc). We predict that the morphology of the nuclear dust at these scales should resemble that of the cold molecular gas (e.g. CO at 10-40 K), as we show for CenA and NGC\\,1566 ...

  5. Cold and warm atomic gas around the Perseus molecular cloud I: Basic Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stanimirovic, Snezana; Lee, Min-Young; Heiles, Carl; Miller, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Using the Arecibo Observatory we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases allowing us to estimate spin temperature (T_s) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual HI clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium, CNM and WNM) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium HI survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have on average a higher total HI column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold HI relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temper...

  6. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey II: Warm Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Three Field Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, B E; Israel, F P; Serjeant, S; Bendo, G J; Brinks, E; Clements, D L; Irwin, J A; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Mühle, S; Mortimer, A M J; Petitpas, G; Sinukoff, E; Spekkens, K; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; van der Werf, P P; Vlahakis, C; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of large-area CO J=3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong CO J=3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multi-wavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion times for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from the THINGS HI survey,...

  7. Dense gas in the Galactic central molecular zone is warm and heated by turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, Adam; Ao, Yiping; Riquelme, Denise; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Mills, Elisabeth A C; Requena-Torres, Miguel A; Immer, Katharina; Testi, Leonardo; Ott, Juergen; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Darling, Jeremy; Aalto, Susanne; Stanke, Thomas; Kendrew, Sarah; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Longmore, Steven; Dale, James; Guesten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center is the closest region in which we can study star formation under extreme physical conditions like those in high-redshift galaxies. We measure the temperature of the dense gas in the central molecular zone (CMZ) and examine what drives it. We mapped the inner 300 pc of the CMZ in the temperature-sensitive J = 3-2 para-formaldehyde (p-H$_2$CO) transitions. We used the $3_{2,1} - 2_{2,0} / 3_{0,3} - 2_{0,2}$ line ratio to determine the gas temperature in $n \\sim 10^4 - 10^5 $cm$^{-3}$ gas. We have produced temperature maps and cubes with 30" and 1 km/s resolution and published all data in FITS form. Dense gas temperatures in the Galactic center range from ~60 K to > 100 K in selected regions. The highest gas temperatures T_G > 100 K are observed around the Sgr B2 cores, in the extended Sgr B2 cloud, the 20 km/s and 50 km/s clouds, and in "The Brick" (G0.253+0.016). We infer an upper limit on the cosmic ray ionization rate ${\\zeta}_{CR} < 10^{-14}$ 1/s. The dense molecular gas temperature o...

  8. FIR Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center: Hot and Warm Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José; Gerin, Maryvonne; Pety, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    The angular resolution (~10'') achieved by the Herschel Space Observatory ~3.5 m telescope at FIR wavelengths allowed us to roughly separate the emission toward the inner parsec of the galaxy (the central cavity) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk (the CND). The FIR spectrum toward Sgr A* is dominated by intense [O III], [O I], [C II], [N III], [N II], and [C I] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by the strong UV field from the central stellar cluster. The high-J CO rotational line intensities observed at the interface between the inner CND and the central cavity are consistent with a hot isothermal component at T k ~ 103.1 K and n(H2)~ 104 cm-3. They are also consistent with a distribution of lower temperatures at higher gas density, with most CO at T k~300 K. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column density or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) likely results from a combination of UV and shock-driven heating. If UV-irradiated and heated dense clumps do not exist, shocks likely dominate the heating of the hot molecular gas component. Although this component is beam diluted in our FIR observations, it may be resolved at much higher angular resolution. An ALMA project using different molecular tracers to characterize UV-irradiated shocks in the innermost layers of the CND is ongoing.

  9. Morphology and Kinematics of Warm Molecular Gas in the Nuclear Region of Arp 220 as Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Rangwala, Naseem; Wilson, Christine; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Spinoglio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle-0 observations of the CO J = 6-5 line in the advanced galaxy merger Arp 220. This line traces warm molecular gas, which dominates the total CO luminosity. The CO emission from the two nuclei is well resolved by the 0.39" x 0.22" beam and the exceptional sensitivity and spatial/spectral resolution reveal new complex features in the morphology and kinematics of the warm gas. The line profiles are asymmetric between the red and blue sides of the nuclear disks and the peak of the line emission is offset from the peak of the continuum emission in both nuclei by about 100 pc in the same direction. CO self-absorption is detected at the centers of both nuclei but it is much deeper in the eastern nucleus. We also clearly detect strong, highly redshifted CO absorption located near the southwest side of each nucleus. For the eastern nucleus, we reproduce the major line profile features with a simple kinematic model of a highly turbulent, rotating disk with a substan...

  10. Warm gas in the rotating disk of the Red Rectangle: accurate models of molecular line emission

    CERN Document Server

    Bujarrabal, V

    2013-01-01

    We aim to study the excitation conditions of the molecular gas in the rotating disk of the Red Rectangle, the only post-Asymptotic-Giant-Branch object in which the existence of an equatorial rotating disk has been demonstrated. For this purpose, we developed a complex numerical code that accurately treats radiative transfer in 2-D, adapted to the study of molecular lines from rotating disks. We present far-infrared Herschel/HIFI observations of the 12CO and 13CO J=6-5, J=10-9, and J=16-15 transitions in the Red Rectangle. We also present our code in detail and discuss the accuracy of its predictions, from comparison with well-tested codes. Theoretical line profiles are compared with the empirical data to deduce the physical conditions in the disk by means of model fitting. We conclude that our code is very efficient and produces reliable results. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with our observations reveals that the temperature of the Red Rectangle disk is typically ~ 100-150 K, about twice as h...

  11. Observations of warm molecular gas and kinematics in the disc around HD 100546

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panic, O.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Belloche, A.; Guesten, R.; Boland, W.; Barychev, Andrei

    Context. The disc around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 100546 is one of the most extensively studied discs in the southern sky. Although there is a wealth of information about its dust content and composition, not much is known about its gas and large-scale kinematics. Many recent results have stressed

  12. Molecular gas in spiral galaxies a new warm phase at large galactocentric distances?

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, P P; Viti, S

    2002-01-01

    There is now strong evidence suggesting that the 12CO J = 1-0 transition, widely used to trace H2 gas, significantly underestimates its mass in metal-poor regions. In spiral disks such regions are found in large galactocentric distances where we show that any unaccounted H2 gas phase is likely to be diffuse (~5-20 cm^-3) and warmer (T(kin) ~ 50-100 K) than the cool (T(kin) ~ 15-20 K) CO-luminous one. Moreover we find that a high value of the H2 formation rate on grains, suggested by recent observational work, can compensate for the reduction of the available grain surface in the metal-poor part of typical galactic disks and thus enhance this CO-poor H2 component which may be contributing significantly to the mass and pressure of spiral disks beyond their optical radius.

  13. FIR Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center: Hot and Warm Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, J R; Cernicharo, J; Gerin, M; Pety, J

    2016-01-01

    The angular resolution (~10") achieved by the Herschel Space Observatory ~3.5m telescope at FIR wavelengths allowed us to roughly separate the emission toward the inner parsec of the galaxy (the central cavity) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk (the CND). The FIR spectrum toward SgrA* is dominated by intense [Oiii], [Oi], [Cii], [Niii], [Nii], and [Ci] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by the strong UV field from the central stellar cluster. The high-J CO rotational line intensities observed at the interface between the inner CND and the central cavity are consistent with a hot isothermal component at T~10^{3.1} K and n(H_2)~10^4 cm^{-3}. They are also consistent with a distribution of lower temperatures at higher gas density, with most CO at T~300 K. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column density or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) likely results from a combination of UV and shock-driven heating. Although thi...

  14. Warm Molecular Gas Traced with CO J=7->6 in the Galaxy's Central 2 Parsecs: Dynamical Heating of the Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bradford, C M; Nikola, T; Bolatto, A D; Jackson, J M; Savage, M L; Davidson, J A

    2005-01-01

    We present an 11 arcsec resolution map of the central two parsecs of the Galaxy in the CO J =7->6 rotational transition. The CO emission shows rotation about Sgr A*, but also evidence for non-circular turbulent motion and a clumpy morphology. We combine our dataset with available CO measurements to model the physical conditions in the disk. We find that the molecular gas in the region is both warm and dense, with T~200-300 K, n_H2~50,000-70,000 cm^-3. The mass of warm molecular gas we measure in the central two parsecs is at least 2000 M_solar, about 20 times the UV-excited atomic gas mass, ruling out an UV heating scenario for the molecular material. We compare the available spectral tracers with theoretical models and conclude that molecular gas is heated with magneto-hydrodynamic shocks with v~10-20 kms and B~0.3-0.5 mG. Using the conditions derived with the CO analysis, we include the other important coolants--neutral oxygen and molecular hydrogen--to estimate the total cooling budget of the molecular mat...

  15. Herschel SPIRE-FTS Observations of Excited CO and [CI] in the Antennae (NGC 4038/39): Warm and Cold Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schirm, Maximilien R P; Parkin, Tara J; Kamenetzky, Julia; Glenn, Jason; Rangwala, Naseem; Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J; Clements, Dave L; Cooray, Asantha; De Looze, Ilse; Karczewski, Oskar Ł; Madden, Suzanne C; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Wu, Ronin

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE-FTS observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39), a well studied, nearby ($22$ Mpc) ongoing merger between two gas rich spiral galaxies. We detect 5 CO transitions ($J=4-3$ to $J=8-7$), both [CI] transitions and the [NII]$205\\mu m$ transition across the entire system, which we supplement with ground based observations of the CO $J=1-0$, $J=2-1$ and $J=3-2$ transitions, and Herschel PACS observations of [CII] and [OI]$63\\mu m$. Using the CO and [CI] transitions, we perform both a LTE analysis of [CI], and a non-LTE radiative transfer analysis of CO and [CI] using the radiative transfer code RADEX along with a Bayesian likelihood analysis. We find that there are two components to the molecular gas: a cold ($T_{kin}\\sim 10-30$ K) and a warm ($T_{kin} \\gtrsim 100$ K) component. By comparing the warm gas mass to previously observed values, we determine a CO abundance in the warm gas of $x_{CO} \\sim 5\\times 10^{-5}$. If the CO abundance is the same in the warm and cold gas phases, this abund...

  16. Warm gas in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Gerrit

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents a study of warm CO, [OI] and H2 gas coming from the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These various gas tracers are each a proxy for a different radial and vertical region of the PP disk surface. Our sample consists of disks whose shape (based on modeling of the the disk dust emission) can be divided into flaring and self-shadowed (flat). We find [1] evidence for the vertical decoupling of gas and dust in one disks (Chapter 2); [2] That disk geometry has a large influence on the spatial distribution and excitation mechanism of the CO emission (chapters 3,4); [3] Near-IR H 2 emission around 2 (out of 14) HAEBE stars, probably originating from large (±50AU) radii of the disk (chapter 5). In chapter 6 we investigate the trends between CO emission and disk geometry as noted in Chapter 3 and 4.

  17. Warm Molecular Gas Traced with CO J = 7 --> 6 in the Galaxy's Central 2 Parsecs: Dynamical Heating of the Circumnuclear Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, C. M.; Stacey, G. J.; Nikola, T.; Bolatto, A. D.; Jackson, J. M.; Savage, M. L.; Davidson, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present an 11" resolution map of the central 2 pc of the Galaxy in the CO J = 7 --> 6 rotational transition. The CO emission shows rotation about Sgr A* but also evidence for noncircular turbulent motion and a clumpy morphology. We combine our data set with available CO measurements to model the physical conditions in the disk. We find that the molecular gas in the region is both warm and dense, with T approx. 200-300 K and n(sub H2) approx. (5-7) x 10(exp 4) cm(exp -3). The mass of warm molecular gas we measure in the central 2 pc is at least 2000 M(solar), about 20 times the UV-excited atomic gas mass, ruling out a UV heating scenario for the molecular material. We compare the available spectral tracers with theoretical models and conclude that molecular gas is heated with magnetohydrodynamic shocks with v approx. 10-20 km s(exp -1) and B approx. 0.3- 0.5 mG. Using the conditions derived with the CO analysis, we include the other important coolants, neutral oxygen and molecular hydrogen, to estimate the total cooling budget of the molecular material. We derive a mass-to-luminosity ratio of approx. 2-3 M(solar)(L(solar)exp -1), which is consistent with the total power dissipated via turbulent decay in 0.1 pc cells with v(sub rms) approx. 15 kilometers per second. These size and velocity scales are comparable to the observed clumping scale and the velocity dispersion. At this rate, the material near Sgr A* is dissipating its orbital energy on an orbital timescale and cannot last for more than a few orbits. Our conclusions support a scenario in which the features near Sgr A* such as the circumnuclear disk and northern arm are generated by infalling clouds with low specific angular momentum.

  18. Herschel-spire Fourier transform spectrometer observations of excited CO and [C I] in the antennae (NGC 4038/39): Warm and cold molecular gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Wilson, Christine D.; Parkin, Tara J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kamenetzky, Julia; Glenn, Jason; Rangwala, Naseem [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Spinoglio, Luigi; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Barlow, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Clements, Dave L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Karczewski, Oskar Ł. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Madden, Suzanne C.; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Wu, Ronin, E-mail: schirmmr@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.ca [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39), a well-studied, nearby (22 Mpc), ongoing merger between two gas-rich spiral galaxies. The SPIRE-FTS is a low spatial ( FWHM ∼ 19''-43'') and spectral (∼1.2 GHz) resolution mapping spectrometer covering a large spectral range (194-671 μm, 450-1545 GHz). We detect five CO transitions (J = 4-3 to J = 8-7), both [C I] transitions, and the [N II] 205 μm transition across the entire system, which we supplement with ground-based observations of the CO J = 1-0, J = 2-1, and J = 3-2 transitions and Herschel Photodetecting Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of [C II] and [O I] 63 μm. Using the CO and [C I] transitions, we perform both a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of [C I] and a non-LTE radiative transfer analysis of CO and [C I] using the radiative transfer code RADEX along with a Bayesian likelihood analysis. We find that there are two components to the molecular gas: a cold (T {sub kin} ∼ 10-30 K) and a warm (T {sub kin} ≳ 100 K) component. By comparing the warm gas mass to previously observed values, we determine a CO abundance in the warm gas of x {sub CO} ∼ 5 × 10{sup –5}. If the CO abundance is the same in the warm and cold gas phases, this abundance corresponds to a CO J = 1-0 luminosity-to-mass conversion factor of α{sub CO} ∼ 7 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1} in the cold component, similar to the value for normal spiral galaxies. We estimate the cooling from H{sub 2}, [C II], CO, and [O I] 63 μm to be ∼0.01 L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}. We compare photon-dominated region models to the ratio of the flux of various CO transitions, along with the ratio of the CO flux to the far-infrared flux in NGC 4038, NGC 4039, and the overlap region. We find that the densities recovered from our non-LTE analysis are consistent with a

  19. SOFIA Observations of S106: Dynamics of the Warm Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Stutzki, J.; Gusten, R.; Graf, U. U.; Hartogh, P.; Guan, X.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context The H II region/PDR/molecular cloud complex S106 is excited by a single O-star. The full extent of the warm and dense gas close to the star has not been mapped in spectrally resolved high-J CO or [C II] lines, so the kinematics of the warm. partially ionized gas, are unknown. Whether the prominent dark lane bisecting the hourglass-shaped nebula is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk around the exciting star or also to extinction in high column foreground gas was an open question until now. Aims. To disentangle the morphology and kinematics of warm neutral and ionized gas close to the star, study their relation to the bulk of the molecular gas. and to investigate the nature of the dark lane. Methods. We use the heterodyne receiver GREAT on board SOFIA to observe velocity resolved spectral lines of [C II] and CO 11 yields 10 in comparison with so far unpublished submm continuum data at 350 micron (8HARC-Il) and complementary molecular line data. Results. The high angular and spectral resolution observations show a very complex morphology and kinematics of the inner S106 region, with many different components at different excitation conditions contributing to the observed emission. The [C II] lines are found to be bright and very broad. tracing high velocity gas close to the interface of molecular cloud and H II region. CO 11 yields 10 emission is more confined.. both spatially and in velocity, to the immediate surroundings of S 106 IR showing the presence of warm, high density (clumpy) gas. Our high angular resolution submm continuum observations rule out the scenario where the dark lane separating the two lobes is due solely to the shadow cast by a small disk close to the star. The lane is clearly seen also as warm, high column density gas at the boundary of the molecular cloud and H II region.

  20. Molecular Ro-vibrational Collision Rates for Infrared Modeling of Warm Interstellar Gas from Full-dimensional Quantum Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Phillip

    We propose to compute accurate collisional excitation rate coefficients for rovibrational transitions of CS, SiO, SO, NO, H_2O, and HCN due to H_2, He, or H impact. This extends our previous grant which focused on 3- and 4-atom systems to 4- and 5-atom collision complexes, with dynamics to be performed on 6-9 dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs). This work, which uses fully quantum mechanical methods for inelastic scattering and incorporates full-dimensional PESs, pushes beyond the state-of-the-art for such calculations, as recently established by our group for rovibrational transitions in CO-H_2 in 6D. Many of the required PESs will be computed as part of this project using ab initio theory and basis sets of the highest level feasible and particular attention will be given to the long range form of the PESs. The completion of the project will result in 6 new global PESs and state-to-state rate coefficients for a large range of initial rovibrational levels for temperatures between 1 and 3000 K. The chosen collision systems correspond to cases where data are limited or lacking, are important coolants or diagnostics, and result in observable emission features in the infrared (IR). The final project results will be important for the analysis of a variety of interstellar and extragalactic environments in which the local conditions of gas density, radiation field, and/or shocks drive the level populations out of equilibrium. In such cases, collisional excitation data are critical to the accurate prediction and interpretation of observed molecular IR emission lines in protoplanetary disks, star-forming regions, planetary nebulae, embedded protostars, photodissociation regions, etc. The use of the proposed collisional excitation data will lead to deeper examination and understanding of the properties of many astrophysical environments, hence elevating the scientific return from the upcoming JWST, as well as from current (SOFIA, Herschel, HST) and past IR missions

  1. From the warm magnetized atomic medium to molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, P; Vázquez-Semadeni, E; Klessen, R; Audit, E

    2008-01-01

    {It has recently been proposed that giant molecular complexes form at the sites where streams of diffuse warm atomic gas collide at transonic velocities.} {We study the global statistics of molecular clouds formed by large scale colliding flows of warm neutral atomic interstellar gas under ideal MHD conditions. The flows deliver material as well as kinetic energy and trigger thermal instability leading eventually to gravitational collapse.} {We perform adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations which, for the first time in this context, treat self-consistently cooling and self-gravity.} {The clouds formed in the simulations develop a highly inhomogeneous density and temperature structure, with cold dense filaments and clumps condensing from converging flows of warm atomic gas. In the clouds, the column density probability density distribution (PDF) peaks at $\\sim 2 \\times 10^{21} \\psc$ and decays rapidly at higher values; the magnetic intensity correlates weakly with density from $n \\sim 0.1$ to $10^4 \\pcc$, an...

  2. Warm Absorbing Gas in Cooling Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Buote, David A.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the discovery of oxygen absorption and warm (10^5-10^6 K) gas in cooling flows. Special attention is given to new results for M87 for which we find the strongest evidence to date for ionized oxygen absorption in these systems. We briefly discuss implications for observations of cooling flows with Chandra and XMM.

  3. The warm, the excited, and the molecular gas: GRB 121024A shining through its star-forming galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Friis, M; Krühler, T; Fynbo, J P U; Ledoux, C; Vreeswijk, P M; Malesani, D; Gorosabel, J; Starling, R L C; Jakobsson, P; Varela, K; Watson, D J; Wiersema, K; Drachmann, A P; Trotter, A; Thöne, C C; Postigo, A de Ugarte; D'Elia, V; Elliott, J; Maturi, M; Goldoni, P; Greiner, J; Haislip, J; Kaper, L; Knust, F; LaCluyze, A; Milvang-Jensen, B; Reichart, D; Schulze, S; Sudilovsky, V; Vergani, S D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.80+/-0.15, H_2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f) ~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [OII], [OIII] and [NII], as well as a large variety of metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 Msolar/yr), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.5+/-0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor of refractory elements of [Zn/Fe] = 0....

  4. A HIFI preview of warm molecular gas around chi Cyg : first detection of H2O emission toward an S-type AGB star

    CERN Document Server

    Justtanont, K; Schoier, F L; Maercker, M; Olofsson, H; Bujarrabal, V; Marston, A P; Teyssier, D; Alcolea, J; Cernicharo, J; Dominik, C; de Koter, A; Melnick, G; Menten, K; Neufeld, D; Planesas, P; Schmidt, M; Szczerba, R; Waters, R; de Graauw, Th; Whyborn, N; Finn, T; Helmich, F; Siebertz, O; Schmulling, F; Ossenkopf, V; Lai, R

    2010-01-01

    A set of new, sensitive, and spectrally resolved, sub-millimeter line observations are used to probe the warm circumstellar gas around the S-type AGB star chi Cyg. The observed lines involve high rotational quantum numbers, which, combined with previously obtained lower-frequency data, make it possible to study in detail the chemical and physical properties of, essentially, the entire circumstellar envelope of chi Cyg. The data were obtained using the HIFI instrument aboard Herschel, whose high spectral resolution provides valuable information about the line profiles. Detailed, non-LTE, radiative transfer modelling, including dust radiative transfer coupled with a dynamical model, has been performed to derive the temperature, density, and velocity structure of the circumstellar envelope. We report the first detection of circumstellar H2O rotational emission lines in an S-star. Using the high-J CO lines to derive the parameters for the circumstellar envelope, we modelled both the ortho- and para-H2O lines. Our...

  5. Indentifying the Molecular Origin of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, P. P.; Lee, T. J.; Francisco, J.

    2009-12-01

    Indentifying the Molecular Origin of Global Warming Partha P. Bera, Joseph S. Francisco and Timothy J. Lee NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, Moffett Field, California 94035, and Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-1393 Abstract The physical characteristics of greenhouse gases (GHGs) have been investigated to assess which properties are most important in determining the radiative efficiency of a GHG. Chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluoroethers, fluoroethers, nitrogen fluorides, and various other known atmospheric trace molecules have been included in this study. Compounds containing the halogens F or Cl have in common very polar X-F or X-Cl bonds, particularly the X-F bonds. It is shown that as more F atoms bond to the same central atom, the bond dipoles become larger as a result of the central carbon atom becoming more positive. This leads to a linear increase in the total or integrated X-F bond dipole derivatives for the molecule, which leads to a non-linear (quadratic) increase in infrared (IR) intensity. Moreover, virtually all of the X-F bond stretches occur in the atmospheric IR window as opposed to X-H stretches, which do not occur in the atmospheric window. It is concluded that molecules possessing several F atoms will always have a large radiative forcing parameter in the calculation of their global warming potential. Some of the implications for global warming and climate change and a new design strategy for more environmentally friendly industrial materials from a molecular quantum chemistry perspective will be discussed.

  6. The Dark Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfire, Mark G; McKee, Christopher F

    2010-01-01

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H_2 mass. However, a significant H_2 mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas phase carbon resides in C or C+. Here, H_2 self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, where as CO is photodissociated. This H_2 gas is "dark" in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H_2 emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K < T < 100 K typical of this molecular component. This component has been indirectly observed through other tracers of mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component ...

  7. FIR line profiles as probes of warm gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the shapes, velocities, and intensities of FIR lines all help to probe the dynamics, physical associations, and excitation conditions of warm gas in molecular clouds. With this in mind, we have observed the J=9-8, 12-11,14-13, and 16-15 lines of (12)CO and the 158 micron line of C II in a number of positions in 4 selected clouds. The data were obtained with a laser heterodyne spectrometer aboard NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Line measurements at 0.6 km/s resolution allow us to resolve the profiles completely, and thereby to distinguish between UV-and shock-heating mechanisms for the high-excitation gas. For CO, the high-J linewidths lie in the range of 4-20 km/s (FWHM), similar to those observed for low-J (J less than 4) transitions in these sources. This correspondence suggests that the hotter gas (T = 200-600 K) is dynamically linked to the quiescent gas component, perhaps by association with the UV-heated peripheries of the numerous cloud clumps. Much of the C II emission is thought to emanate from these cloud peripheries, but the line profiles generally do not match those seen in CO. None of the observed sources show any evidence in high-J (12)CO emission for shock-excitation (i.e., linewidths greater than 30 km/s).

  8. Measuring Dark Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Heiles, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well known that a substantial fraction of Galactic molecular gas cannot be traced by CO emission. The thus dubbed CO dark molecular gas (DMG) occupy a large volume of ISM with intermediate extinction, where CO is either not self-shielded and/or subthermally excited. We explore the utilities of simple hydrides, such OH, CH, etc., in tracing DMG. We mapped and modeled the transition zone cross a cloud boundary and derived emperical OH abundance and DMG distribution formulae. We also obtained absorption measurements of various species using Arecibo, VLA, ATCA, and ALMA. The absorption technique has the potential to provide systematic quantification of DMG in the next few years.

  9. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various methods exist to calculate global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHG) as measures of net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agroecosystems. Little is, however, known about net GWP and GHGI that account for all sources and sinks of GHG emissions. Sources of GHG include...

  10. Mapping warm molecular hydrogen with Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Photometric maps, obtained with Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), can provide a valuable probe of warm molecular hydrogen within the interstellar medium. IRAC maps of the supernova remnant IC443, extracted from the Spitzer archive, are strikingly similar to spectral line maps of the H2 pure rotational transitions that we obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer. IRS spectroscopy indicates that IRAC Bands 3 and 4 are indeed dominated by the H2 v=0-0 S(5) and S(7) transitions, respectively. Modeling of the H2 excitation suggests that Bands 1 and 2 are dominated by H2 v=1-0 O(5) and v=0-0 S(9). Large maps of the H2 emission in IC433, obtained with IRAC, show band ratios that are inconsistent with the presence of gas at a single temperature. The relative strengths of IRAC Bands 2, 3, and 4 are consistent with pure H2 emission from shocked material with a power-law distribution of gas temperatures. CO vibrational emissions do not contribute significantly to the observed Band 2 inte...

  11. Identifying the Molecular Origin of Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the physical characteristics of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to assess which properties are most important in determining the efficiency of a GHG. Chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), nitrogen fluorides, and various other known atmospheric trace molecules have been included in this study. Compounds containing the halogens F or Cl have in common very polar X-F or X-Cl bonds, particularly the X-F bonds. It is shown that as more F atoms bond to the same central atom, the bond dipoles become larger as a result of the central atom becoming more positive. This leads to a linear increase in the total or integrated XF bond dipole derivatives for the molecule, which leads to a non-linear (quadratic) increase in infrared (IR) intensity. Moreover, virtually all of the X-F bond stretches occur in the atmospheric IR window as opposed to X-H stretches, which do not occur in the atmospheric window. It is concluded that molecules possessing several F atoms will always have a large radiative forcing parameter in the calculation of their global warming potential. Some of the implications for global warming and climate change are discussed.

  12. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel;

    2014-01-01

    by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented...

  13. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  14. Replacing coal with natural gas would reduce warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-08-01

    A debate has raged in the past couple of years as to whether natural gas is better or worse overall than coal and oil from a global warming perspective. The back-and-forth findings have been due to the timelines taken into consideration, the details of natural gas extraction, and the electricity-generating efficiency of various fuels. An analysis by Cathles, which focuses exclusively on potential warming and ignores secondary considerations, such as economic, political, or other environmental concerns, finds that natural gas is better for electricity generation than coal and oil under all realistic circumstances. To come to this conclusion, the author considered three different future fuel consumption scenarios: (1) a business-as-usual case, which sees energy generation capacity continue at its current pace with its current energy mix until the middle of the century, at which point the implementation of low-carbon energy sources dominates and fossil fuel-derived energy production declines; (2) a gas substitution scenario, where natural gas replaces all coal power production and any new oil-powered facilities, with the same midcentury shift; and (3) a low-carbon scenario, where all electricity generation is immediately and aggressively switched to non-fossil fuel sources such as solar, wind, and nuclear.

  15. Dynamics of warm Chaplygin gas inflationary models with quartic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Butt, Sadaf [Lahore Leads University, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Kinnaird College for Women, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2016-05-15

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas, the modified Chaplygin gas, and the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas are being studied. The dissipative coefficient of the form Γ ∝ T, and the weak and the strong dissipative regimes are being considered. We use the quartic potential, (λ{sub *}φ{sup 4})/(4), which is ruled out by current data in cold inflation but in our models by analysis it is seen to be in agreement with the WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. In these scenarios, the power spectrum, the spectral index, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio are being examined in the slow-roll approximation. We show the dependence of the tensor-scalar ratio r on the spectral index n{sub s} and observe that the range of the tensor-scalar ratio is r < 0.05 in the generalized Chaplygin gas, r < 0.15 in the modified Chaplygin gas, and r < 0.12 in the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas models. Our results are in agreement with recent observational data like WMAP9 and the latest Planck data. (orig.)

  16. Enhanced greenhouse gas emissions from the Arctic with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E.; Marushchak, Maija E.; Lind, Saara E.; Novakovskiy, Alexander; Aurela, Mika; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Temperatures in the Arctic are projected to increase more rapidly than in lower latitudes. With temperature being a key factor for regulating biogeochemical processes in ecosystems, even a subtle temperature increase might promote the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. Usually, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the GHGs dominating the climatic impact of tundra. However, bare, patterned ground features in the Arctic have recently been identified as hot spots for nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O is a potent greenhouse gas, which is almost 300 times more effective in its global warming potential than CO2; but studies on arctic N2O fluxes are rare. In this study we examined the impact of temperature increase on the seasonal GHG balance of all three important GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from three tundra surface types (vegetated peat soils, unvegetated peat soils, upland mineral soils) in the Russian Arctic (67˚ 03' N 62˚ 55' E), during the course of two growing seasons. We deployed open-top chambers (OTCs), inducing air and soil surface warming, thus mimicking predicted warming scenarios. We combined detailed CO2, CH4 and N2O flux studies with concentration measurements of these gases within the soil profile down to the active layer-permafrost interface, and complemented these GHG measurements with detailed soil nutrient (nitrate and ammonium) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements in the soil pore water profile. In our study, gentle air warming (˜1.0 ˚ C) increased the seasonal GHG release of all dominant surface types: the GHG budget of vegetated peat and mineral soils, which together cover more than 80 % of the land area in our study region, shifted from a sink to a source of -300 to 144 g CO2-eq m-2 and from -198 to 105 g CO2-eq m-2, respectively. While the positive warming response was governed by CO2, we provide here the first in situ evidence that warming increases arctic N2O emissions: Warming did not only enhance N2O emissions from

  17. High excitation rovibrational molecular analysis in warm environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ferland, Gary J.

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by advances in infrared observation (e.g., Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA), we investigate rovibrational emission CO and SiO in warm astrophysical environments. With recent innovation in collisional rate coefficients and rescaling methods, we are able to construct more comprehensive collisional data with high rovibrational states (vibration up to v=5 and rotation up to J=40) and multiple colliders (H2, H and He). These comprehensive data sets are used in spectral simulations with the radiative transfer codes RADEX and Cloudy. We obtained line ratio diagnostic plots and line spectra for both near- and far-infrared emission lines over a broad range of density and temperature for the case of a uniform medium. Considering the importance of both molecules in probing conditions and activities of UV-irradiated interstellar gas, we model rovibrational emission in photodissociation region (PDR) and AGB star envelopes (such as VY Canis Majoris, IK Tau and IRC +10216) with Cloudy. Rotational diagrams, energy distribution diagrams, and spectra are produced to examine relative state abundances, line emission intensity, and other properties. With these diverse models, we expect to have a better understanding of PDRs and expand our scope in the chemical architecture and evolution of AGB stars and other UV-irradiated regions. The soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will provide high resolution observations at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths, which opens a new window to study molecular vibrational emission calling for more detailed chemical modeling and comprehensive laboratory astrophysics data on more molecules. This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNX12AF42G and NNX15AI61G. We thank Benhui Yang, Kyle Walker, Robert Forrey, and N. Balakrishnan for collaborating on the collisional data adopted in the current work.

  18. Warm Molecular Hydrogen in the Galactic Wind of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S; Swaters, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a complex of extraplanar warm H_2 knots and filaments extending more than ~3 kpc above and below the galactic plane of M82, roughly coincident with the well-known galactic wind in this system. Comparisons of these data with published results at other wavelengths provide quantitative constraints on the topology, excitation, heating, and stability against disruption of the wind-entrained molecular ISM in this prototypical galactic wind. Deep H_2 2.12 um observations such as these represent a promising new method to study the elusive but potentially important molecular component of galactic winds.

  19. Warming effects on greenhouse gas fluxes in peatlands are modulated by vegetation composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Ostle, Nicholas J; Oakley, Simon; Quirk, Helen; Henrys, Peter A; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the effects of warming on greenhouse gas feedbacks to climate change represents a major global challenge. Most research has focused on direct effects of warming, without considering how concurrent changes in plant communities may alter such effects. Here, we combined vegetation manipulations with warming to investigate their interactive effects on greenhouse gas emissions from peatland. We found that although warming consistently increased respiration, the effect on net ecosystem CO2 exchange depended on vegetation composition. The greatest increase in CO2 sink strength after warming was when shrubs were present, and the greatest decrease when graminoids were present. CH4 was more strongly controlled by vegetation composition than by warming, with largest emissions from graminoid communities. Our results show that plant community composition is a significant modulator of greenhouse gas emissions and their response to warming, and suggest that vegetation change could alter peatland carbon sink strength under future climate change.

  20. Molecular Gas at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, P M

    2005-01-01

    The Early Universe Molecular Emission Line Galaxies (EMGs) are a population of galaxies with only 36 examples that hold great promise for the study of galaxy formation and evolution at high redshift. The classification, luminosity of molecular line emission, molecular mass, far-infrared (FIR) luminosity, star formation efficiency, morphology, and dynamical mass of the currently known sample are presented and discussed. The star formation rates derived from the FIR luminosity range from about 300 to 5000 M(sun)per year and the molecular mass from 4 x 10^9 to 1 x 10^{11} M(sun). At the lower end, these star formation rates, gas masses, and diameters are similar to those of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and represent starbursts in centrally concentrated disks, sometimes, but not always, associated with active galactic nuclei. The evidence for large (> 5 kpc) molecular disks is limited. Morphology and several high angular resolution images suggest that some EMGs are mergers with a massive molecular inter...

  1. Detection of warm molecular hydrogen in the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star HD97048

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Zaidi, C; Pantin, E; Habart, E

    2007-01-01

    We present high resolution spectroscopic mid-infrared observations of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star HD97048 with the VLT Imager and Spectrometer for the mid-InfraRed (VISIR). We detect the S(1) pure rotational line of molecular hydrogen (H2) at 17.035 microns arising from the disk around the star. This detection reinforces the claim that HD97048 is a young object surrounded by a flared disk at an early stage of evolution. The emitting warm gas is located within the inner 35 AU of the disk. The line-to-continuum flux ratio is much higher than expected from models of disks at local thermodynamics equilibrium. We investigate the possible physical conditions, such as a gas-to-dust mass ratio higher than 100 and different excitation mechanisms of molecular hydrogen (X-ray heating, shocks, ...) in order to explain the detection. We tentatively estimate the mass of warm gas to be in the range from 0.01 to nearly 1 Jupiter Mass. Further observations are needed to better constrain the excitation mec...

  2. Molecular cloud formation as seen in synthetic Hi and molecular gas observations

    CERN Document Server

    Heiner, Jonathan S; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We present synthetic Hi and CO observations of a simulation of decaying turbulence in the thermally bistable neutral medium. We first present the simulation, with clouds initially consisting of clustered clumps. Self-gravity causes these clump clusters to form more homogeneous dense clouds. We apply a simple radiative transfer algorithm, and defining every cell with > 1 as molecular. We then produce maps of Hi, CO-free molecular gas, and CO, and investigate the following aspects: i) The spatial distribution of the warm, cold, and molecular gas, finding the well-known layered structure, with molecular gas surrounded by cold Hi, surrounded by warm Hi. ii) The velocity of the various components, with atomic gas generally flowing towards the molecular gas, and that this motion is reflected in the frequently observed bimodal shape of the Hi profiles. This conclusion is tentative, because we do not include feedback. iii) The production of Hi self-absorption (HISA) profiles, and the correlation of HISA with molecul...

  3. Multi-wavelength Study of Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Rice, Johnathan; Flagey, Nicolas; Ritchey, Adam M.; Welty, Daniel E.; Goldsmith, Paul; Langer, William; Pineda, Jorge L.; Lambert, David L.; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2017-06-01

    Diffuse atomic and molecular gas is revealed through a combination of absorption lines against background targets and emission. We describe a project that combines results on ultraviolet (UV) and visible absorption with those obtained from the Herschel key program GOTC+ (Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+) to develop a comprehensive picture of neutral diffuse gas in the Galaxy. [C II], H I, and CO emission acquired for the GOTC+ survey reveal the presence of warm neutral atomic gas, cold neutral atomic gas, CO-dark H2 gas (molecular gas not seen in CO emission), and denser molecular gas in different kinematic components. We derive the component structure (number of clouds and their column densities) seen in absorption at visible wavelengths from Ca II, Ca I, K I, CH, CH+, and CN and compare that to the emission from [C II], H I, and CO and its isotopologues. Absorption lines from additional atoms (including C I, O I, and Ni II) and molecules (CO) from UV spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope are used to expand the kinematic correspondences. Preliminary results on physical conditions (gas temperature and density) inferred from analyses of CN chemistry and excitation of neutral and singly-ionized carbon, neutral oxygen, and CO are also presented.

  4. A Warm Molecular Hydrogen Tail Due to Ram Pressure Stripping of a Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, George H

    2009-01-01

    We have discovered a remarkable warm (140 - 160 K) molecular hydrogen tail with a mass of approximately 2.5*10^7 M_sun extending 20 kpc from a cluster spiral galaxy, ESO 137-001, in Abell 3627. Some portion of this gas is lost permanently to the intracluster medium, as the tail extends beyond the tidal radius of the galaxy. We also detect a hot (580 - 680 K) component in the tail that is approximately 1% of the mass of the warm component. This discovery is direct evidence that the galaxy is currently undergoing ram-pressure stripping, as also indicated by its X-ray and H\\alpha tail found by other studies. We estimate the galaxy is losing its interstellar gas at a rate of at least ~ 1 - 2 M_sun yr^-1. If the galaxy persists to lose mass at this estimated rate, it will exhaust its gas reservoir in a single pass through the cluster core, which will take approximately 0.5 - 1 Gyr. The results produced from the modeling of the ram-pressure stripping timescale are consistent with our upper limit and suggest that th...

  5. Modeling deuterium fractionation in cold and warm molecular environments with large chemical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Albertsson, T; Henning, Th

    2013-01-01

    Observations of deuterated species have long proven essential to probe properties and thermal history of various astrophysical environments. We present an elaborated chemical model that includes tens of thousands of reactions with multi-deuterated species, both gas-phase and surface, in which the most recent information on deuterium chemistry is implemented. A detailed study of the chemical evolution under wide range of temperatures and densities typical of cold molecular cores, warm protostellar envelopes, and hot cores/corinos is performed. We consider two cases of initial abundances, with 1) mainly atomic composition and all deuterium locked in HD, and 2) molecular abundances accumulated at 1 Myr of the evolution of a cold prestellar core. We indicate deuterated species that are particularly sensitive to temperature gradients and initial chemical composition. Many multiply-deuterated species produced at 10 K by exothermic ion-molecule chemistry retain large abundances even when temperature rises above 100 ...

  6. Warm neutral halos around molecular clouds. VI - Physical and chemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Wannier, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    A combined physical and chemical modeling of the halos around molecular clouds is presented, with special emphasis on the H-to-H2 transition. On the basis of H I 21 cm observations, it is shown that the halos are extended. A physical model is employed in conjunction with a chemistry code to provide a self-consistent description of the gas. The radiative transfer code provides a check with H I, CO, and OH observations. It is concluded that the warm neutral halos are not gravitationally bound to the underlying molecular clouds and are isobaric. It is inferred from the observed extent of the H I envelopes and the large observed abundance of OH in them that the generally accepted rate for H2 information on grains is too large by a factor of two to three.

  7. XMM-Newton discovery of O VII emission from warm gas in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Tamura, T; Paerels, F B S; Den Herder, J W A

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton recently discovered O VII line emission from ~2 million K gas near the outer parts of several clusters of galaxies. This emission is attributed to the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. The original sample of clusters studied for this purpose has been extended and two more clusters with a soft X-ray excess have been found. We discuss the physical properties of the warm gas, in particular the density, spatial extent, abundances and temperature.

  8. Equation of state and transport properties of warm dense helium via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Qi-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2016-05-01

    The equation of state, self-diffusion, and viscosity coefficients of helium have been investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the warm dense matter regime. Our simulations are validated through the comparison with the reliable experimental data. The calculated principal and reshock Hugoniots of liquid helium are in good agreement with the gas-gun data. On this basis, we revisit the issue for helium, i.e., the possibility of the instabilities predicted by chemical models at around 2000 GPa and 10 g/cm3 along the pressure isotherms of 6309, 15 849, and 31 623 K. Our calculations show no indications of instability in this pressure-temperature region, which reconfirm the predictions of previous QMD simulations. The self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of warm dense helium have been systematically investigated by the QMD simulations. We carefully test the finite-size effects and convergences of statistics, and obtain numerically converged self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients by using the Kubo-Green formulas. The present results have been used to evaluate the existing one component plasma models. Finally, the validation of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for helium in the warm dense regime is discussed.

  9. Seepage from an arctic shallow marine gas hydrate reservoir is insensitive to momentary ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Torres, Marta E.; Carroll, Jolynn; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Yao, Haoyi; Serov, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Arctic gas hydrate reservoirs located in shallow water and proximal to the sediment-water interface are thought to be sensitive to bottom water warming that may trigger gas hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. Here, we evaluate bottom water temperature as a potential driver for hydrate dissociation and methane release from a recently discovered, gas-hydrate-bearing system south of Spitsbergen (Storfjordrenna, ~380 m water depth). Modelling of the non-steady-state porewater profiles and observations of distinct layers of methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules in the sediments indicate centurial to millennial methane emissions in the region. Results of temperature modelling suggest limited impact of short-term warming on gas hydrates deeper than a few metres in the sediments. We conclude that the ongoing and past methane emission episodes at the investigated sites are likely due to the episodic ventilation of deep reservoirs rather than warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in this shallow water seep site.

  10. Wave packet molecular dynamics simulations of warm dense hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Knaup, M; Toepffer, C; Zwicknagel, G

    2003-01-01

    Recent shock-wave experiments with deuterium in a regime where a plasma phase-transition has been predicted and their theoretical interpretation are the matter of a controversial discussion. In this paper, we apply 'wave packet molecular dynamics' (WPMD) simulations to investigate warm dense hydrogen. The WPMD method was originally used by Heller for a description of the scattering of composite particles such as simple atoms and molecules; later it was applied to Coulomb systems by Klakow et al. In the present version of our model the protons are treated as classical point-particles, whereas the electrons are represented by a completely anti-symmetrized Slater sum of periodic Gaussian wave packets. We present recent results for the equation of state of hydrogen at constant temperature T = 300 K and of deuterium at constant Hugoniot E - E sub 0 + 1/2(1/n - 1/n sub 0)(p + p sub 0) = 0, and compare them with the experiments and several theoretical approaches.

  11. Parameters of Warm Molecular Clouds from Methyl Acetylene Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Alakoz, A V; Promislov, V G; Johansson, L E B; Winnberg, A

    2002-01-01

    The results of a survey of 63 galactic star-forming regions in the 6_K-5_K and 5_K-4_K methyl acetylene lines at 102 and 85 GHz, respectively, are presented. Fourty-three sources were detected at 102 GHz, and twenty-five at 85 GHz. Emission was detected towards molecular clouds with kinetic temperatures 20-60 K (so-called ``warm clouds''). The CH3CCH abundances in these clouds appeared to be about several units X 10^(-9). Five mapped sources were analyzed using the maximum entropy method. The sizes of the mapped clouds fall within the range between 0.1 and 1.7 pc, virial masses - between 90-6200 Msun, and densities - between 6 X 10^4 and 6 X 10^5 cm^(-3). The CH3CCH sources spatially coincide with the CO and CS sources. Chemical evolution simulations showed that the typical methyl acetylene abundance in the observed clouds corresponds to an age of ~ 6 X 10^4 years.

  12. Is molecular gas necessary for star formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O

    2011-01-01

    On galactic scales, the surface density of star formation appears to be well correlated with the surface density of molecular gas. This has lead many authors to suggest that there exists a causal relationship between the chemical state of the gas and its ability to form stars -- in other words, the assumption that the gas must be molecular before star formation can occur. We test this hypothesis by modelling star formation within a dense cloud of gas with properties similar to a small molecular cloud using a series of different models of the chemistry, ranging from one in which the formation of molecules is not followed and the gas is assumed to remain atomic throughout, to one that tracks the formation of both H2 and CO. We find that presence of molecules in the gas has little effect on the ability of the gas to form stars: star formation can occur just as easily in atomic gas as in molecular gas. At low densities (< 10^4 cm^-3), the gas is able to cool via C+ fine-structure emission almost as efficiently...

  13. Overestimating climate warming-induced methane gas escape from the seafloor by neglecting multiphase flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranne, C.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    Continental margins host large quantities of methane stored partly as hydrates in sediments. Release of methane through hydrate dissociation is implicated as a possible feedback mechanism to climate change. Large-scale estimates of future warming-induced methane release are commonly based on a hydrate stability approach that omits dynamic processes. Here we use the multiphase flow model TOUGH + hydrate (T + H) to quantitatively investigate how dynamic processes affect dissociation rates and methane release. The simulations involve shallow, 20-100 m thick hydrate deposits, forced by a bottom water temperature increase of 0.03°C yr-1 over 100 years. We show that on a centennial time scale, the hydrate stability approach can overestimate gas escape quantities by orders of magnitude. Our results indicate a time lag of > 40 years between the onset of warming and gas escape, meaning that recent climate warming may soon be manifested as widespread gas seepages along the world's continental margins.

  14. Offsetting global warming-induced elevated greenhouse gas emissions from an arable soil by biochar application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2017-08-17

    Global warming will likely enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. Due to its slow decomposability, biochar is widely recognized as effective in long-term soil carbon (C) sequestration and in mitigation of soil GHG emissions. In a long-term soil warming experiment (+2.5 °C, since July 2008) we studied the effect of applying high-temperature Miscanthus biochar (0, 30 t/ha, since August 2013) on GHG emissions and their global warming potential (GWP) during 2 years in a temperate agroecosystem. Crop growth, physical and chemical soil properties, temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Rs ), and metabolic quotient (qCO2 ) were investigated to yield further information about single effects of soil warming and biochar as well as on their interactions. Soil warming increased total CO2 emissions by 28% over 2 years. The effect of warming on soil respiration did not level off as has often been observed in less intensively managed ecosystems. However, the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was not affected by warming. Overall, biochar had no effect on most of the measured parameters, suggesting its high degradation stability and its low influence on microbial C cycling even under elevated soil temperatures. In contrast, biochar × warming interactions led to higher total N2 O emissions, possibly due to accelerated N-cycling at elevated soil temperature and to biochar-induced changes in soil properties and environmental conditions. Methane uptake was not affected by soil warming or biochar. The incorporation of biochar-C into soil was estimated to offset warming-induced elevated GHG emissions for 25 years. Our results highlight the suitability of biochar for C sequestration in cultivated temperate agricultural soil under a future elevated temperature. However, the increased N2 O emissions under warming limit the GHG mitigation potential of biochar. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed,which can overcome the deficiency of single production method.Based on the combination production method,the physical and mathematical models are developed to simulate the hydrate dissociation.The mathematical model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production.The mechanism of gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is revealed by the numerical simulation.The evolutions of such physical variables as pressure,temperature,saturations and gas and water rates are analyzed.Numerical results show that under certain conditions the combination method has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single producing method.

  16. Tracing Ram-Pressure Stripping with Warm Molecular Hydrogen Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, George H

    2014-01-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of on-going ram-pressure stripping. H$_2$ emission is detected in all four; two show extraplanar H$_2$ emission. The emission usually has a warm (T $\\sim$ $115 - 160$K) and a hot (T $\\sim$ 400 $-$ 600K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically $10^{19} - 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ with masses of $10^6 - 10^8 M_\\odot$. The warm H$_2$ is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H$_2$ is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H$_2$ tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H$_2$ within these galaxies is shock-heated from th...

  17. Molecular Gas in the Bulge and Ring of NGC 7331

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, F P

    1999-01-01

    Maps of the J=2-1 12CO emission from the SbII galaxy NGC 7331 show a low-contrast ring at a radius of about 3.5 kpc. There is no evidence for a pronounced central hole in the CO distribution as claimed by others. The molecular ring is just outside the radius of peak emission from warm dust, but coincides with the peak of colder dust emission. Various 12CO and 13CO transitions have been observed from three positions including the center, which was also observed in the 492 GHz transition. The line measurements have been modelled by emission from a clumpy mixture of low-density molecular gas at about T(kin) = 10 K and high-density molecular gas at temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. The CO to H2 conversion factor in NGC 7331 is lower than that in the Milky Way, and lowest in the center of NGC 7331. The total interstellar gas mass is dominated by molecular hydrogen in the bulge and in the ring, and by atomic hydrogen outside the ring. Total hydrogen mass densities in the ring are about twice those in the bulge. Total ...

  18. WARM GAS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER. I. DISTRIBUTION OF Ly{alpha} ABSORBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Thom, Christopher [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21211 (United States); Chen, Hsiao-Wen, E-mail: jhyoon@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T = 10{sup 4-5} K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Ly{alpha} absorbers (N{sub HI} = 10{sup 13.1-15.4} cm{sup -2}) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.36-1.65 Mpc (0.23-1.05 R{sub vir}). Including 18 Ly{alpha} absorbers previously detected by STIS or GHRS toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers toward a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Ly{alpha} absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find (1) warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray-detected hot intracluster medium (ICM). Also, Ly{alpha} absorption strength increases with cluster impact parameter. (2) Ly{alpha}-absorbing warm gas traces cold H I-emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. (3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the warm gas covering fraction (100% for N{sub HI} > 10{sup 13.1} cm{sup -2}) is in agreement with cosmological simulations. We speculate that the observed warm gas is part of large-scale gas flows feeding the cluster both in the ICM and galaxies.

  19. Molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ocana-Flaquer, B; Lim, L; Dinh-V-Trung,; Combes, F

    2009-01-01

    Powerful radio-AGN are normally hosted by massive elliptical galaxies which are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless the gas is needed in the very center to feed the nuclear activity. Thus it is important to study the origin, the distribution and the kinematics of the molecular gas in such objects. We have performed at the IRAM-30m telescope a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission in the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio-continuum fluxes. The main result of this survey is the very low content in molecular gas of such galaxies compared to FIR selected galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass, taking into account the upper limits, is 1x10^8 Msun; if we calculate it for all the galaxies together, and if we separate them into FR-I and FR-II type galaxies, an important difference is found between them. Moreover, the CO spectra indicates the presence of a central molecular gas disk in these radio galaxies. Our results contrast ...

  20. Tracing ram-pressure stripping with warm molecular hydrogen emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivanandam, Suresh [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Rm 101, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H., E-mail: sivanandam@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H{sub 2} emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H{sub 2} emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ∼ 115-160 K) and a hot (T ∼ 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} with masses of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The warm H{sub 2} is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H{sub 2} is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H{sub 2} tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H{sub 2} within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 μm is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The Hα and 24 μm luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  1. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available about management practice effects on the net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) under dryland cropping systems. We evaluated the effects of cropping sequences (conventional-tillage malt barley [Hordeum vulgaris L.]–fallow [CTB-F], no-ti...

  2. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  3. Warming-Induced Changes to the Molecular Composition of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Simpson, M. J.; Simpson, A. J.; Wilson, K. P.; Williams, D.

    2007-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) contains two times more carbon than the atmosphere and the potential changes to SOM quantity and quality with global warming are a major concern. It is commonly believed that global warming will accelerate the decomposition of labile SOM compounds while refractory SOM constituents will remain stable. However, experimental evidence of molecular-level changes to SOM composition with global warming is currently lacking. Here we employ SOM biomarkers and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study SOM composition and degradation in a soil warming experiment in southern Ontario, Canada. The soil warming experiment consisted of a control and a treatment plot in a mixed forest that had a temperature difference of about 5 degrees C for 14 months. Before soil warming the control and treatment plots had the same organic carbon (OC) content and SOM composition. Soil warming significantly increased soil OC content and the abundance of cutin-derived carbon originating from leaf tissues and decreased carbohydrates that are regarded as easily degradable. Lignin components, which are believed to be part of the stable and slowly-cycling SOM, were observed to be in an advanced stage of degradation. This observation is corroborated by increases in fungal biomass in the warmed soil because fungi are considered the primary decomposer of lignin in the soil environment. An NMR study of SOM in the warmed and control plots indicates that alkyl carbon, mainly originating from plant cuticles in the soil, increased in the warmed soil while O-alkyl carbon, primarily occurring in carbohydrates, decreased. Aromatic and phenolic carbon regions, which include the main structures found in lignin, decreased in the warmed soil. These data collectively suggest that there is a great potential for lignin degradation with soil warming, and that the refractory (aromatic) soil carbon storage may be reduced as a result of increased fungal growth in a warmer climate.

  4. Kiloparsec-scale molecular gas excitation in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. F.; Jaffe, D. T.; Bash, F. N.; Israel, F. P.; Maloney, P. R.; Baas, F.

    1993-09-01

    We combine beam-matched (C-13)O, (C-12)O J = 3 - 2 and J = 2 - 1 line data to infer the molecular gas excitation conditions in the central 500 to 1600 pc diameters of a small sample of IR-bright external galaxies: NGC 253, IC 342, M83, Maffei 2, and NGC 6946. We find that the central 170 to 530 pc diameter regions have typical molecular gas densities ranging from approximately less than 10,000/cu cm (in M83) to approximately greater than 100,000/cu cm (in NGC 253) and that, outside of these regions, the densities are likely to be approximately less than 10,000/cu cm. The molecular clouds outside the inner 170-530 pc are at least as warm as the molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Column densities derived from integrated (C-13)O line strengths and H-alpha surface brightnesses suggest that the star formation rate is enhanced in the central 170-530 pc diameters by an order of magnitude over that inferred for the outer star-forming disks in spiral galaxies.

  5. Warm Gas in and Around Simulated Galaxy Clusters as Probed by Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Emerick, Andrew; Putman, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding gas flows into and out of the most massive dark matter structures in our Universe, galaxy clusters, is fundamental to understanding their evolution. Gas in clusters is well studied in the hot ($>$ 10$^{6}$ K) and cold ($<$ 10$^{4}$ K) regimes, but the warm gas component (10$^{4}$ - 10$^{6}$ K) is poorly constrained. It is challenging to observe directly, but can be probed through Ly$\\alpha$ absorption studies. We produce the first systematic study of the warm gas content of galaxy clusters through synthetic Ly$\\alpha$ absorption studies using cosmological simulations of two galaxy clusters produced with Enzo. We explore the spatial and kinematic properties of our cluster absorbers, and show that the majority of the identified absorbers are due to fast moving gas associated with cluster infall from IGM filaments. Towards the center of the clusters, however, the warm IGM filaments are no longer dominant and the absorbers tend to have higher column densities and metallicities, representing strip...

  6. Cold and Warm Atomic Gas around the Perseus Molecular Cloud. II. The Impact of High Optical Depth on the HI Column Density Distribution and Its Implication for the HI-to-H2 Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Min-Young; Murray, Claire E; Heiles, Carl; Miller, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of high optical depth on the HI surface density (Sigma_HI) saturation observed in the Perseus molecular cloud. We use Arecibo HI emission and absorption measurements obtained toward 26 radio continuum sources to derive the spin temperature and optical depth of individual HI components along each line of sight. The derived properties are used to estimate the correction for high optical depth. We examine two different methods for the correction, Gaussian decomposition and isothermal approximation methods, and find that they are consistent as having the maximum correction factor of ~1.2 likely due to the relatively low optical depth and insignificant contribution from the diffuse radio continuum emission for Perseus. We apply the correction to the HI column density image derived in the optically thin approximation on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and find that the total HI mass increases by only ~10%. Using the corrected HI column density image and far-infrared data from the Improved Reproces...

  7. Warm intermediate inflationary Universe model in the presence of a generalized Chaplygin gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Videla, Nelson [Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, FCFM, Santiago (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-01-15

    A warm intermediate inflationary model in the context of generalized Chaplygin gas is investigated. We study this model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes, considering a generalized form of the dissipative coefficient Γ = Γ(T,φ), and we describe the inflationary dynamics in the slow-roll approximation. We find constraints on the parameters in our model considering the Planck 2015 data, together with the condition for warm inflation T > H, and the conditions for the weak and strong dissipative regimes. (orig.)

  8. Origin of CH+ in diffuse molecular clouds. Warm H2 and ion-neutral drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Godard, Benjamin; Hennebelle, Patrick; Gerin, Maryvonne; Lesaffre, Pierre; Le Bourlot, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Context. Molecular clouds are known to be magnetised and to display a turbulent and complex structure where warm and cold phases are interwoven. The turbulent motions within molecular clouds transport molecules, and the presence of magnetic fields induces a relative velocity between neutrals and ions known as the ion-neutral drift (vd). These effects all together can influence the chemical evolution of the clouds. Aims: This paper assesses the roles of two physical phenomena which have previously been invoked to boost the production of CH+ under realistic physical conditions: the presence of warm H2 and the increased formation rate due to the ion-neutral drift. Methods: We performed ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations that include the heating and cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM), and where we treat dynamically the formation of the H2 molecule. In a post-processing step we compute the abundances of species at chemical equilibrium using a solver that we developed. The solver uses the physical conditions of the gas as input parameters, and can also prescribe the H2 fraction if needed. We validate our approach by showing that the H2 molecule generally has a much longer chemical evolution timescale compared to the other species. Results: We show that CH+ is efficiently formed at the edge of clumps, in regions where the H2 fraction is low (0.3-30%) but nevertheless higher than its equilibrium value, and where the gas temperature is high (≳ 300 K). We show that warm and out of equilibrium H2 increases the integrated column densities of CH+ by one order of magnitude up to values still 3-10 times lower than those observed in the diffuse ISM. We balance the Lorentz force with the ion-neutral drag to estimate the ion-drift velocities from our ideal MHD simulations. We find that the ion-neutral drift velocity distribution peaks around 0.04 km s-1, and that high drift velocities are too rare to have a significant statistical impact on the

  9. Warm Gas in the Virgo Cluster: I. Distribution of Lya Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Joo Heon; Thom, Christopher; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Bryan, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The first systematic study of the warm gas (T=10^4-5 K) distribution across a galaxy cluster is presented using multiple background QSOs to the Virgo Cluster. We detect 25 Lya absorbers (N_HI = 10^13.1-15.4 cm^-2) in the Virgo velocity range toward 9 of 12 QSO sightlines observed with COS, with a cluster impact parameter range of 0.25-1.15 Mpc (0.23-1.05Rvir). Including 18 previously STIS or GHRS detected Lya absorbers toward 7 of 11 background QSOs in and around the Virgo Cluster, we establish a sample of 43 absorbers towards a total of 23 background probes for studying the incidence of Lya absorbers in and around the Virgo Cluster. With these absorbers, we find: 1) Warm gas is predominantly in the outskirts of the cluster and avoids the X-ray detected hot ICM. Also, Lya absorption strength increases with a cluster impact parameter. 2) Lya absorbing warm gas traces cold HI emitting gas in the substructures of the Virgo Cluster. 3) Including the absorbers associated with the surrounding substructures, the war...

  10. Molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, S; Combes, F; Van Trung, D

    2001-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the central region of nearby 3CR radio galaxies (z$<$ 0.03). Out of 21 galaxies, 8 have been detected in, at least, one of the two CO transitions. The total molecular gas content is below 10$^9$ \\msun. Their individual CO emission exhibit, for 5 cases, a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of the galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then these galaxies must have merged a long time ago (few Gyr or more) but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last 10$^7$ years or less) become active radio galaxies. Instead, we argue the the cannibalism of g...

  11. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star forma...

  12. Increasing insolation and greenhouse gas concentration trigger Bølling-Allerød warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obase, Takashi; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2017-04-01

    During the last deglaciation, a major global warming was punctuated by several abrupt climate changes, likely related to Atlantic Meridional Overturning Curculation (AMOC) (Clark et al. 2012). Transient deglaciation experiments from the Last Glacial Maximum have been conducted by applying time-dependent insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations, and glacial meltwater forcing (Liu et al. 2009). They have showed that reduction in glacial meltwater discharge rate into North Atlantic induces abrupt recovery of AMOC, warming of Greenland and cooling of Antarctica (bipolar response) during the period of Bølling-Allerød (BA, 14.6 ka). We conduct a transient simulation from the Last Glacial Maximum to BA using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM) MIROC 4m (an IPCC-class Japanese community model). The model is initialized with the 21ka, and we change insolation, greenhouse gas concentrations and meltwater fluxes following the protocol of PMIP4 (Ivanovic et al. 2016). Glacial meltwater is derived from ice sheet reconstruction (ICE6g, Peltier et al. 2015). We assume the glacial meltwater due to ice sheet loss is uniformly applied to the area of 50-70N North Atlantic Ocean. We conduct additional experiments branched from 16 ka, where 50-80% of ICE6g meltwater fluxes are applied without reducing the meltwater fluxes before the BA. The model results show that abrupt resumption of AMOC and warming of Greenland occurred at around the period of BA even under hosing of 0.06 Sv. Transition from cold stadial mode to warm interstadial mode occurs in about 100 years, which is consistent with reconstructions (Buizert et al. 2014). The result implies that increasing summer insolation and greenhouse gas concentration trigger abrupt AMOC recovery and warming in the Northern Hemisphere, and large fluctuation of meltwater due to ice sheet melting may not be necessary.

  13. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N =1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy Fxc of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of |Δ V |/|V |,|Δ Fxc|/|F |xc˜10-3 . A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of Fxc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  14. The Link Between Warm Molecular Disks in Maser Nuclei and Star Formation Near the Black Hole at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Milosavljevic, M; Milosavljevic, Milos; Loeb, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of hundreds of young, bright stars within a parsec from the massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy presents a challenge to star formation theories. The requisite Roche densities for gravitational collapse of gas clouds are most naturally achieved in accretion disks. The water maser sources in Keplerian rotation in the nuclei of NGC4258, NGC1068, and the Circinus Galaxy indicate the presence of warm, extended, molecular accretion disks around black holes similar in mass to the Galactic black hole. We here argue that the current conditions in the maser nuclei, and those near the Galactic center, represent two consecutive, recurrent phases in the life cycle of the nucleus of a typical gas-rich spiral bulge. The warm molecular disks that give rise to the observed maser emission fragment into stellar-size objects. The stellar masses, their orbital geometry, and the total number of stars thus formed are consistent with the values identified at the Galactic Center. The stars tend to form in com...

  15. The molecular gas mass of M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gratier, P; Schuster, K; Rosolowsky, E; Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Combes, F; Kramer, C; Henkel, C; Herpin, F; Israel., F; Koribalski, B S; Mookerjea, B; Tabatabaei, F S; Röllig, M; van der Tak, F F S; van der Werf, P; Wiedner, M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Do some environments favor efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars? To answer this, we need to be able to estimate the H2 mass. Traditionally, this is done using CO and a few assumptions but the Herschel observations in the FIR make it possible to estimate the molecular gas mass independently of CO. Previous attempts to derive gas masses from dust emission suffered from biases. Generally, dust surface densities, HI column densities, and CO intensities are used to derive a gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) and the local CO intensity to H2 column density ratio (XCO), sometimes allowing for an additional CO-dark gas component (Kdark). We tested earlier methods, revealing degeneracies among the parameters, and then used a Bayesian formalism to derive the most likely values for each of the parameters mentioned above as a function of position in the nearby low metallicity spiral galaxy M33. The data are from the IRAM 30m CO(2-1) line, high-resolution HI and Herschel dust continuum observations. Solving fo...

  16. The warming effect of the flare of natural gas on soil biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevdokimov, Ilya; Yusupov, Irek; Shavnin, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Simulation of global warming is one of the key issues of international efforts to study climatic changes. A number of manipulation experiments with soil warming have been established throughout the world in the last decades. We used warming with natural gas flare near the pine forest as a kind of manipulation experiment to assess the synergistic effect of drying and warming on plant-soil-microbial interactions. The experimental area is situated in a pine forest subzone of the forest zone of the Western Siberia near Pokachi, Yugra (61o73'N, 75o49'E). The experimental plots were established in a young Scotch pine forest on sandy podzolic soil at three distances of 70, 90 and 130 m from the flare of natural gas, with trees exposed to strong (S) moderate (M), and weak (W) impact, respectively. Increase of soil temperature in summer time were moderate: on average 0.7oC and 1.3oC for the plots M and S, respectively, compared to the plot W. The plot S demonstrated increase in CO2 efflux from the soil surface, mainly due to intensifying plant root respiration, by 18% compared to the plot W as well as increase in SOM content by 31%, with intensive accumulation of recalcitrant humus. By contrast, microbial biomass, labile SOM pool and basal respiration were higher in soil with weak flaring impact by 74%, 33% and 24%, respectively. Thus, three trends in plant-soil-microbe system exposed to warming and drying were revealed: i) SOM accumulation, ii) suppression of microbial activity, and iii) stimulation of root respiration. The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation and Russian Foundation for Basic Researches.

  17. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinshausen, Malte; Meinshausen, Nicolai; Hare, William; Raper, Sarah C B; Frieler, Katja; Knutti, Reto; Frame, David J; Allen, Myles R

    2009-04-30

    More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 degrees C or below (relative to pre-industrial levels) as a guiding principle for mitigation efforts to reduce climate change risks, impacts and damages. However, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions corresponding to a specified maximum warming are poorly known owing to uncertainties in the carbon cycle and the climate response. Here we provide a comprehensive probabilistic analysis aimed at quantifying GHG emission budgets for the 2000-50 period that would limit warming throughout the twenty-first century to below 2 degrees C, based on a combination of published distributions of climate system properties and observational constraints. We show that, for the chosen class of emission scenarios, both cumulative emissions up to 2050 and emission levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed 2 degrees C relative to pre-industrial temperatures. Limiting cumulative CO(2) emissions over 2000-50 to 1,000 Gt CO(2) yields a 25% probability of warming exceeding 2 degrees C-and a limit of 1,440 Gt CO(2) yields a 50% probability-given a representative estimate of the distribution of climate system properties. As known 2000-06 CO(2) emissions were approximately 234 Gt CO(2), less than half the proven economically recoverable oil, gas and coal reserves can still be emitted up to 2050 to achieve such a goal. Recent G8 Communiqués envisage halved global GHG emissions by 2050, for which we estimate a 12-45% probability of exceeding 2 degrees C-assuming 1990 as emission base year and a range of published climate sensitivity distributions. Emissions levels in 2020 are a less robust indicator, but for the scenarios considered, the probability of exceeding 2 degrees C rises to 53-87% if global GHG emissions are still more than 25% above 2000 levels in 2020.

  18. GAS ACCRETION IS DOMINATED BY WARM IONIZED GAS IN MILKY WAY MASS GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, M. Ryan; Putman, Mary E.; Bryan, Greg L.; Fernandez, Ximena; Peek, J. E. G., E-mail: moo@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We perform high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of a Milky Way mass galaxy in a fully cosmological setting using the adaptive mesh refinement code, Enzo, and study the kinematics of gas in the simulated galactic halo. We find that the gas inflow occurs mostly along filamentary structures in the halo. The warm-hot (10{sup 5} K 10{sup 6} K) ionized gases are found to dominate the overall mass accretion in the system (with M-dot = 3-5 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) over a large range of distances, extending from the virial radius to the vicinity of the disk. Most of the inflowing gas (by mass) does not cool, and the small fraction that manages to cool does so primarily close to the galaxy (R {approx}< 100 kpc, with more pronounced cooling at smaller R), perhaps comprising the neutral gas that may be detectable as, e.g., high-velocity clouds. The neutral clouds are embedded within larger, accreting filamentary flows, and represent only a small fraction of the total mass inflow rate. The inflowing gas has relatively low metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun} < 0.2). The outer layers of the filamentary inflows are heated due to compression as they approach the disk. In addition to the inflow, we find high-velocity, metal-enriched outflows of hot gas driven by supernova feedback. Our results are consistent with observations of halo gas at low z.

  19. The molecular gas mass of M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Schuster, K.; Rosolowsky, E.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Combes, F.; Kramer, C.; Henkel, C.; Herpin, F.; Israel, F.; Koribalski, B. S.; Mookerjea, B.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Röllig, M.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Werf, P.; Wiedner, M.

    2017-03-01

    Do some environments favor efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars? To answer this, we need to be able to estimate the H2 mass. Traditionally, this is done using CO observations and a few assumptions but the Herschel observations which cover the far-IR dust spectrum make it possible to estimate the molecular gas mass independently of CO and thus to investigate whether and how the CO traces H2. Previous attempts to derive gas masses from dust emission suffered from biases. Generally, dust surface densities, H i column densities, and CO intensities are used to derive a gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) and the local CO intensity to H2 column density ratio (XCO), sometimes allowing for an additional CO-dark gas component (Kdark). We tested earlier methods, revealing degeneracies among the parameters, and then used a sophisticated Bayesian formalism to derive the most likely values for each of the parameters mentioned above as a function of position in the nearby prototypical low metallicity (12 + log (O/H) 8.4) spiral galaxy M 33. The data are from the IRAM Large Program mapping in the CO(2-1) line along with high-resolution H i and Herschel dust continuum observations. Solving for GDR, XCO, and Kdark in macropixels 500 pc in size, each containing many individual measurements of the CO, H i, and dust emission, we find that (i) allowing for CO dark gas (Kdark) significantly improves fits; (ii) Kdark decreases with galactocentric distance; (iii) GDR is slightly higher than initially expected and increases with galactocentric distance; (iv) the total amount of dark gas closely follows the radially decreasing CO emission, as might be expected if the dark gas is H2 where CO is photodissociated. The total amount of H2, including dark gas, yields an average XCO of twice the galactic value of 2 × 1020 cm-2/ K km s-1, with about 55% of this traced directly through CO. The rather constant fraction of dark gas suggests that there is no large population of diffuse H2 clouds

  20. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Heather D.; Ryu, Taewoo; Donelson, Jennifer M.; van Herwerden, Lynne; Seridi, Loqmane; Ghosheh, Yanal; Berumen, Michael L.; Leggat, William; Ravasi, Timothy; Munday, Philip L.

    2015-12-01

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  1. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Veilleux, Heather D.

    2015-07-20

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  2. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  3. Ionized gas at the edge of the Central Molecular Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, W D; Pineda, J L; Velusamy, T; Requena-Torres, M A; Wiesemeyer, H

    2015-01-01

    To determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E we observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C II] 158 micron and [N II] 205 micron fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C II] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N II] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C II] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. We detect two [C II] and [N II] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at -207 km/s associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km/s outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N II] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of about 5 to 25 cm{-3} for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the warm ionized medium in the disk. The column density of the CO-dark H$_2$ layer ...

  4. Hot Molecular Gas in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Herrnstein, R M G; Herrnstein, Robeson McGary; Ho, Paul T.P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the new 23 GHz receivers at the Very Large Array (VLA), we have detected NH3(6,6) emission (nu=25.056025 GHz) from hot (>150 K) molecular clouds in the central 10 pc of the Galaxy. This is the first successful detection of NH3(6,6) with the VLA. The brightest emission comes from a region interior to the ``circumnuclear disk'' (CND), less than 1.5 pc in projected distance from Sgr A*. This region does not show molecular emission from lower energy transitions such as NH3(1,1) and (2,2), HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0). Line ratios of NH3(6,6) and (3,3) emission as well as NH3(6,6) line widths have peak values within 1.5 pc of Sgr A*, indicating that the gas is physically close to the nucleus. NH3(6,6) is also detected towards many features outside the CND observed in NH3(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3). These features tend to lie along ridges of gas associated with Sgr A East or the massive ``molecular ridge'' that connects the ``20 km/s'' and ``50 km/s'' giant molecular clouds (GMCs).

  5. Molecular gas in young debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Kóspál, Á; Apai, D; Henning, Th; Csengeri, T; Grady, C

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas, and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J=3-2 survey with Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities...

  6. Uncertainties in the attribution of greenhouse gas warming and implications for climate prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Gareth S; Mitchell, John F B

    2016-01-01

    Using optimal detection techniques with climate model simulations, most of the observed increase of near surface temperatures over the second half of the twentieth century is attributed to anthropogenic influences. However, the partitioning of the anthropogenic influence to individual factors, such as greenhouse gases and aerosols, is much less robust. Differences in how forcing factors are applied, in their radiative influence and in models' climate sensitivities, substantially influence the response patterns. We find standard optimal detection methodologies cannot fully reconcile this response diversity. By selecting a set of experiments to enable the diagnosing of greenhouse gases and the combined influence of other anthropogenic and natural factors, we find robust detections of well mixed greenhouse gases across a large ensemble of models. Of the observed warming over the 20th century of 0.65K/century we find, using a multi model mean not incorporating pattern uncertainty, a well mixed greenhouse gas warm...

  7. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  8. Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

    2008-09-30

    The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

  9. Accretion-Inhibited Star Formation in the Warm Molecular Disk of the Green-valley Elliptical Galaxy NGC 3226

    CERN Document Server

    Appleton, P N; Bitsakis, T; Lacy, M; Alatalo, K; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Duc, P -A; Lisenfeld, U; Ogle, P

    2014-01-01

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy, and Herschel photometry, of the peculiar "Green Valley" elliptical galaxy NGC~3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity AGN, forms a pair with NGC~3227, and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and HI filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16$\\mu$m reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy, and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc-long HI tail. In-situ star formation associated with the IR plume is identified from narrow-band HST imaging. The end of the IR-plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring, containing 0.7-1.1 $\\times$ 10$^7$ M$_{\\odot}$ detected within the central kpc. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H$_2$ is in a warm state. Photometry, derived from the UV to the far-IR, shows evidence for a low star formation rate of $\\sim$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ averaged over the last 100 Myrs. A mid-IR ...

  10. Lighting the Dark Molecular Gas: H2 as a Direct Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, J. D. T.

    2016-10-01

    Robust knowledge of molecular gas mass is critical for understanding star formation in galaxies. The {{{H}}}2 molecule does not emit efficiently in the cold interstellar medium, hence the molecular gas content of galaxies is typically inferred using indirect tracers. At low metallicity and in other extreme environments, these tracers can be subject to substantial biases. We present a new method of estimating total molecular gas mass in galaxies directly from pure mid-infrared rotational {{{H}}}2 emission. By assuming a power-law distribution of {{{H}}}2 rotational temperatures, we can accurately model {{{H}}}2 excitation and reliably obtain warm (T ≳ 100 K) {{{H}}}2 gas masses by varying only the power law’s slope. With sensitivities typical of Spitzer/IRS, we are able to directly probe the {{{H}}}2 content via rotational emission down to ∼80 K, accounting for ∼15% of the total molecular gas mass in a galaxy. By extrapolating the fitted power-law temperature distributions to a calibrated single lower cutoff temperature, the model also recovers the total molecular content within a factor of ∼2.2 in a diverse sample of galaxies, and a subset of broken power-law models performs similarly well. In ULIRGs, the fraction of warm {{{H}}}2 gas rises with dust temperature, with some dependency on α CO. In a sample of five low-metallicity galaxies ranging down to 12+{log}[{{O}}/{{H}}]=7.8, the model yields molecular masses up to ∼100× larger than implied by CO, in good agreement with other methods based on dust mass and star formation depletion timescale. This technique offers real promise for assessing molecular content in the early universe where CO and dust-based methods may fail.

  11. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: Broad Lyman-Alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Tepper-García, Thorsten; Schaye, Joop; Booth, Craig M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical state of HI absorbing gas at low redshift (z=0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations from the OWLS project, focusing in particular on broad (b_HI > 40 km/s) Lyman-Alpha absorbers (BLAs), which are believed to originate in shock-heated gas in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). Our fiducial model, which includes radiative cooling by heavy elements and feedback by supernovae and active galactic nuclei, predicts that by z=0.25 nearly 60 per cent of the gas mass ends up at densities and temperatures characteristic of the WHIM and we find that half of this fraction is due to outflows. The standard HI observables (distribution of HI column densities N_HI, distribution of Doppler parameters b_HI, b_HI - N_HI correlation) and the BLA line number density predicted by our simulations are in remarkably good agreement with observations. BLAs arise in gas that is hotter, more highly ionised and more enriched than the gas giving rise to typical Lyman-Alpha forest abs...

  12. Comparison of net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by management practices in two dryland cropping sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the effect of management practices on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dryland cropping systems. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of a combinat...

  13. HIFI observations of warm gas in DR21 : Shock versus radiative heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkopf, Volker; Roellig, M.; Simon, R.; Schneider, N.; Okada, Y.; Stutzki, J.; Gerin, M.; Akyilmaz, M.; Beintema, D; Benz, A. O.; Berne, O.; Boulanger, F.; Bumble, B.; Coeur-Joly, O.; Dedes, C.; Diez-Gonzalez, M. C.; France, K.; Fuente, A.; Gallego, J. D.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Guesten, R.; Harris, A.; Higgins, R.; Jackson, B.; Jarchow, C.; Joblin, C.; Klein, T.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Martin, P.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Mookerjea, B.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T.; Rizzo, J. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Teyssier, D.; Yorke, H.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The molecular gas in the DR21 massive star formation region is known to be affected by the strong UV field from the central star cluster and by a fast outflow creating a bright shock. The relative contribution of both heating mechanisms is the matter of a long debate. Aims. By better sampli

  14. The history and future trends of ocean warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in the SW Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Chand, Shyam; Bünz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The Barents Sea is a major part of the Arctic where the Gulf Stream mixes with the cold Arctic waters. Late Cenozoic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in hydrocarbon leakage from reservoirs, evolution of fluid flow systems, shallow gas accumulations, and hydrate formation throughout the Barents Sea. Here we integrate seismic data observations of gas hydrate accumulations along with gas hydrate stability modeling to analyze the impact of warming ocean waters in the recent past and future (1960-2060). Seismic observations of bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) indicate significant thermogenic gas input into the hydrate stability zone throughout the SW Barents Sea. The distribution of BSR is controlled primarily by fluid flow focusing features, such as gas chimneys and faults. Warming ocean bottom temperatures over the recent past and in future (1960-2060) can result in hydrate dissociation over an area covering 0.03-38% of the SW Barents Sea.

  15. Modelling the Molecular Gas in NGC 6240

    CERN Document Server

    Tunnard, R; Garcia-Burillo, S; Carpio, J Graciá; Fuente, A; Tacconi, L; Neri, R; Usero, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the first observations of H$^{13}$CN$(1-0)$, H$^{13}$CO$^+(1-0)$ and SiO$(2-1)$ in NGC 6240, obtained with the IRAM PdBI. Combining a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) code with Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) modelling we derive posterior probability density functions (pdfs) for the dense gas parameters, including mass$-$luminosity conversion factors, finding a large amount of dense molecular gas $(\\sim10^{10}M_\\odot)$ in cold, dense clouds ($T_k\\sim10$ K, $n_{{\\rm H}_2}\\sim10^6$ cm$^{-3}$) with a small volume filling factor $(<0.002)$. Including literature CO data we present simultaneously fitted multi-species, two phase models which spontaneously separate into a hot, diffuse phase ($\\log_{10}\\left(T_k / [{\\rm K}]\\right) = 3.2^{3.3}_{3.1}$, $\\log_{10}\\left(n_{{\\rm H}_2} / [{\\rm cm}^{-3}]\\right)=3.6^{3.8}_{3.5}$) and a cold, dense phase ($\\log_{10}\\left(T_k / [{\\rm K}]\\right) = 0.9^{0.9}_{0.8}$, $\\log_{10}\\left(n_{{\\rm H}_2} / [{\\rm cm}^{-3}]\\right)=6.6^{6.8}_{6.3}$). A restricted three phase model...

  16. Halpha and [S II] emission from warm ionized gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Alex S; Haffner, L Matthew; Gostisha, Martin; Barger, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [S II] {\\lambda}6716 and H{\\alpha} spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310{\\deg} = 100 R. The line ratio is better correlated with H{\\alpha} intensity than with height above the plane, indicating that the physical conditions within the WIM vary systematically with electron density. We argue that the variation of the line ratio with height is a consequence of the decrease of electron density with height. Our results reinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse H{\\alpha} emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  17. Detection of two intervening Ne viii absorbers probing warm gas at z ˜ 0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachat, Sachin; Narayanan, Anand; Khaire, Vikram; Savage, Blair D.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Wakker, Bart P.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the detection of two Ne viii absorbers, at z = 0.619 07 and 0.570 52 in the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectrum of background quasars SDSS J080908.13 + 461925.6 and SBS 1122 + 594, respectively. The Ne viii 770 line is at ∼3σ significance. In both instances, the Ne viii is found to be tracing gas with T ≳ 105 K, predominantly collisionally ionized, with moderate densities of n_{H} ≲ 10^{-4} cm-3, sub-solar metallicities and total hydrogen column densities of N(H) ≳ 1019 cm-2. In the z = 0.619 07 absorber, the low, intermediate ions and O vi are consistent with origin in photoionized gas, with the O vi potentially having some contribution from the warm collisional phase traced by Ne viii. The z = 0.570 52 system has H I absorption in at least three kinematically distinct components, with one of them having b({H I}) = 49 {± } 11 km s-1. The intermediate-ionization lines, O vi and Ne viii, are coincident in velocity with this component. Their different line widths suggest warm temperatures of T = (0.5-1.5) × 105 K. Both absorbers are residing in regions where there are several luminous (≳L★) galaxies. The absorber at z = 0.570 52 is within the virial radius of a 2.6L★ galaxy, possibly associated with shock-heated circumgalactic material.

  18. ACCRETION-INHIBITED STAR FORMATION IN THE WARM MOLECULAR DISK OF THE GREEN-VALLEY ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 3226?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, P. N.; Bitsakis, T.; Alatalo, K. [NASAHerschel Science Center, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, 770S Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mundell, C. [Astrophysics Research Institute, John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Lacy, M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Armus, L. [Spitzer NASAHerschel Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Duc, P.-A. [Service d' Astrophysique, Laboratoire AIM, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, Bat 709, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lisenfeld, U. [Dept. Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, University of Granada, Edifica Mecenas, Granada (Spain); Ogle, P., E-mail: apple@ipac.caltech.edu [NASA Extragalactic Database, IPAC, Caltech, 1200 East California Boulevard, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present archival Spitzer photometry and spectroscopy and Herschel photometry of the peculiar ''Green Valley'' elliptical galaxy NGC 3226. The galaxy, which contains a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), forms a pair with NGC 3227 and is shown to lie in a complex web of stellar and H I filaments. Imaging at 8 and 16 μm reveals a curved plume structure 3 kpc in extent, embedded within the core of the galaxy and coincident with the termination of a 30 kpc long H I tail. In situ star formation associated with the infrared (IR) plume is identified from narrowband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. The end of the IR plume coincides with a warm molecular hydrogen disk and dusty ring containing 0.7-1.1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} detected within the central kiloparsec. Sensitive upper limits to the detection of cold molecular gas may indicate that a large fraction of the H{sub 2} is in a warm state. Photometry derived from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR shows evidence for a low star-formation rate of ∼0.04 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} averaged over the last 100 Myr. A mid-IR component to the spectral energy distribution (SED) contributes ∼20% of the IR luminosity of the galaxy, and is consistent with emission associated with the AGN. The current measured star formation rate is insufficient to explain NGC 3226's global UV-optical ''green'' colors via the resurgence of star formation in a ''red and dead'' galaxy. This form of ''cold accretion'' from a tidal stream would appear to be an inefficient way to rejuvenate early-type galaxies and may actually inhibit star formation.

  19. Evolution of the atomic and molecular gas content of galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, Gergö; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include new modelling of the partitioning of cold gas in galactic discs into atomic, molecular, and ionized phases. We adopt two scenarios for the formation of molecules: one pressure base

  20. Lighting the dark molecular gas: H$_{2}$ as a direct tracer

    CERN Document Server

    Togi, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Robust knowledge of molecular gas mass is critical for understanding star formation in galaxies. The H$_{2}$ molecule does not emit efficiently in the cold interstellar medium, hence the molecular gas content of galaxies is typically inferred using indirect tracers. At low metallicity and in other extreme environments, these tracers can be subject to substantial biases. We present a new method of estimating total molecular gas mass in galaxies directly from pure mid-infrared rotational H$_{2}$ emission. By assuming a power-law distribution of H$_{2}$ rotational temperatures, we can accurately model H$_{2}$ excitation and reliably obtain warm ($T\\!\\gtrsim\\!100$ K) H$_{2}$ gas masses by varying only the power law's slope. With sensitivities typical of Spitzer/IRS, we are able to directly probe the H$_{2}$ content via rotational emission down to ~80 K, accounting for ~15% of the total molecular gas mass in a galaxy. By extrapolating the fitted power law temperature distributions to a calibrated \\emph{single} low...

  1. Extended warm gas in Orion KL as probed by methyl cyanide

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, T A; Viti, S; Marcelino, N; Palau, Aina; Esplugues, G B; Tercero, B

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the temperature distribution of the extended gas within the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula, we have mapped the emission by methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in its J=6_K-5_K, J=12_K-11_K, J=13_K-12_K, and J=14_K-13_K transitions at an average angular resolution of ~10 arcsec (22 arcsec for the 6_K-5_K lines), as part of a new 2D line survey of this region using the IRAM 30m telescope. These fully sampled maps show extended emission from warm gas to the northeast of IRc2 and the distinct kinematic signatures of the hot core and compact ridge source components. We have constructed population diagrams for the four sets of K-ladder emission lines at each position in the maps and have derived rotational excitation temperatures and total beam-averaged column densities from the fitted slopes. In addition, we have fitted LVG model spectra to the observations to determine best-fit physical parameters at each map position, yielding the distribution of kinetic temperatures across the region. The resulting temperature...

  2. Circumnuclear molecular gas in megamaser disk galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Seth, Anil [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Lyubenova, Mariya; Van de Ven, Glenn; Läsker, Ronald [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Walsh, Jonelle [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-parsec scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ∼50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ∼100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for noncircular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100 parsec scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Brγ trace outflow along the 100 parsec-scale jet. In NGC 1194, the continuum from the accreting black hole is very strong, making it difficult to measure robust two-dimensional kinematics, but the spatial distribution and line ratios of the molecular hydrogen and Brγ have consistent properties between the two galaxies.

  3. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity influenced by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information exists about sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) affected by management practices to account for net emissions from agroecosystems. We evaluated the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas...

  4. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis - Herschel/PACS observations from the DIGIT key programme

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, Johan E; Green, Joel D; Herczeg, Gregory J; Dionatos, Odysseas; Evans, Neal J; Karska, Agata; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-01-01

    The effects of external irradiation on the chemistry and physics in the protostellar envelope around low-mass young stellar objects are poorly understood. The Corona Australis star-forming region contains the R CrA dark cloud, comprising several low-mass protostellar cores irradiated by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented. The distribution of CO, OH, H2O, [C II], [O I], and continuum emission is investigated. We have developed a deconvolution algorithm which we use to deconvolve the maps, separating the point-source emission from the extended emission. We also construct rotational diagrams of the molecular species. By deconvolution of the Herschel data, we find large-scale (several thousand AU) dust continuum and spectral line emission not associate...

  5. Tentative detection of warm intervening gas towards PKS 0548-322 with XMM-Newton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcons, X.

    2005-03-17

    We present the results of a long ({approx} 93 ksec) XMM-Newton observation of the bright BL-Lac object PKS 0548-322 (z = 0.069). Our Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a single absorption feature at an observed wavelength {lambda} = 23.33 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} which we interpret as OVI K{alpha} absorption at z = 0.058, i.e., {approx} 3000 km s{sup -1} from the background object. The observed equivalent width of the absorption line {approx} 30m {angstrom}, coupled with the lack of the corresponding absorption edge in the EPIC pn data, implies a column density N{sub OVI} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and turbulence with a Doppler velocity parameter b > 100 km s{sup -1}. Within the limitations of our RGS spectrum, no OVII or OV K{alpha} absorption are detected. Under the assumption of ionization equilibrium by both collisions and the extragalactic background, this is only marginally consistent if the gas temperature is {approx} 2.5 x 10{sup 5} K, with significantly lower or higher values being excluded by our limits on OV or OVII. If confirmed, this would be the first X-ray detection of a large amount of intervening warm absorbing gas through OVI absorption. The existence of such a high column density absorber, much stronger than any previously detected one in OVI, would place stringent constraints on the large-scale distribution of baryonic gas in the Universe.

  6. Uncertainties in the attribution of greenhouse gas warming and implications for climate prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth S.; Stott, Peter A.; Mitchell, John F. B.

    2016-06-01

    Using optimal detection techniques with climate model simulations, most of the observed increase of near-surface temperatures over the second half of the twentieth century is attributed to anthropogenic influences. However, the partitioning of the anthropogenic influence to individual factors, such as greenhouse gases and aerosols, is much less robust. Differences in how forcing factors are applied, in their radiative influence and in models' climate sensitivities, substantially influence the response patterns. We find that standard optimal detection methodologies cannot fully reconcile this response diversity. By selecting a set of experiments to enable the diagnosing of greenhouse gases and the combined influence of other anthropogenic and natural factors, we find robust detections of well-mixed greenhouse gases across a large ensemble of models. Of the observed warming over the twentieth century of 0.65 K/century we find, using a multimodel mean not incorporating pattern uncertainty, a well-mixed greenhouse gas warming of 0.87 to 1.22 K/century. This is partially offset by cooling from other anthropogenic and natural influences of -0.54 to -0.22 K/century. Although better constrained than recent studies, the attributable trends across climate models are still wide, with implications for observational constrained estimates of transient climate response. Some of the uncertainties could be reduced in future by having more model data to better quantify the simulated estimates of the signals and natural variability, by designing model experiments more effectively and better quantification of the climate model radiative influences. Most importantly, how model pattern uncertainties are incorporated into the optimal detection methodology should be improved.

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions from Swiss agriculture since 1990: implications for environmental policies to mitigate global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifeld, Jens [AGROSCOPE, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jens.leifeld@fal.admin.ch; Fuhrer, Juerg [AGROSCOPE, Swiss Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, Air Pollution/Climate Group, Reckenholzstrasse 191, 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-08-01

    Agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribute significantly to global warming, and environmental protection strategies have thus to integrate emission reduction measures from this source. In Switzerland, legislation together with monetary incentives has forced primarily integrated, and to a lesser extend organic farming, both covering nowadays more than 95% of the agriculturally useful area. Though reducing greenhouse gas emissions was not a primary intention of this reorganisation, the measures were successful in reducing the overall emissions of nitrous oxide and methane by 10% relative to 1990. A reduction of the animal herd, namely of dairy cattle, non-dairy cattle and swine, and decreasing inputs of mineral N are the main contributors to the achieved emission reduction. Crop productivity was not negatively affected and milk productivity even increased, referring to the ecological potential of agricultural reorganisation that has been tapped. Total meat production declined proportional to the animal herd. Stabilised animal numbers and fertiliser use during the last 4 years refer to an exhaustion of future reduction potentials without further legislative action because this stabilisation is most likely due to the adaptation to the production guidelines. A comparison of emission trends and carbon sequestration potentials in the broader context of the EU15 reveals that nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and methane (CH{sub 4}) have been reduced more efficiently most probably due to the measures taken, but that sequestration potentials are smaller than in the EU15 mainly because of differences in the agricultural structure. The change from an intensified towards a more environmental sound integrated production has a significant reduction potential, but in any case, agriculture will remain a net GHG source in spite of emission mitigation and carbon sequestration.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Nanoscale Sorbents for Mercury Capture from Warm Fuel Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja A. Jadhav

    2006-05-31

    Several different types of nanocrystalline metal oxide sorbents were synthesized and evaluated for capture of mercury (Hg) from coal-gasifier warm fuel gas. Detailed experimental studies were carried out to understand the fundamental mechanism of interaction between mercury and nanocrystalline sorbents over a range of fuel gas conditions. The metal oxide sorbents evaluated in this work included those prepared by GTI's subcontractor NanoScale Materials, Inc. (NanoScale) as well as those prepared in-house. These sorbents were evaluated for mercury capture in GTI's Mercury Sorbent Testing System. Initial experiments were focused on sorbent evaluation for mercury capture in N{sub 2} stream over the temperature range 423-533 K. These exploratory studies demonstrated that NanoActive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} along with its supported form was the most active of the sorbent evaluated. The capture of Hg decreased with temperature, which suggested that physical adsorption was the dominant mechanism of Hg capture. Desorption studies on spent sorbents indicated that a major portion of Hg was attached to the sorbent by strong bonds, which suggested that Hg was oxidized by the O atoms of the metal oxides, thus forming a strong Hg-O bond with the oxide. Initial screening studies also indicated that sulfided form of CuO/alumina was the most active for Hg capture, therefore was selected for detailed evaluation in simulated fuel gas (SFG). It was found that such supported CuO sorbents had high Hg-sorption capacity in the presence of H{sub 2}, provided the gas also contained H{sub 2}S. Exposure of supported CuO sorbent to H{sub 2}S results in the formation of CuS, which is an active sorbent for Hg capture. Sulfur atom in CuS forms a bond with Hg that results into its capture. Although thermodynamically CuS is predicted to form unreactive Cu{sub 2}S form when exposed to H{sub 2}, it is hypothesized that Cu atoms in such supported sorbents are in &apos

  9. Hα and [SII] Emission from Warm Ionized Gas in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alex S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Gostisha, Martin C.; Barger, Kathleen A.

    2014-06-01

    We present Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper [SII] λ6716 and Hα spectroscopic maps of the warm ionized medium (WIM) in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm at Galactic longitudes 310° extinction-corrected Hα intensities (I_{{H} \\alpha }^c), we measure an exponential scale height of electron density squared in the arm of H_{n_e^2}= 0.30 \\, {kpc} (assuming a distance of 3.5 kpc), intermediate between that observed in the inner Galaxy and in the Perseus Arm. The [S II]/Hα line ratio is enhanced at large |z| and in sightlines with faint I_{{H} \\alpha }^c. We find that the [S II]/Hα line ratio has a power-law relationship with I_{{H} \\alpha }^c from a value of ≈1.0 at I_{{H} \\alpha }^creinforce the well-established picture in which the diffuse Hα emission is due primarily to emission from in situ photoionized gas, with scattered light only a minor contributor.

  10. Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: OVI

    CERN Document Server

    Tepper-Garcia, Thorsten; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P C

    2010-01-01

    [abridged] We investigate the origin and physical properties of OVI absorbers at low redshift (z = 0.25) using a subset of cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project. Intervening OVI absorbers are believed to trace shock-heated gas in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) and may thus play a key role in the search for the missing baryons in the present-day Universe. When compared to observations, the predicted distributions of the different OVI line parameters (column density, Doppler parameter, rest equivalent width) from our simulations exhibit a lack of strong OVI absorbers, a discrepancy that has also been found by Oppenheimer & Dave (2009b). This suggests that physical processes on sub-grid scales (e.g. turbulence) may strongly influence the observed properties of OVI systems. We find that the intervening OVI absorption arises in highly metal-enriched (10^{-1} < 10^2 and temperatures T =10^{5.3\\pm0.5} K. While the OVI resides in a similar ...

  11. Circumnuclear Molecular Gas in Megamaser Disk Galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Jenny E; Lyubenova, Mariya; Walsh, Jonelle; van de Ven, Glenn; Laesker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-pc scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ~50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ~100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for non-circular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100-pc scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Br-gamma trace outflow along the 100 pc-scale jet. In NGC 119...

  12. Collisional excitation of sulfur dioxide by molecular hydrogen in warm molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balança, Christian; Spielfiedel, Annie; Feautrier, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of SO2 line emission in warm environments requires a detailed knowledge of collisional rate coefficients for a wide range of levels and temperatures. Using an accurate theoretical interaction potential for SO2-H2, rate coefficients for collisions of SO2 with para and ortho-H2 for the 31 first SO2, rotational levels are calculated for temperatures up to 500 K using the coupled states (CS) approximation. From a comparison with previously published close-coupling (CC) results, it was shown that the two sets of data agree within 20-30 per cent for both para- and ortho-H2 collisions. As previously found within the CC approach, the CS rate coefficients with ortho and para-H2 differ by a factor of 2 in average, the largest being mainly the rates for collisions with ortho-H2. For higher levels and temperatures, rate constants were computed within the infinite order sudden (IOS) approximation. Rate coefficients were obtained for the lowest 410 rotational levels of SO2 in the 100-1000 K temperature range. A comparison at 30, 100 and 300 K of the IOS data with the corresponding para-H2 CS results indicates that the IOS approximation systematically underestimates the CS results by a factor up to 2 at the lowest temperatures. As expected, IOS and CS rates are in a better agreement at higher temperatures. Considering that the IOS theory was developed for collisions with para-H2, this approach cannot describe with the same accuracy collisions with ortho-H2. So, our IOS data may be considered as quite reliable for collisions with para-H2 and less accurate for collisions with ortho-H2.

  13. Equations of state and transport properties of warm dense beryllium: a quantum molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Long, Yao; Tian, Ming-Feng; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Ping

    2013-04-01

    We have calculated the equations of state, the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, and electronic transport coefficients of beryllium in the warm dense regime for densities from 4.0 to 6.0 g/cm(3) and temperatures from 1.0 to 10.0 eV by using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The principal Hugoniot curve is in agreement with underground nuclear explosive and high-power laser experimental results up to ~20 Mbar. The calculated viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients are compared with the one-component plasma model, using effective charges given by the average-atom model. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, which connects viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, is found to hold fairly well in the strong coupling regime. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is computed via Kubo-Greenwood formula and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in the warm dense region.

  14. HIFI observations of warm gas in DR21: Shock versus radiative heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Simon, R; Schneider, N; Okada, Y; Stutzki, J; Gerin, M; Akyilmaz, M; Beintema, D; Benz, A O; Berne, O; Boulanger, F; Bumble, B; Coeur-Joly, O; Dedes, C; Diez-Gonzalez, M C; France, K; Fuente, A; Gallego, J D; Goicoechea, J R; Güsten, R; Harris, A; Higgins, R; Jackson, B; Jarchow, C; Joblin, C; Klein, T; Kramer, C; Lord, S; Martin, P; Martin-Pintado, J; Mookerjea, B; Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T; Rizzo, J R; van der Tak, F F S; Teyssier, D; Yorke, H

    2010-01-01

    The molecular gas in the DR21 massive star formation region is known to be affected by the strong UV field from the central star cluster and by a fast outflow creating a bright shock. The relative contribution of both heating mechanisms is the matter of a long debate. By better sampling the excitation ladder of various tracers we provide a quantitative distinction between the different heating mechanisms. HIFI observations of mid-J transitions of CO and HCO+ isotopes allow us to bridge the gap in excitation energies between observations from the ground, characterizing the cooler gas, and existing ISO LWS spectra, constraining the properties of the hot gas. Comparing the detailed line profiles allows to identify the physical structure of the different components. In spite of the known shock-excitation of H2 and the clearly visible strong outflow, we find that the emission of all lines up to > 2 THz can be explained by purely radiative heating of the material. However, the new Herschel/HIFI observations reveal ...

  15. Radial molecular abundances and gas cooling in starless cores

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to simulate radial profiles of molecular abundances and the gas temperature in cold and heavily shielded starless cores by combining chemical and radiative transfer models. Methods: A determination of the dust temperature in a modified Bonnor-Ebert sphere is used to calculate initial radial molecular abundance profiles. The abundances of selected cooling molecules corresponding to two different core ages are then extracted to determine the gas temperature at two time steps. The calculation is repeated in an iterative process yielding molecular abundances consistent with the gas temperature. Line emission profiles for selected substances are calculated using simulated abundance profiles. Results: The gas temperature is a function of time; the gas heats up as the core gets older because the cooling molecules are depleted onto grain surfaces. The contributions of the various cooling molecules to the total cooling power change with time. Radial chemical abundance profiles are non-trivial: different s...

  16. Path Integral Monte Carlo and Density Functional Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Warm Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militzer, Burkhard; Driver, Kevin

    2011-10-01

    We analyze the applicability of two first-principles simulation techniques, path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and density functional molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), to study the regime of warm dense matter. We discuss the advantages as well as the limitations of each method and propose directions for future development. Results for dense, liquid helium, where both methods have been applied, demonstrate the range of each method's applicability. Comparison of the equations of state from simulations with analytical theories and free energy models show that DFT is useful for temperatures below 100000 K and then PIMC provides accurate results for all higher temperatures. We characterize the structure of the liquid in terms of pair correlation functions and study the closure of the band gap with increasing density and temperature. Finally, we discuss simulations of heavier elements and demonstrate the reliability are both methods in such cases with preliminary results.

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of equation of state of warm dense ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Ying; Wang, Cong; Li, Yong-Sheng; Li, Da-Fang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The equation of state of warm dense ethane is obtained using quantum molecular dynamics simulations based on finite-temperature density functional theory for densities from 0.1 g / cm 3 to 3.1 g / cm 3 and temperatures from 0.1 eV to 5.17 eV. The calculated pressure and internal energy are fitted with cubic polynomials in terms of density and temperature. Specific density-temperature-pressure tracks such as the principal and double shock Hugoniot curves along with release isentropes are predicted which are fundamental for the analysis and interpretation of high-pressure experiments. The principal and double shock Hugoniot curves are in agreement with the experimental data from the Sandia Z-Machine [Magyar et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 134109 (2015)].

  18. TANGO I: Interstellar medium in nearby radio galaxies. Molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña Flaquer, B.; Leon, S.; Combes, F.; Lim, J.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies that are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless, gas is needed at their very center to feed the nuclear activity. Aims: We study the molecular gas properties (i.e., mass, kinematics, distribution, origin) of these objects, and compare them with results for other known samples. Methods: At the IRAM-30m telescope, we performed a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. Results: The main result of our survey is that the molecular gas content of these galaxies is very low compared to spiral or FIR-selected galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass, including detections and upper limits, is 2.2 × 108 M⊙. When separated into FR-I and FR-II types, a difference in their H2 masses is found. The median value of FR-I galaxies is about 1.9 × 108 M⊙ and higher for FR-II galaxies, at about 4.5 × 108 M⊙. Which is probably entirely because of a Malmquist bias. Our results contrast with those of previous surveys, whose targets were mainly selected by means of their FIR emission, implying that we measure higher observed masses of molecular gas. Moreover, the shape of CO spectra suggest that a central molecular gas disk exists in 30% of these radio galaxies, a lower rate than in other active galaxy samples. Conclusions: We find a low level of molecular gas in our sample of radio-selected AGNs, indicating that galaxies do not need much molecular gas to host an AGN. The presence of a molecular gas disk in some galaxies and the wide range of molecular gas masses may be indicative of different origins for the gas, which we can not exclude at present (e.g., minor/major mergers, stellar mass loss, or accretion). Appendices and Figure 15 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Dynamics of Rarefied Gas and Molecular Gas Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-25

    No 4, 1970. 15. A. I. Tolstoys . Aerodynamic characteristics of the cooled spherical blunting in hypersonic flow of the weakly-rarefied gas. Izv. of the...0000 0000 6727 367 7305 3574 6742 6646 005 6743 6750 6631 673a leo gags ggca aego’a& 6647 016 6650 7501 7610 6731 log 7305 357 6742? 665o goo 6631

  20. Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics for Simulating the Correlated Electron Plasma in Warm Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, Vivek; Deymier, Pierre; Runge, Keith

    2011-10-01

    Several areas of study including heavy ion beam, large scale laser, and high pressure or Thomson scattering studies necessitate a fundamental understanding of warm dense matter (WDM) i.e. matter at high temperature and high density. The WDM regime, however, lacks any adequate highly developed class of simulation methods. Recent progress to address this deficit has been the development of orbital-free Density Functional Theory (ofDFT). However, scant benchmark information is available on temperature and pressure dependence of simple but realistic models in WDM regime. The present work aims to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Within the discrete path integral representation, electrons are described as harmonic necklaces. Quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. The fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values. The molecular dynamics algorithm is employed to sample phase space. Here, we focus on the behavior of strongly correlated electron plasmas under WDM conditions. We compute the kinetic and potential energies and compare them to those obtained with the ofDFT method. Several areas of study including heavy ion beam, large scale laser, and high pressure or Thomson scattering studies necessitate a fundamental understanding of warm dense matter (WDM) i.e. matter at high temperature and high density. The WDM regime, however, lacks any adequate highly developed class of simulation methods. Recent progress to address this deficit has been the development of orbital-free Density Functional Theory (ofDFT). However, scant benchmark information is available on temperature and pressure dependence of simple but realistic models in WDM regime. The present work aims to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Within the discrete path integral representation, electrons are described as

  1. {\\em Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas in the thermodynamic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We perform \\emph{ab initio} quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with linear response theory we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the entire warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown \\emph{et al.}~[PRL \\textbf{110}, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to $N=1000$ electrons enable us to compute the potential energy $V$ and the exchange-correlation free energy $F_{xc}$ of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of $|\\Delta V|/|V|, |\\Delta F_{xc}|/|F|_{xc} \\sim 10^{-3}$. A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of $F_{xc}$ by Karasiev {\\em et al.} [PRL {\\bf 112}, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant inaccuracies of the latter.

  2. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  3. Spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Priya; Kumar, Krishan; Moudgil, R. K.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied spin-resolved correlations in the warm-dense homogeneous electron gas by determining the linear density and spin-density response functions, within the dynamical self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi et al. The calculated spin-resolved pair-correlation function gσσ'(r) is compared with the recent restricted path-integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC) simulations due to Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)], while interaction energy Eint and exchange-correlation free energy Fxc with the RPIMC and very recent ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations by Dornheim et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 156403 (2016)]. g↑↓(r) is found to be in good agreement with the RPIMC data, while a mismatch is seen in g↑↑(r) at small r where it becomes somewhat negative. As an interesting result, it is deduced that a non-monotonic T-dependence of g(0) is driven primarily by g↑↓(0). Our results of Eint and Fxc exhibit an excellent agreement with the QMC study due to Dornheim et al., which deals with the finite-size correction quite accurately. We observe, however, a visible deviation of Eint from the RPIMC data for high densities ( 8% at rs = 1). Further, we have extended our study to the fully spin-polarized phase. Again, with the exception of high density region, we find a good agreement of Eint with the RPIMC data. This points to the need of settling the problem of finite-size correction in the spin-polarized phase also. Interestingly, we also find that the thermal effects tend to oppose spatial localization as well as spin polarization of electrons. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-70532-y

  4. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  5. gravitational collapse of a molecular gas cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Arreaga-Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos los resultados de un conjunto de simulaciones num ericas dedi- cadas a estudiar el colapso gravitacional de una nube de gas interestelar, r gidamente rotante, aislada y esf ericamente sim etrica. Usamos una ecuaci on de estado barotr opica (beos por brevedad que depende de la densidad de la nube y que incluye una densidad cr tica como par ametro libre, crit. Durante el colapso tem- prano, cuando crit, la beos se comporta como una ecuaci on de estado del gas ideal. Para el colapso posterior, cuando crit, la beos incluye un t ermino adicional que toma en cuenta el calentamiento del gas debido a la contracci on gravi- tacional. Investigamos la ocurrencia de fragmentaci on r apida en la nube para lo cual usamos cuatro valores diferentes de la crit. Trabajamos con dos tipos de modelos de colapso, de acuerdo con el per l radial inicial de la densidad.

  6. Diffuse Atomic and Molecular Gas near IC443

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschauer, A; Wallerstein, George; Means, T

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of results on absorption from Ca II, Ca I, K I, and the molecules CH+, CH, C2, and CN that probes gas interacting with the supernova remnant IC443. The eleven directions sample material across the visible nebula and beyond its eastern edge. Most of the neutral material, including the diatomic molecules, is associated with the ambient cloud detected via H I and CO emission. Analysis of excitation and chemistry yields gas densities that are typical of diffuse molecular gas. The low density gas probed by Ca II extends over a large range in velocities, from -120 to +80 km/s in the most extreme cases. This gas is distributed among several velocity components, unlike the situation for the shocked molecular clumps, whose emission occurs over much the same range but as very broad features. The extent of the high-velocity absorption suggests a shock velocity of 100 km/s for the expanding nebula.

  7. The Energetics of Molecular Gas in NGC 891 from H2 and FIR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, G J; Boulanger, F; Wu, Yanling; Combes, F; Higdon, S J U; Smith, J D T; Nikola, T

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the molecular hydrogen energetics of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC\\,891, using a 34-position map in the lowest three pure rotational H$_2$ lines observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. The S(0), S(1), and S(2) lines are bright with an extinction corrected total luminosity of $\\sim2.8 \\times 10^{7}$ L$_{\\odot}$, or 0.09\\% of the total-infrared luminosity of NGC\\,891. The H$_2$ line ratios are nearly constant along the plane of the galaxy -- we do not observe the previously reported strong drop-off in the S(1)/S(0) line intensity ratio in the outer regions of the galaxy, so we find no evidence for the very massive cold CO-free molecular clouds invoked to explain the past observations. The H$_2$ level excitation temperatures increase monotonically indicating more than one component to the emitting gas. More than 99\\% of the mass is in the lowest excitation (T$_{ex}$ $\\sim$125 K) ``warm'' component. In the inner galaxy, the warm H$_2$ emitting gas is $\\sim$15\\% of the CO(1-0)-traced cool ...

  8. Polymeric molecular sieve membranes for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Qiao, Zhenan; Chai, Songhai

    2017-08-15

    A porous polymer membrane useful in gas separation, the porous polymer membrane comprising a polymeric structure having crosslinked aromatic groups and a hierarchical porosity in which micropores having a pore size less than 2 nm are present at least in an outer layer of the porous polymer membrane, and macropores having a pore size of over 50 nm are present at least in an inner layer of the porous polymer membrane. Also described are methods for producing the porous polymer membrane in which a non-porous polymer membrane containing aromatic rings is subjected to a Friedel-Crafts crosslinking reaction in which a crosslinking molecule crosslinks the aromatic rings in the presence of a Friedel-Crafts catalyst and organic solvent under sufficiently elevated temperature, as well as methods for using the porous polymer membranes for gas or liquid separation, filtration, or purification.

  9. Observations of Arp 220 using Herschel-SPIRE: An Unprecedented View of the Molecular Gas in an Extreme Star Formation Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, Jason; Wilson, Christine D; Rykala, Adam; Isaak, Kate; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J; Boselli, Alessandro; Bradford, Charles M; Clements, D L; Cooray, Asantha; Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter; Kamenetzky, Julia; Madden, Suzanne C; Mentuch, Erin; Sacchi, Nicola; Sauvage, Marc; Schirm, Maximilien R P; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, Luigi; Wolfire, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE-FTS observations of Arp~220, a nearby ULIRG. The FTS continuously covers 190 -- 670 microns, providing a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water ladders with comparable total luminosity; very high-J HCN absorption; OH+, H2O+, and HF in absorption; and CI and NII. Modeling of the continuum yields warm dust, with T = 66 K, and an unusually large optical depth of ~5 at 100 microns. Non-LTE modeling of the CO shows two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T ~ 50 K and warm molecular gas at T ~1350 K. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but dominates the luminosity of the CO ladder. The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with H2 rotational lines. At 1350 K, H2 dominates the cooling (~20 L_sun/M_sun) in the ISM compared to CO (~0.4 L_sun/M_sun). We found that only a non-ionizing source such as the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds ca...

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics study of expanded beryllium: evolution from warm dense matter to atomic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dafang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Siliang; Wang, Cong; Wu, Zeqing; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-07-31

    By performing quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, we investigate the equation of states, electrical and optical properties of the expanded beryllium at densities two to one-hundred lower than the normal solid density, and temperatures ranging from 5000 to 30000 K. With decreasing the density of Be, the optical response evolves from the one characteristic of a simple metal to the one of an atomic fluid. By fitting the optical conductivity spectra with the Drude-Smith model, it is found that the conducting electrons become localized at lower densities. In addition, the negative derivative of the electrical resistivity on temperature at density about eight lower than the normal solid density demonstrates that the metal to nonmetal transition takes place in the expanded Be. To interpret this transition, the electronic density of states is analyzed systematically. Furthermore, a direct comparison of the Rosseland opacity obtained by using QMD and the standard opacity code demonstrates that QMD provides a powerful tool to validate plasma models used in atomic physics approaches in the warm dense matter regime.

  11. TANGO I: ISM in nearby radio galaxies. Molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Flaquer, Breezy Ocana; Combes, Francoise; Lim, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Powerful radio-AGN are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies which are usually very poor in molecular gas. Nevertheless gas is needed in the very center to feed the nuclear activity. We aim to study the molecular gas properties (mass, kinematics, distribution, origin) in such objects, and to compare them with results of other known samples. We have performed at the IRAM-30m telescope a survey of the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission in the most powerful radio galaxies of the Local Universe, selected only on the basis of their radio continuum fluxes. The main result of our survey is the very low content in molecular gas of such galaxies compared to spiral or FIR-selected galaxies. The median value of the molecular gas mass, including detections and upper limits, is 2.2x10^8 Msun. If separated into FR-I and FR-II types, a difference in H_2 masses between them is found. The median value of FR-I galaxies is about 1.9x10^8 and higher for FR-II galaxies, about 4.5x10^8 Msun but this is very probably entirely due to a Ma...

  12. A New View of Molecular Gas in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Morris, M.; Güsten, R.; Requena Torres, M.; Lang, C. C.; Butterfield, N.; Ott, J.

    2013-01-01

    On average, the molecular gas in the center of our Galaxy is significantly hotter (T = 50-300 K), denser (n > 10^4 cm^-3), and more turbulent than gas in the rest of the disk. I will present results from a recent series of observations that indicate that our understanding of the Galactic center (GC) molecular gas is incomplete, and that conditions in some clouds are even more extreme than previously thought. Using the Green Bank telescope, we have measured a very hot molecular gas component (T = 400-500 K ) in three largely quiescent GC giant molecular clouds using metastable inversion lines of ammonia from (8,8) to (15,15) . We further detect the (9,9) line in seven other GC clouds, indicating that this hot gas component may be a common feature of GC clouds, potentially yielding insight into the heating source of the molecular gas in this region. In addition, I will present new density constraints for the circumnuclear disk (CND), a reservoir of gas and dust 1.5 parsecs in radius from the central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. Recent estimates of the CND density vary by four orders of magnitude, which makes its future evolution uncertain: gas in the CND could either accrete onto the black hole, dissipate, or, if the density is higher than 10^7 cm^-3, exist in gravitationally-stable clumps capable of forming stars. However, our APEX measurements of highly excited lines of HCN and HCO+ indicate that although the CND gas is denser than most other GC clouds, it is not likely to be tidally stable and thus is unlikely to host star formation. Finally, I will present early results from a new Very Large Array study of gas on sub-parsec scales in a sample of GC clouds, all of which exhibit unexpectedly abundant Class I methanol maser emission. The widespread distribution of these masers suggests shocks play an important role in driving cloud evolution throughout this unique region of our Galaxy.

  13. Properties of Molecular Gas in Galaxies in Early and Mid Stage of the Interaction: I. Distribution of Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Iono, Daisuke; Tamura, Yoichi; Tosaki, Tomoka; Nakanishi, Koichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of 12CO(J = 1-0) mapping observations toward four interacting galaxies in early and mid stages of the interaction to understand the behavior of molecular gas in galaxy-galaxy interaction. The observations were carried out using the 45-m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO). We compared our CO total flux to those previously obtained with single-dish observations and found that there are no discrepancy between them. Applying a typical CO-H2 conversion factor, all constituent galaxies have molecular gas mass more than 10^9 M_sun. Comparisons to HI, Ks and tracers of SF such as Halpha, FUV, 8 um and 24 um revealed that the distribution of molecular gas in interacting galaxies in the early stage of the interaction differs from atomic gas, stars and star-forming regions. These differences are not explained without the result of the interaction. Central concentration of molecular gas of interacting galaxies in the early stage of the interaction is lower than that of isolated galaxies,...

  14. WARM IONIZED-GAS IN THE EDGE-ON GALAXIES NGC-4565 AND NGC-4631

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RAND, RJ; KULKARNI, [No Value; HESTER, JJ

    1992-01-01

    We present H-alpha observations of two edge-on galaxies: NGC 4565 and NGC 4631. In contrast to NGC 891, which was studied in a previous paper, neither of these galaxies shows evidence for a smooth, vertically extended, diffuse, warm ionized medium. NGC 4565 is a weak H-alpha emitter, and shows no ev

  15. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: numerical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Margarita; Maio, Umberto

    2012-06-01

    We present the results from self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multifrequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of 13 primordial species (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H2, H?, D, D+, HD and HeH+), performed using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and we show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static and dynamic density field around a central radiative source, and for cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation. As a demonstrative application of radiative feedback on molecular gas, we also run cosmological simulations of early structure formation in a ˜1-Mpc sized box. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. Consistent with other works, we find that ionization fronts from central sources can boost H2 fractions in shock-compressed gas. The tight dependence on H2 also leads to a corresponding boost of HD fractions. We see a strong lowering of the typical molecular abundances up to several orders of magnitude, which partially hinders further gas collapse of pristine neutral gas. This clearly suggests the need for reionized gas or metal cooling in the formation of the following generation of structures.

  16. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Bigiel, Frank; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; de Blok, W J G; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schinnerer, Eva; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; Usero, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by 12CO(2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between Sig_mol and Sig_SFR but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol = Sig_mol / Sig_SFR. At our 1 kpc common resolution, CO correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally and using a fixed, Milky Way alpha_CO, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, t_dep^mol=Sig_mol/Sig_SFR ~ 2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex scatter, in good agreement with literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density and find N=1+/-0.15 for our full data set with some variation from galaxy to galaxy. However, we caution that a power law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlat...

  17. Pahs, Ionized Gas, and Molecular Hydrogen in Brightest Cluster Galaxies of Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; O'Connell, Robert W; Voit, G Mark; Hoffer, Aaron; McNamara, Brian R; Nulsen, Paul E J

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of 5-25 {\\mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of 9 cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally-excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H2 rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as ...

  18. A global meta-analysis on the impact of management practices on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from cropland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural practices contribute significant amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but little is known about their effects on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) that account for all sources and sinks of carbon dioxide emissions per unit area or crop yield. Se...

  19. The ALMA View of Dense Molecular Gas in 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Indebetouw, Remy; Brogan, Crystal L.; Hunter, Todd R.; Leroy, Adam

    2017-01-01

    At a distance of 50 kpc, the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts several sites of star formation including R136, a starburst region home to dozens of evolved O stars. The intense radiation from R136 creates an extreme environment for nearby star formation in such a low-metallicity, low mass galaxy. We have targeted a star-forming region ~15 pc away from R136 within 30 Doradus using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to map the molecular gas to study the sites of star formation. We are conducting a clump-by-clump analysis of the intensities and line ratios of dense gas (HCO+, HCN, CS, H13CO+, H13CN) and diffuse gas (CO, 13CO, C18O) tracers at sub-parsec resolution. We identify and characterize ~100 molecular clumps within the region. With the observed molecular species, we aim to determine the physical conditions of each clump (e.g. size, internal turbulence, molecular abundance). We compare the intensities and line ratios to non-LTE Radex model grids of the excitation temperature, molecular column density, and volume density of the H2 collider to determine the physical excitation conditions within the clumps. We compare these properties of each clump to both associated and embedded star formation properties to quantify the relative importance of internal feedback from the star formation itself versus external feedback processes from R136 and determine which process dominates in this region.

  20. \\emph{Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Malone, Fionn; Schoof, Tim; Sjostrom, Travis; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Warm dense matter is one of the most active frontiers in plasma physics due to its relevance for dense astrophysical objects as well as for novel laboratory experiments in which matter is being strongly compressed e.g. by high-power lasers. Its description is theoretically very challenging as it contains correlated quantum electrons at finite temperature---a system that cannot be accurately modeled by standard analytical or ground state approaches. Recently several breakthroughs have been achieved in the field of fermionic quantum Monte Carlo simulations. First, it was shown that exact simulations of a finite model system ($30 \\dots 100$ electrons) is possible that avoid any simplifying approximations such as fixed nodes [Schoof {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 115}, 130402 (2015)]. Second, a novel way to accurately extrapolate these results to the thermodynamic limit was reported by Dornheim {\\em et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 117}, 156403 (2016)]. As a result, now thermodynamic results for the warm dense...

  1. Rapid formation of molecular clouds from turbulent atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S. C. O.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    The characteristic lifetimes of molecular clouds remain uncertain and a topic of frequent debate, with arguments having recently been advanced both in support of short-lived clouds, with lifetimes of a few Myr or less (see e.g. Elmegreen 2000; Hartmann et al. 2001) and in support of much longer-lived clouds, with lifetimes of the order of 10 Myr or more (see e.g. Tassis & Mouschovias, 2004; Goldsmith & Li, 2005). An argument that has previously been advanced in favour of longer lived clouds is the apparent difficulty involved in converting sufficient atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen within the short timescale required by the rapid cloud formation scenario. However, previous estimates of the time required for this conversion to occur have not taken into account the effects of the supersonic turbulence which is inferred to be present in the atomic gas. In this contribution, we present results from a set of high resolution three-dimensional simulations of turbulence in gravitationally unstable atomic gas. These simulations were performed using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP hydrodynamical code (Norman 2000), and include a detailed treatment of the thermal balance of the gas and of the formation of molecular hydrogen. The effects of photodissociation of H2 by the Galactic UV field are also included, with a simple local approximation used to compute the effects of H2 self-shielding. The results of our simulations demonstrate that H2 formation occurs rapidly in turbulent atomic gas. Starting from purely atomic gas, large quantities of molecular gas can be produced on timescales of less than a Myr, given turbulent velocity dispersions and magnetic field strengths consistent with observations. Moreover, as our simulations underestimate the effectiveness of H2 self-shielding and dust absorption, we can be confident that the molecular fractions which we compute are strong lower limits on the true values. The formation of large quantities of molecular gas on the

  2. Dense gas without star formation: The kpc-sized molecular disk in 3C326 N

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, Nicole; Lehnert, Matt; Guillard, Pierre; Salome, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 3 kpc disk of few 10^9 Ms of dense, warm H_2 in the nearby radio galaxy 3C326 N, which shows no signs of on-going or recent star formation and falls a factor 60 below the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy shows broad (FWHM \\sim 500 km/s) ro-vibrational H_2 lines across all of the disk, with irregular profiles and line ratios consistent with shocks. The ratio of turbulent and gravitational energy suggests that the gas is highly turbulent and not gravitationally bound. In absence of the driving by the jet, short turbulent dissipation times suggest the gas should collapse rapidly and form stars, at odds with the recent star-formation history. Motivated by hydrodynamic models of rapid H_2 formation boosted by turbulent compression, we propose that the molecules formed from diffuse atomic gas in the turbulent jet cocoon. Since the gas is not self-gravitating, it cannot form molecular clouds or stars while the jet is active, and is likely to disperse and become ato...

  3. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  4. Properties of Diffuse Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the interstellar medium in the lower-metallicity Magellanic Clouds explore somewhat different environmental conditions from those typically probed in our own Galactic ISM. Recent studies based on optical/UV spectra of SMC and LMC targets, for example, have revealed unexpected differences in gas-phase abundance patterns {for various atomic and molecular species} and have begun to explore the effects of differences in metallicity on the atomic-to-molecular transition and resulting molecular fraction f{H_2} - a key aspect in the formation of molecular clouds. We propose a more detailed study of the abundances, depletions, and local physical conditions characterizing diffuse molecular material in the Magellanic Clouds, using STIS E140H and E230M spectra of two sight lines with N{H_2} > 10^20 cm^-2 {both probing the outskirts of molecular clouds seen in CO emission}. The two STIS settings will include lines from various neutral and ionized species {with a range in depletion behavior}, several C I multiplets, and several bands of CO and C_2. By probing and characterizing the atomic-to-molecular transition in the Magellanic Clouds, we will address key issues regarding the effects of differences in metallicity on the relationship between the atomic and molecular gas in galaxies; on cloud structure, physical conditions, and diffuse cloud chemistry; and on the composition and properties of interstellar dust. The results of this project should thus aid in the interpretation of observations of atomic and molecular material in more distant low-metallicity systems.

  5. Dense circum-nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Claire-Elise; Green, James A; Dawson, Joanne R; Jones, Paul A; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Henkel, Christian; Baan, Willem A; Martín, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circum-nuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterise the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO$^{+}$ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circum-nuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1$-$0) and HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1$-$0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circum-nuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity integrated intensity ratios, HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0) and HNC (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps we identify photon dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it...

  6. SUBTASK 3.12 – GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Curran, Tyler; Henderson, Ann

    2014-06-30

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three scenarios. The first scenario used traditional techniques for cleaning the syngas prior to Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis, including gas sweetening with a physical solvent. In the second scenario, the CO2 was not removed from the gas stream prior to FT synthesis. In the third scenario, only warm-gas cleanup techniques were used, such that the feed gas to the FT unit contained both moisture and CO2. The results of the testing showed that the liquid fuels production from the FT catalyst was significantly hindered by the presence of moisture and CO2 in the syngas. Further testing would be needed to determine if this thermally efficient process is feasible with other FT catalysts. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  7. High Resolution Molecular Gas Maps of M33

    CERN Document Server

    Rosolowsky, E; Matsushita, S; Willner, S

    2007-01-01

    New observations of CO (J=1->0) line emission from M33, using the 25 element BEARS focal plane array at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45-m telescope, in conjunction with existing maps from the BIMA interferometer and the FCRAO 14-m telescope, give the highest resolution (13'') and most sensitive (RMS ~ 60 mK) maps to date of the distribution of molecular gas in the central 5.5 kpc of the galaxy. A new catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) has a completeness limit of 1.3 X 10^5 M_sun. The fraction of molecular gas found in GMCs is a strong function of radius in the galaxy, declining from 60% in the center to 20% at galactocentric radius R_gal ~ 4 kpc. Beyond that radius, GMCs are nearly absent, although molecular gas exists. Most (90%) of the emission from low mass clouds is found within 100 pc projected separation of a GMC. In an annulus 2.1< R_gal <4.1 kpc, GMC masses follow a power law distribution with index -2.1. Inside that radius, the mass distribution is truncated, and clouds more massive tha...

  8. Molecular gas content of H I monsters and implications to cold gas content evolution in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheoljong; Chung, Aeree; Yun, Min S.; Cybulski, Ryan; Narayanan, G.; Erickson, N.

    2014-06-01

    We present 12CO (J = 1 → 0) observations of a sample of local galaxies (0.04 monsters'. The data were obtained using the redshift search receiver on the five college radio astronomy observatory (FCRAO) 14 m telescope. The sample consists of 20 H I-massive galaxies with MH I > 3 × 1010 M⊙ from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey and 8 low surface brightness galaxies (LSBs) with a comparable MH I(>1.5 × 1010 M⊙). Our sample selection is purely based on the amount of neutral hydrogen, thereby providing a chance to study how atomic and molecular gas relate to each other in these H I-massive systems. We have detected CO in 15 out of 20 ALFALFA selected galaxies and 4 out of 8 LSBs with molecular gas mass MH2 of (1-11)× 109 M⊙. Their total cold gas masses of (2-7) × 1010 M⊙ make them some of the most gas-massive galaxies identified to date in the Local Universe. Observed trends associated with H I, H2, and stellar properties of the H I massive galaxies and the field comparison sample are analysed in the context of theoretical models of galaxy cold gas content and evolution, and the importance of total gas content and improved recipes for handling spatially differentiated behaviours of disc and halo gas are identified as potential areas of improvement for the modelling.

  9. Molecular Gas Content of HI Monsters and Implications to Cold Gas Content Evolution in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Cheoljong; Yun, Min S; Cybulski, Ryan; Narayanan, G; Erickson, N

    2014-01-01

    We present 12CO (J=1-0) observations of a sample of local galaxies (0.043e10Msun from the ALFALFA survey and 8 LSBs with a comparable M(HI) (>1.5e10Msun). Our sample selection is purely based on the amount of neutral hydrogen, thereby providing a chance to study how atomic and molecular gas relate to each other in these HI-massive systems. We have detected CO in 15 out of 20 ALFALFA selected galaxies and 4 out of 8 LSBs with molecular gas mass M(H2) of (1-11)e9Msun. Their total cold gas masses of (2-7e10Msun make them some of the most gas-massive galaxies identified to date in the Local Universe. Observed trends associated with HI, H2, and stellar properties of the HI massive galaxies and the field comparison sample are analyzed in the context of theoretical models of galaxy cold gas content and evolution, and the importance of total gas content and improved recipes for handling spatially differentiated behaviors of disk and halo gas are identified as potential areas of improvement for the modeling.

  10. Molecular gas and star formation in the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combes F.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The dense molecular gas is the ideal tracer of the spiral structure in the Milky Way, and should be used intensively to solve the puzzle of its structure. In spite of our position inside the plane, we can hope to disentangle the structures, with position-velocity diagrams, in addition to (l − b. I summarize the state of the art simulations of gas flows in the MW, and describe what can be done to improve the models, taking into account the star formation, in view of what is already done in external galaxies, with a more favorable viewing angle.

  11. The molecular gas associated with the Orion bright bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodaka, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Telsuo; Hayashi, Saeko S.

    1994-07-01

    Detailed studies of the shocked region associated with the Orion bright bar are presented. The millimeter wave spectral lines of (12)CO (J = 1-0), (13)CO (J = 1-0), CS (J = 2-1), HCO(+) (J = 1-0), and H51 alpha have been observed across the bright bar. The intensity of all the molecular species shows a rapid increase close to the ionization front and a significant falloff at a distance of approximately 50 sec farther out from it. This suggests the existence of a layer of dense molecular gas just outside the ionization front. This layer has a velocity redshifted by 1-2 km s-1 relative to the ambient molecular cloud, which can be due to acceleration by thermal and kinetic pressure from the H II region or due to a passage of a shock. The high-density molecular layer associated with the bar is probably a shock-compressed layer driven by the ionization front of M42. A multitransitional anaylsis of the CS emission shows that the H2 volume density of the molecular gas is larger than that of the ambient gas by a factor of 3. The apparent density enhancement of a factor of 3 in the shocked gas is too small for a radiative shock in a homogeneous medium; density inhomgeneities or clumpiness in the pre- and postshocked layer may account for this apparently small compression ratio. This layer is exposed to intense UV radiation from the Trapezium stars and a photodissocited region is formed between neutral layer and the ionization front. The similarity in distribution of the thermally excited H2 emissions arising from shock fronts and or dense phtotodissociation regions and the millimeter-wave molecular line emissions originating from cooled shock-compressed regions also supports the idea of homogeneity or clumpiness is the shocked cloud. The gas temperature of this shocked layer is about 100 K and is very high compared with other molecular clouds without an embedded heat source. Both shock heating and radiative heating may contribute to maintain this high temperature.

  12. Molecular Phylogeny Of Microbes In The Deep-Sea Sediments From Tropical West Pacific Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Xiao, X.; Wang, P.

    2005-12-01

    The presence and phylogeny of bacteria and archaea in five deep-sea sediment samples collected from west Pacific Warm Pool area (WP-0, WP-1, WP-2, WP-3, WP-4), and in five sediment layers (1cm-, 3cm-, 6cm-, 10cm-, 12cm- layer) of the 12-cm sediment core of WP-0 were checked and compared. The microbial diversity in the five deep-sea sediments were similar as revealed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and all of them contained members of non-thermophilic marine group I crenarchaeota as the predominant archaeal group. The composition of methylotrophs including methanotrophs, sulfate reducing bacteria in the WP-0 sediment core were further investigated by molecular marker based analysis of mxaF, pmoA, dsrAB, specific anoxic methane oxidation archaeal and sulfate reducing bacterial 16S rRNA genes. From MxaF amino acid sequence analysis, it was demonstrated that microbes belonging to α - Proteobacteria most related to Hyphomicrobium and Methylobacterium were dominant aerobic methylotrophs in this deep-sea sediment; and small percentage of type II methanotrophs affiliating closest to Methylocystis and Methylosinus were also detected in this environment. mxaF quantitative PCR results showed that in the west Pacific WP sediment there existed around 3× 10 4-5 methylotrophs per gram sediment, 10-100 times more than that in samples collected from several other deep-sea Pacific sediment sample, but about 10 times less than that present in samples collected from rice and flower garden soil. Diverse groups of novel archaea (named as WPA), not belonging to any known archaeal lineages were checked out. They could be placed in the euryarchaeota kingdom, separated into two distinct groups, the main group was peripherally related with methanogens, the other group related with Thermoplasma. Possible sulfate reducing bacterial related with Desulfotomaculum, Desulfacinum, Desulfomonile and Desulfanuticus were also detected in our study. The vertical distributions of WPA

  13. A jet-induced outflow of warm gas in 3C 293

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Tadhunter, C N; Oosterloo, T A; Holt, J; Van der Hulst, J M

    2005-01-01

    Using long slit emission-line spectra we detect a fast outflow of ionized gas, with velocities up to 1000 km/s, in the nearby powerful radio galaxy 3C 293 (z = 0.045). The fast outflow is located about 1 kpc east of the nucleus, in a region of enhanced radio emission due to the presence of a distorted radio jet. We present results that indicate that this fast outflow is caused by a jet-ISM interaction. The kinematics of the outflowing ionized gas are very similar to those of a fast outflow of neutral hydrogen gas in this galaxy, suggesting that both outflows are the result of the same driving mechanism. While the mass of the outflowing ionized gas is about 1 x 10e5 M_sun, the total HI mass involved in the neutral outflow is about 100 times higher (10e7 M_sun). This shows that, despite the high energies that must be involved in driving the outflow, most of the gas remains, or becomes again, neutral. Other outflows of ionized gas, although not as pronounced as in the region of the enhanced radio emission, are a...

  14. Intense Atomic and Molecular Beams via Neon Buffer Gas Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David; Doyle, John M

    2008-01-01

    We realize a continuous guided beam of cold deuterated ammonia with a flux of 3e11 ND3 molecules/s and a continuous free-space beam of cold potassium with a flux of 1e16 K atoms/s. A novel feature of the buffer gas source used to produce these beams is cold neon, which, due to intermediate Knudsen number beam dynamics, produces a forward velocity and low-energy tail that is comparable to much colder helium-based sources. We expect this source to be trivially generalizable to a very wide range of atomic and molecular species with significant vapor pressure below 1000 K. This source has properties that make it a good starting point for laser cooling of molecules or atoms, cold collision studies, trapping, or nonlinear optics in buffer-gas-cooled atomic or molecular gases.

  15. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane (CMSM) for Industrial Gas Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kean; Haraya Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Membrane separation is an environmental benign technology for 21st century, and is developing quickly to replace the conventional distillation process. Carbon molecular sieve membrane (CMSM) was synthesized through the controlled pyrolysis of polyimide films. The CMSM is symmetric in structure and presents strong sieving effect towards gas molecules of slightly different diameters. The microstructure of CMSM was manipulated through the thermal treatment program and further modified through activation vapor/chemical depositions. It is demonstrated that CMSM can be synthesized/modified for specific gas mixtures, such as O2/N2, CO2/CH4, C3H6/C3H8, and ect. The pore size distribution, relationship between the permeance & selectivity on CMSM for the separation of some gas pairs was also investigated.

  16. Molecular Gas Feeding the Circumnuclear Disk of the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Kim, Woong-Tae; Tang, Ya-Wen; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The interaction between a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the surrounding material is of primary importance in modern astrophysics. The detection of the molecular 2 pc circumnuclear disk (CND) immediately around the Milky Way SMBH, SgrA*, provides a unique opportunity to study SMBH accretion at subparsec scales. Our new wide-field CS(J = 2 ‑ 1) map toward the Galactic center (GC) reveals multiple dense molecular streamers that originated from the ambient clouds 20 pc further out, and that are connected to the central 2 pc of the CND. These dense gas streamers appear to carry gas directly toward the nuclear region and might be captured by the central potential. Our phase-plot analysis indicates that these streamers show a signature of rotation and inward radial motion with progressively higher velocities as the gas approaches the CND and finally ends up corotating with the CND. Our results might suggest a possible mechanism of gas feeding the CND from 20 pc around 2 pc in the GC. In this paper, we discuss the morphology and the kinematics of these streamers. As the nearest observable Galactic nucleus, this feeding process may have implications for understanding the processes in extragalactic nuclei.

  17. High Density Molecular Gas in the IR-bright Galaxy System VV114

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, D; Yun, M S; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Sakamoto, K

    2004-01-01

    New high resolution CO(3-2) interferometric map of the IR-bright interacting galaxy system VV114 observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) reveal a substantial amount of warm and dense gas in the IR-bright but optically obscured galaxy, VV114E, and the overlap region connecting the two nuclei. A 1.8 x 1.4 kpc concentration of CO(3-2) emitting gas with a total mass of 4 x 10^9 Msun coincides with the peaks of NIR, MIR, and radio continuum emission found previously by others, identifying the dense fuel for the AGN and/or the starburst activity there. Extensive CO(2-1) emission is also detected, revealing detailed distribution and kinematics that are consistent with the earlier CO(1-0) results. The widely distributed molecular gas traced in CO(2-1) and the distributed discrete peaks of CO(3-2) emission suggest that a spatially extended intense starbursts may contribute significantly to its large IR luminosity. These new observations further support the notion that VV114 is approaching its final stage of merger...

  18. Molecular gas associated with IRAS 10361-5830

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzano, M M; Vasquez, J; Rubio, M; Romero, G A; .,

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas and the dust in the molecular clump linked to IRAS 10361-5830, located in the environs of the bubble-shaped HII region Gum 31 in the Carina region, with the aim of determining the main parameters of the associated material and investigating the evolutionary state of the young stellar objects identified there. Using the APEX telescope, we mapped the molecular emission in the J=3-2 transition of three CO isotopologues, 12CO, 13CO and C18O, over a 1.5' x 1.5' region around the IRAS position. We also observed the high density tracers CS and HCO+ toward the source. The cold dust distribution was analyzed using submillimeter continuum data at 870 \\mu\\ obtained with the APEX telescope. Complementary IR and radio data at different wavelengths were used to complete the study of the ISM. The molecular gas distribution reveals a cavity and a shell-like structure of ~ 0.32 pc in radius centered at the position of the IRAS source, with some young stellar objects (YSOs) proj...

  19. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (Vcmax), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  20. Characterizing the drivers of seedling leaf gas exchange responses to warming and altered precipitation: indirect and direct effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G; Pold, Grace; Goranson, Carol; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic forces are projected to lead to warmer temperatures and altered precipitation patterns globally. The impact of these climatic changes on the uptake of carbon by the land surface will, in part, determine the rate and magnitude of these changes. However, there is a great deal of uncertainty in how terrestrial ecosystems will respond to climate in the future. Here, we used a fully factorial warming (four levels) by precipitation (three levels) manipulation experiment in an old-field ecosystem in the northeastern USA to examine the impact of climatic changes on leaf carbon exchange in five species of deciduous tree seedlings. We found that photosynthesis generally increased in response to increasing precipitation and decreased in response to warming. Respiration was less sensitive to the treatments. The net result was greater leaf carbon uptake in wetter and cooler conditions across all species. Structural equation modelling revealed the primary pathway through which climate impacted leaf carbon exchange. Net photosynthesis increased with increasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic enzyme capacity (Vcmax), and decreased with increasing respiration of leaves. Soil moisture and leaf temperature at the time of measurement most heavily influenced these primary drivers of net photosynthesis. Leaf respiration increased with increasing soil moisture, leaf temperature, and photosynthetic supply of substrates. Counter to the soil moisture response, respiration decreased with increasing precipitation amount, indicating that the response to short- (i.e. soil moisture) versus long-term (i.e. precipitation amount) water stress differed, possibly as a result of changes in the relative amounts of growth and maintenance demand for respiration over time. These data (>500 paired measurements of light and dark leaf gas exchange), now publicly available, detail the pathways by which climate can impact leaf gas exchange and could be useful for testing assumptions in

  1. Dust and Molecular Gas from the Optically Faint Quasars at z 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, C.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Wagg, J.; Walter, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Omont, A.; Cox, P.; Menten, K.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present millimeter observations of the twelve z 6 quasars discovered from the SDSS southern survey. These objects are typically one or two magnitudes fainter in the optical (i.e., 20.6 Max Plank Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO) on the IRAM-30m telescope and three of them have been detected. We also searched for Molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three MAMBO detections with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and two of them have been detected. The millimeter continuum and CO detections in the optically faint quasars at z 6 reveal strong FIR emission from 40 to 60 K warm dust and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. The molecular gas masses of the two CO detections are all about 10^10 Msun, which are comparable to that of the CO-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. Their FIR-to-CO luminosity ratios are also consistent with that of the previous CO-detected quasars at z 2 to 6 and the dusty starbusrt systems, e.g., the submillimeter galaxies. However, their FIR-to-UV luminosity ratios are higher than that of the millimeter-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. This confirms the shallow nonlinear FIR-to-AGN luminosity relationship found with other AGN-starburst systems at local and high-z universe. All these results suggest massive star formation coeval with rapid black hole accretion in the host galaxies of the millimeter-detected optically faint quasars at z 6. Further high-resolution imaging of the Molecular CO emission (e.g., with ALMA) will be important to measure the dynamical masses of the spheroidal hosts and understand the black hole-bulge relationship of the optically faint quasars at the earliest epoch.

  2. Cold dust but warm gas in the unusual elliptical galaxy NGC 4125

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Foyle, K; Parkin, T J; Cooper, E Mentuch; Roussel, H; Sauvage, M; Smith, M W L; Baes, M; Bendo, G; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; De Looze, I; Galametz, M; Gear, W; Lebouteiller, V; Madden, S; Pereira-Santaella, M; Remy-Ruyer, A

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory have revealed an unusual elliptical galaxy, NGC 4125, which has strong and extended submillimeter emission from cold dust but only very strict upper limits to its CO and HI emission. Depending on the dust emissivity, the total dust mass is 2-5x10^6 Msun. While the neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is extremely low (= 10^4 K faster than the dust is evaporated. If galaxies like NGC 4125, where the far-infrared emission does not trace neutral gas in the usual manner, are common at higher redshift, this could have significant implications for our understanding of high redshift galaxies and galaxy evolution.

  3. The injection of liquid cool CO2 in a warm depleted gas reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, C.; Maas, J.H.; Loeve, D.

    2013-01-01

    The P18-4 compartment (operated by TAQA Energy B.V.) would be injected by CO2 at a minimum temperature of 12 degrees C. At these temperatures, the CO2 phase will either be a gas or a liquid. As the initial temperature of the reservoir is 120 oC, the CO2 will eventually be the gaseous or (at higher

  4. Dense Molecular Gas: A Sensitive Probe of Stellar Feedback Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-01-01

    We show that the mass fraction of GMC gas (n>100 cm^-3) in dense (n>>10^4 cm^-3) star-forming clumps, observable in dense molecular tracers (L_HCN/L_CO(1-0)), is a sensitive probe of the strength and mechanism(s) of stellar feedback. Using high-resolution galaxy-scale simulations with pc-scale resolution and explicit models for feedback from radiation pressure, photoionization heating, stellar winds, and supernovae (SNe), we make predictions for the dense molecular gas tracers as a function of GMC and galaxy properties and the efficiency of stellar feedback. In models with weak/no feedback, much of the mass in GMCs collapses into dense sub-units, predicting L_HCN/L_CO(1-0) ratios order-of-magnitude larger than observed. By contrast, models with feedback properties taken directly from stellar evolution calculations predict dense gas tracers in good agreement with observations. Changing the strength or timing of SNe tends to move systems along, rather than off, the L_HCN-L_CO relation (because SNe heat lower-de...

  5. Extended Warm Gas in the ULIRG Mrk273: Galactic Outflows and Tidal Debris

    CERN Document Server

    Zaurin, Javier Rodriguez; Rupke, David S N; Veilleux, Sylvain; Spoon, Henrik W W; Chiaberge, Marco; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Batcheldor, Dan; Sparks, William B

    2014-01-01

    We present new HST ACS medium- and narrow-band images and long-slit, optical (4000 - 7200A) spectra obtained using the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) on La Palma, of the merging system Mrk273. The HST observations sample the [OIII]4959,5007 emission from the galaxy and the nearby continuum. The images show that the morphologies of the extended continuum and the ionised gas emission from the galaxy are decoupled, extending almost perpendicular to each other. In particular, we detect for the first time a spectacular structure of ionised gas in the form of filaments extending ~23 kpc to the east of the nuclear region. The quiescent ionised gas kinematics at these locations suggests that these filaments are tidal debris left over from a secondary merger event that are illuminated by an AGN in the nuclear regions. The images also reveal a complex morphology in the nuclear region of the galaxy for both the continuum and the [OIII] emission. Kinematic disturbance, in the form of broad (FWHM > 500 km s-1) and/or strong...

  6. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, Robin T; Herbst, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable o...

  7. Fighting global warming by greenhouse gas removal: destroying atmospheric nitrous oxide thanks to synergies between two breakthrough technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tingzhen; de Richter, Renaud; Shen, Sheng; Caillol, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Even if humans stop discharging CO2 into the atmosphere, the average global temperature will still increase during this century. A lot of research has been devoted to prevent and reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere, in order to mitigate the effects of climate change. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one of the technologies that might help to limit emissions. In complement, direct CO2 removal from the atmosphere has been proposed after the emissions have occurred. But, the removal of all the excess anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 will not be enough, due to the fact that CO2 outgases from the ocean as its solubility is dependent of its atmospheric partial pressure. Bringing back the Earth average surface temperature to pre-industrial levels would require the removal of all previously emitted CO2. Thus, the atmospheric removal of other greenhouse gases is necessary. This article proposes a combination of disrupting techniques to transform nitrous oxide (N2O), the third most important greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of current radiative forcing, which is harmful for the ozone layer and possesses quite high global warming potential. Although several scientific publications cite "greenhouse gas removal," to our knowledge, it is the first time innovative solutions are proposed to effectively remove N2O or other GHGs from the atmosphere other than CO2.

  8. Dense Molecular Gas Excitation at High Redshift: Detection of HCO+(J=4-3) Emission in the Cloverleaf Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Riechers, Dominik A; Carilli, Christopher L; Cox, Pierre; Weiss, Axel; Bertoldi, Frank; Menten, Karl M

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of HCO+(J=4-3) emission in the Cloverleaf Quasar at z=2.56, using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. HCO+ emission is a star formation indicator similar to HCN, tracing dense molecular hydrogen gas (n(H2) ~= 10^5 cm^-3) within star-forming molecular clouds. We derive a lensing-corrected HCO+(J=4-3) line luminosity of L'(HCO+(4-3)) = (1.6+/-0.3) x 10^9 (mu_L/11)^-1 K km/s pc^2, which corresponds to only 48% of the HCO+(J=1=0) luminosity, and <~4% of the CO(J=3-2) luminosity. The HCO+ excitation thus is clearly subthermal in the J=4-3 transition. Modeling of the HCO+ line radiative transfer suggests that the HCO+ emission emerges from a region with physical properties comparable to that exhibiting the CO line emission, but 2x higher gas density. This suggests that both HCO+ and CO lines trace the warm, dense molecular gas where star formation actively takes place. The HCO+ lines have only ~2/3 the width of the CO lines, which may suggest that the densest gas is more spatially co...

  9. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  10. A heterogeneous model for gas transport in carbon molecular sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L P; Yuan, Y X; Farooq, S; Bhatia, S K

    2005-01-18

    A dual resistance model with distribution of either barrier or pore diffusional activation energy is proposed in this work for gas transport in carbon molecular sieve (CMS) micropores. This is a novel approach in which the equilibrium is homogeneous, but the kinetics is heterogeneous. The model seems to provide a possible explanation for the concentration dependence of the thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients observed in previous studies from this laboratory on gas diffusion in CMS. The energy distribution is assumed to follow the gamma distribution function. It is shown that the energy distribution model can fully capture the behavior described by the empirical model established in earlier studies to account for the concentration dependence of thermodynamically corrected barrier and pore diffusion coefficients. A methodology is proposed for extracting energy distribution parameters, and it is further shown that the extracted energy distribution parameters can effectively predict integral uptake and column breakthrough profiles over a wide range of operating pressures.

  11. Accurate exchange-correlation energies for the warm dense electron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, FD; Blunt, NS; Brown, EW; Lee, DKK; Spencer, JS; Foulkes, WMC; Shepherd, JJ

    2016-01-01

    Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) is used to sample exact-on-average $N$-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10$^{124}$ matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the $k$-space configurati...

  12. Effects of viscous pressure on warm inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia, E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: rabiasaleem1988@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, University of the Punjab, Quaid-e-Azam Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2014-12-01

    This paper is devoted to study the effects of bulk viscous pressure on an inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model using FRW background. The matter contents of the universe are assumed to be inflaton and imperfect fluid. We evaluate inflaton fields, potentials and entropy density for variable as well as constant dissipation and bulk viscous coefficients in weak as well as high dissipative regimes during intermediate era. In order to discuss inflationary perturbations, we evaluate entropy density, scalar (tensor) power spectra, their corresponding spectral indices, tensor-scalar ratio and running of spectral index in terms of inflaton which are constrained using recent Planck, WMAP7 and Bicep2 probes.

  13. Characterising the Dense Molecular Gas in Exceptional Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnard, Richard C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The interferometric facilities now coming online (the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) and the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA)) and those planned for the coming decade (the Next Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA)) in the radio to sub-millimetre regimes are opening a window to the molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies. However, our understanding of similar galaxies in the local universe is still far from complete and the data analysis techniques and tools needed to interpret the observations in consistent and comparable ways are yet to be developed. I first describe the Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) script developed to empower a public radiative transfer code. I characterise both the public code and MCMC script, including an exploration of the effect of observing molecular lines at high redshift where the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) can provide a significant background, as well as the effect this can have on well-known local correlations. I present two studies of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the local universe making use of literature and collaborator data. In the first of these, NGC6240, I use the wealth of available data and the geometry of the source to develop a multi-phase, multi-species model, finding evidence for a complex medium of hot diffuse and cold dense gas in pressure equilibrium. Next, I study the prototypical ULIRG Arp 220; an extraordinary galaxy rendered especially interesting by the controversy over the power source of the western of the two merger nuclei and its immense luminosity and dust obscuration. Using traditional grid based methods I explore the molecular gas conditions within the nuclei and find evidence for chemical differentiation between the two nuclei, potentially related to the obscured power source. Finally, I investigate the potential evolution of proto-clusters over cosmic time with sub-millimetre observations of 14 radio galaxies, unexpectedly finding

  14. The MASSIVE Survey. VI. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of Warm Ionized Gas in the Most Massive Local Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Ene, Irina; Davis, Timothy A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Goulding, Andy D.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Nyland, Kristina; Thomas, Jens

    2017-03-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the existence, spatial distribution, and kinematics of warm ionized gas as traced by the [O ii] 3727 Å emission line in 74 of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. All of our galaxies have deep integral-field spectroscopy from the volume- and magnitude-limited MASSIVE survey of early-type galaxies with stellar mass {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )> 11.5 (M K sample, we detect warm ionized gas in 28, which yields a global detection fraction of 38 ± 6% down to a typical [O ii] equivalent width limit of 2 Å. MASSIVE fast rotators are more likely to have gas than MASSIVE slow rotators with detection fractions of 80 ± 10% and 28 ± 6%, respectively. The spatial extents span a wide range of radii (0.6–18.2 kpc; 0.1–4R e ), and the gas morphologies are diverse, with 17/28 ≈ 61 ± 9% being centrally concentrated, 8/28 ≈ 29 ± 9% exhibiting clear rotation out to several kiloparsecs, and 3/28 ≈ 11 ± 6% being extended but patchy. Three out of four fast rotators show kinematic alignment between the stars and gas, whereas the two slow rotators with robust kinematic measurements available exhibit kinematic misalignment. Our inferred warm ionized gas masses are roughly ∼105 M ⊙. The emission line ratios and radial equivalent width profiles are generally consistent with excitation of the gas by the old underlying stellar population. We explore different gas origin scenarios for MASSIVE galaxies and find that a variety of physical processes are likely at play, including internal gas recycling, cooling out of the hot gaseous halo, and gas acquired via mergers.

  15. Molecular gas temperature and density in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. F.; Jaffe, D. T.; Bash, F. N.; Israel, F. P.; Maloney, P. R.; Baas, F.

    1993-01-01

    We combine beam-matched CO-13, CO-12 J = 3 yields 2 and J = 2 yields 1 line data to infer the molecular gas excitation conditions in the central 500 to 1600 pc diameters of a small sample of infrared-bright external galaxies: NGC253, IC342, M 83, Maffei 2, and NGC6946. Additional observations of the J = 1 yields 0 lines of C-18O and CO-13 set limits on the opacity of the CO-13 J = 1 yields 0 line averaged over the central kiloparsec of these spiral galaxies.

  16. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Schuster, Karl-Friedrich [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d' Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/ Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep

  17. Pandemics, pathogenicity and changing molecular epidemiology of cholera in the era of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fazle Rabbi; Nur, Zannatun; Hassan, Nazia; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dunachie, Susanna

    2017-03-07

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative, non-spore forming curved rod is found in diverse aquatic ecosystems around the planet. It is classified according to its major surface antigen into around 206 serogroups, of which O1 and O139 cause epidemic cholera. A recent spatial modelling technique estimated that around 2.86 million cholera cases occur globally every year, and of them approximately 95,000 die. About 1.3 billion people are currently at risk of infection from cholera. Meta-analysis and mathematical modelling have demonstrated that due to global warming the burden of vector-borne diseases like malaria, leishmaniasis, meningococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, dengue and chikungunya will increase in the coming years in the tropics and beyond. This review offers an overview of the interplay between global warming and the pathogenicity and epidemiology of V. cholerae. Several distinctive features of cholera survival (optimal thriving at 15% salinity, 30 °C water temperature, and pH 8.5) indicate a possible role of climate change in triggering the epidemic process. Genetic exchange (ctxAB, zot, ace, cep, and orfU) between strains and transduction process allows potential emergence of new toxigenic clones. These processes are probably controlled by precise environmental signals such as optimum temperature, sunlight and osmotic conditions. Environmental influences on phytoplankton growth and chitin remineralization will be discussed alongside the interplay of poor sanitary conditions, overcrowding, improper sewage disposal and global warming in promoting the growth and transmission of this deadly disease. The development of an effective early warning system based on climate data could help to prevent and control future outbreaks. It may become possible to integrate real-time monitoring of oceanic regions, climate variability and epidemiological and demographic population dynamics to predict cholera outbreaks and support the design of cost-effective public health

  18. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  19. The influence of warm ischemia elimination on kidney injury during transplantation – clinical and molecular study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Hałoń, Agnieszka; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Myszka, Marta; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Polak, Wojciech; Boratyńska, Maria; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Kidney surface cooling was used during implantation to assess the effect of warm ischemia elimination on allograft function, histological changes and immune-related gene expression. 23 recipients were randomly assigned to a group operated on with kidney surface cooling during implantation (ice bag technique, IBT group), and the other 23 recipients receiving the contralateral kidney from the same donor were operated on with a standard technique. Three consecutive kidney core biopsies were obtained during the transplantation procedure: after organ recovery, after cold ischemia and after reperfusion. Gene expression levels were determined using low-density arrays (Format 32, TaqMan). The IBT group showed a significantly lower rate of detrimental events (delayed graft function and/or acute rejection, p = 0.015) as well as higher glomerular filtration rate on day 14 (p = 0.026). A greater decrease of MMP9 and LCN2 gene expression was seen in the IBT group during total ischemia (p = 0.003 and p = 0.018). Elimination of second warm ischemia reduced the number of detrimental events after kidney transplantation, and thus had influence on the short-term but not long-term allograft function. Surface cooling of the kidney during vascular anastomosis may reduce some detrimental effects of immune activation resulting from both brain death and ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27808277

  20. Complex molecular gas structure in the Medusa merger

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S

    2000-01-01

    High resolution OVRO aperture synthesis maps of the 12CO 1-0 emission in the `Medusa' galaxy merger (NGC4194) reveal the molecular emission being surprisingly extended. It is distributed on a total scale of 25$''$ (4.7 kpc) - despite the apparent advanced stage of the merger. The complex, striking CO morphology occupies mainly the center and the north-eastern part of the main optical body. The extended 12CO flux is tracing two prominent dust lanes: one which is crossing the central region at right angle and a second which curves to the north-east and then into the beginning of the northern tidal tail. The bulk of the 12CO emission (67%) can be found in a complex starburst region encompassing the central 2kpc. The molecular gas is distributed in five major emission regions of typical size 300pc. About 15% of the total 12CO flux is found in a bright region 1.5'' south of the radio continuum nucleus. We suggest that this region together with the kpc sized central starburst is being fueled by gas flows along the ...

  1. Absorption from Diffuse Molecular Gas in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Dan; Murphy, Tara; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony

    2011-04-01

    Observations of absorption from complex molecular species (e.g., HCO+, H2CO, HCN, C3H2, NH3) in the mm- and cm-wave spectra of extragalactic radio sources have revealed a surprisingly rich chemistry in relatively diffuse Galactic gas. Some of those same species have been detected, at redshifts z ~ 0.6-0.9, in similar spectra of several gravitationally lensed QSOs. It is not at all clear how such complex molecules are formed (and survive) in clouds characterized by such relatively low densities and extinctions. We propose to search for absorption from NH3 and C3H2 in the nearby, lower metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud, using ATCA/CABB observations of two of the brightest 20 GHz sources behind the main body of the LMC. Comparisons among the lowest NH3 inversion lines can yield estimates for the kinetic temperature in the gas; the ratio of linear- to cyclic-C3H2 can give an indication of the density. Via comparisons with existing observations of these species in our Galaxy and in several higher redshift systems, we aim to further understand (1) how complex molecules can be present in diffuse media, and (2) diffuse cloud chemistry and the atomic-to-molecular transition in lower metallicity systems.

  2. Structure–performance characterization for carbon molecular sieve membranes using molecular scale gas probes

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Understanding the relationship between carbon molecular sieve (CMS) pore structure and corresponding gas separation performance enables optimization for a given gas separation application. The final pyrolysis temperature and starting polymer precursor are the two critical parameters in controlling CMS performance. This study considers structure and performance changes of CMS derived from a commercially available polymer precursor at different pyrolysis temperatures. As reviewed in this paper, most traditional characterization methods based on microscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, sorption-based pore size distribution measurements etc. provide limited information for relating separation performance to the CMS morphology and structural changes. A useful alternative approach based on different sized gases as molecular scale probes of the CMS pore structure was successfully used here in conjunction with separation data to provide critical insights into the structure-performance relationships of the engineered CMS.

  3. Accurate Exchange-Correlation Energies for the Warm Dense Electron Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Brown, Ethan W; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C; Shepherd, James J

    2016-09-09

    The density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) method is used to sample exact-on-average N-body density matrices for uniform electron gas systems of up to 10^{124} matrix elements via a stochastic solution of the Bloch equation. The results of these calculations resolve a current debate over the accuracy of the data used to parametrize finite-temperature density functionals. Exchange-correlation energies calculated using the real-space restricted path-integral formalism and the k-space configuration path-integral formalism disagree by up to ∼10% at certain reduced temperatures T/T_{F}≤0.5 and densities r_{s}≤1. Our calculations confirm the accuracy of the configuration path-integral Monte Carlo results available at high density and bridge the gap to lower densities, providing trustworthy data in the regime typical of planetary interiors and solids subject to laser irradiation. We demonstrate that the DMQMC method can calculate free energies directly and present exact free energies for T/T_{F}≥1 and r_{s}≤2.

  4. The Use of Biofilter to Reduce Atmospheric Global Warming Gas (CH4) Eemissions from Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Thomas, J. C.; Brown, K. W.; Sung, K.

    2001-12-01

    The emission of greenhouse gasses resulting from anthropogenic activities is increasing the atmospheric concentration of these gases, which can influence the climatic system by changing the temperature, precipitation, wind and other climate factors. Methane (CH4) is a very potent greenhouse gas and CH4 emission from landfills in US has been reported as 37% of total anthropogenic source of CH4 emission. Properly designed soil biofilters may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills and help reduce the accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. Biofilter performance was tested under a variety of environmental and design conditions. The results showed that biofilters have the potential to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills by as much as 83%. A quadratic equation was developed to describe the dependence of methane oxidation rate in a sandy loam textured soil as a function of soil temperature, soil moisture and ammonium nitrogen concentration. Using this equation and the averaged soil temperature and moisture contents, and census data for the largest cities of each of the 48 contiguous states, oxidation rates was calculated. A methane emission model was also developed to estimate the methane emission from municipal waste landfills with different covers. Older landfills with soil covers emitted an average of 83% of the generated CH4. Landfills with RCRA covers emitted 90% of the generated CH4 without biofilters and only 10% with biofilters. Thus, the installation of properly sized biofilters should significantly reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills.

  5. Heating of the molecular gas in the massive outflow of the local ultraluminous-infrared and radio-loud galaxy 4C12.50

    CERN Document Server

    Dasyra, K M; Novak, G S; Bremer, M; Spinoglio, L; Santaella, M Pereira; Salome, P; Falgarone, E

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparison of the molecular gas properties in the outflow vs. in the ambient medium of the local prototype radio-loud and ultraluminous-infrared galaxy 4C12.50 (IRAS13451+1232), using new data from the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and 30m telescope, and the Herschel space telescope. Previous H_2 (0-0) S(1) and S(2) observations with the Spitzer space telescope had indicated that the warm (~400K) molecular gas in 4C12.50 is made up of a 1.4(+-0.2)x10^8 M_sun ambient reservoir and a 5.2(+-1.7)x10^7 M_sun outflow. The new CO(1-0) data cube indicates that the corresponding cold (25K) H_2 gas mass is 1.0(+-0.1)x10^10 M_sun for the ambient medium and = 30 times higher in the outflow than in the ambient medium, indicating that a non-negligible fraction of the accelerated gas is heated to temperatures at which star formation is inefficient. This conclusion is robust against the use of different alpha factor values, and/or different warm gas tracers (H_2 vs. H_2 plus CO): with the CO-probed gas mas...

  6. The nearby interstellar medium toward α Leo. UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the conditions in the nearest interstellar cloud. Methods: We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star α Leo (Regulus). Observations were obtained with STIS at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. Results: The gas in front of α Leo exhibits two absorption components. The main one is kinematically identified as the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second component is shifted by +5.6 km s-1 relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky, and shares its ionization and physical conditions. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750, -600) K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025, -0.03) cm-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance yields the ion fractions for 10 different atoms and indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized. Metals are significantly depleted onto grains, with sulfur showing [S/H] -0.27. N(H I) = 1.9 (+0.9, -0.6) × 1018 cm-3, which indicates that this partly neutral gas occupies only 2 to 8 parsecs (about 13%) of the space toward the star, with the remaining volume being filled with a hot gas that emits soft X-rays. We do not detect any absorption features from the highly ionized species that could be produced in an interface between the warm medium and the surrounding hot gas, possibly because of non-equilibrium conditions or a particular magnetic field orientation that reduces thermal conduction. Finally, the radial velocity of the LIC agrees with that of the Local Leo Cold Cloud, indicating that they may be physically related.

  7. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this

  8. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this

  9. Eutrophication effects on greenhouse gas fluxes from shallow-lake mesocosms override those of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Thomas A; Audet, Joachim; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Lauridsen, Torben L; Søndergaard, Martin; Landkildehus, Frank; Larsen, Søren E; Jeppesen, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Fresh waters make a disproportionately large contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with shallow lakes being particular hot spots. Given their global prevalence, how GHG fluxes from shallow lakes are altered by climate change may have profound implications for the global carbon cycle. Empirical evidence for the temperature dependence of the processes controlling GHG production in natural systems is largely based on the correlation between seasonal temperature variation and seasonal change in GHG fluxes. However, ecosystem-level GHG fluxes could be influenced by factors, which while varying seasonally with temperature are actually either indirectly related (e.g. primary producer biomass) or largely unrelated to temperature, for instance nutrient loading. Here, we present results from the longest running shallow-lake mesocosm experiment which demonstrate that nutrient concentrations override temperature as a control of both the total and individual GHG flux. Furthermore, testing for temperature treatment effects at low and high nutrient levels separately showed only one, rather weak, positive effect of temperature (CH4 flux at high nutrients). In contrast, at low nutrients, the CO2 efflux was lower in the elevated temperature treatments, with no significant effect on CH4 or N2 O fluxes. Further analysis identified possible indirect effects of temperature treatment. For example, at low nutrient levels, increased macrophyte abundance was associated with significantly reduced fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 for both total annual flux and monthly observation data. As macrophyte abundance was positively related to temperature treatment, this suggests the possibility of indirect temperature effects, via macrophyte abundance, on CH4 and CO2 flux. These findings indicate that fluxes of GHGs from shallow lakes may be controlled more by factors indirectly related to temperature, in this case nutrient concentration and the abundance of primary producers. Thus, at ecosystem

  10. Modeling of diffuse molecular gas applied to HD 102065 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Nehme, Cyrine; Boulanger, Francois; Forets, Guillaume Pineau des; Gry, Cecile

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We model a diffuse molecular cloud present along the line of sight to the star HD 102065. We compare our modeling with observations to test our understanding of physical conditions and chemistry in diffuse molecular clouds. Methods. We analyze an extensive set of spectroscopic observations which characterize the diffuse molecular cloud observed toward HD 102065. Absorption observations provide the extinction curve, H2, C I, CO, CH, and CH+ column densities and excitation. These data are complemented by observations of CII, CO and dust emission. Physical conditions are determined using the Meudon PDR model of UV illuminated gas. Results. We find that all observational results, except column densities of CH, CH+ and H2 in its excited (J > 2) levels, are consistent with a cloud model implying a Galactic radiation field (G~0.4 in Draine's unit), a density of 80 cm-3 and a temperature (60-80 K) set by the equilibrium between heating and cooling processes. To account for excited (J >2) H2 levels column densit...

  11. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity influenced by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M; Stevens, William B; Caesar-TonThat, Thecan; Liebig, Mark A; Wang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Little information exists about how global warming potential (GWP) is affected by management practices in agroecosystems. We evaluated the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on net GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI or GWP per unit crop yield) calculated by soil respiration (GWP and GHGI) and organic C (SOC) (GWP and GHGI) methods after accounting for CO emissions from all sources (irrigation, farm operations, N fertilization, and greenhouse gas [GHG] fluxes) and sinks (crop residue and SOC) in a Lihen sandy loam from 2008 to 2011 in western North Dakota. Treatments were two irrigation practices (irrigated vs. nonirrigated) and five cropping systems (conventional-till malt barley [ L.] with N fertilizer [CTBN], conventional-till malt barley with no N fertilizer [CTBO], no-till malt barley-pea [ L.] with N fertilizer [NTB-P], no-till malt barley with N fertilizer, and no-till malt barley with no N fertilizer [NTBO]). While CO equivalents were greater with irrigation, tillage, and N fertilization than without, NO and CH fluxes were 2 to 218 kg CO eq. ha greater in nonirrigated NTBN and irrigated CTBN than in other treatments. Previous year's crop residue and C sequestration rate were 202 to 9316 kg CO eq. ha greater in irrigated NTB-P than in other treatments. Compared with other treatments, GWP and GWP were 160 to 9052 kg CO eq. ha lower in irrigated and nonirrigated NTB-P. Similarly, GHGI and GHGI were lower in nonirrigated NTB-P than in other treatments. Regardless of irrigation practices, NTB-P may lower net GHG emissions more than other treatments in the northern Great Plains. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. The state of the warm and cold gas in the extreme starburst at the core of the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Hogan, Michael T. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Wilner, David J.; Bayliss, Matthew B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Benson, Bradford A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); McNamara, Brian R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Wei, Lisa H., E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (∼800 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L {sub Hα} = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM ≳ 500 km s{sup –1}), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, which implies that

  13. Integrated evaluation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) agroecosystems in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammad; Khoramivafa, Mahmud; Mondani, Farzad

    2014-08-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine and discuss the aggregate of energy use and greenhouse gas emission (CO2, N2O, and CH4) for sugar beet agroecosystems in western of Iran. For this propose data was collected by using questionnaires and face to face interview with 50 farmers. Results showed that total inputs and output energy were 49517.2 and 1095360.0 MJ ha-1, respectively. Energy use efficiency was 22.12. Total CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions due to chemical inputs were 2668.35, 22.92 and 3.49 kg, respectively. In sugar beet farms total global warming potential (GWPs) was 9847.77 kg CO2eq ha-1. In terms of CO2 equivalents, 27% of the GWPs come from CO2, 72% from N2O, and 1% from CH4. In this research input and output carbon were 29340.0 and 2678.6 kg C ha-1, respectively. Hence, carbon efficiency ratio was 10.95.

  14. Differences in net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity between major rice-based cropping systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhengqin; Liu, Yinglie; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Pingli; Huang, Taiqing

    2015-12-02

    Double rice (DR) and upland crop-single rice (UR) systems are the major rice-based cropping systems in China, yet differences in net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) between the two systems are poorly documented. Accordingly, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to simultaneously measure methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) in oil rape-rice-rice and wheat-rice (representing DR and UR, respectively) systems with straw incorporation (0, 3 and 6 t/ha) during the rice-growing seasons. Compared with the UR system, the annual CH4, N2O, grain yield and NGWP were significantly increased in the DR system, though little effect on SOC sequestration or GHGI was observed without straw incorporation. Straw incorporation increased CH4 emission and SOC sequestration but had no significant effect on N2O emission in both systems. Averaged over the three study years, straw incorporation had no significant effect on NGWP and GHGI in the UR system, whereas these parameters were greatly increased in the DR system, i.e., by 108% (3 t/ha) and 180% (6 t/ha) for NGWP and 103% (3 t/ha) and 168% (6 t/ha) for GHGI.

  15. Energetics of the molecular gas in the H_2 luminous radio galaxy 3C 326: Evidence for negative AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, N P H; Salome, P; Guillard, P; Lehnert, M D; Ogle, P; Appleton, P; Falgarone, E; Forets, G Pineau des

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the gas conditions in the H_2 luminous radio galaxy 3C326N at z~0.1, which has a low star formation rate (SFR~0.07 M_sun/yr) in spite of a gas surface density similar to those in starburst galaxies. Its star-formation efficiency is likely a factor ~20-30 lower than those of ordinary star-forming galaxies. Combining new IRAM CO emission-line interferometry with existing Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy, we find that the luminosity ratio of CO and pure rotational H_2 line emission is factors 10-100 lower than what is usually found. This may suggest that most of the molecular gas is warm. The Na D absorption-line profile of 3C326N in the optical suggests an outflow with a terminal velocity of ~ -1800 km/s and a mass outflow rate of 30-40 M_sun/yr, which cannot be explained by star formation. The mechanical power implied by the wind, of order 10^43 erg/s, is comparable to the bolometric luminosity of the emission lines of ionized and molecular gas. To explain these observations,...

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential of traditional and diversified tropical rice rotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sebastian; Janz, Baldur; Jörg, Lena; Kraus, David; Racela, Heathcliff S U; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Global rice agriculture will be increasingly challenged by water scarcity, while at the same time changes in demand (e.g. changes in diets or increasing demand for biofuels) will feed back on agricultural practices. These factors are changing traditional cropping patterns from double-rice cropping to the introduction of upland crops in the dry season. For a comprehensive assessment of greenhouse gas (GHG) balances, we measured methane (CH4 )/nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions and agronomic parameters over 2.5 years in double-rice cropping (R-R) and paddy rice rotations diversified with either maize (R-M) or aerobic rice (R-A) in upland cultivation. Introduction of upland crops in the dry season reduced irrigation water use and CH4 emissions by 66-81% and 95-99%, respectively. Moreover, for practices including upland crops, CH4 emissions in the subsequent wet season with paddy rice were reduced by 54-60%. Although annual N2 O emissions increased two- to threefold in the diversified systems, the strong reduction in CH4 led to a significantly lower (P < 0.05) annual GWP (CH4  + N2 O) as compared to the traditional double-rice cropping system. Measurements of soil organic carbon (SOC) contents before and 3 years after the introduction of upland crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other systems SOC stocks were unaffected. This trend for R-M systems needs to be followed as it has significant consequences not only for the GWP balance but also with regard to soil fertility. Economic assessment showed a similar gross profit span for R-M and R-R, while gross profits for R-A were reduced as a consequence of lower productivity. Nevertheless, regarding a future increase in water scarcity, it can be expected that mixed lowland-upland systems will expand in SE Asia as water requirements were cut by more than half in both rotation systems with upland crops.

  17. Sound emission from the gas of molecular superrotors

    CERN Document Server

    Milner, A A; Milner, V

    2015-01-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to deposit a controllable amount of rotational energy into dense molecular ensembles. Subsequent rotation-translation energy transfer, mediated by thermal collisions, results in the localized heating of the gas and generates strong sound wave, clearly audible to the unaided ear. For the first time, the amplitude of the sound signal is analyzed as a function of the experimentally measured rotational energy. The proportionality between the two experimental observables confirms that rotational excitation is the main source of the detected sound wave. As virtually all molecules, including the main constituents of the atmosphere, are amenable to laser spinning by the centrifuge, we anticipate this work to stimulate further development in the area of photo-acoustic control and spectroscopy.

  18. Molecular ions of ionic liquids in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jürgen H

    2008-09-01

    Ionic liquids form neutral ion pairs (CA) upon evaporation. The softness of the gas-phase ionization of field ionization has been used to generate "molecular ions," CA(+*), of ionic liquids, most probably by neutralization of the anion. In detail, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-thiocyanate, [C(6)H(11)N(2)](+) [SCN](-), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-tricyanomethide, [C(8)H(15)N(2)](+) [C(4)N(3)](-), N-butyl-3-methylpyridinium-dicyanamide, [C(10)H(16)N](+) [C(2)N(3)](-), and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium-bis[(trifluormethyl)sulfonyl]amide, [C(9)H(20)N](+) [C(2)F(6)NO(4)S(2)](-) were used. The assignment as CA(+*) ions, which has been confirmed by accurate mass measurements and misassignments due to thermal decomposition of the ionic liquids, has been ruled out by field desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the residues.

  19. MOLECULAR GAS VELOCITY DISPERSIONS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas, E-mail: caldu@mpia.de, E-mail: schruba@mpe.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In order to characterize the distribution of molecular gas in spiral galaxies, we study the line profiles of CO (1 – 0) emission in Andromeda, our nearest massive spiral galaxy. We compare observations performed with the IRAM 30 m single-dish telescope and with the CARMA interferometer at a common resolution of 23 arcsec ≈ 85 pc × 350 pc and 2.5 km s{sup −1}. When fitting a single Gaussian component to individual spectra, the line profile of the single dish data is a factor of 1.5 ± 0.4 larger than the interferometric data one. This ratio in line widths is surprisingly similar to the ratios previously observed in two other nearby spirals, NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, but measured at ∼0.5–1 kpc spatial scale. In order to study the origin of the different line widths, we stack the individual spectra in five bins of increasing peak intensity and fit two Gaussian components to the stacked spectra. We find a unique narrow component of FWHM = 7.5 ± 0.4 km s{sup −1} visible in both the single dish and the interferometric data. In addition, a broad component with FWHM = 14.4 ± 1.5 km s{sup −1} is present in the single-dish data, but cannot be identified in the interferometric data. We interpret this additional broad line width component detected by the single dish as a low brightness molecular gas component that is extended on spatial scales >0.5 kpc, and thus filtered out by the interferometer. We search for evidence of line broadening by stellar feedback across a range of star formation rates but find no such evidence on ∼100 pc spatial scale when characterizing the line profile by a single Gaussian component.

  20. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  1. Molecular gas in the Galactic center region. III. Probing shocks in molecular cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettemeister, S.; Dahmen, G.; Mauersberger, R.; Henkel, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Martin-Pintado, J.

    1998-06-01

    Multiline observations of C(18) O and SiO isotopomers toward 33 molecular peaks in the Galactic center region, taken at the SEST, JCMT and HHT telescopes, are presented. The C(18) O presumably traces the total H_2 column density, while the SiO traces gas affected by shocks and high temperature chemistry. The J =2-> 1 line of SiO is seen only in few regions of the Galactic disk. This line is easily detected in all Galactic center sources observed. A comparison of the strength of the rare isotopomers (29) SiO and (30) SiO to the strength of the main isotopomer (28) SiO implies that the J = 2 -> 1 transition of (28) SiO is optically thick. The (29) Si/(30) Si isotope ratio of 1.6 in the Galactic center clouds is consistent with the terrestrial value. Large Velocity Gradient models show that the dense component (n_H_2 >= 10(4) \\percc) in typical molecular cores in the Galactic center is cool (\\TKIN ~ 25 K), contrary to what is usually found in Giant Molecular Clouds in the disk, where the densest cores are the hottest. High kinetic temperatures, > 100 K, known to exist from NH_3 studies, are only present at lower gas densities of a few 10(3) cm(-3) , where SiO is highly subthermally excited. Assuming that \\CEIO\\ traces all of the molecular gas, it is found that in all cases but one, SiO emission is compatible with arising in gas at higher density that is (presently) relatively cool. The relative abundance of SiO is typically 10(-9) , but differs significantly between individual sources. It shows a dependence on the position of the source within the Galactic center region. High abundances are found in those regions for which bar potential models predict a high likelihood for cloud-cloud collisions. These results can be used to relate the amount of gas that has encountered shocks within the last ~ 10(6) years to the large scale kinematics in the inner ~ 500 pc of the Galaxy. Based on observations obtained at the Swedish-ESO Submillimeter Telescope (SEST, Project C

  2. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  3. A dirty window diffuse and translucent molecular gas in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Magnani, Loris

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the physics of interstellar gas in the Galaxy. It deals with the diffuse interstellar medium which supplies a complex environment for exploring the neutral gas content of a galaxy like the Milky Way and the techniques necessary for studying this non-stellar component. After an initial exposition of the phases of the interstellar medium and the role of gas in a spiral galaxy, the authors discuss the transition from atomic to molecular gas. They then consider basic radiative transfer and molecular spectroscopy with particular emphasis on the molecules useful for studying low-density molecular gas. Observational techniques for investigating the gas and the dust component of the diffuse interstellar medium throughout the electromagnetic spectrum are explored emphasizing results from the recent Herschel and Planck missions. A brief exposition on dust in the diffuse interstellar medium is followed by a discussion of molecular clouds in general and high-latitude molecular clouds...

  4. Warm molecular Hydrogen at high redshift with the James Webb Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Guillard, P; Lehnert, M D; Appleton, P N; Forêts, G Pineau des

    2015-01-01

    The build-up of galaxies is regulated by a complex interplay between gravitational collapse, galaxy merging and feedback related to AGN and star formation. The energy released by these processes has to dissipate for gas to cool, condense, and form stars. How gas cools is thus a key to understand galaxy formation. \\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope} infrared spectroscopy revealed a population of galaxies with weak star formation and unusually powerful H$_2$ line emission. This is a signature of turbulent dissipation, sustained by large-scale mechanical energy injection. The cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium is associated with emission in the H$_2$ lines. These results have profound consequences on our understanding of regulation of star formation, feedback and energetics of galaxy formation in general. The fact that H$_2$ lines can be strongly enhanced in high-redshift turbulent galaxies will be of great importance for the \\textit{James Webb Space Telescope} observations which will unveil the role tha...

  5. Simulation of the Correlated Electron Plasma in the Warm Dense Matter Regime by Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, Vivek; Deymier, Pierre; Runge, Keith

    2012-02-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) can be characterized by electron temperatures of a few eV and densities an order of magnitude or more beyond ambient. This regime currently lacks any adequate highly developed class of simulation methods. Recent developments in orbital-free Density Functional Theory (ofDFT) aim to provide such a simulation method, however, little benchmark information is available on temperature and pressure dependence of simple but realistic models in WDM regime. The present work aims to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Within the discrete path integral representation, electrons are described as harmonic necklaces, while, quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. The fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values and a molecular dynamics algorithm is employed to sample phase space. Here, we focus on the behavior of strongly correlated electron plasmas under WDM conditions. We compute the kinetic and potential energies and compare them to those obtained with the ofDFT method.

  6. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xin; Liu, Yinglie; Wang, Jinyang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of how global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on GWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions from all sources, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon sequestration). The ISSM mainly consisted of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates and split, manure, Zn and Na2SiO3 fertilization and planting density for the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Four ISSM scenarios consisting of different chemical N rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, ISSM-N1 (25 % reduction), ISSM-N2 (10 % reduction), ISSM-N3 (FP rate) and ISSM-N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 35 and 40 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the ISSM-N1 and ISSM-N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar GWPs. The ISSM-N3 and ISSM-N4 scenarios remarkably increased the GWP and GHGI by an average of 69 and 39 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of ISSM-N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of sulfate-reducing bacteria from deep sediment layers of the tropical West Pacific warm pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhuhua; YE Dezan; HUANG Xiangling

    2006-01-01

    The diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from deep layers of deep-sea sediments [ more than 2 m bsf ( below seafloor) ] of two sites (W01 -3 and WP01 -4) in a tropical West Pacific warm pool region was characterized by using molecular phylogenetic analysis. The results of culture-independent samples demonstrated that the dominant clones from both sites were related to Grampositive spore forming genus, Desulfotomaculum, which accounted for 36.8% of all the sequencing clones from Site WP01 -3 and62.8% from Site WP01 -4. However, the other SRB group which was generally reported to be predominant in the deep-sea sediments of other regions, δ- subclass of the proteobacteria was found to be in very low percentages. Therefore, it could be speculated that there existed a unique chemical environment in the deep-sea sediment of this warm pool region. When comparing the Desulfotomaculum sp. related sequences from both sites, it was revealed that though the Desulfotomaculum-like sequences from Site WP01 -3 were more diverse than those from Site WP01 -4, all these sequences from both sites showed high similarity and formed a new phylogenetically homogeneous cluster in the Desulfotomaculum genus which had never been reported before. Successful enrichment of SRB was only achieved from samples of Site WP01 - 4 and the sequence analysis of culture-dependent samples further confirmed the dominance of Desulfotomaculum genus. But Desulfotomaculum-related sequences from culture-dependent and culture-independent samples belonged to two different clusters respectively. This difference showed the choice of cultivation to the microorganisms.

  8. Radiative and mechanical feedback into the molecular gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud. I. N159W

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Min-Young; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Gusdorf, Antoine; Godard, Benjamin; Wu, Ronin; Galametz, Maud; Cormier, Diane; Petit, Franck Le; Roueff, Evelyne; Bron, Emeric; Carlson, Lynn; Chevance, Melanie; Fukui, Yasuo; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Hughes, Annie; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Franck; Kawamura, Akiko; Bourlot, Jacques Le; Lesaffre, Pierre; Meixner, Margaret; Muller, Erik; Nayak, Omnarayani; Onishi, Toshikazu; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sewilo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We present Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations of N159W, an active star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In our observations, a number of far-infrared cooling lines including CO(4-3) to CO(12-11), [CI] 609 and 370 micron, and [NII] 205 micron are clearly detected. With an aim of investigating the physical conditions and excitation processes of molecular gas, we first construct CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) on 10 pc scales by combining the FTS CO transitions with ground-based low-J CO data and analyze the observed CO SLEDs using non-LTE radiative transfer models. We find that the CO-traced molecular gas in N159W is warm (kinetic temperature of 153-754 K) and moderately dense (H2 number density of (1.1-4.5)e3 cm-3). To assess the impact of the energetic processes in the interstellar medium on the physical conditions of the CO-emitting gas, we then compare the observed CO line intensities with the models of photodissociation regions (PDRs) and shock...

  9. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B. S.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A.; Carignan, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors αCO to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro-Frenk-White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of αCO can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  10. Contrasting impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the molecular responses of CO2-resilient oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Thompson, Emma L; Raftos, David A

    2017-06-02

    This study characterises the molecular processes altered by both elevated CO2 and increasing temperature in oysters. Differences in resilience of marine organisms against the environmental stressors associated with climate change will have significant implications for the sustainability of coastal ecosystems worldwide. Some evidence suggests that climate change resilience can differ between populations within a species. B2 oysters represent a unique genetic resource because of their capacity to better withstand the impacts of elevated CO2 at the physiological level, compared to non-selected oysters from the same species (Saccostrea glomerata). Here, we used proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of gill tissue to evaluate whether the differential response of B2 oysters to elevated CO2 also extends to increased temperature. Substantial and distinctive effects on protein concentrations and gene expression were evident among B2 oysters responding to elevated CO2 or elevated temperature. The combination of both stressors also altered oyster gill proteomes and gene expression. However, the impacts of elevated CO2 and temperature were not additive or synergistic, and may be antagonistic. The data suggest that the simultaneous exposure of CO2-resilient oysters to near-future projected ocean pH and temperature results in complex changes in molecular processes in order to prevent stress-induced cellular damage. The differential response of B2 oysters to the combined stressors also indicates that the addition of thermal stress may impair the resilience of these oysters to decreased pH. Overall, this study reveals the intracellular mechanisms that might enable marine calcifiers to endure the emergent, adverse seawater conditions resulting from climate change.

  11. Origin of warm and hot gas emission from low-mass protostars: Herschel-HIFI observations of CO J = 16-15. I. Line profiles, physical conditions, and H2O abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Mottram, J. C.; Karska, A.; Yıldız, U. A.; Bergin, E. A.; Bjerkeli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Doty, S.; Evans, N. J.; Gusdorf, A.; Harsono, D.; Herczeg, G. J.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Kempen, T. A.; Lee, J.-E.; Maret, S.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Through spectrally unresolved observations of high-J CO transitions, Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) has revealed large reservoirs of warm (300 K) and hot (700 K) molecular gas around low-mass protostars. The excitation and physical origin of this gas is still not understood. Aims: We aim to shed light on the excitation and origin of the CO ladder observed toward protostars, and on the water abundance in different physical components within protostellar systems using spectrally resolved Herschel-HIFI data. Methods: Observations are presented of the highly excited CO line J = 16-15 (Eup/kB = 750 K) with the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward a sample of 24 low-mass protostellar objects. The sources were selected from the Herschel "Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) and "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) key programs. Results: The spectrally resolved line profiles typically show two distinct velocity components: a broad Gaussian component with an average FWHM of 20 km s-1 containing the bulk of the flux, and a narrower Gaussian component with a FWHM of 5 km s-1 that is often offset from the source velocity. Some sources show other velocity components such as extremely-high-velocity features or "bullets". All these velocity components were first detected in H2O line profiles. The average rotational temperature over the entire profile, as measured from comparison between CO J = 16-15 and 10-9 emission, is 300 K. A radiative-transfer analysis shows that the average H2O/CO column-density ratio is 0.02, suggesting a total H2O abundance of 2 × 10-6, independent of velocity. Conclusions: Two distinct velocity profiles observed in the HIFI line profiles suggest that the high-J CO ladder observed with PACS consists of two excitation components. The warm PACS component (300 K) is associated with the broad HIFI component, and the hot PACS component (700 K) is associated with the offset HIFI

  12. Global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, John

    2005-06-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources.

  13. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA : I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods

  14. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods

  15. Molecular Communication over Gas Stream Channels using Portable Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Marshall, Alan; Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic generation/coding and transmission of olfactory information over a gas stream or an odor network is a new and unexplored field. Application areas vary from the entertainment or advertisement industry to security and telemedicine. However, current technological limitations frustrate the accurate reproduction of decoded and transmitted olfactory data. This study describes the development, testing, and characterization of a novel odor emitter (OE) that is used to investigate the generation-encoding of gaseous standards with odorous characteristics with a regulatable way, for scent transmission purposes. The calibration and the responses of a developed OE were examined using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Experiments were undertaken for a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at different temperatures and flow rates. Individual compounds and mixtures were tested to investigate periodic and dynamic transmission characteristics within two different size tubular containers for distances up to 3 m. Olfactory information transmission is demonstrated using MS as the main molecular sensor for odor detection and monitoring and for the first time spatial encryption of olfactory information is shown.

  16. Reactions of molecular dications in the gas phase

    CERN Document Server

    Tafadar, N N

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents the results from a series of experiments investigating the reactivity of gas phase molecular dications with neutral collision partners, at collision energies between 3 and 13 eV in the laboratory frame using a crossed-beam apparatus. The experiments involve measurement of product ion intensities, which are determined by means of time of flight mass spectrometry. The experimental methodology, together with relevant theory is described in the thesis. The relative intensities of product ions formed are a powerful probe of the reaction mechanism. Where appropriate, the reactions are examined for isotope effects by using the isotopic analogue of the neutral collision partner. Our investigation of the CF sub 3 sup 2 sup + /Ar collision system shows neutral loss and electron transfer dominating the product ion yield. The variation of the neutral loss ion yield with collision energy provides a first estimate of the bond energy of the weak CF sub 2 sup 2 sup + -F bond. Ab initio calculations indic...

  17. Radio observations of Supernova Remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, G

    2011-01-01

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least 10^14 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  18. Gas source molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Duncan W.

    1992-11-01

    Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) has long been recognized as a promising radiation hard optoelectronic material. AlGaN has a wide direct band gap and therefore has potential applications in the fabrication of short wave-length devices, e.g., detectors and light-emitting diodes in the visible to ultraviolet region. Additionally, its piezoelectric properties and high acoustic velocities make it attractive for acoustic devices. The technical objective in Phase 1 was to determine if low temperature sources based on covalently bonded Group 3-nitrogen compounds could be used to prepare AlGaN films by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The program required to investigate low temperature AlGaN source materials was separated into two parts: (1) the synthesis, purification, and pyrolysis of gallium-nitrogen adducts and aluminum-nitrogen adducts; and (2) the growth of GaN by chemical beam epitaxy. We clearly demonstrated under CBE conditions GaN(x)C(y) films could be grown using compounds with pre-existing Ga-N bonds whereas no films were formed using trimethylgallium. Dimethylgallium amide was shown to produce dramatically lower carbon content films in the presence of ammonia than did trimethylgallium in the presence of ammonia.

  19. Molecular Survey of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria in the Deep-Sea Sediments of the West Pacific Warm Pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng; XIAO Xiang; ZHANG Haiyan; WANG Fengping

    2008-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) community in the deep-sea sediments of the west Pacific Warm Pool (WP) was surveyed by molecular phylogenetic analyses using primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene fragments of SRB. Specific 16S rRNA gene libraries from five sediment layers (1-cm, 3-cm, 6-cm, 10-cm and 12-cm layer) of the 12-cm core of WP-0 were constructed. The clones in the five libraries were differentiated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and representative clones were selected to sequence. It was found that the clones fell into four groups, which were closest related to Desulfotomaculum, Desul- facinum, Desulfomonile and Desulfanuticus. Desulfacinum-like clones were only detected in the upper layers of the sediment core, whereas Desulfomonile-like clones were only present in the deeper layers. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was further carried out to visualize and count the SRB and bacteria in the five sediment layers. It was found that SRB constituted only a small proportion of the bacteria community (0.34%-1.95%), it had the highest content in the 3-cm layer (1.95%) and had a depth- related decreasing tendency along the 12- cm core.

  20. Molecular gas during the post-starburst phase: low gas fractions in green-valley Seyfert post-starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; French, K. Decker; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.

    2017-08-01

    Post-starbursts (PSBs) are candidate for rapidly transitioning from starbursting to quiescent galaxies. We study the molecular gas evolution of PSBs at z ∼ 0.03-0.2. We undertook new CO (2-1) observations of 22 Seyfert PSB candidates using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope. This sample complements previous samples of PSBs by including green-valley PSBs with Seyfert-like emission, allowing us to analyse for the first time the molecular gas properties of 116 PSBs with a variety of AGN properties. The distribution of molecular gas to stellar mass fractions in PSBs is significantly different from normal star-forming galaxies in the CO Legacy Database (COLD) GASS survey. The combined samples of PSBs with Seyfert-like emission line ratios have a gas fraction distribution that is even more significantly different and is broader (∼0.03-0.3). Most of them have lower gas fractions than normal star-forming galaxies. We find a highly significant correlation between the WISE 12 and 4.6 μm flux ratios and molecular gas fractions in both PSBs and normal galaxies. We detect molecular gas in 27 per cent of our Seyfert PSBs. Taking into account the upper limits, the mean and the dispersion of the distribution of the gas fraction in our Seyfert PSB sample are much smaller (μ = 0.025, σ = 0.018) than previous samples of Seyfert PSBs or PSBs in general (μ ∼ 0.1-0.2, σ ∼ 0.1-0.2).

  1. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reach, W.R.; Pound, M.W.; Wilner, D.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Lee, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have surveyed high-latitude molecular clouds (MBM 12, 7, 55, 40) in spectral lines that are believed to be dense-gas' tracers due to the high H[sub 2] volume density required for collisional excitation. An extensive CS (2-1) line map of MBM 12 revealed emission that is not confined to clumps. Less than 20% of the integrated line emission from the cloud originates in clearly identified clumps with size between 0.2 pc and 0.02 pc in the integrated line map. The bulk of the emission originates from a relatively smooth horseshoe' structure about 0.1 pc wide and 1 pc long. The CS (2-1) map correlates with the published Bell Labs [sup 13] CO map, with significant [sup 13] CO emission even where the CS emission is undetectable. Within the central core, the C[sup 18]O(1-0) and CS(2-1) lines are positively correlated with significant scatter. There is some indication of higher CS/[sup 13]CO in the cores than the horseshoe'. The observed correlations suggest that both the diffuse CS and [sup 13]CO originate from either numerous, unresolved clumps, or the diffuse parts of the cloud. High-spatial-resolution observations of HCO[sup +] from MBM 12 obtained with the BIMA Hat Creek array demonstrated that the main core emission is primarily on spatial scales greater than 0.004 pc. It appears that the authors have resolved most of the spatial structure of the dense-gas' tracers and have found that the emission is primarily diffuse. To understand the excitation mechanism of the CS rotational levels, a multitransitional study of the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 lines is being performed. The CS excitation may be governed by electron collisions in regions with H[sub 2] column densities an order of magnitude lower than the critical density' of [approx gt] 2 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup -3]. If electron collisions are populating the CS levels, then the CS and [sup 13]CO lines can both be produced in the outer parts of the cloud, explaining their positive correlation

  2. Molecular Gas Distribution around the Supernova Remnant G40.5-0.5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of dense molecular gas around the supernova remnant G40.5-0.5 has been investigated by radio spectroscopic observations in the CO (J = 1 - 0) transition. The molecular gas is found to extend over the entire region of G40.5-0.5. A molecular shell, with a diameter of ~ 26', coincides with the ionized gas as revealed by the cm-radio observations. This coincidence, along with the velocity discontinuity following the shell, provides direct evidence for interaction between the ionized gas and the dense molecular gas. No clear evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration can be identified from this SNR as previously suggested, due to positional uncertainty in relating the SNR shell defined by CO to the EGRET gamma-ray sources,GRO J1904+06, from the gamma-ray observations.

  3. ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614 --- Breaking of Star Formation Law in the Central kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, C K; Lu, N; Gao, Y; Diaz-Santos, T; Herrero-Illana, R; Meijerink, R; Privon, G; Zhao, Y -H; Evans, A S; König, S; Mazzarella, J M; Aalto, S; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Chu, J; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; van der Werf, P

    2014-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc < r < 350pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \\Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \\Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation fro...

  4. A Pair of O VI and Broad Ly-alpha Absorbers Probing Warm Gas in a Galaxy Group Environment at z ~ 0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Pachat, Sachin; Muzahid, Sowgat; Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan; Wakker, Bart P; Savage, Blair D

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detection of two O VI absorbers separated in velocity by 710 km/s at z ~ 0.4 towards the background quasar SBS0957+599. Both absorbers are multiphase systems tracing substantial reservoirs of warm baryons. The low and intermediate ionization metals in the first absorber is consistent with an origin in photoionized gas. The O VI has a velocity structure different from other metal species. The Ly-alpha shows the presence of a broad feature. The line widths for O VI and the broad Ly-alpha suggest T = 7.1 x 10^5 K. This warm medium is probing a baryonic column which is an order of magnitude more than the total hydrogen in the cooler photoionized gas. The second absorber is detected only in H I and O VI. Here the temperature of 4.6 x 10^4 K supports O VI originating in a low-density photoionized gas. A broad component is seen in the Ly-alpha, offset from the O VI. The temperature in the broad Ly-alpha is T < 2.1 x 10^5 K. The absorbers reside in a galaxy overdensity region with 7 spectroscopica...

  5. Molecular Gas in the Halo Fuels the Growth of a Massive Cluster Galaxy at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Villar-Martin, M; Norris, R P; Ekers, R D; van Moorsel, G A; Dannerbauer, H; Pentericci, L; Miley, G K; Allison, J R; Sadler, E M; Guillard, P; Carilli, C L; Mao, M Y; Rottgering, H J A; De Breuck, C; Seymour, N; Gullberg, B; Ceverino, D; Jagannathan, P; Vernet, J; Indermuehle, B T

    2016-01-01

    The largest galaxies in the Universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon-monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb Galaxy -a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster- is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched inter-galactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earlier ultraviolet observations of the Spiderweb Galaxy. Our results support the notion that giant galaxies in clusters formed from extended regions of recycled gas at high redshift.

  6. OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 1255 38th street, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Rykala, Adam [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Isaak, Kate [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bradford, Charles M. [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter [Blue Sky Spectroscopy Inc, Suite 9-740 4th Avenue South, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0N9 (Canada); Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Nicola [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

    2011-12-10

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub

  7. Disgas, a new model for passive gas dispersion. Early applications for the warm gases emitted by Solfatara (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    D. Granieri; COSTA, A.; Macedonio, G.; Chiodini, G.(INFN Sezione di Lecce, Lecce, Italy); Bisson, M.; Avino, R.; Caliro, S

    2011-01-01

    A model to describe the cloud dispersion of gas denser than air is presented here. The dispersion of heavy gas is basically governed by the gravity but, when the density contrast (gas vs air) is not important the dispersion is controlled by the wind and atmospheric turbulence (so-called “passive dispersion”). DisGas is a model for dense gases which are dispersed under passive conditions, based on the full solution of the advection-diffusion equations for the gas concentration (Sankaranarayana...

  8. Cold gas properties of the Herschel Reference Survey. III. Molecular gas stripping in cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Boquien, M; Boissier, S; Catinella, B; Gavazzi, G; Lagos, C; Saintonge, A

    2014-01-01

    The HRS is a complete volume-limited sample of nearby objects including Virgo cluster and isolated objects. Using a recent compilation of HI and CO data we study the effects of the cluster on the molecular gas content of spiral galaxies. We first identify M* as the scaling variable that traces the total H2 mass of galaxies better. We show that, on average, HI-deficient galaxies are significantly offset from the M(H2) vs. M* relation for HI-normal galaxies. We use the M(H2) vs. M* scaling relation to define the H2-deficiency parameter. This parameter shows a weak and scattered relation with the HI-def, here taken as a proxy for galaxy interactions with the cluster environment. We also show that, as for the HI, the extent of the H2 disc decreases with increasing HI-deficiency. These results show that cluster galaxies have, on average, a lower H2 content than similar objects in the field. The slope of the H2-def vs. HI-def relation is less than 1, while the D(HI)/D(i) vs. HI-def relation is steeper than the D(CO...

  9. Molecular beam photoionization and gas-surface scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S.T.

    1979-09-01

    The energetics of the ethylene ion-molecule reactions was investigated in more detail than previously possible in two body collision experiments by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals ethylene dimer. The stability of the (C/sub 2/H/sub 4/)/sup +/C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ ion-molecule collision complex has been determined to be 18.2 +- 0.5 kcal. The highest potential barriers along the reaction coordinate for decomposition of this collision complex into C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup +/ + H and C/sub 3/H/sub 5//sup +/ + CH/sub 3/ have been determined to be 0 +- 1.5 and 8.7 +- 1.5 kcal. In a similar manner, the energetics of the solvated ethylene dimer ion was investigated by the photoionization of the ethylene trimer. The absolute proton affinity of NH/sub 3/ (203.6 +- 1.3 kcal/mole) and the proton solvation energies by more than one NH/sub 3/ have been determined by molecular beam photoionization. In addition, the NH/sub 3//sup +/-NH/sub 3/ interaction energy (0.79 +- 0.05 eV) was measured by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals dimer. These experiments have shown that photoionization of van der Waals clusters is a very powerful method of determining the energetics of gas phase proton solvation. The scattering of helium atomic beams from a high Miller index platinum surface that exhibits ordered, periodic steps on the atomic scale to probe the effect of atomic steps on the scattering distribution is explored. Rainbow scattering is observed when the step edges are perpendicular to the incident helium atoms. The design, construction and operation of a beam-surface scattering apparatus are described. The first data obtained in this apparatus are presented and the interesting dynamical aspects of the oxidation of D, D/sub 2/ and CO are discussed. 75 references.

  10. High-global warming potential F-gas emissions in California: comparison of ambient-based versus inventory-based emission estimates, and implications of refined estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Glenn; Zhan, Tao; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Gupta, Pamela; Pederson, James; Croes, Bart; Blake, Donald R; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Ashford, Paul; Vetter, Arnie; Saba, Sabine; Slim, Rayan; Palandre, Lionel; Clodic, Denis; Mathis, Pamela; Wagner, Mark; Forgie, Julia; Dwyer, Harry; Wolf, Katy

    2014-01-21

    To provide information for greenhouse gas reduction policies, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventories annual emissions of high-global-warming potential (GWP) fluorinated gases, the fastest growing sector of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Baseline 2008 F-gas emissions estimates for selected chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a) made with an inventory-based methodology were compared to emissions estimates made by ambient-based measurements. Significant discrepancies were found, with the inventory-based emissions methodology resulting in a systematic 42% under-estimation of CFC-12 emissions from older refrigeration equipment and older vehicles, and a systematic 114% overestimation of emissions for HFC-134a, a refrigerant substitute for phased-out CFCs. Initial, inventory-based estimates for all F-gas emissions had assumed that equipment is no longer in service once it reaches its average lifetime of use. Revised emission estimates using improved models for equipment age at end-of-life, inventories, and leak rates specific to California resulted in F-gas emissions estimates in closer agreement to ambient-based measurements. The discrepancies between inventory-based estimates and ambient-based measurements were reduced from -42% to -6% for CFC-12, and from +114% to +9% for HFC-134a.

  11. Possibility of gas sensor based on C{sub 20} molecular devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wenkai [School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Yang, Chuanlu, E-mail: yangchuanlu@126.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Zou, Dongqing [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Sun, Zhaopeng [School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Ji, Guomin [Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Tulsa, OK 74078 (United States)

    2017-06-09

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of diatomic gas detection (NO, CO, O{sub 2}) by making use of the transport properties of the C{sub 20} molecular junctions. The calculations are performed by using nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism in combination with density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we systematically study the most stable adsorption structural configurations, adsorption energy, and the transport properties on C{sub 20} molecular junctions with these diatomic gas molecules. It is found that NO and O{sub 2} gas molecule can be detected selectively. We suggest its possibility of nanosensors for highly sensitive and selective based on C{sub 20} molecular junction systems. - Highlights: • The most favorable adsorption site is investigated. • The mechanism of gas sensors is revealed. • NO and O{sub 2} gas molecules can be detected by C{sub 20} selectively.

  12. THE IMPACT OF MOLECULAR GAS ON MASS MODELS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, B. S.; Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Carignan, C., E-mail: frank@astron.nl [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2016-04-15

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors α{sub CO} to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro–Frenk–White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of α{sub CO} can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  13. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  14. Alma Observations of Massive Molecular Gas Filaments Encasing Radio Bubbles in the Phoenix Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, H. R.; McDonald, M.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Bayliss, M. B.; Benson, B. A.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Edge, A. C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marrone, D. P.; Reichardt, C. L.; Vieira, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from the 2.1+/- 0.3× {10}10 {M}ȯ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fueling a vigorous starburst at a rate of 500{--}800 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 and powerful black hole activity in the forms of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each 10{--}20 {kpc} long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities induced in low-entropy gas lifted in the updraft of the bubbles. These new data provide compelling evidence for close coupling between the radio bubbles and the cold gas, which is essential to explain the self-regulation of feedback. The very feedback mechanism that heats hot atmospheres and suppresses star formation may also paradoxically stimulate production of the cold gas required to sustain feedback in massive galaxies.

  15. Preparation and Gas Adsorption of Porous Materials from Molecular Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming

    ABSTRACT This thesis deals with the synthesis of porous materials and their applications in gas adsorption. The thesis consists of eight chapters as follows: The first two chapters provide a brief introduction to porous materials and gas adsorption. Chapter 1 gives an overview of construction...... and characteristics of various porous materials, including activated carbons, zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and organic porous polymers (POPs). Chapter 2 briefly introduces gas adsorption theory, such as physical and chemical adsorption, adsorption isotherms...

  16. The EGNoG Survey: Molecular Gas in Intermediate-Redshift Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bauermeister, Amber; Bolatto, Alberto D; Bureau, Martin; Leroy, Adam; Ostriker, Eve; Teuben, Peter J; Wong, Tony; Wright, Melvyn C H

    2013-01-01

    We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z=0.05 to z=0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30)x10^10 M_Sun and star formation rates of 4-100 M_Sun yr^-1. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 \\pm 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 \\pm 0.04 Gyr for star...

  17. High molecular gas fractions in normal massive star-forming galaxies in the young Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R; Neri, R; Cox, P; Cooper, M C; Shapiro, K; Bolatto, A; Bouché, N; Bournaud, F; Burkert, A; Combes, F; Comerford, J; Davis, M; Schreiber, N M Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S; Gracia-Carpio, J; Lutz, D; Naab, T; Omont, A; Shapley, A; Sternberg, A; Weiner, B

    2010-02-11

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. As this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more molecular-gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far largely been restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars, and accordingly we do not yet have a clear idea about the gas content of more normal (albeit massive) galaxies. Here we report the results of a survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive-star-forming galaxies at mean redshifts of about 1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was respectively 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements reveal that distant star forming galaxies were indeed gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z = 2.3 and z = 1.2 is respectively about 44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z approximately 2 and z approximately 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.

  18. Molecular interpretation of nonclassical gas dynamics of dense vapors under the van der Waals model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.

    2006-01-01

    The van der Waals polytropic gas model is used to investigate the role of attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces and the influence of molecular complexity on the possible nonclassical gas dynamic behavior of vapors near the liquid-vapor saturation curve. The decrease of the sound speed upon

  19. Molecular interpretation of nonclassical gas dynamics of dense vapors under the van der Waals model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, P.; Guardone, A.

    2006-01-01

    The van der Waals polytropic gas model is used to investigate the role of attractive and repulsive intermolecular forces and the influence of molecular complexity on the possible nonclassical gas dynamic behavior of vapors near the liquid-vapor saturation curve. The decrease of the sound speed upon

  20. Ram-pressure stripped molecular gas in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4522

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Pappalardo, C; Hily-Blant, P

    2008-01-01

    IRAM 30m 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) HERA observations are presented for the ram-pressure stripped Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4522. The CO emission is detected in the galactic disk and the extraplanar gas. The extraplanar CO emission follows the morphology of the atomic gas closely but is less extended. The CO maxima do not appear to correspond to regions where there is peak massive star formation as probed by Halpha emission. The presence of molecular gas is a necessary but not sufficient condition for star formation. Compared to the disk gas, the molecular fraction of the extraplanar gas is 30% lower and the star formation efficiency of the extraplanar gas is about 3 times lower. The comparison with an existing dynamical model extended by a recipe for distinguishing between atomic and molecular gas shows that a significant part of the gas is stripped in the form of overdense arm-like structures. It is argued that the molecular fraction depends on the square root of the total large-scale density. Based on the combi...

  1. High resolution 12CO(2-1) observations of the molecular gas in Centaurus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rydbeck, G.; Wiklind, T.; Cameron, M.; Wild, W.; Eckart, A.; Genzel, R.; Rothermel, H.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of (C-12)O(2-1) emission in the dust lane of Centaurus A show that, except for the center region, the overall distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas is consistent with that of ionized gas. Deconvolution of the observed emission reveals (i) a structure agreeing with what would

  2. Molecular observations of HH34 - Does NH3 accurately trace dense molecular gas near young stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. J.; Dent, W. R. F.

    1993-03-01

    Single-dish observations in HCO(+) J = 4-3 are presented of the regions around HH34 and around HH34IRS. The former is one of the best examples of the association between Herbig-Haro shocks, optical jets, and young stellar objects. The HCO(+) and CS maps peak toward the outflow source HH34IRS and suggest the presence of a hot dense molecular core. The NH3 is confined to a peak about 4-0 arcsec east of HH34IRS and to a ridge which extends in a north-south direction and peaks about 20 arcsec south of the end of the optical jet. Thus, the NH3 observations do not trace the underlying gas density and temperature in this outflow source. Toward HH34IRS the NH3 column density is less by a factor of about 10 than toward the NH3 peak position is the HH34 region, providing evidence that the NH3 is underabundant towards the central exciting stars. This underabundance may explain the toroidal structures often seen in NH3 observations of other outflow sources.

  3. Study of Molecular-Shape Selectivity of Zeolites by Gas Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Yao-Yuan; Ho, Grace Hsiuying; Chuang, Shiow-Huey; Tsai, Tseng-Chang; Lee, Chi-Young; Tsai, Shang-Tien; Huang, Jun-Fu

    2008-01-01

    A sorption experiment using a gas chromatograph is described that can help students understand the "molecular-shape selectivity" behavior of zeolites in the subnano regime. Hexane isomers are used as probe molecules to demonstrate the sorption phenomena. In the experiment, a zeolite adsorbs certain hexane isomers with molecular sizes smaller than…

  4. Warm gas phase chemistry as possible origin of high HDO/H2O ratios in hot and dense gases: application to inner protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Kamp, Inga

    2009-01-01

    The origin of Earth oceans is controversial. Earth could have acquired its water either from hydrated silicates (wet Earth scenario) or from comets (dry Earth scenario). [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are used to discriminate between the scenarios. High [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are found in Earth oceans. These high ratios are often attributed to the release of deuterium enriched cometary water ice, which was formed at low gas and dust temperatures. Observations do not show high [HDO]/[H2O] in interstellar ices. We investigate the possible formation of high [HDO]/[H2O] ratios in dense (nH> 1E6 cm^{-3}) and warm gas (T=100-1000 K) by gas-phase photochemistry in the absence of grain surface chemistry. We derive analytical solutions, taking into account the major neutral-neutral reactions for gases at T>100 K. The chemical network is dominated by photodissociation and neutral-neutral reactions. Despite the high gas temperature, deuterium fractionation occurs because of the difference in activation energy between deuteration enrich...

  5. A molecular survey of outflow gas: velocity-dependent shock chemistry and the peculiar composition of the EHV gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, M.; Santiago-García, J.; Hacar, A.; Bachiller, R.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Bipolar outflows from Class 0 protostars often present two components in their CO spectra that have different kinematic behaviors: a smooth outflow wing and a discrete, extremely high-velocity (EHV) peak. Aims: To better understand the origin of these two outflow components, we have studied and compared their molecular composition. Methods: We carried out a molecular survey of the outflows powered by L1448-mm and IRAS 04166+2706, two sources with prominent wing and EHV components. For each source, we observed a number of molecular lines towards the brightest outflow position and used them to determine column densities for 12 different molecular species. Results: The molecular composition of the two outflows is very similar. It presents systematic changes with velocity that we analyze by dividing the outflow in three chemical regimes, two of them associated with the wing component and the other the EHV gas. The analysis of the two wing regimes shows that species like H2CO and CH3OH favor the low-velocity gas, while SiO and HCN are more abundant in the fastest gas. This fastest wing gas presents strong similarities with the composition of the “chemically active” L1157 outflow (whose abundances we re-evaluate in an appendix). We find that the EHV regime is relatively rich in O-bearing species compared to the wing regime. The EHV gas is not only detected in CO and SiO (already reported elsewhere), but also in SO, CH3OH, and H2CO (newly reported here), with a tentative detection in HCO+. At the same time, the EHV regime is relatively poor in C-bearing molecules like CS and HCN, for which we only obtain weak detections or upper limits despite deep integrations. We suggest that this difference in composition arises from a lower C/O ratio in the EHV gas. Conclusions: The different chemical compositions of the wing and EHV regimes suggest that these two outflow components have different physical origins. The wing component is better explained by shocked ambient

  6. Formaldehyde in Absorption: Tracing Molecular Gas in Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) have been long-classified as the red, ellipsoidal branch of the classic Hubble tuning fork diagram of galactic structure. In part with this classification, ETGs are thought to be molecular and atomic gas-poor with little to no recent star formation. However, recent efforts have questioned this ingrained classification. Most notably, the ATLAS3D survey of 260 ETGs within ~40 Mpc found 22% contain CO, a common tracer for molecular gas. The presence of cold molecular gas also implies the possibility for current star formation within these galaxies. Simulations do not accurately predict the recent observations and further studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms of ETGs.CO traces molecular gas starting at densities of ~102 cm-3, which makes it a good tracer of bulk molecular gas, but does little to constrain the possible locations of star formation within the cores of dense molecular gas clouds. Formaldehyde (H2CO) traces molecular gas on the order of ~104 cm-3, providing a further constraint on the location of star-forming gas, while being simple enough to possibly be abundant in gas-poor ETGs. In cold molecular clouds at or above ~104 cm-3 densities, the structure of formaldehyde enables a phenomenon in which rotational transitions have excitation temperatures driven below the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), ~2.7 K. Because the CMB radiates isotropically, formaldehyde can be observed in absorption, independent of distance, as a tracer of moderately-dense molecular clouds and star formation.This novel observation technique of formaldehyde was incorporated for observations of twelve CO-detected ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample, including NGC 4710 and PGC 8815, to investigate the presence of cold molecular gas, and possible star formation, in ETGs. We present images from the Very Large Array, used in its C-array configuration, of the J = 11,0 - 11,1 transition of formaldehyde towards these sources. We report our

  7. Abundant Molecular Gas in Tidal Dwarf Galaxies On-going Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Braine, J; Lisenfeld, U; Charmandaris, V; Vallejo, O; Leon, S; Brinks, E

    2001-01-01

    [Abridged...] We investigate the process of galaxy formation as can be observed in the only currently forming galaxies -- the so-called Tidal Dwarf Galaxies, hereafter TDGs -- through observations of the molecular gas detected via its CO emission. These objects are formed of material torn off of the outer parts of a spiral disk due to tidal forces in a collision between two massive galaxies. Molecular gas is a key element in the galaxy formation process, providing the link between a cloud of gas and a bona fide galaxy. We have detected CO in 8 TDGs (two of them have already been published in Braine et al. 2000), with an overall detection rate of 80%, showing that molecular gas is abundant in TDGs, up to a few 10^8 M_sun. The CO emission coincides both spatially and kinematically with the HI emission, indicating that the molecular gas forms from the atomic hydrogen where the HI column density is high. A possible trend of more evolved TDGs having greater molecular gas masses is observed, in accord with the tran...

  8. Molecular and atomic gas along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintonge, Amelie; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Genzel, Reinhard; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Kramer, Carsten; Lutz, Katharina A.; Schiminovich, David; Tacconi, Linda J.; Wuyts, Stijn; Accurso, Gioacchino

    2016-10-01

    We use spectra from the ALFALFA, GASS and COLD GASS surveys to quantify variations in the mean atomic and molecular gas mass fractions throughout the SFR-M* plane and along the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies. Although galaxies well below the MS tend to be undetected in the Arecibo and IRAM observations, reliable mean atomic and molecular gas fractions can be obtained through a spectral stacking technique. We find that the position of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane can be explained mostly by their global cold gas reservoirs as observed in the H I line, with in addition systematic variations in the molecular-to-atomic ratio and star formation efficiency. When looking at galaxies within ±0.4 dex of the MS, we find that as stellar mass increases, both atomic and molecular gas mass fractions decrease, stellar bulges become more prominent, and the mean stellar ages increase. Both star formation efficiency and molecular-to-atomic ratios vary little for massive MS galaxies, indicating that the flattening of the MS is due to the global decrease of the cold gas reservoirs of galaxies rather than to bottlenecks in the process of converting cold atomic gas to stars.

  9. Preparation and Gas Adsorption of Porous Materials from Molecular Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming

    ABSTRACT This thesis deals with the synthesis of porous materials and their applications in gas adsorption. The thesis consists of eight chapters as follows: The first two chapters provide a brief introduction to porous materials and gas adsorption. Chapter 1 gives an overview of construction...... and characteristics of various porous materials, including activated carbons, zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and organic porous polymers (POPs). Chapter 2 briefly introduces gas adsorption theory, such as physical and chemical adsorption, adsorption isotherms...... rise to significant red-shift of absorption/emission and reduction of fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield Transition-metal-catalyzed and organolithium-mediated reactions provide polymers with only macroporous interparticle voids and thus very low surface areas (4−51 m2 g−1). Attempts have been also...

  10. Recent progress in understanding the hot and warm gas phases in the halos of star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution we present a few selected examples of how the latest generation of space-based instrumentation -- NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) -- are finally answering old questions about the influence of massive star feedback on the warm and hot phases of the ISM and IGM. In particular, we discuss the physical origin of the soft thermal X-ray emission in the halos of star-forming and starburst galaxies, its relationship to extra-planar H-alpha emission, and plasma diagnostics using FUSE observations of O VI absorption and emission.

  11. Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): VI. Detection of a molecular gas disk/torus via HCN in the Seyfert2 galaxy NGC6951?

    CERN Document Server

    Krips, M; García-Burillo, S; Combes, F; Schinnerer, E; Baker, A J; Eckart, A; Boone, F; Hunt, L; Leon, S; Tacconi, L J

    2007-01-01

    Several studies of nearby active galaxies indicate significantly higher HCN-to-CO intensity ratios in AGN than in starburst (SB) environments. HCN enhancement can be caused by many different effects, such as higher gas densities/temperatures, UV/X-ray radiation, and non-collisional excitation. As active galaxies often exhibit intense circumnuclear SB, high angular resolution/sensitivity observations are of paramount importance to disentangling the influence of SB from that of nuclear activity on the chemistry of the surrounding molecular gas. The tight relation of HCN enhancement and nuclear activity may qualify HCN as an ideal tracer of molecular gas close to the AGN, providing complementary and additional information to that gained via CO. NGC6951 houses nuclear and SB activity, making it an ideal testbed in which to study the effects of different excitation conditions on the molecular gas. We used the new ABCD configurations of the IRAM PdBI to observe HCN(1-0) in NGC6951 at high angular resolution (1''). ...

  12. Galaxy metallicities depend primarily on stellar mass and molecular gas mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Maiolino, R.; Cicone, C.; Peng, Y.; Wagg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the behaviour of galaxies in a four-dimensional parameter space defined by stellar mass, metallicity, star formation rate, and molecular gas mass. We analyse a combined sample of 227 galaxies that draws from a number of surveys across the redshift range 0 90% of the sample at z 0) and covers >3 decades in stellar mass. Methods: Using principal component analysis, we demonstrate that galaxies in our sample lie on a 2D plane within this 4D parameter space, which is indicative of galaxies that exist in an equilibrium between gas inflow and outflow. Furthermore, we find that the metallicity of galaxies depends only on stellar mass and molecular gas mass. In other words, gas-phase metallicity has a negligible dependence on star formation rate once the correlated effect of molecular gas content is accounted for. Results: The well-known fundamental metallicity relation which describes a close and tight relationship between metallicity and SFR (at fixed stellar mass) is therefore entirely a by-product of the underlying physical relationship with molecular gas mass (through the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation).

  13. Using IBEX data to constrain the heliosphere's large-scale structure: interstellar neutral gas and the Warm Breeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Sokol, Justyna M.; Schwadron, Nathan; Heirtzler, David M.; Kubiak, M. Marzena A.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the heliosphere is governed by the interaction of the partly ionized, magnetized interstellar gas and the magnetized, fully ionized solar wind, structured in heliolatitude. Determining factors of this interaction are the density and flow velocity of interstellar gas relative to the Sun, the Mach number of this flow and the strength and inclination of the interstellar magnetic field to the flow vector at the interstellar side, and the magnitude of dynamic pressure of solar wind and the strength of its embedded magnetic field at the solar side. As a result of charge exchange interactions operating in the boundary region between the heliosphere and interstellar matter, a new population of neutral atoms is created, in addition to the population of unperturbed interstellar neutral gas. Both of these populations penetrate deep inside the heliosphere, where they can be sampled by the first space probe dedicated to observations of the heliosphere and its immediate surroundings by means of neutral atoms: the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Due to distortion of the heliosphere from axial symmetry, the secondary population of interstellar neutrals, created via charge exchange between the plasma flowing past the heliopause and the unperturbed pristine neutral interstellar gas, appears to be coming from a different direction than the unperturbed interstellar neutral flow. These two directions should be coplanar with the plane defined by the local interstellar magnetic field and the flow direction of the unperturbed gas. IBEX provides an unprecedented opportunity to study and interpret these relations. The IBEX science team have recently accomplished important milestones in researching the primary and secondary populations of interstellar gas and their relation to the local interstellar magnetic fields. First, the temperature and velocity vector of the inflowing interstellar neutral gas has been determined with unprecedented robustness based

  14. Atomic-to-molecular gas phase transition triggered by the radio jet in Centaurus A

    CERN Document Server

    Salomé, Quentin; Combes, Françoise; Hamer, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) is one of the best example to study AGN-feedback in the local Universe. At 13.5 kpc from the galaxy, optical filaments with recent star formation are lying along the radio-jet direction. We used the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) to map the CO(2-1) emission all along the filament structure. Molecular gas mass of 8.2x10^7 Msun was found over the 4.2 kpc-structure which represents about 3% of the total gas mass of the NGC 5128 cold gas content. Two dusty mostly molecular structure are identified, following the optical filaments. The region corresponds to the crossing of the radio jet with the Northern HI shell, coming from a past galaxy merger. One filament is located at the border of the HI shell, while the other is entirely molecular, and devoid of HI gas. The molecular mass is comparable to the HI mass in the shell, suggesting a scenario where the atomic gas was shocked and transformed in molecular clouds by the radio jet. Comparison with combined FIR Herschel and UV GALEX estima...

  15. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01molecular hydrogen, and a Galactic conversion factor, we obtain molecular gas masses of $M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  16. Kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas in nearby luminous infrared interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John; Font, Joan; Rosado, Margarita; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Borlaff, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    We have observed three luminous infrared galaxy systems which are pairs of interacting galaxies, with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, and combined the observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of these systems in CO emission to compare the physical properties of the star formation regions and the molecular gas clouds, and specifically the internal kinematics of the star-forming regions. We identified 88 star-forming regions in the Hα emission data cubes, and 27 molecular cloud complexes in the CO emission data cubes. The surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas are significantly higher in these systems than in non-interacting galaxies and the Galaxy, and are closer to the surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas of extreme star-forming galaxies at higher redshifts. The large values of the velocity dispersion also show the enhanced gas surface density. The H II regions are situated on the SFR - σv envelope, and so are also in virial equilibrium. Since the virial parameter decreases with the surface densities of both the star formation rate and the molecular gas, we claim that the clouds presented here are gravitationally dominated rather than being in equilibrium with the external pressure.

  17. On The Gas Temperature of Molecular Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Juvela, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the uncertainties affecting the temperature profiles of dense cores of interstellar clouds. In regions shielded from external ultraviolet radiation, the problem is reduced to the balance between cosmic ray heating, line cooling, and the coupling between gas and dust. We show that variations in the gas phase abundances, the grain size distribution, and the velocity field can each change the predicted core temperatures by one or two degrees. We emphasize the role of non-local radiative transfer effects that often are not taken into account, for example, when modelling the core chemistry. These include the radiative coupling between regions of different temperature and the enhanced line cooling near the cloud surface. The uncertainty of the temperature profiles does not necessarily translate to a significant error in the column density derived from observations. However, depletion processes are very temperature sensitive and a two degree difference can mean that a given molecule no longer traces t...

  18. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  19. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey I. Star Forming Molecular Gas in Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Israel, F P; Serjeant, S; Bendo, G; Brinks, E; Clements, D; Courteau, S; Irwin, J; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Muehle, S; Mortier, A M J; Petitpas, G; Sinukoff, E; Spekkens, K; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; Van der Werf, P P; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2008-01-01

    We present large-area maps of the CO J=3-2 emission obtained at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope for four spiral galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. We combine these data with published CO J=1-0, 24 micron, and Halpha images to measure the CO line ratios, molecular gas masses, and instantaneous gas depletion times. For three galaxies in our sample (NGC 4254, NGC4321, and NGC 4569), we obtain molecular gas masses of 7E8-3E9 Msun and disk-averaged instantaneous gas depletion times of 1.1-1.7 Gyr. We argue that the CO J=3-2 line is a better tracer of the dense star forming molecular gas than the CO J=1-0 line, as it shows a better correlation with the star formation rate surface density both within and between galaxies. NGC 4254 appears to have a larger star formation efficiency(smaller gas depletion time), perhaps because it is on its first passage through the Virgo Cluster. NGC 4569 shows a large-scale gradient in the gas properties traced by the CO J=3-2/J=1-0 line ratio, which suggests that its interaction with ...

  20. Dense Molecular Gas and H2O Maser Emission in Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Huang; J. S. Zhang; R. M. Li; H. K. Li

    2014-09-01

    Extragalactic H2O masers have been found in dense gas circumstance in off-nuclear star formation regions or within parsecs of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). HCN molecular (one of the best dense gas tracers) Emission has been detected in more than 60 galaxies. For HCN-detected galaxy sample, the relation of maser and gas emission was investigated here to identify physical observable properties that differentiate maser and non-maser galaxies. Our analysis results show that there is no significant difference on the infrared and gas emission between maser galaxies and galaxies without maser detection. For maser host HCN-galaxies, maser luminosity is found to be correlated to CO luminosity (a proxy of the total molecular gas) and HCN luminosity, i.e., kilomasers (H2O < 10⊙) with low maser luminosity having low gas emission luminosity, with respect to megamasers (H2O > 10⊙). For normalized maser and HCN luminosity (for removing distance effect), the correlation is still apparent. However, for normalized maser and CO luminosity, the correlation disappeared completely. Thus one proposition that the amount of dense molecular gas should be a good tracer of H2O maser emission can be made.

  1. Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Ancestors of Milky Way-Mass Galaxies 9 Billion Years Ago

    CERN Document Server

    Papovich, Casey; Glazebrook, Karl; Quadri, Ryan; Bekiaris, Georgios; Dickinson, Mark; Finkelstein, Steven; Fisher, David; Inami, Hanae; Livermore, Rachael; Spitler, Lee; Straatman, Caroline; Tran, Kim-Vy

    2016-01-01

    The gas accretion and star-formation histories of galaxies like the Milky Way remain an outstanding problem in astrophysics. Observations show that 8 billion years ago, the progenitors to Milky Way-mass galaxies were forming stars 30 times faster than today and predicted to be rich in molecular gas, in contrast with low present-day gas fractions ($<$10%). Here we show detections of molecular gas from the CO(J=3-2) emission (rest-frame 345.8 GHz) in galaxies at redshifts z=1.2-1.3, selected to have the stellar mass and star-formation rate of the progenitors of today's Milky Way-mass galaxies. The CO emission reveals large molecular gas masses, comparable to or exceeding the galaxy stellar masses, and implying most of the baryons are in cold gas, not stars. The galaxies' total luminosities from star formation and CO luminosities yield long gas-consumption timescales. Compared to local spiral galaxies, the star-formation efficiency, estimated from the ratio of total IR luminosity to CO emission,} has remained...

  2. Origin of warm and hot gas emission from low-mass protostars: Herschel-HIFI observations of CO J = 16-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Egstrøm; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Mottram, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    not understood. Aims. We aim to shed light on the excitation and origin of the CO ladder observed toward protostars, and on the water abundance in different physical components within protostellar systems using spectrally resolved Herschel-HIFI data. Methods. Observations are presented of the highly excited CO...... line J = 16-15 (Eup/kB = 750 K) with the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward a sample of 24 low-mass protostellar objects. The sources were selected from the Herschel "Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) and "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) key programs...... excitation components. The warm PACS component (300 K) is associated with the broad HIFI component, and the hot PACS component (700 K) is associated with the offset HIFI component. The former originates in either outflow cavity shocks or the disk wind, and the latter in irradiated shocks. The low water...

  3. Arctic climate change: Greenhouse warming unleashed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Human activity alters the atmospheric composition, which leads to global warming. Model simulations suggest that reductions in emission of sulfur dioxide from Europe since the 1970s could have unveiled rapid Arctic greenhouse gas warming.

  4. Molecular line emission in NGC1068 imaged with ALMA. I An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Burillo, S; Usero, A; Aalto, S; Krips, M; Viti, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Hunt, L K; Schinnerer, E; Baker, A J; Casasola, F Boone V; Colina, L; Costagliola, F; Eckart, A; Fuente, A; Henkel, C; Labiano, A; Martin, S; Marquez, I; Muller, S; Planesas, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Spaans, M; Tacconi, L J; van der Werf, P P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We have used ALMA to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3) and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2kpc of NGC1068 with spatial resolutions ~ 0.3"-0.5" (~ 20-35pc). Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the AGN, betraying ongoing feedback. The gas kinematics from r ~ 50pc out to r ~ 400pc reveal a massive (M_mol ~ 2.7 (+0.9, -1.2) x 10^7 Msun) outflow in all molec...

  5. The Carina Nebula and Gum 31 molecular complex: I. Molecular gas distribution, column densities and dust temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Rebolledo, David; Green, Anne; Braiding, Catherine; Molinari, Sergio; Wong, Graeme; Blackwell, Rebecca; Elia, Davide; Schisano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    We report high resolution observations of the $^{12}$CO$(1\\rightarrow0)$ and $^{13}$CO$(1\\rightarrow0)$ molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of the The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg$^2$ from $l = 285^{\\circ}$ to 290$^{\\circ}$, and from $b = -1.5^{\\circ}$ to +0.5$^{\\circ}$. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from $6.3\\times\\ 10^{20}$ to $1.4\\times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a log-normal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density dis...

  6. Modeling impacts of alternative practices on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from rice-wheat annual rotation in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evaluating the net exchange of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions in conjunction with soil carbon sequestration may give a comprehensive insight on the role of agricultural production in global warming. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measured data of methane (CH(4 and nitrous oxide (N(2O were utilized to test the applicability of the Denitrification and Decomposition (DNDC model to a winter wheat - single rice rotation system in southern China. Six alternative scenarios were simulated against the baseline scenario to evaluate their long-term (45-year impacts on net global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: The simulated cumulative CH(4 emissions fell within the statistical deviation ranges of the field data, with the exception of N(2O emissions during rice-growing season and both gases from the control treatment. Sensitivity tests showed that both CH(4 and N(2O emissions were significantly affected by changes in both environmental factors and management practices. Compared with the baseline scenario, the long-term simulation had the following results: (1 high straw return and manure amendment scenarios greatly increased CH(4 emissions, while other scenarios had similar CH(4 emissions, (2 high inorganic N fertilizer increased N(2O emissions while manure amendment and reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenarios decreased N(2O emissions, (3 the mean annual soil organic carbon sequestration rates (SOCSR under manure amendment, high straw return, and no-tillage scenarios averaged 0.20 t C ha(-1 yr(-1, being greater than other scenarios, and (4 the reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenario produced the least N loss from the system, while all the scenarios produced comparable grain yields. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of net GWP and GHGI for the comprehensive assessment of climate change and crop production, reduced inorganic N fertilizer scenario followed by no-tillage scenario would be advocated for this specified

  7. Theoretical aspects of gas-phase molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckerman, J.T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is focused on the development and application of time-dependent quantum mechanical and semiclassical methods for treating inelastic and reactive molecular collisions, and the photochemistry and photophysics of atoms and molecules in laser fields. Particular emphasis is placed on the development and application of grid methods based on discrete variable representations, on time-propagation methods, and, in systems with more that a few degrees of freedom, on the combined use of quantal wavepackets and classical trajectories.

  8. Gas feeding molecular phosphorous ion source for semiconductor implanters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Bugaev, A. S.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Hershcovitch, A.

    2014-02-01

    Phosphorus is a much used dopant in semiconductor technology. Its vapors represent a rather stable tetratomic molecular compound and are produced from one of the most thermodynamically stable allotropic forms of phosphorus—red phosphorus. At vacuum heating temperatures ranging from 325 °C, red phosphorus evaporates solely as P4 molecules (P4/P2 ˜ 2 × 105, P4/P ˜ 1021). It is for this reason that red phosphorus is best suited as a source of polyatomic molecular ion beams. The paper reports on experimental research in the generation of polyatomic phosphorus ion beams with an alternative P vapor source for which a gaseous compound of phosphorus with hydrogen - phosphine - is used. The ion source is equipped with a specially designed dissociator in which phosphine heated to temperatures close to 700 °C decomposes into molecular hydrogen and phosphorus (P4) and then the reaction products are delivered through a vapor line to the discharge chamber. Experimental data are presented reflecting the influence of the discharge parameters and temperature of the dissociator heater on the mass-charge state of the ion beam.

  9. DISCOVERY OF MOLECULAR GAS AROUND HD 131835 IN AN APEX MOLECULAR LINE SURVEY OF BRIGHT DEBRIS DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Kóspál, Á.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Henning, Th.; Balog, Z. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Juhász, A. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3, OHA (United Kingdom); Pascucci, I. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Vavrek, R. [Herschel Science Centre, ESA/ESAC, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691, Madrid (Spain); Curé, M. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso (Chile); Csengeri, T.; Güsten, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Grady, C., E-mail: moor@konkoly.hu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10–40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30 m radio telescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3–2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk at both 70 and 100 μm, with a characteristic radius of ∼170 AU. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles β Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young (≤40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of a detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young, and in terms of its disk, more massive analog of the β Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system, similar to HD 21997, possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.

  10. Discovery of Molecular Gas around HD 131835 in an APEX Molecular Line Survey of Bright Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, A.; Henning, Th.; Juhász, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Balog, Z.; Kóspál, Á.; Pascucci, I.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Vavrek, R.; Curé, M.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Güsten, R.; Kiss, Cs.

    2015-11-01

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30 m radio telescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk at both 70 and 100 μm, with a characteristic radius of ˜170 AU. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles β Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young (≤40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of a detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young, and in terms of its disk, more massive analog of the β Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system, similar to HD 21997, possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.

  11. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  12. Towards molecular gas flows in micro propulsion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, Rodion; Rath, Hans J.

    Developing micro propulsion devices like cold gas thrusters the geometry has to be optimized for the varying pressure and temperature fields inside the unit. Modelling diluted gas flows in microchannels the influence of the mean free path of molecules has to be respected describing pressure drop and specific momentum of a micro-propulsion unit. With the molecule mass factor the density is given used for a five-equation-system modelling the momentum and heat diffusion inside a channel flow for higher Knudsen numbers. The five equations are transport equation for the three mean velocity components, the velocity standard deviation and the molecule collision rate. The present model does not base on the definition of a Dirichlet boundary condition. The momentum boundary condition is given by a shear stress function depending on the collision rate and the standard deviation square of the molecule velocity. With this new wall stress modelling method the slip velocity results from the computation of the transported parameters. The present model is validated computing Poiseuille and Couette flows with different Knudsen numbers. Showing the advantages of the present model the simulation results are compared with simulation results of the wall-distance depending diffusivity model of Lockerby and Reese and BGK results of a Lattice-Boltzmann simulation.

  13. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Local Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bureau, M; Alatalo, K; Crocker, A F; Blitz, L; Young, L M; Combes, F; Bois, M; Bournaud, F; Cappellari, M; Davies, R L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, P -A; Emsellem, E; Khochfar, S; Krajnovic, D; Kuntschner, H; Lablanche, P -Y; McDermid, R M; Morganti, R; Naab, T; Oosterloo, T; Sarzi, M; Scott, N; Serra, P; Weijmans, A

    2011-01-01

    The molecular gas content of local early-type galaxies is constrained and discussed in relation to their evolution. First, as part of the Atlas3D survey, we present the first complete, large (260 objects), volume-limited single-dish survey of CO in normal local early-type galaxies. We find a surprisingly high detection rate of 22%, independent of luminosity and at best weakly dependent on environment. Second, the extent of the molecular gas is constrained with CO synthesis imaging, and a variety of morphologies is revealed. The kinematics of the molecular gas and stars are often misaligned, implying an external gas origin in over a third of the systems, although this behaviour is drastically diffferent between field and cluster environments. Third, many objects appear to be in the process of forming regular kpc-size decoupled disks, and a star formation sequence can be sketched by piecing together multi-wavelength information on the molecular gas, current star formation, and young stars. Last, early-type gala...

  14. Discovery of molecular gas around HD 131835 in an APEX molecular line survey of bright debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Juhász, A; Ábrahám, P; Balog, Z; Kóspál, Á; Pascucci, I; Szabó, Gy M; Vavrek, R; Curé, M; Csengeri, T; Grady, C; Güsten, R; Kiss, Cs

    2015-01-01

    Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30m radiotelescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk both at 70 and 100$\\mu$m, with a characteristic radius of ~170 au. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles $\\beta$ Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young ($\\leq$40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of detectable amount of gas in the m...

  15. Molecular and atomic gas along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saintonge, A; Cortese, L; Genzel, R; Giovanelli, R; Haynes, M P; Janowiecki, S; Kramer, C; Lutz, K A; Schiminovich, D; Tacconi, L J; Wuyts, S; Accurso, G

    2016-01-01

    We use spectra from the ALFALFA, GASS and COLD GASS surveys to quantify variations in the mean atomic and molecular gas mass fractions throughout the SFR-M* plane and along the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies. Although galaxies well below the MS tend to be undetected in the Arecibo and IRAM observations, reliable mean atomic and molecular gas fractions can be obtained through a spectral stacking technique. We find that the position of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane can be explained mostly by their global cold gas reservoirs as observed in the HI line, with in addition systematic variations in the molecular-to-atomic ratio and star formation efficiency. When looking at galaxies within +/-0.4 dex of the MS, we find that as stellar mass increases, both atomic and molecular gas mass fractions decrease, stellar bulges become more prominent, and the mean stellar ages increase. Both star formation efficiency and molecular-to-atomic ratios vary little for massive main sequence galaxies, indicating that the ...

  16. ALMA observations of massive molecular gas filaments encasing radio bubbles in the Phoenix cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; McNamara, B R; Fabian, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Bayliss, M B; Benson, B A; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Edge, A C; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Marrone, D P; Reichardt, C L; Vieira, J D

    2016-01-01

    We report new ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) line emission from the $2.7\\pm0.4\\times10^{10}\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}$ molecular gas reservoir in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. The cold molecular gas is fuelling a vigorous starburst at a rate of $500-800\\rm\\thinspace M_{\\odot}\\rm\\; yr^{-1}$ and powerful black hole activity in the form of both intense quasar radiation and radio jets. The radio jets have inflated huge bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot, X-ray atmospheres surrounding the host galaxy. The ALMA observations show that extended filaments of molecular gas, each $10-20\\rm\\; kpc$ long with a mass of several billion solar masses, are located along the peripheries of the radio bubbles. The smooth velocity gradients and narrow line widths along each filament reveal massive, ordered molecular gas flows around each bubble, which are inconsistent with gravitational free-fall. The molecular clouds have been lifted directly by the radio bubbles, or formed via thermal instabilities ...

  17. Molecular Astrophysics from Space: the Physical and Chemical Effects of Star Formation and the Destruction of Planetary Systems around Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David

    2005-01-01

    The research conducted during the reporting period is grouped into three sections: 1) Warm molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM); 2) Absorption line studies of "cold" molecular clouds; 3) Vaporization of comets around the AGB star IRC+10216.

  18. Novel studies of molecular orientation in synthetic polymeric membranes for gas separation

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, A F

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to produce a super-selective asymmetric membrane for gas separation. To achieve this, molecular orientation induced by rheological conditions during membrane fabrication was investigated and related to the gas separation performance of flat sheet and hollow fiber membranes. Infrared dichroism, a spectroscopic technique, was developed in the first phase of the research to directly measure molecular orientation in flat sheet membranes. The degree of molecular orientation was found to increase with increasing shear during fabrication which enhanced both pressure-normalised flux and selectivity of the coated membranes. The rheology of polymer solutions and the mechanism of molecular orientation have been treated in detail for membrane production. This is a novel approach since previous fundamental work has focused on the phase inversion process. The current study showed that rheological conditions during membrane fabrication have the utmost importance in enhancing memb...

  19. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  20. Understanding Gas adsorption selectivity in IRMOF-8 using molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Renjith S; Pinto, Moisés L; Pires, João; Jorge, Miguel; Gomes, José R B

    2015-01-14

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were used to explore the adsorption behavior of methane, ethane, ethylene, and carbon dioxide in isoreticular metal-organic frameworks, IRMOF-1, noninterpenetrated IRMOF-8, and interpenetrated IRMOF-8. The simulated isotherms are compared with experimentally measured isotherms, when available, and a good agreement is observed. In the case of IRMOF-8, the agreement is much better for the interpenetrated model than for the noninterpenetrated model, suggesting that the experimental data was obtained on an essentially interpenetrated structure. Simulations show that carbon dioxide is preferentially adsorbed over methane, and a selective adsorption at low pressures of ethane over ethylene, especially in the case of IRMOF-8, confirm recent experimental results. Analysis of simulation results on both the interpenetrated and the noninterpenetrated structures shows that interpenetration is responsible for the higher adsorbed amounts of ethane at low pressures (adsorption. This indicates that interpenetrated MOF structures may be of interest for the separation of small gas molecules.

  1. Scattering properties of gas molecules on self-assembled monolayers using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideki

    2016-11-01

    The scattering properties of argon gas molecules on the SAM (self-assembled monolayer) surface which consists of 1-propanethiol molecules chemically adsorbed on a gold surface have been investigated by using the molecular dynamics method. The trapping probability, the angular distribution and the angular scattering distribution for the gas molecule have been obtained for various incident energies and angles. It is shown that the trapping probability decreases with increasing the incident energy. The angular distribution for small incident angle is almost close to the cosine distribution. In addition, the partial accommodation coefficients of tangential momentum and energy for gas molecules are discussed.

  2. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in the Cartwheel

    CERN Document Server

    Higdon, James L; Ruiz, Sergio Martin; Rand, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 12CO(J=1-0) observations are used to study the cold molecular ISM of the Cartwheel ring galaxy and its relation to HI and massive star formation (SF). CO moment maps find $(2.69\\pm0.05)\\times10^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$ of H$_2$ associated with the inner ring (72%) and nucleus (28%) for a Galactic I(CO)-to-N(H2) conversion factor ($\\alpha_{\\rm CO}$). The spokes and disk are not detected. Analysis of the inner ring's CO kinematics show it to be expanding ($V_{\\rm exp}=68.9\\pm4.9$ km s$^{-1}$) implying an $\\approx70$ Myr age. Stack averaging reveals CO emission in the starburst outer ring for the first time, but only where HI surface density ($\\Sigma_{\\rm HI}$) is high, representing $M_{\\rm H_2}=(7.5\\pm0.8)\\times10^{8}$ M$_{\\odot}$ for a metallicity appropriate $\\alpha_{\\rm CO}$, giving small $\\Sigma_{\\rm H_2}$ ($3.7$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$), molecular fraction ($f_{\\rm mol}=0.10$), and H$_2$ depletion timescales ($\\tau_{\\rm mol} \\approx50-600$ Myr). Elsewhere in the ou...

  3. Simulation of the gas-side heat input for the pre-calculation of the thermal behaviour and consumption in the warm-up of engines; Simulation des gasseitigen Waermeeintrags zur Vorausberechnung des thermischen Verhaltens und des Verbrauchs im Motorwarmlauf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salbrechter, Sebastian; Wimmer, Andreas; Pirker, Gerhard [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Forschungsbereich LEC; Noest, Michael [Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Graz (AT). Kompetenzzentrum ' ' Das virtuelle Fahrzeug' ' (VIF)

    2011-07-01

    In addition to the friction heat, the heat input resulting from the combustion process is the main determining factor for the warm-up behaviour of a combustion engine. In order to predict the fuel consumption during warm-up, an accurate reproduction of the gas-sided heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port is of utmost importance in the simulation of the thermal behaviour of combustion engines. Since the relevant driving cycles cover a large area of the engine-map range and the application changes play a large role during warm-up, the formulation of the gas-sided heat transfer is very demanding. In this article, the procedure for deriving a heat-input model will be shown using the example of a gasoline engine with direct injection and variable valve train. (orig.)

  4. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaño, Hugo P.; Vásquez, J.; Cappa, C. E.; Gómez, M.; Duronea, N.; Rubio, M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. Methods: We observed the 12CO(3 -2), 13CO(3 -2), C18O(3 -2), HCO+(3 -2), and HCN(3 -2) molecular lines in a region of 150''× 150'', centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H2 volume density are 310 M⊙ and 1.2 × 104 cm-3, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows. Final reduced APEX data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A115

  5. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    CERN Document Server

    Saldaño, Hugo P; Cappa, C E; Gómez, M; Duronea, N U; Rubio, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. We observed the CO(3-2), ^{13}CO(3-2), C^{18}O(3-2), HCO+(3-2), and HCN(3-2) molecular lines in a region of 150" x 150", centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H_2 volume density are 310 Mo and 1.2 x 10^4 cm^{-3}, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN and HCO lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows.

  6. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China.

  7. Molecular Gas Dominated 50 kpc Ram Pressure Stripped Tail of the Coma Galaxy D100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáchym, Pavel; Sun, Ming; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Cortese, Luca; Combes, Françoise; Yagi, Masafumi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Palouš, Jan; Roediger, Elke

    2017-04-01

    We have discovered large amounts of molecular gas, as traced by CO emission, in the ram pressure stripped gas tail of the Coma cluster galaxy D100 (GMP 2910), out to large distances of about 50 kpc. D100 has a 60 kpc long, strikingly narrow tail, which is bright in X-rays and Hα. Our observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope reveal in total ˜ {10}9 {M}⊙ H2 (assuming the standard CO-to-H2 conversion) in several regions along the tail, thus indicating that molecular gas may dominate its mass. Along the tail, we measure a smooth gradient in the radial velocity of the CO emission that is offset to lower values from the more diffuse Hα gas velocities. Such a dynamic separation of phases may be due to their differential acceleration by ram pressure. D100 is likely being stripped at a high orbital velocity ≳ 2200 km s-1 by (nearly) peak ram pressure. Combined effects of intra-cluster medium (ICM) viscosity and magnetic fields may be important for the evolution of the stripped interstellar matter. We propose that D100 has reached a continuous mode of stripping of dense gas remaining in its nuclear region. D100 is the second known case of an abundant molecular stripped gas tail, suggesting that conditions in the ICM at the centers of galaxy clusters may be favorable for molecularization. From comparison with other galaxies, we find that there is a good correlation between the CO flux and the Hα surface brightness in ram pressure stripped gas tails, over ˜2 dex. Based on observations made with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  8. Dense Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, K; Vila-Vilaro, B; Okumura, S K; Shibatsuka, T; Okiura, M; Ishizuki, S; Kawabe, R

    2002-01-01

    An imaging survey of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HCO$^+$(1-0) lines in the centers of nearby Seyfert galaxies has been conducted using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array and the RAINBOW interferometer. Preliminary results reveal that 3 Seyferts out of 7 show abnormally high HCN/CO and HCN/HCO$^+$ ratios, which cannot occur even in nuclear starburst galaxies. We suggest that the enhanced HCN emission originated from X-ray irradiated dense obscuring tori, and that these molecular line ratios can be a new diagnostic tool to search for ``pure'' AGNs. According to our HCN diagram, we suggest that NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 5194 host ``pure'' AGNs, whereas Seyfert nuclei of NGC 3079, NGC 6764, and NGC 7469 may be ``composite'' in nature.

  9. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way-type galaxies - II: The temperature distribution of the gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the temperature distribution of CO-dark molecular hydrogen (H2) in a series of disk galaxies simulated using the AREPO moving-mesh code. In conditions similar to those in the Milky Way, we find that H2 has a flat temperature distribution ranging from 10 - 100 K. At $T 30$ K, the H2 fraction spans a broader range and the CO content is small, allowing us to classify gas in these two regimes as CO-bright and CO-dark, respectively. The mean sound speed in the CO-dark H2 is 0.64 km/s, significantly lower than the value in the cold atomic gas (1.15 km/s), implying that the CO-dark molecular phase is more susceptible to turbulent compression and gravitational collapse than its atomic counterpart. We further show that the temperature of the CO-dark H2 is highly sensitive to the strength of the interstellar radiation field, but that conditions in the CO-bright H2 remain largely unchanged. Finally, we examine the usefulness of the [CII] and [OI] fine structure lines as tracers of the CO-dark gas. We sho...

  10. Comparison greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming potential (GWP) effect of energy use in different wheat agroecosystems in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammad; Mahdavi Damghani, Abdolmajid; Khoramivafa, Mahmud

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine energy requirement and global warming potential (GWP) in low and high input wheat production systems in western of Iran. For this purpose, data were collected from 120 wheat farms applying questionnaires via face-to-face interviews. Results showed that total energy input and output were 60,000 and 180,000 MJ ha(-1) in high input systems and 14,000 and 56,000 MJ ha(-1) in low input wheat production systems, respectively. The highest share of total input energy in high input systems recorded for electricity power, N fertilizer, and diesel fuel with 36, 18, and 13 %, respectively, while the highest share of input energy in low input systems observed for N fertilizer, diesel fuel, and seed with 32, 31, and 27 %. Energy use efficiency in high input systems (3.03) was lower than of low input systems (3.94). Total CO2, N2O, and CH4 emissions in high input systems were 1981.25, 31.18, and 1.87 kg ha(-1), respectively. These amounts were 699.88, 0.02, and 0.96 kg ha(-1) in low input systems. In high input wheat production systems, total GWP was 11686.63 kg CO2eq ha(-1) wheat. This amount was 725.89 kg CO2eq ha(-1) in low input systems. The results show that 1 ha of high input system will produce greenhouse effect 17 times of low input systems. So, high input production systems need to have an efficient and sustainable management for reducing environmental crises such as change climate.

  11. Detection of Molecular Gas in Void Galaxies : Implications for Star Formation in Isolated Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO line emission as a tracer. The observations were done using the 45m Nobeyama Radio Telescope. Void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Ha line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO line emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and the molecular gas masses lie between 10^8 to 10^9 Msolar. We did follow-up Ha imaging observations of three detected galaxies us...

  12. Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA) I.The counter-rotating LINER NGC4826

    CERN Document Server

    García-Burillo, S; Hunt, L K; Boone, F; Baker, A J; Tacconi, L J; Eckart, A; Neri, R; Leon, S; Schinnerer, E; Englmaier, P

    2003-01-01

    We present new high-resolution observations of the nucleus of the counter-rotating LINER NGC4826, made in the J=1-0 and J=2-1 lines of 12CO with the IRAM Plateau de Bure mm-interferometer(PdBI).The CO maps, which achieve 0.8''(16pc) resolution in the 2-1 line, fully resolve an inner molecular gas disk which is truncated at an outer radius of 700pc. The total molecular gas mass is distributed in a lopsided nuclear disk of 40pc radius and two one-arm spirals, which develop at different radii in the disk. The distribution and kinematics of molecular gas in the inner 1kpc of NGC4826 show the prevalence of different types of m=1 perturbations in the gas. Although dominated by rotation, the gas kinematics are perturbed by streaming motions related to the m=1 instabilities. The non-circular motions associated with the inner m=1 perturbations agree qualitatively with the pattern expected for a trailing wave developed outside corotation ('fast' wave). In contrast, the streaming motions in the outer m=1 spiral are bett...

  13. The EDGE--CALIFA Survey: Molecular Gas Depletion Time in Galaxy Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Dyas; Blitz, Leo; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wong, Tony H.; Ostriker, Eve C.; EDGE--CALIFA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the first results of the EDGE--CALIFA survey, combining the power of optical Integral Field Unit and millimeter-interferometric observations to study the variations of molecular gas depletion time in the centers of 86 galaxies. Our key findings are the following. (1) About 25% of our sample shows deviations from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, namely a shorter depletion time in the centers relative to the disks. If the galaxy centers undergo star formation cycles, then they spend 25% of their duty cycles in a burst-mode period. (2) Barred galaxies tend to have shorter depletion time in the centers, presumably due to the dynamical effects induced by bars. (3) Galaxies with shorter depletion time in the centers tend to have higher ratio of stellar to molecular gas gravity, because that ratio sets the gravitational pressure per unit molecular gas mass that must be balanced by the energy and momentum feedback from star formation to maintain thermal and dynamical equilibrium states. (4) Both depletion time and bar dynamics affect the gradient of gas-phase metallicities, where unbarred galaxies with shorter depletion time in the centers show the steepest gradient, presumably due to high star formation activities that inject more metals and lack of gas mixing because bars are not present. We discuss possible scenarios that may cause the variations of depletion time in the centers and their implications within the context of galaxy evolution.

  14. Galaxy metallicities depend primarily on stellar mass and molecular gas mass

    CERN Document Server

    Bothwell, M S; Cicone, C; Peng, Y; Wagg, J

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the behaviour of galaxies in a four-dimensional parameter space defined by stellar mass, metallicity, star formation rate, and molecular gas mass. We analyse a combined sample of 227 galaxies, which draws from a number of surveys across the redshift range 0 90% of the sample at z~0), and covers > 3 decades in stellar mass.Using Principle Component Analysis, we demonstrate that galaxies in our sample lie on a 2-dimensional plane within this 4D parameter space, indicative of galaxies that exist in an equilibrium between gas inflow and outflow. Furthermore, we find that the metallicity of galaxies depends only on stellar mass and molecular gas mass. In other words, gas-phase metallicity has a negligible dependence on star formation rate, once the correlated effect of molecular gas content is accounted for. The well-known `fundamental metallicity relation', which describes a close and tight relationship between metallicity and SFR (at fixed stellar mass) is therefore entire...

  15. The NGC 1614 Interacting Galaxy: Molecular Gas Feeding a "Ring of Fire"

    CERN Document Server

    König, S; Muller, S; Beswick, R J; Gallagher, J S

    2013-01-01

    Minor mergers frequently occur between giant and gas-rich low mass galaxies and can provide significant amounts of interstellar matter to refuel star formation and power AGN in the giant systems. Major starbursts and/or AGN result when fresh gas is transported and compressed in the central regions of the giant galaxy. This is the situation in NGC1614, whose molecular medium we explore at half arcsecond angular resolution through our observations of 12CO(2-1) emission using the SMA. We compare our maps with optical and Pa alpha, HST and high angular resolution radio continuum images to study the relationships between dense molecular gas and the starburst region. The most intense CO emission occurs in a partial ring with ~230pc radius around the center, with an extension to the north-west into the dust lane that contains diffuse molecular gas. We resolve 10 GMAs in the ring which has an integrated molecular mass of ~8x10^8M_sun. Our observations filter out a large part of the CO(1-0) emission mapped at shorter ...

  16. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pérez, E.; Serra-Crespo,P.; Hamad, S.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations o

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AMIGA IX. Molecular gas properties (Lisenfeld+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Espada, D.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Kuno, N.; Leon, S.; Sabater, J.; Sato, N.; Sulentic, J.; Verley, S.; Min, Y.

    2011-08-01

    File "table1.dat" contains the CIG number, and general data for the total CO sample. File "tale4.dat" contains the CIG number, and the velocity integrated 12CO(1-0) intensities, line width and central velocities for galaxies newly observed. File "tale5.dat" contains the CIG number and the molecular gas mass for the total CO sample. (3 data files).

  18. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pérez, E.; Serra-Crespo,P.; Hamad, S.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations

  19. The molecular gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies: a new emergent picture

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P; Weiss, Axel; van der Werf, Paul; Isaak, Kate; Gao, Yu; Xilouris, Manolis; Greve, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Results from a large, multi-J CO, {13}CO, and HCN line survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L_{IR}>=10^{10} L_{\\odot}) in the local Universe (z10^{12} L_{\\odot}) the Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) can encompass at most \\sim few% of their molecular gas mass while the large U_{CR} and the strong turbulence in these merger/starbursts, can volumetrically heat much of their molecular gas to T_{kin}\\sim(100-200)K, unhindered by the high dust extinctions. Moreover the strong supersonic turbulence in ULIRGs relocates much of their molecular gas at much higher average densities than in isolated spirals. This renders low-J CO lines incapable of constraining the properties of the bulk of the molecular gas in ULIRGs, with substantial and systematic underestimates of its mass possible when only such lines are used. A comparative study of multi-J HCN lines and CO SLEDs from J=1--0 up to J=13--12 of NGC 6240 and Arp 193 offers a clear example of two merger/starbursts whose similar low-J CO SLEDs, and L_{IR}/L_{CO,1-0}, L_...

  20. SENSITIVE LIMITS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT OF CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MCNAMARA, BR; JAFFE, W

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for molecular gas toward six cluster cooling flows in the CO(2-1) line using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The sample includes clusters with estimated total cooling rates Of m(CF) approximately 10-600M. yr-1, at redshifts between z approximately 0.01-0.06. None were detected ei

  1. Physical Conditions And Kinematics Of The Molecular Gas In Feedback-dominated Radio Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillard, Pierre; Ogle, P.; Emonts, B.; Appleton, P.; Morganti, R.

    2012-01-01

    Active Galac Nuclei (AGN) feedback is widely introduced in numerical simulations of galaxy evolution to clear the circum-nuclear gas, thus regulating star formation and preventing the formation of too many massive galaxies in the early universe. However, the impact of AGN feedback on the molecular g

  2. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Mookerjea, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12” × 2.6 km s-1, enabling indivi

  3. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Roellig, M.; Mookerjea, B.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12 '' x 2.6 km s(-1), enabling in

  4. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Bradley S; Walter, F; Leroy, A; Carignan, C

    2015-01-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from the HERACLES survey. We combine our data with literature THINGS, SINGS and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (${\\rm H{\\scriptstyle I}}$ from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and ${\\rm H{\\scriptstyle I}}$ kinematics with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{CO}}$ to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density - the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES and KINGFISH data. We study t...

  5. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  6. Infrared Excess and Molecular Gas in Galactic Supershells

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J E; Koo, B C; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae; Koo, Bon-Chul

    1999-01-01

    We have carried out high-resolution observations along one-dimensional cuts through the three Galactic supershells GS 064-01-97, GS 090-28-17, and GS 174+02-64 in the HI 21 cm and CO J=1-0 lines. By comparing the HI data with IRAS data, we have derived the distributions of the I_100 and tau_100 excesses, which are, respectively, the 100 mum intensity and 100 mum optical depth in excess of what would be expected from HI emission. We have found that both the I_100 and tau_100 excesses have good correlations with the CO integrated intensity W_CO in all three supershells. But the I_100 excess appears to underestimate H_2 column density N(H_2) by factors of 1.5-3.8. This factor is the ratio of atomic to molecular infrared emissivities, and we show that it can be roughly determined from the HI and IRAS data. By comparing the tau_100 excess with W_CO, we derive the conversion factor X = N(H_2)/W_CO = 0.26-0.66 in the three supershells. In GS 090-28-17, which is a very diffuse shell, our result suggests that the regi...

  7. Inhibited, Explosive and Anisotropic Relaxation in a Gas of Molecular Super-Rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion intact and relatively slow. We investigate collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases, and find that it follows a remarkable generic scenario. The route to equilibrium starts with a durable metastable 'gyroscopic stage', in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the long-lasting optical birefringence, and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the 'gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by a self-accelerating explosive rotational-translational energy exchange leading the gas towards the final thermal equilibrium. We i...

  8. Gas separation by the molecular exchange flow through micropores of the membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michiaki; Nakaye, Shoeji; Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    A model gas separator that makes use of the molecular exchange flow through porous membrane of 18 cm2 area is fabricated. The gas separator performance is tested for helium-neon mixture. The separator divides a continuous flow of gas mixture into two flows of different gases. The difference of mole percentage is around 8 % at the volumetric feed flow rate of 1 sccm. In the present system, the molecular exchange flow is induced in two Knudsen pumps, where the mixed cellulose ester membrane is used as the thermal transpiration material. The experiment demonstrates the capability of these pumps to increase the concentration of heavy and light molecules, respectively, from the feed mixture.

  9. Do all the protic ionic liquids exist as molecular aggregates in the gas phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Yong; Li, Haoran

    2011-10-21

    According to an EI-MS study of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), it has been concluded that not all PILs exist as molecular aggregates in the gas phase. The detection of both ions of m/z 115.0 and m/z 116.0 for the 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium trifluoromethylsulfonate (TMGS) protic ionic liquid indicates that both the molecular and ionic aggregates co-exist in the gas phase, which is to say that the TMGS may also evaporate via the ionic aggregates just like aprotic ionic liquids. Furthermore, investigation on triethylamine-based and 1-methylimidazole-based PILs confirmed that the gas phase structure of PILs depends on both the acidity and basicity of the corresponding acid and base.

  10. ORFEUS echelle spectra Molecular hydrogen in disk, IVC, and HVC gas in front of the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Bluhm, H J; Marggraf, O; Richter, P; Bluhm, Hartmut; Boer, Klaas. S. de; Marggraf, Ole; Richter, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    In front of the LMC molecular hydrogen is found in absorption near 0 km/s, being local disk gas, near +60 km/s in an intermediate velocity cloud, and near +120 km/s, in a high velocity halo cloud. The nature of the gas is discussed based on four ORFEUS far UV spectra of LMC stars and including data from the ground and from the IUE satellite. The local gas is cool and, given a span of sight lines of only 2.5 deg, rather fluffy. The fractional abundance of H_2 varies from log(f)=-5.4 to -3.3. Metal depletions (up to -1.7 dex for Fe) are typical for galactic disk gas. In the IV and HV gas an apparent underabundance of neutral oxygen points to an ionization level of the gas of about 90%. H_2 is detected in IV and HV gas toward HD 269546. In the IV gas we find an H_2 column density of log(N)\\simeq15.6. The H_2 excitation indicates that the line of sight samples a cloud at a temperature below 150 K. Column densities are too small to detect the higher UV pumped excitation levels. The high velocity H_2 (log(N)\\simeq1...

  11. Molecular Gas Chemistry in AGN I. The IRAM Survey of NGC1068

    CERN Document Server

    Usero, A; Fuente, A; Martín-Pintado, J; Rodríguez-Fernández, N J

    2004-01-01

    There is observational evidence that nuclear winds and X-rays can heavily influence the physical conditions and chemical abundances of molecular gas in the circumnuclear disks (CND) of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In this paper we probe the chemical status of molecular gas in the CND of NGC1068, a prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy. Precedent claims that the chemistry of molecular gas in the nucleus of NGC1068 is abnormal by galactic standards were based on the high HCN/CO luminosity ratio measured in the CND. Results from new observations obtained in this survey have served to derive abundances of molecular species such as SiO, CN, HCO+, HOC+, H13CO+ and HCO. These estimates are complemented by a re-evaluation of molecular abundances for HCN, CS and CO, based on previously published single-dish and interferometer observations of NGC1068. We report on the first detection of SiO emission in the CND of NGC1068. The estimated large abundance of SiO in the CND, X(SiO)~5-10x10^{-9}, cannot be attributed to shocks rela...

  12. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS IN VOID GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN ISOLATED ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M.; Honey, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India); Saito, T. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate school of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Iono, D. [Chile Observatory, NAOJ (Japan); Ramya, S., E-mail: mousumi@iiap.res.in [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-10

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1–0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1–0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  13. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR-FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE CENTRAL AND BAR REGIONS OF NGC 6946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hsi-An; Sorai, Kazuo [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Kuno, Nario [Division of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Koda, Jin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Hirota, Akihiko [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Kaneko, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hapan@astro1.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, NAOJ, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2015-12-10

    In this work, we investigate the molecular gas and star-formation properties in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 using multiple molecular lines and star-formation tracers. A high-resolution image (100 pc) of {sup 13}CO (1–0) is created for the inner 2 kpc disk by the single-dish Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and interferometer Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, including the central region (nuclear ring and bar) and the offset ridges of the primary bar. Single-dish HCN (1–0) observations were also made to constrain the amount of dense gas. The physical properties of molecular gas are inferred from (1) the large velocity gradient calculations using our observations and archival {sup 12}CO (1–0), {sup 12}CO(2–1) data, (2) the dense gas fraction suggested by the luminosity ratio of HCN to {sup 12}CO (1–0), and (3) the infrared color. The results show that the molecular gas in the central region is warmer and denser than that of the offset ridges. The dense gas fraction of the central region is similar to that of luminous infrared galaxies/ultraluminous infrared galaxies, whereas the offset ridges are close to the global average of normal galaxies. The coolest and least-dense region is found in a spiral-like structure, which was misunderstood to be part of the southern primary bar in previous low-resolution observations. The star-formation efficiency (SFE) changes by about five times in the inner disk. The variation of SFE agrees with the prediction in terms of star formation regulated by the galactic bar. We find a consistency between the star-forming region and the temperature inferred by the infrared color, suggesting that the distribution of subkiloparsec-scale temperature is driven by star formation.

  14. Molecular conformation of linear alkane molecules: From gas phase to bulk water through the interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murina, Ezequiel L.; Fernández-Prini, Roberto; Pastorino, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    We studied the behavior of long chain alkanes (LCAs) as they were transferred from gas to bulk water, through the liquid-vapor interface. These systems were studied using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation and we have calculated properties like free energy profiles, molecular orientation, and radius of gyration of the LCA molecules. The results show changes in conformation of the solutes along the path. LCAs adopt pronounced molecular orientations and the larger ones extend appreciably when partially immersed in the interface. In bulk water, their conformations up to dodecane are mainly extended. However, larger alkanes like eicosane present a more stable collapsed conformation as they approach bulk water. We have characterized the more probable configurations in all interface and bulk regions. The results obtained are of interest for the study of biomatter processes requiring the transfer of hydrophobic matter, especially chain-like molecules like LCAs, from gas to bulk aqueous systems through the interface.

  15. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity of conventional and conservation agriculture system in rainfed semi arid tropics of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratibha, G.; Srinivas, I.; Rao, K. V.; Shanker, Arun K.; Raju, B. M. K.; Choudhary, Deepak K.; Srinivas Rao, K.; Srinivasarao, Ch.; Maheswari, M.

    2016-11-01

    Agriculture has been considered as one of the contributors to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and it continues to increase with increase in crop production. Hence development of sustainable agro techniques with maximum crop production, and low global warming potential is need of the hour. Quantifying net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) of an agricultural activity is a method to assess the mitigation potential of the activity. But there is dearth of information on NGWP of conservation agriculture under rainfed conditions. Hence in this study two methods such as crop based (NGWPcrop) and soil based (NGWPsoil) were estimated from the data of the experiment initiated in 2009 in rainfed semiarid regions of Hyderabad, India with different tillage practices like conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT), zero tillage (ZT) and residue retention levels by harvesting at different heights which includes 0, 10 and 30 cm anchored residue in pigeonpea-castor systems. The results of the study revealed that under rainfed conditions CT recorded 24% higher yields over ZT, but CT and RT were on par with each other. However, the yield gap between the tillage treatments is narrowing down over 5 years of study. ZT and RT recorded 26 and 11% lower indirect GHG emissions (emissions from farm operations and input use) over CT, respectively. The percent contribution of CO2 eq. N2O emission is higher to total GHG emissions in both the crops. Both NGWPcrop, NGWPsoil, GHGIcrop, and GHGIsoil based were influenced by tillage and residue treatments. Further, castor grown on pigeonpea residue recorded 20% higher GHG emissions over pigeonpea grown on castor residues. The fuel consumption in ZT was reduced by 58% and 81% as compared to CT in pigeonpea and castor, respectively. Lower NGWP and GHGI based on crop and soil was observed with increase in crop residues and decrease in tillage intensity in both the crops. The results of the study indicate that, there

  16. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. II. The chemistry of the dense molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, S.; García-Burillo, S.; Fuente, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Usero, A.; Henkel, C.; Eckart, A.; Martin, S.; Spaans, M.; Muller, S.; Combes, F.; Krips, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Casasola, V.; Costagliola, F.; Marquez, I.; Planesas, P.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We present a detailed analysis of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Bands 7 and 9 data of CO, HCO+, HCN, and CS, augmented with Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) data of the ~200 pc circumnuclear disc (CND) and the ~1.3 kpc starburst ring (SB ring) of NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy. We aim to determine the physical characteristics of the dense gas present in the CND, and to establish whether the different line intensity ratios we find within the CND, as well as between the CND and the SB ring, are due to excitation effects (gas density and temperature differences) or to a different chemistry. Methods: We estimate the column densities of each species in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We then compute large one-dimensional, non-LTE radiative transfer grids (using RADEX) by using only the CO transitions first, and then all the available molecules to constrain the densities, temperatures, and column densities within the CND. We finally present a preliminary set of chemical models to determine the origin of the gas. Results: We find that, in general, the gas in the CND is very dense (>105 cm-3) and hot (T> 150 K), with differences especially in the temperature across the CND. The AGN position has the lowest CO/HCO+, CO/HCN, and CO/CS column density ratios. The RADEX analyses seem to indicate that there is chemical differentiation across the CND. We also find differences between the chemistry of the SB ring and some regions of the CND; the SB ring is also much colder and less dense than the CND. Chemical modelling does not succeed in reproducing all the molecular ratios with one model per region, suggesting the presence of multi-gas phase components. Conclusions: The LTE, RADEX, and chemical analyses all indicate that more than one gas-phase component is necessary to uniquely fit all the available molecular ratios within the CND. A higher number of molecular transitions at the ALMA resolution is necessary to

  17. High density gas state at water/graphite interface studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chun-Lei; Li Zhao-Xia; Li Jing-Yuan; Xiu Peng; Hu Jun; Fang Hai-Ping

    2008-01-01

    In this paper molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the accumulation behaviour of N2 and H2 at water/graphite interface under ambient temperature and pressure. It finds that both N2 and H2 molecules can accumulate at the interface and form one of two states according to the ratio of gas molecules number to square of graphite surface from our simulation results: gas films (pancake-like) for a larger ratio and nanobubbles for a Smaller ratio. In addition, we discuss the stabilities of nanobubbles at different environment temperatures. Surprisingly, it is found that the density of both kinds of gas states can be greatly increased, even comparable with that of the liquid N2 and liquid H2. The present results are expected to be helpful for the understanding of the stable existence of gas film (pancake-like) and nanobubbles.

  18. The nearby interstellar medium towards alpha Leo -- UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star alpha Leo (Regulus) obtained at high resolution and high S/N by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. The gas in front of alpha Leo exhibits two absorption components, one of which coincides in velocity with the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second, smaller, component is shifted by +5.6 km/s relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750,-600)K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025,-0.03) cm^-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance of all the available species indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and that metals are significantly depleted onto grains. We infer that N(H I) = 1.9 (+...

  19. Molecular phylogeny of bark and ambrosia beetles reveals multiple origins of fungus farming during periods of global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordal Bjarte H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungus farming is an unusual life style in insects that has evolved many times in the wood boring weevils named ‘ambrosia beetles’. Multiple occurrences of this behaviour allow for a detailed comparison of the different origins of fungus farming through time, its directionality, and possible ancestral states. We tested these hypotheses with a phylogeny representing the largest data set to date, nearly 4 kb of nucleotides from COI, EF-1α, CAD, ArgK, 28S, and 200 scolytine taxa. Results Phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian or parsimony approaches placed the root of Scolytinae close to the tribe Scolytini and Microborus, but otherwise indicated low resolution at older nodes. More recent clades were well resolved, including ten origins of fungus farming. There were no subsequent reversals to bark or phloem feeding in the fungus farming clades. The oldest origin of fungus farming was estimated near 50 Ma, long after the origin of Scolytinae (100-120 Ma. Younger origins included the species rich Xyleborini, dated to 21 Ma. Sister group comparisons and test of independence between traits indicated that neither gregarious larval feeding nor regular inbreeding by sibling mating was strongly correlated with the origin of fungus farming. Conclusion Origins of fungus farming corresponded mainly with two periods of global warming in the Cenozoic era, which were characterised by broadly distributed tropical forests. Hence, it seems likely that warm climates and expanding tropical angiosperm forests played critical roles in the successful radiation of diverse fungus farming groups. However, further investigation will likely reveal additional biological factors that promote fungus farming.

  20. Molecular diversity and high virulence of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from biofilms developed within a warm spring of a thermal spa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaabna Zineddine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases of legionellosis have been diagnosed in the same French thermal spa in 1986, 1994 and 1997. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1 strains have been isolated from several patients, but the source of contamination was not identified despite the presence of different Lp1 in water samples of the three natural springs feeding the spa at this period. Results Our strategy was to investigate L. pneumophila (Lp strains from natural biofilms developed in a sulphur-rich warm spring of this contaminated site. Biofilm analysis revealed the presence of three Lp serogroups (Lp1, Lp10 and Lp12. Surprisingly, Lp10 and Lp12 were not reported in the previous described studies from water samples. Besides, the new seven Lp1 we isolated exhibit a high molecular diversity and have been differentiated in five classes according to their DNA genome patterns obtained by PFGE and mip sequences. It must be noted that these DNA patterns are original and unknown in databases. Interestingly, the 27 Lp environmental strains we isolated display a higher cytotoxicity and virulence towards the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii than those of known Lp1 epidemic strains. Conclusion The characteristics of Legionella pneumophila Lp1 strains isolated from the warm spring are in agreement with their presence in biofilms and their probable long-term persistence in this ecosystem.

  1. Multiple-Line Study of NGC 1068: Hot Molecular Gas Caused by Jet-Gas Interaction in the Central 100pc?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krips, Melanie

    2012-07-01

    A multiple molecular line and line transition study is presented for the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the proto-typical Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. A detailed analysis of the kinematics and excitation conditions of the molecular gas, as traced by 12CO, 13CO, HCN and HCO+, suggests that part of the molecular gas in the CND is shocked, expanding and heated to high kinetic temperatures most likely as a consequence of an interaction between the radio jet and the CND. We further find support for an X-ray altered chemistry of the molecular gas in the CND based on the significantly elevated abundance of HCN when compared to star-forming, starbursting or quiescent gas regions.

  2. Evolution of the atomic and molecular gas content of galaxies in dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, G; Peeples, M S

    2014-01-01

    We present a semi-empirical model to infer the atomic and molecular hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of halo mass and time. Our model combines the SFR-halo mass-redshift relation (constrained by galaxy abundances) with inverted SFR-surface density relations to infer galaxy H I and H2 masses. We present gas scaling relations, gas fractions, and mass functions from z = 0 to z = 3 and the gas properties of galaxies as a function of their host halo masses. Predictions of our work include: 1) there is a ~ 0.2 dex decrease in the H I mass of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass since z = 1.5, whereas the H2 mass of galaxies decreases by > 1 dex over the same period. 2) galaxy cold gas fractions and H2 fractions decrease with increasing stellar mass and time. Galaxies with M* > 10^10 Msun are dominated by their stellar content at z < 1, whereas less-massive galaxies only reach these gas fractions at z = 0. We find the strongest evolution in relative gas content at z < 1.5. 3) the SFR to gas m...

  3. Molecular dynamics analysis of reflected gas molecules on self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideki

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the gas flow of high Knudsen number, it is necessary to specify the boundary condition for the reflected gas molecules at a solid surface. In most cases of the analysis, the diffuse reflection is generally assumed, but there are many cases for which this reflection cannot be applied. The characteristics of the reflected gas molecules depend on the state of the solid surface as well as the gas-surface interaction. The present author analyzed the scattering properties of monoatomic and diatomic gases on various solid surfaces based on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and proposed the boundary condition of reflected gas molecule (Phys. Fluids 18, 046103, 2006). Recently, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for the functionalization of the solid surface have been used in the development of micro/nano devices such as microarray and nanosensor. Therefore, it is interesting to study the scattering behavior of the reflected gas molecules on the SAM surface and make the scattering model of gases for the boundary condition. In this study, the angular distribution and the trapping probability for gas molecule on the SAM surface are observed by using MD simulation. The scattering probability at different incident energies is also discussed. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26870813.

  4. Thermometry of Guided Molecular Beams from a Cryogenic Buffer-Gas Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-11-18

    A comprehensive characterisation of cold molecular beams from a cryogenic buffer-gas cell, providing insight into the physics of buffer-gas cooling, is presented. Cold molecular beams are extracted from a cryogenic cell by electrostatic guiding, which is also used to measure their velocity distribution. The rotational-state distribution of the molecules is probed by radio-frequency resonant depletion spectroscopy. With the help of complete trajectory simulations, yielding the guiding efficiency for all of the thermally populated states, it is possible to determine both the rotational and the translational temperature of the molecules at the output of the buffer-gas cell. This thermometry method is demonstrated for various regimes of buffer-gas cooling and beam formation as well as for molecular species of different sizes (CH3 F and CF3 CCH). Comparison of the rotational and translational temperatures provides evidence of faster rotational thermalisation for the CH3 F/He system in the limit of low He density. In addition, the relaxation rates for different rotational states appear to be different. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular Gas Kinematics and Line Diagnostics in Early-type Galaxies: NGC4710 and NGC5866

    CERN Document Server

    Topal, Selcuk; Davis, Timothy A; Krips, Melanie; Young, Lisa M; Crocker, Alison F

    2016-01-01

    We present interferometric observations of CO lines (12CO(1-0, 2-1) and 13CO(1-0, 2-1)) and dense gas tracers (HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), HNC(1-0) and HNCO(4-3)) in two nearby edge-on barred lenticular galaxies, NGC 4710 and NGC 5866, with most of the gas concentrated in a nuclear disc and an inner ring in each galaxy. We probe the physical conditions of a two-component molecular interstellar medium in each galaxy and each kinematic component by using molecular line ratio diagnostics in three complementary ways. First, we measure the ratios of the position-velocity diagrams of different lines, second we measure the ratios of each kinematic component's integrated line intensities as a function of projected position, and third we model these line ratios using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer code. Overall, the nuclear discs appear to have a tenuous molecular gas component that is hotter, optically thinner and with a larger dense gas fraction than that in the inner rings, suggesting more dense ...

  6. Analytical solutions for a soil vapor extraction model that incorporates gas phase dispersion and molecular diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junqi; Goltz, Mark N.

    2017-06-01

    To greatly simplify their solution, the equations describing radial advective/dispersive transport to an extraction well in a porous medium typically neglect molecular diffusion. While this simplification is appropriate to simulate transport in the saturated zone, it can result in significant errors when modeling gas phase transport in the vadose zone, as might be applied when simulating a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system to remediate vadose zone contamination. A new analytical solution for the equations describing radial gas phase transport of a sorbing contaminant to an extraction well is presented. The equations model advection, dispersion (including both mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion), and rate-limited mass transfer of dissolved, separate phase, and sorbed contaminants into the gas phase. The model equations are analytically solved by using the Laplace transform with respect to time. The solutions are represented by confluent hypergeometric functions in the Laplace domain. The Laplace domain solutions are then evaluated using a numerical Laplace inversion algorithm. The solutions can be used to simulate the spatial distribution and the temporal evolution of contaminant concentrations during operation of a soil vapor extraction well. Results of model simulations show that the effect of gas phase molecular diffusion upon concentrations at the extraction well is relatively small, although the effect upon the distribution of concentrations in space is significant. This study provides a tool that can be useful in designing SVE remediation strategies, as well as verifying numerical models used to simulate SVE system performance.

  7. Thermometry of Guided Molecular Beams from a Cryogenic Buffer-Gas Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X; Zeppenfeld, M; Chervenkov, S; Rempe, G

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cold molecular beams from a cryogenic buffer-gas cell, providing an insight into the physics of buffer-gas cooling. Cold molecular beams are extracted from a cryogenic cell by electrostatic guiding, which is also used to measure their velocity distribution. Molecules' rotational-state distribution is probed via radio-frequency resonant depletion spectroscopy. With the help of complete trajectory simulations, yielding the guiding efficiency for all of the thermally populated states, we are able to determine both the rotational and the translational temperature of the molecules at the output of the buffer-gas cell. This thermometry method is demonstrated for various regimes of buffer-gas cooling and beam formation as well as for molecular species of different sizes, $\\rm{CH_3F}$ and $\\rm{CF_3CCH}$. Comparison between the rotational and translational temperatures provides evidence of faster rotational thermalization for the $\\rm{CH_3F-He}$ system in the limit of low...

  8. CO-dark gas and molecular filaments in Milky Way type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rowan J; Clark, Paul C; Klessen, Ralf S; Springel, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We use the moving mesh code AREPO coupled to a time-dependent chemical network to investigate the formation and destruction of molecular gas in simulated spiral galaxies. This allows us to determine the characteristics of the gas that is not traced by CO emission. Our extremely high resolution AREPO simulations allow us to capture the chemical evolution of the disc, without recourse to a parameterised `clumping factor'. We calculate H2 and CO column densities through our simulated disc galaxies, and estimate the CO emission and CO-H2 conversion factor. We find that in conditions akin to those in the local interstellar medium, around 42% of the total molecular mass should be in CO-dark regions, in reasonable agreement with observational estimates. This fraction is almost insensitive to the CO integrated intensity threshold used to discriminate between CO-bright and CO-dark gas, as long as this threshold is less than 10 K km/s. The CO-dark molecular gas primarily resides in extremely long (>100 pc) filaments th...

  9. Effects of a raised water table on greenhouse gas emissions and celery yield from agricultural peat under climate warming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysek, Magdalena; Zona, Donatella; Leake, Jonathan; Banwart, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are globally important areas for carbon preservation: covering only 3% of world's land, they store 30% of total soil carbon. At the same time, peat soils are widely utilised in agriculture: in Europe 14% of peatland area is under cultivation, 40% of UK peatlands have been drained for agricultural use and 24% of deep peat area in England is being farmed. One of the most important regions for crop production on lowland peats in the UK are the East Anglian Fenlands (the Fens): an area of drained peatlands in East England. 88% of the Fenland area is cultivated, sustaining around 4000 farms and supplying 37% of total vegetable production in England. The soils of the area are fertile (89% of agricultural land being classified as grade 1 or 2) and so crops with high nutritional demands tend to dominate. It is estimated that Fenland peats store 41 Tg of Carbon, which is lost from the ecosystem at a rate of 0.4 Tg C/yr. The Fens are at risk due to continued drainage-induced volume loss of the peat layer via shrinkage, compaction and oxidation, which are estimated to result in wastage rate of 2.1 cm/yr. Cultivation of peat soil requires drainage as most crops are intolerant of root-zone anoxia: this leads to creation of oxic conditions in which organic matter becomes vulnerable to mineralisation by aerobic microorganisms. It is, therefore, crucial to find a water table level which would minimise peat loss and at the same time allow for economically viable crop growth. Despite the importance of preservation of agricultural peats, there is a lack of studies which attempt to find water table level that strikes a balance between crop yield and greenhouse gas production. The future of the Fens is overshadowed by another uncertainty: increases in temperature brought by the climate change. It is estimated that average global temperature increase expected by the end of this century (relative to 1986-2005) would be within the range of 0.3-4.8°C, depending on the scenario

  10. Warm Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Grøn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available I show here that there are some interesting differences between the predictions of warm and cold inflation models focusing in particular upon the scalar spectral index n s and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. The first thing to be noted is that the warm inflation models in general predict a vanishingly small value of r. Cold inflationary models with the potential V = M 4 ( ϕ / M P p and a number of e-folds N = 60 predict δ n s C ≡ 1 − n s ≈ ( p + 2 / 120 , where n s is the scalar spectral index, while the corresponding warm inflation models with constant value of the dissipation parameter Γ predict δ n s W = [ ( 20 + p / ( 4 + p ] / 120 . For example, for p = 2 this gives δ n s W = 1.1 δ n s C . The warm polynomial model with Γ = V seems to be in conflict with the Planck data. However, the warm natural inflation model can be adjusted to be in agreement with the Planck data. It has, however, more adjustable parameters in the expressions for the spectral parameters than the corresponding cold inflation model, and is hence a weaker model with less predictive force. However, it should be noted that the warm inflation models take into account physical processes such as dissipation of inflaton energy to radiation energy, which is neglected in the cold inflationary models.

  11. Kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas in nearby luminous infrared interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Font, Joan; Rosado, Margarita; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Borlaff, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We have observed three luminous infrared galaxy systems (LIRGS) which are pairs of interacting galaxies, with the Galaxy H$\\alpha$ Fabry-Perot system (GH$\\alpha$FaS) mounted on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, and combined the observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of these systems in CO emission to compare the physical properties of the star formation regions and the molecular gas clouds, and specifically the internal kinematics of the star forming regions. We identified 88 star forming regions in the H$\\alpha$ emission data-cubes, and 27 molecular cloud complexes in the CO emission data-cubes. The surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas are significantly higher in these systems than in non-interacting galaxies and the Galaxy, and are closer to the surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas of extreme star forming galaxies at higher redshifts. The large values of the velocity dis...

  12. Molecular CO(1-0) gas in the z~2 radio galaxy MRC 0152-209

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Mao, M Y; Norris, R P; Miley, G; Ekers, R D; Villar-Martin, M; Rottgering, H J A; Sadler, E M; Rees, G; Morganti, R; Saikia, D J; Oosterloo, T A; Stevens, J B; Tadhunter, C N

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of molecular CO(1-0) gas in the high-z radio galaxy MRC 0152-209 (z = 1.92) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend (ATCA/CABB). This is the third known detection of CO(1-0) in a high-z radio galaxy to date. CO(1-0) is the most robust tracer of the overall molecular gas content (including the wide-spread, low-density and subthermally excited component), hence observations of CO(1-0) are crucial for studying galaxy evolution in the Early Universe. We derive L'(CO) = (6.6 +- 2.0) x 10^10 K km/s pc^2 for MRC 0152-209, which is comparable to that derived from CO(1-0) observations of several high-z submillimetre and starforming BzK galaxies. The CO(1-0) traces a total molecular hydrogen mass of M(H2) = 5 x 10^10 (alpha_x/0.8) Msun. MRC 0152-209 is an infra-red bright radio galaxy, in which a large reservoir of cold molecular gas has not (yet) been depleted by star formation or radio source feedback. Its compact radio source is reliably detected at 40 GHz and has a steep...

  13. Molecular gas and star formation towards the IR dust bubble S24 and its environs

    CERN Document Server

    Cappa, C E; Firpo, V; Vasquez, J; López-Caraballo, C H; Rubio, M; Vazzano, M M

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the infrared dust bubble S24, and its environs, with the aim of investigating the characteristics of the molecular gas and the interstellar dust linked to them, and analyzing the evolutionary status of the young stellar objects (YSOs) identified there. Using APEX data, we mapped the molecular emission in the CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1), and $^{13}$CO(3-2) lines in a region of about 5'x 5' in size around the bubble. The cold dust distribution was analyzed using ATLASGAL and Herschel images. Complementary IR and radio data were also used.The molecular gas linked to the S24 bubble, G341.220-0.213, and G341.217-0.237 has velocities between -48.0 km sec$^{-1}$ and -40.0 km sec$^{-1}$. The gas distribution reveals a shell-like molecular structure of $\\sim$0.8 pc in radius bordering the bubble. A cold dust counterpart of the shell is detected in the LABOCA and Herschel images.The presence of extended emission at 24 $\\mu$m and radio continuum emission inside the b...

  14. Molecular Gas Along a Bright Hα Filament in 2A 0335+096 Revealed by ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantyghem, A. N.; McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Hogan, M. T.; Edge, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Main, R. A.; Murray, N. W.; O'Connell, R. W.; O'Dea, C. P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Parrish, I. J.; Sanders, J. S.; Tremblay, G.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of 1.13 ± 0.15 × 109 M ⊙ is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for 3.2 ± 0.4 × 108 M ⊙ of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies cooled out of the intracluster medium over a period of 25-100 Myr. The filament trails an X-ray cavity, suggesting that the gas has cooled from low-entropy gas that has been lifted out of the cluster core and become thermally unstable. We are unable to distinguish between inflow and outflow along the filament with the present data. Cloud velocities along the filament are consistent with gravitational free-fall near the plane of the sky, although their increasing blueshifts with radius are consistent with outflow.

  15. The Bluedisk Survey: molecular gas distribution and scaling relations in the context of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cormier, D; Wang, J; Pety, J; Usero, A; Roychowdhury, S; Carton, D; van der Hulst, J M; Jozsa, G I G; Garcia, M Gonzales; Saintonge, A

    2016-01-01

    One of the key goals of the Bluedisk survey is to characterize the impact of gas accretion in disc galaxies in the context of galaxy evolution. It contains 50 disc galaxies in the stellar mass range 10^10-10^11 Msun, of which half are bluer and more HI-rich galaxies than their HI-normal (control) counterparts. In this paper, we investigate how ongoing disc growth affects the molecular gas distribution and the star-formation efficiency in these galaxies. We present 12CO observations from the IRAM 30-m telescope in 26 galaxies of the Bluedisk survey. We compare the amount and spatial distribution of the molecular gas to key quantities such as atomic gas, stellar mass and surface density, star-formation rate and metallicity. We analyse the star-formation rate per unit gas (SFR/HI and SFR/H2) and relate all those parameters to general galaxy properties (HI-rich/control disc, morphology, etc.). We find that the HI-rich galaxies have similar H2 masses as the control galaxies. In their centres, HI-rich galaxies have...

  16. A review of recent advances in molecular simulation of graphene-derived membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Seyyed Mahmood; Abbasi, Zeynab; Rajabzadeh, Halimeh; Hashemizadeh, Seyyed Ali; Deldar, Amir Noori

    2017-07-01

    To obtain an ideal membrane for gas separation the following three characteristics should be considered: the membrane should be as thin as possible, be mechanically robust, and have well-defined pore sizes. These features will maximize its solvent flux, preserve it from fracture, and guarantee its selectivity. These attractive properties of graphene-derived membranes introduce them as appropriate candidates for gas separation and gas molecular-sieving processes in nanoscale dimensions. The current effort has focused on two issues, including the review of the most newly progression on drilling holes in single graphene membranes for making ultrathin membranes for gas separation, and studying functionalized nanoporous sheet and graphene-derived membranes, including doped graphene, graphene oxide, fluorographene, and reduced graphene oxide from theoretical perspectives for making functional coatings for nano ultrafiltration for gas separation. We investigated the basic mechanism of separation by membranes derived from graphene and relevant possible applications. Functionalized nanoporous membranes as novel approach are characterized by low energy cost in realizing high throughput molecular-sieving separation.

  17. Recent progress in molecular simulation of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Baniasadi, Aminreza; Moradi, Mahrokh

    2017-07-01

    If an ideal membrane for gas separation is to be obtained, the following three characteristics should be considered: the membrane should be as thin as possible, be mechanically robust, and have welldefined pore sizes. These features will maximize its solvent flux, preserve it from fracture, and guarantee its selectivity. Graphene is made up of a hexagonal honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with sp 2 hybridization state forming a one-atom-thick sheet of graphite. Following conversion of the honeycomb lattices into nanopores with a specific geometry and size, a nanoporous graphene membrane that offers high efficiency as a separation membrane because of the ultrafast molecular permeation rate as a result of its one-atom thickness is obtained. Applications of nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation have been receiving remarkably increasing attention because nanoporous graphene membranes show promising results in this area. This review focuses on the recent advances in nanoporous graphene membranes for applications in gas separation, with a major emphasis on theoretical works. The attractive properties of nanoporous graphene membranes introduce make them appropriate candidates for gas separation and gas molecular-sieving processes in nanoscale dimensions.

  18. The missing link: tracing molecular gas in the outer filament of Centaurus A

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, Raffaella; Oonk, J B Raymond; Santoro, Francesco; Tadhunter, Clive

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection, using observations of the CO(2-1) line performed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, of molecular gas in the region of the outer filament of Centaurus A, a complex region known to show various signatures of an interaction between the radio jet, an HI cloud and ionised gas filaments. We detect CO(2-1) at all observed locations, which were selected to represent regions with very different physical conditions. The H_2 masses of the detections range between 0.2 x 10^6 and 1.1 x 10^6 msun, for conservative choices of the CO-to-H_2 conversion factor. Surprisingly, the stronger detections are not coincident with the HI cloud, but instead are in the region of the ionised filaments. We also find variations in the widths of the CO(2-1) lines throughout the region, with broader lines in the region of the ionised gas, i.e. where the jet-cloud interaction is strongest, and narrow profiles in the HI cloud. This may indicate that the molecular gas in the region of the ionised gas has the momentu...

  19. WISDOM Project - II. Molecular gas measurement of the supermassive black hole mass in NGC 4697

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Onishi, Kyoko; Cappellari, Michele; Iguchi, Satoru; Sarzi, Marc

    2017-07-01

    As part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses (WISDOM) project, we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotating early-type galaxy NGC 4697. This estimate is based on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle-3 observations of the 12CO(2-1) emission line with a linear resolution of 29 pc (0.53 arcsec). We find that NGC 4697 hosts a small relaxed central molecular gas disc with a mass of 1.6 × 107 M⊙, co-spatial with the obscuring dust disc visible in optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We also resolve thermal 1 mm continuum emission from the dust in this disc. NGC 4697 is found to have a very low molecular gas velocity dispersion, σgas = 1.65^{+0.68}_{-0.65} km s-1. This seems to be partially because the giant molecular cloud mass function is not fully sampled, but other mechanisms such as chemical differentiation in a hard radiation field or morphological quenching also seem to be required. We detect a Keplerian increase of the rotation of the molecular gas in the very centre of NGC 4697, and use forward modelling of the ALMA data cube in a Bayesian framework with the KINematic Molecular Simulation (kinms) code to estimate an SMBH mass of (1.3_{-0.17}^{+0.18}) × 108 M⊙ and an i-band mass-to-light ratio of 2.14_{-0.05}^{+0.04} M⊙/L⊙ (at the 99 per cent confidence level). Our estimate of the SMBH mass is entirely consistent with previous measurements from stellar kinematics. This increases confidence in the growing number of SMBH mass estimates being obtained in the ALMA era.

  20. Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Warren, Steven R.; Hodge, Jacqueline; Levy, Rebecca C.; Meier, David S.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Ott, Jürgen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Scoville, Nick; Weiss, Axel; Zschaechner, Laura; Zwaan, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ∼300 pc, with a width of ∼50 pc, and a velocity dispersion of ∼40 km s‑1, which is consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s‑1 pc‑1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching an escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: we measure an HCN(1–0)/CO(1–0) line ratio of ∼ 1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (∼ 1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ∼1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.

  1. The warm ionized gas in CALIFA early-type galaxies: 2D emission-line patterns and kinematics for 32 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, J M; Kehrig, C; Vílchez, J M; Lehnert, M D; Sánchez, S F; Ziegler, B; Breda, I; Reis, S N dos; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Galbany, L; Bomans, D J; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Fernandes, R Cid; Walcher, C J; Falcón-Barroso, J; García-Benito, R; Márquez, I; del Olmo, A; Masegosa, J; Mollá, M; Marino, R A; Delgado, R M González; López-Sánchez, Á R

    2015-01-01

    The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (<~150Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample (Papaderos et al. 2013; P13). We include here H\\alpha\\ intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, besides ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. This study is supplemented by \\tau-ratio maps as an efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by pAGB stars, as compared to other mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Additio...

  2. Analysis of the thin layer of Galactic warm ionized gas in the range 20 < l < 30 deg, -1.5 < b < +1.5 deg

    CERN Document Server

    Paladini, R; Davies, R D; Giard, M

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of the thin layer of Galactic warm ionized gas at an angular resolution ~ 10'. This is carried out using radio continuum data at 1.4 GHz, 2.7 GHz and 5 GHz in the coordinate region 20 < l < 30 deg, -1.5 < b < +1.5 deg. For this purpose, we evaluate the zero level of the 2.7 and 5 GHz surveys using auxiliary data at 2.3 GHz and 408 MHz. The derived zero level corrections are T_{zero}(2.7 GHz)=0.15 +/- 0.06 K and T_{zero}(5 GHz)=0.1 +/- 0.05 K. We separate the thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) component by means of a spectral analysis performed adopting an antenna temperature spectral index -2.1 for the free-free emission, a realistic spatial distribution of indices for the synchrotron radiation and by fitting, pixel-by-pixel, the Galactic spectral index. We find that at 5 GHz, for |b| = 0 deg, the fraction of thermal emission reaches a maximum value of 82%, while at 1.4 GHz, the corresponding value is 68%. In addition, for the thermal emission, the analysis in...

  3. D sub 2 DT gas purification by cryosorption on 5 A molecular sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blet, V.; Labrune, D.; Guidon, H.; Hircq, B. (CEA, 91 - Bruyeres le Chatel (France)); Moll, G. (USSI INGENIERIE, 92 - Bagneux (France))

    1991-12-01

    Purification of deuterium and deuterium-tritium gas has been performed by cryosorption of impurities on 5 A molecular sieve as absorbent. This process is efficient for most of the impurities (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, carbon oxides, argon, water) except helium. In closed loop operations, their residual levels can be better than 10 vpm during at least 5 h if the trap temperature is sufficiently low (<93 K). At low temperature, cryosorption of D{sub 2} and DT gas is significant. Nevertheless, their recovery can be easily achieved by heating up the adsorbent. (orig.).

  4. D{sub 2} and DT gas purification by cryosorption on 5 Angstrom molecular sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blet, V.; Labrune, D.; Guidon, H.; Hircq, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Moll, G. [Societe de Construction d`une Usine de Separation Isotopique (USSI), 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    1991-12-31

    Purification of deuterium and deuterium-tritium gas has been performed by cryosorption of impurities on 5 A molecular sieve as adsorbent. This process is efficient for most of the impurities (nitrogen, methane, oxygen, carbon oxides, argon, water) except helium. In closed loop operations, their residual levels can be better than 10 vpm during at least 5 hours if the trap temperature is sufficiently low (< 93 K). At low temperature, cryosorption of D{sub 2} and DT gas is significant. Nevertheless, their recovery can be easily achieved by heating up the adsorbent.

  5. Molecular Simulation Studies of Flue Gas Purification by Bio-MOF

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Li; Gangqiang Xu; Bei Liu; Xin Lv; Guangjin Chen; Changyu Sun; Peng Xiao; Yifei Sun

    2015-01-01

    As a new branch of MOFs which are composed of biocompatible metal ions and organic ligands, bio-metal-organic frameworks (bio-MOFs) have attracted much attention recently. Bio-MOFs feature multiple Lewis basic sites which have strong interaction with CO2 molecules, thus they have great potential in the separation and purification of gas mixtures containing CO2. In this work, molecular simulation studies were carried out to investigate the adsorption and diffusion behaviors of CO2/N2 gas mixtu...

  6. Equation of state of warm dense deuterium and its isotopes from density-functional theory molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J-F; Kazandjian, L; Piron, R

    2016-04-01

    Of the two approaches of density-functional theory molecular dynamics, quantum molecular dynamics is limited at high temperature by computational cost whereas orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on an approximation of the kinetic electronic free energy, can be implemented in this domain. In the case of deuterium, it is shown how orbital-free molecular dynamics can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature for the calculation of the equation of state. To this end, accurate quantum molecular dynamics calculations are performed up to 20 eV at mass densities as low as 0.5g/cm^{3} and up to 10 eV at mass densities as low as 0.2g/cm^{3}. As a result, the limitation in temperature so far attributed to quantum molecular dynamics is overcome and an approach combining quantum and orbital-free molecular dynamics is used to construct an equation of state of deuterium. The thermodynamic domain addressed is that of the fluid phase above 1 eV and 0.2g/cm^{3}. Both pressure and internal energy are calculated as functions of temperature and mass density, and various exchange-correlation contributions are compared. The generalized gradient approximation of the exchange-correlation functional, corrected to approximately include the influence of temperature, is retained and the results obtained are compared to other approaches and to experimental shock data; in parts of the thermodynamic domain addressed, these results significantly differ from those obtained in other first-principles investigations which themselves disagree. The equations of state of hydrogen and tritium above 1 eV and above, respectively, 0.1g/cm^{3} and 0.3g/cm^{3}, can be simply obtained by mass density scaling from the results found for deuterium. This ab initio approach allows one to consistently cover a very large domain of temperature on the domain of mass density outlined above.

  7. A low thermal mass fast gas chromatograph and its implementation in fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Moragn, Mati; Amirav, Aviv

    2011-12-30

    A new type of low thermal mass (LTM) fast gas chromatograph (GC) was designed and operated in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), including GC-MS-MS with SMB, thereby providing a novel combination with unique capabilities. The LTM fast GC is based on a short capillary column inserted inside a stainless steel tube that is resistively heated. It is located and mounted outside the standard GC oven on its available top detector port, while the capillary column is connected as usual to the standard GC injector and supersonic molecular beam interface transfer line. This new type of fast GC-MS with SMB enables less than 1 min full range temperature programming and cooling down analysis cycle time. The operation of the fast GC-MS with SMB was explored and 1 min full analysis cycle time of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons in the C(10)H(22) up to C(44)H(90) range was achieved. The use of 35 mL/min high column flow rate enabled the elution of C(44)H(90) in less than 45 s while the SMB interface enabled splitless acceptance of this high flow rate and the provision of dominant molecular ions. A novel compound 9-benzylazidanthracene was analyzed for its purity and a synthetic chemistry process was monitored for the optimization of the chemical reaction yield. Biodiesel was analyzed in jet fuel (by both GC-MS and GC-MS-MS) in under 1 min as 5 ppm fatty acid methyl esters. Authentic iprodion and cypermethrin pesticides were analyzed in grapes extract in both full scan mode and fast GC-MS-MS mode in under 1 min cycle time and explosive mixture including TATP, TNT and RDX was analyzed in under 1 min combined with exhibiting dominant molecular ion for TATP. Fast GC-MS with SMB is based on trading GC separation for speed of analysis while enhancing the separation power of the MS via the enhancement of the molecular ion in the electron ionization of cold molecules in the SMB. This paper further discusses several features of

  8. Adsorption separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas of natural gas-fired boiler by a novel nanoporous 'molecular basket' adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Song, Chunshan; Miller, Bruce G.; Scaroni, Alan W. [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, and Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 209 Academic Projects Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    A novel nanoporous CO{sub 2} 'molecular basket' adsorbent has been developed and applied in the separation of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of a natural gas fired boiler. The nanoporous CO{sub 2} 'molecular basket' adsorbent was prepared by uniformly dispersing polyethylenimine (PEI) into the pores of mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41. The use of MCM-41 and PEI had a synergetic effect on the CO{sub 2} adsorption. The rates of CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption of PEI were also greatly improved. Adsorption separation results showed that CO{sub 2} was selectively separated from simulated flue gas and flue gas of a natural gas-fired boiler by using this novel adsorbent. The adsorbent adsorbed very little N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and CO in the flue gas. Moisture had a promoting effect on the adsorption separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The adsorbent simultaneously adsorbed CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas. The adsorbed amount of CO{sub 2} was around 3000 times larger than that of NO{sub x}. The adsorbent was stable in several cyclic adsorption/desorption operations. However, very little NO{sub x} desorbed after adsorption indicating the need for pre-removal of NO{sub x} from flue gas before capture of CO{sub 2} by this novel adsorbent. (author)

  9. The molecular gas around the luminous blue variable star G24.73+0.69

    CERN Document Server

    Petriella, A; Giacani, E

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: We study the molecular environment of the luminous blue variable star G24.73+0.69 to investigate the origin of the two infrared shells around this massive star and to determine its effects on the surrounding interstellar medium. METHODS: We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas using the 13CO J=1-0 emission extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey. We also use near and mid-infrared data from 2MASS and GLIMPSE to identify the young stellar objects in the field. RESULTS: We discover the molecular counterpart of the outer infrared shell around G24.73+0.69. The CO shell was probably blown by the stellar wind of the star mainly during its main sequence phase. We also find molecular gas in correspondence with the inner infrared shell, although its origin remains uncertain. We find seven young stellar objects upon the molecular material, whose birth could have been triggered by the stellar wind of the luminous blue variable star. We suggest that G24.73+0.69 and the progenitor of the nearby supernova rem...

  10. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  11. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams.

  12. The Relationship between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO across the California Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, S.; Lada, C. J.; Lada, E. A.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Bieging, J. H.; Lombardi, M.; Forbrich, J.; Alves, J. F.

    2015-05-01

    We present results of an extinction-CO line survey of the southeastern part of the California molecular cloud (CMC). Deep, wide-field, near-infrared images were used to construct a sensitive, relatively high resolution (˜0.5 arcmin) (NICEST) extinction map of the region. The same region was also surveyed in the 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and C18O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. These data were used to investigate the relation between the molecular gas, traced by CO emission lines, and the dust column density, traced by extinction, on spatial scales of 0.04 pc across the cloud. We found strong spatial variations in the abundances of 13CO and C18O that were correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature-dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The 13CO-to-C18O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C18O by the ambient UV radiation field. The effect is particularly pronounced in the vicinity of an embedded cluster where the UV radiation appears to have penetrated deeply (i.e., {{A}V} ≲ 15 mag) into the cloud. We derived the cloud-averaged X-factor to be = 2.53 × 1020 c{{m}-2}{{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1}, a value somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find there is no single empirical value of the 12CO X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (Tk ≲ 15 K) cloud regions, with XCO ∝ AV0.74 for {{A}V} ≳ 3 mag. However, in regions containing relatively hot (Tex ≳ 25 K) molecular gas we find a clear correlation between W(12CO) and {{A}V} over a large (3 ≲ {{A}V} ≲ 25 mag) range of extinction. This results in a constant XCO = 1.5 × 1020 c{{m}-2} {{≤ft( K km {{s}-1} \\right)}-1} for the hot gas, a lower value than either the average for the CMC or the Milky Way. Overall we find an (inverse) correlation between XCO and Tex in the cloud with XCO ∝ Tex -0.7. This correlation suggests that

  13. Black hole mass measurement using molecular gas kinematics: what ALMA can do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ilsang

    2017-04-01

    We study the limits of the spatial and velocity resolution of radio interferometry to infer the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic centres using the kinematics of circum-nuclear molecular gas, by considering the shapes of the galaxy surface brightness profile, signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of the position-velocity diagram (PVD) and systematic errors due to the spatial and velocity structure of the molecular gas. We argue that for fixed galaxy stellar mass and SMBH mass, the spatial and velocity scales that need to be resolved increase and decrease, respectively, with decreasing Sérsic index of the galaxy surface brightness profile. We validate our arguments using simulated PVDs for varying beam size and velocity channel width. Furthermore, we consider the systematic effects on the inference of the SMBH mass by simulating PVDs including the spatial and velocity structure of the molecular gas, which demonstrates that their impacts are not significant for a PVD with good S/N unless the spatial and velocity scale associated with the systematic effects are comparable to or larger than the angular resolution and velocity channel width of the PVD from pure circular motion. Also, we caution that a bias in a galaxy surface brightness profile owing to the poor resolution of a galaxy photometric image can largely bias the SMBH mass by an order of magnitude. This study shows the promise and the limits of ALMA observations for measuring SMBH mass using molecular gas kinematics and provides a useful technical justification for an ALMA proposal with the science goal of measuring SMBH mass.

  14. AGN feedback on molecular gas reservoirs in quasars at z 2.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Feruglio, C.; Brusa, M.; Cresci, G.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Balmaverde, B.; Fiore, F.; Ferrara, A.; Gallerani, S.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Sani, E.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.; Testi, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present new ALMA observations aimed at mapping molecular gas reservoirs through the CO(3-2) transition in three quasars at z ≃ 2.4, LBQS 0109+0213, 2QZ J002830.4-281706, and [HB89] 0329-385. Previous [Oiii]λ5007 observations of these quasars showed evidence for ionised outflows quenching star formation in their host galaxies. Systemic CO(3-2) emission has been detected only in one quasar, LBQS 0109+0213, where the CO(3-2) emission is spatially anti-correlated with the ionised outflow, suggesting that most of the molecular gas may have been dispersed or heated in the region swept by the outflow. In all three sources, including the one detected in CO, our constraints on the molecular gas mass indicate a significantly reduced reservoir compared to main-sequence galaxies at the same redshift, supporting a negative feedback scenario. In the quasar 2QZ J002830.4-281706, we tentatively detect an emission line blob blue-shifted by v - 2000 km s-1 with respect to the galaxy systemic velocity and spatially offset by 0.2'' (1.7 kpc) with respect to the ALMA continuum peak. Interestingly, such emission feature is coincident in both velocity and space with the ionised outflow as seen in [Oiii]λ5007. This tentative detection must be confirmed with deeper observations but, if real, it could represent the molecular counterpart of the ionised gas outflow driven by the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Finally, in all ALMA maps we detect the presence of serendipitous line emitters within a projected distance 160 kpc from the quasars. By identifying these features with the CO(3-2) transition, we find that the serendipitous line emitters would be located within | Δv | quasars, hence suggesting an overdensity of galaxies in two out of three quasars.

  15. ATCA detections of massive molecular gas reservoirs in dusty, high-z radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, I.; Contreras, Y.; Smith, D. J. B.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Gómez, L.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Werf, P. van der

    2017-02-01

    Observations using the 7-mm receiver system on the Australia Telescope Compact Array have revealed large reservoirs of molecular gas in two high-redshift radio galaxies: HATLAS J090426.9+015448 (z = 2.37) and HATLAS J140930.4+003803 (z = 2.04). Optically, the targets are very faint, and spectroscopy classifies them as narrow-line radio galaxies. In addition to harbouring an active galactic nucleus the targets share many characteristics of sub-mm galaxies. Far-infrared data from Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey suggest high levels of dust (>109 M⊙) and a correspondingly large amount of obscured star formation (∼1000 M⊙ yr-1). The molecular gas is traced via the J = 1 → 0 transition of 12CO, its luminosity implying total H2 masses of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 1011 and (9.5 ± 2.4) × 1010 (αCO/0.8) M⊙ in HATLAS J090426.9+015448 and HATLAS J140930.4+003803, respectively. Both galaxies exhibit molecular line emission over a broad (∼1000 km s-1) velocity range and feature double-peaked profiles. We interpret this as evidence of either a large rotating disc or an on-going merger. Gas depletion time-scales are ∼100 Myr. The 1.4-GHz radio luminosities of our targets place them close to the break in the luminosity function. As such they represent 'typical' z > 2 radio sources, responsible for the bulk of the energy emitted at radio wavelengths from accretion-powered sources at high redshift, and yet they rank amongst the most massive systems in terms of molecular gas and dust content. We also detect 115-GHz rest-frame continuum emission, indicating a very steep high-radio-frequency spectrum, possibly classifying the targets as compact steep spectrum objects.

  16. Poissonian reducibility and thermal scaling within the lattice gas model and molecular dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Y.G.

    2000-01-01

    The emission of clusters in the nuclear disassembly is investigated within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model and classical molecular dynamics model. As observed in the recent experimental data, it is found that the emission of individual cluster is poissonian and thermal scaling is observed in the linear Arrhenius plots made from the average multiplicity of each cluster. The mass, isotope and charge dependent "emission barriers" are extracted from the slopes of the Arrheniu...

  17. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  18. Detection of HCN, HCO+ and HNC in the Mrk231 molecular outflow - Dense molecular gas in the AGN wind

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S; Muller, S; Winters, J M; van der Werf, P; Henkel, C; Costagliola, F; Neri, R

    2011-01-01

    We detect luminous emission from HCN, HCO+ and HNC 1--0 in the QSO ULIRG Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 1."55 by 1."28 resolution. All three lines show broad line wings - which are particularly prominent for HCN. Velocities are found to be similar (750 km/s) to those found for CO 1-0. This is the first time bright HCN, HCO+ and HNC emission has been detected in a large-scale galactic outflow. We find that both the blue- and red-shifted line wings are spatially extended by at least 0."75 (700 pc) in a north-south direction. The line wings are brighter (relative to the line center intensity) in HCN than in CO 1-0 and line ratios suggest that the molecular outflow consists of dense (n>10E4 cmE-3) and clumpy gas with a high HCN abundance X(HCN)>10E-8. These properties are consistent with the molecular gas being compressed and fragmented by shocks in the outflow. Alternatively, HCN is instead pumped by mid-IR continuum, but we propose that this effect is not strong for the spatially extend...

  19. Evolution of OH and CO-dark Molecular Gas Fraction Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary In Taurus

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Duo; Yue, Nannan; Goldsmith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of 12CO J=1-0, 13CO J=1-0, HI, and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. Based on a PDR model that reproduces CO and [CI] emission from the same region, we modeled the three OH transitions, 1612, 1665, 1667 MHz successfully through escape probability non-LTE radiative transfer model calculations. We could not reproduce the 1720 MHz observations, due to un-modeled pumping mechanisms, of which the most likely candidate is a C-shock. The abundance of OH and CO-dark molecular gas (DMG) are well constrained. The OH abundance [OH]/[H2] decreases from 8*10-7 to 1*10-7 as Av increases from 0.4 to 2.7 mag, following an empirical law [OH]/[H2]= 1.5 * 10^{-7} + 9.0 * 10^{-7} * exp(-Av/0.81), which is higher than PDR model predictions for low extinction regions by a factor of 80. The overabundance of OH at extinctions at or below 1 mag is likely the result of a C-shock. The dark gas fraction (DGF, defined as fra...

  20. Dense Molecular Gas Around Protostars and in Galactic Nuclei European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Baan, W A; Langevelde, H J

    2004-01-01

    The phenomena observed in young stellar objects (YSO), circumstellar regions and extra-galactic nuclei show some similarity in their morphology, dynamical and physical processes, though they may differ in scale and energy. The European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004 gave astronomers a unique opportunity to discuss the links among the observational results and to generate common interpretations of the phenomena in stars and galaxies, using the available diagnostic tools such as masers and dense molecular gas. Their theoretical understanding involves physics, numerical simulations and chemistry. Including a dozen introductory reviews, topics of papers in this book also cover: maser and dense gas diagnostics and related phenomena, evolution of circumstellar regions around protostars, evolution of circumnuclear regions of active galaxies, diagnostics of the circumnuclear gas in stars and galactic nuclei. This book summarizes our present knowledge in these topics, highlights major problems to be addressed...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of gas diffusion in metal-organic frameworks: argon in CuBTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulidas, Anastasios I

    2004-02-11

    The class of coordination polymers known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has three-dimensional porous structures that are considered as a promising alternative to zeolites and other nanoporous materials for catalysis, gas adsorption, and gas separation applications. In this paper, we present the first study of gas diffusion inside an MOF and compare the observed diffusion to known behaviors in zeolites. Using grand canonical Monte Carlo and equilibrium molecular dynamics, we calculate the adsorption isotherm and self-, corrected, and transport diffusivities for argon in the CuBTC metal-organic framework. Our results indicate that diffusion of Ar in CuBTC is very similar to Ar diffusion in silica zeolites in magnitude, concentration, and temperature dependence. This conclusion appears to apply to a broad range of MOF structures.

  2. PdBI U/LIRG Survey (PULS): Dense molecular gas in Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Downes, Dennis

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We present new IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of Arp 220 in HCN, HCO+, HN13C J = 1 - 0, C2H N = 1 - 0, SiO J = 2 - 1, HNCO Jk,k' = 50,4 - 40,4, CH3CN(6-5), CS J = 2 - 1 and 5-4 and 13CO J = 1 - 0 and 2-1 and of NGC 6240 in HCN, HCO+J = 1 - 0 and C2H N = 1 - 0. In addition, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submill-meter Array science verification observations of Arp 220 in CS J = 4 - 3 and CH3CN(10-9). Various lines are used to analyse the physical conditions of the molecular gas including the [12CO]/[13CO] and [12CO]/[C18O] abundance ratios. These observations will be made available to the public. Methods: We create brightness temperature line ratio maps to present the different physical conditions across Arp 220 and NGC 6240. In addition, we use the radiative transfer code RADEX and a Monte Carlo Markov chain likelihood code to model the 12CO, 13CO and C18O lines of Arp 220 at 2'' ( 700 pc) scales, where the 12CO and C18O measurements were obtained from literature. Results: Line ratios of optically thick lines such as 12CO show smoothly varying ratios while the line ratios of optically thin lines such as 13CO show a east-west gradient across Arp 220. The HCN/HCO+ line ratio differs between Arp 220 and NGC 6240, where Arp 220 has line ratios above 2 and NGC 6240 below 1. The radiative transfer analysis solution is consistent with a warm ( 40 K), moderately dense ( 103.4 cm-3) molecular gas component averaged over the two nuclei. We find [12CO]/[13CO] and [12CO]/[C18O] abundance ratios of 90 for both. The abundance enhancement of C18O can be explained by stellar nucleosynthesis enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  3. The variation in molecular gas depletion time: II the impact of galaxy internal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    We use a data set of nearby galaxies drawn from the HERACLES, ATLAS3D, and COLD GASS surveys to study variations in molecular gas depletion time (Tdep) in galaxy structures such as bulges, grand-design spiral arms, bars and rings. Molecular gas is traced by CO line emission and star formation rate (SFR) is derived using the combination of far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The contribution of old stars to MIR emission for the ATLAS3D sample is corrected using 2MASS K-band images. We apply a two-dimensional image decomposition algorithm to decompose galaxies into bulges and discs. Spiral arms, bars and rings are identified in the residual maps, and molecular gas depletion times are derived on a square grid of 1 kpc^2 size. In previous work, we showed that Tdep correlates strongly with specific star formation rate (sSFR). We now find that at a given sSFR, the bulge has shorter Tdep than the disc. The shift to shorter depletion times is most pronounced in the inner bulge (R < 0.1Re). Grids from gala...

  4. Feeding cosmic star formation: exploring high-redshift molecular gas with CO intensity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breysse, Patrick C.; Rahman, Mubdi

    2017-06-01

    The study of molecular gas is crucial for understanding star formation, feedback and the broader ecosystem of a galaxy as a whole. However, we have limited understanding of its physics and distribution in all but the nearest galaxies. We present a new technique for studying the composition and distribution of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies inaccessible to existing methods. Our proposed approach is an extension of carbon monoxide intensity mapping methods, which have garnered significant experimental interest in recent years. These intensity mapping surveys target the 115 GHz 12CO (1-0) line, but also contain emission from the substantially fainter 110 GHz 13CO (1-0) transition. The method leverages the information contained in the 13CO line by cross-correlating pairs of frequency channels in an intensity mapping survey. Since 13CO is emitted from the same medium as the 12CO, but saturates at a much higher column density, this cross-correlation provides valuable information about both the gas density distribution and isotopologue ratio, inaccessible from the 12CO alone. Using a simple model of these molecular emission lines, we show that a future intensity mapping survey can constrain the abundance ratio of these two species and the fraction of emission from optically thick regions to order ˜30 per cent. These measurements cannot be made by traditional CO observations, and consequently the proposed method will provide unique insight into the physics of star formation, feedback and galactic ecology at high redshifts.

  5. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  6. Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ronin; Galliano, Frédéric; Wilson, Christine D; Kamenetzky, Julia; Lee, Min-Young; Schirm, Maximilien; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Spinoglio, Luigi; Cormier, Diane; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Baes, Martin; Boselli, Alexandro; Bournaud, Frédéric; De Looze, Ilse; Hughes, Thomas M; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rangwala, Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Since the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory, our understanding about the photo-dissociation regions (PDR) has taken a step forward. In the bandwidth of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board Herschel, ten CO rotational transitions, including J=4-3 to J=13-12, and three fine structure lines, including [CI] 609, [CI] 370, and [NII] 250 micron, are covered. In this paper, I present our findings from the FTS observations at the nuclear region of M83, based on the spatially resolved physical parameters derived from the CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) map and the comparisons with the dust properties and star-formation tracers. I will discuss (1) the potential of using [NII] 250 and [CI] 370 micron as star-formation tracers; (2) the reliability of tracing molecular gas with CO; (3) the excitation mechanisms of warm CO; (4) the possibility of studying stellar feedback by tracing the thermal pressure of molecular gas in the nuclear ...

  7. A black-hole mass measurement from molecular gas kinematics in NGC4526.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2013-02-21

    The masses of the supermassive black holes found in galaxy bulges are correlated with a multitude of galaxy properties, leading to suggestions that galaxies and black holes may evolve together. The number of reliably measured black-hole masses is small, and the number of methods for measuring them is limited, holding back attempts to understand this co-evolution. Directly measuring black-hole masses is currently possible with stellar kinematics (in early-type galaxies), ionized-gas kinematics (in some spiral and early-type galaxies) and in rare objects that have central maser emission. Here we report that by modelling the effect of a black hole on the kinematics of molecular gas it is possible to fit interferometric observations of CO emission and thereby accurately estimate black-hole masses. We study the dynamics of the gas in the early-type galaxy NGC 4526, and obtain a best fit that requires the presence of a central dark object of 4.5(+4.2)(-3.1) × 10(8) solar masses (3σ confidence limit). With the next-generation millimetre-wavelength interferometers these observations could be reproduced in galaxies out to 75 megaparsecs in less than 5 hours of observing time. The use of molecular gas as a kinematic tracer should thus allow one to estimate black-hole masses in hundreds of galaxies in the local Universe, many more than are accessible with current techniques.

  8. The Cool ISM in S0 Galaxies. I. A Survey of Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, G A; Welch, Gary A.; Sage, Leslie J.

    2003-01-01

    Lenticular galaxies remain remarkably mysterious as a class. Observations to date have not led to any broad consensus about their origins, properties and evolution, though they are often thought to have formed in one big burst of star formation early in the history of the Universe, and to have evolved relatively passively since then. In that picture, current theory predicts that stellar evolution returns substantial quantities of gas to the interstellar medium; most is ejected from the galaxy, but significant amounts of cool gas might be retained. Past searches for that material, though, have provided unclear results. We present results from a survey of molecular gas in a volume-limited sample of field S0 galaxies, selected from the Nearby Galaxies Catalog. CO emission is detected from 78 percent of the sample galaxies. We find that the molecular gas is almost always located inside the central few kiloparses of a lenticular galaxy, meaning that in general it is more centrally concentrated than in spirals. We ...

  9. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  10. ALMA observations of cold molecular gas filaments trailing rising radio bubbles in PKS0745-191

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Edge, A C; Combes, F; Murray, N W; Parrish, I J; Salome, P; Sanders, J S; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; Main, R A; O'Connell, R W; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G; Vantyghem, A N; Voit, G M

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) line emission tracing filaments of cold molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster PKS0745-191. The total molecular gas mass of 4.6 +/- 0.3 x 10^9 solar masses, assuming a Galactic X_{CO} factor, is divided roughly equally between three filaments each extending radially 3-5 kpc from the galaxy centre. The emission peak is located in the SE filament roughly 1 arcsec (2 kpc) from the nucleus. The velocities of the molecular clouds in the filaments are low, lying within +/-100 km/s of the galaxy's systemic velocity. Their FWHMs are less than 150 km/s, which is significantly below the stellar velocity dispersion. Although the molecular mass of each filament is comparable to a rich spiral galaxy, such low velocities show that the filaments are transient and the clouds would disperse on <10^7 yr timescales unless supported, likely by the indirect effect of magnetic fields. The velocity structure is inconsistent with a merger origin or gravitational ...

  11. Evolution of Molecular and Atomic Gas Phases in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Koda, Jin; Heyer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We analyze radial and azimuthal variations of the phase balance between the molecular and atomic ISM in the Milky Way. In particular, the azimuthal variations -- between spiral arm and interarm regions -- are analyzed without any explicit definition of spiral arm locations. We show that the molecular gas mass fraction, i.e., fmol=H2/ (HI+H2) in mass, varies predominantly in the radial direction: starting from ~100% at the center, remaining ~>50% (~>60%) to R~6kpc, and decreasing to ~10-20% (~50%) at R=8.5 kpc when averaged over the whole disk thickness (in the mid plane). Azimuthal, arm-interarm variations are secondary: only ~20%, in the globally molecule-dominated inner MW, but becoming larger, ~40-50%, in the atom-dominated outskirts. This suggests that in the inner MW, the gas stays highly molecular (fmol>50%) as it goes from an interarm region, into a spiral arm, and back into the next interarm region. Stellar feedback does not dissociate molecules much, and the coagulation and fragmentation of molecular...

  12. ALMA Observations of the Interaction of a Radio Jet with Molecular Gas in Minkowski's Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Mark; Croft, Steve; Fragile, Chris; Wood, Sarah; Nyland, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    We use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to detect and image CO (1-0) emission from Minkowski’s Object, a dwarf galaxy in the cluster Abell 194 that is interacting with a radio jet from a nearby elliptical galaxy. The ALMA observations, which are the first to detect molecular gas in Minkowski’s Object, also image the high-frequency continuum emission from the radio jet, allowing us to study the interaction in detail. We estimate the range in the mass of molecular gas in Minkowski’s Object assuming two different values of the ratio of the molecular gas mass to the CO luminosity, {α }{CO}. For the Milky Way value of {α }{CO}=4.6 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1 we obtain a molecular gas mass of {M}{{{H}}2}=3.0× {10}7 {M}ȯ , 6% of the H I gas mass. We also use the prescription of Narayanan et al. (2012) to estimate an {α }{CO}=27 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1, in which case we obtain {M}{{{H}}2}=1.8× {10}8 {M}ȯ , 36% of the H I mass. The observations are consistent with previous claims of star formation being induced in Minkowski’s Object via the passage of the radio jet, and it therefore being a rare local example of positive feedback from an active galactic nucleus. In particular, we find highly efficient star formation, with gas depletion timescales ∼ 5× {10}7{--}3× {10}8 year (for assumed values of {α }{CO}=4.6 and 27 {M}ȯ {({{K}}{km}{{{s}}}-1{{pc}}2)}-1, respectively) in the upstream regions of Minkowski’s Object that were struck first by the jet, and less efficient star formation downstream. We discuss the implications of this observation for models of jet-induced star formation and radio-mode feedback in massive galaxies.

  13. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas, HI, and Star Formation in the Low-Mass, Low-Metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, Katherine E; Leroy, Adam K; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl; Hughes, Annie; Israel, Frank P; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C; Bot, Caroline; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Pellegrini, Eric W; Galametz, Maud; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds provide the only laboratory to study the effect of metallicity and galaxy mass on molecular gas and star formation at high (~20 pc) resolution. We use the dust emission from HERITAGE Herschel data to map the molecular gas in the Magellanic Clouds, avoiding the known biases of CO emission as a tracer of H2. Using our dust-based molecular gas estimates, we find molecular gas depletion times of ~0.4 Gyr in the LMC and ~0.6 SMC at 1 kpc scales. These depletion times fall within the range found for normal disk galaxies, but are shorter than the average value, which could be due to recent bursts in star formation. We find no evidence for a strong intrinsic dependence of the molecular gas depletion time on metallicity. We study the relationship between gas and star formation rate across a range in size scales from 20 pc to ~1 kpc, including how the scatter in molecular gas depletion time changes with size scale, and discuss the physical mechanisms driving the relationships. We compare the metal...

  14. The Atlas3D project - XIV. The extent and kinematics of molecular gas in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Timothy A; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Scott, Nicholas; Young, Lisa M; Blitz, Leo; Crocker, Alison F; Bayet, Estelle; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P Tim; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    We use interferometric CO observations to compare the extent, surface brightness profiles and kinematics of the molecular gas in CO-rich Atlas3D early-type galaxies (ETGs) and spiral galaxies. We find that the molecular gas extent is smaller in absolute terms in ETGs than in late-type galaxies, but that the size distributions are similar once scaled by the galaxies optical/stellar characteristic scale-lengths. Virgo cluster ETGs have less extended molecular gas reservoirs than field counterparts. Approximately half of ETGs have molecular gas surface brightness profiles that follow the stellar light profile. These systems often have relaxed gas out to large radii, suggesting they are unlikely to have had recent merger/accretion events. A third of the sample galaxies show molecular gas surface brightness profiles that fall off slower than the light, and sometimes show a truncation. We suggest that ram pressure stripping and/or the presence of hot gas has compressed/truncated the gas in these systems. The remain...

  15. A comparative study of cold- and warm-adapted Endonucleases A using sequence analyses and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Davide; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav; Bon, Davide; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Tiberti, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The psychrophilic and mesophilic endonucleases A (EndA) from Aliivibrio salmonicida (VsEndA) and Vibrio cholera (VcEndA) have been studied experimentally in terms of the biophysical properties related to thermal adaptation. The analyses of their static X-ray structures was no sufficient to rationalize the determinants of their adaptive traits at the molecular level. Thus, we used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to compare the two proteins and unveil their structural and dynamical differences. Our simulations did not show a substantial increase in flexibility in the cold-adapted variant on the nanosecond time scale. The only exception is a more rigid C-terminal region in VcEndA, which is ascribable to a cluster of electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as also supported by MD simulations of the VsEndA mutant variant where the cluster of interactions was introduced. Moreover, we identified three additional amino acidic substitutions through multiple sequence alignment and the analyses of MD-based protein structure networks. In particular, T120V occurs in the proximity of the catalytic residue H80 and alters the interaction with the residue Y43, which belongs to the second coordination sphere of the Mg2+ ion. This makes T120V an amenable candidate for future experimental mutagenesis. PMID:28192428

  16. Erratum: ``Molecular Gas in Spiral Galaxies: A New Warm Phase at Large Galactocentric Distances?'' (ApJ, 579, 270 [2002])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, P. P.; Thi, W.-F.; Viti, S.

    2003-01-01

    Two errors occurred because author corrections were not transferred faithfully during the production process. Equation (7) should readR10=26.8rop(1+1/5e510/T1+[ncr(0)/n]1+3/7e845/T1+[ncr(1)/n])(7)instead ofR10=26.8rop(1+1/5e510/T1+[ncr(0)/n]1+3/7e845/T1+[ncr(1)/n])op.(7) In the Acknowledgments, the name of the friend we honored is Enric Argiles Maja, not Enrique Argiles Maja. The Press sincerely regrets these errors.

  17. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency: a 5 year field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, Z.; Liu, Y.; Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Zhang, H.; Xiong, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of how net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a 5 year field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on NGWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all sources (methane, CH4, and nitrous oxide, N2O, emissions, agrochemical inputs, Ei, and farm operations, Eo) and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon, SOC, sequestration). For the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), four ISSM scenarios consisting of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, N1 (25 % reduction), N2 (10 % reduction), N3 (FP rate) and N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios, i.e., N1, N2, N3 and N4, significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 86 and 82 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the N1 and N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar NGWPs. The N3 and N4 scenarios remarkably increased the NGWP and GHGI by an average of 67 and 36 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  18. Molecular Simulation Studies of Flue Gas Purification by Bio-MOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As a new branch of MOFs which are composed of biocompatible metal ions and organic ligands, bio-metal-organic frameworks (bio-MOFs have attracted much attention recently. Bio-MOFs feature multiple Lewis basic sites which have strong interaction with CO2 molecules, thus they have great potential in the separation and purification of gas mixtures containing CO2. In this work, molecular simulation studies were carried out to investigate the adsorption and diffusion behaviors of CO2/N2 gas mixtures in bio-MOF-11. Results show that bio-MOF-11 displays excellent adsorption selectivity towards CO2 in CO2/N2 gas mixtures which was dominated by electrostatic interaction between material and CO2. In addition, we found both CO2 and N2 molecules were preferably adsorbed around the pyrimidine ring and exocyclic amino and transferred to the secondary favorable adsorption sites (methyl groups with increasing pressure. Bio-MOF-11 membranes show superior permeation selectivity, but low permeability for CO2/N2 gas systems. The reason is that the small pores restrict the movement of gas molecules, leading to the observed low permeability. The information obtained in this work can be applied to other theoretical and experimental studies of bio-MOFs adsorbents and membranes in the future.

  19. Toward Measuring Galactic Dense Molecular Gas Properties and 3D Distribution with Hi-GAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's submillimeter dust continuum survey Hi-GAL provides a powerful new dataset for characterizing the structure of the dense interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Hi-GAL observed a 2° wide strip covering the entire 360° of the Galactic plane in broad bands centered at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm, with angular resolution ranging from 10 to 40 arcseconds. We are adapting a molecular cloud clump-finding algorithm and a distance probability density function distance-determination method developed for the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) to the Hi-GAL data. Using these methods we expect to generate a database of 105 cloud clumps, derive distance information for roughly half the clumps, and derive precise distances for approximately 20% of them. With five-color photometry and distances, we will measure the cloud clump properties, such as luminosities, physical sizes, and masses, and construct a three-dimensional map of the Milky Way's dense molecular gas distribution.The cloud clump properties and the dense gas distribution will provide critical ground truths for comparison to theoretical models of molecular cloud structure formation and galaxy evolution models that seek to emulate spiral galaxies. For example, such models cannot resolve star formation and use prescriptive recipes, such as converting a fixed fraction of interstellar gas to stars at a specified interstellar medium density threshold. The models should be compared to observed dense molecular gas properties and galactic distributions.As a pilot survey to refine the clump-finding and distance measurement algorithms developed for BGPS, we have identified molecular cloud clumps in six 2° × 2° patches of the Galactic plane, including one in the inner Galaxy along the line of sight through the Molecular Ring and the termination of the Galactic bar and one toward the outer Galaxy. Distances have been derived for the inner Galaxy clumps and compared to Bolocam Galactic Plane

  20. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in a double cropping cereal rotation as affected by nitrogen and straw management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen and straw management on global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI in a winter wheat–summer maize double-cropping system on the North China Plain were investigated. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O emissions and studied net GWP (NGWP and GHGI by calculating the net exchange of CO2 equivalent (CO2-eq from greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural inputs and management practices, and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC, based on a long-term field experiment established in 2006. The field experiment includes six treatments with three fertilizer N levels (zero-N control, optimum and conventional N and straw removal (i.e. N0, Nopt and Ncon or return (i.e. N0, Nopt and SNcon. Optimum N management (Nopt, SNopt saved roughly half of the fertilizer N compared to conventional agricultural practice (Ncon, SNcon with no significant effect on grain yields. Annual mean N2O emissions reached 3.90 kg N2O-N ha−1 in Ncon and SNcon, and N2O emissions were reduced by 46.9% by optimizing N management of Nopt and SNopt. Straw return increased annual mean N2O emissions by 27.9%. Annual SOC sequestration was 0.40–1.44 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 in plots with N application and/or straw return. Compared to the conventional N treatments the optimum N treatments reduced NGWP by 51%, comprising 25% from decreasing N2O emissions and 75% from reducing N fertilizer application rates. Straw return treatments reduced NGWP by 30% compared to no straw return because the GWP from increments of SOC offset the GWP from higher emissions of N2O, N fertilizer and fuel after straw return. The GHGI trends from the different nitrogen and straw management practices were similar to the NGWP. In conclusion, optimum N and straw return significantly reduced NGWP and GHGI and concomitantly achieved relatively high grain yields in this important winter wheat–summer maize double-cropping system.

  1. Impact of venous systemic oxygen persufflation supplemented with nitric oxide gas on cold-stored, warm ischemia-damaged experimental liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Pramod Kadaba; Yagi, Shintaro; Doorschodt, Benedict; Nagai, Kazuyuki; Afify, Mamdouh; Uemoto, Shinji; Tolba, Rene

    2012-02-01

    The increasing shortage of donor organs has led to the increasing use of organs from non-heart-beating donors. We aimed to assess the impact of venous systemic oxygen persufflation (VSOP) supplemented with nitric oxide (NO) gas during the cold storage (CS) of warm ischemia (WI)-damaged experimental liver grafts. Rat livers (n = 5 per group) were retrieved after 30 minutes of WI induced by cardiac arrest (the WI group) and were thereafter preserved for 24 hours by CS in histidine tryptophan ketoglutarate solution. During CS, gaseous oxygen was insufflated via the caval vein with 40 ppm NO (the VSOP-NO group) or without NO (the VSOP group). Cold-stored livers without WI served as controls. Liver viability was assessed after the preservation period by normothermic isolated reperfusion for 45 minutes with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. After 45 minutes of reperfusion, the VSOP-NO-treated livers showed significantly lower alanine aminotransferase values than the WI-damaged livers (10.2 ± 0.2 versus 78.2 ± 14.6 IU/L), whereas the control livers showed no differences from the VSOP-NO-treated livers. The mitochondrial enzyme release was lower in the VSOP-NO group (4.0 ± 0.7 IU/L) versus the WI group (18.2 ± 4.9 IU/L). An increased portal vein pressure was observed throughout reperfusion (45 minutes) in the WI group (21.7 ± 0.2 mm Hg) versus the VSOP-NO group (12.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg) and the control group (19.9 ± 0.4 mm Hg). Furthermore, the NO concentration in the perfusate after 5 minutes of reperfusion was highest in the VSOP-NO group. The release of malondialdehyde into the perfusate was significantly reduced in the VSOP-NO group (0.9 ± 0.1 nmol/mL) versus the WI group (31.3 ± 5.3 nmol/mL). In conclusion, the resuscitation of livers after 30 minutes of WI to a level comparable to that of nonischemically damaged livers is possible with VSOP supplemented with NO gas. Moreover, the application of VSOP with NO minimizes the extent of injuries caused by oxygen free

  2. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas emission under different soil nutrient management practices in soybean-wheat system of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Sangeeta; Lenka, Narendra Kumar; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Singh, B; Raghuwanshi, Jyothi

    2017-02-01

    Soil nutrient management is a key component contributing to the greenhouse gas (GHG) flux and mitigation potential of agricultural production systems. However, the effect of soil nutrient management practices on GHG flux and global warming potential (GWP) is less understood in agricultural soils of India. The present study was conducted to compare three nutrient management systems practiced for nine consecutive years in a soybean-wheat cropping system in the Vertisols of India, in terms of GHG flux and GWP. The treatments were composed of 100% organic (ONM), 100% inorganic (NPK), and integrated nutrient management (INM) with 50% organic + 50% inorganic inputs. The gas samples for GHGs (CO2, CH4, and N2O) were collected by static chamber method at about 15-day interval during 2012-13 growing season. The change in soil organic carbon (SOC) content was estimated in terms of the changes in SOC stock in the 0-15 cm soil over the 9-year period covering 2004 to 2013. There was a net uptake of CH4 in all the treatments in both soybean and wheat crop seasons. The cumulative N2O and CO2 emissions were in the order of INM > ONM > NPK with significant difference between treatments (p < 0.05) in both the crop seasons. The annual GWP, expressed in terms of CH4 and N2O emission, also followed the same trend and was estimated to be 1126, 1002, and 896 kg CO2 eq ha(-1) year(-1) under INM, ONM, and NPK treatments, respectively. However, the change in SOC stock was significantly higher under ONM (1250 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) followed by INM (417 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) and least under NPK (198 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) treatment. The wheat equivalent yield was similar under ONM and INM treatments and was significantly lower under NPK treatment. Thus, the GWP per unit grain yield was lower under ONM followed by NPK and INM treatments and varied from 250, 261, and 307 kg CO2 eq Mg(-1) grain yield under ONM, NPK, and INM treatments, respectively.

  3. Imaging spectroscopy of the centers of nearby AGN: Molecular gas streaming and obscuring the active nucleus of NGC1068

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Müller Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcanzando resoluciones espaciales hasta de 0.075", hemos obtenido imágenes de la distribució y cinemática del gas y las estrellas de un conjunto de AGN cercanos utilizando el espectrógrafo de campo integral asistido por óptica adaptativa SINFONI en el infrarrojo cercano. Presentamos los resultados sobre las propiedades generales del proceso de formación de estrellas y el gas molecular en las regiones centrales de 9 AGN. Adicionalmente, en NGC 1068 con una resolución de 5 pc hemos observado gas molecular exactamente enfrente del AGN y fluyendo hacia el núcleo. Interpretamos este cúmulo nuclear de gas como un conjunto de nubes cayendo hacia el núcleo y que forman la parte externa y ópticamente gruesa de una estructura amorfa y grumosa de polvo/gas molecular.

  4. The ATLAS 3D project - XVI. Physical parameters and spectral line energy distributions of the molecular gas in gas-rich early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bayet, Estelle; Davis, Timothy A; Young, Lisa M; Crocker, Alison F; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the molecular gas in a sample of 18 molecular gas-rich early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS$ 3D sample. Our goal is to better understand the star formation processes occurring in those galaxies, starting here with the dense star-forming gas. We use existing integrated $^{12}$CO(1-0, 2-1), $^{13}$CO(1-0, 2-1), HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) observations and present new $^{12}$CO(3-2) single-dish data. From these, we derive for the first time the average kinetic temperature, H$_{2}$ volume density and column density of the emitting gas, this using a non-LTE theoretical model. Since the CO lines trace different physical conditions than of those the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ lines, the two sets of lines are treated separately. We also compare for the first time the predicted CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) and gas properties of our molecular gas-rich ETGs with those of a sample of nearby well-studied disc galaxies. The gas excitation con...

  5. Molecular gas and star formation in the Tidal Dwarf Galaxy VCC 2062

    CERN Document Server

    Lisenfeld, U; Duc, P A; Boquien, M; Brinks, E; Bournaud, F; Lelli, F; Charmandaris, V

    2016-01-01

    The physical mechanisms driving star formation (SF) in galaxies are still not fully understood. Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs), made of gas ejected during galaxy interactions, seem to be devoid of dark matter and have a near-solar metallicity. The latter makes it possible to study molecular gas and its link to SF using standard tracers (CO, dust) in a peculiar environment. We present a detailed study of a nearby TDG in the Virgo Cluster, VCC 2062, using new high-resolution CO(1--0) data from the Plateau de Bure, deep optical imaging from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), and complementary multiwavelength data. Until now, there was some doubt whether VCC 2062 was a true TDG, but the new deep optical images from the NGVS reveal a stellar bridge between VCC 2062 and its parent galaxy, NGC 4694, which is clear proof of its tidal origin. Several high-resolution tracers (\\halpha, UV, 8~\\mi, and 24~\\mi) of the star formation rate (SFR) are compared to the molecular gas distribution as traced by the CO(1-...

  6. The Fueling Diagram: Linking Galaxy Molecular-to-Atomic Gas Ratios to Interactions and Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, David V; Wei, Lisa H; Baker, Andrew J; Leroy, Adam K; Eckert, Kathleen D; Vogel, Stuart N

    2013-01-01

    To assess how external factors such as local interactions and fresh gas accretion influence the global ISM of galaxies, we analyze the relationship between recent enhancements of central star formation and total molecular-to-atomic (H2/HI) gas ratios, using a broad sample of field galaxies spanning early-to-late type morphologies, stellar masses of 10^(7.2-11.2) Msun, and diverse stages of evolution. We find that galaxies occupy several loci in a "fueling diagram" that plots H2/HI vs. mass-corrected blue-centeredness, a metric tracing the degree to which galaxies have bluer centers than the average galaxy at their stellar mass. Spiral galaxies show a positive correlation between H2/HI and mass-corrected blue-centeredness. When combined with previous results linking mass-corrected blue-centeredness to external perturbations, this correlation suggests a link between local galaxy interactions and molecular gas inflow/replenishment. Intriguingly, E/S0 galaxies show a more complex picture: some follow the same cor...

  7. Depletion of molecular gas by an accretion outburst in a protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Banzatti, A; Bruderer, S; Muzerolle, J; Meyer, M R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate new and archival 3-5 $\\mu$m high resolution ($\\sim3$ km s$^{-1}$) spectroscopy of molecular gas in the inner disk of the young solar-mass star EX Lupi, taken during and after the strong accretion outburst of 2008. The data were obtained using the CRIRES spectrometer at the ESO Very Large Telescope in 2008 and 2014. In 2008, emission lines from CO, H$_{2}$O, and OH were detected with broad profiles tracing gas near and within the corotation radius (0.02-0.3 AU). In 2014, the spectra display marked differences. The CO lines, while still detected, are much weaker, and the H$_{2}$O and OH lines have disappeared altogether. At 3 $\\mu$m a veiled stellar photospheric spectrum is observed. Our analysis finds that the molecular gas mass in the inner disk has decreased by an order of magnitude since the outburst, matching a similar decrease in the accretion rate onto the star. We discuss these findings in the context of a rapid depletion of material accumulated beyond the disk corotation radius during qu...

  8. A Census of the High-Density Molecular Gas in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Naylor, B J; Aguirre, J E; Bock, J J; Earle, L; Glenn, J; Inami, H; Kamenetzky, J; Maloney, P R; Matsuhara, H; Nguyen, H T; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-pointing study of the molecular gas in the starburst nucleus of M82 based on 190 - 307 GHz spectra obtained with Z-Spec at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We measure intensities or upper-limits for 20 transitions, including several new detections of CS, HNC, C2H, H2CO and CH3CCH lines. We combine our measurements with previously-published measurements at other frequencies for HCN, HNC, CS, C34S, and HCO+ in a multi-species likelihood analysis constraining gas mass, density and temperature, and the species' relative abundances. We find some 1.7 - 2.7 x 10^8 M_sun of gas with n_H2 between 1 - 6 x 10^4 cm^-3 and T > 50 K. While the mass and temperature are comparable to values inferred from mid-J CO transitions, the thermal pressure is a factor of 10 - 20 greater. The molecular ISM is largely fragmented and is subject to UV irradiation from the star clusters. It is also likely subject to cosmic rays and mechanical energy input from the supernovae, and is warmer on average than the molec...

  9. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume, E-mail: g.jeanmairet@fkf.mpg.de; Levesque, Maximilien, E-mail: maximilien.levesque@ens.fr [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr [SIS2M, LIONS, CEA, Saclay (France); Borgis, Daniel [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Maison de la Simulation, USR 3441, CEA - CNRS - INRIA - Univ. Paris-Sud - Univ. de Versailles, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  10. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  11. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the a

  12. The Scale Dependence of the Molecular Gas Depletion Time in M33

    CERN Document Server

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2010-01-01

    We study the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 to investigate how the observed scaling between the (kpc-averaged) surface density of molecular gas (\\Sigma_H2) and recent star formation rate (\\Sigma_SFR) relates to individual star-forming regions. To do this, we measure the ratio of CO emission to extinction-corrected Halpha emission in apertures of varying sizes centered both on peaks of CO and Halpha emission. We parameterize this ratio as a molecular gas (H_2) depletion time (\\tau_dep). On large (kpc) scales, our results are consistent with a molecular star formation law (Sigma_SFR \\sim Sigma_H2^b) with b \\sim 1.1 - 1.5 and a median \\tau_dep \\sim 1 Gyr, with no dependence on type of region targeted. Below these scales, \\tau_dep is a strong function of adopted angular scale and the type of region that is targeted. Small (\\lesssim 300pc) apertures centered on CO peaks have very long \\tau_dep (i.e., high CO-to-Halpha flux ratio) and small apertures targeted toward Halpha peaks have very short \\tau_dep. This implie...

  13. Kinematics of Shocked Molecular Gas Adjacent to the Supernova Remnant W44

    CERN Document Server

    Sashida, Tomoro; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Aono, Kazuya; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Seta, Masumichi

    2013-01-01

    We mapped molecular gas toward the supernova remnant W44 in the HCO+ J=1-0 line with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and in the CO J=3-2 line with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. High-velocity emission wings were detected in both lines over the area where the radio shell of W44 overlaps the molecular cloud in the plane of the sky. We found that the average velocity distributions of the wing emission can be fitted by a uniform expansion model. The best-fit expansion velocities are 12.2+-0.3 km/s and 13.2+-0.2 km/s in HCO+ and CO, respectively. The non-wing CO J=3-2 component is also fitted by the same model with an expansion velocity of 4.7+-0.1 km/s . This component might be dominated by a post shock higher-density region where the shock velocity had slowed down. The kinetic energy of shocked molecular gas is estimated to be (3.5+-1.3)x10^{49} erg. Adding this and the energy of the previously identified HI shell, we concluded that (1.2+-0.2)x10^{50} erg has been co...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of gas-phase ozone reactions with sabinene and benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, H F; Mohan, B; Cui, X; Chua, K J; Islam, M R

    2017-06-01

    Gas-phase reactions of ozone (O3) with volatile organic compounds were investigated both by experiment and molecular simulations. From our experiments, it was found ozone readily reacts with VOC pure components and reduces it effectively. By introducing ozone intermittently, the reaction between VOC and ozone is markedly enhanced. In order to understand the relationship between intermediate reactions and end products, ozone reaction with benzene and alicyclic monoterpene sabinene were simulated via a novel hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) algorithm that forced repeated bimolecular collisions. Molecular orbital (MO) rearrangements (manifested as bond dissociation or formation), resulting from the collisions, were computed by semi-empirical unrestricted Hartree-Fock methods (e.g., RM1). A minimum of 975 collisions between ozone and targeted organic species were performed to generate a distribution of reaction products. Results indicated that benzene and sabinene reacted with ozone to produce a range of stable products and intermediates, including carbocations, ring-scission products, as well as peroxy (HO2 and HO3) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals. Among the stable sabinene products observed included formaldehyde and sabina-ketone, which have been experimentally demonstrated in gas-phase ozonation reactions. Among the benzene ozonation products detected composed of oxygen mono-substituted aromatic C6H5O, which may undergo further transformation or rearrangement to phenol, benzene oxide or 2,4-cyclohexadienone; a phenomenon which has been experimentally observed in vapor-phase photocatalytic ozonation reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel gas-vacuum interface for environmental molecular beam studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S.; Pettersson, Jan B. C.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques are commonly used to obtain detailed information about reaction dynamics and kinetics of gas-surface interactions. These experiments are traditionally performed in vacuum and the dynamic state of surfaces under ambient conditions is thereby excluded from detailed studies. Herein we describe the development and demonstration of a new vacuum-gas interface that increases the accessible pressure range in environmental molecular beam (EMB) experiments. The interface consists of a grating close to a macroscopically flat surface, which allows for experiments at pressures above 1 Pa including angularly resolved measurements of the emitted flux. The technique is successfully demonstrated using key molecular beam experiments including elastic helium and inelastic water scattering from graphite, helium and light scattering from condensed adlayers, and water interactions with a liquid 1-butanol surface. The method is concluded to extend the pressure range and flexibility in EMB studies with implications for investigations of high pressure interface phenomena in diverse fields including catalysis, nanotechnology, environmental science, and life science. Potential further improvements of the technique are discussed.

  16. A novel gas-vacuum interface for environmental molecular beam studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sofia M; Kong, Xiangrui; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2017-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques are commonly used to obtain detailed information about reaction dynamics and kinetics of gas-surface interactions. These experiments are traditionally performed in vacuum and the dynamic state of surfaces under ambient conditions is thereby excluded from detailed studies. Herein we describe the development and demonstration of a new vacuum-gas interface that increases the accessible pressure range in environmental molecular beam (EMB) experiments. The interface consists of a grating close to a macroscopically flat surface, which allows for experiments at pressures above 1 Pa including angularly resolved measurements of the emitted flux. The technique is successfully demonstrated using key molecular beam experiments including elastic helium and inelastic water scattering from graphite, helium and light scattering from condensed adlayers, and water interactions with a liquid 1-butanol surface. The method is concluded to extend the pressure range and flexibility in EMB studies with implications for investigations of high pressure interface phenomena in diverse fields including catalysis, nanotechnology, environmental science, and life science. Potential further improvements of the technique are discussed.

  17. ATCA detections of massive molecular gas reservoirs in dusty, high-z radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heywood, I; Smith, D J B; Cooray, A; Dunne, L; Gomez, L; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M J; Michalowski, M J; Riechers, D A; van der Werf, P

    2016-01-01

    Observations using the 7 mm receiver system on the Australia Telescope Compact Array have revealed large reservoirs of molecular gas in two high-redshift radio galaxies: HATLAS J090426.9+015448 (z = 2.37) and HATLAS J140930.4+003803 (z = 2.04). Optically the targets are very faint, and spectroscopy classifies them as narrow-line radio galaxies. In addition to harbouring an active galactic nucleus the targets share many characteristics of sub-mm galaxies. Far-infrared data from Herschel-ATLAS suggest high levels of dust (>10^9 M_solar) and a correspondingly large amount of obscured star formation (~1000 M_solar / yr). The molecular gas is traced via the J = 1-0 transition of 12CO, its luminosity implying total H_2 masses of (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10^11 and (9.5 +/- 2.4) x 10^10 ({\\alpha}_CO/0.8) M_solar in HATLAS J090426.9+015448 and HATLAS J140930.4+003803 respectively. Both galaxies exhibit molecular line emission over a broad (~1000 km/s) velocity range, and feature double-peaked profiles. We interpret this as evi...

  18. Growth mechanism of a gas clathrate hydrate from a dilute aqueous gas solution: a molecular dynamics simulation of a three-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Hiroki

    2006-08-24

    A molecular dynamics simulation of a three-phase system including a gas clathrate, liquid water, and a gas was carried out at 298 K and high pressure in order to investigate the growth mechanism of the clathrate from a dilute aqueous gas solution. The simulation indicated that the clathrate grew on interfaces between the clathrate and the liquid water, after transfer of the gas molecules from the gas phase to the interfaces. The results suggest a two-step process for growth: first, gas molecules are arranged at cage sites, and second, H(2)O molecules are ordered near the gas molecules. The results also suggest that only the H(2)O molecules, which are surrounded or sandwiched by the gas molecules, form the stable polygons that constitute the cages of the clathrate. In addition, the growth of the clathrate from a concentrated aqueous gas solution was also simulated, and the results suggested a growth mechanism in which many H(2)O and gas molecules correctively form the structure of the clathrate. The clathrate grown from the concentrated solution contained some empty cages, whereas the formation of empty cages was not observed during the growth from the dilute solution. The results obtained by both simulations are compared with the results of an experimental study, and the growth mechanism of the clathrate in a real system is discussed.

  19. Greenhouse gas flux under warm-season perennial C4 grasses across different soil and climate gradients on the Islands of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, M. N.; Crow, S. E.; Sumiyoshi, Y.; Wells, J.; Kikkawa, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural soils can serve as either a sink or a source for atmospheric carbon (C) and other greenhouse gases (GHG). This is particularly true for tropical soils where influences from climate and soil gradients are wide ranging. Current estimates of GHG flux from soil are often under or overestimated due to high variability in sample sites and inconsistencies in land use and vegetation type, making extrapolation to new study systems difficult. This work aimed to identify patterns of trace fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) across two soil types and three species of warm season perennial C4 grasses: Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass), Panicum maximum (Guinea grass) and Saccharum officinarum (sugar cane) on the islands of Oahu and Maui in Hawaii. Multiple static vented chambers were installed into replicate plots for each species; flux measurements were made during the growth, fertilization and harvest cycles at set time intervals for one hour and analyzed by gas chromatography. Initial results from Oahu indicate no significant differences in CO2 flux between the P. maximum and P. purpureum species after fertilization or at full growth. We observed an average flux of 143 mg m-2 h-1 and 155 mg m-2 h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively at full growth for CO2 and 1.7 μg m-2 h-1and 0.3 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O. Additionally, N2O rates sampled after a typical fertilizer application were significantly greater than at full growth (p=0.0005) with flux rates of 25.2 μg m2h-1 and 30.3 μg m2h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively. With a global warming potential of 310 for N2O, even short-term spikes following fertilizer application can cause long lasting effects of GHG emission from agricultural soils. CH4 flux was negligible for all species on the Oahu plots during these sample periods. Globally, water limitation is a major factor influencing the potential productivity of agricultural crops and the sustainability of

  20. The Fundamentally Different Dynamics of Dust and Gas in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    We study the behavior of large dust grains in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs). In primarily neutral regions, dust grains move as aerodynamic particles, not necessarily with the gas. We therefore directly simulate, for the first time, the behavior of aerodynamic grains in highly supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence typical of MCs. We show that, under these conditions, grains with sizes a>0.01 micron exhibit dramatic (exceeding factor ~1000) fluctuations in the local dust-to-gas ratio (implying large small-scale variations in abundances, dust cooling rates, and dynamics). The dust can form highly filamentary structures (which would be observed in both dust emission and extinction), which can be much thinner than the characteristic width of gas filaments. Sometimes, the dust and gas filaments are not even in the same location. The 'clumping factor' of the dust (critical for dust evolution) can reach ~100, for grains in the ideal size range. The dust clustering is maximized around scales ~0.2pc*(a/micron)*...

  1. Carbon molecular sieve gas separation membranes based on an intrinsically microporous polyimide precursor

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xiaohua

    2013-10-01

    We report the physical characteristics and gas transport properties for a series of pyrolyzed membranes derived from an intrinsically microporous polyimide containing spiro-centers (PIM-6FDA-OH) by step-wise heat treatment to 440, 530, 600, 630 and 800 C, respectively. At 440 C, the PIM-6FDA-OH was converted to a polybenzoxazole and exhibited a 3-fold increase in CO2 permeability (from 251 to 683 Barrer) with a 50% reduction in selectivity over CH4 (from 28 to 14). At 530 C, a distinct intermediate amorphous carbon structure with superior gas separation properties was formed. A 56% increase in CO2-probed surface area accompanied a 16-fold increase in CO2 permeability (4110 Barrer) over the pristine polymer. The graphitic carbon membrane, obtained by heat treatment at 600 C, exhibited excellent gas separation properties, including a remarkable CO2 permeability of 5040 Barrer with a high selectivity over CH4 of 38. Above 600 C, the strong emergence of ultramicroporosity (<7 Å) as evidenced by WAXD and CO2 adsorption studies elicits a prominent molecular sieving effect, yielding gas separation performance well above the permeability-selectivity trade-off curves of polymeric membranes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fabrication of a SnO2-Based Acetone Gas Sensor Enhanced by Molecular Imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhu Tan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new route to design a highly sensitive SnO2–based sensor for acetone gas enhanced by the molecular imprinting technique. Unassisted and acetone-assisted thermal synthesis methods are used to synthesis SnO2 nanomaterials. The prepared SnO2 nanomaterials have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption−desorption. Four types of SnO2 films were obtained by mixing pure deionized water and liquid acetone with the two types of as-prepared powders, respectively. The acetone gas sensing properties of sensors coated by these films were evaluated. Testing results reveal that the sensor coated by the film fabricated by mixing liquid acetone with the SnO2 nanomaterial synthesized by the acetone-assisted thermal method exhibits the best acetone gas sensing performance. The sensor is optimized for the smooth adsorption and desorption of acetone gas thanks to the participation of acetone both in the procedure of synthesis of the SnO2 nanomaterial and the device fabrication, which results in a distinct response–recovery behavior.

  3. Massive molecular gas flows in the Abell 1664 brightest cluster galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; Edge, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N; Combes, F; Fabian, A C; Murray, N; Salome, P; Wilman, R J; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G R; Voit, G M

    2013-01-01

    We report ALMA Early Science CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 1664. The BCG contains 1.1x10^{10} solar masses of molecular gas divided roughly equally between two distinct velocity systems: one from -250 to +250 km/s centred on the BCG's systemic velocity and a high velocity system blueshifted by 570 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. The BCG's systemic component shows a smooth velocity gradient across the BCG center with velocity proportional to radius suggestive of solid body rotation about the nucleus. However, the mass and velocity structure are highly asymmetric and there is little star formation coincident with a putative disk. It may be an inflow of gas that will settle into a disk over several 10^8 yr. The high velocity system consists of two gas clumps, each ~2 kpc across, located to the north and southeast of the nucleus. Each has a line of sight velocity spread of 250-300 km/s. The velocity of the gas in the high velocity system tends to incre...

  4. Radio jets clearing the way through galaxies: the view from HI and molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Massive gas outflows are considered a key component in the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Because of this, they are the topic of many studies aimed at learning more about their occurrence, location and physical conditions as well as the mechanism(s) at their origin. This contribution presents recent results on two of the best examples of jet-driven outflows traced by cold and molecular gas. Thanks to high-spatial resolution observations, we have been able to locate the region where the outflow occurs. This appears to be coincident with bright radio features and regions where the interaction between radio plasma jet and ISM is known to occur, thus strongly supporting the idea of jet-driven outflows. We have also imaged the distribution of the outflowing gas. The results clearly show the effect that expanding radio jets and lobes have on the ISM. This appears to be in good agreement with what predicted from numerical simulations. Furthermore, the results show that cold gas is associated with these p...

  5. Physical properties of CO-dark molecular gas traced by C+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ningyu; Li, Di; Heiles, Carl; Wang, Shen; Pan, Zhichen; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Context. Neither Hi nor CO emission can reveal a significant quantity of so-called dark gas in the interstellar medium (ISM). It is considered that CO-dark molecular gas (DMG), the molecular gas with no or weak CO emission, dominates dark gas. Determination of physical properties of DMG is critical for understanding ISM evolution. Previous studies of DMG in the Galactic plane are based on assumptions of excitation temperature and volume density. Independent measurements of temperature and volume density are necessary. Aims: We intend to characterize physical properties of DMG in the Galactic plane based on C+ data from the Herschel open time key program, namely Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+) and Hi narrow self-absorption (HINSA) data from international Hi 21 cm Galactic plane surveys. Methods: We identified DMG clouds with HINSA features by comparing Hi, C+, and CO spectra. We derived the Hi excitation temperature and Hi column density through spectral analysis of HINSA features. The Hi volume density was determined by utilizing the on-the-sky dimension of the cold foreground Hi cloud under the assumption of axial symmetry. The column and volume density of H2 were derived through excitation analysis of C+ emission. The derived parameters were then compared with a chemical evolutionary model. Results: We identified 36 DMG clouds with HINSA features. Based on uncertainty analysis, optical depth of HiτHi of 1 is a reasonable value for most clouds. With the assumption of τHi = 1, these clouds were characterized by excitation temperatures in a range of 20 K to 92 K with a median value of 55 K and volume densities in the range of 6.2 × 101 cm-3 to 1.2 × 103 cm-3 with a median value of 2.3 × 102 cm-3. The fraction of DMG column density in the cloud (fDMG) decreases with increasing excitation temperature following an empirical relation fDMG =-2.1 × 10-3Tex,(τHi = 1) + 1.0. The relation between fDMG and total hydrogen column density NH is given by f

  6. Decay of an oscillating plate in a free-molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Aoki, Kazuo

    2011-05-01

    An infinite plate without thickness is placed in a free-molecular gas, and an external force, obeying Hooke's law, is acting perpendicularly on the plate. If the plate is displaced perpendicularly from its equilibrium position and released, then it starts an oscillatory motion, which decays as time goes on because of the drag exerted by the gas molecules. This unsteady motion is investigated numerically, under the diffuse reflection condition, with special interest in the manner of its decay. It is shown that the decay of the displacement of the plate is slow and is in proportion to an inverse power of time. The result complements the existing mathematical study of a similar problem [S. Caprino, et al., Math. Models. Meth. Appl. Sci. 17, pp. 1369-1403 (2007)] in the case of non-oscillatory decay.

  7. Surprising Existence of Massive and Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in A Distant Protocluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2017-07-01

    We know that environment has a critical impact on galaxy growth and evolution. What we do not know is when it starts to have an impact and how it does it. I present results of our on-going survey of low surface brightness emission of cold molecular gas in protoclusters galaxies and their halos with the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). These findings alter our view of the important topics of the development and gas phase distribution of the "proto-intracluster medium": how ram pressure stripping may operate in protoclusters, how the galaxies may contribute to the proto-intracluster medium and how their star formation may be limited by dynamics. Finally, I present our new ATCA Large Program, COALAS (CO ATCA Legacy Archive of Star-Forming Galaxies), which will extend significantly our study of environmental effects on cluster and field galaxies.

  8. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  9. CH as a Molecular Gas Tracer and C-shock Tracer Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary in Taurus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Li, Di

    2016-12-01

    We present new observations of all three ground-state transitions of the methylidyne (CH) radical and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. These data were analyzed in conjunction with existing CO and dust images. The derived CH abundance is consistent with previous observations of translucent clouds (0.8 ≤ A v ≤ 2.1 mag). The X(CH)-factor is nearly a constant (1.0 ± 0.06) × 1022 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in this extinction range, with less dispersion than that of the more widely used molecular tracers CO and OH. CH turns out be a better tracer of total column density in such an intermediate extinction range than CO or OH. Compared with previous observations, CH is overabundant below 1 mag extinction. Such an overabundance of CH is consistent with the presence of a C-shock. CH has two kinematic components, one of which shifts from 5.3 to 6 km s-1, while the other stays at 6.8 km s-1 when moving from outside toward inside of the cloud. These velocity behaviors exactly match previous OH observation. The shifting of the two kinematic components indicates colliding streams or gas flow at the boundary region, which could be the cause of the C-shock.

  10. The effect of ram pressure on the molecular gas of galaxies: three case studies in the Virgo cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bumhyun; Chung, Aeree; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Wong, O. Ivy; Vollmer, B.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Crowl, Hugh H.; van Gorkom, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    We present 12CO (2-1) data of three Virgo spirals - NGC 4330, NGC 4402 and NGC 4522 obtained using the Submillimeter Array. These three galaxies show clear evidence of ram pressure stripping due to the cluster medium as found in previous H I imaging studies. Using the high-resolution CO data, we investigate how the properties of the inner molecular gas disc change while a galaxy is undergoing H I stripping in the cluster. At given sensitivity limits, we do not find any clear signs of molecular gas stripping. However, both its morphology and kinematics appear to be quite disturbed as those of H I. Morphological peculiarities present in the molecular and atomic gas are closely related with each other, suggesting that the molecular gas can be also affected by strong intracluster medium (ICM) pressure even if it is not stripped. CO is found to be modestly enhanced along the upstream sides in these galaxies, which may change the local star formation activity in the disc. Indeed, the distribution of Hα emission, a tracer of recent star formation, well coincides with that of the molecular gas, revealing enhancements near the local CO peak or along the CO compression. FUV and Hα share some properties in common, but FUV is always more extended than CO/Hα in the three galaxies, implying that the star-forming disc is rapidly shrinking as the molecular gas properties have changed. We discuss how ICM pressure affects dense molecular gas and hence star formation properties while diffuse atomic gas is being removed from a galaxy.

  11. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Molecular Gas Reservoirs in High-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Bacon, Roland; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F.; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C.; Cox, Pierre; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Inami, Hanae; Ivison, Rob; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kazuaki; Popping, Gergö; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We study the molecular gas properties of high-z galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets an ˜1 arcmin2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3 and 1 mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities {L}{IR}\\gt {10}11 {L}⊙ , i.e., a detection in CO emission was expected. Out of these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than those typically found in starburst/sub-mm galaxy/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in the context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): the CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-{L}{IR} envelope of the scatter in the {L}{IR}{--}{L}{CO}\\prime relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of ˜1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ({M}{{H}2}/M *) is consistent with earlier measurements of main-sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor ˜2-5× smaller than those based on CO. When we account for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.

  12. Committed warming inferred from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritsen, Thorsten; Pincus, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lifetime of CO2, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the temporary impacts of short-lived aerosols and reactive greenhouse gases, the Earth’s climate is not equilibrated with anthropogenic forcing. As a result, even if fossil-fuel emissions were to suddenly cease, some level of committed warming is expected due to past emissions as studied previously using climate models. Here, we provide an observational-based quantification of this committed warming using the instrument record of global-mean warming, recently improved estimates of Earth’s energy imbalance, and estimates of radiative forcing from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Compared with pre-industrial levels, we find a committed warming of 1.5 K (0.9-3.6, 5th-95th percentile) at equilibrium, and of 1.3 K (0.9-2.3) within this century. However, when assuming that ocean carbon uptake cancels remnant greenhouse gas-induced warming on centennial timescales, committed warming is reduced to 1.1 K (0.7-1.8). In the latter case there is a 13% risk that committed warming already exceeds the 1.5 K target set in Paris. Regular updates of these observationally constrained committed warming estimates, although simplistic, can provide transparent guidance as uncertainty regarding transient climate sensitivity inevitably narrows and the understanding of the limitations of the framework is advanced.

  13. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  14. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  15. Energy of one-dimensional diatomic elastic granular gas: Theory and molecular dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Widayani,; Waris, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional ideal diatomic gas is simulated through possible types of motion of a molecule. Energy of each type of its motion is calculated from theory and numerical method. Calculation of kinetic energy of an atom in translational-vibrational motion is not analytically simple, but it can be solved by numerical method of molecular dynamic simulation. This paper justifies that kinetic energy of a diatomic molecule can be determined by two different approaches. The first is the sum of kinetic energy of each atom and second is the sum of kinetic energy of translational motion and vibrational motion.

  16. Aperture Synthesis Observations of Molecular Gas in the Wolf-Rayet Galaxy He 2-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, Chip; Sargent, Anneila; Conti, Peter; Hogg, David; Dickey, John

    1994-05-01

    We present aperture synthesis observations of the prototype Wolf-Rayet galaxy He 2-10 in the line of (12) CO(1-0). These observations represent one of the first aperture synthesis maps of molecular gas in a blue compact dwarf galaxy. He 2-10 contains two starburst regions, A and B, separated by 8 arcsec which corresponds to 350 pc at at distance of 9 Mpc. Optical spectroscopy of region A indicates the presence of some 300 Wolf-Rayet and 4000 O-type stars, consistent with a very young starburst (Vacca & Conti, 1992, ApJ 401, 543). From a line integral of of 165+/-8 K km s(-1) we derive a total molecular gas mass of 1.8 times 10(8) M_sun based on (12) CO(1-0) spectra from the 12m NRAO telescope. The ratio of molecular to atomic gas mass, M(H_2)/M(HI)=0.54, is among the highest of any late type or blue compact dwarf galaxy. (12) CO(1-0) maps made with the Owens valley interferometer show two dynamical systems, suggesting an interaction-triggered starburst. While the CO peak is not conincident with either optical maximum, the CO is more nearly centered on the brighter and younger of the two starburst regions, A. There is no visible concentration of molecular gas near starburst region B which contains only a few hundred O-type stars. A significant fraction of the CO lies well outside the bright optical core, and is thus unaffiliated with the site of active star formation. We find a lower limit to the dynamical mass in the central 70 pc of 3.0times 10(6) M_sun inferred from the CO rotation curve. Conti & Vacca (1994, ref) estimate the combined mass of nine blue starburst knots revealed by HST UV imaging to be 4.5times 10(6) M_sun. Even if the inclination of He 2-10 is as low as 30(deg) , the young clusters, termed proto-globular clusters by Conti & Vacca, comprise at least 75% of the dynamical mass in the inner 70 pc!

  17. Estudio asintótico-numérico de la descarga de chorros laminares de gas: efecto del peso molecular

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales Vera, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    La tesis que presentamos analiza la estructura de un chorro laminar de gas cuyo peso molecular es muy distinto del de el gas en el que descarga. Esa diferencia de peso molecular, si la temperatura de ambos gases es la misma, se traduce una fuerte diferencia de densidades que determina la evolución posterior del chorro. In this thesis we investigate the steady laminar flow generated by the discharge of a gas jet of radius a with a moderately large Reynolds number into a coflow stream of ...

  18. New studies on molecular chirality in the gas phase: enantiomer differentiation and determination of enantiomeric excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David; Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-21

    Chirality plays a fundamental role in the activity of biological molecules and broad classes of chemical reactions. The chemistry of life is built almost exclusively on left-handed amino acids and right-handed sugars, a phenomenon known as "homochirality of life". Furthermore, most drugs developed in the last decade are of specified chirality. Thus, fast and reliable methods that can differentiate molecules of different handedness, determine the enantiomeric excess of even molecular mixtures, and allow for an unambiguous determination of molecular handedness are of great interest, in particular with respect to complex mixtures. In this perspective article, we discuss the recent developments, with an emphasis on modern spectroscopic methods using gas-phase samples, such as photoelectron circular dichroism, Coulomb explosion imaging, and microwave three-wave mixing.

  19. Synthesis of highly selective zeolite topology molecular sieve for adsorption of benzene gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Chen, Yunlin; Zhang, Baoping; Zu, Zhinan

    2013-02-01

    Shangdong fly ash (SFA), Fangshan fly ash (FFA) and Heilongjiang fly ash (HFA) were selected as the raw materials to be used for synthesis of highly selective zeolite topology molecular sieve. Twice foaming method was studied in terms of synthetic zeolite. The experimental products were characterized by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and automated surface area & pore size analyser. The results indicated that 10 M NaOH was chosen as modification experiment condition to process SFA. Crystallization temperature and time were 140 °C and 8 h, respectively. Zeolite topology molecular sieve was prepared with Si/Al molar ratio of 7.9, and its adsorption ratio of benzene gas was up to 66.51%.

  20. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  1. Deep time evidence for climate sensitivity increase with warming:Climate Sensitivity Rise With Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, Gary; Huber, Matthew; Rondanelli, Roberto; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2016-01-01

    Future global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will depend on climate feedbacks, the effect of which is expressed by climate sensitivity, the warming for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content. It is not clear how feedbacks, sensitivity, and temperature will evolve in our warming world, but past warming events may provide insight. Here we employ paleoreconstructions and new climate-carbon model simulations in a novel framework to explore a wide scenario range for the Paleoce...

  2. A Global Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Management Practices on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from Cropland Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M

    2016-01-01

    Management practices, such as tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization, may affect net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), but their global impact on cropland soils under different soil and climatic conditions need further evaluation. Available global data from 57 experiments and 225 treatments were evaluated for individual and combined effects of tillage, cropping systems, and N fertilization rates on GWP and GHGI which accounted for CO2 equivalents from N2O and CH4 emissions with or without equivalents from soil C sequestration rate (ΔSOC), farm operations, and N fertilization. The GWP and GHGI were 66 to 71% lower with no-till than conventional till and 168 to 215% lower with perennial than annual cropping systems, but 41 to 46% greater with crop rotation than monocroppping. With no-till vs. conventional till, GWP and GHGI were 2.6- to 7.4-fold lower when partial than full accounting of all sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) were considered. With 100 kg N ha-1, GWP and GHGI were 3.2 to 11.4 times greater with partial than full accounting. Both GWP and GHGI increased curvilinearly with increased N fertilization rate. Net GWP and GHGI were 70 to 87% lower in the improved combined management that included no-till, crop rotation/perennial crop, and reduced N rate than the traditional combined management that included conventional till, monocopping/annual crop, and recommended N rate. An alternative soil respiration method, which replaces ΔSOC by soil respiration and crop residue returned to soil in the previous year, similarly reduced GWP and GHGI by 133 to 158% in the improved vs. the traditional combined management. Changes in GWP and GHGI due to improved vs. traditional management varied with the duration of the experiment and inclusion of soil and climatic factors in multiple linear regressions improved their relationships. Improved management practices reduced GWP and GHGI compared with traditional management

  3. A Global Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Management Practices on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from Cropland Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra M Sainju

    Full Text Available Management practices, such as tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization, may affect net global warming potential (GWP and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI, but their global impact on cropland soils under different soil and climatic conditions need further evaluation. Available global data from 57 experiments and 225 treatments were evaluated for individual and combined effects of tillage, cropping systems, and N fertilization rates on GWP and GHGI which accounted for CO2 equivalents from N2O and CH4 emissions with or without equivalents from soil C sequestration rate (ΔSOC, farm operations, and N fertilization. The GWP and GHGI were 66 to 71% lower with no-till than conventional till and 168 to 215% lower with perennial than annual cropping systems, but 41 to 46% greater with crop rotation than monocroppping. With no-till vs. conventional till, GWP and GHGI were 2.6- to 7.4-fold lower when partial than full accounting of all sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs were considered. With 100 kg N ha-1, GWP and GHGI were 3.2 to 11.4 times greater with partial than full accounting. Both GWP and GHGI increased curvilinearly with increased N fertilization rate. Net GWP and GHGI were 70 to 87% lower in the improved combined management that included no-till, crop rotation/perennial crop, and reduced N rate than the traditional combined management that included conventional till, monocopping/annual crop, and recommended N rate. An alternative soil respiration method, which replaces ΔSOC by soil respiration and crop residue returned to soil in the previous year, similarly reduced GWP and GHGI by 133 to 158% in the improved vs. the traditional combined management. Changes in GWP and GHGI due to improved vs. traditional management varied with the duration of the experiment and inclusion of soil and climatic factors in multiple linear regressions improved their relationships. Improved management practices reduced GWP and GHGI compared with traditional

  4. Effects of nitrogen application rates on net annual global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in double-rice cropping systems of the Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongdu; Chen, Fu; Zhang, Hailin; Liu, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    The net global warming potential (NGWP) and net greenhouse gas intensity (NGHGI) of double-rice cropping systems are not well documented. We measured the NGWP and NGHGI including soil organic carbon (SOC) change and indirect emissions (IE) from double-crop rice fields with fertilizing systems in Southern China. These experiments with three different nitrogen (N) application rates since 2012 are as follows: 165 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 225 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N1), which was the local N application rates as the control; 135 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 180 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N2, 20 % reduction); and 105 kgN ha(-1) for early rice and 135 kgN ha(-1) for late rice (N3, 40 % reduction). Results showed that yields increased with the increase of N application rate, but without significant difference between N1 and N2 plots. Annual SOC sequestration rate under N1 was estimated to be 1.15 MgC ha(-1) year(-1), which was higher than those under other fertilizing systems. Higher N application tended to increase CH4 emissions during the flooded rice season and significantly increased N2O emissions from drained soils during the nonrice season, ranking as N1 > N2 > N3 with significant difference (P < 0.05). Two-year average IE has a huge contribution to GHG emissions mainly coming from the higher N inputs in the double-rice cropping system. Reducing N fertilizer usage can effectively decrease the NGWP and NGHGI in the double-rice cropping system, with the lowest NGHGI obtained in the N2 plot (0.99 kg CO2-eq kg(-1) yield year(-1)). The results suggested that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be simultaneously achieved by properly reducing N fertilizer application in double-rice cropping systems.

  5. Pinpointing the molecular gas within an Lyα blob at z ∼ 2.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yujin; Bertoldi, Frank; Bădescu, Toma [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Weiss, Axel [Max-Planck-Insitut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Prescott, Moire K. M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2014-04-01

    We present IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of the CO(3-2) and CO(5-4) line transitions from an Lyα blob at z ∼ 2.7 in order to investigate the gas kinematics, determine the location of the dominant energy source, and study the physical conditions of the molecular gas. CO line and dust continuum emissions are detected at the location of a strong MIPS source that is offset by ∼1.''5 from the Lyα peak. Neither of these emission components is resolved with the 1.''7 beam, showing that the gas and dust are confined to within ∼7 kpc from this galaxy. No millimeter source is found at the location of the Lyα peak, ruling out a central compact source of star formation as the power source for the Lyα emission. Combined with a spatially resolved spectrum of Lyα and He II, we constrain the kinematics of the extended gas using the CO emission as a tracer of the systemic redshift. Near the MIPS source, the Lyα profile is symmetric, and its line center agrees with that of the CO line, implying that there are no significant bulk flows and that the photo-ionization from the MIPS source might be the dominant source of the Lyα emission. In the region near the Lyα peak, the gas is slowly receding (∼100 km s{sup –1}) with respect to the MIPS source, thus making the hyper-/superwind hypothesis unlikely. We find a sub-thermal line ratio between two CO transitions, I {sub CO(5-4)}/I {sub CO(3-2)} = 0.97 ± 0.21. This line ratio is lower than the average values found in high-z submillimeter galaxies and QSOs but is consistent with the value found in the Galactic center, suggesting that there is a large reservoir of low-density molecular gas that is spread over the MIPS source and its vicinity.

  6. The Dense Gas Fraction in the Central Molecular Zone in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Salazar, Irene; Battersby, Cara; Walker, Daniel; Zhang, Qizhou; CMZoom

    2017-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a large reservoir of dense molecular gas occupying the central 500pc of the Milky Way, is an extreme star-formation environment where the validity of star formation prescriptions can be tested. The star formation rate (SFR) in the CMZ is about an order of magnitude lower than predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. An international team lead by PIs Battersby and Keto conducted a survey from 2013-2016 called CMZoom using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to characterize star formation within resolved molecular clouds in this extreme region. One of the main goals of this survey is to further quantify and understand the low SFR found in this region of the Galaxy. Here, we use the CASA software package to run synthetic observations of hydrodynamical simulations of molecular clouds and vary the observation parameters in such a way that we explore the real parameter space that was probed during the survey. The purpose of this is to investigate how the different observational parameters affect the resultant data. Afterwards, we estimate the “dense gas fraction” (DGF) found in regions across the CMZ. This estimate was found by using the interferometric flux from SMA and the single-dish flux from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. We analyzed the effects that different locations of the CMZ had on these approximate DGF. With these simulations and DGF estimates, we are able to generate improved methods to analyze the data from this survey that will help understand star formation in an extreme environment.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Testing the universality of the star-formation efficiency in dense molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Y.; André, Ph.; Braine, J.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Ladjelate, B.; Roy, A.; Gao, Y.; Chen, H.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Recent studies with, for example, Spitzer and Herschel have suggested that star formation in dense molecular gas may be governed by essentially the same "law" in Galactic clouds and external galaxies. This conclusion remains controversial, however, in large part because different tracers have been used to probe the mass of dense molecular gas in Galactic and extragalactic studies. Aims: We aimed to calibrate the HCN and HCO+ lines commonly used as dense gas tracers in extragalactic studies and to test the possible universality of the star-formation efficiency in dense gas (≳104 cm-3), SFEdense. Methods: We conducted wide-field mapping of the Aquila, Ophiuchus, and Orion B clouds at 0.04 pc resolution in the J = 1 - 0 transition of HCN, HCO+, and their isotopomers. For each cloud, we derived a reference estimate of the dense gas mass MHerschelAV > 8, as well as the strength of the local far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field, using Herschel Gould Belt survey data products, and estimated the star-formation rate from direct counting of the number of Spitzer young stellar objects. Results: The H13CO+(1-0) and H13CN(1-0) lines were observed to be good tracers of the dense star-forming filaments detected with Herschel. Comparing the luminosities LHCN and LHCO+ measured in the HCN and HCO+ lines with the reference masses MHerschelAV > 8, the empirical conversion factors αHerschel - HCN (=MHerschelAV > 8/LHCN) and αHerschel - HCO+ (=MHerschelAV > 8/LHCO+) were found to be significantly anti-correlated with the local FUV strength. In agreement with a recent independent study of Orion B by Pety et al., the HCN and HCO+ lines were found to trace gas down to AV ≳ 2. As a result, published extragalactic HCN studies must be tracing all of the moderate density gas down to nH2 ≲ 103 cm-3. Estimating the contribution of this moderate density gas from the typical column density probability distribution functions in nearby clouds, we obtained the following G0

  8. Molecular gas kinematics of the CMZ: Great oaks from little acorns grow

    CERN Document Server

    Henshaw, J D

    2016-01-01

    The central molecular zone (CMZ) hosts some of the most massive and dense molecular clouds and star clusters in the Galaxy, offering an important window into star formation under extreme conditions. Star formation in this extreme environment may be closely linked to the 3-D distribution and orbital dynamics of the gas. Here I discuss how our new, accurate description of the $\\{l,b,v\\}$ structure of the CMZ is helping to constrain its 3-D geometry. I also present the discovery of a highly-regular, corrugated velocity field located just upstream from the dust ridge molecular clouds (which include G0.253+0.016 and Sgr B2). The extremes in this velocity field correlate with a series of massive ($\\sim10^{4}$ M$_{\\odot}$) cloud condensations. The corrugation wavelength ($\\sim23$ pc) and cloud separation ($\\sim8$ pc) closely agree with the predicted Toomre ($\\sim17$ pc) and Jeans ($\\sim6$ pc) lengths, respectively. I conclude that gravitational instabilities are driving the formation of molecular clouds within the G...

  9. Molecular Gas in the X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044 as Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    David, Laurence P; Forman, William; Vrtilek, Jan; Combes, Francoise; Salome, Philippe; Edge, Alastair; Jones, Christine; Sun, Ming; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Temi, Pasquale; Schmitt, Henrique; Ohyama, Youichi; Hamer, Stephen; Mathews, William; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, Sandro; Trung, Dinh-V

    2014-01-01

    A short 30 minute ALMA observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 5044, which resides at the center of an X-ray bright group with a moderate cooling flow, has detected 24 molecular structures within the central 2.5 kpc. The masses of the molecular structures vary from 3e5 to 1e7 Mo3 and the CO(2-1) linewidths vary from 15 to 65 km/s. Given the large CO(2-1) linewidths, the observed structures are likely giant molecular associations (GMAs) and not individual molecular clouds (GMCs). Only a few of the GMAs are spatially resolved with the cycle 0 ALMA beam and the average density of these GMAs yields a GMC volume filling factor of about 15%. The observed masses of the resolved GMAs are insufficient for them to be gravitationally bound, however, the most massive GMA does contain a less massive component with a linewidth of 5.5 km/s (typical of an individual virialized GMC). We also show that the GMAs cannot be pressure confined by the hot gas. Given the observed CO(2-1) linewidths of the GMAs (i.e., the velocity di...

  10. Accommodative Behavior of Non-porous Molecular crystal at Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Mande, Hemant M.; Ghalsasi, Prasanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular crystals demonstrate drastically different behavior in solid and liquid state, mainly due to their difference in structural frameworks. Therefore, designing of unique structured molecular compound which can work at both these interfaces has been a challenge. Here, we present remarkable ‘molecular’ property by non-porous molecular solid crystal, dinuclear copper complex (C6H5CH(X)NH2)2CuCl2, to reversibly ‘adsorb’ HCl gas at solid-gas interface as well as ‘accommodate’ azide anion at...

  11. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Mookerjea, B.

    2010-11-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12” × 2.6 km s-1, enabling individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) to be resolved. The observed region is 650 square arcminutes mainly along the major axis and out to a radius of 8.5 kpc, and covers entirely the 2' × 40' radial strip observed with the HIFI and PACS Spectrometers as part of the HERM33ES Herschel key program. The achieved sensitivity in main-beam temperature is 20-50 mK at 2.6 km s-1 velocity resolution. The CO(2-1) luminosity of the observed region is 1.7±0.1 × 107 K km s-1 pc2 and is estimated to be 2.8±0.3 × 107 K km s-1 pc2 for the entire galaxy, corresponding to H2 masses of 1.9 × 108 Msun and 3.3 × 108 Msun respectively (including He), calculated with N(H2)/ICO(1-0) twice the Galactic value due to the half-solar metallicity of M 33. The H i 21 cm VLA archive observations were reduced, and the mosaic was imaged and cleaned using the multi-scale task in the CASA software package, yielding a series of datacubes with resolutions ranging from 5” to 25”. The H i mass within a radius of 8.5 kpc is estimated to be 1.4 × 109 Msun. The azimuthally averaged CO surface brightness decreases exponentially with a scale length of 1.9±0.1 kpc whereas the atomic gas surface density is constant at ΣH I = 6±2 Msun pc-2 deprojected to face-on. For an N(H2)/ICO(1-0) conversion factor twice that of the Milky Way, the central kiloparsec H2 surface density is ΣH2 = 8.5±0.2 Msun pc-2. The star formation rate per unit molecular gas (SF efficiency, the rate of transformation of molecular gas into stars), as traced by the ratio of CO to Hα and FIR brightness, is constant with radius. The SFE, with a N(H2)/ICO(1-0) factor twice galactic, appears 2-4 times greater than for large spiral

  12. Large turbulent reservoirs of cold molecular gas around high-redshift starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgarone, E.; Zwaan, M. A.; Godard, B.; Bergin, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Andreani, P. M.; Bournaud, F.; Bussmann, R. S.; Elbaz, D.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Walter, F.

    2017-08-01

    Starburst galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation are among the most extreme star-forming engines in the Universe, producing stars over about 100 million years (ref. 2). The star-formation rates of these galaxies, which exceed 100 solar masses per year, require large reservoirs of cold molecular gas to be delivered to their cores, despite strong feedback from stars or active galactic nuclei. Consequently, starburst galaxies are ideal for studying the interplay between this feedback and the growth of a galaxy. The methylidyne cation, CH+, is a most useful molecule for such studies because it cannot form in cold gas without suprathermal energy input, so its presence indicates dissipation of mechanical energy or strong ultraviolet irradiation. Here we report the detection of CH+ (J = 1–0) emission and absorption lines in the spectra of six lensed starburst galaxies at redshifts near 2.5. This line has such a high critical density for excitation that it is emitted only in very dense gas, and is absorbed in low-density gas. We find that the CH+ emission lines, which are broader than 1,000 kilometres per second, originate in dense shock waves powered by hot galactic winds. The CH+ absorption lines reveal highly turbulent reservoirs of cool (about 100 kelvin), low-density gas, extending far (more than 10 kiloparsecs) outside the starburst galaxies (which have radii of less than 1 kiloparsec). We show that the galactic winds sustain turbulence in the 10-kiloparsec-scale environments of the galaxies, processing these environments into multiphase, gravitationally bound reservoirs. However, the mass outflow rates are found to be insufficient to balance the star-formation rates. Another mass input is therefore required for these reservoirs, which could be provided by ongoing mergers or cold-stream accretion. Our results suggest that galactic feedback, coupled jointly to turbulence and gravity, extends the starburst phase of a galaxy instead of quenching it.

  13. Molecular simulation of excess isotherm and excess enthalpy change in gas-phase adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D D; Do, H D; Nicholson, D

    2009-01-29

    We present a new approach to calculating excess isotherm and differential enthalpy of adsorption on surfaces or in confined spaces by the Monte Carlo molecular simulation method. The approach is very general and, most importantly, is unambiguous in its application to any configuration of solid structure (crystalline, graphite layer or disordered porous glass), to any type of fluid (simple or complex molecule), and to any operating conditions (subcritical or supercritical). The behavior of the adsorbed phase is studied using the partial molar energy of the simulation box. However, to characterize adsorption for comparison with experimental data, the isotherm is best described by the excess amount, and the enthalpy of adsorption is defined as the change in the total enthalpy of the simulation box with the change in the excess amount, keeping the total number (gas + adsorbed phases) constant. The excess quantities (capacity and energy) require a choice of a reference gaseous phase, which is defined as the adsorptive gas phase occupying the accessible volume and having a density equal to the bulk gas density. The accessible volume is defined as the mean volume space accessible to the center of mass of the adsorbate under consideration. With this choice, the excess isotherm passes through a maximum but always remains positive. This is in stark contrast to the literature where helium void volume is used (which is always greater than the accessible volume) and the resulting excess can be negative. Our definition of enthalpy change is equivalent to the difference between the partial molar enthalpy of the gas phase and the partial molar enthalpy of the adsorbed phase. There is no need to assume ideal gas or negligible molar volume of the adsorbed phase as is traditionally done in the literature. We illustrate this new approach with adsorption of argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide under subcritical and supercritical conditions.

  14. Outflowing atomic and molecular gas at z ~ 0.67 towards 1504 + 377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Nissim; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2008-02-01

    We report the detection of OH 1667-MHz and wide HI 21-cm absorption at z ~ 0.67 towards the red quasar 1504 + 377, with the Green Bank Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The HI 21-cm absorption extends over a velocity range of ~600kms-1 blueward of the quasar redshift (z = 0.674), with the new OH 1667-MHz absorption component at ~-430kms-1, nearly coincident with earlier detections of millimetre-wave absorption at z ~ 0.6715. The atomic and molecular absorption appear to arise from a fast gas outflow from the quasar, with a mass outflow rate and a molecular hydrogen fraction . The radio structure of 1504 + 377 is consistent with the outflow arising as a result of a jet-cloud interaction, followed by rapid cooling of the cloud material. The observed ratio of HCO+ and OH column densities is ~20 times higher than typical values in Galactic and high-z absorbers. This could arise because of small-scale structure in the outflowing gas on sub-parsec scales, which would also explain the observed variability in the HI 21-cm line.

  15. WISDOM project - I. Black hole mass measurement using molecular gas kinematics in NGC 3665

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kyoko; Iguchi, Satoru; Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Sarzi, Marc; Blitz, Leo

    2017-07-01

    As a part of the mm-Wave Interferometric Survey of Dark Object Masses (WISDOM) project, we present an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the nearby fast-rotator early-type galaxy NGC 3665. We obtained the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) B and C array observations of the 12CO(J = 2 - 1) emission line with a combined angular resolution of 0.59 arcsec. We analysed and modelled the three-dimensional molecular gas kinematics, obtaining a best-fitting SMBH mass M_BH=5.75^{+1.49}_{-1.18} × 108 M⊙, a mass-to-light ratio at H-band (M/L)H = 1.45 ± 0.04 (M/L)⊙,H and other parameters describing the geometry of the molecular gas disc (statistical errors, all at 3σ confidence). We estimate the systematic uncertainties on the stellar M/L to be ≈0.2 (M/L)⊙,H, and on the SMBH mass to be ≈0.4 × 108 M⊙. The measured SMBH mass is consistent with that estimated from the latest correlations with galaxy properties. Following our older works, we also analysed and modelled the kinematics using only the major-axis position-velocity diagram, and conclude that the two methods are consistent.

  16. The Relationship Between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO Across the California Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, S; Lada, E A; Román-Zúñiga, C; Bieging, J H; Lombardi, M; Forbrich, J; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    A deep, wide-field, near-infrared imaging survey was used to construct an extinction map of the southeastern part of the California Molecular Cloud (CMC) with $\\sim$ 0.5 arc min resolution. The same region was also surveyed in the $^{12}$CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. Strong spatial variations in the abundances of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O were found to be correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The $^{13}$CO to C$^{18}$O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C$^{18}$O by the ambient UV radiation field. The cloud averaged X-factor is found to be $$ $=$ 2.53 $\\times$ 10$^{20}$ ${\\rm cm}^{-2}~({\\rm K~km~s}^{-1})^{-1}$, somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find no single empirical value of the X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (T$_{\\rm k}$ $\\lesssim$ 15 ...

  17. Molecular gas on large circumgalactic scales at z=3.47

    CERN Document Server

    Ginolfi, Michele; Nagao, Tohru; Carniani, Stefano; Belfiore, Francesco; Cresci, Giovanni; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Mannucci, Filippo; Marconi, Alessandro; Pallottini, Andrea; Schneider, Raffaella; Santini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    We report ALMA observations of the most massive (star forming) galaxy in the redshift range 3molecular gas around the massive primeval galaxy, traced by the CO(4-3) emission, and extended over 40 kpc. We infer a mass of the large gaseous structure of Mgas~2-6x10^11 Msun. About 60% of this mass is not directly associated with either the central galaxy or its two lower mass satellites. The CO extended structure is also detected in continuum thermal emission. The kinematics of the molecular gas shows the presence of different components, which cannot be ascribed to simple rotation. Furthermore, on even larger scales, we detect nine additional CO systems within a radius of 250 kpc from the massive galaxy and mostly distributed in the same direction as the CO elongated structure found in the central 40 kpc. The stacked images of these CO systems show detections in the thermal continuum and in the X-rays, suggesting that these syste...

  18. The relation between gas and dust in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Pineda, Jorge L; Chapman, Nicholas; Snell, Ronald L; Li, Di; Cambresy, Laurent; Brunt, Chris

    2010-01-01

    (abridged) We report a study of the relation between dust and gas over a 100deg^2 area in the Taurus molecular cloud. We compare the H2 column density derived from dust extinction with the CO column density derived from the 12CO and 13CO J= 1-0 lines. We derive the visual extinction from reddening determined from 2MASS data. The comparison is done at an angular size of 200", corresponding to 0.14pc at a distance of 140pc. We find that the relation between visual extinction Av and N(CO) is linear between Av~3 and 10 mag in the region associated with the B213--L1495 filament. In other regions the linear relation is flattened for Av > 4 mag. We find that the presence of temperature gradients in the molecular gas affects the determination of N(CO) by ~30--70% with the largest difference occurring at large column densities. Adding a correction for this effect and accounting for the observed relation between the column density of CO and CO2 ices and Av, we find a linear relationship between the column of carbon mon...

  19. Feeding cosmic star formation: Exploring high-redshift molecular gas with CO intensity mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Breysse, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    The study of molecular gas is crucial for understanding star formation, feedback, and the broader ecosystem of a galaxy as a whole. However, we have limited understanding of its physics and distribution in all but the nearest galaxies. We present a new technique for studying the composition and distribution of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies inaccessible to existing methods. Our proposed approach is an extension of carbon monoxide intensity mapping methods, which have garnered significant experimental interest in recent years. These intensity mapping surveys target the 115 GHz $^{12}$CO (1-0) line, but also contain emission from the substantially fainter 110 GHz $^{13}$CO (1-0) transition. The method leverages the information contained in the $^{13}$CO line by cross-correlating pairs of frequency channels in an intensity mapping survey. Since $^{13}$CO is emitted from the same medium as the $^{12}$CO, but saturates at a much higher column density, this cross-correlation provides valuable information a...

  20. Molecular gas properties of UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, T S; Overzier, R A; Pérez, L; Martin, D C

    2014-01-01

    Lyman break analogues (LBAs) are a population of star-forming galaxies at low redshift (z ~ 0.2) selected in the ultraviolet (UV). These objects present higher star formation rates and lower dust extinction than other galaxies with similar masses and luminosities in the local universe. In this work we present results from a survey with the Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy (CARMA) to detect CO(1-0) emission in LBAs, in order to analyse the properties of the molecular gas in these galaxies. Our results show that LBAs follow the same Schmidt-Kennicutt law as local galaxies. On the other hand, they have higher gas fractions (up to 66%) and faster gas depletion time-scales (below 1 Gyr). These characteristics render these objects more akin to high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We conclude that LBAs are a great nearby laboratory for studying the cold interstellar medium in low-metallicity, UV-luminous compact star-forming galaxies.

  1. Circumbinary Gas Accretion onto a Central Binary: Infrared Molecular Hydrogen Emission from GG Tau A

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Tracy L; Dutrey, Anne; Piétu, Vincent; Guilloteau, Stephane; Lubow, S H; Simon, M

    2012-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution maps of ro-vibrational molecular hydrogen emission from the environment of the GG Tau A binary component in the GG Tau quadruple system. The H2 v= 1-0 S(1) emission is spatially resolved and encompasses the inner binary, with emission detected at locations that should be dynamically cleared on several hundred-year timescales. Extensions of H2 gas emission are seen to ~100 AU distances from the central stars. The v = 2-1 S(1) emission at 2.24 microns is also detected at ~30 AU from the central stars, with a line ratio of 0.05 +/- 0.01 with respect to the v = 1-0 S(1) emission. Assuming gas in LTE, this ratio corresponds to an emission environment at ~1700 K. We estimate that this temperature is too high for quiescent gas heated by X-ray or UV emission from the central stars. Surprisingly, we find that the brightest region of H2 emission arises from a spatial location that is exactly coincident with a recently revealed dust "streamer" which seems to be transferring material fr...

  2. The gas density measurement of one long distance supersonic molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Han, J. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Bai, L. X.; Zhou, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    The gas density of the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is a crucial parameter for the fueling or diagnostic process in the tokamak experiments. Using the microphone, one improved method of gas density measurement is proposed, which can greatly improve the measurement capacity by about 3 orders of magnitude by studying the pulsed signal characteristic of the microphone when it is pushed by the SMB. The gas density of the SMB is measured within the axial range of 20-2000 mm, and the axial central density at 2000 mm is about 100 times less than that at 20 mm. It is also found that the radial density distribution follows the Gaussian function in both free expansion (where the SMB can expand freely without any influence from the vacuum chamber) and restricted expansion (where the expansion of the SMB is restricted inside the flight tube of the vacuum system). And the axial central density decreases with the axial distance, which follows the inverse square law in the free expansion, but it deviates from this law in the restricted expansion.

  3. Dense molecular gas toward W49A: A template for extragalactic starbursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Helen; Fuller, Gary; Plume, René; Bayet, Estelle

    2010-01-01

    The HCN, HCO+, and HNC molecules are commonly used as tracers of dense star-forming gas in external galaxies, but such observations are spatially unresolved. Reliably inferring the properties of galactic nuclei and disks requires detailed studies of sources whose structure is spatially resolved. We compare the spatial distributions and abundance ratios of HCN, HCO+, and HNC in W49A, the most massive and luminous star-forming region in the Galactic disk, based on maps of a 2' (6.6 pc) field at 14" (0.83 pc) resolution of the J=4-3 transitions of HCN, H13CN, HC15N, HCO+, H13CO+, HC18O+ and HNC. The kinematics of the molecular gas in W49A appears complex, with a mixture of infall and outflow motions. Both the line profiles and comparison of the main and rarer species show that the main species are optically thick. Two 'clumps' of infalling gas appear to be at ~40 K, compared to ~100 K at the source centre, and may be ~10x denser than the rest of the outer cloud. Chemical modelling suggests that the HCN/HNC ratio...

  4. Molecular gas kinematics within the central 250 pc of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Henshaw, J D; Kruijssen, J M D; Davies, B; Bally, J; Barnes, A; Battersby, C; Burton, M; Cunningham, M R; Dale, J E; Ginsburg, A; Immer, K; Jones, P A; Kendrew, S; Mills, E A C; Molinari, S; Moore, T J T; Ott, J; Pillai, T; Rathborne, J; Schilke, P; Schmiedeke, A; Testi, L; Walker, D; Walsh, A; Zhang, Q

    2016-01-01

    Using spectral-line observations of HNCO, N2H+, and HNC, we investigate the kinematics of dense gas in the central ~250 pc of the Galaxy. We present SCOUSE (Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine), a line fitting algorithm designed to analyse large volumes of spectral-line data efficiently and systematically. Unlike techniques which do not account for complex line profiles, SCOUSE accurately describes the {l, b, v_LSR} distribution of CMZ gas, which is asymmetric about Sgr A* in both position and velocity. Velocity dispersions range from 2.6 km/s28. The gas is distributed throughout several "streams", with projected lengths ~100-250 pc. We link the streams to individual clouds and sub-regions, including Sgr C, the 20 and 50 km/s clouds, the dust ridge, and Sgr B2. Shell-like emission features can be explained by the projection of independent molecular clouds in Sgr C and the newly identified conical profile of Sgr B2 in {l ,b, v_LSR} space. These features have previously invoked...

  5. Global warming

    CERN Document Server

    Hulme, M

    1998-01-01

    Global warming-like deforestation, the ozone hole and the loss of species- has become one of the late 20the century icons of global environmental damage. The threat, is not the reality, of such a global climate change has motivated governments. businesses and environmental organisations, to take serious action ot try and achieve serious control of the future climate. This culminated last December in Kyoto in the agreement for legally-binding climate protocol. In this series of three lectures I will provide a perspective on the phenomenon of global warming that accepts the scientific basis for our concern, but one that also recognises the dynamic interaction between climate and society that has always exited The future will be no different. The challenge of global warning is not to pretend it is not happening (as with some pressure groups), nor to pretend it threatens global civilisation (as with other pressure groups), and it is not even a challenge to try and stop it from happening-we are too far down the ro...

  6. Molecular bio-dosimetry for carcinogenic risk assessment in survivors of Bhopal gas tragedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradyumna Kumar Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available December 2014 marked the 30th year anniversary of Bhopal gas tragedy. This sudden and accidental leakage of deadly poisonous methyl isocyanate (MIC gas instigated research efforts to understand the nature, severity of health damage and sufferings of 570 000 ailing survivors of this tragedy. In a decade-long period, our systematic laboratory investigations coupled with long-term molecular surveillance studies have comprehensively demonstrated that the risk of developing an environmental associated aberrant disease phenotype, including cancer, involves complex interplay of genomic and epigenetic reprogramming. These findings poised us to translate this knowledge into an investigative framework of “molecular biodosimetry” in a strictly selected cohort of MIC exposed individuals. A pragmatic cancer risk-assessment strategy pursued in concert with a large-scale epidemiological study might unfold molecular underpinnings of host-susceptibility and exposureresponse relationship. The challenges are enormous, but we postulate that the study will be necessary to establish a direct initiation-promotion paradigm of environmental carcinogenesis. Given that mitochondrial retrograde signaling-induced epigenetic reprogramming is apparently linked to neoplasticity, a cutting-edge tailored approach by an expert pool of biomedical researchers will be fundamental to drive these strategies from planning to execution. Validating the epigenomic signatures will hopefully result in the development of biomarkers to better protect human lives in an overburdened ecosystem, such as India, which is continuously challenged to meet population demands. Besides, delineating the mechanistic links between MIC exposure and cancer morbidity, our investigative strategy might help to formulate suitable regulatory policies and measures to reduce the overall burden of occupational and environmental carcinogenesis.

  7. Classical electron ionization mass spectra in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Alexander; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-09-01

    A major benefit of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and its fly-through ion source is the ability to obtain electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules (cold EI), which show enhanced molecular ions. However, GC/MS with an SMB also has the flexibility to perform 'classical EI' mode of operation which provides mass spectra to mimic those in commercial 70 eV electron ionization MS libraries. Classical EI in SMB is obtained through simple reduction of the helium make-up gas flow rate, which reduces the SMB cooling efficiency; hence the vibrational temperatures of the molecules are similar to those in traditional EI ion sources. In classical EI-SMB mode, the relative abundance of the molecular ion can be tuned and, as a result, excellent identification probabilities and very good matching factors to the NIST MS library are obtained. Classical EI-SMB with the fly-through dual cage ion source has analyte sensitivity similar to that of the standard EI ion source of a basic GC/MS system. The fly-through EI ion source in combination with the SMB interface can serve for cold EI, classical EI-SMB, and cluster chemical ionization (CCI) modes of operation, all easily exchangeable through a simple and quick change (not involving hardware). Furthermore, the fly-through ion source eliminates sample scattering from the walls of the ion source, and thus it offers full sample inertness, tailing-free operation, and no ion-molecule reaction interferences. It is also robust and enables increased column flow rate capability without affecting the sensitivity.

  8. PHIBSS: MOLECULAR GAS, EXTINCTION, STAR FORMATION, AND KINEMATICS IN THE z = 1.5 STAR-FORMING GALAXY EGS13011166

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Kurk, J.; Wuyts, S.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Gracia-Carpio, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Combes, F.; Freundlich, J. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Bolatto, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Cooper, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Neri, R. [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d' Heres, Grenoble (France); Nordon, R. [Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bournaud, F. [Service d' Astrophysique, DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Burkert, A. [Universitaetssternwarte der Ludwig-Maximiliansuniversitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Comerford, J. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, 1 University Station, C1402 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Cox, P. [Department of Physics, Le Conte Hall, University of California, 94720 Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, M. [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garcia-Burillo, S. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional-OAN, Observatorio de Madrid, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Naab, T. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lutz, D., E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: linda@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-08-10

    We report matched resolution imaging spectroscopy of the CO 3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H{alpha} line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope) in the massive z = 1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the ''Plateau de Bure high-z, blue-sequence survey'' (PHIBSS: Tacconi et al.). We combine these data with Hubble Space Telescope V-I-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction, and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similar and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable, rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution and peaks in an obscured, star-forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a ''mixed'' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation, N = dlog{Sigma}{sub starform}/dlog{Sigma}{sub molgas}, depends strongly on the adopted extinction model, and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model, we find N = 1.14 {+-} 0.1.

  9. ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Molecular gas reservoirs in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Decarli, Roberto; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Bacon, Roland; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C; Cox, Pierre; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Inami, Hanae; Ivison, Rob; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kazuaki; Popping, Gergö; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the U...

  10. Molecular gas content in strongly-lensed z~1.5-3 star-forming galaxies with low IR luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M; Schaerer, D; Combes, F; Egami, E; Swinbank, A M; Richard, J; Sklias, P; Rawle, T D; Rex, M; Kneib, J -P; Boone, F; Blain, A

    2014-01-01

    To extend the molecular gas measurements to typical star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with SFR 1. The combined sample of CO-detected SFGs at z>1 shows a large spread in star formation efficiency (SFE), such that SFE extend beyond the low values of local spirals and overlap the distribution of z>1 sub-mm galaxies. We find that the spread in SFE (or equivalently in molecular gas depletion timescale) is due to primarily the specific star formation rate, but also stellar mass and redshift. Correlations of SFE with the offset from the main-sequence and the compactness of the starburst are less clear. The increase of the molecular gas depletion timescale with M* now revealed by low M* SFGs at z>1 is opposed to the admitted constant molecular gas depletion timescale and the linear Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We confirm an increase of the molecular gas fraction (fgas) from z~0.2 to z~1.2, followed by a quasi non-evolution toward higher redshifts. At each redshift fgas shows a large dispersion due to the dependence of fgas...

  11. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey III: Comparisons of cold dust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, molecular gas, and atomic gas in NGC 2403

    CERN Document Server

    Bendo, G J; Warren, B E; Brinks, E; Butner, H M; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Courteau, S; Irwin, J; Israel, F P; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Muehle, S; Petitpas, G; Serjeant, S; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; Vaccari, M; van der Werf, P; Vlahakis, C; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2009-01-01

    We used 3.6, 8.0, 70, 160 micron Spitzer Space Telescope data, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope HARP-B CO J=(3-2) data, National Radio Astronomy Observatory 12 meter telescope CO J=(1-0) data, and Very Large Array HI data to investigate the relations among PAHs, cold (~20 K) dust, molecular gas, and atomic gas within NGC 2403, an SABcd galaxy at a distance of 3.13 Mpc. The dust surface density is mainly a function of the total (atomic and molecular) gas surface density and galactocentric radius. The gas-to-dust ratio monotonically increases with radius, varying from ~100 in the nucleus to ~400 at 5.5 kpc. The slope of the gas-to-dust ratio is close to that of the oxygen abundance, suggesting that metallicity strongly affects the gas-to-dust ratio within this galaxy. The exponential scale length of the radial profile for the CO J=(3-2) emission is statistically identical to the scale length for the stellar continuum-subtracted 8 micron (PAH 8 micron) emission. However, CO J=(3-2) and PAH 8 micron surface brightne...

  12. Experience of molecular monitoring techniques in upstream oil and gas operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Anthony F.; Anfindsen, Hilde; Liengen, Turid; Molid, Solfrid [Statoil ASA (Denmark)

    2011-07-01

    For a numbers of years, molecular monitoring tools have been used in upstream oil and gas operations but the results have given only limited added value. This paper discusses the various techniques available for upstream molecular monitoring which provides scope for identification of microbial influenced problems. The methodology, which consists of analyzing solid samples using traditional as well as molecular techniques, is detailed. Two cases were studied with the objective of determining if microbial contamination was contributing to the problem. The first case was a study of amorphous deposits in production wells and mainly iron sulphide was found. The second study was of amorphous deposits in water injection wells and the analysis showed typical components of drilling and completion fluids with some organic material. Two more cases, corrosion of tubing in a water injection well and flow line corrosion, are discussed and the results are given. From the study, it can be concluded that failure can be due to several factors, chemical and biological.

  13. Concentration measurements in molecular gas mixtures with a two-pump pulse femtosecond polarization spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, E.; Chaux, R.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.

    2001-08-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the ability of the Raman-induced polarization spectroscopy (RIPS) technique to accurately determine concentration or polarizability anisotropy ratio in low-pressure binary molecular mixtures [E. Hertz, B. Lavorel, O. Faucher, and R. Chaux, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 6629 (2000)]. It has been also pointed out that macroscopic interference, occurring when two revivals associated to different molecules time overlap, can be used to achieve measurements with picosecond time resolution. The applicability of the technique is intrinsically limited to a concentration range where the signals of both molecules are of the same magnitude. In this paper, a two-pump pulse sequence with different intensities is used to overcome this limitation. The relative molecular responses are weighted by the relative laser pump intensities to give comparable signals. Furthermore, by tuning the time delay between the two-pump pulses, macroscopic interference can be produced regardless of the accidental coincidences between the two molecular temporal responses. The study is performed in a CO2-N2O gas mixture and the concentration is measured with and without macroscopic interference. Applications of the method in the field of noninvasive diagnostics of combustion media are envisaged.

  14. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  15. A 10{sup 10} solar mass flow of molecular gas in the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Main, R. A.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Kirkpatrick, C. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nulsen, P. E. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Murray, N. W.; Hamer, S. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, M5S 3H8 ON (Canada); Combes, F.; Salome, P. [L' Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de L' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Baum, S. A.; O' Dea, C. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Bregman, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Donahue, M.; Voit, G. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 567 Wilson Road, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Egami, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oonk, J. B. R. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Tremblay, G. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-04-10

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its ensemble velocity profile width of ∼130 km s{sup –1} FWHM is too narrow for the molecular clouds to be supported in the galaxy by dynamic pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. Roughly 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the northwest and to the east of the nucleus with line-of-sight velocities lying between –250 km s{sup –1} and +480 km s{sup –1} with respect to the systemic velocity. The high-velocity gas may be either inflowing or outflowing. However, the absence of high-velocity gas toward the nucleus that would be expected in a steady inflow, and its bipolar distribution on either side of the nucleus, are more naturally explained as outflow. Star formation and radiation from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) are both incapable of driving an outflow of this magnitude. The location of the high-velocity gas projected behind buoyantly rising X-ray cavities and favorable energetics suggest an outflow driven by the radio AGN. If so, the molecular outflow may be associated with a hot outflow on larger scales reported by Kirkpatrick and colleagues. The molecular gas flow rate of approximately 200 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is comparable to the star formation rate of 100-180 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in the central disk. How radio bubbles would lift dense molecular gas in their updrafts, how much gas will be lost to the BCG, and how much will return to fuel future star formation and AGN activity are poorly understood. Our results imply that radio-mechanical (radio-mode) feedback not only heats hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies and BCGs, but it is able to sweep higher density molecular gas away from their centers.

  16. Warm Breeze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Middle-aged female painter Wang Yingchun is a first-grade artist at the Research Instituteof Chinese Painting. With a solid foundation in: Chinese painting, oil painting andsculpture she began to experiment in the early 1980s with stone carving, murals, folkart, landscapes, flowers and birds, cubism, expressionism and abstractionism. Living ina time of social transformation, she felt pressed to create her own artistic style. Aftervisiting South America, she produced a batch of works which drew the essence of theBeast Group and used a new technique, without sketching the contours of flowers, sothat the paintings look wild, romantic and exuberant. This painting Warm Breeze displaysWang’s style: While extensively studying the paintings of various schools, she makes hertraditional Chinese ink paintings tinted with modern color.

  17. Optimal Timing for Venous Systemic Oxygen Persufflation Supplemented with Nitric Oxide Gas in Cold-Stored, Warm Ischemia-Damaged Experimental Liver Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porschen, Anne; Kadaba Srinivasan, Pramod; Iwasaki, Junji; Afify, Mamdouh; Tolba, René H

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide shortage of donor organs has increased the use of donation after cardiac death (DCD). The aim of this study was to analyze the best time point for venous systemic oxygen persufflation (VSOP) supplemented with nitric oxide (NO) gas during the 1st and 24th hour of cold storage (CS) in warm ischemia (WI)-damaged experimental liver grafts. Liver grafts (n = 5) were retrieved after 30 min of WI induced by cardiac arrest and CS in histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution at 4°C. The 1st hour group was immediately persufflated with a VSOP plus NO (VSOP+NO) mixture for 1 h followed by 23 h of static CS (DCD+NO 1st hour). The 24th hour group entailed CS for 23 h followed by 1 h of VSOP+NO persufflation (DCD+NO 24th hour). CS livers without WI but with VSOP served as controls. CS livers with WI represented the fourth group (DCD). Viability of the liver grafts was assessed by normothermic isolated reperfusion for 45 min with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Data are presented as mean ± SEM (control vs. DCD vs. DCD+NO 1st hour vs. DCD+NO 24th hour). After 45 min of reperfusion, the DCD+NO 1st hour group showed significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase (13.4 ± 5.3, 63.2 ± 17.3, 25.6 ± 3.9, and 82.8 ± 27.3 U/l) and lactate dehydrogenase levels (289.4 ± 41.2, 2,139.4 ± 542.7, 577.2 ± 117.2, and 2,429 ± 221.6 U/l). Malondialdehyde levels were significantly abrogated (1.0 ± 0.3, 2.7 ± 1, 1.0 ± 0, and 3.9 ± 1.2 nmol/ml). Significantly higher levels of portal venous pressure were recorded in the DCD+NO 24th hour group (12.0 ± 1, 21.2 ± 3.1, 16.1 ± 1, and 23.2 ± 3.5 mm Hg). NO levels were recorded after 5 min of reperfusion (1.42 ± 0.17, 1.8 ± 0.2, 2.7 ± 0.2, and 2.6 ± 0.1 μmol/l). Bile production levels showed no statistical significance (23.2 ± 3.8, 27.3 ± 1.8, 43.5 ± 18, and 31 ± 2.5 μl/45 min). Our results present the beneficial effects of NO combined with VSOP during the 1st hour of CS of WI-damaged experimental liver grafts.

  18. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W J G

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in Star Formation (SF), finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction and the apparent SF efficiency (SFE) of dense gas. The latter may be unexpected, given the popularity of gas density threshold models to explain SF scaling relations. We used the IRAM 30-m telescope to observe HCN(1-0) across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2-1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. Because our observations span a range of galactocentric radii, we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions. We focus on how the IR/CO, HCN/CO, and IR/HCN ratios (observational cognates of the SFE, dense gas fraction, and dense gas SFE) depend on the stellar surface density and the molecular/atomic ratio. The HCN/CO ra...

  19. Molecular gas kinematics and high-mass star formation In the spiral arms of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Luna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudiamos la cinem atica del gas molecular mediante la l nea rotacional 12CO(J=1!0, as como la formaci on estelar que trazan las regiones HII ultracompactas en el IV cuadrante gal actico (270 l 360 . Mostramos que hay una conexi on entre (1 la formaci on de estrellas masivas en los brazos espirales, (2 el gas molecular de alta densidad columnar y (3 los movimientos a gran escala observados en el gas. Estos ultimos implican que hay menos momento angular a disipar en los procesos de formaci on estelar. Mostramos un sistema m ultiple en estudio, que est a embebido en su nube molecular en Carina.

  20. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) II: Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time Across the Blue Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B; Vogel, Stuart N; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A; Ott, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\\Shtwo\\gtrsim$20 \\msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\

  1. The Molecular Origin of Turbulence in a Flowing Gas According to James Clerk Maxwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graffenried, Albert

    2007-11-01

    James Clerk Maxwell was an eminent physicist who operated out of the University of Edinburgh in the early 1800's. He is internationally famous for his derivation of the laws governing the propagation of electro-magnetic waves. He also derived an equation for the Viscosity of a gas (μ) in terms of its molecular parameters. This derivation established clearly and unequivocably that a real (viscous) flowing gas was a molecular fluid, that is, a flow of molecules which obeys the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Maxwell's derivation of the Viscosity of a gas takes place in a zone of a flowing gas which (1) is remote from any solid surface, and (2) is in a region having a linear velocity-gradient dvx/dy . The derivation which I will present today takes place in a zone of the flowing gas which is (1) immediately adjacent a solid surface, and (2) where the velocity gradient is unknown. My analytical approach, the parameters I use, and the theoretical concepts are all taken from Maxwell's derivation. I have simply re-arranged some of his equations in order to solve the 1-dimensional case of boundary-layer growth over an infinite flat plate, starting with a step-function of flow velocity, namely: vx(y,t) for the initial condition vx(y=0+,t=0+) = U0 ,viz: rectilinear flow as an initial condition. Using Maxwell's approach, we write the equation for Net Stream-Momentum Flux flowing through an element of area, day . This quantity is shown to be the difference between two Convolution integrals which Laplace transform readily into an equation in the s-plane which equation has the same form as a positive-feedback, single closed-loop amplifier gain equation, viz: Output = (input)x(transfer function). The solution in the Real plane shows vx(y,t) equal to the sum of two exponentials. The coefficients of the two exponents, r1 and r2 . are found by using the binomial equation which contains a square-root radical. If the argument under the radical (the radicand) is positive, the two roots are

  2. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  3. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  4. Radiative feedback on early molecular gas and implications for primordial structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Petkova, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    We present results from self-consistent simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multi-frequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H_2, H_2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+, performed by using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static density field around a central radiative source; cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation; cosmological simulations of early structure formation with radiative feedback. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. The contributions from the detailed chemical network affect at a ~10% level the determination of the Stroemgren radius of an ionized bubble, and additional processes from the different species considered allows the gas to recombine slightly later, with respect to the H-only approximation. Moreover, we find that radiative effects from the cosmic microwave background are negl...

  5. Gas-Transport-Property Performance of Hybrid Carbon Molecular Sieve−Polymer Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita

    2010-10-06

    High-performance hybrid materials using carbon molecular sieve materials and 6FDA-6FpDA were produced. A detailed analysis of the effects of casting processes and the annealing temperature is reported. Two existing major obstacles, sieve agglomeration and residual stress, were addressed in this work, and subsequently a new membrane formation technique was developed to produce high-performing membranes. The successfully improved interfacial region of the hybrid membranes allows the sieves to increase the selectivity of the membranes above the neat polymer properties. Furthermore, an additional performance enhancement was seen with increased sieve loading in the hybrid membranes, leading to an actual performance above the upper bound for pure polymer membranes. The membranes were also tested under a mixed-gas environment, which further demonstrated promising results. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Molecular Gas Along a Bright H-alpha Filament in 2A 0335+096 Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Vantyghem, A N; Russell, H R; Hogan, M T; Edge, A C; Nulsen, P E J; Fabian, A C; Combes, F; Salome, P; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; Main, R A; Murray, N W; O'Connell, R W; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Parrish, I J; Sanders, J S; Tremblay, G

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of (1.13+/-0.15) x 10^9 M_sun is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for (3.2+/-0.4) x 10^8 M_sun of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally-supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies <20 Myr ago disrupted a pre-existing molecular gas reservoir within the BCG. Most of the molecular gas, (7.8+/-0.9) x 10^8 M_sun, is located in the filament. The CO emission is co-spatial with a 10^4 K emission-line nebula and soft X-rays from 0.5 ke...

  7. A Ten Billion Solar Mass Outflow of Molecular Gas Launched by Radio Bubbles in the Abell 1835 Brightest Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R; Nulsen, P E J; Edge, A C; Murray, N W; Main, R A; Vantyghem, A N; Combes, F; Fabian, A C; Salome, P; Kirkpatrick, C C; Baum, S A; Bregman, J N; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Hamer, S; O'Dea, C P; Oonk, J B R; Tremblay, G; Voit, G M

    2013-01-01

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the Abell 1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5E10 solar masses of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its velocity width of ~130 km/s FWHM is too narrow to be supported by dynamical pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. The disk is forming stars at a rate of 100-180 solar masses per year. Roughly 1E10 solar masses of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the north-west and to the east of the nucleus with line of sight velocities lying between -250 km/s to +480 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. Although inflow cannot be ruled out, the rising velocity gradient with radius is consistent with a broad, bipolar outflow driven by radio jets or buoyantly rising X-ray cavities. The molecular outflow may be associated with an outflow of hot gas in Abell 1835 seen on larger scales. Molecular gas is flowing out of the BCG at a rate of approximately...

  8. HERSCHEL-SPIRE IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF MOLECULAR GAS IN M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenetzky, J.; Glenn, J.; Rangwala, N.; Maloney, P. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Bradford, M. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wilson, C. D.; Schirm, M. R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Bendo, G. J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille (France); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Isaak, K. G. [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Wu, R. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Spinoglio, L. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 {mu}m) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J = 4 {yields} 3 to J = 13 {yields} 12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 3 arcmin map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, [C I], [N II], HCN, and HCO{sup +} in emission, along with OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF in absorption and H{sub 2}O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer ({approx}500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of {sup 13}CO (and [C I]) is new and indicates that [C I] may be tracing different gas than {sup 12}CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of the bulk properties of the galaxy. At such a high temperature, cooling is dominated by molecular hydrogen. Photon-dominated region (PDR) models require higher densities than those indicated by our Bayesian likelihood analysis in order to explain the high-J CO line ratios, though cosmic-ray-enhanced PDR models can do a better job reproducing the emission at lower densities. Shocks and turbulent heating are likely required to explain the bright high-J emission.

  9. Separation and Molecular Identification of Resistant Bacteria to Lead from Behbahan Bidboland Gas Refinery Wastewater (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Mehrbakhsh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are one of the pollution sources in environment. The pollution due to these metals is the problem that could have negative impact on water. Human is faced with these poisons effects due to occupational reasons. The lead is regarded as heavy metal whose industrial applications cause environmental pollution in high rate.The aim of this project was Separation and Molecular Identification of Resistant Bacteria to Lead from Behbahan Bidboland Gas Refinery Wastewater (Iran. For this aim, 6 samples of water and refinery output wastewater is provided after sampling, pH, COD, BOD rates and lead metal primary concentration was determined in wastewaters, after this phase the concentration and separation of resistant bacteria was done to separate them from lead. In this phase the minimum inhibitory concentration was defined from heavy metal growth (MIC. To determine the bacteria identity first the evaluation method of bacteria morphologic and gram staining and then biochemical tests and finally colony-–PCR molecular method was used and then separated bacteria 16S rRNA gen was identified. The obtained results from this research showed that among the separated bacteria from Behbahan Bidboland gas refinery wastewater, the Providencia genous had the most resistant toward Pb. The MIC rate for this bacteria was calculated at 1140 mg/l. the result of this study showed that separated bacteria in this wastewater seemed to have high resistant toward heavy metals due to long encountering to pollution sources and hence they could be proper factor for bioremediation process of heavy metals

  10. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the ULIRG IRAS 13120–5453

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privon, G. C.; Aalto, S.; Falstad, N.; Muller, S.; González-Alfonso, E.; Sliwa, K.; Treister, E.; Costagliola, F.; Armus, L.; Evans, A. S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Izumi, T.; Sakamoto, K.; van der Werf, P.; Chu, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 7 (∼340 GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120–5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4–3) emission, relative to HCO+ (4–3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of ∼1.2 yr‑1, the high HCN/HCO+ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high ΣIR of 4.7 × 1012 L⊙ kpc‑2, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the Galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H2O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of ∼40 K. IRAS 13120–5453 has a lower dust temperature and ΣIR than is inferred for the systems termed “compact obscured nuclei (CONs)” (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120–5453 has undergone a CON phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/active galactic nucleus core.

  11. The overmassive black hole in NGC 1277: new constraints from molecular gas kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharwächter, J.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Sun, M.; Krips, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission from NGC 1277, a lenticular galaxy in the Perseus Cluster. NGC 1277 has previously been proposed to host an overmassive black hole (BH) compared to the galaxy bulge luminosity (mass), based on stellar-kinematic measurements. The CO(1-0) emission, observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) using both, a more compact (2.9-arcsec resolution) and a more extended (1-arcsec resolution) configuration, is likely to originate from the dust lane encompassing the galaxy nucleus at a distance of 0.9 arcsec (˜320 pc). The double-horned CO(1-0) profile found at 2.9-arcsec resolution traces 1.5 × 108 M⊙ of molecular gas, likely orbiting in the dust lane at ˜550 km s-1, which suggests a total enclosed mass of ˜2 × 1010 M⊙. At 1-arcsec resolution, the CO(1-0) emission appears spatially resolved along the dust lane in east-west direction, though at a low signal-to-noise ratio. In agreement with the previous stellar-kinematic measurements, the CO(1-0) kinematics is found to be consistent with an ˜1.7 × 1010 M⊙ BH for a stellar mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = 6.3, while a less massive BH of ˜5 × 109 M⊙ is possible when assuming a larger M/LV = 10. While the molecular gas reservoir may be associated with a low level of star formation activity, the extended 2.6-mm continuum emission is likely to originate from a weak AGN, possibly characterized by an inverted radio-to-millimetre spectral energy distribution. Literature radio and X-ray data indicate that the BH in NGC 1277 is also overmassive with respect to the Fundamental Plane of BH activity.

  12. Formation of Water in the Warm Atmospheres of Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glassgold, A E; Najita, J R

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase chemistry of water in protoplanetary disks is analyzed with a model based on X-ray heating and ionization of the disk atmosphere. Several uncertain processes appear to play critical roles in generating the column densities of warm water that are detected from disks at infrared wavelengths. The dominant factors are the reactions that form molecular hydrogen, including formation on warm grains, and the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. All of these can work together to produce a region of high water abundances in the molecular transition layer of the inner disk atmosphere, where atoms are transformed into molecules, the temperature drops from thousands to hundreds of Kelvins, and the ionization begins to be dominated by the heavy elements. Grain formation of molecular hydrogen and mechanical heating of the atmosphere can play important roles in this region and directly affect the amount of warm water in protoplanetary disk atmospheres. Thus it may be possible to account for the existing me...

  13. C18O Observations of the Dark Molecular Cloud L134 and Gas Depletion onto Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Jie Mao; Xiao-Xia Sun

    2005-01-01

    We map the dark molecular cloud core of L134 in the C18O (J =1 -0) emission line using the PMO 13.7m telescope, and present a contour map of integrated intensity of C18O (J = 1 - 0) emission. The C18O cloud is inside the distribution of extinction AB, the visual extinction of blue light, as well as inside the 13CO cloud in the L134 region. The depletion factors in this C18O cloud are generally greater than unity, which means there is gas depletion onto dust. Since only a minimum AB = 9.7 mag is available, and our observations measure both undepleted and depleted regions along the line of sight, the depletion factors could very likely be larger in the central core than the calculated value. So we conclude that depletion does occur in the bulk of the C18O cloud through a comparison between the C18O and blue extinction maps in the L134 region. There is no direct evidence as yet for star formation in L134, and so cores on the verge of collapse will not be visible in CO and other gas molecules.

  14. The Role of Galaxy Mergers and Molecular Gas in the Early Phase of Galaxy Cluster Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chao-Ling

    2017-08-01

    High-redshift protoclusters are ideal places to study the formation of the largest structures in the Universe and the early environmental influences on galaxy evolution. Recent discoveries of z>2 protoclusters with extremely rich populations of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs; SFR>100 Msun/yr) represent the most active assembly phases of massive galaxy clusters. Understanding the triggering mechanisms of these unusual concentrations of extreme star-forming galaxies can provide critical insights into the formation of most massive galaxies in these clusters and the assembly of massive clusters themselves. For example, an increased probability of galaxy interactions and/or enhanced gas supply may trigger an excess of DSFGs. Using the extensive ancillary data in the COSMOS field, we study the role of galaxy mergers through measuring the frequency of galaxy pairs in two such DSFG-rich protoclusters at z=2.10 and 2.47, respectively. We also investigate the mean molecular gas content of protocluster galaxies by stacking SCUBA-2 850 micron images. These independent investigations provide complementary views into the physical nature of these DSFG-rich protoclusters.

  15. Dense Molecular Gas around AGN: HCN/CO in NGC3227

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, R; Sternberg, A

    2011-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence that the intensity of HCN molecular line emission is enhanced around active galactic nuclei. In this paper we examine the specific case of the Seyfert galaxy NGC3227, for which there are subarcsecond resolution data for the HCN (1-0) 88 GHz and CO (2-1) 230 GHz rotational lines, enabling us to spatially separate a circumnuclear ring at a radius of 140pc and an inner nuclear region within 40pc of the AGN. The HCN(1-0)/CO(2-1) flux ratio differs by more than an order of magnitude between these two regions. We carry out large velocity gradient (LVG) computations to determine the range of parameters (gas temperature and density, HCN/CO abundance ratio, column densities and velocity gradients) that yield physically plausible solutions for the observed flux ratio in the central 100pc. The observed HCN/CO intensity ratio in the nucleus is consistent with very optically thick thermalized emission in very dense (>=10^5cm^{-3}) gas, in which case the HCN/CO abundance ratio there is unco...

  16. The JCMT dense gas survey in dense molecular clouds: an HCO+/HCN comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, Samantha; Richer, John; Buckle, Jane; Salji, Carl; Hatchell, Jennifer; Drabek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a large-scale survey of the very dense molecular gas in Perseus, Orion A and B, Serpens and Ophiuchus using HCO+ and HCN (J = 4 - 3) transitions. We have used this emission to trace the structure and kinematics of gas at the extremely high densities found in pre- and protostellar cores; as well as tracing outflows powered by these early star-forming cores. We present a comparison of the HCO+/HCN data, highlighting regions where there is a marked discrepancy in the spectra of the two emission lines. This is particularly noticeable in some of the more powerful outflows driven by Class 0 sources, where the HCN is greatly enhanced in the linewings in comparison with HCO+. We also use the HCO+ to positively identify protostellar outflows and their driving sources. We present a statistical analysis of the outflow properties that we derive from this tracer. We show that our results are comparable to those obtained from similar outflow analyses using 12CO.

  17. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, E; Serra-Crespo, P; Hamad, S; Kapteijn, F; Gascon, J

    2014-08-14

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations of gas adsorption and diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane in NH2-MIL-53(Al) are carried out using a linear combination of two crystallographic structures with rigid force fields. Once the interactions of carbon dioxide molecules and the bridging hydroxyls groups of the framework are optimized, an excellent match is found for simulations and experimental data for the adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide, including the stepwise uptake due to the breathing effect. In addition, diffusivities of pure components are calculated. The pore expansion by the breathing effect influences the self-diffusion mechanism and much higher diffusivities are observed at relatively high adsorbate loadings. This work demonstrates that using a rigid force field combined with a minimum number of experiments, reproduces adsorption and simulates diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane in the flexible metal-organic framework NH2-MIL-53(Al).

  18. Herschel-SPIRE Imaging Spectroscopy of Molecular Gas in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenetzky, J; Rangwala, N; Maloney, P; Bradford, M; Wilson, C D; Bendo, G J; Baes, M; Boselli, A; Cooray, A; Isaak, K G; Lebouteiller, V; Madden, S; Panuzzo, P; Schirm, M R P; Spinoglio, L; Wu, R

    2012-01-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 microns) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J=4-3 to J=13-12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled ~ 3 x 3 arcminute map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], [NII], HCN, and HCO+ in emission, along with OH+, H2O+ and HF in absorption and H2O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by 12CO and 13CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer (~ 500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of 13CO (and [CI]) is new and indicates that [CI] may be tracing different gas than 12CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of th...

  19. Excitation of the molecular gas in the nuclear region of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Loenen, A F; Güsten, R; Meijerink, R; Israel, F P; Requena-Torres, M A; García-Burillo, S; Harris, A I; Klein, T; Kramer, C; Lord, S; Martín-Pintado, J; Röllig, M; Stutzki, J; Szczerba, R; Weiß, A; Philipp-May, S; Yorke, H; Caux, E; Delforge, B; Helmich, F; Lorenzani, A; Morris, P; Philips, T G; Risacher, C; Tielens, A G G M

    2010-01-01

    We present high resolution HIFI spectroscopy of the nucleus of the archetypical starburst galaxy M82. Six 12CO lines, 2 13CO lines and 4 fine-structure lines are detected. Besides showing the effects of the overall velocity structure of the nuclear region, the line profiles also indicate the presence of multiple components with different optical depths, temperatures and densities in the observing beam. The data have been interpreted using a grid of PDR models. It is found that the majority of the molecular gas is in low density (n=10^3.5 cm^-3) clouds, with column densities of N_H=10^21.5 cm^-2 and a relatively low UV radiation field (GO = 10^2). The remaining gas is predominantly found in clouds with higher densities (n=10^5 cm^-3) and radiation fields (GO = 10^2.75), but somewhat lower column densities (N_H=10^21.2 cm^-2). The highest J CO lines are dominated by a small (1% relative surface filling) component, with an even higher density (n=10^6 cm^-3) and UV field (GO = 10^3.25). These results show the str...

  20. CIRCUMBINARY GAS ACCRETION ONTO A CENTRAL BINARY: INFRARED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION FROM GG Tau A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Lubow, S. H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr. Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bary, Jeffrey S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States); Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stephane [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l' Univers (OASU), Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l' Observatoire, BP89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France); Pietu, Vincent [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, 38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Simon, M., E-mail: tbeck@stsci.edu, E-mail: lubow@stsci.edu, E-mail: jbary@colgate.edu, E-mail: Anne.Dutrey@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr, E-mail: Stephane.Guilloteau@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr, E-mail: pietu@iram.fr, E-mail: michal.simon@sunysb.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We present high spatial resolution maps of ro-vibrational molecular hydrogen emission from the environment of the GG Tau A binary component in the GG Tau quadruple system. The H{sub 2} v = 1-0 S(1) emission is spatially resolved and encompasses the inner binary, with emission detected at locations that should be dynamically cleared on several hundred year timescales. Extensions of H{sub 2} gas emission are seen to {approx}100 AU distances from the central stars. The v = 2-1 S(1) emission at 2.24 {mu}m is also detected at {approx}30 AU from the central stars, with a line ratio of 0.05 {+-} 0.01 with respect to the v = 1-0 S(1) emission. Assuming gas in LTE, this ratio corresponds to an emission environment at {approx}1700 K. We estimate that this temperature is too high for quiescent gas heated by X-ray or UV emission from the central stars. Surprisingly, we find that the brightest region of H{sub 2} emission arises from a spatial location that is exactly coincident with a recently revealed dust 'streamer' which seems to be transferring material from the outer circumbinary ring around GG Tau A into the inner region. As a result, we identify a new excitation mechanism for ro-vibrational H{sub 2} stimulation in the environment of young stars. The H{sub 2} in the GG Tau A system appears to be stimulated by mass accretion infall as material in the circumbinary ring accretes onto the system to replenish the inner circumstellar disks. We postulate that H{sub 2} stimulated by accretion infall could be present in other systems, particularly binaries and 'transition disk' systems which have dust-cleared gaps in their circumstellar environments.

  1. The Many Faces of the Gas in Centaurus A (NGC 5128)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morganti, Raffaella

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is ideal for investigating the characteristics and role of gas in an early-type galaxy in the presence of a radio-loud active nucleus. The different phases of the gas-hot (X-ray), warm (ionized), and cold (H I and molecular) - are all detected in this object and can be studied

  2. Comparative study of global warming effects during silicon nitride etching using C3F6O/O2 and C3F6/O2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka Youn; Moon, Hock Key; Lee, Nae-Eung; Hong, Bo Han; Oh, Soo Ho

    2015-01-01

    C3F6 and C3F6 gases were investigated as replacement gases for SF6 used in display industry due to their low global warming potential and short lifetime. In the C3F6/O2 and C3F6/O2 capacitively coupled plasmas, Si3N4 etch conditions were varied by controlling process parameters. The global warming effects were quantified as million metric ton carbon equivalents (MMTCEs) obtained from the volumetric emission of by-product and etch gases. A lower MMTCE value and higher etch rate process with combination of high and low source frequencies, f HF (27.12 MHz)/ f LF (2 MHz), were observed for the C3F6/O2 chemistry than for the C3F6/O2 chemistry.

  3. Shocked molecular gas towards the SNR G359.1-0.5 and the Snake

    CERN Document Server

    Lazendic, J S; Burton, M G; Yusef-Zadeh, F; Whiteoak, J B; Green, A J; Ashley, M C B

    2002-01-01

    We have found a bar of shocked molecular hydrogen (H2) towards the OH(1720 MHz) maser located at the projected intersection of supernova remnant (SNR) G359.1-0.5 and the nonthermal radio filament, known as the Snake. The H2 bar is well aligned with the SNR shell and almost perpendicular to the Snake. The OH(1720 MHz) maser is located inside the sharp western edge of the H2 emission, which is consistent with the scenario in which the SNR drives a shock into a molecular cloud at that location. The spectral-line profiles of 12CO, HCO+ and CS towards the maser show broad-line absorption, which is absent in the 13CO spectra and most probably originates from the pre-shock gas. A density gradient is present across the region and is consistent with the passage of the SNR shock while the H2 filament is located at the boundary between the pre--shocked and post-shock regions.

  4. Molecular gas in the immediate vicinity of Sgr A* seen with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Lydia; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Eckart, Andreas; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.; García-Marin, Macarena; Kunneriath, Devaky; Zensus, Anton; Britzen, Silke; Sabha, Nadeen; Shahzamanian, Banafsheh; Borkar, Abhijeet; Fischer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We report serendipitous detections of line emission with ALMA in band 3, 6, and 7 in the central parsec of the Galactic center at an up to now highest resolution (<0.7''). Among the highlights are the very first and highly resolved images of sub-mm molecular emission of CS, H13CO+, HC3N, SiO, SO, C2H, and CH3OH in the immediate vicinity (~1'' in projection) of Sgr A* and in the circumnuclear disk (CND). The central association (CA) of molecular clouds shows three times higher CS/X (X: any other observed molecule) luminosity ratios than the CND suggesting a combination of higher excitation - by a temperature gradient and/or IR-pumping - and abundance enhancement due to UV- and/or X-ray emission. We conclude that the CA is closer to the center than the CND is and could be an infalling clump consisting of denser cloud cores embedded in diffuse gas. Moreover, we identified further regions in and outside the CND that are ideally suited for future studies in the scope of hot/cold core and extreme PDR/XDR chemistry and consequent star formation in the central few parsecs.

  5. Molecular and Atomic Gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud - I. Conditions for CO Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, T; Fukui, Y; Kawamura, A; Mizuno, N; Ott, J; Müller, E; Pineda, J L; Welty, D E; Kim, S; Mizuno, Y; Murai, M; Onishi, T

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the conditions for detection of CO(1-0) emission in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), using the recently completed second NANTEN CO survey. In particular, we investigate correlations between CO integrated intensity and HI integrated intensity, peak brightness temperature, and line width at a resolution of 2.6' (~40 pc). We find that significant HI column density and peak brightness temperature are necessary but not sufficient conditions for CO detection, with many regions of strong HI emission not associated with molecular clouds. The large scatter in CO intensities for a given HI intensity persists even when averaging on scales of >200 pc, indicating that the scatter is not solely due to local conversion of HI into H_2 near GMCs. We focus on two possibilities to account for this scatter: either there exist spatial variations in the I(CO) to N(H_2) conversion factor, or a significant fraction of the atomic gas is not involved in molecular cloud formation. A weak tendency for CO emission to be suppr...

  6. Molecular and Atomic Gas in the Local Group Galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gratier, P; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N J; Schuster, K F; Kramer, C; Xilouris, E M; Tabatabaei, F S; Henkel, C; Corbelli, E; Israel, F; van der Werf, P P; Calzetti, D; Garcia-Burillo, S; Sievers, A; Combes, F; Wiklind, T; Brouillet, N; Herpin, F; Bontemps, S; Aalto, S; Koribalski, B; van der Tak, F; Wiedner, M C; Roellig, M; Mookerjea, B

    2010-01-01

    We present high resolution large scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group Galaxy M33. The observations were carried out using the HERA multibeam receiver at the 30m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line achieving a resolution of 12" x 2.6km/s, enabling individual Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) to be resolved. The observed region is 650 square arcminutes mainly along the major axis and out to a radius of 8.5 kpc, and covers entirely the 2' x40' radial strip observed with the HIFI and PACS Spectrometers as part of the HERM33ES Herschel key program. The achieved sensitivity in main beam temperature is 20-50mK at 2.6km/s velocity resolution. The CO(2-1) luminosity of the observed region is 1.7+/-0.1x10^7 Kkm/s pc^2 and is estimated to be 2.8+/-0.3x10^7 Kkm/s pc^2 for the entire galaxy, corresponding to H_2 masses of 1.9x10^8 M_sun and 3.3x10^8 M_sun respectively (including He), calculated with a NH2/ICO twice the Galactic value due to the half-solar metallicity of M33. HI 21 cm VLA archiv...

  7. The Star-Forming Molecular Gas in High R