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Sample records for ward kagera region

  1. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbabazi Pamela K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33 plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies. Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species followed by roots (13 species while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further

  2. Impact of ALSO training on the management of prolonged labor and neonatal care at Kagera Regional Hospital, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Bjarke Lund; Rasch, Vibeke; Massawe, Siriel

    2010-01-01

    5.6% to 71.5% (RR 12.71; 95% CI, 9.04-17.88). There was a significant decrease from 6 to 0 neonatal deaths before discharge among those born with an Apgar score after 1minute of 4 or more (P=0.03). CONCLUSION: ALSO training had no effect on the management of prolonged labor. Early contact between......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the management of prolonged labor and neonatal care before and after Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) training. METHODS: Staff involved in childbirth at Kagera Regional Hospital, Tanzania, attended a 2-day ALSO provider course. In this prospective intervention study....... During prolonged labor, action was delayed for more than 3hours in half of the cases. The stillbirth rate, Apgar scores, and frequency of neonatal resuscitation did not change significantly. After the intervention, there was a significant increase in newborns given to their mothers within 10minutes, from...

  3. Social capital and the decline in HIV transmission - A case study in three villages in the Kagera region of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumence, Gasto; Killewo, Japhet; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Nyström, Lennarth; Eriksson, Malin; Emmelin, Maria

    2010-10-01

    We present data from an exploratory case study characterising the social capital in three case villages situated in areas of varying HIV prevalence in the Kagera region of Tanzania. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews revealed a range of experiences by community members, leaders of organisations and social groups. We found that the formation of social groups during the early 1990s was partly a result of poverty and the many deaths caused by AIDS. They built on a tradition to support those in need and provided social and economic support to members by providing loans. Their strict rules of conduct helped to create new norms, values and trust, important for HIV prevention. Members of different networks ultimately became role models for healthy protective behaviour. Formal organisations also worked together with social groups to facilitate networking and to provide avenues for exchange of information. We conclude that social capital contributed in changing HIV related risk behaviour that supported a decline of HIV infection in the high prevalence zone and maintained a low prevalence in the other zones.

  4. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 3: plants used in traditional medicine in Kikuku village, Muleba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshi Mainen J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practice. Traditional medicines are the mainstay of healthcare in this region and are known to support the management of many illnesses such as malaria, bacterial infections, epilepsy, gynecological problems and others. However, most of the plants being used have either not been documented or evaluated for safety and efficacy or both. This study, the sixth of an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plants that are used at Kikuku village, Muleba District. Methodology A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the common/local names of the plants, parts of the plants used, diseases treated, methods of preparing the herbal remedies, dosage of the remedies administered, frequency and duration of treatment and toxicity of the medicines. A literature review was carried out for information on the ethnomedical uses of the reported plants. Results A total of 49 plant species belonging to 47 genera and 24 plant families were documented. The family Euphorbiaceae and Asteraceae had the highest representation. The plants are used for the treatment of skin conditions (10 plants; 20%, bacterial infections and wounds (14 plants; 28.6%, malaria (14 plants; 28.6%, gastrointestinal disorders (11 plants; 22.4%, gynecological problems including infertility (8 plants; 16.3%, hypertension (5 plants; 10.2%, viral infections (7 plants; 14.3%, chest problems (5 plants; 10.2%, diabetes (3 plants; 6.1%, cancer (2 plants; 4.1%, inflammatory conditions (arthritis, rheumatism, HIV and AIDS, and hernia each treated by 1 plant (3 plants in total; 6.1%. Information obtained from the literature indicate that 25 (51.0% of the therapeutic claims are supported by laboratory results or have similar claims of ethnomedical use from other countries. Conclusion Herbal remedies comprise an important and effective component of the healthcare system

  5. Kagera Region, Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community knowledge, attitude and practice towards Sexually Transmitted. Diseases and ... reported to have been taught about AIDS and less than 30% on sex and pregnancy. Sixty three ..... sexual partners place young people at risk of early.

  6. Exploring the role of cognitive and structural forms of social capital in HIV/AIDS trends in the Kagera region of Tanzania - a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumence, Gasto; Eriksson, Malin; Nystrom, Lennarth; Killewo, Japhet; Emmelin, Maria

    2011-04-01

    The article presents a synthesis of data from three village case studies focusing on how structural and cognitive social capital may have influenced the progression of the HIV epidemic in the Kagera region of Tanzania. Grounded theory was used to develop a theoretical model describing the possible links between structural and cognitive social capital and the impact on sexual health behaviours. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews were carried out to represent the range of experiences of existing social capital. Both structural and cognitive social capital were active avenues for community members to come together, empower each other, and develop norms, values, trust and reciprocal relations. This empowerment created an enabling environment in which members could adopt protective behaviours against HIV infection. On the one hand, we observed that involvement in formal and informal organisations resulted in a reduction of numbers of sexual partners, led people to demand abstinence from sexual relations until marriage, caused fewer opportunities for casual sex, and gave individuals the agency to demand the use of condoms. On the other hand, strict membership rules and regulations excluded some members, particularly excessive alcohol drinkers and debtors, from becoming members of the social groups, which increased their vulnerability in terms of exposure to HIV. Social gatherings (especially those organised during the night) were also found to increase youths' risk of HIV infection through instances of unsafe sex. We conclude that even though social capital may at times have negative effects on individuals' HIV-prevention efforts, this study provides initial evidence that social capital is largely protective through empowering vulnerable groups such as women and the poor to protect against HIV infection and by promoting protective sexual behaviours.

  7. Parenteral Admixture Compatibility in Neurosurgery Ward in Prof. Dr. Margono Soekarjo Regional Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Maharani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral admixtures (intravenous admixtures have been done commonly in hospitals. However, it has a possibility of failures, like incompatibilities and changes in drug stabilities. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of drug incompatibilities in mixing parenteral preparations in neurosurgery ward in Prof. Dr. Margono Soekarjo Regional Public Hospital which undergo physical incompatibility observed in organoleptic. This study was a prospective descriptive research for one month period. Data were collected and analyzed descriptively. The results showed that from 667 parenteral admixtures in neurosurgery ward in Prof Dr Margono Soekarjo Hospital in February 2010, there were 0.45% potential incompatibility and 2.55% actual incompatibility happened. Actual incompatibility shown as crystal 0.17%, sediment 0.17%, and 2.04% was non-permanent haze in phenytoin and sodium chloride or ringer lactate admixtures.

  8. Epidemiology and outcome of candidemia in internal medicine wards: A regional study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Giannella, Maddalena; Bartoletti, Michele; Cristini, Francesco; Cioni, Giorgio; Ambretti, Simone; Carretto, Edoardo; Sambri, Vittorio; Sarti, Mario; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-10-01

    More than one-third of candidemia episodes occur in Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs) but only few studies have focused on this setting and specific data about epidemiology, clinical characteristics and risk factors for mortality are scant. To describe epidemiology and to assess risk factors for in-hospital mortality among patients with candidemia in IMWs. Multicenter retrospective cohort study on patients with candidemia cared for in IMWs of an Italian region (Emilia Romagna) from January 2012 to December 2013. Non survivors were compared with survivors; variables with p≤0.1 at univariate analysis were entered into a multivariate Cox regression model. 232 patients were included. Overall candidemia incidence was 2.2 cases/1000 admissions. Candida albicans accounted for 59% of cases. Antifungal treatment was started 72h from blood cultures in 47%, 27% and 12% of patients, respectively; 13.8% of patients received no antifungal treatment. In-hospital mortality was 40%. At multivariate analysis, chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease (HR 2.72, 95%CI 1.66-4.45, pcandidemia in IMWs, with a worrisome rate of inappropriateness in patient management. Specific interventions aimed to increase awareness of IMWs about candidemia are needed. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [The home palliative care transition manual for the regional cooperation from the general ward at Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Ko

    2007-12-01

    Recently, a home palliative care has been recommended for terminal stage cancer patients. However, a few clinics are available providing a home palliative care. As a result of that, there have been many cases of the terminal stage cancer patients who could not receive a peace of mind care and die peacefully at home. Home palliative care has been promoted in Shizuoka City by starting Shizuoka city regional cooperation conference of cancer management with a help from Shizuoka city medical association and the general hospital. It is important to have the knowledge and technique put into practice by clinics and home visiting nurses for a further improvement of the palliative care. In order to transfer patient smoothly, the palliative care team conference is held in the general ward and the homecare transition manual is used at the hospital. An application of homecare insurance, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged in parallel to management of physical and psychological symptoms of the patient, the visiting doctor and nurse are arranged. Before a patient is discharged from the hospital, the meeting will be held among the ward staff, visiting nurse and the patient's family. We intervened 8 cases from April to July 2007. Six out of 8 cases were transferred to home, and 2 patients were died at home. The home care transition manual will be shared with other hospitals from now on.

  10. Castle Ward, County Down

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Fisher was a painter and engraver in Ireland, working after the Dutch and Italian landscape painting tradition. He is best known by engravings after his designs, of which a large number were produced during his career.[notes from Irish Paintings in the `National Gallery of Ireland?, 2001]The present painting depicts Castle Ward in the distance, an 18th century dwelling famed for its mix of Classical and Gothic architecture.

  11. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, Alexander; Sesay, Andrew; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Mamud; Blacklock, Claire

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5%) were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%). Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8%) of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%). Intravenous (IV) fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%), including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) was given to 629 (78.8%) patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6%) patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%), and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%). This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  12. Characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera wards in a regional referral hospital during the 2012 epidemic in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Blacklock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In 2012, Sierra Leone suffered a nationwide cholera epidemic which affected the capital Freetown and also the provinces. This study aims to describe the characteristics and clinical management of patients admitted to cholera isolation wards of the main referral hospital in the Northern Province and compare management with standard guidelines. Design: All available clinical records of patients from the cholera isolation wards were reviewed retrospectively. There was no active case finding. The following data were collected from the clinical records after patients had left the ward: date of admission, demographics, symptoms, dehydration status, diagnoses, tests and treatments given, length of stay, and outcomes. Results: A total of 798 patients were admitted, of whom 443 (55.5% were female. There were 18 deaths (2.3%. Assessment of dehydration status was recorded in 517 (64.8% of clinical records. An alternative or additional diagnosis was made for 214 patients (26.8%. Intravenous (IV fluids were prescribed to 767 patients (96.1%, including 95% of 141 patients who had documentation of being not severely dehydrated. A history of vomiting was documented in 92.1% of all patients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS was given to 629 (78.8% patients. Doxycycline was given to 380 (47.6% patients, erythromycin to 34 (4.3%, and other antibiotics were used on 247 occasions. Zinc was given to 209 (26.2%. Discussion: This retrospective study highlights the need for efforts to improve the quality of triage, adherence to clinical guidance, and record keeping. Conclusions: Data collection and analysis of clinical practices during an epidemic situation would enable faster identification of those areas requiring intervention and improvement.

  13. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  14. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  15. Ward identity in noncommutative QED

    OpenAIRE

    Mariz, T.; Pires, C. A. de S.; R F Ribeiro

    2002-01-01

    Although noncommutative QED presents a nonabelian structure, it does not present structure constants. In view of this we investigate how Ward identity is satisfied in pair annihilation process and $\\gamma \\gamma \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ scattering in noncommutative QED.

  16. Development and validation of scales to measure organisational features of acute hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A; Bond, S; Arber, S

    1995-12-01

    In order to make comparisons between wards and explain variations in outcomes of nursing care, there is a growing need in nursing research for reliable and valid measures of the organisational features of acute hospital wards. This research developed The Ward Organisational Features Scales (WOFS); each set of six scales comprising 14 subscales which measure discrete dimensions of acute hospital wards. A study of a nationally representative sample of 825 nurses working in 119 acute wards in 17 hospitals, drawn from seven Regional Health Authorities in England provides evidence for the structure, reliability and validity of this comprehensive set of measures related to: the physical environment of the ward, professional nursing practice, ward leadership, professional working relationships, nurses' influence and job satisfaction. Implications for further research are discussed.

  17. Revision of Darsie and Ward (1981) to include Ochlerotatus japonicus Theobald and a checklist of species referred to the genus Ochlerotatus in the Nearctic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsie, Richard F

    2002-12-01

    Breeding populations of Ochlerotatus japonicus japonicus, 1st detected in 1998, are now found in several states in the United States. To be able to identify this mosquito with the keys to the mosquitoes of North America north of Mexico, changes are proposed, especially dealing with the new genus Ochlerotatus. Also, a checklist of the genera Ochlerotatus and Aedes in the Nearctic Region is given.

  18. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... Atmosphere' is the focal point developed through the study. Primarily, the model frames the study and serves as a design tool for creating the light atmosphere in hospital wards. First, brain storming is used to open up the field supported by theoretical aspects based on Gernot Böhmes' concept of atmosphere...

  19. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience.

  20. Ward Valley status report: Science versus politics. Which will win?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasternak, A.D. [California Radioactive Materials Management Forum, Lafayette, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The State of California has issued a license to US Ecology, Inc. to construct and operate a disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) at the remote, arid Ward Valley site in the Mojave Desert. The license and certification of the associated environmental documentation have been upheld by the California courts. The Ward Valley license is the first and, so far, only license to be issued for a new LLRW disposal facility pursuant to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act enacted in 1980 and amended in 1985. However, the dates of construction and operation of the disposal facility are uncertain because the federal government has refused to sell land in Ward Valley to the State of California for the site of the Southwestern Compact`s regional disposal facility. The Clinton Administration`s repeated excuses for delaying the land transfer, and the circumstances of these delays, indicate that prospects for success of the Ward Valley project, and perhaps the Policy Act itself, depend on the outcome of a battle between science and politics. In view of these delays by the administration, Congressional action to Transfer the Ward Valley lands to California will serve both state and federal goals for safe disposal of LLRW.

  1. Noise pollution on an acute surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Emma; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to measure and analyse noise levels over a 24-h period on five general surgical wards. Noise levels were measured on three wards with four bays of six beds each (wards A, B and C), one ward of side-rooms only (ward D) and a surgical high dependency unit (ward E) of eight beds. Noise levels were measured for 15 min at 4-hourly intervals over a period of 24 h midweek. The maximum sound pressure level, baseline sound pressure level and the equivalent continuous level (LEq) were recorded. Peak levels and LEq were compared with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for community noise. Control measurements were taken elsewhere in the hospital and at a variety of public places for comparison. The highest peak noise level recorded was 95.6 dB on ward E, a level comparable to a heavy truck. This exceeded all control peak readings except that recorded at the bus stop. Peak readings frequently exceeded 80 dB during the day on all wards. Each ward had at least one measurement which exceeded the peak sound level of 82.5 dB recorded in the supermarket. The highest peak measurements on wards A, B, C and E also exceeded peak readings at the hospital main entrance (83.4 dB) and coffee shop (83.4 dB). Ward E had the highest mean peak reading during the day and at night - 83.45 dB and 81.0 dB, respectively. Ward D, the ward of side-rooms, had the lowest day-time mean LEq (55.9 dB). Analysis of the LEq results showed that readings on ward E were significantly higher than readings on wards A, B and C as a group (P = 0.001). LEq readings on ward E were also significantly higher than readings on ward D (P < 0.001). Day and night levels differ significantly, but least so on the high dependency unit. The WHO guidelines state that noise levels on wards should not exceed 30 dB LEq (day and night) and that peak noise levels at night should not exceed 40 dB. Our results exceed these guidelines at all times. It is likely that these findings will translate to

  2. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  3. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  4. Anatomy of the ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient's narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient's right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  5. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    . The four key aspects are: ‘Light’, ‘Space’, ‘Users’ and ‘Time’. The ‘Light’ aspect describes, as shown in (Fig 0.6), the character of the light, light information and light effect i.e. function, aesthetics or symbolism. The ‘Space’ aspect looks into the dimension of the space, geographical orientation...... in Denmark are lastly an investigation on light zones at the hospital ward defined in order to optimize the illumination. The third cycle of iteration is an experimental study testing a lighting concept developed and grounded in the knowledge gained through the first and second cycle. The fourth cycle...

  6. Ward Identities for Hall Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We derive quantum field theory Ward identities based on linear area preserving and conformal transformations in 2+1 dimensions. The identities relate Hall viscosities, Hall conductivities and the angular momentum. They apply both for relativistic and non relativistic systems, at zero and at finite temperature. We consider systems with or without translation invariance, and introduce an external magnetic field and viscous drag terms. A special case of the identities yields the well known relation between the Hall conductivity and half the angular momentum density.

  7. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... the requirements. What does it mean to create a 'home-like' and 'pleasant or appealing' light in this context? Does the composition of CRI and degree of Kelvin tell it all? Is it enough information to provide a proper illumination in which the patient can have a homely and pleasant experience? The 'Model of Light...... from the Danish interior design magazine BO BEDRE.The findings show that the placement of light atmosphere in Denmark are determined as three horizontal light zones: 'High Lighting Zone', 'Center Lighting Zone' and 'Low Lighting Zone' An experimental study evaluates the experience of the atmosphere...

  8. Three point SUSY Ward identities without Ghosts

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M L

    2004-01-01

    We utilise a non-local gauge transform which renders the entire action of SUSY QED invariant and respects the SUSY algebra modulo the gauge-fixing condition, to derive two- and three-point ghost-free SUSY Ward identities in SUSY QED. We use the cluster decomposition principle to find the Green's function Ward identities and then takes linear combinations of the latter to derive identities for the proper functions.

  9. "Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 MalaCards: scn5a-related romano ward syndrome Merck Manual Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Familial long QT syndrome Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) National Organization for Rare Disorders Resource List from the University ...

  11. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  12. "Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

  13. Nosocomial candidemia in patients admitted to medicine wards compared to other wards: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Roberto; Merelli, Maria; Ansaldi, Filippo; Rosin, Chiara; Azzini, Annamaria; Cavinato, Silvia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Vedovelli, Claudio; Cattelan, Annamaria; Marina, Busetti; Gatti, Giuseppe; Concia, Ercole; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for nosocomial candidemia, severity of sepsis, treatment, and outcome were compared between patients admitted to medicine wards and those to surgical and intensive care units (ICUs). Data were retrospectively collected from patients belonging to six referral hospitals in Italy between January 2011 and December 2013. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated in the whole patient population. A total of 686 patients (mean age 70 ± 15 years) with candidemia were included. 367 (53.5 %) patients were in medicine wards, and 319 in surgery and ICUs. Host-related risk factors for candidemia were more common in medicine patients whereas healthcare-related factors in surgery/ICU patients. These patients showed severe sepsis and septic shock more commonly (71.7 %) than medicine patients (59.9 %) (p 0.003). The latter underwent central venous catheter (CVC) removal and adequate antifungal therapy less frequently than surgery/ICU patients. 149 (40.6 %) patients died with candidemia in medicine wards and 69 (21.6 %) in other wards (p candidemia was different between medicine patients and those in other wards. Despite the lower severity of candidemia in medicine patients, their mortality turned out to be higher than in surgery or ICU patients. Awareness of the best management of candidemia should be pursued, especially in medicine wards.

  14. Implementing lean in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Jacobsen, Peter

    Using the well-known principles from lean management in an orthopedic surgical ward at a major Danish hospital reorganized their work-flow and processes. The ward has ten operating rooms and performs the complete range of the orthopedic procedures ranging from patients that need simple standard...... for productivity improvement. Lean management has its origins in industrial production, but it is now being transferred to many other sectors, e.g., health care. Two important prerequisites exist for implementing lean management: Firstly, stable and standardized processes and secondly leveling of production...... be planned in advance and meet the prerequisites for lean management. Two of ten operating rooms have been allocated to this flow. Selected surgeons, nurses and porters have been allocated to the two operating rooms and they remain in the sterile environment for the duration of the workday. The effect...

  15. Ward identities for amplitudes with reggeized gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartles, J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Vacca, G.P. [INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Starting from the effective action of high energy QCD we derive Ward identities for Green's functions of reggeized gluons. They follow from the gauge invariance of the effective action, and allow to derive new representations of amplitudes containing physical particles as well as reggeized gluons. We explicitly demonstrate their validity for the BFKL kernel, and we present a new derivation of the kernel.

  16. The Ward ansaetze and Painleve tau function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M Y [Department of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 ITW (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-03

    We have classified a tau function for the hypergeometric solutions of the Painleve VI equation constructed by Shah and Woodhouse (2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 12265-9) through twistor methods. We have shown that the tau function is the product of a Toeplitz determinant and a power of the time variable t. In a suitable trivialization of the twistor bundle, the symbol of this Toeplitz determinant is the minus of the off-diagonal entry in the patching matrix. The method can also be applied to other solutions obtained from the Ward ansaetze.

  17. Nurse rostering at a Danish ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæklund, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    , and its linear relaxation is solved by means of column generation. The pricing sub-problem is to generate feasible schedules for the nurses and -- as a couple of different constraints including several special Danish regulations have to be observed -- is solved by constraint programming. A number......This paper considers a nurse rostering problem from a ward at a Danish hospital.  The problem is highly constrained and comprises a large set of different constraints. A branch-and-price method for solving the problem exactly is proposed. The master problem is to assign schedules to the nurses...

  18. Ideal ward round making in neurosurgical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of a perfect ward round lies in the role of the consultant leading the ′round making group′ (RMG as well as the hallmark of effective questioning and participation of each member. Twelve senior consultants with more than 10 years′ experience in neurosurgical practice at three different university hospitals were observed during round making by a participant observer. Observations were made on the group climate of the RMG, the leadership pattern and language expressed by the clinician conducting the round and the effectiveness in his performance as a leader during clinical discussions. The group climate showed evidence of good productivity and flexibility with 92% and 75% consultants, pleasantness of climate was above average with only 50% (6/12 and poor objectivity with 42% (5/12 consultants. Forty two percent of the consultants were not always very well comprehensible, while only 50% (6/12 spoke exactly fitting the occasion. Only 33% (4/12 of the consultants used humour effectively, while 42% (5/12 spoke unnecessarily in between discussion and were poor in introducing the problems of patient to the round making group. Ward round making in neurosurgical practice needs a holistic approach with motivation, planning, leadership skills and structured curriculum to fulfill its objectives.

  19. Relative deprivation between neighbouring wards is predictive of coronary heart disease mortality after adjustment for absolute deprivation of wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Steven; Scarborough, Peter; Keegan, Thomas; Rayner, Mike

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether deprivation inequality at small area level in England is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates and to assess whether this provides evidence of an association between area-level and individual-level risk. Mortality rates for all wards in England were calculated using all CHD deaths between 2001 and 2006. Ward-level deprivation was measured using the Carstairs Index. Deprivation inequality within local authorities (LAs) was measured by the IQR of deprivation for wards within the LA. Relative deprivation for wards was measured as the modulus of the difference between deprivation for the ward and average deprivation for all neighbouring wards. Deprivation inequality within LAs was positively associated with CHD mortality rates per 100000 (eg, all men β; 95% CI=2.7; 1.1 to 4.3) after adjustment for absolute deprivation (pRelative deprivation for wards was positively associated with CHD mortality rates per 100000 (eg, all men 1.4; 0.7 to 2.1) after adjustment for absolute deprivation (prelative deprivation was independently associated with CHD mortality rates in both affluent and deprived wards. Rich wards surrounded by poor areas have higher CHD mortality rates than rich wards surrounded by rich areas, and poor wards surrounded by rich areas have worse CHD mortality rates than poor wards surrounded by poor areas. Local deprivation inequality has a similar adverse impact on both rich and poor areas, supporting the hypothesis that income inequality of an area has an impact on individual-level health outcomes.

  20. Patients Light Preferences in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Bjerrum, H. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning;

    2011-01-01

    it can have a positive influence on the recovery process. The present paper introduces the human perspective and the Danish cultural approach in illuminating homes and how it can contribute to innovative lighting design at hospitals. The importance of having a holistic approach to lighting design...... is introduced based on the theory by Gernot Böhmes i.e. “concept of atmosphere” dealing with the effect of experiencing atmosphere. The aim of this study for design of a lighting concept for wards is to get qualified information on patients light preferences for light atmosphere by studying the everyday use...... of light in homes. This explorative study displays the preferred light atmosphere in Danish homes in the age group of 60-85 years old people. With an anthropologically approach to the subject using semi structured interviews, the goal is to explore preferences for light atmosphere when the user...

  1. Implementing lean in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Jacobsen, Peter

    of the lean implementation has been a 33% increase in patient throughput. The second flow is unchanged and concerned with non-standard and emergency procedures, e.g.., major hip surgery on old people or surgery on traffic victims. The surgeries within this flow are non-routine, unpredictable and cannot....... Stable and standardized processes ensure quality and predictability (e.g. process time). Leveling of production is essential for production planning. Based on the results of the case study of the surgical ward this paper will discuss three issues or challenges that emerged from the implementation of lean...... procedures to patients in need of complex emergency procedures. The primary result of the lean project has been to split the flow of patients in two. The first flow is concerned with highly standardized and non-emergency procedures, e.g. minor knee surgery. These surgeries are routine, predictable and can...

  2. Positioning and change in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbeck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This paper focuses on communication about hygiene in a hospital ward and with the relevant infection control organization. The purpose of this paper is to examine the function of the hygiene coordinator as a key change agent and the communicative challenges and role conflicts implied in her...... to positional dilemmas regarding professional hierarchies and collegial relations. In order to have the hygiene coordinator gain authority and achieve empowerment in her function, additional documentation and training are needed, and communication efforts between the department management and the hygiene...... coordinator need strengthening. Furthermore, the hygiene area should be connected to the hospital's overarching purpose of saving lives. Originality/value These findings point to the importance of taking communication on the departmental level into consideration in relation to change strategies...

  3. Ward leadership: balancing the clinical and managerial roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Kate

    2002-04-01

    This qualitative study investigated ward managers' experiences of combining a clinical leadership role with the managerial and administrative parts of their job. Ward managers saw their main task as one of developing their staff and improving the quality of their service, yet found balancing their different roles problematic.

  4. Ward identity implies recursion relations in Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang

    2012-07-01

    The Ward identity in gauge theory constrains the behavior of the amplitudes. We discuss the Ward identity for amplitudes with a pair of shifted lines with complex momenta. This will induce a recursion relation identical to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations at the finite poles of the complexified amplitudes. Furthermore, according to the Ward identity, it is also possible to transform the boundary term into a simple form, which can be obtained by a new recursion relation. For the amplitude with one off-shell line in pure Yang-Mills theory, we find this technique is effective for obtaining the amplitude even when there are boundary contributions.

  5. On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162758.html On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect' When ... should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an ...

  6. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  7. Electronic Printed Ward Round Proformas: Freeing Up Doctors' Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Darren; Eneje, Philip

    2017-01-01

    The role of a junior doctor involves preparing for the morning ward round. At a time when there are gaps on rotas and doctors' time is more stretched, this can be a source of significant delay and thus a loss of working time. We therefore looked at ways in which we could make the ward round a more efficient place by introducing specific electronic, printed ward round proformas. We used the average time taken to write proformas per patient and the average time taken per patient on the ward round. This would then enable us to make fair comparisons with future changes that were made using the plan, do, study, and act principles of quality improvement. Our baseline measurement found that the average time taken to write up the proforma for each patient was 1 minute 9 seconds and that the average time taken per patient on the ward round was 8 minutes 30 seconds. With the changes we made during our 3 PDSA cycles and the implementation of an electronic, printed ward round proforma, we found that we were able to reduce the average time spent per patient on the ward round to 6 minutes 32 seconds, an improvement of 1 min 58 seconds per patient. The project has thus enabled us to reduce the time taken per patient during the ward round. This improved efficiency will enable patients to be identified earlier for discharge. It will also aid in freeing up the time of junior doctors, allowing them to complete discharge letters sooner, order investigations earlier and enable them to complete their allocated tasks within contracted hours. PMID:28352467

  8. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khademi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB. Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax and the equalizing level (Leq. The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion:  The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were  more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area.

  9. [Nursing Education Utilizing Experiences in a Virtual Hospital Ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Matsumoto, Maki; Takai, Kiyako; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Iwata, Naomi

    2015-06-01

    Environmental design should be required at medical facilities for conducting medical practice safely and for making hospitalization comfortable. Many medical nursing students cannot imagine medical facilities, especially hospital wards, when they study medical environments in a basic nursing lecture. As a result, they cannot connect well with patient assistance. We employed a computer assisted designing software, "3D My Home Designer" (Mega Soft Company) that runs on Windows 8, and considered the usefulness of it for lectures on environmental design showing how to design a hospital ward for patients' optimal hospital stay. We drew a medical facility in 2-D first, transformed it into 3D images, and then created movies of a virtual hospital ward in which a patient walked around. These movies consisted of 3 kinds: a) hospital room with changeable wall color, b) different allocations of hospital room and nurse station, and c) a blurred ward which corresponded to how a patient with poor eyesight (cataract) would see a ward. We prepared as controls: a') still images of a hospital room, b') still images of ward, and c') a documentation on how a ward is seen by a patient with a cataract. We gave a questionnaire to students and nurses about these movies and still images (controls). In a) and b), there were no differences between the movies and still images in both students and nurses. In c), both students and nurses had a viewpoint from the patient with poor eyesight. From these results, we consider that the students, who have fewer experiences in a hospital, may understand the environments well by movies and the application of a virtual movie ward to nursing education may be useful in a lecture, depending on the readiness of the students.

  10. Ergonomics in the psychiatric ward towards workers or patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvana, Salerno; Laura, Forcella; Ursula, Di Fabio; Irene, Figà Talamanca; Paolo, Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Patient's aggressive behavior is one of the major problem in the psychiatric ward. Here we present the preliminary results of a psychiatric ward case-study, of a public hospital in the Chieti province, in order to plan ergonomic improvement. We applied the Method of Organizational Congruencies in the psychiatric ward in order to study the relationship between organized hospital work and nurses wellbeing in a 24 hour shifts. We observed 58 main phases in the three work shifts. The technical actions are mainly those of any hospital wards (shift briefing, preparing and administering drugs, recording data on clinical charts, etc.). We found important differences mainly due to the nurses overcontrol activities on the patients behavior (preventing suicides or self destructive behavior), the occurrence of restraint procedure towards patients, the pollution due to patient's cigarette smoke. The fear of patient's self destructive behavior or other aggressive behaviour are the main cognitive and social aspects of this hospital ward. Nurses working in this psychiatric ward have to accept: locked doors, poor and polluted environment, restraint procedure with high risk of aggression and no availability of mental health care programs. A new interdisciplinary concept for ergonomics in psychiatry setting may represent a challenge for both nurses and patients and the community.

  11. Exploring the experiences of young people nursed on adult wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Linda; Black, Sharon

    This paper reports on a study of experiences of young people aged 14 to 18 years who were nursed on acute adult hospital wards in NHS hospitals in England. In spite of British government guidelines, young people from 14 years of age continue to be admitted to adult wards in the UK. Although much has been written about the transition of the young person to adult services, there is little research about the experiences of young people who are nursed on adult wards. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of eight young people who had been nursed on adult wards between 2004 and 2010. Data were collected in 2010. In-depth interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework ( Colaizzi, 1978 ). Themes explored included expectations of what the experience may be like, young people's first impressions of the ward environment, the feelings of the young person while in hospital, the attitudes of people towards them including, both staff and other patients, and future admissions and how they would cope with readmissions. Better provision needs to be made for young people including appropriately trained staff, adolescent-friendly environments and areas in adult wards that are dedicated to adolescents.

  12. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao He

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  13. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao He; De-Ying Hu; Yi-Lan Liu; Li-Fen Wu; Lian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School (CCWS) on the nurses' caring ability. Methods: Questionnaire 25 nurses of humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS using the Nkongho Caring Ability Inventory (CAI) before and after implement the humanistic nursing care model, including reform the systems of nursing care, introduce humanistic care model, implement the humanistic care, to measure the nurses' caring ability. Results: The nurses' caring ability had significantly developed on total, cognition dimension, courage dimension and patience dimension after all measures considered (p Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  14. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T.; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice.\\ud \\ud Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables.\\ud \\ud Methods: A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. Thi...

  15. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] Ward Valley Report deserves better coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.

    Eos, Transactions, AGU, which is bannered as “The Newspaper of the Geophysical Sciences,” carried an “In Brief” article in the issue of May 23 that does a serious disservice to the geophysical sciences. It was written in a flip editorial style that questioned the usefulness of the Ward Valley report (Secretary Babbitt found it useful enough to act decisively) and the integrity of the NAS/NRC committee members who wrote it.The 17 committee members, most of whom are AGU members, studied the issues as a public service at the request of the NAS in response to Babbitt's request. They documented the evidence and conclusions thoroughly in a report of over 200 pages. Surely, scientific input is needed for decisions about complex issues in our society.

  16. Introducing the nurse practitioner into the surgical ward: an ethnographic study of interprofessional teamwork practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, Susanne; Jangland, Eva; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-08-22

    The first nurse practitioners in surgical care were introduced into Swedish surgical wards in 2014. Internationally, organisations that have adopted nurse practitioners into care teams are reported to have maintained or improved the quality of care. However, close qualitative descriptions of teamwork practice may add to existing knowledge of interprofessional collaboration when introducing nurse practitioners into new clinical areas. The aim was to report on an empirical study describing how interprofessional teamwork practice was enacted by nurse practitioners when introduced into surgical ward teams. The study had a qualitative, ethnographic research design, drawing on a sociomaterial conceptual framework. The study was based on 170 hours of ward-based participant observations of interprofessional teamwork practice that included nurse practitioners. Data were gathered from 2014 to 2015 across four surgical sites in Sweden, including 60 interprofessional rounds. The data were analysed with an iterative reflexive procedure involving inductive and theory-led approaches. The study was approved by a Swedish regional ethics committee (Ref. No.: 2014/229-31). The interprofessional teamwork practice enacted by the nurse practitioners that emerged from the analysis comprised a combination of the following characteristic role components: clinical leader, bridging team colleague and ever-present tutor. These role components were enacted at all the sites and were prominent during interprofessional teamwork practice. The participant nurse practitioners utilised the interprofessional teamwork practice arrangements to enact a role that may be described in terms of a quality guarantee, thereby contributing to the overall quality and care flow offered by the entire surgical ward team. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  17. Occurrence of hypoxia in the wards of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Appearance of hypoxia in a patient may be an indicator of a serious medical condition that can have grave consequences. Clinical evaluation fails to detect majority of the patients of hypoxia, and therefore, it may remain unnoticed in the wards. We planned to assess the magnitude of hypoxia in different wards of our tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: We studied all the patients admitted in various medical and surgical wards during 1 week of study. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 was measured with the help of a pulse oximeter in all the patients who remained admitted for at least 24 h. Hypoxia was diagnosed in a patient when he had SpO 2 less than 90%. Results: During the study period, 1167 patients were admitted in various wards of the hospital. Hypoxia was detected in 121 patients (10.36%. Among them, 7 (0.59% patients were already having a diagnosis of respiratory failure, but were not on oxygen therapy while 5 (0.42% patients were having SpO 2 less than 90% despite of oxygen therapy. In 109 (9.34% patients, hypoxia was detected incidentally. Conclusion: Unnoticed hypoxia was detected in a significant number of the patients admitted in the wards of the hospital. Therefore, it is concluded that oxygen saturation measurements should be included with other vital parameters like pulse, temperature, and blood pressure, in the monitoring chart of all the admitted patients.

  18. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five....... Multivariable analysis showed that surgical and psychiatric settings were more susceptible to involvement in dispensing errors and that polypharmacy was a risk factor. In this ward stock system, dispensing errors are relatively common, they depend on speciality and are associated with polypharmacy...... wards, samples of dispensed solid drugs were collected prospectively and compared with the prescriptions. Data were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 2173 samples were collected, 95.5% of which were correctly dispensed (95% CI 94.5-96.2). In total, 124 errors in 6715...

  19. Creating a simulated Mental Health Ward: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Jeanette; Musker, Kathleen; Smyth, Siobhan; Byrne, Evelyn; Maney, Catherine; Selig, Kristen; Jones-Bendel, Trish

    2014-10-01

    The future of psychiatric-mental health nursing depends on the preparation of nurses who will meet the mental health care needs of society. The current article discusses the development of the "Mental Health Ward," a simulated mental health experience that was offered for the first time to undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university in the United States. The Mental Health Ward is an innovative simulated hospital environment that includes the use of standardized patients and role play scenarios, resulting in a full mission simulation whereby students learn various psychiatric diagnoses and practice various pertinent skills, including nursing assessments, admission and discharge processes, medication administration, and therapeutic communication. Lessons learned by faculty and students in formulating the Mental Health Ward are presented.

  20. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  2. Ward-type Data Flow Diagram Simulating System

    OpenAIRE

    Arisawa, Makoto; Iwatani, Yasuaki; Kato, Juniji

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss about a Ward-type Data Flow Diagram Simulating System that we implemented. The system works on NEC PC9801/VX personal computer with a mouse. It consists of two parts, DFD editor and DFD Interpreter. The DFD Editor is to draw Ward-type DFD's along with Mini Spec. in the form of Finite State Automaton and Guarded Command. The DFD Interpreter is to simulate the parallel process interactions and to output the results. We have a simple assumption that time sequence ...

  3. Holographic Ward identities: Examples from 2+1 gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, M; Banados, Maximo; Caro, Rodrigo

    2004-01-01

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence the boundary Ward identities are encoded in the bulk constraints. We study the three-dimensional version of this result using the Chern-Simons formulation of gravity. Due the metric boundary conditions the conformal identities cannot be derived in a straightforward way from the chiral ones. We pay special attention to this case and find the necessary modifications to the chiral currents in order to find the two Virasoro operators. The supersymmetric Ward identities are studied as well.

  4. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively...... realistic three-dimensional thermal mannequins with a parallel bed arrangement simulated the patients. The maximum dispersion distances in time under ward ventilation conditions were studied. A velocity profile simulated a time-dependent cough with total duration of 0.4 s. The results indicated...

  5. [Job stress and burnout among nurses and care workers in psychiatric wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzaki, Toshiki; Tanihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the actual state of job stress and burnout among nurses and care workers working in psychiatric wards by comparing them with those who serve in internal medicine wards. A survey was conducted of female ward nurses and care workers working at two psychiatric hospitals and two general hospitals in the Chugoku area using the brief job stress questionnaire and the Maslach burnout inventory-Japanese version. A total of 232 female nurses and care workers were analyzed, 125 from psychiatric wards and 107 from internal medicine wards. Job stressors of stress due to workplace environment, job control, skill utilization, job aptitude and worthwhileness of working life were significantly greater in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. Stress of quantitative and qualitative workloads, however, was significantly lower in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. For job stress reaction, vigor was significantly lower in psychiatric wards than in internal medicine wards. For burnout, psychiatric wards scored significantly higher in depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment compared with internal medicine wards. Reviewing these results and their association with stress control policy in psychiatric wards, we suggest that three factors are important: maintaining working environment, enhancing conferences, and providing learning opportunities.

  6. Nurse health-related quality of life: associations with patient and ward characteristics in Japanese general acute care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Fukahori, Hiroki

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the factors affecting nurse health-related quality of life (HRQOL) by considering the patient characteristics and ward characteristics. Nurse health-related quality of life is an important health outcome, and should be promoted for quality nursing care. This cross-sectional study was conducted on nurses who work in general acute care wards in three university hospitals in metropolitan Japan. Multilevel analysis was conducted to investigate possible factors related to nurse health-related quality of life. Nurses who worked at a ward had a significantly lower physical health score (β = -0.13, P characteristics. Further large-scale studies are needed in order to investigate the effect of hospital characteristics on nurse health-related quality of life. Increasing the number of nurses' aides and delegating assistance with ADL to them could support nurse health-related quality of life in the acute care setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventililation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Li, Y.

    2004-01-01

    an appropriate turbulent model to simulate and reproduce the process of contaminant dispersion. The low Reynolds-number (LRN) k-e (Launder and Sharma, 1978) turbulence model with a damping function (Chikamoto et al., 1992) was considered and evaluated by experiment. We carried out an experimental study to test...... wards probably due to its inability to remove large particles and risk of particle deposition on horizontal surfaces in the occupied regions. However, the existing downward ventilation system commonly used in isolation rooms does not deliver the required performance. There is a need to develop effective...

  8. Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type β-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region.

  9. Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of Ahmadu ... and management outcomes of children admitted with typhoid fever during a ... All the children had pre-admission antibiotics, while 93.3% had abdominal pain, ... had laparotomy but there was no mortality, and all were discharged after recovery.

  10. An observational study of hand hygiene compliance in paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Jacqueline; Firth, Joseph; Vaughan, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    To measure healthcare workers', children's and visitors' hand hygiene compliance in a paediatric oncology ward and a paediatric respiratory ward in an English hospital. Children are especially vulnerable to healthcare-associated infections, yet few studies have reported on hand hygiene compliance in paediatric clinical areas. This was an observational study. We measured hand hygiene compliance over an eight-hour period in two hospital wards using the 'five moments of hand hygiene' observation tool. We monitored a total of 407 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall opportunities for compliance were 74% for healthcare workers (n = 315) and children and visitors 23% (n = 92). Compliance was 84% for allied health professionals, 81% for doctors, 75% for nurses and 73% for ancillary and other staff. Hand hygiene compliance varied depending on which of the five moments of hygiene healthcare workers were undertaking (p hygiene compliance, and for visitors to the oncology ward, hand hygiene compliance was higher (p hygiene compliance; however, visitors' compliance was low. Among healthcare workers, levels of compliance were higher compared with previous reported estimates. Visitors had the lowest level of compliance yet owing to the nature of the clinical environments, nearly a quarter of care is delivered by them rather than healthcare workers, and so, this offers opportunities for specific future interventions aimed at families and carers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Accounting for Inpatient Wards When Developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, Peter T.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Hans, Erwin W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Lent, van Wineke A.M.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Background:As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations,

  12. 'Real life' clinical learning on an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeth, D; Reeves, S; Goreham, C; Parker, P; Haynes, S; Pearson, S

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the multi-method evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and an extension of pioneering work in Sweden (Wahlström et al. 1997, Wahlstroöm & Sandén 1998), this interprofessional clinical placement allowed senior pre-qualifying students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop both their profession-specific skills in a real-world setting and the quality of their interprofessional teamwork. Student teams were supported by facilitators who led reflective sessions and acted as a resource for the students' problem-based learning. The training ward was evaluated by a multi-method approach, incorporating interviews, observations and questionnaires with students, patients and clinical staff. The evaluation findings have been grouped into a number of themes which offer an insight into the varying perspectives of training ward students, patients and staff. This paper pays particular attention to the nursing perspective of the interprofessional training ward pilot.

  13. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  14. Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relation to One Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEHan-Xin

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the transverse Ward-Takahashi relation for the vector vertex in momentum space at one-loop order in four-dimensional Abelian gauge theory. We demonstrate explicitly that the result is exactly the same as that derived by using one-loop vector vertex calculations.

  15. Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment.

  16. Ward Identities, B-> \\rho Form Factors and |V_ub|

    CERN Document Server

    Gilani, A H S; Riazuddin, M; Gilani, Amjad Hussain Shah

    2003-01-01

    The exclusive FCNC beauty semileptonic decay B-> \\rho is studied using Ward identities in a general vector meson dominance framework, predicting vector meson couplings involved. The long distance contributions are discussed which results to obtain form factors and |V_ub|. A detailed comparison is given with other approaches.

  17. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations

  18. The relationship between leadership, teamworking, structure, burnout and attitude to patients on acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Simpson, A.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conflict (aggression, substance use, absconding, etc.) and containment (coerced medication, manual restraint, etc.) threaten the safety of patients and staff on psychiatric wards. Previous work has suggested that staff variables may be significant in explaining differences between wards

  19. Comorbid depression in dementia on psychogeriatric nursing home wards: which symptoms are prominent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide insight into the prevalence and clinically relevant symptoms of comorbid depression among dementia patients in psychogeriatric nursing home wards, to enhance depression recognition. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of multicenter diagnostic data. SETTING: Psychogeriatric wards

  20. Ward based community road safety performance benchmarking, monitoring and intervention programmes in the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ribbens, H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available benchmarking, monitoring and intervention programme. Community road safety needs in the respective wards are articulated through the ward councillor. The rationale is that the community exactly knows where these problem areas are, because they suffer as a...

  1. Impact of the physical environment of psychiatric wards on the use of seclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, P.S. van der; Dusseldorp, E.; Keuning, F.M.; Janssen, W.A.; Noorthoorn, E.O.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The physical environment is presumed to have an effect on aggression and also on the use of seclusion on psychiatric wards. Multicentre studies that include a broad variety of design features found on psychiatric wards and that control for patient, staff and general ward characteristics

  2. Perturbative Correction to Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relation for the Vector Vertex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin; YU Hong-Wei

    2003-01-01

    We re-derive exactly the transverse Ward-Takahashi relation for the vector vertex in momentum space.The result shows that this transverse Ward-Takahashi relation in momentum space involves a perturbative correction term. We demonstrate explicitly that this transverse Ward-Takahashi relation is satisfied indeed at one-loop order.

  3. Supporting Information Access in a Hospital Ward by a Context-Aware Mobile Electronic Patient Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2006-01-01

    Ward is to support nurses in conducting morning procedures in a hospital ward. MobileWard is context-aware as it is able to discover and react autonomously according to changes in the environment and since it integrates the ability to provide information and services to the user where the relevancy depends...

  4. The relationship between substance use and exit security on psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, A.; Bowers, L.; Allan, T.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we report on the rates of drug/alcohol use on acute psychiatric wards in relation to levels and intensity of exit security measures. Background. Many inpatient wards have become permanently locked, with staff concerned about the risk of patients leaving the ward and harming

  5. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  6. Census of Ligurian Internal Medicine Wards of non-teaching hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela La Regina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is the future of internal medicine in Italy? Which competencies? Which potentialities? To this aim Ligurian FADOI Regional Society performed a census among 18 Internal Medicine Wards (IMWs in non-teaching Ligurian Hospital. We administered, by email, a questionnaire to the heads of IMWs. Data about staffing, equipment, skills, competencies and productivity during 2011 were collected from 1st to 31st November 2012. A total of 15/18 (83.3% chiefs answered to the questionnaire. The number of beds was largely variable among the wards. In 2011, mean diagnosis-related group (DRG-weight was 1.09 (range 0.91-1.6 and that revenues/costs ratio much higher than 1.5. Staff was quite adequate to standards defined by current law, only 33% has got a doctor:patients ratio superior to 1:6.4. However, annual hospitalizations exceed the availability of beds in medicine and the complexity of the patients would require a lower doctor:patients ratio, at least for a group of patients. In fact, 4 wards have a progressive care organization with a defined area for more seriously ill patients. Mean length of stay was 10 days. Expertise was wide, covering almost all medical sub-specialties. Acquired skills such as abdominal, heart and vascular ultrasounds, invasive procedures and their comprehensive knowledge make internists complete and cost-effective specialists. IMWs, as a concentrate of medical knowledge and skills, are the natural destination of current patients with co-morbidities. Staffing and number of beds should be revised according to this new demand. Their revenues/costs ratio resulted favorable and their global approach to patients and not to disease can be useful for resource rationalization. Wider and further studies are needed to improve the awareness of stakeholders about Internal Medicine.

  7. Liouville theory Ward identities for generating functional and modular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Takhtajan, L A

    1994-01-01

    We continue the study of quantum Liouville theory through Polyakov's functional integral \\cite{Pol1,Pol2}, started in \\cite{T1}. We derive the perturbation expansion for Schwinger's generating functional for connected multi-point correlation functions involving stress-energy tensor, give the "dynamical" proof of the Virasoro symmetry of the theory and compute the value of the central charge, confirming previous calculation in \\cite{T1}. We show that conformal Ward identities for these correlation functions contain such basic facts from Kähler geometry of moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces, as relation between accessory parameters for the Fuchsian uniformization, Liouville action and Eichler integrals, Kähler potential for the Weil-Petersson metric, and local index theorem. These results affirm the fundamental role, that universal Ward identities for the generating functional play in Friedan-Shenker modular geometry \\cite{FS}.

  8. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively...... realistic three-dimensional thermal mannequins with a parallel bed arrangement simulated the patients. The maximum dispersion distances in time under ward ventilation conditions were studied. A velocity profile simulated a time-dependent cough with total duration of 0.4 s. The results indicated...... that the transport characteristic of droplets due to coughing is highly influenced by their size. Although the effects of gravity or inertia on small droplets ( 40 μm are significantly affected by gravity and soon fall...

  9. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design in private and public settings are often not similar. The purpose of this article is therefore present a approach dividing the hospital ward in 3 user zones for patients, staff and visitors. The main user of the zone should be in control of the light scenario and thereby a refining......Studying Standard and recommendations for lighting in hospital environment its often suggest a uniform light distribution to facilitate the needs of the staff. At the same time the standards recommend a lighting design supporting the patients feeling a homely and pleasant atmosphere, and point out...... that the light should not be disrupting the patients wellbeing. These two approaches are not necessarily consistent because the right quality and quantity of light in wards is highly depending on the functionality of the space and the wished and expected lighting atmosphere of the space, and a comparison...

  10. Lighting quality in hospital wards - State of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    and a multitude of users with many different needs and requirements. It is a public domain with many references to the design of homes in the private sphere. The aim of the report is to display the existing research in the area of lighting design in hospital wards, and to present new lighting design strategies......When constructing and designing hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. Designing a healing hospital environment is a very important factor when planning new hospitals. How can aspects such as design, architecture, arts, lights, sounds and materials support and improve......, the furnishing, the acoustics and light are essential in evaluating of the experience of an environment. The light is crucial for the physical and psychological experience of wellbeing and the feeling of safety. The ward is a complex and interesting architectural space to design. It has a wide range of functions...

  11. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex;

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine...... the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  12. The background scale Ward identity in quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Percacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We show that with suitable choices of parametrization, gauge fixing and cutoff, the anomalous variation of the effective action under global rescalings of the background metric is identical to the derivative with respect to the cutoff, i.e. to the beta functional, as defined by the exact RG equation. The Ward identity and the RG equation can be combined, resulting in a modified flow equation that is manifestly invariant under global background rescalings.

  13. Ward-Takahashi Identity on the Light-Front

    CERN Document Server

    Naus, H W L; Frederico, T

    1998-01-01

    The Ward-Takahashi identity, reflecting local gauge invariance, is perturbatively verified for a boson model in light front field theory. A careful integration over the light front energy, corresponding to exactly taking into account pair terms, which are the contributions of the zero longitudinal momentum mode, is crucial to obtain this result. Furthermore, the one-loop boson form factors are calculated for arbitrary off-shell momenta.

  14. The background scale Ward identity in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percacci, Roberto [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Vacca, Gian Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We show that with suitable choices of parametrization, gauge fixing and cutoff, the anomalous variation of the effective action under global rescalings of the background metric is identical to the derivative with respect to the cutoff, i.e. to the beta functional, as defined by the exact RG equation. The Ward identity and the RG equation can be combined, resulting in a modified flow equation that is manifestly invariant under global background rescalings. (orig.)

  15. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Ward-Nutrition Communication Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ardolino, Margaret K.; Kahane, Stephen N.; Nichols, Karen; Richmond, Debra W.

    1987-01-01

    Communicating patient-specific diet information at any large medical institution is a complex process. The Johns Hopkins Hospital has chosen to automate the manual method of communicating this information. The development of the “Ward-Nutrition Communication Application” will allow users on an inpatient Nursing unit to order patient diets and other nutritional needs utilizing a multi-windowed, menu-based and mouse driven environment. This, and other applications, will run on high performance,...

  16. Utility of Ward-Based Retinal Photography in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shaun; Brown, Michael; Stirling, Verity; Vignarajan, Janardhan; Prentice, David; Kanagasingam, Yogesan

    2017-03-01

    Improvements in acute care of stroke patients have decreased mortality, but survivors are still at increased risk of future vascular events and mitigation of this risk requires thorough assessment of the underlying factors leading to the stroke. The brain and eye share a common embryological origin and numerous similarities exist between the small vessels of the retina and brain. Recent population-based studies have demonstrated a close link between retinal vascular changes and stroke, suggesting that retinal photography could have utility in assessing underlying stroke risk factors and prognosis after stroke. Modern imaging equipment can facilitate precise measurement and monitoring of vascular features. However, use of this equipment is a challenge in the stroke ward setting as patients are frequently unable to maintain the required seated position, and pupil dilatation is often not feasible as it could potentially obscure important neurological signs of stroke progression. This small study investigated the utility of a novel handheld, nonmydriatic retinal camera in the stroke ward and explored associations between retinal vascular features and stroke risk factors. This camera circumvented the practical limitations of conducting retinal photography in the stroke ward setting. A positive correlation was found between carotid disease and both mean width of arterioles (r = .40, P = .00571) and venules (r = .30, P = .0381). The results provide further evidence that retinal vascular features are clinically informative about underlying stroke risk factors and demonstrate the utility of handheld retinal photography in the stroke ward. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  18. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  19. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members' experience on Ward Round Teaching content. This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  20. Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65 years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3 %) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8 %) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies.

  1. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Nijman, Henk; Warren, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data included 69 serious untoward incidents. Adverse incidents were more likely during and after weeks of high numbers of male admissions, during weeks when other incidents also occurred, and during weeks of high regular staff absence through leave and vacancy. It may be possible to predict adverse incidents. Careful staff management and deployment may reduce the risks.

  2. Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose

    2009-01-01

    on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. METHODS: The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after......BACKGROUND: Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches...... outcome of the intervention was not met. The priorities of the intervention--to improve nurse-parent relationships--did not match the priorities of the nursing staff. Development of awareness and empathy was not enough to provide care that was satisfactory to clients in the context of working conditions...

  3. Words in Maternity Wards: An Aproximation to Perinatal Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Oiberman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledgment that just born babies interact with human and physical contexts originated changes in behaviors of health teems working in maternity wards settings. Concepts such as initial interactions, attachment, dyads, maternal vulnerability, behavioral competences of the just born babies and their applications to perinatal psychology, marked a transformation in different professionals involved in birth’s approaches. From one side, it can be said that medicalization of the birth act in Western societies had allowed to minimize risk factors. But this progress had been carried out without taking into account emotional expressions. The introduction of psychological interventions in neonatal periods is a new field of knowledge. History shows that in different periods and cultures there were amulets, potions and other elements associated with magic that were used to swear baby or mother’s death risk during childbirth. All these practices were taken the place of words, in a hard emotional moment: parturition. It was necessary to walk a long and difficult road for Perinatal Psycholy to recuperate the ancient place of old good women and incorporate words in maternity wards, knowing that the main scenery is first occupied by the mother’s body and then by the baby. Our daily job in a maternity ward, working together with pediatricians and neonatologists, allowed us to verify that words come out when psychologists themselves “include their body” as well as do mothers, babies and the medical teem. Words contribute to facilitate emotional expressions related to motherhood and place the baby in the family history, making able his or her “psychological birth”. 

  4. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  5. Ward identities and Wilson renormalization group for QED

    CERN Document Server

    Bonini, M; Marchesini, G

    1994-01-01

    We analyze a formulation of QED based on the Wilson renormalization group. Although the ``effective Lagrangian'' used at any given scale does not have simple gauge symmetry, we show that the resulting renormalized Green's functions correctly satisfies Ward identities to all orders in perturbation theory. The loop expansion is obtained by solving iteratively the Polchinski's renormalization group equation. We also give a new simple proof of perturbative renormalizability. The subtractions in the Feynman graphs and the corresponding counterterms are generated in the process of fixing the physical conditions.

  6. Ward identities and Wilson renormalization group for QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, M.; D'Attanasio, M.; Marchesini, G.

    1994-04-01

    We analyze a formulation of QED based on the Wilson renormalization group. Although the "effective lagrangian" used at any given scale does not have simple gauge symmetry, we show that the resulting renormalized Green's function correctly satisfies Ward identities to all orders in perturbation theory. The loop expansion is obtained by solving iteratively the Polchinski renormalization group equation. We also give a new simple proof of perturbative renormalizability. The subtractions in the Feynman graphs and the corresponing counter-terms are generated in the process of fixing the physical conditions.

  7. Dealing with conflict - The role of the ward sister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Cremer

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available In the course of her duties, the ward sister has to contend with many forms of conflict, discord and dissension. These involve conflict of the intrapersonal, interpersonal and intergroup varieties. Conflict is in the main, disruptive and dysfunctional. Skilful management, however, embodying cooperative effort in its reduction can produce constructive and positive results. Conflict management strategies are therefore either restrictive or constructive. Persons in serious conflict suffer varied degrees of personality disequilibrium, which necessitates emotional first aid or crisis intervention. Such primary preventive care is applicable to patients, their relatives, and members of the nursing staff in such need.

  8. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-09

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children\\'s ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children\\'s service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved.

  9. The Ottoman Hammam Al-Ward In Saida, Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howayda al-Harithy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hammam Al-Ward is an Ottoman monument in Saida. Siada (or Sidon is a coastal city in Lebanon and a hidden treasure with numerous Mamluk and Ottoman monuments. These monuments are of various types, from mosques to hammams to palaces and khans. They remain unstudied and at times undocumented. This is an architectural monograph of Hammam Al-Ward placed within the urban history of the city and the social practices of its inhabitants. Through documentation and comparative analysis, the paper argues that the hammam was built during the early eighteenth century but carries within it an old tradition of building that dates back to the Mamluk period and an old socio-spatial practice that dates back to Roman times. The article investigates and presents the urban condition that unfolds through the hammam patronage, style and location, the architectural interpretation of the hammam type of the Mediterranean Arab World and the socio-spatial practices of bathing and leisure that continue till modern times.

  10. The impact on the workload of the Ward Manager with the introduction of administrative assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Leach, Camilla; Kitsell, Fleur; Griffith, Jacki

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the impact on the workload of the Ward Manager (WM) with the introduction of administrative assistants into eight trusts in the South of England in a year-long pilot. Ward Managers are nurse leaders who are responsible for ward management and delivering expert clinical care to patients. They have traditionally been expected to achieve this role without administrative assistance. Meeting the workload demands of multiple roles and overload has meant the leadership and clinical role has suffered, presenting issues of low morale among existing WMs and issues of recruiting the next generation of WMs. Sixty qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 WMs, 12 Ward Manager Assistants (WMAs), and six senior nurse executives about the impact of the introduction of the WMA post. Quantitative data to measure change in WM workload and ward activity was supplied by 24 wards. Ward Managers reported spending reduced time on administrative tasks and having increased time available to spend on the ward with patients and leading staff. With the introduction of WMAs, there was also improvement in key performance measures (the maintenance of quality under service pressures) and increased staff motivation. There was overwhelming support for the introduction of administrative assistants from participating WMs. The WMAs enabled WMs to spend more time with patients and, more widely, to provide greater support to ward teams. The success of the pilot is reflected in wards working hard to be able to extend contracts of WMAs. The extent of the success is reflected in wards that were not participants in the pilot, observing the benefits of the post, having worked to secure funding to recruit their own WMAs. The widespread introduction of administrative assistance could increase ward productivity and provide support for clinical leaders. Continuing professional development for WMs needs to incorporate training about management responsibilities and how to best use administrative

  11. Ventilation of wards and nosocomial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江山平; 黄莉文; 陈锡龙; 王景峰; 伍卫; 尹松梅; 陈为宪; 詹俊; 严励; 马丽萍; 李建国; 黄子通

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify valid measures for preventing outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among protected healthcare workers in isolation units.Methods Architectural factors, admitted SARS cases and infection of healthcare workers in different isolation wards between January 30 and March 30, 2003 were analyzed.Results Four types of isolation wards were analyzed, including the ward where the thirty-first bed was located on the twelfth floor, the laminar flow ward in the Intensive Care Unit where the tenth bed was located on the fifteenth floor, the ward where the twenty-seventh bed was located on the thirteenth floor of the Lingnan Building, and thirty wards on the fourteenth to eighteenth floors of the Zhongshan Building. The ratios (m2/m3) of the area of the ventilation windows to the volume of the rooms were 0, 0, 1∶ 95 and 1∶ 40, respectively. Numbers of SARS cases in the wards mentioned above were 1, 1, 1 and 96, respectively. Total times of hospitalization were 43, 168, 110 and 1272 hours, respectively. The infection rates of the healthcare workers in the areas mentioned above were 73.2%, 32.1%, 27.5% and 1.7%, respectively. The difference in the infection rates was of statistical significance.Conclusions Isolating SARS cases in wards with good ventilation could reduce the viral load of the ward and might be the key to preventing outbreaks of SARS among healthcare workers along with strict personal protection measures in isolation units.

  12. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward.

  13. Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Bvumbwe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item “nursing staff provided constructive feedback” (P=0.162. Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978. The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment.

  14. Working time structure of pediatric nurses in hospital wards representing different referential levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Smoleń

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Working time is a non-renewable and important element in the management of an organization. The implementation of changes in the structure of working time may be facilitated by the insight into activities undertaken by employees during work. Such an approach plays an important role since the effective use of time improves the quality of care, prevents timewasting and optimizes the use of the full potential of employees, including nurses. The objective of the study was to determine the structure of working time of pediatric nurses in hospital wards of 2 referential levels. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in 2 wards (2nd and 3rd levels of reference in the Regional Specialist Children’s Hospital in Olsztyn. The research method involved the measurement of working time, as well as continuous and snap-shot observation techniques. Standardized research instruments were used in the study; 8 continuous observations and 2333 snap-shot observations were carried out. Results: In the structure of working time of pediatric nurses indirect nursing-related activities predominated (52.2%. Direct nursing made 28.7% of the working time. The nurses devoted the smallest amount of time to coordination and organization – 8%. The percentage of time associated with non-duty activities and breaks at work was 11.1%. In direct nursing activities associated with diagnosing (9% and treatment (11.7% prevailed. In indirect nursing activities pertaining to documentation of activities related to direct nursing made 24.6%. Conclusions: Pediatric nurses devote insufficient amount of time to direct nursing. Activities associated with documentation of activities related to direct nursing, preparation for direct nursing, as well as treatment and diagnosing predominate in the working time structure of nurses. Med Pr 2017;68(1:95–103

  15. Clinical ethics ward rounds: building on the core curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa; Watts, Lisa; Scicluna, Helen

    2012-08-01

    The clinical years of medical student education are an ideal time for students to practise and refine ethical thinking and behaviour. We piloted a new clinical ethics teaching activity this year with undergraduate medical students within the Rural Clinical School at the University of New South Wales. We used a modified teaching ward round model, with students bringing deidentified cases of ethical interest for round-table discussion. We found that students were more engaged in the subject of clinical ethics after attending the teaching sessions and particularly appreciated having structured time to listen to and learn from their peers. Despite this, we found no change in student involvement in managing or planning action in situations that they find ethically challenging. A key challenge for educators in clinical ethics is to address the barriers that prevent students taking action.

  16. Nosocomial klebsiellas. II. Transfer in a hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkorn, M J; Michel, M F

    1979-04-01

    During a 6-month period an epidemiological survey of the carriage of Klebsiella was conducted in a hospital ward where no outbreak of nosocomial infection occurred. In this endemic situation the regular sampling of several sites of patients, members of the nursing staff, and the environment, and the biotyping of Klebsiella made it possible to analyse the patterns of transmission between sites. There was abundant evidence for striking transmission of Klebsiella between the throat, hands, and faeces of patients. Transmission between patients seemed to be mainly through hands. The role of nurses' hands in transmission was not evident from this survey, probably due to the relatively long interval (a week) between samplings. Through the hands of patients, wash stands and the surrounding floor were contaminated with Klebsiella. The biotyping of Klebsiella facilitated the epidemiological analysis of the results.

  17. Nursing safety management in onco-hematology pediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying how safety management is applied by nurses to manage the nursing care, and at analyzing their challenges in onco-hematology pediatric wards. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2013. Six nurses were interviewed, and the content analysis was used. The key aspects relate to the importance of training and continuing education, teamwork, with the challenges in the care of hospitalized children and particularities of the disease, and the systematization, use of instruments and protocols. For child safety, the relationship between the administration and support is critical to the quality of care.

  18. Christmas cards workshop in a Restricted Access Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa García

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Christmas cards workshop is an intervention study made in the Restricted Access Ward (RAW of Hospital Gregorio Marañón (Madrid, in December 2001, from the 5th to the 22nd. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this workshop to improve the quality of the RAW patients´ hospital day, through their participation. They made 47 cards, the mean per patient was 1,52. Participation: 91,2% of the patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Drawings and texts alluded to the convict´s perspective of Christmas time, from their own experience. The Christmas cards were exhibited in the hospital and they also were sent to different penitentiary institutions in Madrid, to make the RAW known. The course “Education for health for interdisciplinary projects in penitentiary institutions” was the frame of this workshop.

  19. $B_7$, $B_8$ and chiral Ward identities

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, W; Lee, Weonjong; Fleming, George T.

    2005-01-01

    We present recent progress in understanding weak matrix elements on the lattice. We use HYP staggered fermions in quenched QCD to study numerically various properties of the $K^+\\to\\pi^+$ amplitudes of the electroweak penguin operators $Q_7$ and $Q_8$. We check chiral Ward identities to probe the validity of using improved staggered fermions in the calculation of weak matrix elements. We address the issue of mixing with unphysical lower dimension operators, which causes a divergent term in the case of the $\\Delta I = 1/2$ amplitudes. We propose a particular subtraction method as the best choice. We also measure the gold-plated ratio $R$ originally suggested by Becirevic and Villadoro.

  20. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...... demo will show the HyPR device and setup in order for conference attendees to experience the technology `in action'....

  1. Implementation of Releasing Time to Care - the productive ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwyneth

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Productive Ward - releasing time to care programme. It will discuss the benefits and key successes and provides advice for those wishing to implement the programme. In Lord Darzi's Next Stage Review, he advocates an ambitious vision of patient centred - clinician led, locally driven NHS. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a unique opportunity for everyone working within the NHS to improve effectiveness, safety and reliability of the services we provide. Whilst being situated within a National Health Service policy environment learning from this work can be translated nationally and internationally, as the principles underpin the provision of high quality care. Evaluation is currently in relation to each of the 15 modules rather than as the programme as a whole. It uses various methods including audit, observation, activity follow through, satisfaction surveys and process mapping. Each month data is colated for each of the 11 metrics which has shown a reduction in falls, drug administration errors and improvement in the recording of patient observations. One of the key issues is that an essential component for the success of the programme lies in the tangible support of the Trust Board/Board of Directors. Evidence shows that this programme improves patient satisfaction as it enables the provision of an increase in direct patient care by staff and subsequently improved clinical and safety outcomes. Ward Sister/Charge Nurse development includes Leadership, Project management and Lean Methodology techniques. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a key component of the Next Stage Review. It will create productive organisations by being a catalyst for the transformation of Trust services, enabling staff to spend more time caring for patients and users. This release in time will result in better outcomes and subsequent improvement with patient and staff satisfaction and

  2. 4WARD: A European Perspective towards the Future Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Marcus; Abramowicz, Henrik; Niebert, Norbert; Correia, Luis M.

    In this paper, we describe several approaches to address the challenges of the network of the future. Our main hypothesis is that the Future Internet must be designed for the environment of applications and transport media of the 21st century, vastly different from the initial Internet's life space. One major requirement is the inherent support for mobile and wireless usage. A Future Internet should allow for the fast creation of diverse network designs and paradigms and must also support their co-existence at run-time. We detail the technical and business scenarios that lead the development in the EU FP7 4WARD project towards a framework for the Future Internet.

  3. Prevention of measles spread on a paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapisiz, A; Polat, M; Kara, S S; Tezer, H; Simsek, H; Aktas, F

    2015-03-01

    Since measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant airborne transmission risk in hospitals, effective prevention measures are crucial. After a mother accompanying her child on a paediatric ward lacking a negative pressure room was diagnosed with measles, exposed persons without evidence of immunity (documentary evidence of receiving two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine) were treated with vaccination or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The interruption of transmission with these treatments was evaluated. There were 44 children and 101 adults exposed to the index patient. Twenty-five children and 88 adults were considered immune, providing evidence of immunity. Nineteen children and 13 adults were either given vaccination or IVIG for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). There were no additional cases of measles after 3 weeks follow-up. We conclude that measles is highly preventable by adequate PEP with vaccination or IVIG in a healthcare setting that lacks the benefit of a negative pressure room.

  4. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can...... support patients’ experience or maybe even have a positive influence on the recovery process. Thus at a general level, it is a crucial task to investigate how aspects such as the design of the environment, arts, lights, sounds can support and improve the patients’ recovery rate and the satisfaction...... of staff and guests in the future hospital. This paper introduce the concept of atmosphere based on the theory of Gernot Böhmes and it is dealing with the effect of light in experiencing atmosphere, looking at the importance having a holistic approach to lighting design. The paper displays important design...

  5. The full Ward-Takahashi Identity for colored tensor models

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I

    2016-01-01

    We derive the full $\\mathrm{U}(\\infty)$-Ward-Takahashi Identities for random colored tensor models. The strategy is to expand the free energy in boundary graphs that determine the combinatorics of the sources. This contributes to the organization of the correlation functions of colored tensor models and is carried out for arbitrary interactions of any rank, $D$, with subsequent focus on the $\\varphi^4$-theories. The result is that the boundary sector of quartic melonic interactions suffices to generate all $D$-colored graphs. For the rank-$3$ $\\varphi^4$-theory we derive the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades graph theory for analytical methods.

  6. Bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study has been to evaluate the pathogenic bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in hospital wards. Material and Methods: Samples were taken from frequently touched surfaces in the hospital environment in 13 units of various types. Culturing was carried out on solid blood agar and in growth broth (tryptic soy broth – TSB. Species identification was performed using the analytical profile index (API biochemical testing and confirmed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS system. Results: The total of 161 samples were taken for the study. Fifty-two of them, after 24 h of culture on a solid medium, demonstrated bacterial growth and further 60 samples had growth after prior multiplication in TSB. Overall, 69.6% of samples exhibited growth of 19 bacterial species. Pathogenic species – representing indicator organisms of efficiency of hospital cleaning – was demonstrated by 21.4% of samples. Among them Acinetobacter spp., Enterocococci spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were predominant. The proportion of various groups of bacteria significantly varied in respective hospitals, and in various types of wards. Disturbing observation is a large proportion of resistance of isolated CNS strains as a potential reservoir of resistance genes. Conclusions: The results show that touch surfaces in hospital units are contaminated by both potentially pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species. In connection with the reported, also in Poland, frequent omission or incorrect execution of hand hygiene by hospital staff, and probably patients, touch surfaces still constitute important reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. Improving hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers with recommendations is necessary for increasing biological safety of hospital environment. Med Pr 2017;68(3:459–467

  7. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofoss Dag

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1 that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2 that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006. Multilevel analysis by MLwiN version 1.10. Results Considerable parts of the score variations were at the ward and department levels. More organization level variation was seen at the ward level than at the department level. Conclusions Patient safety culture improvement efforts should not be limited to all-hospital interventions or interventions aimed at entire departments, but include involvement at the ward level, selectively aimed at low-scoring wards. Patient safety culture should be studied as closely to the patient as possible. There may be such a thing as "hospital safety culture" and the variance across hospital departments indicates the existence of department safety cultures. However, neglecting the study of patient safety culture at the ward level will mask important local variations. Safety culture research and improvement should not stop at the lowest formal level of the hospital (wards, out-patient clinics, ERs, but proceed to collect and analyze data on the micro-units within them.

  8. Insider action research and the microsystem of a Danish surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Mørcke, Anne Mette; Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This insider action research project aimed to improve interprofessional team performance at a surgical ward. The purpose of the project was (1) to critically appraise potential deficiencies in staffs’ identification, clinical judgment, and management of deteriorating ward patients, (2) to develop...

  9. Incidence, staff awareness and mortality of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Lippert, A.; Perner, A.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, staff awareness and subsequent mortality of patients with abnormal vital signs on general wards in a Danish university hospital.......The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, staff awareness and subsequent mortality of patients with abnormal vital signs on general wards in a Danish university hospital....

  10. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Simpson, A.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping

  11. Controlled Confrontation: The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority. An Exemplary Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Ward Grievance Procedure of the California Youth Authority is one of 17 programs that earned the National Institute's "Exemplary" label. This brochure provides the requisite practical information for those who wish to test or consider testing the ward grievance procedure. The program was developed as a way of dealing with the questions raised…

  12. Authenticity in Learning--Nursing Students' Experiences at a Clinical Education Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and understand first year nursing students' experiences of learning at a clinical education ward. Design/methodology/approach: The setting is a clinical education ward for nursing students at a department of infectious diseases. A qualitative study was carried out exploring students' encounters with patients,…

  13. [Reasons for Hospital Treatment of Psychiatric Patients before and after the Opening of a Satellite Ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-04-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within the catchment area that is administered by a psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to approach community treatment on the one hand and somatic medicine on the other hand, consequently diminishing the threshold for hospital treatment. This study investigated whether the diagnostic, psychopathologic and social reasons for admissions changed from this catchment area due to the lower threshold of a satellite ward. The results were controlled with another catchment area's admissions to the 30 km distant psychiatric hospital. The opening of the satellite ward was followed by an 81 % increase of admissions. In particular, admissions of patients with neuroses and personality disorders were more frequent. There was no change of the severity code of psychopathology at admission. From the catchment area of the satellite ward less patients were admitted involuntarily whereas more admissions happened due to social reasons and after patients' own decision.

  14. Application of visual management in medication management in the ward%目视管理在病区备用药物管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琴; 何桂娟; 金瑛

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of visual management in standby medication management in the ward. Methods:Using visual management method including color, logo, regional lines, and signboard to perform the standardized management of standby medication in the ward. Results:After implementation of visual management, the adverse events of ward standby medication reduced signiifcantly (P<0.05). Conclusion:Using visual management model in standby medication management in the ward is beneifcial for nurses to be familiar with the environment, enhance the safety awareness on standby medication management, reduce medication errors, ensure patient safety, and promote the standardized management of the ward standby medication.%目的:探讨目视管理在病区备用药物管理中的应用效果。方法:采用颜色、标识、区域线、看板等目视管理方法对病区备用药物进行规范化管理。结果:实施目视管理后,病区备用药物相关的不良事件发生率较前明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:目视管理应用于病区备用药物管理,可方便护士熟悉环境,增强护士对药物管理的安全意识,降低病区备用药物不良事件发生率,保证患者用药安全,实现病区备用药物的规范化管理。

  15. Opening the black box in nursing work and management practice: the role of ward managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Keith; Wilkinson, Adrian; Kellner, Ashlea

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to identify and explore key obstacles preventing ward managers from effectively performing the human resource management (HRM) responsibilities required in their role. In the context of increasing costs and the decentralisation of responsibility to ward level, the relevance of the ward manager role within the 'black box' between human resource management and firm performance is becoming increasingly pertinent. This paper presents an intensive case study including 37 interviews across all levels of a hospital where senior management attempted to shift to a high performance model of human resource management. The findings indicated that ward managers played a critical role in maintaining and improving employee performance, although they were restricted from effectively performing their responsibilities due to budget pressure and limited managerial skill development. Our findings support the contention that hospitals would benefit from focusing on the critical role of the ward manager as the central locus of influence in high performance human resource management (HPHRM) systems. Investment into high performance human resource management is discouraged if the hospital cannot adequately enable ward managers who are responsible for implementation. Introduction of managerial skills training to potential and existing ward managers is critical. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  18. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization′s (WHO guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  19. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  20. Overcrowding in Psychiatric Wards is Associated With Increased Risk of Adverse Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Alexander; Lahad, Amnon; Calfon, Nitza; Gun-Usishkin, Monica; Lubin, Gad; Tsur, Anat

    2016-03-01

    To study the association between bed occupancy in psychiatric wards and rate of adverse incidents (AIs) including aggressive behavior and falls. This is a retrospective study analyzing bed occupancy and AIs' data in 4 closed wards in a state psychiatric hospital in Israel over a 20-month period. Ward-level daily records were extracted from the hospital's electronic admission-discharge and AI registries, creating a log of 609 days for each of the 4 wards. Relationships between gross and net bed occupancy and AIs rate were calculated, in general and for each ward and type of incidents. Average gross occupancy was 106±14.8% and net occupancy was 96.4±15.6%. Gross occupancy >100% was recorded in 51% of days. Net occupancy was higher on days with at least 1 incident than on no-incident days (98.6±14.8% vs. 95.7±15.7%, Poccupancy quadrant (up to 85% occupancy), compared with 26.7% of days in the highest occupancy quadrant (106% and above). Moreover, aggressive behavior-type incidents were significantly lower in the lowest occupancy quadrant days compared with the highest occupancy quadrant (8.3% vs. 14.1%, Pbed occupancy on AIs rate was found. Overoccupancy is prevalent in psychiatric wards and is associated with an increased rate of aggressive AIs and falls. Policy makers should be convinced about the necessity to reduce overcrowding in psychiatric wards and to improve safety of inpatient facilities.

  1. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  2. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  3. Intussusception at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, A H; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H; Yosodiharjo, A

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study had been conducted on hospitalized infants and children in the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1, 1987 through December 31, 1988. The purpose is to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of intussusception. During the same period, there were 6484 infants and children hospitalized, 39 (0.6%) with intussusception, consisting of 23 (58.9%) males and (41.1%) females. Most of the cases (53.85%) were in age group of 4-6 months. Thirty four patients (87.12%) were wellnourished, and 5 patients (12.82%) undernourished. The major symptoms of intussusception were bloody diarrhoea (87.17%), vomiting (82.05%) and abdominal distention (66.41%). Successful reposition with barium enema occurred in 1 (20%) out of 5 patients. The major symptoms of intussusception were bloody diarrhoea (87.17%), vomiting. Surgical intervention was performed in 22 patients (56.41%). The result was as follows: discharged in good condition in 15 (68.18%) and deaths occurred in the remaining cases (7 cases = 31.82%). Of those 7 cases who died after operation, 2 cases were hospitalized in less than 2 days, 3 cases in less than 3 days and the remaining 2 cases in more than 3 days, after the symptoms developed.

  4. BED UTILIZATION IN CARDIO VASCULAR AND THORACIC SURGERY WARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishtyak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Of all the subsystems of a hospital, inpatient care occupies prime place in terms of resource consumed, use of specialized technical man power, technology and skill. In spite of the huge investment of money, material and the manpower at times even the basic needs of patients are not met. AIMS: The study was conducted, to observe the average length of stay (ALS of patients in cardio vascular and thoracic Surgery (CVTS ward, and to find out the bed occupancy rate. METHODS: The admission and discharge record of all the patients was recorded from the report books, hospital files of all the patients were checked to know complete biodata. Medical record section was consulted and admission discharge register/files were recorded to know the symptomatology, clinical findings, diagnosis and the management thereof. Mortality and morbidity was recorded from admission files. RESULTS: A total of 732 patients were admitted on a bed complement of 11712 days having 8639 bed days. 84.28% of the patients underwent surgical procedures. Daily average beds occupied were 23.60 beds per day, average length of stay was 11.23 days, and 73.76% was the bed occupancy rate. CONCLUSION: Patients having major operations had more length of stay compared to patients who were admitted after pre anesthetic checkup and full planning from outdoor departments. Preadmission evaluation, pre anesthetic checkup and preventing post-operative morbidity decrease length of stay

  5. An Analysis On Ward Identity For Multi-Field Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2013-01-01

    Given a correlation function (or n-point function), can the corresponding nature of space-time be determined ? To answer this question it is required to derive the Ward Identity (WI), analyse the symmetries and arrive at the law of conservation. Modus operandi involves Lie differentiating two-point function considering the symmetry to be non-anomalous. The WI so obtained is shown to form a Lie algebra which determines the nature of space-time. Solving the identity results in a law of conservation, which physically explains the reason for WI to form an algebra and contains in it an equation of motion for four-point function. As a special case, a relation between mass and potential involving the spatial derivatives of four- and five- point function is obtained. Finally, the conservation equation is exploited to get the probability amplitude for the two-point function which shows how correlation functions provide an opportunity to probe the fundamental laws of physics.

  6. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice.

  7. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  8. Strange and charm quark spins from the anomalous Ward identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ming; Yang, Yi-Bo; Liang, Jian; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; χQCD Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present a calculation of the strange and charm quark contributions to the nucleon spin from the anomalous Ward identity (AWI). This is performed with overlap valence quarks on 2 +1 -flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations on a 2 43×64 lattice with lattice spacing a-1=1.73 GeV and the light sea mass at mπ=330 MeV . To satisfy the AWI, the overlap fermion for the pseudoscalar density and the overlap Dirac operator for the topological density, which do not have multiplicative renormalization, are used to normalize the form factor of the local axial-vector current at finite q2. For the charm quark, we find that the negative pseudoscalar term almost cancels the positive topological term. For the strange quark, the pseudoscalar term is less negative than that of the charm. By imposing the AWI, the strange gA(q2) at q2=0 is obtained by a global fit of the pseudoscalar and the topological form factors, together with gA(q2) and the induced pseudoscalar form factor hA(q2) at finite q2. The chiral extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives Δ s +Δ s ¯=-0.0403 (44 )(78 ).

  9. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good...... sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43% resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47% of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time...

  10. The Importance of a Role-Specific, In-Hospital Ward Clerk Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Ward clerks are essential members of the healthcare team, providing administrative and organizational support to acute care units and clinics. This role influences such matters as nurses' direct patient-care time, timeliness of patient discharges, and patient safety. To support ward clerks in the varying responsibilities and complex scope of this role, a formal orientation and ongoing education program is imperative. Whereas corporate orientation informs new employees of overall organizational processes, a ward clerk-specific workplace education program prepares individuals for the demands of the position, ultimately supporting the healthcare team and patient safety.

  11. Particle Removal Efficiency of the Portable HEPA Air Cleaner in a Simulated Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Sun, Hequan

    2010-01-01

    Use of a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter in a room is believed to assist in reducing the risk of transmission of infectious diseases through removing the particles or large droplets to which pathogens may be attached. Use of a portable HEPA filter(s) in hospital wards is hypothesized...... of beds in an isolation ward is insufficient. An experiment was conducted in a full scale experimental ward with a dimension of 6.7 m × 6 m × 2.7 m and 6 beds to test these hypotheses for a portable HEPA filter. The removal efficiency for different size particles was measured at different locations...

  12. Factors Influencing Participation of Rural Women in Zimbabwes 2013 Constitution Referendum A Case Study Of Ward 22 Gutu District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbra Ncube

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Participation is the cornerstone of citizen engagement. In constitution making and other public policy formulation processes public participation typically involves preparing the public to participate through civic education and public information campaigns as well as consulting the public on issues such as how the process should take place and the contents of the constitution itself. This study sought to examine the factors that influence womens participation in constitution making processes specifically relating to voting in the constitution referendum in the case of rural women residing in ward 22 of Gutu district of Zimbabwe. Gutu District is the third largest district in Masvingo province. Ward 22 is located in the communal region of Gutu central. The people of ward 22 largely depend on subsistence farming and market gardening for their livelihoods. The objectives of the study were to ascertain to what extent media campaign and publicity efforts by womens civic groups and public interaction through public meetings and hearings were able to influence the participation of Zimbabwean women in the 2013 referendum in ward 22 Gutu district. Over and above these objectives the study sought to document the experiences and views of rural Zimbabwean women on the constitution making process. This study adopted a descriptive case study research design. Samples of 108 women from Ward 22 Gutu District were conveniently selected to participate in this study. Data was collected using a structured interview guide and questionnaires which were administered to the respondents. A focused group discussion was also carried out to verify the information gathered through these instruments. Findings and conclusions were derived by means of detailed comparative and inductive analysis of data. Descriptive statistics were employed in the presentation of the findings. Amongst the major findings are that rural women in ward 22 in Gutu district were in actual

  13. Misoprostol for treatment of incomplete abortion at the regional hospital level: results from Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwekerela, B; Kalumuna, R; Kipingili, R; Mashaka, N; Westheimer, E; Clark, W; Winikoff, B

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the safety, efficacy, and acceptability of misoprostol versus manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) for treatment of incomplete abortion. A prospective open-label randomised trial. Kagera Regional Hospital, Bukoba, Tanzania. Three hundred women with a clinical diagnosis of incomplete abortion and a uterine size misoprostol or MVA. If abortion was clinically complete at 7-day follow up, the woman was released from the study. If it was still incomplete, the woman was offered the choice of an additional 1-week follow up or immediate MVA. Cases still incomplete after a further week were offered MVA. Incidence of successful abortion (success defined as no secondary surgical intervention provided), incidence of adverse effects, patient satisfaction. Success was very high in both arms (misoprostol: 99%; MVA: 100%; difference not significant). Most adverse effects were higher in the misoprostol arm, although the mean pain score was higher in the MVA arm (3.0 versus 3.5; P misoprostol (75%) than with MVA (55%, P = 0.001), and a higher proportion of women in the misoprostol arm said that they would recommend the treatment to a friend (95% versus 75%, P Misoprostol is as effective as MVA at treating incomplete abortion at uterine size of misoprostol appears higher. Given the many practical advantages of misoprostol over MVA in low-resource settings, misoprostol should be more widely available for treatment of incomplete abortion in the developing world.

  14. "SEND IN THE CLOWNS!", OR THE IMAGINATION AT WORK: THE NARRATIVES OF THREE PEDIATRIC WARD CLOWNS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francesca Gobbo

    2014-01-01

      The article presents an interpretation of three narratives collected from three young professionals who volunteer as clowns for the young patients of a pediatric ward in a northern Italian hospital...

  15. Post natal use of analgesics: comparisons between conventional postnatal wards and a maternity hotel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeng, Hedvig; Eskild, Anne; Nesheim, Britt-Ingjerd

    2010-04-01

    To investigate factors related to analgesic use after delivery, and especially whether rates of analgesic use were different in a midwife-managed maternity hotel as compared to conventional postnatal wards. One maternity hotel and two conventional postnatal wards at Ullevål University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. Data were obtained from hospital records for 804 women with vaginal deliveries. Postnatal analgesic use. Overall, approximately half the women used analgesics after vaginal delivery in both conventional postnatal wards and maternity hotel. The factors that were significantly associated with use of analgesics postnatally in multivariate analysis were multiparity, having a non-Western ethnicity, smoking in pregnancy, younger age, instrumental delivery, analgesic use during labour, maternal complications post partum, and duration of postnatal stay 4 days or more. The use of analgesics is determined by socio-demographic and obstetric factors rather than the organisation of the ward.

  16. Structured risk assessment and violence in acute psychiatric wards: randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abderhalden, Christoph; Needham, Ian; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Ruud; Haug, Hans-Joachim; Fischer, Joachim E

    2008-01-01

    .... To assess whether such risk assessments decrease the incidence of violence and coercion. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with 14 acute psychiatric admission wards as the units of randomisation, including a preference arm...

  17. Attitudes of parents and staff towards medical students on the paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, A; Kennedy, C; Canas-Martinez, A; Gildea, D; Jamaludin, M A; Moore, M; Meehan, J; Nadeem, M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes of parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards in a Dublin teaching hospital. We invited 100 parents of patients and 30 staff involved in the care of children on the paediatric wards to participate. The majority of parents agreed or strongly agreed that they would be happy for a student to interview them (n = 87; (87%)), interview their child (80%) or examine their child (74%). Of 30 staff, 12 (40%) staff agreed that the presence of medical students on the ward increased their job satisfaction, 13 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that medical student presence encouraged them to keep up to date with recent medical developments and 6 (20%) felt that it increased the quality of patient care. Attitudes of both parents and staff to medical students on paediatric wards are positive with both emphasising the need for professional behaviour.

  18. Theory of mind in schizophrenia: correlation with clinical symptomatology, emotional recognition and ward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Kyeong; Kim, Yong Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have suggested the presence of a theory of mind (ToM) deficit in schizophrenic disorders. This study examined the relationship of emotion recognition, theory of mind, and ward behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Fifty-five patients with chronic schizophrenia completed measures of emotion recognition, ToM, intelligence, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Nurse's Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE). Theory of mind sum score correlated significantly with IQ, emotion recognition, and ward behavior. Ward behavior was linked to the duration of the illness, and even more so to theory of mind deficits. Theory of mind contributed a significant proportion of the amount of variance to explain social behavior on the ward. Considering our study results, impaired theory of mind contributes significantly to the understanding of social competence in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content...... construct validity, an observer assessed 4 groups of doctors during performance of a complete ward round (n = 32). The nurse who accompanied the doctor on rounds made a global assessment of the performance. RESULTS: The response rate to the questionnaire was 80.7%. The respondents found that all 10 items...... on the checklist were relevant to ward round performance and that the item collection was comprehensive. Checklist mean-item scores differed between levels of expertise: junior house officers 1.4 (1.0-1.9); senior house officers 2.0 (1.5-2.9); specialist trainees 2.5 (1.8-2.8), and specialists 2.7 (2...

  20. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  1. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV) System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zulfikar A Adamu; Andrew Price

    2015-01-01

      Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications...

  2. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Diagnostic dilemmas in the maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić-Mitrović Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS refers to a newborn neurological, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory disorder if a newborn was exposed to psychoactive substances in the intrauterine period. NAS is difficult to diagnose due to unreliability of the data on addictive substances use during pregnancy, limited possibilities of the prenatal exposure diagnosis and postnatal substance detection, which all lead to diagnostic dilemmas. Objective. The aim of this study was to indicate the problems in patients with early NAS diagnosis in the maternity ward and the importance of clinical presentation used as a guide toward the diagnosis. Methods. This retrospective study included five term eutrophic newborns with high Apgar score, good adaptation in the first day and with clinical presentation of NAS during the second day of life. The clinical presentation was dominated by irritability, increased wakefulness, increased muscle tone, shrilly crying, tremors, problems with accepting food, tachypnea, subfebrility and hyperhidrosis. Finnegan scale was introduced in order to diagnose NAS and apply the therapy. Single-medication therapy of phenobarbitone was applied in four cases and a combination of phenobarbitone and morphine in one case. For toxicological analysis newborns’ urine samples were used. Results. Conditions such as perinatal asphyxia, infection, hunger, polycythemia, hypoglycemia or hypocalcemia were excluded. Finnegan score implied that pharmacological treatment had to be administered. The discrepancy between the NAS anamnesis and toxicological analysis existed. Response to the treatment was positive in all cases. Conclusion. NAS is a multisystemic disorder and should be suspected when it is noticed that children exhibit characteristic signs. However, other pathological conditions have to be excluded. Quantification according to the adopted scales for NAS leads toward appropriate treatment and recovery of the newborns.

  3. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgeland Jon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification. Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only

  4. Patient safety culture lives in departments and wards: Multilevel partitioning of variance in patient safety culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hofoss Dag; Deilkås Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Aim of study was to document 1) that patient safety culture scores vary considerably by hospital department and ward, and 2) that much of the variation is across the lowest level organizational units: the wards. Setting of study: 500-bed Norwegian university hospital, September-December 2006. Methods Data collected from 1400 staff by (the Norwegian version of) the generic version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ Short Form 2006). Multilevel analysis by MLwiN vers...

  5. Feasibility and acceptability of rapid HIV screening in a labour ward in Togo

    OpenAIRE

    Pitche, Vincent P; Renaud Becquet; Mathieu Sibe; François Dabis; Albert Tatagan; Annette Lawson-Evi; Koffi Akpadza; Marthe-Aline Jutand; Coffie, Patrick A.; Benjamin G Kariyiare; Ekouevi, Didier K; Mireille David

    2012-01-01

    Background: HIV screening in a labour ward is the last opportunity to initiate an antiretroviral prophylaxis among pregnant women living with HIV to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Little is known about the feasibility and acceptability of HIV screening during labour in West Africa. Findings: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the labour ward at the Tokoin Teaching Hospital in Lomé (Togo) between May and August 2010. Pregnant women admitted for labour were randomly sel...

  6. Training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" was launched in Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    @@ On March 6th, the training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" (GPM ward) was launched in the conference hall of Westin Hotel, Wuhan.The conference was hosted by Clinics Medical Secretary, Ministry of Health, and undertaken by CSCO and Mundipharma (China) Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Three hundreds experts, doctors and nurses, from departments of oncology, pain, anesthesiology and pharmacy, in 6 provinces (including Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shanxi, Shanxi, Henan), attended the conference.

  7. Observations on Henneguya salminicola Ward, a myxosporidian parasitic in Pacific salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, F.F.

    1939-01-01

    Henneguya salminicola was described in 1919 by Dr. H. B. Ward from cysts found in the body musculature of a silver salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum) taken from the Stickeen River in southeastern Alaska. Ward described the cysts as “pyriform, fairly uniform in size, and hard to the touch. . . . The cysts measured 3 to 6 mm in diameter and were found everywhere through the muscle mass.”

  8. Evaluation of fungal air contamination in selected wards of two tertiary hospitals in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kamali Sarwestani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the frequency and diversity of fungal spores in hospital wards were different. In addition, since the fungal contamination in the hospital environment are affected by various environmental factors and the efficiency of ventilation systems, some of these wards require better ventilation system as well as regular monitoring to remove these fungal bioaerosols in order to maintain the health of patients and health care workers.

  9. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Abebe; Chanie, Tesfahun; Woldie, Mirkuzie

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to Marc...

  10. Outbreak of staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a maternity ward linked to an asymptomatic healthcare worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occelli, P; Blanie, M; Sanchez, R; Vigier, D; Dauwalder, O; Darwiche, A; Provenzano, B; Dumartin, C; Parneix, P; Venier, A G

    2007-11-01

    An outbreak of staphylococcal bullous impetigo occurred over a period of five months in a maternity ward involving seven infected and two colonised neonates. The skin lesions were due to epidermolytic toxin A-producing Staphylococcus aureus. Infection control measures were implemented and a retrospective case-control study performed. Contact with an auxiliary nurse was the only risk factor for cases of bullous impetigo (Pimpetigo and the auxiliary nurse was reassigned to an adult ward.

  11. Psychiatric wards in general hospitals - the opinions of psychiatrists employed there

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Chojnowski

    2016-04-01

    The psychiatrists employed in the psychiatric wards in general hospitals in Poland evaluate this organisational model positively. However, the destabilisation of economic foundations of these wards reported in the world literature was also reflected in the results of a survey conducted in Poland. There is a need to develop standards for the organisation and financing departments of psychiatry in general hospitals providing them stable status in the healthcare system in Poland.

  12. Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the

  13. Evaluation of bio-aerosols concentration in the different wards of three educational hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatollah Nourmoradi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioaerosols level in the various parts of three educational hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The collection of bioaerosols (including bacterial and fungal microorganisms was carried out with one-stage Anderson sampler. The sampling was carried out at the height of 1.5 m from the floor of various hospitals wards (infectious, surgery, urology wards, and operating room. The volume of each sample was determined based on pre-tests carried and was about 50 L. After sampling, the samples were incubated and analyzed. The effect of various environmental conditions including humidity, temperature, and outdoor bioaerosol levels was also investigated. Results: The lowest numbers of fungal and bacterial concentration were obtained in operating rooms of the hospitals and the highest concentration was observed in infectious disease wards of hospital 1 and 2 and surgery ward of hospital 3. The bacterial concentration was observed to be higher in hospital wards than outdoor, except hospitals′ operating rooms. Conclusion: The findings showed that the bioaerosols level in the hospitals was relatively high. The higher levels of indoor bacteria than outdoor might be associated with the presence of patients, their activity, unsuitable ventilation, and disinfection. Therefore, environmental monitoring and control measures are required to improve hospital environmental quality especially in the wards with immune deficiency patients.

  14. The 'Releasing Time to Care--the Productive Ward' programme: participants' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jacqueline; Adams, John

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of nursing staff concerning the implementation of the 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme in a specialist cardiothoracic hospital. The 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme uses the 'lean' philosophy originally developed in the Japanese motor industry to improve the efficiency of hospital wards. Its aim is to increase the proportion of time that nurses are able to spend in direct patient care. This study used a descriptive qualitative method with a sample size of four nurses and two health-care support workers. Thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken using the procedure developed by Burnard. Thematic content analysis identified five major themes: starting to implement the programme, anxiety and defensiveness, the importance of leadership and communication, challenges, and learning and personal development. Overall, the programme had a positive impact on both the wards studied. Challenges that were identified included the need to sustain momentum once the initial enthusiasm had waned. This study highlighted the importance of key transformational leadership skills at ward manager level, such as the ability to inspire nurses to approach old problems in new ways, in the implementation of the 'Releasing Time to Care - the Productive Ward' programme. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The locked psychiatric ward: hotel or detention camp for people with dual diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkelsen, Toril Borch; Larsen, Inger Beate

    2013-10-01

    The concepts of autonomy and liberty are established goals in mental health care; however, involuntary commitment is used towards people with mental health and substance abuse problems (dual diagnosis). To explore how patients and staff act in the context of involuntary commitment, how interactions are described and how they might be interpreted. Ethnographic methodology in a locked psychiatric ward in Norway. Two parallel images emerged: (a) The ward as a hotel. Several patients wanted a locked ward for rest and safety, even when admission was classified as involuntary. The staff was concerned about using the ward for real treatment of motivated people, rather than merely as a comfortable hotel for the unmotivated. (b) The ward as a detention camp. Other patients found involuntary commitment and restrictions in the ward as a kind of punishment, offending them as individuals. Contrary, the staff understood people with dual diagnoses more like a generalized group in need of their control and care. Patients and staff have different perceptions of involuntary commitment. Based on the patients' points of view, mental health care ought to be characterized by inclusion and recognition, treating patients as equal citizens comparable to guests in a hotel.

  16. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  17. Outside the operating room: How a robotics program changed resource utilization on the inpatient Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Annie; Abitbol, Jeremie; Ramana-Kumar, Agnihotram V; Fadlallah, Bassam; Kessous, Roy; Cohen, Sabine; Lau, Susie; Salvador, Shannon; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the changes in the composition of the gynecologic oncology inpatient ward following the implementation of a robotic surgery program and its impact on inpatient resource utilization and costs. Retrospective review of the medical charts of patients admitted onto the gynecologic oncology ward the year prior to and five years after the implementation of robotics. The following variables were collected: patient characteristics, hospitalization details (reason for admission and length of hospital stay), and resource utilization (number of hospitalization days, consultations, and imaging). Following the introduction of robotic surgery, there were more admissions for elective surgery yet these accounted for only 21% of the inpatient ward in terms of number of hospital days, compared to 36% prior to the robotic program. This coincided with a sharp increase in the overall number of patients operated on by a minimally invasive approach (15% to 76%, probotics era. The robotics program contributed to a ward with higher proportion of patients with complex comorbidities (Charlson≥5: RR 1.06), Stage IV disease (RR 1.30), and recurrent disease (RR 1.99). Introduction of robotic surgery allowed for more patients to be treated surgically while simultaneously decreasing inpatient resource use. With more patients with non-surgical oncological issues and greater medical complexity, the gynecologic oncology ward functions more like a medical rather than surgical ward after the introduction of robotics, which has implications for hospital-wide resource planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ophthalmology hospital wards contamination to pathogenic free living Amoebae in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Haghighi, Ali; Taghipour, Niloofar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoeba in ophthalmology wards in reference hospitals in Iran. Since an increasing number of Acanthamoeba Keratitis cases after eye surgery and eye trauma have been recently observed in this country, it could be possible that the disinfection procedures undertaken in the clinical setting may not have a good hygiene and disinfection procedures, hence the aim of this study. Therefore, 42 dust and biofilm samples were collected from different areas of ophthalmology wards and checked for the presence of FLA using morphological criteria, PCR based analysis and DNA sequencing. Of the 42 samples from dust and biofilm sources, 18(42.86%) isolates were found to contain FLA and 12(92.3%) isolates belonged to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype. Isolation of the pathogenic genotype T4 from medical instruments, including slit lamp in corneal wards, may be a threat for patients undergoing eye surgery in these wards. Other FLA isolated in this study included Acanthamoeba genotype T5, Vahlkampfia sp, Naegleria australiensis, Vermamoeba vermiformis and Echinamoeba exudans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of potentially pathogenic FLA in ophthalmology wards in Iran. Improved disinfection methods and monitoring of hospitals ward are thus necessary in this area in order to minimize the risk of infection in patients.

  19. Is clinical competence perceived differently for student daily performance on the wards versus clerkship grading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmers, Paul F; Kanter, Steven L; Splinter, Ted A W; Schmidt, Henk G

    2008-12-01

    Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical teachers consider the same competencies important for clerkship grading, a survey that consisted of 21 different student characteristics was administered to clinical teachers. Two independent factor analyses using structural equation modeling were conducted to abstract underlying latent relationships among the different student characteristics and to define a clinical competence profile for daily performance of students on the wards and clerkship grading. Differences between the degree of importance for student daily ward performance and clerkship grading are considered and discussed. The results of the survey indicate that the degree of importance of competencies are rated different for daily performance of students on the wards and clerkship grades. Competencies related to the diagnostic process are more important for clerkship grading, whereas interpersonal skills, professional qualities, and motivation are more important for daily ward performance. It is concluded that the components of clinical competence considered important for adequate performance are not necessarily in alignment with what is required for grading. Future research should focus on an explanation why clinical educators think differently about the importance of competencies for student examination in contrast to what is required for adequate daily performance on the wards.

  20. Active learning on the ward: outcomes from a comparative trial with traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Prado, Hegla; Hannois Falbo, Gilliatt; Rodrigues Falbo, Ana; Natal Figueirôa, José

    2011-03-01

    Academic activity during internship is essentially practical and ward rounds are traditionally considered the cornerstone of clinical education. However, the efficacy and effectiveness of ward rounds for learning purposes have been under-investigated and it is necessary to assess alternative educational paradigms for this activity. This study aimed to compare the educational effectiveness of ward rounds conducted with two different learning methodologies. Student subjects were first tested on 30 true/false questions to assess their initial degree of knowledge on pneumonia and diarrhoea. Afterwards, they attended ward rounds conducted using an active and a traditional learning methodology. The participants were submitted to a second test 48hours later in order to assess knowledge acquisition and were asked to answer two questions about self-directed learning and their opinions on the two learning methodologies used. Seventy-two medical students taking part in a paediatric clinic rotation were enrolled. The active methodology proved to be more effective than the traditional methodology for the three outcomes considered: knowledge acquisition (33 students [45.8%] versus 21 students [29.2%]; p=0.03); self-directed learning (38 students [52.8%] versus 11 students [15.3%]; pactive methodology produced better results than the traditional methodology in a ward-based context. This study seems to be valuable in terms of the new evidence it demonstrates on learning methodologies in the context of the ward round. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  1. Assesment of psychosocial work conditions of nurses at selected hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Rotter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good organisation of work, clear division of responsibilities, support from superiors are factors that positively influence the satisfaction of the profession. The purpose of the work was the assessment of psychosocial working conditions of nurses. Material and Methods: The research included 388 nurses working at surgical wards, medical treatment wards, and psychiatric wards. The research method was a diagnostic survey carried out by means of a questionnaire called Psychosocial Work Conditions. The obtained results were statistically analysed. Results: Nearly a half of the nurses considers the requirements at work as moderate, and 36.66% as high. Nurses from medical treatment wards indicate the highest level of requirements. Nurses working at psychiatric wards and in a shift system significantly more often feel the requirements relating to overload and resulting from a conflict of roles. Nurses working in the profession for more than 10 years considerably more often describe the level of behavioural control as high in comparison to those working for a shorter time. Regardless of the character of a ward, nurses most often (44.33% assess the support from co-workers as average, and 1/5 considered this as low. Conclusions: The results indicate the correctness of introducing psychosocial training for professionally active nurses. Med Pr 2014;65(2:173–179

  2. Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Eva

    2015-09-01

    To describe nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards. A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants. Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicators, regular assessment of patients' swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results. Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure, process and outcome components must be addressed. The use of care pathways, standard care plans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Assessment of Measurement Tools of Observation Rate of Nursing Handover Standards in Clinical Wards of Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadi Amini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : In health centers, clinical information of patient is transferred among care staffs regularly. One of the common cases in information transferring is during the time of nurses’ handover in hospital which performing it correctly will help schedule patient care, providing safety and facilitating exact transferring of information. The aim of this study is investigating validity and reliability of assessment of observance rate of shift handover in clinical wards checklist. Material and Methods : In order to determine the reliability of checklist, two experts panel meetings were held with the presence of 10 experts in clinical field that in those meetings the reliability was investigated with discussion and consensus of participants. Checklist validity was investigated through pilot study in 4 wards of 4 hospitals and calculated by Kronbach- alpha method with 28 cases of shifts handover in morning, noon, and night shift. Results : In studying reliability, the primary checklist was divided into two checklists: patient handover, equipments and ward handover that included 27 and 72 items, respectively. The reliability of patient handover checklist was verified with 0.9155 Kronbach-alpha and that of equipments and ward handover was verified with 0.8779 Kronbach-alpha. Conclusion : Verifying checklists by mentioned scientific and statistical methods showed that these are very powerful instruments that can be used as one of the assessment tools of shift handover in clinical wards to be used towards promoting received services by customers of healthcare system.

  4. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused.

  5. Medical students learning experiences of the labour ward: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Danielle; Turner, Michael J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Higgins, Mary F

    2016-11-01

    To study the educational value to medical students of a labour ward rotation. Qualitative research study was performed in two tertiary level obstetric hospitals attached to a large medical school in Dublin. Medical students attending a six-week rotation in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in University College Dublin were invited to participate. As part of this rotation, students spend one week as part of the clinical team working on the labour ward. Focus groups were held in order to identify common themes and experiences of medical students during this labour ward week. Grounded theory with thematic analysis was used. The main outcome measures were the educational experience and value of a labour ward rotation to medical students. Five distinct themes developed from the focus groups of 19 students. A high value was placed on patient centred bedside teaching. Midwives were identified as excellent teachers and facilitators of learning. There was a clear sense of teamwork and belonging by the students. However, students reported frustration with unclear learning objectives. Students identified extra pre-learning with pre-specified learning aims before the labour ward week as being important. Bedside teaching was highly valued as it advanced student's knowledge of obstetrics theory and improved communication skills. In general, medical students reported a positive experience from working in the labour word but there is scope for improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interprofessional communication between surgery trainees and nurses in the inpatient wards: Why time and space matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Oshan; Coburn, Natalie G; Nathens, Avery B; Hallet, Julie; Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib

    2016-09-01

    Optimal interprofessional communication (IPC) is broadly viewed as a prerequisite to providing quality patient care. In this study, we explored the enablers and barriers to IPC between surgical trainees and ward nurses with a view towards improving IPC and the quality of surgical patient care. We conducted an ethnography in two academic centres in Canada totalling 126 hours of observations and 32 semi-structured interviews with trainees and nurses. Our findings revealed constraints on IPC between trainees and nurses derived from contested meanings of space and time. Trainees experienced the contested spatial boundaries of the surgical ward when they perceived nurses to project a sense of territoriality. Nurses expressed difficulty getting trainees to respond and attend to pages from the ward, and to have a poor understanding of the nurses' role. Contestations over time spent in training and patient care were found in trainee-nurse interactions, wherein trainees perceived seasoned nurses to devalue their clinical knowledge on the ward. Nurses viewed the limited time that trainees spent in clinical rotation in the ward as adversely affecting communication. This study underscores that challenges to enhancing IPC at academic health centres are rooted in team and professional cultures. Efforts to improve IPC should therefore: identify and target the social and cultural dimensions of healthcare team member relations; recognise how power is deployed and experienced in ways that negatively impact IPC; and enhance an understanding and appreciation in the temporal and spatial dimensions of IPC.

  7. Mini outbreak of Kaposi′s varicelliform eruption in skin ward: A study of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao GRR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kaposi`s varicelliform eruption (KVE represents widespread cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV infection in patients with preexisting dermatoses. Occasionally, this infection can present as a nosocomial infection in skin wards, if adequate bed-spacing and barrier nursing methods are not followed. We are reporting five cases of KVE; four cases acquired the infection in a makeshift ward after admission of the first case in May 2005, due to the renovation work of the regular skin ward. Aim: The purpose of this study is to create clinical awareness about this uncommon dermatologic entity and to stress upon the importance of bed-spacing and barrier nursing in skin wards. Methods: Five cases of KVE, three females and two males with different primary dermatoses (pemphigus foliaceus - one, pemphigus vulgaris - two, paraneoplastic pemphigus - one and toxic epidemal necrolysis - one were included in this study. Diagnosis was made clinically and supported with Tzanck smear and HSV serology. All the cases were treated with oral acyclovir. Results: Four out of five cases of KVE recovered with treatment, one case of extensive pemphigus vulgaris with KVE succumbed to death. Conclusion: Mini outbreaks of KVE can occur in skin wards with inadequate bed-spacing and overcrowding of patients. Therefore adequate bed-spacing, barrier nursing and isolation of suspected cases are mandatory to prevent such life-threatening infections.

  8. Barriers to nurse-patient communication in cardiac surgery wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-15

    An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care.

  9. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users.

  10. Acceptance of the 2009 Henry Baldwin Ward Medal: The accidental parasitologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Society, President Conn, colleagues, friends, and particularly students, the Ward Medal recipient, from Clarke Read onward, traditionally recounts how their career was shaped. A decade ago, in a crumbling Kona hotel, the ASP's own tattooed lady, Janine Caira, opened her Ward Medal address with: “To all future Ward Medalists, many of whom I trust are sitting in the audience out there today, I say: savor the moment! You have no idea how much easier it is to be sitting out there where you are than standing up here where I am” (Caira 1998). I certainly didn't imagine that Janine was delivering her advice to me and it is presumptuous to imagine my story is a template for shaping a career. As the title of my talk indicates, it was an accident.

  11. Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, M.

    2009-01-01

    , computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs-was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. RESULTS: The majority (93......BACKGROUND: Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role......, clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. METHODS: Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital...

  12. [The role of the psychologist in hospitals and maternity wards in the state of Sergipe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lyvia de Jesus; Vieira, Maria Jésia

    2012-05-01

    This article seeks to reflect on the professional activity of the psychologist in the hospital context by examining the role of psychologists working in hospitals and maternity wards in the State of Sergipe. It seeks to identify the specific role of these professionals in hospitals and maternity wards, as well as their motivating forces and the difficulties encountered. This work is part of a broader project that sought to study not only the activity per se, but also training aspects of these professionals. The sample was analyzed using a qualitative and quantitative approach for thematic analysis. Results revealed that the characterization of the role of psychologists has a focus on psychotherapeutic work with patients before and after surgery, as well as the caregivers and family members of critically ill patients in the following units: ICU, ICC, oncology, dialysis and surgical wards, offering support, especially at the pre- and post-surgery phase.

  13. [Intercommunication and information flow. An explorative study about ward rounds and patients' documentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Uwe; Fotuhi, Parwis; Seele, Anja; Nikolic, Djordje

    2008-07-01

    In modern patient interprofessional communication is an impor tant factor of good outcome. The aim of this study was to analyse the intercommunication during ward rounds and information passed by patients' documentation on an internal and geriatric medicine ward. Beside frequent interruptions the ward rounds showed a restricted flow of information that is based and targeted on the chief physician Nursing staff felt excluded from the informational flow. Regarding patients' documentation staff complained about lack of information and illegible notes. Availability of written information was found to be problematic. A team-orientated approach could help to improve interprofessional communication in the future. Besides the importance of carefully performed documentation as a reliable form of communication, communicative contribution of the nursing staff has to be upvalued.

  14. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy.

  15. Experiences of therapeutic relationships on hospital wards, dissociation, and making connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Sarah; Lloyd, Mike; Simpson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    An interpretive phenomenological analysis sought to explore how people reporting moderate to high levels of dissociation experienced relationships with multidisciplinary hospital ward staff. Three superordinate themes were developed. First, the theme "multiple me and multiple them" explores the instability experienced by the participants as they managed their dissociative experiences alongside many inconsistencies. Second, "recognizing, meeting, or neglecting interpersonal and care needs" reflects on participants' needs within therapeutic relationships. Third, "between the needs of the internal system: navigating between 'better on my own' and 'someone to talk to'" discusses the confusion and understanding around dissociation and the importance of working with parts, not around them. Findings suggested that the current culture of some hospital wards directly influenced participants' distress, which could lead to further dissociation as a means of coping with perceived threats. Reflections on relational complexities and developing ward-based treatment are discussed.

  16. Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventililation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Li, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Airflow and Contaminant Distribution in Hospital Wards with a Displacement Ventilalation System. The 2nd International Conference on Build Environment and Public Health, BEPH 2004, Shenzhen , China . ABSTRACT Displacement ventilation has not been considered to be an applicable system for hospital...... to accurately predict three-dimensional distribution of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentration in the ward. Indoor airflow in a displacement ventilation system involves a combination of different flow streams such as the gravity currents and thermal plumes. It is important to choose...... assisted us to understand the contaminant dispersion. It was shown that the interaction of exhaled flow and the body thermal plume generated by manikin would affect exhaled virus-laden aerosols distribution in the ward with displacement ventilation system....

  17. Cross Infection in a Hospital Ward and Deposition of Particles Exhaled from a Source Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The cross infection in a hospital ward is studied. Deposition of particles exhaled from a source manikin is investigated in a full-scale hospital ward ventilated by downward directed ventilation. Deposition on vertical surfaces close to the source shows distribution of particles directed upwards...... in the room. Deposition at the four beds shows that particles smaller than 10 μm disperse evenly in the ward, indicating that particles smaller than this size are airborne. The influence of top and bottom extraction openings on dispersion of particles is investigated. Results show that vertical distribution...... in the room is not affected by the position of the return openings. Deposition of particles at the four beds gives some indication of a less wide spread of particles with the use of ceiling-mounted return openings, and thereby a better protection of patients compared with bottom return openings....

  18. Dispersion of Exhalation Pollutants in a Two-bed Hospital Ward with a Downward Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Nielsen, Peter V.; Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    heavier clean air from a ceiling diffuser to push down contaminants, which would then be removed via outlets at floor level. A "laminar" (strictly speaking, unidirectional) flow is expected to be produced to avoid flow mixing and thus reduce cross-infection risk. Experiments were carried out in a full......-scale experimental hospital ward with a downward ventilation system to investigate the possibility of applying downward ventilation in a general hospital ward. Two life-sized breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. Computation fluid dynamics was also used...... to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people...

  19. External equivalent type Ward aiming optimization studies in power systems; Equivalentes externos tipo Ward visando estudos de otimizacao em sistemas de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepomuceno, Leonardo

    1993-07-01

    The execution of functions such as contingency analysis, optimization, reactive dispatch, etc, at the control centers requires appropriate models representing the non-observable parts (external system). The classical external equivalents have been developed considering basically the contingency analysis. This work points out the performance of the Extended Ward Equivalent (W.E.), which currently represents the state of art concerning reduced circuit based models. the work analyzes the W.E. response to changes occurred in optimization studied. Moreover, a new model, named INTERNAL REACTIVE WARD (WRINT), resulting from an adaptation of the W.E. is proposed focusing on the improvement of the equivalent in case of changes occurs in optimization studies. The model's general idea is to reflect the equivalent's capacity of reactive response into the internal system. Comparative computational test results are shown. The details of routines implementation are also pointed out. (author)

  20. Ratio of Pediatric ICU versus Ward Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Events is Increasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Holubkov, Richard; Nicholson, Carol E.; Dean, J. Michael; Harrison, Rick; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen; Newth, Christopher; Moler, Frank; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Doctor, Allan; Wessel, David; Berger, John; Shanley, Thomas; Carcillo, Joseph; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequency of pediatric in-hospital CPR events occurring in intensive care units (ICUs) compared to general wards. We hypothesized that the proportion of pediatric CPR provided in ICUs versus general wards has increased over the past decade and this shift is associated with improved resuscitation outcomes. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting Total of 315 hospitals in the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GTWG-R) database. Patients Total of 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events between January 1, 2000 and September 14, 2010. CPR events were defined as external chest compressions >1minute. Measurements and Results The primary outcome was proportion of total ICU versus general ward CPR events over time evaluated by chi square test for trend. Secondary outcome included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following the CPR event. Among 5870 pediatric CPR events, 5477 (93.3%) occurred in ICUs compared to 393 (6.7%) on inpatient wards. Over time, significantly more of these CPR events occurred in the ICU compared to the wards (test for trend: p<0.01), with a prominent shift noted between 2003 and 2004 (2000-2003: 87 - 91% vs. 2004-2010: 94 - 96%). In a multivariable model controlling for within center variability and other potential confounders, ROSC increased in 2004-2010 compared with 2000-2003 (RR 1.08, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.13). Conclusions In-hospital pediatric CPR is much more commonly provided in ICUs vs. Wards and the proportion has increased significantly over the past decade with concomitant increases in return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23921270

  1. Poverty and violence, frustration and inventiveness: hospital ward life in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahaduz

    2004-11-01

    An ethnographic exploration was done in an orthopaedic ward of a government teaching hospital in Bangladesh to understand the nature of hospital culture in the context of Bangladeshi society at large. Life and work in the ward result in a culture that is simultaneously created by its inhabitants and the conditions in which they are situated. The study shows that biomedicine is a product of particular social conditions and that the hospital reflects features of its society. Behind the injuries and broken limbs in the ward are stories of violence, crime, and intolerance occurring in a society where masses of people fight over limited resources. In the ward people interact in an extremely hierarchical manner. The patients, who are mainly from poor economic backgrounds, remain at the bottom of the hierarchy. Doctors and other staff members are often professionally frustrated. Strikes related to hospital staff's various professional demands hamper the regular flow of work in the ward. Family members are engaged in nursing and provide various kinds of support to their hospitalized relatives. Patients give small bribes to ward boys and cleaners to obtain their day-to-day necessities. Patients joke with each other and mock senior doctors. Thus, they neutralize their powerlessness and drive away the monotony of their stay. Doctors develop 'indigenous' solutions to orthopaedic problems. Instead of using high-tech devices, they employ instruments made of bamboo, bricks, and razor blades. This study shows how medical practice takes shape in an understaffed, under-resourced and poorly financed hospital operating in a low-income country.

  2. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  3. Care practices of older people with dementia in the surgical ward: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hynninen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the care practices of nursing staff caring older people with dementia in a surgical ward. Methods: The data were collected from nursing staff (n = 191 working in surgical wards in one district area in Finland during October to November 2015. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed statistically. The instrument consists of a total number of 141 items and four dimensions. The dimensions were as follows: background information (12 of items, specific characteristics of older people with dementia in a surgical ward (24 of items, specific characteristics of their care in a surgical ward (66 of items and use of physical restraints and alternative models for use of restraints for people with dementia (39 of items. Results: The questions which measure the nursing staff’s own assessment of care practices when caring for people with dementia in surgical wards were selected: counseling people with dementia, reaction when a surgical patient with dementia displays challenging behavior and use of alternative approach instead of physical restraints. Most commonly the nursing staff pay attention to patient’s state of alertness before counseling older people with dementia. Instead of using restraints, nursing staff gave painkillers for the patient and tried to draw patients’ attention elsewhere. The nursing staff with longer work experience estimate that they can handle the patients’ challenging behavior. They react by doing nothing more often than others. They pretend not to hear, see or notice anything. Conclusion: The findings of this study can be applied in nursing practice and in future studies focusing on the care practices among older people with dementia in acute care environment. The results can be used while developing patient treatments process in surgical ward to meet future needs.

  4. [The leadership style exercised by nurses in surgical wards focuses on situational leadership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, C M; Trevizan, M A; Sawada, N O; Fávero, N

    1997-04-01

    The present study was oriented to the leadership theme focussing nurses inside surgical ward unities. As a theoretical reference, the authors used the Situational Leadership Model proposed by Hersey and Blanchard. This study aimed at analysing the correspondence between the opinions of nurses and auxiliary personnel about the leadership style exerted by nurses in the surgical ward unit regarding the six categories of the assistance activity that were studied. Authors noticed that nurses, from the two studied hospitals, adopted the directive leadership styles (E2/selling or E1/telling) with the auxiliary personnel.

  5. Lung ultrasound and chest x-ray for detecting pneumonia in an acute geriatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Our aim was to compare the accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) and standard chest x-ray (CXR) for diagnosing pneumonia in older patients with acute respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, and atypical chest pain) admitted to an acute-care geriatric ward. Methods: We enrolled 169 (80 M, 89 F) multimorbid patients aged 83.0 ± 9.2 years from January 1 to October 31, 2015. Each participant underwent CXR and bedside LUS within 6 hours from ward admission. LUS was perfo...

  6. Experience based co-design reduces formal complaints on an acute mental health ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springham, Neil; Robert, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    An acute mental health triage ward at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust was attracting high levels of formal service user and family complaints. The Trust used experience based co-design to examine the issues and redesign procedures. This resulted in an immediate eradication of formal complaints for a period of 23 months. This paper describes two outcomes: firstly, the successful adaptations made to the experience based co-design methodology from its origins in physical care, in order to ensure it was safe and effective in an acute mental health setting; and, secondly, the changes made to the ward as a result of this quality improvement intervention.

  7. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautter M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Sven Andreesen,2 Nadja Köhl-Hackert,2 Katja Hoffmann,3 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, University of Heidelberg, 2Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, 3Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Peer-assisted learning (PAL has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective.Purpose: To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors.Methods: A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80. The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants. The discussions were analyzed using content analysis.Results: The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available.Conclusion: On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance

  8. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Leila; Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-04-02

    Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients' satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Among 600 patients, 239 (n=38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75±.35, 3.03±.53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p=.018, p=.029). Spearman test showed a statistically significant correlation between

  9. Do daily ward interviews improve measurement of hospital quality and safety indicators? A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Mitchell N; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Haas, Romi; Mitchell, Deb; O'Brien, Lisa; May, Kerry; Ghaly, Marcelle; Ho, Melissa; Haines, Terry P

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the addition of daily ward interview data improves the capture of hospital quality and safety indicators compared with incident reporting systems alone. An additional aim was to determine the potential characteristics influencing under-reporting of hospital quality and safety indicators in incident reporting systems. A prospective, observational study was performed at two tertiary metropolitan public hospitals. Research assistants from allied health backgrounds met daily with the nurse in charge of the ward and discussed the occurrence of any falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls. Data were collected from four general medical wards, four surgical wards, an orthopaedic, neurosciences, plastics, respiratory, renal, sub-acute and acute medical assessment unit. An estimated total of 303 falls, 221 pressure injuries and 884 rapid response medical team calls occurred between 15 wards across two hospitals, over a period of 6 months. Hospital incident reporting systems underestimated falls by 30.0%, pressure injuries by 59.3% and rapid response medical team calls by 17.0%. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved data capture of falls by 23.8% (n = 72), pressure injuries by 21.7% (n = 48) and rapid response medical team calls by 12.7% (n = 112). Falls events were significantly less likely to be reported if they occurred on a Monday (P = 0.04) and pressure injuries significantly more likely to be reported if they occurred on a Wednesday (P = 0.01). Hospital quality and safety indicators (falls, pressure injuries and rapid response medical team calls) were under-reported in incident reporting systems, with variability in under-reporting between wards and the day of event occurrence. The use of ward interview data collection in addition to hospital incident reporting systems improved reporting of hospital quality and safety

  10. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  11. Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A staff questionnaire study of MRSA infection on ENT and general surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, P S; Golagani, A K; Malik, A; Payne, F B

    2010-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) infection has received much attention in both the medical and non-medical press. However, it is not widely encountered on ENT wards, given the profile of short-stay, relatively well patients, although its impact seems to be increasing. We wished to explore the knowledge and attitudes towards MRSA on general surgical and ENT wards, and see if there were any significant differences between specialties, or between doctors and nurses. A 13-item questionnaire with a Likert scale response with six knowledge questions and seven attitude questions was prepared. It was completed anonymously by all nursing and medical staffs on the ENT and general surgical wards of a large District General Hospital. ENT doctors displayed the lowest knowledge and attitude scores; however, this only attained significance in terms of the knowledge of the difference between infection and colonization. Overall, nurses displayed significantly more positive attitudes towards MRSA patients than doctors, but knowledge scores were not significantly different between professions. The study suggests a lack of knowledge about and preponderance of negative attitudes towards MRSA amongst ENT doctors. The difference between colonization and infection is not well understood. Reasons for this may include the relative rarity of MRSA cases on ENT wards.

  13. Potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae isolated from hospital wards with immunodeficient patients in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Shahabi, Saed; Biderouni, Farid Tahvildar; Taghipour, Niloofar; Eftekhar, Mohamad; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of free-living amoebae (FLA) in immunodeficiency wards of hospitals in Tehran, Iran. A total of 70 dust and biofilm samples from wards serving transplant, pediatric (malignancies), HIV, leukemia and oncology patients of five university hospitals were collected and examined for the presence of FLA using culturing and molecular approaches. Based on the morphology of the amoebae in plate cultures, primer sets were applied for molecular identification of Acanthamoeba, vahlkampfiid amoebae and Hartmannella. Out of 70 samples, 37 (52.9%) were positive for FLA. Acanthamoeba belonged to the T4 genotype was the most prevalent isolate. Presence of the T4 genotype on medical instruments, including an oxygen mask in an isolation room of an immunodeficiency pediatric ward, should be of concern for health authorities. Acanthamoeba T5 genotypes, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Vahlkampfia avara were also present. These results highlight a clear need for greater attention to improved disinfection, especially where susceptible patients, such as those who are immune-suppressed, are served. To our knowledge, this is the first report of these FLA in immunodeficiency wards in Iran, and also the first to identify Acanthamoeba T5, Hartmannella, and Vahlkampfia in moist habitats, such as biofilms, in this country.

  14. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  15. Prevention and management of aggression training and violent incidents on U.K. Acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Nijman, Henk; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Warren, Jonathan; Turner, Lynny

    2006-07-01

    Reports of violence and injuries to staff and patients in acute psychiatric inpatient settings have led to the development and implementation of training courses in the Prevention and Management of Violence and Aggression (PMVA). The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between PMVA training of acute psychiatric ward nursing staff and officially reported violent incident rates. A retrospective analysis was conducted of training records (312 course attendances) and violent incident rates (684 incidents) over two-and-a-half years on 14 acute admission psychiatric wards (5,384 admissions) at three inner-city hospitals in the United Kingdom as part of the Tompkins Acute Ward Study. A positive association was found between training and rates of violent incidents. There was weak evidence that increased rates of aggressive incidents prompted course attendance, no evidence that course attendance reduced violence, and some evidence that attendance of briefer update courses triggered small short-term rises in rates of physical aggression. Course attendance was associated with a rise in physical and verbal aggression while staff were away from the ward. The failure to find a drop in incident rates after training, coupled with the small increases in incidents detected, raises concerns about the training course's efficacy as a preventive strategy. Alternatively, the results are consistent with a threshold effect, indicating that once adequate numbers of staff have been trained, further training keeps incidents at a low rate.

  16. Audit of a ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia service in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for postoperative pain control was introduced at our institution in 2006. We audited the efficacy and safety of ward-based PCEA from January 2006 to December 2008. METHOD: Data were collected from 928 patients who received PCEA in general surgical wards for postoperative analgesia using bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 mug\\/mL. RESULTS: On the first postoperative day, the median visual analogue pain score was 2 at rest and 4 on activity. Hypotension occurred in 21 (2.2%) patients, excessive motor blockade in 16 (1.7%), high block in 5 (0.5%), nausea in 5 (0.5%) and pruritus in only 1 patient. Excessive sedation occurred in two (0.2%) patients but no intervention was required. There were no serious complications such as epidural abscess, infection or haematoma. CONCLUSION: Effective and safe postoperative analgesia can be provided with PCEA in a general surgical ward without recourse to high-dependency supervision.

  17. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  18. Is Clinical Competence Perceived Differently for Student Daily Performance on the Wards versus Clerkship Grading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Kanter, Steven L.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical rotations play an important role in the medical curriculum and are considered crucial for student learning. However, competencies that should be learned can differ from those that are assessed. In order to explore which competencies are considered important for daily performance of student on the wards and to what extent clinical teachers…

  19. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie...

  20. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  1. HRM and strategic climates in hospitals: does the message come accross at the ward level?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, M.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how employees perceive intended strategic goals and HRM at the ward level, and if these perceptions generate the desired effects. The qualitative part of the research reveals that the hospital pursues two strategic goals (i.e. quality and safety). Analysis of the questionnaire da

  2. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  3. Predicting Spatial Distribution of Infection Risk of Airborne Transmission Diseases in a Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2007-01-01

    This study attempt to integrate the Wells-Riley equation and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing the risk of airborne transmission diseases in a building. The new method can predict the spatial distribution of the infection risk of the airborne transmission diseases in a large hospital ward...

  4. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  5. Proposed Reference Model for Guiding Teachers to Perform Ward Round Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Corona Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ward round teaching is an essential professional medical activity as an organizational form of teaching in undergraduate medical education. Its great importance for shaping a professional "personality" is well recognized by the faculty; as well as its extremely complex implementation and development of the necessary skills. The problem to be solved in this paper is related to the need to help younger clinical teachers in undergraduate medical education to develop the skills to conduct ward round teaching; which would be achieved through appropriate guidance on how to perform this activity. Based on this, the teaching staff in the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Dr. Raúl Dorticós Torrado Faculty of Medical Sciences in Cienfuegos has designed a model or representation of ward round teaching to be used as a guide. The main results include the development of a model with two variants, according to the care provided to a recently admitted patient or an already known patient; and the definition of conditions, both in practical and educational areas, which should be considered for the proper implementation of the activity. The model is not a complete representation of the ward round teaching, thus the proposal is open to review and improvement; and its use is based on its adaptation to the particularities of the different disciplines and learning scenarios.

  6. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove;

    2016-01-01

    roles, responsibility. Conclusion: Before using PAR it is crucial to investigate if the organization and the participants at all levels are suited and agree to participate actively. The findings indicate, that to carry out PAR in a busy medical ward, it is necessary to evaluate whether the necessary...

  7. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  8. Overcrowding in hospital wards as a predictor of antidepressant treatment among hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Ferrie, Jane E; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Helenius, Hans; Elovainio, Marko; Honkonen, Teija; Terho, Kirsi; Oksanen, Tuula; Kivimäki, Mika

    2008-11-01

    This report assessed whether hospital ward overcrowding predicts antidepressant use among hospital staff. The extent of hospital ward overcrowding was determined using administrative records of monthly bed occupancy rates between 2000 and 2004 in 203 somatic illness wards in 16 Finnish hospitals providing specialized health care. Information on job contracts for personnel was obtained from the employers' registers. Comprehensive daily data on purchased antidepressant prescriptions (World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification code N06A) for nurses (N=6,699) and physicians (N=641) was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between bed occupancy rate and subsequent antidepressant treatment. Monthly bed occupancy rates were used as a time-dependent exposure that could change in value over the course of observation. Hazard ratios were adjusted for sex, age, occupation, type and length of employment contract, hospital district, specialty, and calendar year. Exposure over 6 months to an average bed occupancy rate over 10% in excess of the recommended limit was associated with new antidepressant treatment. This association followed a dose-response pattern, with increasing bed occupancy associated with an increasing likelihood of antidepressant use. There was no evidence of reverse causality; antidepressant treatment among employees did not predict subsequent excess bed occupancy. The increased risk of antidepressant use observed in this study suggests that overcrowding in hospital wards may have an adverse effect on the mental health of staff.

  9. Nursing handover from ICU to cardiac ward: Standardised tools to reduce safety risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graan, Sher Michael; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2016-08-01

    Standardising handover processes and content, and using context-specific checklists are proposed as solutions to mitigate risks for preventable errors and patient harm associated with clinical handovers. Adapt existing tools to standardise nursing handover from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the cardiac ward and assess patient safety risks before and after pilot implementation. A three-stage, pre-post interrupted time-series design was used. Data were collected using naturalistic observations and audio-recording of 40 handovers and focus groups with 11 nurses. In Stage 1, examination of existing practice using observation of 20 handovers and a focus group interview provided baseline data. In Stage 2, existing tools for high-risk handovers were adapted to create tools specific to ICU-to-ward handovers. The adapted tools were introduced to staff using principles from evidence-based frameworks for practice change. In Stage 3, observation of 20 handovers and a focus group with five nurses were used to verify the design of tools to standardise handover by ICU nurses transferring care of cardiac surgical patients to ward nurses. Stage 1 data revealed variable and unsafe ICU-to-ward handover practices: incomplete ward preparation; failure to check patient identity; handover located away from patients; and information gaps. Analyses informed adaptation of process, content and checklist tools to standardise handover in Stage 2. Compared with baseline data, Stage 3 observations revealed nurses used the tools consistently, ward readiness to receive patients (10% vs 95%), checking patient identity (0% vs 100%), delivery of handover at the bedside (25% vs 100%) and communication of complete information (40% vs 100%) improved. Clinician adoption of tools to standardise ICU-to-ward handover of cardiac surgical patients reduced handover variability and patient safety risks. The study outcomes provide context-specific tools to guide handover processes and delivery of verbal

  10. Nurses' personal and ward accountability and missed nursing care: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srulovici, Einav; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2017-08-16

    Missed nursing care is considered an act of omission with potentially detrimental consequences for patients, nurses, and organizations. Although the theoretical conceptualization of missed nursing care specifies nurses' values, attitudes, and perceptions of their work environment as its core antecedents, empirical studies have mainly focused on nurses' socio-demographic and professional attributes. Furthermore, assessment of missed nursing care has been mainly based on same-source methods. This study aimed to test the joint effects of personal and ward accountability on missed nursing care, by using both focal (the nurse whose missed nursing care is examined) and incoming (the nurse responsible for the same patients at the subsequent shift) nurses' assessments of missed nursing care. A cross-sectional design, where nurses were nested in wards. A total of 172 focal and 123 incoming nurses from 32 nursing wards in eight hospitals. Missed nursing care was assessed with the 22-item MISSCARE survey using two sources: focal and incoming nurses. Personal and ward accountability were assessed by the focal nurse with two 19-item scales. Nurses' socio-demographics and ward and shift characteristics were also collected. Mixed linear models were used as the analysis strategy. Focal and incoming nurses reported occasional missed nursing care of the focal nurse (Mean=1.87, SD=0.71 and Mean=2.09, SD=0.84, respectively; r=0.55, ppersonal socio-demographic characteristics, higher personal accountability was significantly associated with decreased missed care (β=-0.29, p0.05). The interaction effect was significant (β=-0.31, ppersonal accountability and missed nursing care. Similar patterns were obtained for the incoming nurses' assessment of focal nurse's missed care. Use of focal and incoming nurses' missed nursing care assessments limited the common source bias and strengthened our findings. Personal and ward accountability are significant values, which are associated with

  11. A quantitative comparison of ward-based clinical pharmacy activities in 7 acute UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onatade, Raliat; Miller, Gavin; Sanghera, Inderjit

    2016-12-01

    Background Several clinical pharmacy activities are common to UK hospitals. It is not clear whether these are provided at similar levels, and whether they take similar amounts of time to carry out. Objective To quantify and compare clinical pharmacist ward activities between different UK hospitals. Setting Seven acute hospitals in the Greater London area (UK). Methods A list of common ward activities was developed. On five consecutive days, pharmacists visiting hospital wards documented total time spent and how many of each activity they undertook. Results were analysed by hospital. The range and number of activities per 100 occupied bed days, and per 24 beds were compared. Main outcome measure Time spent on wards and numbers of each activity undertaken. Results Pharmacists logged a total of 2291 h carrying out 40,000 activities. 4250 changes to prescriptions were made or recommended. 5901 individual medication orders were annotated for clarity or safety. For every 24 beds visited, mean time spent was 230 min-seeing 6.2 new patients, carrying out 3.9 calculations and 1.3 patient consultations, checking and authorising 1.8 discharge prescriptions, and providing staff with information twice. Other activities varied significantly, not all could be explained by differences in hospital specialties or Information Technology systems. Conclusion This is the first detailed comparison of clinical pharmacy ward activities between different hospitals. There are some typical levels of activities carried out. Wide variations in other activities could not always be explained. Despite a large number of contacts, pharmacists reported very few consultation sessions with patients.

  12. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  13. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  14. Umbilical cord clamping at birth--practice in Norwegian maternity wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Camilla; Øian, Pål; Klingenberg, Claus

    2013-11-26

    The timing and practice used for umbilical cord clamping of neonates are controversial internationally as well as in Norway. We therefore wished to investigate routines and practices for umbilical cord clamping of neonates in Norway. A web-based questionnaire was sent to heads of departments of all maternity wards in Norway (n = 52). They were asked about their practice with regard to umbilical cord clamping of neonates and whether written routines had been prepared for this purpose. We defined early umbilical cord clamping as immediate or within 30 seconds and late clamping as ≥ 1 minute or not until pulsation in the umbilical cord had ceased. Fifty (96%) of the maternity institutions returned a completed questionnaire. Twelve institutions (24%) reported to clamp the umbilical cord of full-term neonates early, and 38 (76%) reported to practise late clamping. Nineteen maternity wards (38%) followed written routines for umbilical cord clamping of full-term neonates, and among these, early umbilical cord clamping was practised in nine (47%). In the 31 maternity wards that had no written routines, early umbilical cord clamping was practised in three (10%). Twenty-seven of the maternity wards reported that the child is placed on the maternal abdomen before clamping of the umbilical cord, 14 reported that the child commonly is held below the introitus before umbilical cord clamping, and the rest did not report any consistent practice. There is wide variation in the practice for umbilical cord clamping in Norwegian maternity wards, many of which have no written guidelines. We argue that national guidelines for umbilical cord clamping of neonates should be established.

  15. Comparison of maternal anxiety scores in pediatric intensive care unit and general ward parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lie Affendi Kartikahadi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Hospitalization of a child is known to be a dreadful and stressful situation for parents. One study reported that admitting a child to a general ward caused mild anxiety to mothers, while admitting a child to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU caused moderate anxiety to mothers. Objective To compare Hamilton anxiety scores of mothers whose children were admitted to the PICU to those of mothers whose children were admitted to the general ward. Methods A cross-sectional study was done on mothers of children aged 1 month-12 years. Children were admitted to either the intensive care unit or the general ward from October 2010-January 2011. All subjects were assessed by Hamilton anxiety scores and questioned for risk factors and other causes of maternal anxiety. Consecutive sampling was used to allocate the subjects. Differences were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Results Of the 72 subjects, the median Hamilton anxiety score in mothers of children admitted to the PICU was 20.5 (interquartile range 14-29.75, higher than that of mothers of children admitted to the general ward (14, interquartile range 9-16.75. Mann-Whitney U test revealed a statistically significant difference in scores between the two groups (P = 0.001. Ancova multivariate analysis showed the admission location to be the only significant relationship to Hamilton anxiety score (P = 0.0001. Conclusion Hamilton anxiety scores were higher for mothers of children admitted to the PICU than that of mothers with children admitted to the general ward. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:95-8].

  16. Detection of prescription errors by a unit-based clinical pharmacist in a nephrology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessal, Ghazal

    2010-02-01

    To determine the impact of a clinical pharmacist on detection and prevention of prescription errors at the nephrology ward of a referral hospital. Nephrology ward of a major referral hospital in Southern Iran. During a 4-month period, a clinical pharmacist was assigned to review medication order sheets and drug orders three times a week at the nephrology ward. Besides chart review, the clinical pharmacist participated in medical rounds once a week. The occurrence of prescribing errors, and related harm was determined on hospitalized patients in this ward during the 4 month period. When an error was detected, intervention was made after agreement of the attending physician. Number and types of prescribing errors, level of harm, and number of interventions were determined. Seventy six patient charts were reviewed during the 4-month period. A total of 818 medications were ordered in these patients. Eighty six prescribing errors were detected in 46 hospital admissions. The mean age of the patients was 47.7 +/- 17.2. Fifty five percent were male while 45% were female. Different types of prescribing errors and their frequencies were as follows: wrong frequency (37.2%), wrong drug selection (19.8%), overdose (12.8%), failure to discontinue (10.5%), failure to order (7 %), under- dose (3.5%), wrong time (3.5%), monitoring (3.5%), wrong route (1.2%), and drug interaction (1.2 %). The attending physician agreed to 96.5% of the prescription errors detected, and interventions were made. Although 89.5% of the detected errors caused no harm, 4(4.7%) of the errors increased the need for monitoring, 2 (2.3%) increased length of stay, and 2 (2.3%) led to permanent patient harm. presence of a clinical pharmacist at the nephrology ward helps in early detection of prescription errors, and therefore potential prevention of negative consequences due to drug administration.

  17. Unplanned Transfers from Hospital Wards to the Neurological Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, C A; Mayer, S A; Lennihan, L; Claassen, J; Willey, J Z

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of unplanned transfers of adult patients from hospital wards to a neurological intensive care unit (NICU). We retrospectively reviewed consecutive unplanned transfers from hospital wards to the NICU at our institution over a 3-year period. In-hospital mortality rates were compared between patients readmitted to the NICU ("bounce-back transfers") and patients admitted to hospital wards from sources other than the NICU who were then transferred to the NICU ("incident transfers"). We also measured clinical characteristics of transfers, including source of admission and indication for transfer. A total of 446 unplanned transfers from hospital wards to the NICU occurred, of which 39% were bounce-back transfers. The in-hospital mortality rate associated with all unplanned transfers to the NICU was 17% and did not differ significantly between bounce-back transfers and incident transfers. Transfers to the NICU within 24 h of admission to a floor service accounted for 32% of all transfers and were significantly more common for incident transfers than bounce-back transfers (39 vs. 21%, p = .0002). Of patients admitted via the emergency department who had subsequent incident transfers to the NICU, 50% were transferred within 24 h of admission. Unplanned transfers to an NICU were common and were associated with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Quality improvement projects should target the triage process and transitions of care to the hospital wards in order to decrease unplanned transfers of high-risk patients to the NICU.

  18. Medical ward round competence in internal medicine - an interview study towards an interprofessional development of an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfel, Teresa; Beltermann, Esther; Lottspeich, Christian; Vietz, Elisa; Fischer, Martin R; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2016-07-11

    The medical ward round is a central but complex activity that is of relevance from the first day of work. However, difficulties for young doctors have been reported. Instruction of ward round competence in medical curricula is hampered by the lack of a standardized description of the procedure. This paper aims to identify and describe physicians' tasks and relevant competences for conducting a medical ward round on the first day of professional work. A review of recent literature revealed known important aspects of medical ward rounds. These were used for the development of a semi-structured interview schedule. Medical ward round experts working at different hospitals were interviewed. The sample consisted of 14 ward physicians (M = 8.82 years of work experience) and 12 nurses (M = 14.55 years of work experience) working in different specializations of internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive-deductive coding scheme. Nine fields of competences with 18 related sub-competences and 62 observable tasks were identified as relevant for conducting a medical ward round. Over 70 % of the experts named communication, collaborative clinical reasoning and organization as essential competences. Deeper analysis further unveiled the importance of self-management, management of difficult situations, error management and teamwork. The study is the first to picture ward round competences and related tasks in detail and to define an EPA "Conducting an internal medicine ward round" based on systematic interprofessional expert interviews. It thus provides a basis for integration of ward round competences in the medical curricula in an evidence based manner and gives a framework for the development of instructional intervention studies and comparative studies in other medical fields.

  19. A multi-center prospective cohort study of patient transfers from the intensive care unit to the hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelfox, Henry T; Leigh, Jeanna Parsons; Dodek, Peter M; Turgeon, Alexis F; Forster, Alan J; Lamontagne, Francois; Fowler, Rob A; Soo, Andrea; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2017-08-29

    To provide a 360-degree description of ICU-to-ward transfers. Prospective cohort study of 451 adults transferred from a medical-surgical ICU to a hospital ward in 10 Canadian hospitals July 2014-January 2016. Transfer processes documented in the medical record. Patient (or delegate) and provider (ICU/ward physician/nurse) perspectives solicited by survey 24-72 h after transfer. Medical records (100%) and survey responses (ICU physicians-80%, ICU nurses-80%, ward physicians-46%, ward nurses-64%, patients-74%) were available for most transfers. The median time from initiation to completion of transfer was 25 h (IQR 6-52). ICU physicians and nurses reported communicating with counterparts via telephone (78 and 75%) when transfer was requested (82 and 24%) or accepted (31 and 59%) and providing more elements of clinical information than ward physicians (mean 4.7 vs. 3.9, p transfer when they received more information (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.48), had their questions addressed (OR 3.96, 95% CI 1.33-11.84), met the ward physician prior to transfer (OR 4.61, 95% CI 2.90-7.33), and were assessed by a nurse within 1 h of ward arrival (OR 4.70, 95% CI 2.29-9.66). Recommendations for improvement included having a documented care plan travel with the patient (all stakeholders), standardized face-to-face handover (physicians), avoiding transfers at shift change (nurses) and informing patients about pending transfers in advance (patients). ICU-to-ward transfers are characterized by failures of patient flow and communication; experienced differently by patients, ICU/ward physicians and nurses, with distinct suggestions for improvement.

  20. Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    to assess, from the relatives' perspective, collaboration between relatives of frail elderly patients and nurses in acute hospital wards, as well as prerequisites for, and outcome of, collaboration. DESIGN: Instrument development and psychometric testing. SETTING: Acute medical and geriatric wards......BACKGROUND: Collaboration between relatives and nurses in acute care settings is sparsely investigated, and that mostly from nurses' point of view. Feasible and valid instruments are needed for assessing collaboration, its prerequisites and outcome. OBJECTIVES: To develop and test an instrument....... PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-six relatives. Women constituted 74.8%, offspring 63.9% and spouses 20%, respectively. METHODS: A model for collaboration was developed and underpinned the development and construction of the instrument. Face and content validity was examined by relatives and an expert panel...

  1. Develop high quality nursing service and normalize management of neonatal ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua YANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To tamp basic neonatal care, provide high quality nursing service, improve the quality of neonatal care, guarantee the safety of nursing care, achieve satisfactory project. Methods:Adjust the staff of the neonatal ward , optimize schedule; strengthen the training and knowledge; strengthen the supervision and ensure the basic nursing; the nursing quality management group work out the rate of incidence of high quality nursing service, the incidence rate of hospital infection of the newborn as well as the satisfaction of their families. Results: The different data between the control group and observation group was statistically significant ( P < 0.05 . Conclusion: Develop the neonatal ward of high quality nursing service, ensure the basic nursing implement, significantly improve the quality of nursing, reduce nursing adverse events and neonatal hospital infection incidence to" zero defects and zero tolerance", and that ensures nursing safety, and achieve the goal of " quality care demonstration project" --- patient satisfaction, social satisfaction, and government satisfaction.

  2. The effect of pharmacy restriction of clindamycin on Clostridium difficile infection rates in an orthopedics ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rodríguez, Nora Cecilia; Hernández-García, Raúl; Salinas-Caballero, Ana Gabriela; Pérez-Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Garza-González, Elvira; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2014-06-01

    A high consumption of clindamycin was noted in an orthopedics ward with high rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We restricted clindamycin for the entire ward. A reduction of 88% in CDI (1.07 to 0.12 × 1,000 patients-days, P = .056) and 84% for all-cause diarrhea (2.40 to 0.38 × 1,000 patients-days, P = .021) was achieved. Clindamycin was reduced 92.61% without an increase in other antibiotics. We identified high consumption of clindamycin as a risk factor for CDI. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Romano-Ward syndrome: a case presenting as near drowning with a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E M; Knapp, J F; Sharma, V

    1992-10-01

    Patients with the Romano-Ward syndrome, a form of congenital long Q-T syndrome (LQTS), present with syncopal episodes and are at risk for sudden death. Patients with LQTS may be misdiagnosed if the physician is unaware of this entity. The risk of sudden death makes recognition important so that appropriate therapy can be initiated. A case is discussed in which the patient presented following a near-drowning episode. Family history revealed a familial "seizure disorder." After analysis of the patient's and father's ECGs, the diagnosis of Romano-Ward syndrome was made. A review of the literature was done, concentrating on presentation, pathophysiology, electrocardiographic findings, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of congenital LQTS. This paper is presented to emphasize the importance of physician awareness of LQTS because of the risk of sudden death. Proper diagnosis can lead to treatment that is effective in reducing mortality by more than 90%.

  4. Risk of Cross-Infection in a Hospital Ward with Downward Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    A two-bed hospital ward with one standing healthcare person and a ceiling-mounted lowimpulse semicircular inlet diffuser is simulated in a full-scale room. Tracer gas is used for simulating gaseous contaminants, and the concentration is measured at different air change rates and different postures...... of the patients. A textile partition between the beds, which is typical in a hospital ward, is used for protection of the patients in some of the experiments. Three different layouts of return openings are tested. One layout with one opening at the ceiling, another with four openings at the wall opposite...... to the inlet diffuser, and one with a high location of these four openings. The downward recirculating flow is on average parallel with the partition, and in most cases the partition does not decrease cross-infection. A high location of the four return openings decreases the risk of cross-infection....

  5. Noise at night in hospital general wards: a mapping of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillary, Julie; Chaplin, Hema; Jones, Gill; Thompson, Angela; Holme, Anita; Wilson, Patricia

    English NHS inpatient surveys consistently identify that noise at night in hospitals and its impact on patients' sleep is a persisting problem that needs addressing. To identify how noise at night in hospital affects patients on general wards and the range of interventions aimed at reducing the problem, a systematic mapping of the literature was undertaken. All primary studies and relevant literature published January 2003-July 2013 were included. Key issues identified in the literature included noise levels and causes, impact on patient experience, and lack of staff awareness. Interventions to reduce noise were targeted at staff education, behaviour modification, care organisation and environmental solutions. The scoping suggested that when compared with specialist units, there is little evidence on effective interventions reducing disturbance from night-time noise on general wards. The available evidence suggests a whole systems approach should be adopted to aid quality sleep and promote recovery.

  6. Validity of the Ward seven-subtest WAIS-III short form in a neuropsychological population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, B M; Meyers, J E; Bayless, J; Whetstone, M M

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the Ward 7-subtest short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) in a neuropsychological clinic sample finds that the short form retains equivalent psychometric properties to those previously reported for the same short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). The correlations found for the 7-subtest form of the WAIS-III were .95 for Performance IQ, .97 for Verbal IQ, and .98 for Full Scale IQ. The 7-subtest short form of the WAIS-III was also found to perform similarly to its WAIS-R counterpart on other markers of test accuracy. These results support the continued use of the Ward 7-subtest short form of the WAIS-III in a neuropsychological population.

  7. Applying Mobile and Pervasive Computer Technology to Enhance Coordination of Work in a Surgical Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    , and unnecessary stress. To accommodate this situation and to increase the quality of work in operating wards, we have designed a set of pervasive computer systems which supports what we call context-mediated communication and awareness. These systems use large interactive displays, video streaming from key...... locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75......Collaboration, coordination, and communication are crucial in maintaining an efficient and smooth flow of work in an operating ward. This coordination, however, often comes at a high price in terms of unsuccessfully trying to get hold of people, disturbing telephone calls, looking for people...

  8. Applying mobile and pervasive computer technology to enhance coordination of work in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    , and unnecessary stress. To accommodate this situation and to increase the quality of work in operating wards, we have designed a set of pervasive computer systems which supports what we call context-mediated communication and awareness. These systems use large interactive displays, video streaming from key...... locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75......Collaboration, coordination, and communication are crucial in maintaining an efficient and smooth flow of work in an operating ward. This coordination, however, often comes at a high price in terms of unsuccessfully trying to get hold of people, disturbing telephone calls, looking for people...

  9. Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, M.

    2009-01-01

    and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses' work......, and clinical tasks performed by doctors during ward rounds, require highly mobile computer devices. Nurses and doctors on ward rounds showed a strong preference for generic COWs over all other devices. Tablet PCs were selected by doctors for only a small proportion of clinical tasks. Even when using mobile......BACKGROUND: Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role...

  10. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  11. Optimization of hospital ward resources with patient relocation using Markov chain modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Reinhardt, Line Blander

    2017-01-01

    Overcrowding of hospital wards is a well-known and often revisited problem in the literature, yet it appears in many different variations. In this study, we present a mathematical model to solve the problem of ensuring sufficient beds to hospital wards by re-distributing beds that are already...... that patient occupancy is reflected by our Markov chain model, and that a local optimum can be derived within a reasonable runtime.Using a Danish hospital as our case study, the Markov chain model is statistically found to reflect occupancy of hospital beds by patients as a function of how hospital beds...... are distributed. Furthermore, our heuristic is found to efficiently derive the optimal solution. Applying our model to the hospital case, we found that relocation of daily arrivals can be reduced by 11.7% by re-distributing beds that are already available to the hospital....

  12. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters in patients admitted to medical wards in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Calvo, Beatriz; Vara, Rebeca; Villar, Rocío N; Aguado, José María

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence and predisposing factors were determined for inappropriate urinary catheterization (UC) among inpatients in medical wards. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients aged ≥ 18 years admitted to medical wards in a 1300-bed tertiary-care centre, and who had a urinary catheter in place on the day of the survey. Of 380 patients observed, 46 (12.1%) had a urinary catheter in place. Twelve of them (26.1%) were inappropriately catheterized. The most common indication for inappropriate UC was urine output monitoring in a cooperative, non-critically ill patient. Inappropriateness was associated with increased age, poor functional status, urinary incontinence, dementia, and admission from a long-term care facility. Further educational efforts should be focused on improving catheterization prescribing practices by physicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews by pharmacy technicians in a geriatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Gronkjaer, Louise Smed; Duckert, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    % of total). During the prescribing reviews, a total of 860 prescription errors were detected, approximately one per medication review. Almost all of the detected prescription errors were later accepted and/or corrected by the physicians. "Dosage and time interval errors" were the most frequently detected...... and prescribing reviews. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the interventions made by pharmacy technicians could reduce the time spent by the nurses on administration of medications to the patients. METHODS: This observational study was conducted over a 7 week period in the geriatric ward at Odense...... University Hospital, Denmark. Two pharmacy technicians conducted medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews at the time of patients' admission to the ward. The reviews were conducted according to standard operating procedures developed by a clinical pharmacist and approved by the Head of the Geriatric...

  14. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  15. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Timeliness Between Bronchodilator Treatments from Emergency Department to Medical Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerham, Jennifer R; Lowe, Gary R; Willis, Randy; Stecks, Ryan M; Berlinski, Ariel

    2016-12-01

    Quality improvement methodology was applied to study sporadic reports that patients with asthma were not given bronchodilator treatments or assessed within an appropriate time frame when they were admitted from the emergency department to the medical ward. The goal was to increase the number of patients who had an interval between emergency department assessment/bronchodilator treatment and medical ward assessment/treatment of flow chart diagram, a fishbone diagram, data collection, intervention implementation, and data monitoring and analysis were used in this study. Data were collected on a pre-test of change cohort of 227 subjects with asthma from January 2013 to March 2014. A test of change adding a Q2H respiratory therapist assessment and as needed bronchodilator treatment order while the subject was in the emergency department was implemented during May of 2014. These data were compared with a post-test of change cohort of 278 subjects with asthma from May 2014 to July 2015. Data collection for both cohorts included the time from the last assessment/bronchodilator treatment in the emergency department to emergency department discharge, the time from emergency department discharge to assessment/treatment in the medical ward, and the sum of these 2 time periods. Mean times (minutes) were noted, and comparisons were made using 2-tailed independent t tests with significance set at P process control charts. There was a 124% increase noted in the percentage of subjects who received bronchodilator treatment within 120 min, a 53% increase within 180 min, and a 19% increase within 240 min. The interval time between treatments decreased 21%. Through quality improvement methodology, the group was able to significantly decrease the time between the last assessment/bronchodilator treatment in the emergency department and the first assessment/treatment in the medical ward for subjects with asthma. Moreover, improvement was seen in all studied parameters despite similar

  16. Infantile diarrhea in the Pediatric Ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metrizal; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on infants with diarrhea who were hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan in a period of one year (January 1 to December 31, 1986). There were 3317 hospitalized patients and 1506 (45.40%) of them had diarrhea. Of these, 773 (51.32%) were in the age group of under 2 years. Thirty eight patients (4.91%) with infantile diarrhea died and prolonged diarrhea was found in 54 (6.98%) cases.

  17. [The paradoxes of humanized childbirth care in a public maternity ward in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornquist, Carmen Susana

    2003-01-01

    The maternity ward of the University Hospital in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil, attempts to follow World Health Organization guidelines for humanized childbirth care, including the encouragement of non-surgical delivery, breastfeeding, rooming-in, extended family visitation, and reduction of excessive technological intervention in the delivery process. The study focuses specifically on the choice of delivery procedure and on family presence during labor/childbirth, as well as women's experience with labor and breastfeeding.

  18. Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relation for the Vector Vertex in Quantum Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2001-01-01

    The transverse Ward-Takahashi (W-T) relation for the vector vertex in quantum field theory is derived by calculating the curl of the time-ordered product of the three-point function including the vector current operator. This provides the constraint on the transverse part of the vertex. By combining the transverse and normal (longitudinal)W-T identities, we obtain the expression for the full vector vertex function.``

  19. Medication Prescribing Pattern at a Pediatric Ward of an Ethiopian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitsum Sebsibe Teni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: drug use in pediatric patients is a unique dilemma in the management and monitoring of disease. This study aimed at assessing medication prescribing in a pediatric ward of an  Ethiopian hospital. Materials and Methods: a retrospective cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records of 249 patients among those admitted in the period between 11th of September 2007 and 10th of September 2008 to the pediatric ward of Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Data on characteristics like age, sex and weight; the diagnoses for which patients were admitted and medications prescribed to them during their stay in the ward was collected from the medical records of the patients. Results: an average of 3 diagnoses per patient with the most frequently diagnosed being malnutrition (29.23%, severe community acquired pneumonia (12.96% and underweight (8.86% were reported. A mean of 4.5 medications per patient with the most commonly prescribed being antibacterials namely penicillins which constituted 25.42%, other antibacterials making up 19.61% and medications used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances accounting for 17.19% of the total number of medications prescribed in the ward. The most common individual medications prescribed to the patients included crystalline penicillin, gentamicin and maintenance fluid constituting 9.22, 7.52 and 6.45 percentages respectively most of them in solution forms which were administered dominantly intravenously. Conclusion In this study the common prescription of antibacterials and those used for correcting water, electrolyte and acid-base disturbances was observed which went with the common diagnoses of malnutrition and pneumonia. 

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GEOSPATIAL MAP BASED PORTAL FOR DELIMITATION OF MCD WARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kumar Chandra Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Geospatial Delhi Limited (GSDL, a Govt. of NCT of Delhi Company formed in order to provide the geospatial information of National Capital Territory of Delhi (NCTD to the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD and its organs such as DDA, MCD, DJB, State Election Department, DMRC etc., for the benefit of all citizens of Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD. This paper describes the development of Geospatial Map based Portal for Delimitation of MCD Wards (GMPDW and election of 3 Municipal Corporations of NCT of Delhi. The portal has been developed as a map based spatial decision support system (SDSS for delimitation of MCD Wards and draw of peripheral wards boundaries to planning and management of MCD Election process of State Election Commission, and as an MCD election related information searching tools (Polling Station, MCD Wards and Assembly constituency etc., for the citizens of NCTD. The GMPDW is based on Client-Server architecture model. It has been developed using Arc GIS Server 10.0 with .NET (pronounced dot net technology. The GMPDW is scalable to enterprise SDSS with enterprise Geo Database & Virtual Private Network (VPN connectivity. Spatial data to GMPDW includes Enumeration Block (EB and Enumeration Blocks Group (EBG boundaries of Citizens of Delhi, Assembly Constituency, Parliamentary Constituency, Election District, Landmark locations of Polling Stations & basic amenities (Police Stations, Hospitals, Schools and Fire Stations etc.. GMPDW could help achieve not only the desired transparency and easiness in planning process but also facilitates through efficient & effective tools for management of MCD election. It enables a faster response to the changing ground realities in the development planning, owing to its in-built scientific approach and open-ended design.

  1. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medicati...

  2. Ward Identities of W_{\\infty} Symmetry and Higher Genus Amplitudes in 2D String Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Ken-ji

    1995-01-01

    The Ward identities of the $W_{\\infty}$ symmetry in two dimensional string theory in the tachyon background are studied in the continuum approach. We consider amplitudes different from 2D string ones by the external leg factor and derive the recursion relations among them. The recursion relations have non-linear terms which give relations among the amplitudes defined on different genus. The solutions agree with the matrix model results even in higher genus. We also discuss differences of role...

  3. Development of Geospatial Map Based Portal for Delimitation of Mcd Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A. Kumar Chandra; Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    The Geospatial Delhi Limited (GSDL), a Govt. of NCT of Delhi Company formed in order to provide the geospatial information of National Capital Territory of Delhi (NCTD) to the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD) and its organs such as DDA, MCD, DJB, State Election Department, DMRC etc., for the benefit of all citizens of Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD). This paper describes the development of Geospatial Map based Portal for Delimitation of MCD Wards (GMPDW) and election of 3 Municipal Corporations of NCT of Delhi. The portal has been developed as a map based spatial decision support system (SDSS) for delimitation of MCD Wards and draw of peripheral wards boundaries to planning and management of MCD Election process of State Election Commission, and as an MCD election related information searching tools (Polling Station, MCD Wards and Assembly constituency etc.,) for the citizens of NCTD. The GMPDW is based on Client-Server architecture model. It has been developed using Arc GIS Server 10.0 with .NET (pronounced dot net) technology. The GMPDW is scalable to enterprise SDSS with enterprise Geo Database & Virtual Private Network (VPN) connectivity. Spatial data to GMPDW includes Enumeration Block (EB) and Enumeration Blocks Group (EBG) boundaries of Citizens of Delhi, Assembly Constituency, Parliamentary Constituency, Election District, Landmark locations of Polling Stations & basic amenities (Police Stations, Hospitals, Schools and Fire Stations etc.). GMPDW could help achieve not only the desired transparency and easiness in planning process but also facilitates through efficient & effective tools for management of MCD election. It enables a faster response to the changing ground realities in the development planning, owing to its in-built scientific approach and open-ended design.

  4. Development of a nurse robot serving in infectious disease isolation wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A prototype of nurse robot system serving in infectious disease wards is developed by analyzing the systems requirement. Firstly, the type synthesis and dimension synthesis for optimizing the workspace are presented. Secondly, the tele-control system based on velocity control mode is introduced, and tele-control program is written. Finally, the imitation of position workspace and experiment of transforming objects from buffer area to isolation area are carried out.

  5. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  6. Improving Intensive Care Unit and Ward Utilization by Adapting Master Surgery Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fügener, Andreas; Edenharter, Guenther Michael; Kiefer, Paskal; Mayr, Ulrike; Schiele, Julian; Steiner, Fabian; Kolisch, Rainer; Blobner, Manfred

    2016-03-15

    With increasing organizational and financial pressure on hospitals, each individual surgical treatment has to be reviewed and planned thoroughly. Apart from the expensive operating room facilities, proper staffing and planning of downstream units, like the wards or the intensive care units (ICUs), should be considered as well. In this article, we outline the relationship between a master surgery schedule (MSS), i.e., the assignment of surgical blocks to medical specialties, and the bed demand in the downstream units using an analytical model. By using historical data retrieved from the clinical information system and a patient flow model, we applied a recently developed algorithm for predicting bed demand based on the MSSs for patients of 3 surgical subspecialties of a hospital. Simulations with 3 different MSSs were performed. The impact on the required amount of beds in the downstream units was analyzed. We show the potential improvements of the current MSS considering 2 main goals: leveling workload among days and reduction of weekend utilization. We discuss 2 different MSSs, one decreasing the weekend ICU utilization by 20% and the other one reducing maximum ward bed demand by 7%. A test with 12 months of real-life data validates the results. The application of the algorithm provides detailed insights for the hospital into the impact of MSS designs on the bed demand in downstream units. It allowed creating MSSs that avoid peaks in bed demand and high weekend occupancy levels in the ICU and the ward.

  7. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  8. Caring for Acutely Ill Patients in General Wards: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddian, Ali Reza; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Marshall, Tom; Rashidian, Arash; Sayadi, Leila; Jafari, Nazila

    2016-09-01

    The number of acutely ill patients has risen in general wards due to the aging population, more advanced and complicated therapeutic methods, economic changes in the health system, therapeutic choices and shortage of intensive care unit beds. This may lead to adverse events and outcomes with catastrophic results. The purpose of this study was to describe the conditions of acutely ill patients, from the perspective of caregivers. The study was conducted in Tehran University of Medical Sciences and its two affiliated general teaching hospitals. Ten nurses and physicians participated in interviews, which were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods. Four main categories of difficulties in caring for acutely ill patients in general wards were described: problems in identifying acutely ill patients, problems in clinical management of acutely ill patients, inappropriate use of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, and poor structure for mortality control. The staff do not appropriately diagnose the signs of deterioration. There are problems with the appropriate management of acutely ill patients, even if they are considered to be acutely ill and in need of special attention in general wards. Many shortcomings exist caring for acutely ill patients, ranging from identification to clinical management; there are also structural and contextual problems. An immediate plan is necessary to circumvent the challenges and to improve the care for acutely ill patients. These challenges highlight the need for changes in current levels of care for acutely ill patients, as well as the need for appropriate support systems.

  9. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo E Marchiori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5 + 13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance.

  10. Epidemiology, microbiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of candidemia in internal medicine wards-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Babaoff, Roi; Yahav, Dafna; Yanai, Shirly; Shaked, Hila; Bishara, Jihad

    2016-11-01

    The clinical characteristics of internal medicine ward (IMW) patients with candidemia are unclear. The aim of this study was to define the clinical characteristics of candidemic IMW patients and to study the incidence, species distribution, and outcomes of these patients compared to surgical and intensive care unit (ICU) candidemic patients. A retrospective cohort of candidemic patients in IMWs, general surgery wards, and an ICU at Beilinson Hospital during the period 2007-2014 was analyzed. A total of 118 patients with candidemia were identified in six IMWs, two general surgery wards, and one ICU in the hospital. Candida albicans was the leading causative agent (41.1%). Higher proportions of Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis isolates were observed in the IMW patients. IMW patients were significantly older, with poorer functional capacity, and had more frequently been exposed to antibiotic therapy within 90 days, in particular β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and cephalosporins. At onset of candidemia, a significantly lower number of IMW patients were mechanically ventilated (p48h. IMW candidemic patients account for a substantial proportion of candidemia cases and have unique characteristics and high mortality rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroinfection survey at a neurological ward in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Paulo E; Lino, Angelina M M; Machado, Luis R; Pedalini, Livia M; Boulos, Marcos; Scaff, Milberto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to characterize the neuroinfection profile in a tertiary neurological ward. INTRODUCTION: Neuroinfection is a worldwide concern and bacterial meningitis, tetanus and cerebral malaria have been reported as the commonest causes in developing countries. METHODS: From 1999 to 2007, all patients admitted to the Neurology Ward of Hospital das Clínicas, S�o Paulo University School of Medicine because of neuroinfection had their medical records reviewed. Age, gender, immunological status, neurological syndrome at presentation, infectious agent and clinical outcome were recorded. RESULTS: Three hundred and seventy four cases of neuroinfectious diseases accounted for 4.2% of ward admissions and the identification of infectious agent was successful in 81% of cases. Mean age was 40.5±13.4 years, 63.8% were male, 19.7% were immunocompromised patients and meningoencephalitis was the most common clinical presentation despite infectious agent. Viruses and bacteria were equally responsible for 29.4% of neuroinfectious diseases; parasitic, fungal and prion infections accounted for 28%, 9.6% and 3.5% respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Treponema pallidum, Taenia solium, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum were the more common infectious pathogens in the patients. Infection mortality rate was 14.2%, of which 62.3% occurred in immunocompetent patients. CONCLUSION: Our institution appeared to share some results with developed and developing countries. Comparison with literature may be considered as quality control to health assistance. PMID:21808869

  12. Risk Assessment Tool for Pressure Ulcer Development in Indian Surgical Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sushma; Sharma, Deborshi; Rana, Anshika; Pathak, Reetesh; Lal, Romesh; Kumar, Ajay; Biswal, U C

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this paper were to compare the predictive validity of three pressure ulcer (PU) risk scales-the Norton scale, the Braden scale, and the Waterlow scale-and to choose the most appropriate calculator for predicting PU risk in surgical wards of India. This is an observational prospective cohort study in a tertiary educational hospital in New Delhi among 100 surgical ward patients from April to July 2011. The main outcomes measured included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PVP) and negative predictive value (PVN), and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the three PU risk assessment scales. Based on the cutoff points found most appropriate in this study, the sensitivity, specificity, PVP, and PVN were as follows: the Norton scale (cutoff, 16) had the values of 95.6, 93.5, 44.8, and 98.6, respectively; the Braden scale (cutoff, 17) had values of 100, 89.6, 42.5, and 100, respectively; and the Waterlow scale (cutoff, 11) had 91.3, 84.4, 38.8, and 97, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the Norton scale is the most appropriate tool. Factors such as physical condition, activity, mobility, body mass index (BMI), nutrition, friction, and shear are extremely significant in determining risk of PU development (p nutrition, friction, and shear are the most significant factors in Indian surgical ward settings with necessity for future comparison with established scales.

  13. Role of clinical pharmacists' interventions in detection and prevention of medication errors in a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Farsaei, Shadi; Rezaee, Haleh; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2011-04-01

    Frequency and type of medication errors and role of clinical pharmacists in detection and prevention of these errors were evaluated in this study. During this interventional study, clinical pharmacists monitored 861 patients' medical records and detected, reported, and prevented medication errors in the infectious disease ward of a major referral teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. Error was defined as any preventable events that lead to inappropriate medication use related to the health care professionals or patients regardless of outcomes. Classification of the errors was done based on Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation drug-related problem coding. During the study period, 112 medication errors (0.13 errors per patient) were detected by clinical pharmacists. Physicians, nurses, and patients were responsible for 55 (49.1%), 54 (48.2%), and 3 (2.7%) of medication errors, respectively. Drug dosing, choice, use and interactions were the most causes of error in medication processes, respectively. All of these errors were detected, reported, and prevented by infectious diseases ward clinical pharmacists. Medication errors occur frequently in medical wards. Clinical pharmacists' interventions can effectively prevent these errors. The types of errors indicate the need for continuous education and implementation of clinical pharmacist's interventions.

  14. Cockroaches ’ bacterial infections in wards of hospitals, Hamedan city, west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejati Jalil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the relationship between different species of cockroaches with their bacterial infection in different wards of Hamedan county hospitals, western Iran. Methods: Using sticky trap, hand collection and glass trap, 250 cockroaches were collected from 14 wards of 5 hospitals. After having their identification determined by detection key, all of them were used to isolate bacteria from cuticle and alimentary tract. Results: From four identified species, Blatella germanica were the most common in all of the wards (88.8% and next was the Periplaneta Americana (8%. 20 bacteria species isolated from cockroaches' surface and 21 from digestive organ. Escherichia coli were the most predominant bacteria isolated from external surface (26.5 % as well as alimentary tract (30.8%. The frequency of investigated bacteria on cockroaches' body surface was not significantly different between Periplaneta Americana and Blattella germanica except for Kllebsiella oxytoca (P<0.001 and Providensia Spp (P=0.035. Also, frequency of detected bacteria in cockroaches' digestive organ was not significantly different between these two species. Furthermore, the frequency of bacteria isolated from the cockroaches' external surface was not significantly different from that of digestive organ except for shigella disantery (P<0.001, Pseudomonas aeroginosa (P<0.001 and Klebsiella oxytoca (P=0.01 3. Conclusions: Since cockroaches can carry pathogenic bacteria, so their existence in the hospitals could be a serious public health problem. It is suggested to compile programs in order to control cockroaches especially in the hospitals.

  15. Analysis of Outcomes of the NRS 2002 in Patients Hospitalized in Nephrology Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition is a common problem among hospitalized patients. In chronic kidney disease, it affects up to 50% of the population. Undernourishment has an adverse effect on prognosis and prolongs convalescence. The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of NRS (Nutrition Risk Screening -2002 in the assessment of risk of malnutrition for patients hospitalized in nephrology wards. The aim was to develop clinical characteristics of malnourished patients and to assess the relationship between nutritional status and patient outcome. Methods: The analysis included 292 patients, consecutively admitted to nephrology wards. NRS-2002 was assessed in comparison to subjective global assessment. Associations with patient characteristics and outcome were evaluated. Results: Out of all the respondents, 119 patients (40% suffered from malnutrition. The NRS-2002 showed a very strong relationship with Subjective Global Assessment (SGA (p < 0.0001. Malnourished patients were older, were characterized by a significantly lower body mass index (BMI, and had a much longer hospitalization duration. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of malnutrition proved to be an independent predictor of the duration of hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition is highly prevalent among patients hospitalized in nephrology wards, and it affects the length of hospitalization. Identification of malnourished patients and patients at serious risk of malnutrition progression allows the implementation of appropriate nutritional intervention.

  16. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  17. A safe place with space for learning: Experiences from an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin; Kiessling, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional learning in a real ward context effectively increases collaborative and professional competence among students. However, less is known on the processes behind this. The aim of this study was to explore medical, nurse, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy students' perspectives on the process of their own learning at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). We performed a qualitative content analysis on free-text answers of 333 student questionnaires from the years 2004 to 2011. Two main themes emerged: first, students found that the IPTW provided an enriching learning environment--a safe place with space. It included authentic and relevant patients, well-composed and functioning student teams, competent and supportive supervisors, and adjusted ward structures to support learning. Second, they developed an awareness of their own development with faith in the future--from chaos to clarity. It included personal, professional, and interprofessional development towards a comprehensive view of practice and a faith in their ability to work as professionals in the future. Our findings are discussed with a social constructivist perspective. This study suggests that when an IPTW provides a supportive and permissive learning environment with possibilities to interact with one another--a safe place with space--it enables students to move from insecurity to faith in their abilities--from chaos to clarity. However, if the learning environment is impaired, the students' development could be halted.

  18. [Dementia-friendly hospital wards : Expert recommendations for planning and design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büter, K; Motzek, T; Dietz, B; Hofrichter, L; Junge, M; Kopf, D; von Lützau-Hohlbein, H; Traxler, S; Zieschang, T; Marquardt, G

    2017-01-01

    Hospitals face great challenges in the necessity of providing care for the rising number of elderly patients with dementia. The adaptation of the spatial environment represents an important component to improve the care situation of patients with dementia. For more than 30 years research results from long-term care have provided evidence on the therapeutic effect of numerous architectural features on people with dementia. Due to specific medical and organizational requirements in hospitals, the transferability of these findings is, however, limited. An interdisciplinary workshop with experts from the fields of medicine, nursing, gerontology, self-help and architecture was conducted in July 2015. Based on existing research findings and experiences from pilot projects, the spatial requirements for dementia-friendly hospital wards were collated, suggested solutions were discussed from different perspectives and finally design recommendations were derived. The article gives a first comprehensive overview of architectural measures that are required for the design of dementia-friendly hospital wards. The recommendations provided range from architectural criteria, such as the size and spatial structure of hospital wards, to interior design elements, including orientation and navigation aids and the use of light and colors. Furthermore, information about the planning process are given.

  19. [An analysis of cost and profit of a nursing unit using performance-based costing: case of a general surgical ward in a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze net income of a surgical nursing ward in a general hospital. Data collection and analysis was conducted using a performance-based costing and activity-based costing method. Direct nursing activities in the surgical ward were 68, indirect nursing activities were 10. The total cost volume of the surgical ward was calculated at won 119,913,334.5. The cost volume of the allocated medical department was won 91,588,200.3, and the ward consumed cost was won 28,325,134.2. The revenue of the surgical nursing ward was won 33,269,925.0. The expense of a surgical nursing ward was 28,325,134.2. Therefore, the net income of a surgical nursing ward was won 4,944,790.8. We suggest that to develop a more refined nursing cost calculation model, a standard nursing cost calculation system needs to be developed.

  20. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30-96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1-310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057-1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339-6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693-0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955-0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729-8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092-1.306, Ppressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929-0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672-0.960, P=0.016). Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an advanced illness.

  1. Pressure ulcers in palliative ward patients: hyponatremia and low blood pressure as indicators of risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternal, Danuta; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevention strategies for pressure ulcer formation remain critical in patients with an advanced illness. We analyzed factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in a palliative care ward setting. Patients and methods This study was a retrospective analysis of 329 consecutive patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 70.4±11.8 years (range: 30–96 years, median 70.0 years; 55.3% women), who were admitted to the Palliative Care Department between July 2012 and May 2014. Results Patients were hospitalized for mean of 24.8±31.4 days (1–310 days, median 14 days). A total of 256 patients (77.8%) died in the ward and 73 patients (22.2%) were discharged. Two hundred and six patients (62.6%) did not develop pressure ulcers during their stay in the ward, 84 patients (25.5%) were admitted with pressure ulcers, and 39 patients (11.9%) developed pressure ulcers in the ward. Four factors assessed at admission appear to predict the development of pressure ulcers in the multivariate logistic regression model: Waterlow score (odds ratio [OR] =1.140, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.057–1.229, P=0.001), transfer from other hospital wards (OR =2.938, 95% CI =1.339–6.448, P=0.007), hemoglobin level (OR =0.814, 95% CI =0.693–0.956, P=0.012), and systolic blood pressure (OR =0.976, 95% CI =0.955–0.997, P=0.023). Five other factors assessed during hospitalization appear to be associated with pressure ulcer development: mean evening body temperature (OR =3.830, 95% CI =1.729–8.486, P=0.001), mean Waterlow score (OR =1.194, 95% CI =1.092–1.306, P<0.001), the lowest recorded sodium concentration (OR =0.880, 95% CI =0.814–0.951, P=0.001), mean systolic blood pressure (OR =0.956, 95% CI =0.929–0.984, P=0.003), and the lowest recorded hemoglobin level (OR =0.803, 95% CI =0.672–0.960, P=0.016). Conclusion Hyponatremia and low blood pressure may contribute to the formation of pressure ulcers in patients with an

  2. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN CHILDREN ADMITTED TO THE NEUROLOGY WARD OF MOFID CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam BEHESHTI; Farid IMAN ZADEH; Noushin SHAHIDI

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveMalnutrition is commonly considered as an important risk factor that can produce a negative influence on the prognosis of patients with chronic neurological diseases. We aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of patients admitted to the neurology ward of Mofid children's hospital via subjective and objective methods.Materials & Methods61 children (2-6 years of age) who were consecutively hospitalized at the neurology ward between January and March 2008 underwent objective (weight, ...

  4. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse manag...

  5. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  6. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  7. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Sadsad

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Po-Liang; Siu, L K; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Ma, Ling; Chiang, Wen-Gin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chen, Tyen-Po

    2009-10-01

    Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282) contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  9. Feasibility and acceptability of rapid HIV screening in a labour ward in Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent P Pitche

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV screening in a labour ward is the last opportunity to initiate an antiretroviral prophylaxis among pregnant women living with HIV to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Little is known about the feasibility and acceptability of HIV screening during labour in West Africa. Findings: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the labour ward at the Tokoin Teaching Hospital in Lomé (Togo between May and August 2010. Pregnant women admitted for labour were randomly selected to enter the study and were interviewed on the knowledge of their HIV status. Clinical and biological data were collected from the individual maternal health chart. HIV testing or re-testing was systematically proposed to all pregnant women. Among 1530 pregnant women admitted for labour, 508 (32.2% were included in the study. Information on HIV screening was available in the charts of 359 women (71%. Overall, 467 women accepted HIV testing in the labour ward (92%. The HIV prevalence was 8.8% (95% confidence interval: 6.4 to 11.7%. Among the 41 women diagnosed as living with HIV during labour, 34% had not been tested for HIV during pregnancy and were missed opportunities. Antiretroviral prophylaxis had been initiated antenatally for 24 women living with HIV and 17 in the labour room. Conclusions: This study is the first to show in West Africa that HIV testing in a labour room is feasible and well accepted by pregnant women. HIV screening in labour rooms needs to be routinely implemented to reduce missed opportunities for intervention aimed at HIV care and prevention, especially PMTCT.

  10. General ward and pneumonia size as predictors of noninvasive ventilation failure

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    Joveš-Sević Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Shortage of intensive care beds has led to more frequent use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV outside respiratory units, and data on NIV efficacy and safety on general wards is lacking. Objective. The aim was to identify potential predictors for NIV failure. Methods. This was a retrospective analysis of patients treated with NIV at the Institute for Pulmonary Diseases of Vojvodina from 2009 to 2013. Demographics, blood gases, chest radiographs, setting, and outcomes were analyzed to identify predictors of NIV failure. Results. A total of 138 patients (65% men, mean age 66 ± 11 years were treated with NIV. Indications for NIV were acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (85% and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (7%, as well as respiratory insufficiency related to obesity and central hypoventilation (5% and neuromuscular disease (3%. Rate of NIV failure was 34.8%. In 86 patients NIV was applied in the High Dependency Unit (HDU, while 52 received NIV on the general ward. Baseline characteristics in terms of gender, arterial blood gases, and the extent of consolidation on chest radiographs were similar. Patients treated in HDU were younger (64.4 ± 1.2 vs. 69.4 ± 1.5 years, p < 0.001. NIV on the general ward compared to HDU had higher rates of NIV failure (28/52 vs. 20/86, p < 0.001. Presence of consolidation involving two or more quadrants on chest radiograph (55% vs. 29%, p < 0.001 was associated with NIV failure. When adjusted for age and the extent of consolidation on chest radiograph, NIV failure was still less likely in patients treated in HDU (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.10-0.50. Conclusion. Patients with consolidation on chest X-ray and patients treated with NIV outside of dedicated respiratory units are at a higher risk for NIV failure.

  11. Feasibility and acceptability of rapid HIV screening in a labour ward in Togo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekouevi, Didier K; Kariyiare, Benjamin G; Coffie, Patrick A; Jutand, Marthe-Aline; Akpadza, Koffi; Lawson-Evi, Annette; Tatagan, Albert; Dabis, François; Sibe, Mathieu; Pitche, Vincent P; Becquet, Renaud; David, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV screening in a labour ward is the last opportunity to initiate an antiretroviral prophylaxis among pregnant women living with HIV to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Little is known about the feasibility and acceptability of HIV screening during labour in West Africa. Findings A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the labour ward at the Tokoin Teaching Hospital in Lomé (Togo) between May and August 2010. Pregnant women admitted for labour were randomly selected to enter the study and were interviewed on the knowledge of their HIV status. Clinical and biological data were collected from the individual maternal health chart. HIV testing or re-testing was systematically proposed to all pregnant women. Among 1530 pregnant women admitted for labour, 508 (32.2%) were included in the study. Information on HIV screening was available in the charts of 359 women (71%). Overall, 467 women accepted HIV testing in the labour ward (92%). The HIV prevalence was 8.8% (95% confidence interval: 6.4 to 11.7%). Among the 41 women diagnosed as living with HIV during labour, 34% had not been tested for HIV during pregnancy and were missed opportunities. Antiretroviral prophylaxis had been initiated antenatally for 24 women living with HIV and 17 in the labour room. Conclusions This study is the first to show in West Africa that HIV testing in a labour room is feasible and well accepted by pregnant women. HIV screening in labour rooms needs to be routinely implemented to reduce missed opportunities for intervention aimed at HIV care and prevention, especially PMTCT. PMID:22905362

  12. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A; Petersen, L F; Rasmussen, L S

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory rate is among the first vital signs to change in deteriorating patients. The aim was to investigate the agreement between respiratory rate measurements by three different methods. This prospective observational study included acutely admitted adult patients in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM) was considered a clinically relevant difference. We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -13.3 (95% CI: -17.2 to -9.5) BPM and 16.8 (95% CI: 13.0 to 20.6) BPM. A concerning lack of agreement was found between a wireless monitoring system and a standardised clinical approach. Ward staff's measurements also seemed to be inaccurate. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Creation of a questionnaire to measure stress among nurses engaged in palliative care on general wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakado, Ako; Watanabe, Takako

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to create a questionnaire that measures stress among nurses engaged in palliative care on general wards. Nurses with at least 3 years of experience involved in palliative care on a general ward in six facilities in Japan were the subjects from September 7 to October 4, 2004. A draft questionnaire on stress factors and conditions of stress in nurses engaged in end-of-life care was created, and question items and content meaning were revised to produce 32 question items, with a four-point Likert scale for the responses. Two pretests were conducted. Internal validity was investigated and resulted in 31 question items. Factor analysis using the principal factor method (Varimax rotation) was performed, and Cronbach's coefficient alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency and check reliability. The survey response rate was 94%, with a valid response rate of 98%. Analysis was conducted using responses from 269 participants, of whom 98.9% were female, with a mean age of 35.4 years. The mean length of experience as a nurse was 13.6 years, and the mean length of experience in cancer nursing was 8 years. Results of factor analysis produced eigenvalues of 5.260-1.558 and a cumulative proportion of 58.032%. After two items were deleted, six stress-related factors were identified; their alpha coefficients were 0.753 to 0.912, ensuring high reliability. The questionnaire developed had high internal validity and high reliability, and it can thus serve as a first stage in elucidating stress among nurses engaged in palliative care on general wards.

  14. A systems approach to the reduction of medication error on the hospital ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D J; Webster, C S

    2001-07-01

    To discuss a potentially powerful approach to safer medication administration on the hospital ward, based on principles of safety developed in other high-risk industries, and consistent with recent national reports on safety in health care released in the United Kingdom (UK) and United States of America (USA). To discuss why punitive approaches to safety on the hospital ward and in the nursing literature do not work. Drug administration error on the hospital ward is an ever-present problem and its occurrence is too frequent. Administering medication is probably the highest-risk task a nurse can perform, and accidents can lead to devastating consequences for the patient and for the nurse's career. Drug errors in nursing are often dealt with by unsystematic, punitive, and ineffective means, with little knowledge of the factors influencing error generation. Typically, individual nurses are simply blamed for their carelessness. By focusing on the individual, the complete set of contributing factors cannot be known. Instead, vain attempts will be made to change human behaviour - one of the most change-resistant aspects of any system. A punitive, person-centred approach therefore, severely hampers effective improvements in safety. By contrast, in other high-risk industries, such as aviation and nuclear power, the systems-centred approach to error reduction is routine. Accidents or errors are only the tip of the incident iceberg. Through effective, nonpunitive incident reporting, which includes reports of near-misses and system problems in addition to actual accidents, the systems-approach allows the complete set of contributing factors underlying an accident to be understood and addressed. Feedback to participants and targeted improvement in the workplace is also important to demonstrate that incident data are being used appropriately, and to maintain high levels of on-going reporting and enthusiasm for the scheme. Drug administration error is a serious problem, which

  15. ICU ward design and nosocomial infection rates: a cross-sectional study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, A; Schröder, C; Gropmann, A; Schwab, F; Behnke, M; Geffers, C; Sunder, W; Holzhausen, J; Gastmeier, P

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the effects of hospital and ward design on multi-faceted infection control. Definitive evidence is rare and the state of knowledge about current ward design is lacking. To collect data on the current status of ward design for intensive care units (ICUs) and to analyse associations between particular design factors and nosocomial infection rates. In 2015, operational infrastructure data were collected via an online questionnaire from ICUs participating voluntarily in the German nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS). A multi-variate analysis was subsequently undertaken with nosocomial infection rates from the KISS database from 2014 to 2015. In total, 534 ICUs submitted data about their operational infrastructure. Of these, 27.1% of beds were hosted in single-bed rooms with a median size of 18m(2) (interquartile range 15-21m(2)), and 73.5% of all ICU beds had a hand rub dispenser nearby. The authors were able to match 266 ICUs in the multi-variate analysis. ICUs with openable windows in patient rooms were associated with lower device-associated lower respiratory tract infections [odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.90]. ICUs with >40% two-bed rooms were associated with lower primary bloodstream infection rates (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.86). Only minor associations were found between design factors and ICU infection rates. Most were surrogates for other risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. OBSERVED HAND WASHING PRACTICES AMONG HEALTH WORKERS IN TWO CRITICAL PAEDIATRICS WARDS OF A SPECIALIST HOSPITAL

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    Balafama Abinye Alex-Hart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand washing in between patient care by health workers is the single most important measure against occurrence and spread of nosocomial infections within health facilities. This study was done to observe health workers hand washing practices in two critical Paediatric wards of a specialist hospital. Trained observers observed and recorded health workers’ hand washing compliance while carrying out their routine patient care. Other information recorded included the time of observation and health workers’ occupation and rank. Data was fed in to excel spread sheet and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. A total of 150 health workers were observed in this study. There were 116 (77.3% females and 34 (22.7% males giving a male: Female ratio of 1: 3.4. There were 86 (57.3% doctors and 64 (42.7% nurses. During the period of observation, soap with running water was found in only 39 (26.0% occasions. Common cotton towel was found in 78.7% of the period of observation as the only available hand drying facility. Doctors’ hand washing rates before and after patients contact were 17.4 and 64.0% respectively. Doctors’ hand washing rates before and after simple procedures ranged from 0 to 56.5 and 60.6 to 100% respectively. Nurses’ hand washing rates before and after simple procedures ranged from 1.3 to 28.6% and 19.7 to 88.4% respectively. Health workers (doctors and nurses hand washing rates on entering the wards was 4%. Hand washing rate before leaving the wards was 74.7%. Majority of the health workers dried their hands with non-disposable common cotton towels on 72.0% of the occasions. Hand washing rates was very low before patient contact and before simple procedures.

  17. Evaluating performance of the operational managers of obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaresh, Zahra; Kazemi, Ashraf; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The goal of hospitals, as the most important health care providing centers, is to improve the health level of the society. Achieving this goal is directly related with performance of the managers. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of operational managers of obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards from the point of view of the staff at educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. In this descriptive study, target population comprised all supervisors and the staff working at obstetrics and gynecology and maternity wards. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire after evaluation of its reliability and validity using questions on managerial performance (planning, organizing, leadership, and control dimensions) and demographic characteristics of the managers and staff. Data were analyzed using independent t-test, one sample t-test, Spearman and Pearson coefficient tests, and one-way analysis of variance. The total mean score of staff's point of view toward performance of managers' performance was significantly higher than the average level (P < 0.001, t = 13.2). In addition, mean scores of managerial performance in planning (P < 0.001, t = 14.93), organizing (P < 0.001, t = 11.64), leadership (P < 0.001, t = 11.16), and control (P < 0.001, t = 13.75) dimensions were significantly higher than the moderate level. With respect to the fact that maintaining and improving the health of mothers and neonates depends on the management and managers' performance in obstetrics and gynecology service providing wards, more than moderate managers' performance need to be improved. It is recommended that higher-level managers pay special attention to the empowerment of managerial skills among operational managers.

  18. Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Eshraghi, Azadeh; Sahraei, Zahra

    2013-08-07

    Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs) that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each). Wrong frequency 71 (27%), forget to order 37 (14.1%), wrong selection 33 (12.5%), drug interactions 26 (9.9%), forget to discontinue 25 (9.5%) and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5%) were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6%) followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%). Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists.

  19. Impact of team-versus ward-aligned clinical pharmacy on unintentional medication discrepancies at admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Sharon M; Grimes, Tamasine C; Jago-Byrne, Marie-Claire; Galvin, Mairéad

    2017-02-01

    Background Medication reconciliation at admission to hospital reduces the prevalence of medication errors. Strategies are needed to ensure timely and efficient delivery of this service. Objective To investigate the effect of aligning clinical pharmacy services with consultant teams, by pharmacists attending post-admission ward rounds, in comparison to a ward-based service, on prevalence of unintentional unresolved discrepancies 48 h into admission. Setting A 243-bed public university teaching hospital in Ireland. Method A prospective, uncontrolled before-after observational study. A gold standard preadmission medication list was completed for each patient and compared with the patient's admission medication prescription and discrepancies were noted. Unresolved discrepancies were examined at 48 h after admission to determine if they were intentional or unintentional. Main outcome measured Number of patients with one or more unintentional, unresolved discrepancy 48 h into admission. Results Data were collected for 140 patients, of whom 73.5% were over 65 years of age. There were no differences between before (ward-aligned) and after (team-aligned) groups regarding age, number of medications or comorbidities. There was a statistically significant reduction in the prevalence of unintentional, unresolved discrepancy(s) per patient (67.3 vs. 27.3%, p medication (13.7 vs. 4.1%, p medications and comorbidities (adjusted odds ratio 4.9, 95% confidence interval 2.3-10.6). Conclusion A consultant team-based clinical pharmacy service contributed positively to medication reconciliation at admission, reducing the prevalence of unintentional, unresolved discrepancy(s) present 48 h after admission.

  20. Detection and management of medication errors in internal wards of a teaching hospital by clinical pharmacists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasinazari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Any suboptimum treatment in the management of patients can lead to medication errors (MEs that may increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. By establishing well-designed patient care activities within the managed care setting, clinical pharmacists can cooperate with other health care professionals to provide quality care and maximize safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and prevention of MEs by clinical pharmacists. This was a cross-sectional interventional study conducted in internal wards of a teaching hospital during a two-month period. During this period, patient records, and physician orders were reviewed by clinical pharmacists. Any prescription error identified was documented. Incorrect drug selection, dose, dosage form, frequency, or route of administration all were considered as medication errors. Then, the clinical pharmacist discuss about findings with the clinical fellows to change faulty orders. The frequency and types of MEs in different wards that were detected and prevented by clinical pharmacists was documented. During the study period, in 132 patients, 262 errors were detected (1.98 per each. Wrong frequency 71 (27%, forget to order 37 (14.1%, wrong selection 33 (12.5%, drug interactions 26 (9.9%, forget to discontinue 25 (9.5% and inappropriate dose adjustment in renal impairment 25 (9.5% were the most types of errors. Cardiovascular medications were the class with the highest detected errors (31.6% followed by gastrointestinal agents (15.6%. Medication errors are common problems in medical wards that their frequency can be restricted by the intervention of clinical pharmacists.

  1. Improving VTE risk assessment at point of admission to a tertiary centre cardiology ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiology wards are generally high turnover units, which may receive primary PCI, high-risk NSTEMI patients, and other general cardiac admissions from a large geographical area. Many centres also provide national specialist services for rarer cardiac conditions for which admissions may be lengthy. Cardiac patients have significant risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) as immobility may be due to systolic dysfunction, attachment to continuous monitoring and predisposition to chest pain, or cardiac syncope. It is recommended by NICE that an initial VTE risk assessment is undertaken at the time of patient admission, with reassessment within 24 hours. For this purpose a risk assessment tool is featured on the front of many Trust drug charts. It is noted that this risk assessment is electronic in other trusts. We undertook an audit into the drug chart documentation of VTE risk assessment on the cardiology ward and the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) at The Royal Free Hospital. It was evident that documentation of VTE risk assessment was poor. The audit interventions were; a teaching presentation to the cardiology department, an educational poster, several update emails to the department and the identification of a ‘VTE risk assessment champion’ to audit ongoing compliance. Following these measures the second audit round demonstrated that documentation of initial risk assessment was slightly improved, but significant improvement was seen in documentation of risk assessment at 24 hours post admission. Results from a third audit cycle indicated that the improvement in initial VTE risk assessment was sustained, and that there was a significant sustained improvement in risk assessment at 24 hours (p <0.05). Recommendations for sustained improvement included: redesigning the drug chart so that the VTE risk assessment tool was linked to the VTE prophylaxis prescription box, and designating the responsibility of the initial VTE risk assessment to the on call junior doctor

  2. One particle properties in the 2D Coulomb problem. Luttinger-Ward variational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, M.P.

    2007-04-27

    In this work, we have studied the 2D Coulomb problem. We used the Luttinger-Ward variational principle to determine the self-energy {sigma} in ring approximation. The use of an ansatz for {sigma} enables us to perform the frequency sums (integrals as T {yields} 0) analytically. Compared to the usual procedure of iterating the self consistency equation with free Green's function as starting points, the present approach is superior. It works for higher density parameter r{sub s} (low density) where the iteration already fails to converge. The motivation of the present work is the quantum Hall system at filling factor 1/2. The Luttinger-Ward procedure is a rather powerful method in particular if combined with an analytical ansatz for {sigma}. The computation performed here for 2DEG has to be seen as a first step: There, the experiment shows the features of a free Fermion system that is interpreted as a system of Composite Fermions. If one studies the self energy of the Composite Fermions in an conserved approximation that corresponds to the ring approximation, one encounters a self consistency equation. However, an iterative solution of this equation meets with a complication: Instead of the polarization part {pi}{sub 00}, in the case of the Composite Fermion there appears the longitudinal polarization part {pi}{sub LL} that has an additional factor (2k + q){sup 2} under the k integral. This integral converges only after the frequency integral is performed. It is highly difficult to reproduce this numerically. Here, the Luttinger-Ward variational approach applied to the 2D Coulomb problem in the present work looks promising. For the 2D Coulomb problem, in the ring approximation for the LW thermodynamic potential, that already leads to a formidable integral equation that has to be studied numerically. (orig.)

  3. Informed switching strongly decreases the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in hospital wards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Kouyos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitals. Antibiotic cycling has been proposed to contain this spread by a coordinated use of different antibiotics. Theoretical work, however, suggests that often the random deployment of drugs ("mixing" might be the better strategy. We use an epidemiological model for a single hospital ward in order to assess the performance of cycling strategies which take into account the frequency of antibiotic resistance in the hospital ward. We assume that information on resistance frequencies stems from microbiological tests, which are performed in order to optimize individual therapy. Thus the strategy proposed here represents an optimization at population-level, which comes as a free byproduct of optimizing treatment at the individual level. We find that in most cases such an informed switching strategy outperforms both periodic cycling and mixing, despite the fact that information on the frequency of resistance is derived only from a small sub-population of patients. Furthermore we show that the success of this strategy is essentially a stochastic phenomenon taking advantage of the small population sizes in hospital wards. We find that the performance of an informed switching strategy can be improved substantially if information on resistance tests is integrated over a period of one to two weeks. Finally we argue that our findings are robust against a (moderate preexistence of doubly resistant strains and against transmission via environmental reservoirs. Overall, our results suggest that switching between different antibiotics might be a valuable strategy in small patient populations, if the switching strategies take the frequencies of resistance alleles into account.

  4. Personnel exposure to violence in hospital emergency wards: a routine activity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Simha F; Bendalak, Yehudit

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes violence against personnel in the emergency wards of all 25 general hospitals in Israel using a self-report questionnaire (N=2,356). Informed by the routine activity theory, the hypotheses related to the major concepts of this approach: exposure, target suitability, guarding and proximity to offenders. A General Exposure to Violence Index (GEVI) was constructed, based on the participants' reports about type and frequency of their victimization to violence during the preceding year. The multiple regression analysis for explaining the GEVI was composed of 15 independent variables relating to participants' professional and personal characteristics as well as to structural features of hospitals. As predicted, higher exposure to violence was related to security or nursing staff and positions of authority; high weekly workload; working in a profession other than that of training; inability of coping with verbal violence; having no access to an emergency button, and working in settings restricting the number of accompanying persons to one only. Unexpectedly, previous training in coping with violence was related to higher victimization. Younger age, male gender and being of European/American origin (mainly from the former Soviet Union) was also related to higher risk of victimization. The results support the utility of the routine activities approach in explaining differences in emergency ward personnel victimization. The findings also indicate, however, the need to add domain-specific contextual analyses to this approach to reach a fuller understanding of the behaviors under discussion. Implications of the finding to coping with violence against emergency ward personnel are discussed, and suggestions are put forward for further study in this field.

  5. Frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Joachim E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression and violence and negative consequences thereof are a major concern in acute psychiatric inpatient care globally. Variations in study designs, settings, populations, and data collection methods render comparisons of the incidence of aggressive behaviour in high risk settings difficult. Objective To describe the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study on 24 acute admission wards in 12 psychiatric hospitals in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Aggressive incidents were recorded by the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R and we checked the data collection for underreporting. Our sample comprised 2344 treatment episodes of 2017 patients and a total of 41'560 treatment days. Results A total of 760 aggressive incidents were registered. We found incidence rates per 100 treatment days between 0.60 (95% CI 0.10–1.78 for physical attacks and 1.83 (1.70–1.97 for all aggressive incidents (including purely verbal aggression. The mean severity was 8.80 ± 4.88 points on the 22-point SOAS-R-severity measure; 46% of the purely verbally aggression was classified as severe (≥ 9 pts.. 53% of the aggressive incidents were followed by a coercive measure, mostly seclusion or seclusion accompanied by medication. In 13% of the patients, one ore more incidents were registered, and 6.9% of the patients were involved in one ore more physical attack. Involuntary admission (OR 2.2; 1.6–2.9, longer length of stay (OR 2.7; 2.0–3.8, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia (ICH-10 F2 (OR 2.1; 1.5–2.9 was associated with a higher risk for aggressive incidents, but no such association was found for age and gender. 38% of the incidents were registered within the first 7 days after admission. Conclusion Aggressive incidents in acute admission wards are a frequent and serious problem. Due to the

  6. [Mother/child affective bond at the unit of the pediatric ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faquinello, Paula; Collet, Neusa

    2003-12-01

    This study presents the importance of the mother-son relationship in the child physical and emotional development. It aims at contributing to the construction of knowledge in nursing, by rescuing the importance of the mothers' stay in the units of the pediatric ward. It is a bibliographical research using as sources: books, scientific articles, journals, magazines, encyclopedias and the Internet. By reading and analyzing the texts it is possible to identify how the consolidation of the mother and son affective bond is processed and to point out the positive aspects of the mother's stay with the hospitalized son.

  7. Medication communication between nurses and patients during nursing handovers on medical wards: a critical ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2012-08-01

    Communication is central to safe medication management. Handover is a routine communication forum where nurses provide details about how patients' medications are managed. Previous studies have investigated handover processes as general communication forums without specific focus on medication information exchange. The effects of social, environmental and organisational contexts on handover communication and medication safety have not been explored. To examine dominant and submissive forms of communication and power relations surrounding medication communication among nurses, and between nurses and patients during handover. A critical ethnographic approach was utilised to unpack the social and power struggles embedded in handover practices. The study was conducted in two medical wards of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia from January to November 2010. All registered nurses employed in the medical wards during the study time were eligible for participation. Patients were eligible if they were able to communicate with nurses about how their medications were managed. In total, 76 nurses and 27 patients were recruited for the study after giving written consent for participation. Participant observations, field interviews, video-recordings and video reflexive focus groups were conducted. Fairclough's critical discourse analytic framework guided data analysis. Nurse coordinators' group handovers in private spaces prioritised organisational and biomedical discourses, with little emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of medication treatment. The ward spatial structure provided an added complexity to how staff allocation occurred. Handovers involving patients in the public spaces at the bedside facilitated a partnership model in medication communication. Nurses exercised discretion during bedside handovers by discussing sensitive information away from the bedside. Handovers across different wards during patient transfers caused communication

  8. BRST quantization and canonical Ward identity of the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG YongChang; JIANG YunGuo; LI XinGuo

    2007-01-01

    According to the method of path integral quantization for the canonical constrained system in Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin scheme, the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system was quantized. Both the Hamiltonian of the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system in phase space and the quantization procedure were simplified. The BRST generator was constructed, and the BRST transformations of supersymmetric fields were gotten; the effective action was calculated, and the generating functional for the Green function was achieved; also, the gauge generator was constructed, and the gauge transformation of the system was obtained. Finally, the Ward-Takahashi identities based on the canonical Noether theorem were calculated, and two relations between proper vertices and propagators were obtained.

  9. Transverse Vector Vertex Function and Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relations in QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2006-01-01

    The transverse vector vertex function in momentum space in four-dimensional QED is derived in terms of a set of transverse Ward-Takahashi relations for the vector and the axial-vector vertices in the case of massless fermion.It is demonstrated explicitly that the transverse vector vertex function derived this way to one-loop order leads to the same result as one obtained in perturbation theory. This provides a basic approach to determine the transverse part of basic vertex function from the symmetry relations of the system.

  10. Tracheostomy patients on the ward: multiple benefits from a multidisciplinary team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mihae

    2010-01-01

    Patients requiring tracheostomies tend to have a longer length of stay due to their underlying disease. After a thorough literature search, Garrubba and colleagues found only three studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) on tracheostomy patients on the ward. One consistent observation was the decreased time to decannulation after institution of MDT care when compared with historical controls. Although a large prospective randomized trial is desirable before MDT is recommended, many institutions may have already formed a team approach to provide coordinated care resulting in improved outcome and length of stay.

  11. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  12. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  13. Haemostasis and Safety Measures before Lumbar Puncture in the Haematology Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Afshari, Arash

    2015-01-01

    : An online survey with questions pertaining to precautions of haemostasis and application of fundoscopy was sent by e-mail to all 12 haematology wards in Denmark. RESULTS: Eleven sites participated. Five (45%) reported no pausation of antiplatelet drugs at all. The mean platelet limit prior to lumbar...... puncture was 50 × 10(9)/l (range 10-50 × 10(9)/l). Seven (64%) sites had an international normalised ratio limit of 1.5, and the remaining 4 had values between 1.0 and 2.5. Two (18%) reported occasional use of thromboelastography or platelet analysis to assess the bleeding risk. Fundoscopy is routinely...

  14. Note on Ward-Horadam H(x) - binomials' recurrences and related interpretations, II

    CERN Document Server

    Kwasniewski, Andrzej Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    We deliver here second new $\\textit{H(x)}-binomials'$ recurrence formula, were $H(x)-binomials' $ array is appointed by $Ward-Horadam$ sequence of functions which in predominantly considered cases where chosen to be polynomials . Secondly, we supply a review of selected related combinatorial interpretations of generalized binomial coefficients. We then propose also a kind of transfer of interpretation of $p,q-binomial $ coefficients onto $q-binomial$ coefficients interpretations thus bringing us back to $Gy{\\"{o}}rgy P\\'olya $ and Donald Ervin Knuth relevant investigation decades ago.

  15. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral.

  16. A study on bed utilization in the gynaecological ward of a district hospital in West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S; Biswas, R; Lahiri, A

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted in a non-paying gynaecological ward of the district hospital, South 24 Parganas, West Bengal to assess different bed efficiency indicators. Total 331 patients were admitted in 23 study beds (12 OPD beds and 11 emergency beds) during an observation period of six months. Overall average number of admissions were 14.4 and average length of stay 14.7days. Bed turnover rate was 13.8 and was higher for emergency beds (22.1) compared to OPD beds (9). Bed occupancy rate was 61.3% with significant difference between OPD beds (57.5%) and emergency beds (65.4%).

  17. Mode analysis and Ward identities for perturbative quantum gravity in de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamis, N. C.; Woodard, R. P.

    1992-10-01

    We study linearized gravitons on the D-dimensional open submanifold spanned by de Sitter conformal coordinates. The physical modes are found in the same way as for flat space by imposing exact gauge conditions on the invariant field equations and then exploiting the residual gauge freedom of solutions. The resulting polatization tensors have vanishing zero components and are transverse and traceless, just as in flat space. We also show that vacua exist such that the ghost and graviton propagators obey the Ward identity relating them.

  18. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Jon B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification. Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01 used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks, whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4

  19. [Perceiving gender or profession: the practical experience of male nursing students in the obstetrics and gynecology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fen; Yang, Yu-O; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2013-06-01

    The impact of general gender stereotypes on nursing is severe and influential, especially with regard to male nursing students working in obstetrics and gynecology wards. This study examined the experience of male nursing students in obstetrics and gynecology wards. We used a phenomenological qualitative research approach and a sample of 10 male nursing students currently studying at a nursing college in central Taiwan. All participants had obstetrics and gynecology ward experience. Individual interviews were transcribed into the procedural record. Colaizzi content analysis analyzed and categorized research data. Based on participants practical experiences in the obstetrics and gynecology ward, the main stages of participants professional development through their internship experience included: (1) Unbalanced self-role recognition; (2) being defined by the gender framework (gender stereotypes); (3) the difference between male doctor and male nurse; (4) learning appropriate communication techniques; (5) mutual and empathetic understanding of the female psychology during childbirth; (6) gaining sources for positive feedback; (7) releasing the shackles of gender and gaining full insight into and comprehension of nursing functions; and (8) given the opportunity to learn. Through ongoing examination and learning, participant internships in the obstetrics and gynecology wards were significant and essential learning experiences that validated their necessity. Nursing schools and internship institutions alike must realize the importance of gender-equality education to the nursing profession. Medical institutions are encouraged to offer equal learning opportunities to male and female nursing students and provide targeted assistance to males to help them master clinical nursing care practices in the obstetrics and gynecology department.

  20. Etiologies of Prolonged Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Sabzehei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jaundice is a common condition among neonates. Prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia occurs when jaundice persists beyond two weeks in term neonates and three weeks in preterm neonates. This study aimed to determine the etiologies of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Methods: This study was conducted on all infants diagnosed with prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia during 2007-2012 in the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Demographic characteristics of infants, physical examination and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed to determine the etiologies of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Results: In total, 100 infants diagnosed with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in this study, including 49 male and 51 female neonates with mean age of 20±1 days and mean bilirubin level of 17.5±4.0 mg/dL. Main causes of hyperbilirubinemia were urinary tract infection, ABO incompatibility, hypothyroidism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in 14%, 5%, 6% and 5% of neonates, respectively. Moreover, unknown etiologies, such as breastfeeding, were detected in 70% of the studied infants. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, determining the main causes of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in neonates is of paramount importance. In the majority of cases, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with physiological factors, such as breastfeeding.

  1. Student attitudes towards the goals of an inter-professional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijma, M B

    1999-01-01

    For some years, a 14-day practice period in an inter-professional, integrated training ward has been a compulsory element for students in six programmes at the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) in Linkoping, Sweden.The main purposes of the training are to enable students to collaborate in teams and to understand the competences and skills of the other students, to recognize the needs of the patients and to practise and develop their own professional role. A process evaluation of the first year of this training ward focused on students' attitudes towards the goals of the integrated learning activity.Results show that students from all programmes, generally speaking, entered the training with high expectations and that these expectations changed very little, i.e.their expectations were satisfied.The ability to 'understand other competences and skills' had an impact as a result of the training and was the only goal showing a measurable change in a positive direction. As regards programmes, the student nurses were the most positive group. It seems that students representing caring professions, who will cooperate closely in the future, have the highest expectations of teamwork and development of their own professional role and that these expectations are satisfied. Students from medicine and the paramedical programmes were less positive regarding the goal of developing their own professional role. A possible goal conflict between teamwork and practising one's own professional role is discussed.

  2. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Soltani Arabshahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons. The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability. Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher (concern about patient′s welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems, factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system′s monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource. Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  3. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-03-01

    Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  4. Continuous pulse oximetry in the general surgical ward: Nellcor N-200 versus Nellcor N-3000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Lie, C; Rosenberg, J

    1999-01-01

    Symphony N-3000 with the Nellcor N-200 pulse oximeter, when monitoring patients in the general surgical ward. Twenty-two patients were monitored during unrestricted ward activities for a total of 275 h with a N-3000 and a N-200 pulse oximeter simultaneously. Data were analysed for lack of concordance...... between the two pulse oximeters with respect to frequency of registered hypoxaemic episodes and thus the amount of time spent in the alarm state. The median number of desaturation episodes with the N-200 was 18 (range 0-511) compared with four (range 0-476) with the N-3000 (p ... of drop-outs (loss of signal) was 13 (range 1-46) with the N-200 compared with nine (2-41) with the N-3000 (p = 0.06). The N-200 registered saturation values of 85% or below for 23% of the observation time compared with 6% of the observation time with the N-3000 pulse oximeter (p

  5. Respiratory rates measured by a standardised clinical approach, ward staff, and a wireless device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, A; Pedersen, N E; Lippert, A.

    2016-01-01

    in a medical ward. Respiratory rate was measured by three methods: a standardised approach over 60 s while patients lay still and refrained from talking, by ward staff and by a wireless electronic patch (SensiumVitals). The Bland-Altman method was used to compare measurements and three breaths per minute (BPM......) was considered a clinically relevant difference. RESULTS: We included 50 patients. The mean difference between the standardised approach and the electronic measurement was 0.3 (95% CI: -1.4 to 2.0) BPM; 95% limits of agreement were -11.5 (95% CI: -14.5 to -8.6) and 12.1 (95% CI: 9.2 to 15.1) BPM. Removal...... of three outliers with huge differences lead to a mean difference of -0.1 (95% CI: -0.7 to 0.5) BPM and 95% limits of agreement of -4.2 (95% CI: -5.3 to -3.2) BPM and 4.0 (95% CI: 2.9 to 5.0) BPM. The mean difference between staff and electronic measurements was 1.7 (95% CI: -0.5 to 3.9) BPM; 95% limits...

  6. Utilization Pattern of Antibiotics in Different Wards of Sari Imam Khomeini Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ebrahimzadeh, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Due to an increase in cases of irrational drug prescription and it's health and economic consequences, evaluation of the rational use of drugs seemed necessary. Among drug groups antibiotics are greatly significant.Materials and Methods: Utilization pattern of antibiotics in different wards of Sari Imam Khomeini teaching hospital in the first half of 2000 and 2005 were reviewed. ATC/DDD (Anatomic, Therapeutic, Chemical/ Defined Daily Dose methodology was used.Results: Data showed, use of antibiotics jumped from 95.4 DBDs (DDD per patient’s bed-days to 124 DBDs. Distribution of different class of anti-microbial, showed the highest increase in use of vancomycin and clindamycin. Use of cotrimoxazole and aminoglycosides remained fairly unchanged, howerrs consumption of Penicillin G dropped. In year 2005, ICU ward followed by gynecology, were among the University Hospital departments with the highest consumption of antibiotics. Cefazolin was the most prescribed antibiotics during this study.Conclusion: It appers that there is a need for more national drug policities and drug education program for health care professionals. Evaluation of drug distribution in hospitals seems to be necessary.Key words:

  7. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  8. Gastroenteritis at the pediatric ward of Tembakau Deli Hospital, Medan, in 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, F R; Panggabean, G; Loebis, M S; Siregar, Z

    1991-01-01

    In a period of 1 year (1 January-31 December 1988) a retrospective study on patients admitted to the Pediatric ward of Tembakau Deli Hospital, Medan, was done. This hospital is a referral hospital for patients from hospitals of Dept. of Plantation in North Sumatera and Aceh. During year 1988, there were 1339 infants and children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward Tembakau Deli, Medan. Of these patients, 183 had gastroenteritis; it was most frequently found in the age group of 0-13 months (46.4%). The patients consisted of 53.55% males and 46.45% females. Most of the patients i.e. 140 (76.51%), had good nutrition. Malnutrition were found in 31 patients where 16.94% among them were moderate malnutrition, and 12 patients (6.55%) had malnutrition. The total mortality rate of gastroenteritis in this study was 2.18% which was usually associated with severe complications while pure gastroenteritis showed no (0%) mortality.

  9. Evaluation of the biological efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in wards of an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H-T; White, P; Sheorey, H; Cocks, J; Waters, M-J

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of a 'dry' hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in an Australian hospital via a two-armed study. The in vivo arm examined the baseline bacterial counts in high-touch zones within wards and evaluated the efficacy of cleaning with a neutral detergent followed by either hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination, or a manual terminal clean with bleach or Det-Sol 500. The in vitro arm examined the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination on a variety of different surfaces commonly found in the wards of an Australian hospital, deliberately seeded with a known concentration of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). All bacterial counts were evaluated by a protocol of contact plate method. In the in vivo arm, 33.3% of the high-touch areas assessed had aerobic bacterial count below the detection limit (i.e. no bacteria recoverable) post hydrogen peroxide decontamination, and in all circumstances the highest microbial density was ≤3 cfu/cm(2), while in the in vitro arm there was at least a reduction in bacterial load by a factor of 10 at all surfaces investigated. These results showed that dry hydrogen peroxide vapour room decontamination is highly effective on a range of surfaces, although the cleanliness data obtained by these methods cannot be easily compared among the different surfaces as recovery of organisms is affected by the nature of the surface.

  10. Using Isovist Application to Explore Visibility Area of Hospital Inpatient Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengke, M. M. C.; Atmodiwirjo, P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports an on-going project that explores the use of digital application to study human field of view. The focus of discussion is to study the patients’ visual experience, in relation to the arrangement of interior elements in patients’ ward. The physical qualities of the environment can influence the healing process of the patient. Typical layout of interior elements often fails to provide visual stimulus that could support the healing process of the. This study explores the experience of seeing by simulating the hospital ward setting into 3D model using isovist analysis. Isovist is used to represent the experience of seeing by the patient from particular point of view and also to represent the object and surfaces that are being seen. Isovist has a function to show us the boundary of the visible areas, which can reveal which elements can and cannot seen by the patient. Isovist provides a way to understand the experience of seeing and being seen by visualizing the visibility area through three dimensional modelling. This study suggests the possibility to study human field of view to support the design of architecture for health.

  11. Assessment of Midwives’ Communication Skills at the Maternity Wards of Teaching Hospitals in Mashhad in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talate Khadivzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:The quality of communication between midwives and parturient women is a determinant of maternal satisfaction with midwifery care. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the communication skills of midwives at maternity wards of Mashhad teaching hospitals in 2014.   Methods:In this descriptive study, 49 midwives, working at Mashhad teaching hospitals, were randomly selected. All midwives worked rotating shifts at the wards. The midwives’ communication skills were assessed by the researcher, using the self-structured  observation checklist of communicative performance.   Results: The mean age of midwives was 39.11±9.66 years and their mean work experience was 15.9±8.77 years. In total, 68.3% of the participants experienced childbirth themselves. 66.7% of midwives were moderately  keen on midwifery as a profession. The mean score of the checklist obtained by midwives was 67.9±10.7. There was no relationship between midwives’ communication skills and work experience, childbirth experience, age or interest in midwifery. Conclusion:Considering the inadequacy of midwives’ communication skills, which could be the major cause of maternal dissatisfaction with delivery care, it is recommended that in-service training courses be held by applying new teaching methods. Moreover, the educational needs of midwives, including communication skills, should be considered in these training programs .

  12. Medication communication through documentation in medical wards: knowledge and power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-09-01

    Health professionals communicate with each other about medication information using different forms of documentation. This article explores knowledge and power relations surrounding medication information exchanged through documentation among nurses, doctors and pharmacists. Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in 2010 in two medical wards of a metropolitan hospital in Australia. Data collection methods included participant observations, field interviews, video-recordings, document retrieval and video reflexive focus groups. A critical discourse analytic framework was used to guide data analysis. The written medication chart was the main means of communicating medication decisions from doctors to nurses as compared to verbal communication. Nurses positioned themselves as auditors of the medication chart and scrutinised medical prescribing to maintain the discourse of patient safety. Pharmacists utilised the discourse of scientific judgement to guide their decision-making on the necessity of verbal communication with nurses and doctors. Targeted interdisciplinary meetings involving nurses, doctors and pharmacists should be organised in ward settings to discuss the importance of having documented medication information conveyed verbally across different disciplines. Health professionals should be encouraged to proactively seek out each other to relay changes in medication regimens and treatment goals.

  13. Future: new strategies for hospitalists to overcome challenges in teaching on today's wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shannon K; Farnan, Jeanne M; Arora, Vineet M

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the clinical learning environment under resident duty hours restrictions have introduced a number of challenges on today's wards. Additionally, the current group of medical trainees is largely represented by the Millennial Generation, a generation characterized by an affinity for technology, interaction, and group-based learning. Special attention must be paid to take into account the learning needs of a generation that has only ever known life with duty hours. A mnemonic for strategies to augment teaching rounds for hospitalists was created using an approach that considers time limitations due to duty hours as well as the preferences of Millennial learners. These strategies to enhance learning during teaching rounds are Flipping the Wards, Using Documentation to Teach, Technology-Enabled Teaching, Using Guerilla Teaching Tactics, Rainy Day Teaching, and Embedding Teaching Moments into Rounds (FUTURE). Hospitalists serving as teaching attendings should consider these possible strategies as ways to enhance teaching in the post-duty hours era. These techniques appeal to the preferences of today's learners in an environment often limited by time constraints. Hospitalists are well positioned to champion innovative approaches to teaching in a dynamic and evolving clinical learning environment. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Surveying Substance Abuse Frequency in Hospitalized Patients in Psychiatric Ward of Farshchian Hospital in Hamadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghaleiha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Substance abuse is believed to be one of the greatest social, economical ,and cultural problems all over the world and it is commonly observed among all social classes especially among mental disorder patients. Substance abuse can influence on the receptive-mental states such as mood and on the external visible activities such as behaviors. The aim of this study is to survey the frequency of Substance abuse in hospitalized mental-psychic patients in psychiatric ward of Farshchian hospital in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive and retrospective study, available sampling method was used along with examining filed records in which the records of 400 hospitalized patients (293 men and 107 women from September 2000 to 2001 were checked and required data such as demographic information, infliction duration, substance abuse duration, psychiatric diagnosis were extracted and registered. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods.Results: About half of the hospitalized patients in the psychiatric ward had simultaneous substance abuse. Men had substance abuse more than women and the youths aged 20-39 more than the other groups. The study showed that widowing had positive relationship and higher education negative relationship with substance abuse.Conclusion: Mood disorders with 90.53%, schizophrenia with 8.29%, and other diagnostics with 1.18% were observed in persons with substance abuse and these diagnostics in non substance abuse persons were 79.22% ,11.26% and 9.52% respectively.

  15. Effects of neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure admitted to ward

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    de Araújo Carlos José Soares

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromuscular electrostimulation has become a promising issue in cardiovascular rehabilitation. However there are few articles published in the literature regarding neuromuscular electrostimulation in patients with heart failure during hospital stay. Methods This is a randomized controlled pilot trial that aimed to investigate the effect of neuromuscular electrostimulation in the walked distance by the six-minute walking test in 30 patients admitted to ward for heart failure treatment in a tertiary cardiology hospital. Patients in the intervention group performed a conventional rehabilitation and neuromuscular electrostimulation. Patients underwent 60 minutes of electrostimulation (wave frequency was 20 Hz, pulse duration of 20 us two times a day for consecutive days until hospital discharge. Results The walked distance in the six-minute walking test improved 75% in the electrostimulation group (from 379.7 ± 43.5 to 372.9 ± 46.9 meters to controls and from 372.9 ± 62.4 to 500 ± 68 meters to electrostimulation, p Conclusion The neuromuscular electrostimulation group showed greater improvement in the walked distance in the six-minute walking test in patients admitted to ward for compensation of heart failure.

  16. Risk factors for requiring intensive care among children admitted to ward with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Pate, Brian M; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Macias, Charles G; Fisher, Erin S; Piedra, Pedro A; Espinola, Janice A; Sullivan, Ashley F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    To examine risk factors for transfer of bronchiolitis patients from the ward to the intensive care unit (ICU) and/or initiation of critical care interventions. We performed a 16-center, prospective cohort study of hospitalized children age bronchiolitis. During the winters of 2007 to 2010, researchers collected clinical data and nasopharyngeal aspirates from study participants. The primary outcome was late intensive care use, defined as a transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation (regardless of location) after the child's first inpatient day. Among 2104 children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, 1762 (84%) were identified as initial ward patients, comprising the analysis cohort. The median age was 4 months (interquartile range, 2-9 months), and 1048 (59%) were boys. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (72%) and rhinovirus (25%). After the first inpatient day, 47 (3%; 95% confidence interval, 2-4) were subsequently transferred to the ICU or required mechanical ventilation. In the multivariable logistic regression model predicting subsequent transfer to the ICU or mechanical ventilation use, the significant predictors were birth weight bronchiolitis, low birth weight and tachypnea were significantly associated with subsequent transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'

    OpenAIRE

    White, Mark; Wells, John S G; Butterworth, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to 'engage' and 'empower' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the 'engagement' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa. Objective: This paper explores and examines the impact of a large-scale QI programme, the Productive Ward, on the ...

  18. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards.

  19. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  20. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not yet established. However, given the substantial incidence of preventable ADEs in Dutch hospitals found in recent studies, appears warranted. Therefore, "Ward-Oriented Pharmacy", an on-ward service tailored to the Dutch hospital setting, will be developed. This service will consist of multifaceted interventions implemented in the Internal Medicine wards by hospital pharmacists. The effect of this service on preventable ADEs in elderly inpatients will be measured. Elderly patients are at high risk for ADEs due to multi-morbidity, concomitant disabilities and polypharmacy. Most studies on the incidence and preventability of ADEs in elderly patients have been conducted in the outpatient setting or on admission to a hospital, and fewer in the inpatient setting. Moreover, recognition of ADEs by the treating physicians is challenging in elderly patients because their disease presentation is often atypical and complex. Detailed information about the performance of the treating physicians in ADE recognition is scarce. Methods/Design The design is a multi-centre, interrupted time series study. Patients of 65 years or older, consecutively admitted to Internal Medicine wards will be included. After a pre-measurement, a Ward-Oriented Pharmacy service will be introduced and the effect of this service will be assessed during a post-measurement. The primary outcome measures are the ADE prevalence on admission and ADE incidence during hospital stay. These outcomes will be assessed using structured

  1. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini

    2008-01-01

    ; appropriate feeds were not present in any of the hospitals. A diagnosis of HIV-AIDS was made in only two cases while approximately 5% children admitted were expected to be infected with HIV in this area. CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment of children admitted to paediatric wards is disturbingly poor...... outpatient consultations were observed, and a record of care was extracted from the case notes of children on the paediatric ward. Additional data were collected from inspection of ward supplies and hospital reports. FINDINGS: Of 1181 outpatient consultations, basic clinical signs were often not checked; e.......g. of 895 children with a history of fever, temperature was measured in 57%, and of 657 of children with cough or dyspnoea only 57 (9%) were examined for respiratory rate. Among 509 inpatients weight was recorded in the case notes in 250 (49%), respiratory rate in 54 (11%) and mental state in 47 (9...

  2. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses' clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alisha M; Smith, Sheree M S

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory patients. 17 guidelines were identified in our systematic review. The quality assessment demonstrated variability in these guidelines. Common core knowledge and technical and non-technical skills were identified. These include pathophysiology, understanding of physiological measurements and monitoring, education, counselling, and ward and patient management. The knowledge and skills extracted from respiratory clinical guidelines may inform a curriculum for ward-based respiratory nursing to ensure optimal care of adult patients.

  3. Dispersion of exhaled droplet nuclei in a two-bed hospital ward with three different ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    hospital ward with three ventilation systems, i.e. mixing, downward and displacement ventilation. Two life-size breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. The exhalation jet from a bed-lying manikin was visualized using smoke. N2O was used as tracer gas......Effective ventilation in general hospital wards is important for controlling the airborne transmission of infectious respiratory diseases. Experiments have been carried out to increase our understanding of the interaction of the breathing flows of two individuals in a full-scale experimental...... are well mixed in the ward. Bed distance does not affect the personal exposure of the receiving patient. For displacement ventilation, the exhaled jet can penetrate a long distance. A high concentration layer of exhaled droplet nuclei because of thermal stratification locking has also been observed...

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ling

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs, the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282 contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  5. Four Simple Ward Based Initiatives to Reduce Unnecessary In-Hospital Patient Stay: A Quality Improvement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asad; Wali, Gorav; Steuer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hospital stay not only increases financial stress on the National Health Service but also exposes patients to an unnecessarily high risk of adverse ward events. Each day accumulates approximately £225 in bed costs with additional risks of venousthromboembolism, hospital acquired infections, prescription errors, and falls. Despite being medically fit for discharge (MFFD), patients awaiting care packages with prolonged length of stay (LoS) have poorer outcomes and experience increased rates of mortality as a result. A six cycle prospective audit was carried out to investigate if four simple ward based initiatives could optimise patient flow through a medical ward and reduce LoS of inpatients awaiting social packages and placement. The four daily initiatives were: A morning board round between nurses and doctors to prioritise new or sick patients for early review.A post ward round meeting between the multidisciplinary team to expedite rehabilitation and plan discharges early.An evening board round to highlight which patients needed discharge paperwork for the next day to alleviate the wait for pharmacy.A ‘computer on wheels’ on ward rounds so investigations could be ordered and reviewed at the bedside allowing more time to address patient concerns. A control month in August 2013 and five intervention cycles were completed between September 2013 and January 2014. Prior to intervention, mean time taken for patients to be discharged with a package of care, once declared MFFD, was 25 days. With intervention this value dropped to 1 day. The total LoS fell from 46 days to 16 days. It was also found that the time taken from admission to MFFD status was reduced from 21 days to 15 days. In conclusion this data shows that with four simple modifications to ward behaviour unnecessary inpatient stay can be significantly reduced. PMID:26734432

  6. Four Simple Ward Based Initiatives to Reduce Unnecessary In-Hospital Patient Stay: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asad; Wali, Gorav; Steuer, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hospital stay not only increases financial stress on the National Health Service but also exposes patients to an unnecessarily high risk of adverse ward events. Each day accumulates approximately £225 in bed costs with additional risks of venousthromboembolism, hospital acquired infections, prescription errors, and falls. Despite being medically fit for discharge (MFFD), patients awaiting care packages with prolonged length of stay (LoS) have poorer outcomes and experience increased rates of mortality as a result. A six cycle prospective audit was carried out to investigate if four simple ward based initiatives could optimise patient flow through a medical ward and reduce LoS of inpatients awaiting social packages and placement. The four daily initiatives were: A morning board round between nurses and doctors to prioritise new or sick patients for early review.A post ward round meeting between the multidisciplinary team to expedite rehabilitation and plan discharges early.An evening board round to highlight which patients needed discharge paperwork for the next day to alleviate the wait for pharmacy.A 'computer on wheels' on ward rounds so investigations could be ordered and reviewed at the bedside allowing more time to address patient concerns. A control month in August 2013 and five intervention cycles were completed between September 2013 and January 2014. Prior to intervention, mean time taken for patients to be discharged with a package of care, once declared MFFD, was 25 days. With intervention this value dropped to 1 day. The total LoS fell from 46 days to 16 days. It was also found that the time taken from admission to MFFD status was reduced from 21 days to 15 days. In conclusion this data shows that with four simple modifications to ward behaviour unnecessary inpatient stay can be significantly reduced.

  7. Utilizing distributional analytics and electronic records to assess timeliness of inpatient blood glucose monitoring in non-critical care wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular and timely monitoring of blood glucose (BG levels in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus is crucial to optimizing inpatient glycaemic control. However, methods to quantify timeliness as a measurement of quality of care are lacking. We propose an analytical approach that utilizes BG measurements from electronic records to assess adherence to an inpatient BG monitoring protocol in hospital wards. Methods We applied our proposed analytical approach to electronic records obtained from 24 non-critical care wards in November and December 2013 from a tertiary care hospital in Singapore. We applied distributional analytics to evaluate daily adherence to BG monitoring timings. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (1S-KS test was performed to test daily BG timings against non-adherence represented by the uniform distribution. This test was performed among wards with high power, determined through simulation. The 1S-KS test was coupled with visualization via the cumulative distribution function (cdf plot and a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (2S-KS test, enabling comparison of the BG timing distributions between two consecutive days. We also applied mixture modelling to identify the key features in daily BG timings. Results We found that 11 out of the 24 wards had high power. Among these wards, 1S-KS test with cdf plots indicated adherence to BG monitoring protocols. Integrating both 1S-KS and 2S-KS information within a moving window consisting of two consecutive days did not suggest frequent potential change from or towards non-adherence to protocol. From mixture modelling among wards with high power, we consistently identified four components with high concentration of BG measurements taken before mealtimes and around bedtime. This agnostic analysis provided additional evidence that the wards were adherent to BG monitoring protocols. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of our proposed analytical approach as a monitoring

  8. [Medium-term strategy for the specific management of pneumology hospitals and wards after the decentralization of the sanitary system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, Simona Nicoleta; Ioniţa, Diana; Paceonea, Mirela; Chiriac, Nona Delia; Stoicescu, Ileana Paula; Mihălţan, F D

    2011-01-01

    Identifying and promoting new management techniques for the descentralized pneumology hospitals or wards was one of the most ambitious objectives of the project "Quality in the pneumology medical services through continuous medical education and organizational flexibility", financed by the Human Resourses Development Sectorial Operational Programme 2007-2013 (ID 58451). The "Medium term Strategy on the specific management of the pneumology hospitals or wards after the descentralization of the sanitary system" presented in the article was written by the project's experts and discussed with pneumology managers and local authorities representatives. This Strategy application depends on the colaboration of the pneumology hospitals with professional associations, and local and central authorities.

  9. Bacterial contamination of the hands of doctors: A study in the medicine and dermatology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudrajit Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctors′ hands are a common source of bacterial contamination. Often, these organisms are found to be virulent species with multidrug-resistance patterns. These are the sources of nosocomial infections in many patients. Aims: The present study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of bacterial contamination in the hands of doctors in the Medicine and Dermatology wards of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The hands of 44 doctors were swabbed and cultured at entry to ward and at exit. Then, tap water and alcohol swab wash techniques were used and further swabs were done at each step. Thus, each doctor was sampled four-times for the study. The antibiotic-sensitivity pattern of the organisms was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results: There was a significant contamination of the doctors′ hands at entry (59.1% and at exit (90.9%. Overall, Staphylococcus was the predominant organism (59% at entry and 85% at exit; coagulase-negative ones were more prevalent at entry (32% and coagulase-positive ones were more prevalent at exit (54%. There was no difference in the hand contamination rates of junior and senior doctors. Also, the contamination rates were similar in the Medicine and Dermatology wards. Among the Gram negative organisms, Escherichia coli (4.5%, Pseudomonas (4.5%, Enterococci (13.6% and Klebsiella (9% were the main ones isolated. Gram negative organisms were significantly more prevalent at exit (P = 0.009 compared with their numbers at entry. Hand washing techniques reduced the contamination rates significantly, 76% with tap water wash and further 16.5% with alcohol swab. The removal rate for both groups of organisms was similar. Also, coagulase-positive and -negative Staphylococci showed equal rates of removal with hand washing (P = 0.9793. The organisms were found to be resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics; the beta-lactam group was especially largely resistant both for Gram positive and Gram

  10. Rapid response team implementation on a burn surgery/acute care ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroseos, Teresa; Bidwell, Karen; Rui, Lin; Fuhrman, Lawrence; Gibran, Nicole S; Honari, Shari; Pham, Tam N

    2014-01-01

    To date there is limited evidence of efficacy for rapid response teams (RRT) in burns despite widespread their implementation in U.S. hospitals. The burn surgery/acute care ward at the Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, primarily treats burns, acute wounds, and pediatric trauma patients, but also accepts overflow surgical and medical patients. The authors hypothesize that institutional RRT implementation in 2006 has reduced code blue activations, unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, and mortality on the acute care ward of this hospital. The authors retrospectively analyzed all patients treated in our acute care unit before (2000-2004) and after RRT implementation (2007-2011). Patient, injury, and treatment outcomes information were collected and analyzed. The authors specifically examined clinical signs that triggered RRT activation and processes of care after activation. They compared code blue activation rates, unplanned ICU transfers, and mortality between the two periods by Poisson regression. The acute care unit treated 7092 patients before and 9357 patients after RRT implementation. There were 409 RRT activations in 329 patients, 18 of whom ultimately died during hospitalization. Those who died had higher rates of stridor (P = .03), tachypnea (P = .001), and low oxygen saturations (P = .02) compared with survivors. Fewer burn and surgical patients died after implementation (seven patients; 22% of all deaths) compared with patients who died pre-RRT (27 patients; 53% of all deaths). After adjustment for case-mix index, age, and medical service differences between the two periods, code blue calls decreased from 1.4/1000 to 0.4/1000 admissions (P = .04), unplanned ICU transfer rates decreased from 65/1000 to 50/1000 admissions (P < .01), and hospital deaths decreased from 4.5/1000 to 3.3/1000 admissions (P = .11). Since its implementation, RRT activation has been frequently used in the acute care ward of this hospital. Respiratory symptoms

  11. BRST quantization and canonical Ward identity of the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the method of path integral quantization for the canonical constrained system in Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin scheme, the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system was quantized. Both the Hamiltonian of the supersymmetric electromagnetic interaction system in phase space and the quantization procedure were simplified. The BRST generator was constructed, and the BRST transforma- tions of supersymmetric fields were gotten; the effective action was calculated, and the generating functional for the Green function was achieved; also, the gauge generator was constructed, and the gauge transformation of the system was ob- tained. Finally, the Ward-Takahashi identities based on the canonical Noether theorem were calculated, and two relations between proper vertices and propaga- tors were obtained.

  12. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...... of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive...... sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD) age of 79.4 (8.3) years) were included between June and December 2012. INTERVENTION: A daily (on weekdays) program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using...

  13. Warding off the evil eye: when the fear of being envied increases prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Niels; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Pieters, Rik

    2010-11-01

    The fear of being envied makes people act prosocially, in an attempt to ward off the potentially destructive effects of envy. In three experiments, people who were in a superior position and could be envied were more likely than control participants to give time-consuming advice to a potentially envious person or to help a potentially envious person pick up erasers she had accidentally scattered. However, helping behavior increased only if envy was likely to be malicious rather than benign. People who were better off did not increase their helping behavior toward people in general, but increased their helping only toward the potentially envious. This finding is consistent with the idea that the better off act more prosocially as an appeasement strategy. The fear of being envied serves useful group functions, because it triggers prosocial behavior that is likely to dampen the potentially destructive effects of envy and simultaneously helps to improve the situation of people who are worse off.

  14. Patients' characteristics and healthcare providers' perceived workload in French hospital emergency wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Sandrine; Moulin, Pierre; Brangier, Eric; Gilibert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how patients' characteristics increase healthcare providers' perceived workload. Patients' characteristics and dependency, technical and relational complexities of care seem to increase healthcare providers' workload. As workload is multidimensional, we examine which dimensions are affected by patients' characteristics. Our methodology is based on 121 patients assessed with the NASA task load index (NASA-TLX) and a questionnaire filled in by 57 health providers in 2 emergency wards in French hospital settings, to evaluate their attitudes to different patients' characteristics. Our results show that physical demand is the dimension most affected by patients' behaviour and characteristics. Next, we observe that workload increases more due to patients' behaviour than their social characteristics. We propose that a regulation mechanism be taken into account in further research, using methodology based on observations to identify how healthcare providers might adapt their activities to compensate for workload variations caused by patients.

  15. [Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somense, Carolina Bueno; Duran, Erika Christiane Marocco

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors.

  16. Using Gamification Combined with Indoor Location to Improve Nurses' Hand Hygiene Compliance in an ICU Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Marques, Rita; Gregório, João; Pinheiro, Fernando; Póvoa, Pedro; Mira da Silva, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare acquired infections are among the biggest unsolved problems in healthcare, implying an increasing number of deaths, extra-days of hospital stay and hospital costs. Performing hand hygiene is a simple and inexpensive prevention measure, but healthcare workers compliance with it is still far from optimal. Recognized hurdles are lack of time, forgetfulness, wrong technique and lack of motivation. This study aims at exploring gamification to promote nurses' HH compliance self-awareness and action. Real-time data collected from an indoor location system will provide feedback information to a group of nurses working in an ICU ward. In this paper both the research's motivation and methods is presented, along with the first round of results and its discussion.

  17. Ward Identity and Homes' Law in a Holographic Superconductor with Momentum Relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Keun-Young; Park, Miok

    2016-01-01

    We study three properties of a holographic superconductor related to conductivities, where momentum relaxation plays an important role. First, we find that there are constraints between electric, thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. The constraints are analytically derived by the Ward identities regarding diffeomorphism from field theory perspective. We confirm them by numerically computing all two-point functions from holographic perspective. Second, we investigate Homes' law and Uemura's law for various high-temperature and conventional superconductors. They are empirical and (material independent) universal relations between the superfluid density at zero temperature, the transition temperature, and the electric DC conductivity right above the transition temperature. In our model, it turns out that the Homes' law does not hold but the Uemura's law holds at small momentum relaxation related to coherent metal regime. Third, we explicitly show that the DC electric conductivity is finite for a neutral sc...

  18. Effects of discontinuing cover gowns on a postpartal ward upon cord colonization of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, M T

    1983-01-01

    To determine if the incidence of bacterial cord colonization in neonates increased when cover gowns were discontinued on a postpartal ward, a study was conducted. All infants who were admitted to and discharged from the well infant nursery at an Army medical center in Denver, Colorado, were cultured at the umbilicus at the time of admission and at discharge. The control group (N = 74) continued to gown as usual; the experimental group (N = 50) did not wear gowns. Visitors in both groups received the same instructions regarding handwashing. For all organisms, the control group demonstrated 80% colonization of infants who were negative on admission, and the experimental group demonstrated a colonization rate of 62%. When the chi square is applied, these data are statistically significant for P = 0.02 and P = 0.05. The experimental group had less colonization than the control group.

  19. Cultural Construction of Military Patients Ward%谈军人病区文化建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫军峰; 周文斌; 李丹

    2014-01-01

    More and more attentions have been paid to the military grassroots culture and hospital culture . As a special unit of military hospital serving the army , military patients ward focused on building culture , promoting the physical and mental health of patients and a speedy recovery , ensuring battle effectiveness, increasing the mili-tary patients’satisfaction.%部队基层文化和医院文化都受到越来越多的重视。军人病区作为部队医院为部队服务的一个特殊单元,建设军人病区文化,促进伤病员的身心健康和早日康复,保障部队战斗力,提高部队满意度,本院作了一些初步的尝试和探索。

  20. Hygiene and motivation factors of nursing work in a cardiology ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bueno Somense

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to identify hygienic and motivational factors in the nursing work according to the Two-Factor Theory, as well as their relation with professional satisfaction/dissatisfaction. This exploratory-descriptive study involved nine nurses from the cardiology ward of a hospital in the interior of the State of São Paulo, between August and September 2013. A self-applied questionnaire was used, including open and closed questions. The data were categorized as hygienic and motivational. Results show the nurses' satisfaction with autonomy, work itself and teamwork, duties, content and responsibilities of the job. Dissatisfaction is related to career growth possibilities; work, political and administrative conditions at the institution, supervision and lack of institutional support. Satisfaction and dissatisfaction factors include relationships, acknowledgements and remuneration. Nurses' satisfaction is determined by multiple and often controversial factors.

  1. An analysis of population and social change in London wards in the 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, P

    1989-01-01

    "This paper discusses the estimation and projection of small area populations in London, [England] and considers trends in intercensal social and demographic indices which can be calculated using these estimates. Information available annually on vital statistics and electorates is combined with detailed data from the Census Small Area Statistics to derive demographic component based population estimates for London's electoral wards over five year periods. The availability of age disaggregated population estimates permits derivation of small area social indicators for intercensal years, for example, of unemployment and mortality. Trends in spatial inequality of such indicators during the 1980s are analysed and point to continuing wide differentials. A typology of population and social indicators gives an indication of the small area distribution of the recent population turnaround in inner London, and of its association with other social processes such as gentrification and ethnic concentration."

  2. Ventilatory pattern and associated episodic hypoxaemia in the late postoperative period in the general surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Rasmussen, G I; Wøjdemann, K R;

    1999-01-01

    Episodic oxygen desaturation is frequent in the late postoperative period and seems most pronounced on the second and third postoperative nights. However, the ventilatory pattern has not been described systematically during this period. We studied the ventilatory pattern and associated arterial...... oxygenation using the Edentrace II equipment (impedance pneumography and pulse oximetry) on the second and third postoperative nights in 28 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Ventilatory disturbances were common and included periods of hypopnoea, and obstructive, central and mixed apnoeas. Overall...... disturbances. Overall, 23% (0-100) of the hypopnoeas and 7% (0-100) of the apnoeas were associated with episodic hypoxaemia. In conclusion, ventilatory disturbances were common in the late postoperative period in the general surgical ward and often associated with episodes of oxygen desaturation....

  3. HOSPITAL’S WALL COLOUR IMPACT ON STROKE PATIENTS’ WARD USERS IN SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuwidjaja GUNAWAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cardiovascular diseases have become the top killer since 1970 worldwide. In 2005, it was recorded the present of 5.7 million stroke survivors. On the other hand, healing stroke and its related complications required much more considerable time. So the patients’ wards quality especially related to wall colour become very important for the patients' recovery. The study was conducted with exploratory methods combining visual methods of research and Luscher colour test. Series of interviews were conducted to gather the users’ perception. So, it was found on that blue wall colour calmed the medical personals, patients, and their family. The most soothing Blue colour variant according to respondents was the Artic Blue (hue 9.8 B, value 7.4 and chroma 5.6.

  4. Self-Dual Supersymmetry and Supergravity in Atiyah-Ward Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ketov, S V; Gates, S J; Ketov, Sergei V.; Nishino, Hitoshi

    1993-01-01

    We study supersymmetry and self-duality in a four-dimensional space-time with the signature (2,2), that we call the Atiyah-Ward space-time. Dirac matrices and spinors, in particular Majorana-Weyl spinors, are investigated in detail. We formulate $ N\\ge 1 $ supersymmetric self-dual Yang-Mills theories and self-dual supergravities. An N=1 ``self-dual'' tensor multiplet is constructed and a possible ten-dimensional theory that gives rise to the four-dimensional self-dual supersymmetric theories is found. Instanton solutions are given as the zero modes in the N=2 self-dual Yang-Mills theory. The N=2 superstrings are conjectured to have no possible counter-terms at quantum level to all orders. These self-dual supersymmetric theories are to generate exactly soluble supersymmetric systems in lower dimensions.

  5. Holographic renormalization and Ward identities with the Hamilton-Jacobi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, Dario E-mail: d.martelli@qmul.ac.uk; Mueck, Wolfgang E-mail: mueck@na.infn.it

    2003-03-24

    A systematic procedure for performing holographic renormalization, which makes use of the Hamilton-Jacobi method, is proposed and applied to a bulk theory of gravity interacting with a scalar field and a U(1) gauge field in the Stueckelberg formalism. We describe how the power divergences are obtained as solutions of a set of 'descent equations' stemming from the radial Hamiltonian constraint of the theory. In addition, we isolate the logarithmic divergences, which are closely related to anomalies. The method allows to determine also the exact one-point functions of the dual field theory. Using the other Hamiltonian constraints of the bulk theory, we derive the Ward identities for diffeomorphisms and gauge invariance. In particular, we demonstrate the breaking of U(1){sub R} current conservation, recovering the holographic chiral anomaly recently discussed in and.

  6. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  7. Interaction between Nurses and Hospitalized Drug Users in Somatic Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Nanna

    drugs are inpatients in somatic hospital wards. Aim: The project wants to enlighten the meeting between the drug user and the nurse in the hospital. Which roles do the nurses and the users carry and what will the meaning be of former experiences of the drug users of the health care system in the meeting...... the understandings of the nurses which will contribute to the feeling of stigmatization of users of hard drugs when in contact with the health care system. By virtue of their profession and position nurses have a big influence on how citizens while admitted to hospital feel accepted and welcomed. Nurses are subdued...... rules and regulations when performing their task, but are also obliged to offer nursing of high quality to all patients. Drug users have high frequency of morbidity compared to other citizens. Due to their somewhat chaotic lifestyle they get severe infections, wounds, injection damages, and therefore...

  8. Leadership in practice: an analysis of collaborative leadership in the conception of a virtual ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockham, Alayne

    2016-09-30

    The National Health Service (NHS) in the UK is evolving to meet the needs of society, but success depends on effective leadership. The World Health Organization identified intersectoral and multidisciplinary working as key to improving the quality and sustainability of the service, highlighting the need for a new leadership style. This article describes how collaborative leadership was used to successfully implement a virtual ward in the primary care setting in south-east Powys, Wales. The author describes the leadership style and addresses strategies used to manage the change process. The journey demonstrates how collaborative leadership and working collectively enabled a new service to be developed, and established a mutual respect for different professionals' roles.

  9. Design Parameters for Evaluating Light Settings and Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can...... support patients’ experience or maybe even have a positive influence on the recovery process. Thus at a general level, it is a crucial task to investigate how aspects such as the design of the environment, arts, lights, sounds can support and improve the patients’ recovery rate and the satisfaction...... of staff and guests in the future hospital. This paper is based on Böhmes G. concept of atmosphere dealing with the effect of light in experiencing atmosphere, and the importance having a holistic approach when designing a pleasurable light atmosphere. It shows important design parameters for pleasurable...

  10. Assessing the safety and quality of ward-based renal transplant biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Wu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth Wu1, Bindhu Musunuru1, Chera Arunachalam1, Aung Sett1, Paul Musker21Renal Unit, St James’ University Hospital, Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK; 2Renal Unit, St Luke’s Hospital, Bradford, West Yorkshire, UKAbstract: The aim of this pilot study was to compare renal transplant biopsies carried out by ward-based nephrology trainees and departmental based radiologists, primarily reviewing major complications and glomerular yield. There was only one patient who developed a single episode of major complication out of the 145 procedures recorded. We concluded there is no significant difference in complication rate and glomerular yield for renal allograft biopsies between nephrology trainees and radiologists, regardless of location.Keywords: renal transplant, kidney biopsy complications, renal hemorrhage, glomerular yield

  11. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  12. A Nurse's Survival Guide to the Ward - Third edition Richards Ann Edwards Sharon A Nurse's Survival Guide to the Ward - Third edition 500pp £19.99 Elsevier 978 0 7020 4603 2 0702046035 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    This guide is a useful 'friend and companion' to keep close at hand. It is an essential reference for nurses, not only on the ward but in every field of practice where patient care is given. In fact, it makes an accessible guide for all healthcare practitioners.

  13. Oxygen therapy multicentric study--a nationwide audit to oxygen therapy procedures in internal medicine wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, J T; Lobão, M J

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a common and important treatment in Internal Medicine wards, however, several studies report that it isn't provided accordingly with the best of care. The goal of this work is to evaluate oxygen therapy procedures in Portuguese Internal Medicine wards, comparing them to the standards established by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) in its consensus statement "BTS guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients". Between September 3rd and 23rd 2010, each one of the 24 enrolled hospitals audited the oxygen therapy procedures for one randomly chosen day. All Internal Medicine inpatients under oxygen therapy or with oxygen prescription were included. Data was collected regarding oxygen prescription, administration and monitoring. Of the 1549 inpatients, 773 met inclusion criteria. There was an oxygen prescription in 93,4%. Most prescriptions were by a fixed dose (82,4%), but only 11,6% of those stated all the required parameters. Absence of oxygen therapy duration and monitoring were the most frequent errors. Oxygen was administered to only 77,0% of the patients with fixed dose prescriptions. FiO(2) or flow rate and the delivery device were the same as prescribed in 70,9 and 89,2% of the patients, respectively. Out of the 127 patients with oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range, 82,7% were on the prescribed SatO(2) objective range. Several errors were found in oxygen therapy procedures, particularly regarding fixed dose prescriptions, jeopardizing the patients. Although recommended by BTS, oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range are still a minority.

  14. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Intervention Program for Restraint Prevention in an Acute Spanish Psychiatric Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Aguilera Serrano, Carlos; García-Sánchez, Juan A; Pino-Benítez, Isabel; Alba-Vallejo, Mercedes; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2016-05-01

    International recommendations have called to implement strategies to reduce the use of coercion in psychiatric settings. However, in Spain there is a lack of research about intervention programs to reduce mechanical restraint in acute psychiatric units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multimodal intervention program based on the principles of six core strategies to reduce the frequency of use of mechanical restraint in an acute psychiatric ward. The design was a retrospective analysis of the frequency and duration of episodes of mechanical restraint prior to the intervention program (2012) and during the intervention program (2013) in one acute psychiatric ward. The intervention was governed by four strategies: (1) leadership and organizational changes, (2) registration and monitoring of risk patients, (3) staff training, and (4) involving patients in the treatment program. There was a significant difference between the mean number of monthly episodes of mechanical restraint per 1,000 patient days, pre-intervention (18.54 ± 8.78) compared with postintervention (8.53 ± 7.00; p = .005). We found the probability that mechanical restraint would occur in a hospital admission decreased after performing the intervention (odds ratio = .587; confidence interval = 0.411-0.838; p = .003) after adjusting for confounding variables. The total percentage of restrained patients fell from 15.07% to 9.74%. The main implication of the study is to support the effectiveness of specific intervention programs based on different measures to reduce mechanical restraint and without contemplating all the strategies that are considered effective. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Frequency, types, and direct related costs of medication errors in an academic nephrology ward in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhani, Afshin; Kanani, Negin; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2014-09-01

    Medication errors are ongoing problems among hospitalized patients especially those with multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy such as patients with renal diseases. This study evaluated the frequency, types and direct related cost of medication errors in nephrology ward and the role played by clinical pharmacists. During this study, clinical pharmacists detected, managed, and recorded the medication errors. Prescribing errors including inappropriate drug, dose, or treatment durations were gathered. To assess transcription errors, the equivalence of nursery charts and physician's orders were evaluated. Administration errors were assessed by observing drugs' preparation, storage, and administration by nurses. The changes in medications costs after implementing clinical pharmacists' interventions were compared with the calculated medications costs if the medication errors were continued up to patients' discharge time. More than 85% of patients experienced medication error. The rate of medication errors was 3.5 errors per patient and 0.18 errors per ordered medication. More than 95% of medication errors occurred at prescription nodes. Most common prescribing errors were omission (26.9%) or unauthorized drugs (18.3%) and low drug dosage or frequency (17.3%). Most of the medication errors happened on cardiovascular drugs (24%) followed by vitamins and electrolytes (22.1%) and antimicrobials (18.5%). The number of medication errors was correlated with the number of ordered medications and length of hospital stay. Clinical pharmacists' interventions decreased patients' direct medication costs by 4.3%. About 22% of medication errors led to patients' harm. In conclusion, clinical pharmacists' contributions in nephrology wards were of value to prevent medication errors and to reduce medications cost.

  16. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria María Agudelo Ochoa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, approach, kind of formula, and eight complications. Results: A total of 277 patients were evaluated; 83% received enteral nutrition and 17% received parenteral nutrition. Some 69.3% presented risk of malnourishment or severe malnourishment at admittance. About 35.4% of those receiving enteral nutrition and 39.6% of the ones who received parenteral nutrition had complications; no significant difference per support was found (p = 0.363. For the enteral nutrition, the most significant complication was the removal of the catheter (14%, followed by diarrhea (8.3%; an association between the duration of the enteral support with diarrhea, constipation and removal of the catheter was found (p < 0.05. For parenteral nutrition, hyperglycemia was the complication of highest inci­dence (22.9%, followed by hypophosphatemia (12.5%; all complications were associated with the duration of the support (p < 0.05. Nutritional support was suspended in 24.2% of the patients. Conclusions: Complications with nutritional support in hospital-ward patients were frequent, with the removal of the catheter and hyperglycemia showing the highest incidence. Duration of the support was the variable that revealed an asso­ciation with complications. Strict application of protocols could decrease the risk for complications and boost nutritional support benefits.

  17. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawati DK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services.Results: Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%, followed by transcription errors (15%, dispensing errors (14%, and prescribing errors (7%. Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant.Conclusion: Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors.Keywords: geriatric, medication errors, inpatients, medication delivery process

  18. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morphet J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Morphet,1 Kerry Hood,2 Robyn Cant,2 Julie Baulch,3 Alana Gilbee,3 Kate Sandry4 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 3Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 4Dandenong Emergency Department, Monash Health, David St, Dandenong, Victoria, Australia Abstract: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38, students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice

  19. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: Preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mark

    2014-05-14

    Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to \\'engage\\' and \\'empower\\' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the \\'engagement\\' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa.

  20. Exploration of staff attitudes and experiences towards mixed- and single-sex wards in the National Secure Forensic Service for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchley, Michael; O'Brien, Aileen

    2012-10-01

    Mixed-sex wards in adult forensic secure services have been abolished and replaced by single-sex services. The National Secure Forensic Service for Young People (NSFSYP) continues to use a mixture of single-sex male and mixed-sex wards. This study aimed to explore staff experiences and attitudes towards placing young people in mixed- or single-sex wards in the NSFSYP. Mixed methodology was adopted in the form of focus groups (qualitative) and questionnaires (semi-quantitative). Content analyses of the qualitative data revealed five themes: care of female patients, normalization, safety, commissioning and social representation of women. The questionnaire was developed from the qualitative findings and comprised 22 statements measuring attitudes towards mixed- and single-sex wards. One hundred and forty-five questionnaires were returned: a 44% total response rate. Overall, the responses to the questionnaire confirmed the focus group data. There were statistically significant differences in responses between staff working on mixed- and single-sex wards. Staff working on mixed-sex wards felt that mixing genders on wards is a crucial part of adolescent forensic inpatient treatment. For them, mixed wards provide a more developmentally appropriate environment for young people. The needs of female patients broaden the debate beyond segregating and mixing gender.

  1. The effect of multi-professional education on the recognition and outcome of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Perner, A.; Klausen, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. In the pre-intervention period (June-July 2006) and post-intervention period (November-December 2007), all patients on the wards had vital signs measured in the evening by study personnel, who also asked nursing staff questions about patients with abnormal vital signs...

  2. Automated auditory brainstem response: Its efficacy as a screening tool for neonatal hearing screening in the postnatal ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavakula Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This observational study was carried out to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MB11 BERAphone® , when used for neonatal hearing screening in a postnatal ward setting in comparison against the gold standard, auditory brainstem response (ABR. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive newborns (74 ears who either unilaterally or bilaterally failed hearing screening with MB11 BERAphone in the postnatal ward were recruited and a second screening with BERAphone was performed after 1 week along with confirmatory testing using ABR. Results: MB11 BERAphone showed sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 50%, positive predictive value of 30.23%, and negative predictive value of 96.77% for the diagnosis of hearing loss. The prevalence of confirmed hearing impairment was 18.9%. The rate of unilateral impairment was 10.8%, and the rate of bilateral impairment was 13.5%. The average ambient noise levels in the postnatal ward setting was 62.1 dB. Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of MB11 BERAphone is good, the specificity is significantly lower when the test is performed in the postnatal ward setting with high ambient noise. Neonates who fail the two-step screening should undergo auditory response for confirming the diagnosis of hearing loss.

  3. Cross Infection in Hospital Wards with Downward Ventilation - Different Locations of Return Openings without and with Partitions between Beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    A two-bed hospital ward with one standing healthcare assistant and a ceiling-mounted low-impulse semicircular inlet diffuser is simulated in a full-scale room. Tracer gas is used for simulating gaseous contaminants, and the concentration is measured at different air change rates and different pos...

  4. Non-linear supersymmetric {sigma}-models and their gauging in the Atiyah-Ward space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, M.; Vilar, L.C.Q.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    We present a supersymmetric non-linear {sigma}-model built up in the N 1 superspace of Atiyah-ward space-time. A manifold of the Kaehler type comes out that is restricted by a a particular decomposition of the Kaehler potential. The gauging of the {sigma}-model isometries is also accomplished in superspace. (author). 20 refs.

  5. Expectations and needs of persons with family members in an intensive care unit as opposed to a general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, K R; Tenholder, M F

    1993-04-01

    The positive effect of family support on the outcome from serious illness that requires intensive care has been recognized by clinicians for decades. We have all seen that family visitation and an intensive care environment more similar to that of a general ward (sunlight, radio, television) can benefit patients with psychosis related to intensive care. The severity of illness of the individual patient exerts a powerful stress on the family unit, but it has been difficult to measure this effect. We used a 40-question family needs survey with a degree of importance scale to compare the intensive care unit (ICU) with the general ward in terms of impact on the family. Five needs were found to discriminate these two environments. The family members of patients in an ICU considered it very important (1) for staff to give directions on what to do at the bedside, (2) to receive more support from their own family unit, (3) to have a place to be alone as a family unit in the hospital, (4) to be informed in advance of any transfer plan, and (5) to have flexibility in the time allowed for visitation. Family members are willing to accept decreased visitation time if the physicians and nurses can equate this decrease with the complexity of care in the ICU. The results of this survey have helped us modify and individualize our approach based on family expectations especially when patients are transferred from the general ward to the ICU or from the ICU to the ward.

  6. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  7. Effect of early achievement of physiologic resuscitation goals in septic patients admitted from the ward on the kidneys.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Griesdale, D.E.; Litchfield, A.; Reynolds, S.; Gibney, R.T.; Chittock, D.; Pickkers, P.; Sweet, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate if early achievement of physiologic goals of resuscitation in critically ill septic patients admitted from the ward may prevent acute kidney injury (AKI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with a diagnosis of sepsi

  8. Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird-Fick, Heather S; Solomon, David; Jodoin, Christine; Dwamena, Francesca C; Alexander, Kim; Rawsthorne, Larry; Banker, Tammy; Gourineni, Nandu; Aloka, Feras; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses' learning, and patient outcomes. Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents' patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Use and performance of non-invasive ventilation in Internal Medicine ward: a real-life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ventrella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled trials demonstrated efficacy and safety of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in treatment of acute respiratory failure, initially in Intensive Care Units, then in other care settings (semi-intensive care units, emergency departments, and also in the wards, more often pneumological ones. Few studies have been published about NIV in Italian wards of Internal Medicine with full self-management of NIV by internists in a normal ward setting. We performed a prospective real-life study about the use of NIV in Internal Medicine ward devoid of a critical area of semi-intensive therapy, with the aim of confirming, in this setting, the effectiveness of NIV. During a period of 13 months, 42 patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure of different etiology and acidosis (pH<7.25were treated by NIV. NIV was successful in 81% of patients. In-hospital mortality was 9.5%. Safety of NIV is demonstrated by the absence of serious complications: only 7 patients showed poor compliance and 2 patients had facial pressure ulcer due to the mask. There were not statistical differences in success rate of NIV according to severity of acidosis at admission (pH<7.25 vs pH>7.25, neither according to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and the national early warning score, but the modified early warning score only showed statistically significant difference with lower values in the success group: 2.82±1.57 vs 4.13±1.46 (P<0.05. NIV has proven to be effective and safe in Internal Medicine ward.

  10. 特需病房优质护理服务探讨%High Quality Nursing Serviceof Special Wards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹小丽

    2016-01-01

    Special wards is hospital in order to meet the needs of special treatment,and set up a special ward,many kinds of diseases. Patients with high quality,in order to improve the quality of nursing in our hospital ward,to carry out high quality nursing service mode in special wards,through perfect the rules and regulations of the department,make abundant nursing content and target,strengthen the nursing staff's professional knowledge and professional skil s training,pay attention to patients' end-of-life care measures,make the special wards of holistic nursing quality and patient satisfaction has been significantly improved,effectively reduce the incidence of nursing mistakes and accidents.%特需病房是医院为了满足特殊治疗需要而专门设置的病区,疾病种类较多,患者素质较高,为了提高我院特需病房护理质量,在特需病房率先开展优质护理服务工作模式,通过完善科室相关规章制度,制定丰富的护理内容及目标,加强护理人员的专业知识和专科操作技能培训,注重患者临终护理等措施,使特需病房整体护理质量和患者满意度得到大幅提升,有效降低护理差错事故发生率。

  11. Evaluation of reasons for staying and waiting for more than 24 hours in the emergency ward of Imam Hossein hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Alimohammadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Standardization of hospital emergency units is a major goal in developed countries to decrease the duration of patients stay in these units. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of long-term staying in an emergency ward. Methods: In the present 2-month cross-sectional study, patients referring to the emergency ward of Imam Hossein hospital were assessed. The patients’ demographic data, including age, the presenting symptoms and signs, reasons for delays, and the final outcome in relation to the location of hospitalization and discharge information were recorded. Data were reported as frequencies and percentages. The results were reported as means and standard deviations using SPSS version 20. Results: Of 10087 patients admitted into the emergency ward during a 2-month period, 75 patients (0.7% needed to stay and wait for more than 24 hours. The mean ± standard deviation of the patients’ ages was 62.5 ± 20.2 years, with 60% of the patients being over 60 years of age. The most common reason for overcrowding in the emergency ward was a lack of empty beds, with the need for ICU beds as the most important reason for bed deficiency in 59% of the cases. Nervous system problems were the most common reasons for referring to the emergency unit (41% in patients under study. Finally, 81% of the patients were hospitalized, 10% died, 7% were discharged based on personal request and 1.3% were transferred to another hospital. Conclusion: The prevalence of patients staying and waiting in the emergency ward for more than 24 hours was 0.7%. Lack of empty ICU beds was the most important reason for such delays; however, paraclinical problems had no role in these delays which were associated with the death of 10% of patients

  12. Pragmatic, cluster randomized trial of a policy to introduce low-low beds to hospital wards for the prevention of falls and fall injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry P; Bell, Rebecca A R; Varghese, Paul N

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a policy to introduce low-low beds for the prevention of falls and fall injuries on wards that had not previously accessed low-low beds. This was a pragmatic, matched, cluster randomized trial with wards paired according to rate of falls. Intervention and control wards were observed for a 6-month period after implementation of the low-low beds on the intervention wards. Data from a 6-month period before this were also collected and included in analyses to ensure comparability between intervention and control group wards. Public hospitals located in Queensland, Australia. Patients of 18 public hospital wards. Provision of one low-low bed for every 12 on a hospital ward, with written guidance for identifying patients at greatest risk of falls. Falls and fall injuries in the hospital measured using a computerized incident reporting system. There were 10,937 admissions to control and intervention wards combined during the pre-intervention period. There was no significant difference in the rate of falls per 1,000 occupied bed days between intervention and control group wards after the introduction of the low-low beds (generalized estimating equation coefficient=0.23, 95% confidence interval=-0.18-0.65, P=.28). The rate of bed falls, falls resulting in injury, and falls resulting in fracture also did not differ between groups. Some difficulties were encountered in intervention group wards in using the low-low beds as directed. A policy for the introduction of low-low beds did not appear to reduce falls or falls with injury, although larger studies would be required to determine their effect on fall-related fractures.

  13. Patients' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward--an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri; Henriksson, Elisabet Welin; Scheja, Max; Silén, Charlotte

    2014-07-02

    It is well known that patients' involvement in health care students' learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students' learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students' learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between patients and students resulting in patients

  14. Patients’ approaches to students’ learning at a clinical education ward-an ethnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that patients’ involvement in health care students’ learning is essential and gives students opportunities to experience clinical reasoning and practice clinical skills when interacting with patients. Students encounter patients in different contexts throughout their education. However, looking across the research providing evidence about learning related to patient-student encounters reveals a lack of knowledge about the actual learning process that occurs in encounters between patients and students. The aim of this study was to explore patient-student encounters in relation to students’ learning in a patient-centered health-care setting. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to study the encounters between patients and students. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital with eight beds. The study included 10 observations with 11 students and 10 patients. The observer followed one or two students taking care of one patient. During the fieldwork observational and reflective notes were taken. After each observation follow-up interviews were conducted with each patient and student separately. Data were analyzed using an ethnographic approach. Results The most striking results showed that patients took different approaches in the encounters with students. When the students managed to create a good atmosphere and a mutual relationship, the patients were active participants in the students’ learning. If the students did not manage to create a good atmosphere, the relationship became one-way and the patients were passive participants, letting the students practice on their bodies but without engaging in a dialogue with the students. Conclusions Patient-student encounters, at a clinical education ward with a patient-centred pedagogical framework, can develop into either a learning relationship or an attending relationship. A learning relationship is based on a mutual relationship between

  15. Patient risk factors for developing a drug-related problem in a cardiology ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbina O

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Olatz Urbina,1 Olivia Ferrández,1 Sònia Luque,1 Santiago Grau,1,2 Sergi Mojal,3 Rosa Pellicer,1 Marta Riu,4 Esther Salas,1 Josep Comin-Colet5 1Pharmacy Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Statistics, Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Epidemiology and Health Services Evaluation, CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 5Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain Background: Because of the high incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs among hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases and their potential impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify the most susceptible patients, who therefore require closer monitoring of drug therapy.Purpose: To identify the profile of patients at higher risk of developing at least one DRP during hospitalization in a cardiology ward.Method: We consecutively included all patients hospitalized in the cardiology ward of a teaching hospital in 2009. DRPs were identified through a computerized warning system designed by the pharmacy department and integrated into the electronic medical record.Results: A total of 964 admissions were included, and at least one DRP was detected in 29.8%. The variables associated with a higher risk of these events were polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR]=1.228; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.153–1.308, female sex (OR=1.496; 95% CI=1.026–2.180, and first admission (OR=1.494; 95% CI=1.005–2.221.Conclusion: Monitoring patients through a computerized warning system allowed the detection of at least one DRP in one-third of the patients. Knowledge of the risk factors for developing these problems in patients admitted to hospital for cardiovascular problems helps in identifying the most susceptible patients. Keywords

  16. Workplace learning: an analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students' ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students' expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a longitudinal manner. The data suggest that the

  17. Workplace Learning: An analysis of students' expectations of learning on the ward in the Department of Internal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Learning on the ward as a practice-oriented preparation for the future workplace plays a crucial role in the medical education of future physicians. However, students’ ward internship is partially problematic due to condensed workflows on the ward and the high workload of supervising physicians. For the first time in a German-speaking setting, students’ expectations and concerns about their internship on the ward are examined in a qualitative analysis regarding their internal medicine rotation within clinical medical education. Methods: Of a total of 168 medical students in their 6th semester at the Medical Faculty of Heidelberg, 28 students (m=8, f=20, Ø 23.6 years) took part in focus group interviews 3 to 5 days prior to their internship on the internal medicine ward within their clinical internal medicine rotation. Students were divided into four different focus groups. The protocols were transcribed and a content analysis was conducted based on grounded theory. Results: We gathered a total of 489 relevant individual statements. The students hope for a successful integration within the ward team, reliable and supportive supervisors and supervision in small groups. They expect to face the most common diseases, to train the most important medical skills, to assume full responsibility for their own patients and to acquire their own medical identity. The students fear an insufficient time frame to achieve their aims. They are also concerned they will have too little contact with patients and inadequate supervision. Conclusion: For the development and standardization of effective student internships, the greatest relevance should be attributed to guidance and supervision by professionally trained and well-prepared medical teachers, entailing a significant increase in staff and costs. A structural framework is required in order to transfer the responsibility for the treatment of patients to the students at an early stage in medical education and in a

  18. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy.

  19. An Improvement on Precision in D-WARD Detection System with CUSUM Algorithm%基于CUSUM算法提高 D-WARD 系统检测精度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康健; 张喆; 鞠九滨

    2006-01-01

    在深入分析了具有代表性的DDoS源端检测系统 D-WARD 检测算法的基础上,引入统计学中非参数改变点检测方法,使用非参数化递归CUSUM算法对 D-WARD 进行了改进.同时,借鉴负载平衡中Load-Shedding的思想,应用Kaufman算法动态调整和更新阈值Threshold,并对检测性能进行详细比较.实验证明,改进的系统具有更低的误报率和漏报率,能够适应更复杂的网络检测环境.

  20. An Infinite Set of Ward Identities for Adiabatic Modes in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Khoury, Justin

    2014-01-01

    We show that the correlation functions of any single-field cosmological model with constant growing-modes are constrained by an infinite number of novel consistency relations, which relate N+1-point correlation functions with a soft-momentum scalar or tensor mode to a symmetry transformation on N-point correlation functions of hard-momentum modes. We derive these consistency relations from Ward identities for an infinite tower of non-linearly realized global symmetries governing scalar and tensor perturbations. These symmetries can be labeled by an integer n. At each order n, the consistency relations constrain --- completely for n=0,1, and partially for n\\geq 2 --- the q^n behavior of the soft limits. The identities at n=0 recover Maldacena's original consistency relations for a soft scalar and tensor mode, n=1 gives the recently-discovered conformal consistency relations, and the identities for n\\geq 2 are new. As a check, we verify directly that the n=2 identity is satisfied by known correlation functions ...

  1. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  2. N=1 supersymmetry and super-QED in Atiyah-Ward space-time

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrade, M A; Magalhães, M N P; De Andrade, M A; Del Cima, O M; Magalhães, M N P

    1995-01-01

    In this work the supersymmetric gauge invariant action for the massive Abelian N=1 super-{\\QED} in the Atiyah-Ward space-time ({\\DDdd}) is formulated. The questions concerning the scheme of the gauge invariance in {\\DDdd} by means of gauging the massive N=1 super-{\\QED} are investigated. We study how to ensure the gauge invariance at the expenses of the introduction of a complex vector superfield. We discuss the Wess-Zumino gauge and thereupon we conclude that in this gauge, only the imaginary part of the complex vector field, B_{\\m}, gauges a U(1)-symmetry, whereas its real part gauges a Weyl symmetry. We build up the gauge invariant massive term by introducing four scalar superfields: a pair of chiral and a pair of anti-chiral superfields; the supermultiplets of each pair have opposite U(1)-charges. We carry out a dimensional reduction {\\it{\\`a la}} Scherk of the massive N=1 super-{\\QED} action from {\\DDdd} to {\\Ddd}. Truncations are needed in order to suppress unphysical modes and one ends up with a parity...

  3. Factors Influencing communication between the patients with cancer and their nurses in oncology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as "three-factor effects" that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of "Patient as the center of communication", "Nurse as a human factor", and "Organizational structures". The first category consists of two sub-categories of "Imposed changes by the disease" and "the patient′s particular characteristics". The second category includes sub-categories of "sense of vulnerability" and "perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication". The third category consists of the sub-categories of "workload and time imbalance", "lack of supervision", and "impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs". Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach.

  4. Labor ward workload waxes and wanes with the lunar cycle, myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi; Bharadwaj; Gallousis; Matthews

    1998-07-01

    Objective: To test the validity of the statement "We are busy because it is getting close to the full moon" often heard on labor ward, by analysis of birth statistics in relation to lunar cycles.Method: Data for births from spontaneous onset labors for 12 lunar cycles from January 1 to December 31, 1994 was analyzed. Births resulting from induced labors were excluded. Birthrate for each day of the lunar cycle from new moon to full moon (ascending lunar phase) and from full moon to new moon (descending lunar phase) were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Birthrate at full moon was compared to that at new moon and that at mid ascending lunar phase was compared with that at mid descending lunar phase using t test.Results: There were 3706 spontaneous births during the study period. The average daily birthrate was 10.58 with standard deviation (SD) of 1.27. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily birthrate between the ascending and the descending lunar phases, r = -0.21. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the number of births at full moon as compared to that at new moon, P =.44. No difference was found on comparison of number of births during the mid ascending phase to that at the mid descending lunar phase, P =.84.Conclusion: Scientific analysis of data does not support the belief that the number of births increases as the full moon approaches, therefore it is a myth not reality.

  5. Epidemiologic features of early onset sepsis in neonatal ward of Shabih Khani hospital in Kashan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Mosayebi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Neonatal sepsis is defined as presence of clinical signs accompanied by positive blood culture in newborns less than one month of age. Sepsis is a common cause of hospital admission in neonates, and it is known as one of the main causes of mortality among them, not only in developed countries but in developing ones. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy would result in death. The aim of this study is to find the main pathogens of sepsis and evaluate sensitivity changes of organisms to antibiotics in comparison with the past. Method: In this descriptive study, 104 (files of neonates, admitted to the neonatal ward of Shabih Khani Hospital, with positive blood culture over a 24-month period ( 2005-2007 were assessed. Data were extracted for analysis. Results: Over this 24-month study on 104 neonates with sepsis, the most common organisms included flavobacterium 43.3% , pseudomonas 33.3%, coagulase negative staphylococcus 17.3%, coagulase positive staphylococcus 5.9% followed by enterobacter , E.coli, beta-haemolytic streptococcus, klebsiella, diphtheriod and lysteria. Conclusion: In this study Flavobacterium is found to be the most common organism for early sepsis. Although infection with flavobacterium is rare, its rate of mortality is high and it is resistant to majority of common antibiotics. Therefore, early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic prescription helps reduce its complications.

  6. The prevalence of depression among elderly warded in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Rampal, L; Hanim, M Arfah; Thong, P L

    2006-03-01

    Depression is characterized by symptoms like disturbance in behavior, cognition and mood. This is commonly known to affect people aged 60 years and above especially those who are also afflicted with illnesses. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among the elderly in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan. A cross sectional study design was done. Stratified cluster sampling method was used to select the respondents. All elderly patients were selected from the orthopaedic, surgical, gynaecology and medical wards in a government hospital in Wilayah Persekutuan. A 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale questionnaire was used as a screening instrument. Out of the 246 elderly subjects, 198 were interviewed giving a response rate of 80.5%. The results showed that 54% of the elderly respondents were found to have depressive symptoms. Age (p=0.022), sex (p=0.008), ethnicity (p=0.022) and functional disabilities in bathing (p=0.001), grooming (p=0.007), dressing (p= 0.007), using the toilet (p=0.002), transferring from bed to chair and back (p=0.000), mobility (p=0.000) and climbing stairs (p=0.000) were all found to be significantly associated with depression among the elderly respondents. The outcome of this study will have an important impact on the implementation of the health policy for the elderly patients admitted to hospitals.

  7. Hand contamination during routine care in medical wards: the role of hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monistrol, Olga; López, M Liboria; Riera, Montserrat; Font, Roser; Nicolás, Carme; Escobar, Miguel Angel; Freixas, Núria; Garau, Javier; Calbo, Esther

    2013-04-01

    The hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) are the most common vehicle for the transmission of micro-organisms from patient to patient and within the healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multimodal campaign on the type and amount of resident and transient flora and the presence of potential risk factors for hand contamination during routine care. A before-after (PRE and POST periods) interventional study was carried out in medical wards of a tertiary care hospital. Eighty-nine samples were analysed. Samples were cultured immediately before patient contact using a glove-juice method. Data collected included socio-demographic and risk factors for hand contamination. Flora was measured as log10 c.f.u. ml(-1) and evaluated by comparing median values in the PRE and POST periods. Transient flora was isolated from the hands of 67.4 and 46.1 % of HCWs in the PRE and POST periods, respectively (Phand hygiene (HH) (P = 0.007) and an increased use of alcohol-based hand rub instead of soap (Phand contamination.

  8. Gastroenteritis in the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan in 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaribu, S; Lubis, M; Arsyad, F; Barus, N; Sutanto, A H

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, 2869 infants and children were hospitalized in the pediatric ward of the Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Mecan. Of these, 1317 (46.2%) were gastroenteritis cases; 635 of these patients (48.2%) were those ages 0-1 year. The highest prevalence is found among this group. The months of July and August accounted for the majority of gastroenteritis cases, 15.6% in the 1st and 14.2% in the 2nd. This condition held true for all age groups. Mild, moderate, and severe dehydration were encountered in 4.3%, 35.7%, and 60.6% of the cases. The over 3 year olds had the highest number of severe dehydration cases; 76.5% of all patients in the same age group. Most of these cases occurred in July; 71.2% in that month. A significant inverse correlation between age and diarrhea duration was evident--the younger the age, the longer the duration of diarrhea (p0.01). Administration of oral electrolyte solution did not significantly alter the duration of diarrhea. The overall mortality rate was 13%. The highest age specific fatality rate was found among those ages 0-1 (20.3%). Mortality for those children older than 3 was 1.8%.

  9. Ward round documentation in a major trauma centre: can we improve patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gemma; Aframian, Arash; Bernard, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to improve documentation and patient safety in a major trauma centre. A retrospective audit was undertaken in March 2014. Ward round entries for each orthopaedic patients on three dates were assessed against standards and analysed. The audit was repeated in April 2014, and again in August 2014. Thorough documentation is paramount in a major trauma centre. It forms a useful record of the patients hospital stay, is a legal document and is highlighted in national guidelines. It provides a basis for good handover, ensuring continuation of care and maintaining patient safety. Resultant poor compliance with Royal College guidelines in the initial audit led to the production of a new electronic based note keeping system. A meeting was held with all staff prior to introduction. Our initial results gained 75 entries, and none showed full compliance. Mean compliance per entry was 59% (0-81%). The second attempt gained 90 entries, with 30 from the weekend. Mean compliance per entry 97%. Third attempt received 61 entries, with 27 from the weekend. Mean compliance was 96%, meaning that the improvement was being maintained. Recent distressing reports regarding patient highlighted the importance of patient. Our initial audit proved there were many areas lacking in our documentation and improvement was necessary. Prior to introducing electronic systems, the implemented change has produced improvement in documentation, and provides a useful handover tool for staff.

  10. Correlation functions of twist fields from Ward identities in the massive Dirac theory

    CERN Document Server

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We derive non-linear differential equations for correlation functions of U(1) twist fields in the two-dimensional massive Dirac theory. Primary U(1) twist fields correspond to exponential fields in the sine-Gordon model at the free-fermion point, and it is well-known that their vacuum two-point functions are determined by integrable differential equations. We extend part of this result to more general quantum states (pure or mixed) and to certain descendents, showing that some two-point functions are determined by the sinh-Gordon differential equations whenever there is translation and parity invariance, and the density matrix is the exponential of a bilinear expression in fermions. We use methods involving Ward identities associated to the copy-rotation symmetry in a model with two independent, anti-commuting copies. Such methods were used in the context of the thermally perturbed Ising quantum field theory model. We show that they are applicable to the Dirac theory as well, and we suggest that they are like...

  11. Correlation functions of twist fields from Ward identities in the massive Dirac theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Benjamin; Silk, James

    2011-07-01

    We derive non-linear differential equations for correlation functions of U(1) twist fields in the two-dimensional massive Dirac theory. Primary U(1) twist fields correspond to exponential fields in the sine-Gordon model at the free-fermion point, and it is well-known that their vacuum two-point functions are determined by integrable differential equations. We extend part of this result to more general quantum states (pure or mixed) and to certain descendents, showing that some two-point functions are determined by the sinh-Gordon differential equations whenever there is translation and parity invariance, and the density matrix is the exponential of a bilinear expression in fermions. We use methods involving Ward identities associated to the copy-rotation symmetry in a model with two independent, anti-commuting copies. Such methods were used in the context of the thermally perturbed Ising quantum field theory model. We show that they are applicable to the Dirac theory as well, and we suggest that they are likely to have a much wider applicability to free fermion models in general. Finally, we note that our form-factor study of descendents twist fields combined with a CFT analysis provides a new way of evaluating vacuum expectation values of primary U(1) twist fields: by deriving and solving a recursion relation.

  12. Structured smoking cessation training for health professionals on cardiology wards: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Falk, Jan; Vangeli, Eleni; Schiekirka, Sarah; Rustler, Christa; Grassi, Maria Caterina; Pipe, Andrew; West, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor, and smoking cessation is imperative for patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event. This study aimed to evaluate a systems-based approach to helping hospitalized smokers quit and to identify implementation barriers. Prospective intervention study followed by qualitative analysis of staff interviews. The prospective intervention study assessed the effects of implementing standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the provision of counselling and pharmacotherapy to smokers admitted to cardiology wards on counselling frequency. In addition, a qualitative analysis of staff interviews was undertaken to examine determinants of physician and nurse behaviour; this sought to understand barriers in terms of motivation, capability, and/or opportunity. A total of 150 smoking patients were included in the study (75 before and 75 after SOP implementation). Before the implementation of SOPs, the proportion of patients reporting to have received cessation counselling from physicians and nurses was 6.7% and 1.3%, respectively. Following SOP implementation, these proportions increased to 38.7% (p motivation, e.g. role incongruence, appeared to be a major barrier. Introduction of a set of standard operating procedures for smoking cessation advice was effective with physicians but not nurses. Analysis of barriers to implementation highlighted lack of motivation rather than capability or opportunity as a major factor that would need to be addressed. © The European Society of Cardiology 2012.

  13. Effects of antidiabetes drugs on functional independence measure on a subacute rehabilitation ward for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, E; Toyoshima, M; Tachi, T; Teramachi, H; Kawakubo, T; Hayashi, H

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that the improvement of activities of daily living (ADL) by rehabilitation affects glycemic control. However, there are no reports about antidiabetes drugs as factors affecting the outcomes of rehabilitation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of antidiabetes drugs on functional independence measure (FIM) [total (T), motor (M), and cognition (C) items] in stroke patients with diabetes who were discharged from the subacute rehabilitation ward. We chose the frequently used antidiabetes drugs [sulfonylurea (SU), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors (DPP-IVIs), and α-glycosidase inhibitors (α-GIs)] as the basis for categorizing the patients. We compared the patients' background features and laboratory data among the three groups. As a result, when SU was used in stroke patients with diabetes, it is difficult to obtain significant FIM-M gain, FIM-C gain, FIM-M efficiency, and FIM-C efficiency compared with of-GIs. As a reason for this, we hypothesize the possibility of the involvement of insulin resistance. Therefore, we consider that insulin resistance should be determined early and that it is important to reduce insulin resistance comprehensively by involving experts.

  14. Chemical restraint in routine clinical practice: a report from a general hospital psychiatric ward in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papamichael Georgios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of studies regarding chemical restraint in routine clinical psychiatric practice. There may be wide variations between different settings and countries. Methods A retrospective study on chemical restraint was performed in the 11-bed psychiatric ward of the General Hospital of Arta, in northwestern Greece. All admissions over a 2-year-period (from March 2008 to March 2010 were examined. Results Chemical restraint was applied in 33 cases (10.5% of total admissions. From a total of 82 injections, 22 involved a benzodiazepine and/or levomepromazine, whereas 60 injections involved an antipsychotic agent, almost exclusively haloperidol (96.7% of cases, usually in combination with a benzodiazepine (61.7% of cases. In 36.4% of cases the patient was further subjected to restraint or seclusion. Conclusions In our unit, clinicians prefer the combined antipsychotic/benzodiazepine regimen for the management of patients' acute agitation and violent behaviour. Conventional antipsychotics are administrated almost exclusively and in a significant proportion of cases further coercive measures are applied. Studies on the practice of chemical restraint should be regularly performed in clinical settings.

  15. Ending preventable child deaths in South Africa: What role can ward-based outreach teams play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tanya; Kroon, Max; Rhoda, Natasha; Sanders, David

    2016-06-17

    South Africa (SA) has emerged from the Millennium Development Goal era with a mixture of success and failure. The successful national scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services with increasingly efficacious antiretroviral regimens has reduced the mother-to-child transmission rate dramatically; however, over the same period there appears to have been no progress in coverage of high-impact interventions for pneumonia and diarrhoea, which are now leading causes of under-5 mortality. SA embarked on a strategy to re-engineer the primary healthcare system in 2011, which included the creation of ward-based outreach teams consisting of community health workers (CHWs). In this article we argue that the proposed ratio of CHWs to population is too low for public health impact and that the role and scope of CHWs should be extended beyond giving of health information to include assessment and treatment of childhood illnesses (particularly diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia). Evidence and experience amply demonstrate that CHWs in sufficient density can have a rapid and positive impact on neonatal and young child mortality, especially when they are allowed to treat common acute conditions. SA's mediocre performance in child survival could be dramatically improved if there were more CHWs who were allowed to do more.

  16. Inpatients' attitudes towards the rationale use of drugs at a cardiology ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Ugrak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This descriptive survey purposed to evaluate inpatients' attitudes towards the rationale use of drugs at a cardiology ward in GATA. METHODS: Rational Drug Use Questionnaire designed by T.C. Health Ministry was performed. The patients hospitalized during the research period were tried to be reached and 121 inpatients completed the questionnaire. SPSS 15.0 program was used for data evaluation. Descriptive statistics were indicated with mean, standard deviation, frequency. Pearsons Chi-Square Test was used for comparison of groups. Statistical significance at p<0.05 was adopted. RESULTS: Mean age of patient surveyed was 29.3+/-16.4 year and 68.6% of the patients were male. It was seen that 49.6% of the patients reserved residual drugs of a treatment at home to reuse, 87.6% of the patients applied to a physician when drug side effect was seen. 42.1% of female and 36.2% of married participants were seen to use painkiller without prescription. Additionally, significant relationship was observed between attitude of using painkiller without prescription and gender, marital status. CONCLUSION: Our research participants' attitudes towards rational drug use found more positive than previous researches performed in Turkey. It is assessed this difference resulted from participant's high education level and participants' obligation to use drugs for long time because most of them had chronic or congenital heart disease. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(2.000: 137-144

  17. Positive behavioral intervention in children who were wards of the court attending a mainstream school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose I; Aguilar, Manuel; Aguilar, Concepcion; Alcalde, Concepcion; Marchena, Esperanza

    2007-12-01

    This report looked at the effects of treatment using contingency contracts and token economy procedures in three children, two 14 yr. and one 8 yr., who were wards of the court and attending a mainstream school. Students presented problems of adaptation to school, such as making constant noises with the mouth, hands, or pencil on the desk; frequently emitted raucous cries in the classroom; destruction of school resource materials; verbal aggression to classmates and teachers; verbal rejection of all academic work, refusing to do it, making negative comments prior to starting any school activity, in addition to lack of motivation for undertaking school activities. A 4-mo. individual treatment using contingency contracts and token economy behavioral procedures was implemented, with several follow-up sessions. The results indicated an adaptation of behavior to the school environment, confirmed by teachers, significantly reducing the incidence of insults, the destruction of school materials, and indolence during class sessions. These students are at high risk for social exclusion. Interventions have potential social importance in possible prevention of adult criminality, increasing academic achievement, and decreasing social exclusion.

  18. Persuade Mothers in Post Natal Ward for Timely Initiation of Breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamtarani, Ratan K Srivastava, B.Divakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Timely initiation of breast feeding has been an important issue since last many decades. However, encouragement and early initiation of breast feeding gained momentum since last 20 years. The traditional wisdom and scientific research have proved that mother’s milk is the best. Design: It is a Cross sectional study conducted in urban tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods: a pretested semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview hospitalised mothers. This paper is the result of the interview of 600 women who delivered babies in the hospital. Their Details of socio-demographic features were enquired in addition to the questions related to their initiation of breast feeding after the birth of baby. Timely initiation of breast-feeding was calculated in this paper as percent of infants (0 - <12 months who were put to the breast within one hour of delivery. Results: Out of all deliveries, breast feeding was timely initiated with in one hour only by 1.0 percent of mothers. However 30 percent mothers initiated breast feeding within two hours. Conclusion: The observations of the present study supports that the health functionaries must utilise the opportunity to persuade mothers in the postnatal ward after delivery of their babies for early initiation of breast feeding.

  19. Anti-anxiety Activity Studies on Homoeopathic Formulations of Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnera aphrodisiaca Ward (Turneraceae has been traditionally used for the treatment of anxiety neurosis, and as an aphrodisiac. Mother tinctures (85% ethanol extracts of T. aphrodisiaca have also been used for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In the present investigation, T. aphrodisiaca mother tinctures formulated by three reputed manufacturers of homoeopathic medicines (NLK, DWSG and SBL were evaluated for their anxiolytic activity. Dried mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca were subjected to anxiolytic activity evaluation at various doses, i.e. 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 mg/kg p.o. in mice using elevated plus maze apparatus. Dried mother tinctures exhibited significant anxiolytic activity at 50 mg/kg (NLK, 75 mg/kg (DWSG and 125 mg/kg (SBL, respectively, with reference to control as well as standard (diazepam, 2 mg/kg p.o.. Mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca available in the market, have significant anxiolytic activity. Amongst the three mother tinctures of T. aphrodisiaca analyzed, the dry residue of NLK possesses the highest amount of anxiolytic constituent(s. To ensure uniformity and consistency of biological effects in herbal formulations, these should be standardized on the basis of bioactive markers. The authors are actively involved in isolating the bioactive constituent(s from T. aphrodisiaca so that the plant can be standardized on the basis of biologically active constituent(s.

  20. Changing hospital policy from the wards: an introduction to health policy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsohn, Vanessa; DeArman, Maria; Moran, Patrick; Cross, Jennette; Dietz, Deidre; Allen, Rebekah; Bachofer, Sally; Dow-Velarde, Lily; Kaufman, Arthur

    2008-04-01

    Although the need for physician participation in critiquing and setting health policies is great, physician participation in health policy activities is low. Many barriers hamper physician involvement, from limited time to ignorance of their potential roles, to minimal exposure to the issue during medical education. University of New Mexico School of Medicine family medicine residents and students on ward teams were trained to ask specific questions on rounds that framed individual patient encounters as windows into broader community health and policy issues. Teams selected problems on which to intervene, with the intent of influencing hospital policies to improve health care and outcomes. Ten projects were completed in six months, four of which are presented. Resident and student accomplishments included (1) identifying a free drug formulary at the Health Care for the Homeless pharmacy to reduce readmission rates of discharged homeless patients, (2) expanding hospital outpatient pharmacy hours to reduce preventable emergency room visits for medications, (3) expanding the hospital social service workforce to address the overwhelming need to discharge indigent patients needing extended care, and (4) certifying residents and faculty to provide outpatient buprenorphine treatment as a harm-reduction intervention for opiate-addicted patients, thereby reducing preventable hospitalizations for overdose or for medical complications from illicit opiate use. Hospital health policy is made more accessible to learners if issues that generate policy discussions emerge from their daily learning environment, if learners can intervene to improve those policies within a limited timeframe, and if faculty mentors are available to guide their interventions.

  1. Correlation functions of twist fields from Ward identities in the massive Dirac theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyon, Benjamin [Department of Mathematics, King' s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Silk, James [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-22

    We derive non-linear differential equations for correlation functions of U(1) twist fields in the two-dimensional massive Dirac theory. Primary U(1) twist fields correspond to exponential fields in the sine-Gordon model at the free-fermion point, and it is well-known that their vacuum two-point functions are determined by integrable differential equations. We extend part of this result to more general quantum states (pure or mixed) and to certain descendents, showing that some two-point functions are determined by the sinh-Gordon differential equations whenever there is translation and parity invariance, and the density matrix is the exponential of a bilinear expression in fermions. We use methods involving Ward identities associated to the copy-rotation symmetry in a model with two independent, anti-commuting copies. Such methods were used in the context of the thermally perturbed Ising quantum field theory model. We show that they are applicable to the Dirac theory as well, and we suggest that they are likely to have a much wider applicability to free fermion models in general. Finally, we note that our form-factor study of descendents twist fields combined with a CFT analysis provides a new way of evaluating vacuum expectation values of primary U(1) twist fields: by deriving and solving a recursion relation.

  2. Would artificial neural networks implemented in clinical wards help nephrologists in predicting epoetin responsiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marone Claudio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its strong intra- and inter-individual variability, predicting the ideal erythropoietin dose is a difficult task. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the impact of the main parameters known to influence the responsiveness to epoetin beta and to test the performance of artificial neural networks (ANNs in predicting the dose required to reach the haemoglobin target and the monthly dose adjustments. Methods We did a secondary analysis of the survey on Anaemia Management in dialysis patients in Switzerland; a prospective, non-randomized observational study, enrolling 340 patients of 26 centres and in order to have additional information about erythropoietin responsiveness, we included a further 92 patients from the Renal Services of the Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, Bellinzona, Switzerland. The performance of ANNs in predicting the epoetin dose was compared with that of linear regressions and of nephrologists in charge of the patients. Results For a specificity of 50%, the sensitivity of ANNs compared with linear regressions in predicting the erythropoietin dose to reach the haemoglobin target was 78 vs. 44% (P P P Conclusion In predicting the erythropoietin dose required for an individual patient and the monthly dose adjustments ANNs are superior to nephrologists' opinion. Thus, ANN may be a useful and promising tool that could be implemented in clinical wards to help nephrologists in prescribing erythropoietin.

  3. An infinite set of Ward identities for adiabatic modes in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterbichler, Kurt [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Hui, Lam [Physics Department and Institute for Strings, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Columbia University, 538 W 120 St., New York, NY 10027 (United States); Khoury, Justin, E-mail: khinterbichler@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: lh399@columbia.edu, E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We show that the correlation functions of any single-field cosmological model with constant growing-modes are constrained by an infinite number of novel consistency relations, which relate N+1-point correlation functions with a soft-momentum scalar or tensor mode to a symmetry transformation on N-point correlation functions of hard-momentum modes. We derive these consistency relations from Ward identities for an infinite tower of non-linearly realized global symmetries governing scalar and tensor perturbations. These symmetries can be labeled by an integer n. At each order n, the consistency relations constrain — completely for n = 0,1, and partially for n ≥ 2 — the q{sup n} behavior of the soft limits. The identities at n = 0 recover Maldacena's original consistency relations for a soft scalar and tensor mode, n = 1 gives the recently-discovered conformal consistency relations, and the identities for n ≥ 2 are new. As a check, we verify directly that the n = 2 identity is satisfied by known correlation functions in slow-roll inflation.

  4. [Creation and validation of an instrument to identify nursing activities in pediatric wards: information for determining workload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nanci Cristiano; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument for identifying nursing activities performed in a pediatric ward and to provide a basis for defining the workload of these units. The instrument was developed by selecting the activities relevant to pediatric nursing from the Nursing Intervention Classification and then submitting them to a panel of judges for validation. The panel considered the selected activities relevant and representative of pediatric nursing practice. Now that representative activities for the nursing workload have been identified, we envision new studies to verify their usefulness in practice. Determining the amount of time each activity takes to perform will help to develop a system for measuring the workloads of nursing teams in pediatric wards.

  5. Role of Clinical Pharmacists in Early Detection, Reporting and Prevention of Medication Errors in a Medical Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Hassani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization evaluation (DUE is an effective process in order to identifying variability in drug use and subsequent application of effective interventions for improving  patient outcomes. In this study, appropriate uses of drugs were evaluated by pharmacy service.Methods: A prospective, interventional study was designed for determining frequency and type of clinical pharmacists’ interventions and medication errors occurred in the infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 8 months. Results: During the 8 months of the study period, 498 errors were detected among 419 patients that admitted to infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital. Most common errors were related to DVT prophylaxis, SUP and vancomycin monitoring. Discussion: Our result showed that clinical pharmacy interventions can have an important role in reducing adverse drug events and their activities can be effective for reducing of medication error.

  6. Creation and validation of an instrument to identify nursing activities in pediatric wards: information for determining workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanci Cristiano Santos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument for identifying nursing activities performed in a pediatric ward and to provide a basis for defining the workload of these units. The instrument was developed by selecting the activities relevant to pediatric nursing from the Nursing Intervention Classification and then submitting them to a panel of judges for validation. The panel considered the selected activities relevant and representative of pediatric nursing practice. Now that representative activities for the nursing workload have been identified, we envision new studies to verify their usefulness in practice. Determining the amount of time each activity takes to perform will help to develop a system for measuring the workloads of nursing teams in pediatric wards.

  7. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach.

  8. Bridging the gap: an innovative dementia learning program for healthcare assistants in hospital wards using facilitator-led discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alan; Law, Shirley

    2009-04-01

    Nursing a person with dementia in a ward setting can be stressful and a challenge for staff and patients alike. Healthcare assistants are identified as requiring a specific training program. They form part of the front-line workforce and yet have the least access to training but often most contact with patients. The program in this study focused on person-centered care and used six self-study workbooks. Experienced registered nurses are trained to be facilitators of 12 group discussions in the ward setting. The training program viewed the facilitator as playing a key role in empowering the healthcare assistant but also in promoting reflective practice. The outcomes to date have been positive and showed a development in confidence and competence of the healthcare assistants involved.

  9. The Effect of Stress Management on Occupational Stress and Satisfaction among Midwives in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Wards in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Jahromi, Mahdi Karimyar; Minaei, Shahnaz; Abdollahifard, Sareh; Maddahfar, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Occupational stress is one of the major problems of health care staff, substantially affecting their professional and personal performance. This research has been conducted with the aim of determining the effect of stress management on occupational stress and satisfaction among the Midwives in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital wards at Motahari Hospital in Jahrom, Iran 2013-2014. Methods: This is a Quasi-experimental study of the pre- and post-clinical trials type. The study po...

  10. A qualitative assessment of implementing a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Denmark--a description of barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Hassani, Amani; Krasnik, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Research into migration and health is often confronted with methodological challenges related to the identification of migrants in various settings. Furthermore, it is often difficult to reach an acceptable level of participation among migrant groups in quantitative research. The aim of this stud...... is to conduct a qualitative assessment of the barriers encountered during the implementation of a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Copenhagen, Denmark....

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Ling; Chen Tun-Chieh; Siu LK; Lu Po-Liang; Chiang Wen-Gin; Chen Yen-Hsu; Lin Sheng-Fung; Chen Tyen-Po

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs), the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of h...

  12. Does antimicrobial use density at the ward level influence monthly central line-associated bloodstream infection rates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Junichi Yoshida, Yukiko Harada, Tetsuya Kikuchi, Ikuyo Asano, Takako Ueno, Nobuo Matsubara Infection Control Committee, Shimonoseki City Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan Abstract: The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD, for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose/(defined daily dose × patient days ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰, 14 (42.4% of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6% were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936–15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527–0.922 (P=0.038. Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R2=0.1897. Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated. Keywords: bloodstream infection, central line, antimicrobial use density

  13. Non-anomalous `Ward' identities to supplement large-N multi-matrix loop equations for correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Akant, L; Akant, Levent; Krishnaswami, Govind S.

    2007-01-01

    This work concerns single-trace correlations of Euclidean multi-matrix models. In the large-N limit we show that Schwinger-Dyson equations imply loop equations and non-anomalous Ward identities. Loop equations are associated to generic infinitesimal changes of matrix variables (vector fields). Ward identities correspond to vector fields preserving measure and action. The former are analogous to Makeenko-Migdal equations and the latter to Slavnov-Taylor identities. Loop equations correspond to leading large-N Schwinger-Dyson equations. Ward identities correspond to 1/N^2 suppressed Schwinger-Dyson equations. But they become leading equations since loop equations for non-anomalous vector fields are vacuous. We show that symmetries at infinite N persist at finite N, preventing mixing with multi-trace correlations. For one matrix, there are no non-anomalous infinitesimal symmetries. For two or more matrices, measure preserving vector fields form an infinite dimensional graded Lie algebra, and action preserving on...

  14. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Alemayehu Berhanie; Habtamu Tigistu; Yishak Abraham; Yosheph Getachew; Tahir Mehmood Khan; Chandrashekhar Unakal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital.Method:medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors.Result:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications.Conclusion:We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  15. Antibiotic resistance and OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaonan; Bao, Ying; Ma, Ruihua; Zhou, Yufa; Li, Xinxian; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate drug resistance, OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and genetic diversity in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) in burn wards. Airborne A. baumannii were collected in burn wards and their corridors using Andersen 6-stage air sampler from January to June 2011. The isolates susceptibility to 13 commonly used antibiotics was examined according to the CLSI guidelines; OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and molecular diversity of isolates were analyzed, respectively. A total of 16 non-repetitive A. baumannii were isolated, with 10 strains having a resistance rate of greater than 50% against the 13 antibiotics. The resistance rate against ceftriaxone, cyclophosvnamide, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem was 93.75% (15/16), but no isolate observed to be resistant to cefoperazone/sulbactam. Resistance gene analyses showed that all 16 isolates carried OXA-51, and 15 isolates carried OXA-23 except No.15; but OXA-24 and OXA-58 resistance genes not detected. The isolates were classified into 13 genotypes (A-M) according to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) results and only six isolates had a homology ≥90%. In conclusion, airborne A. baumannii in the burn wards had multidrug resistance and complex molecular diversity, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were dominant mechanisms for resisting carbapenems.

  16. The team builder: the role of nurses facilitating interprofessional student teams at a Swedish clinical training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisabeth, Carlson; Ewa, Pilhammar; Christine, Wann-Hansson

    2011-09-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an educational strategy attracting increased interest as a method to train future health care professionals. One example of IPE is the clinical training ward, where students from different health care professions practice together. At these wards the students work in teams with the support of facilitators. The professional composition of the team of facilitators usually corresponds to that of the students. However, previous studies have revealed that nurse facilitators are often in the majority, responsible for student nurses' profession specific facilitation as well as interprofessional team orientated facilitation. The objective of this study was to describe how nurses act when facilitating interprofessional student teams at a clinical training ward. The research design was ethnography and data were collected through participant observations and interviews. The analysis revealed the four strategies used when facilitating teams of interprofessional students to enhance collaborative work and professional understanding. The nurse facilitator as a team builder is a new and exciting role for nurses taking on the responsibility of facilitating interprofessional student teams. Future research needs to explore how facilitating nurses balance profession specific and team oriented facilitating within the environment of an interprofessional learning context.

  17. An Australian hospital-based student training ward delivering safe, client-centred care while developing students' interprofessional practice capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Margo L; Stewart-Wynne, Edward G

    2013-11-01

    Royal Perth Hospital, in partnership with Curtin University, established the first interprofessional student training ward in Australia, based on best practice from Europe. Evaluation of the student and client experience was undertaken. Feedback from all stakeholders was obtained regularly as a key element of the quality improvement process. An interprofessional practice program was established with six beds within a general medical ward. This provided the setting for 2- to 3-week clinical placements for students from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social work, pharmacy, dietetics and medical imaging. Following an initial trial, the training ward began with 79 students completing a placement. An interprofessional capability framework focused on the delivery of high quality client care and effective teamwork underpins this learning experience. Quantitative outcome data showed not only an improvement in students' attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration but also acquisition of a high level of interprofessional practice capabilities. Qualitative outcome data from students and clients was overwhelmingly positive. Suggestions for improvement were identified. This innovative learning environment facilitated the development of the students' knowledge, skills and attitudes required for interprofessional, client centred collaborative practice. Staff reported a high level of compliance with clinical safety and quality.

  18. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  19. Maintaining connections: some thoughts on the value of intensive care unit rounding for general medicine ward teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D

    2011-09-06

    When established ward patients are unexpectedly transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU), the ward team should continue to follow them. Although there may be reasons not to do so, the advantages outweigh the obstacles. Great pedagogic value can be gained from following patients after acute decompensation, but a more important reason is that by following patients into the ICU, the ward team can enact for both patients and their families the twin virtues of caring and continuity. Doing so also demonstrates the highest ideals of medicine-that we are focused not on defined areas of turf, but on our patient's well-being. It shows that we are not merely doing narrowly defined "shift work," but that we truly care about our patients. Rounding on established patients who have been transferred into the ICU is the sort of behavior that undergirds the fundamental bases of professionalism. It takes a few minutes from a busy day, but it can be incredibly beneficial for families, patients, and the ideals of medicine.

  20. Fostering interprofessional communication through case discussions and simulated ward rounds in nursing and medical education: A pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wershofen, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor communication between physicians and nursing staff could result in inadequate interprofessional collaboration with negative effects on patient health. In order to ensure optimal health care for patients, it is important to strengthen interprofessional communication and collaboration between physicians and nurses during their education. Aim: The aim of this project is to foster communication for medical and nursing students through interprofessional case discussions and simulated ward rounds as a form of training.Method: In 2013-15 a total of 39 nursing students and 22 medical students participated in eight seminars, each covering case discussions and simulated ward rounds. The seminar was evaluated based on student assessment of the educational objectives.Results: Students who voluntarily signed up for the seminar profited from the interprofessional interaction and gathered positive experiences working in a team.Conclusion: Through practicing case discussions and ward rounds as a group, interprofessional communication could be fostered between medical and nursing students. Students took advantage of the opportunity to ask those from other profession questions and realized that interprofessional interaction can lead to improved health care.

  1. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Giulio Cabri,2 Eleonora Carretti,3 Giacomo Galli,4 Nina Giambalvo,4 Giulia Rioli,4 Serena Saraceni,4 Giulia Spiga,4 Cinzia Del Giovane,5 Paola Ferri6 1Mental Health Department, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment in NOCSAE General Hospital, 2Private Accredited Psychiatric Hospital villa Igea, Modena, 3Nursing Home of Rubiera, Reggio Emilia, 4Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5PhD Statistics Unit, Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, 6Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Purpose: To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI, which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods: After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town, who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135. We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results: With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD with

  2. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields around High Voltage Power Supply in Hamadan Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Rostampour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Background and Objectives: Biological effects of non-ionizing radiation on the body of living organisms have been studied by researchers in recent years. High Voltage medical equipments are one of the sources generating electromagnetic fields. The electromagnetic field intensity of the medical equipment installed at Hamadan hospitals and the potential hazards were investigated. The main purpose of this study was to determine the intensity of the electromagnetic field around high voltage power supplies in radiology ward of the Hamadan hospitals. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study and we investigated the electromagnetic fields intensity around high voltage power supplies at Hamadan hospital wards. All measurements were performed using a calibrated Tesla-meter (HI-3603. The measurements were conducted at a range of distances varying from 25 cm to 3 m around the supporting high voltage power supply. Results: We found that the maximum intensity of the magnetic and electric fields at a distance of less than 1 m around the high voltage power supply was 29.625±5.738 mGauss and 25.17±0.92 V/m respectively, which is less than the safe amounts recommended by the ICNIRP for occupational exposure (5000 mG and 10000 V/m and even for public exposure (1000 mG and and 5000 V/m. The minimum intensity of EM fields for a less than 3 m distance was found to be 0.1±0.005 mGauss, which relates to a CT-scanner system installed at Farshchian hospital. Among the whole equipments evaluated in the current survey, the most intense magnetic and electric field was found to be for imaging technician office, which was 3.050±0.004 mGauss and 128.88±0.05 V/m respectively; it is lower than the tolerances recommended by the ICNIRP. Conclusion: According to our results, it seems that the EM field occupational exposure for radiation workers working at Hamadan hospitals does not exceed

  3. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emodi, Ij; Ikefuna, An; Ujunwa, Fa; Chinawa, Jm

    2014-01-01

    .... It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu...

  4. Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deboye O Kolawole

    Full Text Available In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST. Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg, exfoliative toxins (ETs and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n = 61. Of these isolates, 7 (11.5% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA. The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0% followed by seb (29.5%, sea (19.7%, seh (14.7% and sec (11.5. The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P = 0.602. PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n = 20, group II (n = 17, group III (n = 14 and group IV (n = 10. Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes.

  5. Recognition of Radiological Protection of Ward Staff after Brachytherapy for Malignant Tumor with Radioiodine Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Shu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Through radiation measurement of the patients after brachytherapy with radioiodine seeds for malignant tumor at different distances and shielding condition, the importance, optimization and individualization of the radiological protection are well recognized. The 35 patients were randomly selected in the minimally invasive interventional ward of Peking University Shenzhen Hospital who underwent brachytherapy for malignant tumor with radioiodine seeds. Within 2 hours after the brachytherapy, the radiation of the patients without shielding, with 0.25 mmPb and 0.5 mmPb shielding were detected by an x-γ ray detector at different distances (equivalent dose rate. The results were analysed by SPSS19.0 t test. Annual equivalent dose was calculated by the average close contact time (two hours everyone per day. The average annual equivalent dose of the 35 patients without shielding was below 20 mSv at 0.5 meter, close to the public limit 1 mSv at 2 meters and equivalent to the background at 4 meters. Under 0.25 mmPb shielding, 6 patients’ radiation was still above the pubic limit, although the average radiation of the 35 patients was below the pubic limit; under 0.5 mmPb shielding, all patients’ radiation was nearly equivalent to the background at 0 meter. The results showed that among the time, distance and shielded protection, the individual radiological protection was especially important. The 0.25 mmPb lead cushion was the most commonly used shield. The 0.5 mmPb lead cushion also should be used in case of the large number of radioiodine seeds implantation and/or more superficial implant site, so as to ensure the individualization and optimization in radiological protection.

  6. Repeated local emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a single hospital ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Tran Do Hoan, Nhu; Wick, Ryan R.; Ingle, Danielle J.; Hawkey, Jane; Edwards, David J.; Kenyon, Johanna J.; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Campbell, James I.; Thwaites, Guy; Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Hall, Ruth M.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Baker, Stephen; Holt, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported a dramatic increase in the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a Vietnamese hospital. This upsurge was associated with a specific oxa23-positive clone that was identified by multilocus VNTR analysis. Here, we used whole-genome sequence analysis to dissect the emergence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in the ICU during 2009–2012. To provide historical context and distinguish microevolution from strain introduction, we compared these genomes with those of A. baumannii asymptomatic carriage and VAP isolates from this same ICU collected during 2003–2007. We identified diverse lineages co-circulating over many years. Carbapenem resistance was associated with the presence of oxa23, oxa40, oxa58 and ndm1 genes in multiple lineages. The majority of resistant isolates were oxa23-positive global clone GC2; fine-scale phylogenomic analysis revealed five distinct GC2 sublineages within the ICU that had evolved locally via independent chromosomal insertions of oxa23 transposons. The increase in infections caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was associated with transposon-mediated transmission of a carbapenemase gene, rather than clonal expansion or spread of a carbapenemase-harbouring plasmid. Additionally, we found evidence of homologous recombination creating diversity within the local GC2 population, including several events resulting in replacement of the capsule locus. We identified likely donors of the imported capsule locus sequences amongst the A. baumannii isolated on the same ward, suggesting that diversification was largely facilitated via reassortment and sharing of genetic material within the localized A. baumannii population.

  7. The Effect on mortality of fluconazole or echinocandins treatment in candidemia in internal medicine wards [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco G De Rosa

    Full Text Available The incidence of candidemia has increased over the past two decades, with an increased number of cases in Internal Medicine and a prevalence ranging from 24% to 57%. This single-center retrospective study was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and the risk factors associated with mortality of candidemia in patients admitted to Internal Medicine wards (IMWs of the City of Health and Sciences, Molinette Hospital, Turin, from January 2004 to December 2012. For each patient, demographic, clinical and microbiological data were collected. A case of candidemia was defined as a patient with at least one blood culture positive for Candida spp. Amongst 670 episodes of candidemia, 274 (41% episodes occurred in IMWs. The mortality was 39% and was associated at multivariate analysis with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst removal of central venous catheter ≤48h was significantly associated with survival. In the 77 patients treated with early antifungal therapy the mortality was 29% and was not significantly different with caspofungin or fluconazole, whilst in patients with definitive therapy the mortality was significantly lower with echinocandins compared to fluconazole (11.7% Vs. 39%; p=0.0289, a finding confirmed by multivariate analysis. The mortality was significantly associated with sepsis, cirrhosis and neurologic diseases, whilst CVC removal ≤48h was associated with survival. In patients with early therapy, fluconazole or caspofungin were equally effective. However, echinocandins were significantly more effective as definitive treatment, a finding not explained by differences in treatment delays. Further studies are needed to understand the full potential of these different therapeutic strategies in IMWs.

  8. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now little investigated, helping professionals to improve quality of care and patients to accept treatments. PMID:28182110

  9. Interprofessional collaboration on an internal medicine ward: role perceptions and expectations among nurses and residents.

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    Virginie Muller-Juge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective interprofessional collaboration requires that team members share common perceptions and expectations of each other's roles. OBJECTIVE: Describe and compare residents' and nurses' perceptions and expectations of their own and each other's professional roles in the context of an Internal Medicine ward. METHODS: A convenience sample of 14 residents and 14 nurses volunteers from the General Internal Medicine Division at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, were interviewed to explore their perceptions and expectations of residents' and nurses' professional roles, for their own and the other profession. Interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. The same respondents also filled a questionnaire asking their own intended actions and the expected actions from the other professional in response to 11 clinical scenarios. RESULTS: Three main themes emerged from the interviews: patient management, clinical reasoning and decision-making processes, and roles in the team. Nurses and residents shared general perceptions about patient management. However, there was a lack of shared perceptions and expectations regarding nurses' autonomy in patient management, nurses' participation in the decision-making process, professional interdependence, and residents' implication in teamwork. Results from the clinical scenarios showed that nurses' intended actions differed from residents' expectations mainly regarding autonomy in patient management. Correlation between residents' expectations and nurses' intended actions was 0.56 (p=0.08, while correlation between nurses' expectations and residents' intended actions was 0.80 (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: There are discordant perceptions and unmet expectations among nurses and residents about each other's roles, including several aspects related to the decision-making process. Interprofessional education should foster a shared vision of each other's roles and clarify the boundaries

  10. Evaluation of the Septifast MGrade Test on Standard Care Wards--A Cohort Study.

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    Franz Ratzinger

    Full Text Available The immediate need for appropriate antimicrobial therapy in septic patients requires the detection of the causative pathogen in a timely and reliable manner. In this study, the real-time PCR Septifast MGrade test was evaluated in adult patients meeting the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS criteria that were treated at standard care wards.Patients with clinical suspected infection, drawn blood cultures (BC, the Septifast M(Grade test (SF and sepsis biomarkers were prospectively screened for fulfillment of SIRS criteria and evaluated using the criteria of the European Centre of Disease Control (ECDC for infection point prevalence studies.In total, 220 patients with SIRS were prospectively enrolled, including 56 patients with detection of bacteria in the blood (incidence: 25.5%. BC analysis resulted in 75.0% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, CI: 61.6%- 85.6% with 97.6% specificity (CI: 93.9%- 99.3% for detecting bacteria in the blood. In comparison to BC, SF presented with 80.4% sensitivity (CI: 67.6%- 89.8% and with 97.6% specificity (CI: 93.9%- 99.3%. BC and SF analysis yielded comparable ROC-AUCs (0.86, 0.89, which did not differ significantly (p = 0.558. A trend of a shorter time-to-positivity of BC analysis was not seen in bacteremic patients with a positive SF test than those with a negative test result. Sepsis biomarkers, including PCT, IL-6 or CRP, did not help to explain discordant test results for BC and SF.Since negative results do not exclude bacteremia, the Septifast M(Grade test is not suited to replacing BC, but it is a valuable tool with which to complement BC for faster detection of pathogens.

  11. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindseth, Marit F; Nøttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-02-27

    The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations >/=0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

  12. Outcome risk factors during respiratory infections in a paediatric ward in Antananarivo, Madagascar 2010-2012.

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    Soatiana Rajatonirina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of infectious disease-related morbidity, hospitalisation and mortality among children worldwide, and particularly in developing countries. In these low-income countries, most patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI, whether it is mild or severe, are still treated empirically. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with the evolution and outcome of respiratory illnesses in patients aged under 5 years old. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study in a paediatric ward in Antananarivo from November 2010 to July 2012 including patients under 5 years old suffering from respiratory infections. We collected demographic, socio-economic, clinical and epidemiological data, and samples for laboratory analysis. Deaths, rapid progression to respiratory distress during hospitalisation, and hospitalisation for more than 10 days were considered as severe outcomes. We used multivariate analysis to study the effects of co-infections. RESULTS: From November 2010 to July 2012, a total of 290 patients were enrolled. Co-infection was found in 192 patients (70%. Co-infections were more frequent in children under 36 months, with a significant difference for the 19-24 month-old group (OR: 8.0. Sixty-nine percent (230/290 of the patients recovered fully and without any severe outcome during hospitalisation; the outcome was scored as severe for 60 children and nine patients (3% died. Risk factors significantly associated with worsening evolution during hospitalisation (severe outcome were admission at age under 6 months (OR = 5.3, comorbidity (OR = 4.6 and low household income (OR = 4.1. CONCLUSION: Co-mordidity, low-income and age under 6 months increase the risk of severe outcome for children infected by numerous respiratory pathogens. These results highlight the need for implementation of targeted public health policy to reduce the contribution of

  13. A work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip; Gilding, Moorene; Seewooruttun, Khooseal; Walsh, Hannah

    2016-09-14

    Background With a rise in the number of unqualified staff providing health and social care, and reports raising concerns about the quality of care provided, there is a need to address the learning needs of clinical support workers. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project that involved a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards. Aim To investigate and identify insights in relation to the content and process of learning using a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers. Method This was a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project involving 25 clinical support workers at the seven mental health inpatient units in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Three clinical skills tutors were appointed to develop, implement and evaluate the work-based learning approach. Four sources of data were used to evaluate this approach, including reflective journals, qualitative responses to questionnaires, three focus groups involving the clinical support workers and a group interview involving the clinical skills tutors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The work-based learning approach was highly valued by the clinical support workers and enhanced learning in practice. Face-to-face learning in practice helped the clinical support workers to develop practice skills and reflective learning skills. Insights relating to the role of clinical support workers were also identified, including the benefits of face-to-face supervision in practice, particularly in relation to the interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusion A work-based learning approach has the potential to enhance care delivery by meeting the learning needs of clinical support workers and enabling them to apply learning to practice. Care providers should consider how the work-based learning approach can be used on a systematic, organisation-wide basis in the context of budgetary

  14. Clinical features of severe malnutrition at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barus, S T; Rani, R; Lubis, N U; Hamid, E D; Tarigan, S

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study on severe malnutrition concerning children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1 to December 31, 1988 was conducted. Patients less than five years old were included in this study. The purpose of this study was to know the incidence of severe malnutrition, its symptoms and signs, the immunization status, feeding pattern and socio-economic factors. Out of the 3370 hospitalized patients, 2453 (72.78%) were children under five years old. Of these, 312 (12%) suffered from severe malnutrition. It consisted of marasmus 131 (41.9%), marasmic kwashiorkor 94 (30.1%) and kwashiorkor 87 (27.8%). The highest incidence was found in the age group of 0-2 years (58%). Clinical manifestation of marasmus were old man face (131 or 100%), muscular hypotrophy (118 or 71.9%) and decreased subcutaneous fat (116 or 71.1%) in marasmic kwashiorkor children 46 or 50% had their hair easily picked out, 45 or 46.3% showed hyperpigmentation and 48 or 52% had pretibial edema in the kwashiorkor group 29 or 63% had moon face, 52 or 60.4% showed crazy pavement dermatosis, 77 or 51.3% had hepatomegaly and 87 or 48% pretebial edema. Moon face was seen in 29 (63%), crazy Pavement Dermatosis in 52 (60.4%), hepatomegaly in 77 (51.3%), and pretebial edema in 87 (48%) of kwashiorkor cases. The accompanying diseases were mostly diarrhea (95%) and bronchopneumonia (22%). Immunization status showed that BCG comprised 50.6%, while DPT III and OPV III in 13.7% and 10.5% respectively and measles only 0.64%. More than half (59.6%) of them were breast-fed up to 6 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to ShirazPediatric Neurology Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    INALOO, Soroor; HAGHBIN, Saeedeh; MORADI, Mehrpoor; DASHTI, Hassan; SAFARI, Nazila

    2014-01-01

    Objective Incidence of CNS acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS), especially multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, appears to be on the rise worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, and prognosis of different types of ADS in Iranian children. Materials & Methods During the period 2002-2012, all the patients (aged 1-18 years) with ADS, such as MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), optic neurotic (ON), Devic disease, and transverse myelitis (TM), referred to the pediatric neurology ward, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were included in this study. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, past and family history, preclinical findings, clinical course, and outcome were obtained. Results We identified 88 patients with ADS in our center. The most prevalent disease was MS with 36.5% (n=32), followed by AEDM 26.1% (n=31), ON 17% (n=13), TM 15.9% (n=14), and Devic disease 4.5% (n=4). MS, ON, TM were more common among females while ADEM was more common in males. Children with ADEM were significantly younger than those with other types of ADS. Family history was positive in 10% of patients with MS. Previous history of recent infection was considerably seen in cases with ADEM. Clinical presentation and prognosis in this study was in accordance with those in previous studies on children. Conclusion In this study, the most common type of ADS was MS, which was more common in female and older age cases. ADEM was more common in male and younger children. ADEM and ON had the best and Devic disease had the worst prognosis. PMID:24949046

  16. Maintaining power: women's experiences from labour onset before admittance to maternity ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Ziegert, Kristina; Sahlberg-Blom, Eva; Nissen, Eva

    2012-02-01

    In Sweden pregnant women are encouraged to remain at home until the active phase of labour. Recommendation is based on evidence, that women who seek care and are admitted in the latent phase of labour are subjected to more obstetric interventions and suffer more complications than women who remain at home until the active phase of labour. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset until admission to labour ward. Interviews were conducted with 19 women after they had given birth to their first child. A Constructivist Grounded theory method was used. 'Maintaining power' was identified as the core category, explaining the women's experience of having enough power, when the labour started. Four related categories: 'to share the experience with another', 'to listen to the rhythm of the body', 'to distract oneself' and 'to be encased in a glass vessel', explained how the women coped and thereby maintained power. The first time mothers in this study, who managed to stay at home during the latent phase of labour, had a sense of power that was expressed as a driving force towards the birth, a bodily and mental strength and the right to decide over their own bodies. This implies that women who maintain power have the ability to make choices during the birth process. The professionals need to be sensitive, supportive and respectful to women's own preferences in the health-care encounter, to promote the existing power throughout the birthing process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Realistic evaluation of Situation Awareness for Everyone (SAFE) on paediatric wards: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighton, J; Edbrooke-Childs, J; Stapley, E; Sevdalis, N; Hayes, J; Gondek, D; Sharples, E; Lachman, P

    2016-12-30

    Evidence suggests that health outcomes for hospitalised children in the UK are worse than other countries in Europe, with an estimated 1500 preventable deaths in hospital each year. It is presumed that some of these deaths are due to unanticipated deterioration, which could have been prevented by earlier intervention, for example, sepsis. The Situation Awareness For Everyone (SAFE) intervention aims to redirect the 'clinical gaze' to encompass a range of prospective indicators of risk or deterioration, including clinical indicators and staff concerns, so that professionals can review relevant information for any given situation. Implementing the routine use of huddles is central to increasing situation awareness in SAFE. In this article, we describe the realistic evaluation framework within which we are evaluating the SAFE programme. Multiple methods and data sources are used to help provide a comprehensive understanding of what mechanisms for change are triggered by an intervention and how they have an impact on the existing social processes sustaining the behaviour or circumstances that are being targeted for change. Ethics approval was obtained from London-Dulwich Research Ethics Committee (14/LO/0875). It is anticipated that the findings will enable us to understand what the important elements of SAFE and the huddle are, the processes by which they might be effective and-given the short timeframes of the project-initial effects of the intervention on outcomes. The present research will add to the extant literature by providing the first evidence of implementation of SAFE and huddles in paediatric wards in the UK. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindseth, Marit F; Nøttestad, Jim Aage; Wallin, Juliska; Roaldset, John Olav; Dahl, Alv A

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM). Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21), The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM). Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination. PMID:18304339

  19. Standardized sign-out reduces intern perception of medical errors on the general internal medicine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Stephen M; Arnett, Michael V; Domanski, Jeremy P

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on reducing variation in housestaff handoff procedures have depended on proprietary checkout software. Use of low-technology standardization techniques has not been widely studied. We wished to determine if standardizing the process of intern sign-out using low-technology sign-out tools could reduce perception of errors and missing handoff data. We conducted a pre-post prospective study of a cohort of 34 interns on a general internal medicine ward. Night interns coming off duty and day interns reassuming care were surveyed on their perception of erroneous sign-out data, mistakes made by the night intern overnight, and occurrences unanticipated by sign-out. Trainee satisfaction with the sign-out process was assessed with a 5-point Likert survey. There were 399 intern surveys performed 8 weeks before and 6 weeks after the introduction of a standardized sign-out form. The response rate was 95% for the night interns and 70% for the interns reassuming care in the morning. After the standardized form was introduced, night interns were significantly (p intern. However, the day teams thought there were significantly less perceived errors on the part of the night intern (p = .001) after introduction of the standardized sign-out sheet. There was no difference in mean Likert scores of resident satisfaction with sign-out before and after the intervention. Standardized written sign-out sheets significantly improve the completeness and effectiveness of handoffs between night and day interns. Further research is needed to determine if these process improvements are related to better patient outcomes.

  20. Assessment of the early effectiveness of a stroke unit in comparison to the general ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马锐华; 王拥军; 曲辉; 杨中华

    2004-01-01

    Background Stroke unit is the most effective treatment method to benefit stroke patients. Our study is to evaluate the early effectiveness of a hospital stroke unit (SU). Methods Three hundred and ninety-two patients who had suffered from acute strokes and who were admitted to our hospital between December 2001 and January 2003 were recruited for this controlled study. All patients were sent at random to either the SU or the general ward (GW) for treatment. The following indices were measured by: Barthel Index (BI), National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Oxford Handicap Scale (OHS). Results The mean change in BI score between the day of admission and the day of discharge was 20.00±24.36 for the SU group and 10.63±23.59 for the GW group. A difference that is statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean change in NIHSS score was -2.01±6.61 for the SU group and 0.55±7.44 for the GW group. A difference that is also statistically significant (P=0.000). Finally, the mean change in OHS score was -0.74±1.04 for the SU group and -0.28±0.98 for the GW group, also a statistically significant difference (P=0.000). Among SU patients, patient satisfaction was higher (P=0.000), the rehabilitation success rate was higher (P=0.000), and there were fewer complications (P=0.000).Conclusion Compared to GW patients, stroke patients treated in a special SU were able to return to normal daily activities earlier, with better social abilities, and have reduced neurological defects, without increasing the overall economic burden.

  1. N=1 supersymmetry and super quantum electrodynamic in Atiyah-Ward space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, M.A. de; Cima, O.M. Del; Magalhaes, M.N.P.

    1994-12-01

    The supersymmetric gauge invariant action for the massive Abelian N=1 super-QED{sub 2+2} in the Atiyah-Ward space-time (D=2+2) is formulated. The questions concerning the scheme of the gauge invariance in D=2+2 by means of gauging the massive N=1 super-QED{sub 2+2} are investigated. It is studied how to ensure the gauge invariance at the expenses of the introduction of a complex vector superfield. It is discussed the Wess-Zumino gauge and thereupon we conclude that in this gauge, only the imaginary part of the complex vector field, B{sub {mu}}, gauges a U(1)-symmetry, whereas its real part gauges a Weyl symmetry. It is build up the gauge invariant massive term by introducing four scalar superfields: a pair of chiral and a pair of anti-chiral superfields; the supermultiplets of each pair have opposite U (1)-changes. It is carried out a dimensional reduction a la Scherk of the massive N=1 super-QED{sub 2+2} action from D=2+2 to D=1+2. Truncations are needed in order to suppress unphysical modes and one ends up with a parity-preserving N=1 super QED{sub 1+2} (rather than N=2) in D=1+2 which spectrum is free from tachyons and ghosts at tree-level. Finally it is show that the N=1 super-QED{sub 1+2} obtained is the supersymmetry version of the {sub {phi}3} QED. (author). 27 refs.

  2. Analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in patients hospitalized at the nephrological ward in Poland

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    Agata Kujawa-Szewieczek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have evaluated the incidence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI in the adult Polish population, in particular in solid organ recipients hospitalized at the nephrological ward.Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze Clostridium difficile infections (CDI among patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology, Transplantation and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice.Material/Methods: Thirty-seven patients with Clostridium difficile infection diagnosed between October 2011 and November 2013 (26 months, identified among a total of 3728 patients hospitalized in this department during this period, were included in this retrospective, single-center study. The CDI definition was based on the current recommendations of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.Results: The observation period was divided into two 13-month intervals. Increased incidence (of borderline significance of CDI in the second period compared to the first period was observed (1.33% vs 0.65% respectively; p=0.057. Patients after kidney (n=11, kidney and pancreas (n=2 and liver (n=5 transplantation represented 48% of the analyzed CDI patients, and in half of these patients (50% CDI symptoms occurred within the first 3 months after transplantation. Clostridium difficile infection leads to irreversible deterioration of graft function in 38% of kidney recipients. Most incidents of CDI (70% were identified as nosocomial infection.Conclusions: 1. Clostridium difficile infection is particularly common among patients in the early period after solid organ transplantation. 2. Clostridium difficile infection may lead to irreversible deterioration of transplanted kidney function.

  3. Spatial distribution of infection risk of SARS transmission in a hospital ward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, JiangSu (China); Nielsen, Peter V. [Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Huang, Xinhua [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    The classical Wells-Riley model for predicting risk of airborne transmission of diseases assumes a uniform spatial distribution of the infected cases in an enclosed space. A new mathematical model is developed here for predicting the spatial distribution of infection risk of airborne transmitted diseases by integrating the Wells-Riley equation into computational fluid dynamics. We applied our new integrated model to analyze a large nosocomial SARS outbreak in Hong Kong during the 2003 SARS epidemics, which was studied in the literature with regard to the association between airflow and SARS infection. The predicted numbers of infected cases of medical students in the same cubicle, the adjacent cubicle and the distant cubicle were 6.39, 0.78 and 0.2 respectively while the observed numbers of infected medical students in the three cubicles were 7, 0 and 0 respectively during the morning of March 6th, which was the highest attack period. The predicted numbers of infected cases of inpatients during the morning of March 6th in the same cubicle, the adjacent cubic and the distance cubicle were 7.8, 5.1, and 4.8 respectively which also agree well with the observed distribution of the infected inpatients during the entire infection period. The new developed model provides a new modelling tool for investigating the airborne transmission of diseases in enclosed spaces. The model is applicable when the susceptible stays mostly at the same location in an enclosed space during the infectious period, such as inpatients in a hospital ward, passengers in an airplane etc. (author)

  4. Narcissism in patients admitted to psychiatric acute wards: its relation to violence, suicidality and other psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallin Juliska

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to examine various aspects of narcissism in patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards and to compare their level of narcissism to that of an age- and gender-matched sample from the general population (NORM. Methods This cross-sectional study interviewed 186 eligible acute psychiatric patients with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. The patients filled in the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-21 item version (NPI-21, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. High and low narcissism was defined by the median of the total NPI-21 score. An age- and gender-matched control sample from the general population also scored the NPI-21 (NORM. Results Being male, involuntary admitted, having diagnosis of schizophrenia, higher self-esteem, and severe violence were significantly associated with high narcissism, and so were also low levels of suicidality, depression, anxiety and GAF scores. Severe violence and high self-esteem were significantly associated with high narcissism in multivariable analyses. The NPI-21 and its subscales showed test-retest correlations ≥0.83, while the BPRS and the HADS showed lower correlations, confirming the trait character of the NPI-21. Depression and suicidality were negatively associated with the NPI-21 total score and all its subscales, while positive association was observed with grandiosity. No significant differences were observed between patients and NORM on the NPI-21 total score or any of the NPI subscales. Conclusion Narcissism in the psychiatric patients was significantly associated with violence, suicidality and other symptoms relevant for management and treatment planning. Due to its trait character, use of the NPI-21 in acute psychiatric patients can give important clinical information. The similar level of narcissism found in patients and NORM is in need of further examination.

  5. Small-scale, homelike facilities versus regular psychogeriatric nursing home wards: a cross-sectional study into residents' characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempen Gertrudis IJM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home care for people with dementia is increasingly organized in small-scale and homelike care settings, in which normal daily life is emphasized. Despite this increase, relatively little is known about residents' characteristics and whether these differ from residents in traditional nursing homes. This study explored and compared characteristics of residents with dementia living in small-scale, homelike facilities and regular psychogeriatric wards in nursing homes, focusing on functional status and cognition. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 769 residents with dementia requiring an intensive level of nursing home care: 586 from regular psychogeriatric wards and 183 residents from small-scale living facilities. Functional status and cognition were assessed using two subscales from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS: the Activities of Daily Living-Hierarchy scale (ADL-H and the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS. In addition, care dependency was measured using Dutch Care Severity Packages (DCSP. Finally, gender, age, living condition prior to admission and length of stay were recorded. Descriptive analyses, including independent samples t- tests and chi-square tests, were used. To analyze data in more detail, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results Residents living in small-scale, homelike facilities had a significantly higher functional status and cognitive performance compared with residents in regular psychogeriatric wards. In addition, they had a shorter length of stay, were less frequently admitted from home and were more often female than residents in regular wards. No differences were found in age and care dependency. While controlling for demographic variables, the association between dementia care setting and functional status and cognition remained. Conclusions Although residents require a similar intensive level of nursing home care

  6. A Survey of the quantity and type of biological aerosols in selected wards of a teaching hospital in Ghazvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Akbar; Karimi, Fatemeh; Karimi, Zainab; Rajabi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bioaerosols are agents that can cause infection, allergy or induce other toxic effects in the human body. If the person exposed to such particles is not capable of their destruction or elimination from the body, the established chemical and physiological disorders can result in disease or death. The aim of this study was to assess the concentrations of bioaerosols in several wards of a teaching hospital. Methods Given that gas air-conditioners (split and window types) were used for ventilation in the eye operating room, internal intensive care unit, and the respiratory isolation room, these wards were selected for passive sampling. Sterile plates containing culture medium were exposed for two hours to the wards’ indoor ambient air. After this time, they were transferred to a lab to undergo incubation, colony count, and identification of the microorganisms. The data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 18, and the significance level of less than 0.05 was used. Results Based on our findings, the highest colony-forming bacterial unit was observed 22 cfu/plate/h in the eye operating room and, the highest colony-forming fungal unit was observed 4 cfu/plate/h in the internal intensive care unit. Based on the results of the differential tests, the most prevalent bacteria identified were Staphylococcus epidermidis (75%) in the air of eye operating room and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (52%) in the internal intensive care unit and isolation room. The most prevalent identified fungi in the air of selected wards were related to Alternaria alternata (43%), Aspergillus flavus (24%), Penicillium (36%) and Curvularia (21%) types. Based on Spearman’s correlation test, no significant relationship was observed between the factor of temperature and the number of fungal and bacterial colonies (r = 0.201, p = 0.42; r = −0.197, p = 0.41). Moreover, a meaningful relationship was observed only between the number of individuals and the bacterial colonies present in

  7. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards: Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    OpenAIRE

    Noor, Sufian K.; Elmadhoun, Wadie M.; Bushara, Sarra O.; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Healt...

  8. Synopsis of non-communicable diseases in children admitted to the paediatric ward of the university of Nigeria teaching hospital (UNTH) Enugu, Nigeria: A ten year review

    OpenAIRE

    I J Emodi; Ikefuna, A. N.; F A Ujunwa; Chinawa, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-communicable diseases are increasing worldwide due to rapidly changing lifestyles and socio-economic status. It is contributing significantly to the global burden of diseases. Objective: To determine the pattern of non-communicable diseases in children admitted into the Paediatrics ward in a tertiary health centre in Enugu. Materials and Methods: A review of admissions into the Paediatrics ward of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, between January 1999 and Dece...

  9. Investigation on Depression of Inpatients in Medical Ward in General Hospital%综合医院内科住院病人抑郁状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈庆红; 舒德海; 刘宇宁; 曹伟; 张可

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the depression of inpatients in general hospital. Methods:252 inpatients in medical ward were investigated by SDS. Results:there were 100(39.7 % ) cases with depression symptoms according to SDS(SDS total scores 1>50) .There were significant correlations between the incidence of depression and kind of disease or education level. Conclusion:There are 39.7% patients with depression sympoms in medical ward of general hosoital.

  10. Quality Control of Air Disinfection Cleanliness in Burn Ward%烧伤病房空气消毒洁净度的质量控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周树仁; 彭幼林; 王建莉; 程永佳

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究烧伤病房空气净化消毒洁净度的质量控制.方法:选择层流、静电和紫外线消毒烧伤病房各一间,分别在开机前、消毒后进行采样做空气培养和微粒检测.结果:层流烧伤病房细菌数明显少于静电和紫外线消毒烧伤病房.结论:烧伤病房层流净化消毒是一种理想的空气净化消毒方式,是实现烧伤病房现代化管理目标的重要设施之一.%Objective To study the quality control of air purification disinfection cleanliness in burn ward. Methods Three bum wards are selected including laminar flow, electrostatic and ultraviolet disinfection respectively. Sampling, air cultivation and particle detection were performed before starting and after disinfection. Results The number of bacteria in laminar flow bum wards is obviously less than wards with electrostatic and ultraviolet disinfection. Conclusion Laminar purification disinfection of bum ward is an ideal air disinfection way, which is is one of the important facilities to realize the modernization management target in bum ward.

  11. Quantification of the diversity among common bean accessions using Ward-MLM strategy Quantificação da diversidade entre acessos de feijoeiro-comum com uso da estratégia Ward-MLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Diego Silva Cabral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at evaluating the divergence among common bean accessions by their agronomic, morphological and molecular traits, based on the Ward-MLM procedure. A collection of 57 accessions from the gene bank of Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo was used in this study, from which: 31 were landraces belonging to the community Fortaleza, in the municipality of Muqui, ES, Brazil; 20 accessions were provided by Embrapa Trigo; and 6 were commercial cultivars. Five agronomic traits (plant cycle, number of seeds per pod, number of pods per plant, weight of 100 seeds, and grain yield, five morphological traits (growth habit, plant size, seed shape, seed color, and commercial group and 16 microsatellite primers were evaluated. High genetic variability was detected considering morphological, agronomic and molecular traits in the 57 common bean accessions studied. The Ward-MLM procedure showed that the ideal number of groups was five, according to the pseudo F and pseudo t² criteria. The accessions from Andean origin had heavier seeds than others and formed a cluster. The Ward-MLM statistical procedure is a useful technique to detect genetic divergence and to cluster genotypes by simultaneously using morphological, agronomic and molecular data.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a divergência de acessos de feijoeiro-comum por suas características agronômicas, morfológicas e moleculares, com base no procedimento Ward-MLM. Uma coleção de 57 acessos do banco de germoplasma da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo foi utilizada neste estudo, dos quais: 31 acessos locais, pertencentes à comunidade Fortaleza, no Município de Muqui, ES; 20 acessos fornecidos pela Embrapa Trigo; e 6 cultivares comerciais. Foram avaliados cinco caracteres agronômicos (ciclo da planta, número de sementes por vagem, número de vagens por planta, peso de 100 grãos e produtividade de grãos, cinco caracteres morfológicos (hábito de crescimento, porte

  12. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist recommendations in the geriatric ward of a Belgian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somers A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Annemie Somers,1 Hugo Robays,1 Peter De Paepe,2 Georges Van Maele,3 Katrina Perehudoff,4 Mirko Petrovic41Department of Pharmacy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 4Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, BelgiumObjective: To evaluate the type, acceptance rate, and clinical relevance of clinical pharmacist recommendations at the geriatric ward of the Ghent university hospital.Methods: The clinical pharmacist evaluated drug use during a weekly 2-hour visit for a period of 4 months and, if needed, made recommendations to the prescribing physician. The recommendations were classified according to type, acceptance by the physician, prescribed medication, and underlying drug-related problem. Appropriateness of prescribing was assessed using the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI before and after the recommendations were made. Two clinical pharmacologists and two clinical pharmacists independently and retrospectively evaluated the clinical relevance of the recommendations and rated their own acceptance of them.Results: The clinical pharmacist recommended 304 drug therapy changes for 100 patients taking a total of 1137 drugs. The most common underlying drug-related problems concerned incorrect dose, drug–drug interaction, and adverse drug reaction, which appeared most frequently for cardiovascular drugs, drugs for the central nervous system, and drugs for the gastrointestinal tract. The most common type of recommendation concerned adapting the dose, and stopping or changing a drug. In total, 59.7% of the recommendations were accepted by the treating physician. The acceptance rate by the evaluators ranged between 92.4% and 97.0%. The mean clinical relevance of the recommendations was assessed as possibly important (53.4%, possibly low relevance (38.1%, and possibly

  13. Drug Utilization on Neonatal Wards: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Rosliana; Dali, Ahmad Fauzi; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Abdullah, Amir Heberd; Ming, Long Chiau; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2017-01-01

    Despite limited evidence on safety and efficacy of drug use in neonates, drugs are extensively used in this age group. However, the availability of information on drug consumption in neonates, especially inpatient neonates, is limited. This paper systematically reviews published studies on drug utilization in hospitalized neonates. A systematic literature review was carried out to identify observational studies published from inception of databases used till August 2016. Four search engines, namely Medline, CINAHL, Embase, and PubMed, were used. Publications written in English that described drug utilization in neonatal wards were selected. Assessment of the data was based on the category of the study design, the objective of study and the method used in reporting drug consumption. A total of 20 drug utilization studies were identified, 12 of which focused on all drug classes, while the other eight evaluated antimicrobials. Studies were reported in Europe (n = 7), the United States (n = 6), India (n = 5), Brazil (n = 1), and Iran (n = 1). Substantial variance with regard to study types (study design and methods), data source, and sample size were found among the selected studies. Of the studies included, 45% were cross-sectional or retrospective, 40% were prospective studies, and the remaining 15% were point prevalence surveys. More than 70% of the studies were descriptive studies, describing drug consumption patterns. Fifteen per cent of the descriptive studies evaluated changes in drug utilization patterns in neonates. Volume of units was the most prevalent method used for reporting all drug categories. The ATC/DDD system for reporting drug use was only seen in studies evaluating antimicrobials. The most commonly reported drugs across all studies are anti-infectives for systemic use, followed by drugs for the cardiovascular system, the nervous system and the respiratory system. Ampicillin and gentamicin were the most prescribed antimicrobials in hospitalized

  14. "Driving the devil away": qualitative insights into miraculous cures for AIDS in a rural Tanzanian ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urassa Mark

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of religious beliefs in the prevention of HIV and attitudes towards the infected has received considerable attention. However, little research has been conducted on Faith Leaders' (FLs perceptions of antiretroviral therapy (ART in the developing world. This study investigated FLs' attitudes towards different HIV treatment options (traditional, medical and spiritual available in a rural Tanzanian ward. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 FLs purposively selected to account for all the denominations present in the area. Data was organised into themes using the software package NVIVO-7. The field work guidelines were tailored as new topics emerged and additional codes progressively added to the coding frame. Results Traditional healers (THs and FLs were often reported as antagonists but duality prevailed and many FLs simultaneously believed in traditional healing. Inter-denomination mobility was high and guided by pragmatism. Praying for the sick was a common practice and over one third of respondents said that prayer could cure HIV. Being HIV-positive was often seen as "a punishment from God" and a consequence of sin. As sinning could result from "the work of Satan", forgiveness was possible, and a "reconciliation with God" deemed as essential for a favourable remission of the disease. Several FLs believed that "evil spirits" inflicted through witchcraft could cause the disease and claimed that they could cast "demons" away. While prayers could potentially cure HIV "completely", ART use was generally not discouraged because God had "only a part to play". The perceived potential superiority of spiritual options could however lead some users to interrupt treatment. Conclusions The roll-out of ART is taking place in a context in which the new drugs are competing with a diversity of existing options. As long as the complementarities of prayers and ART are not clearly and explicitly stated by FLs

  15. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

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    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  16. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Wells, John S G; Butterworth, Tony

    2014-12-01

    Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to 'engage' and 'empower' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the 'engagement' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa. This paper explores and examines the impact of a large-scale QI programme, the Productive Ward, on the 'work engagement' of the nurses and ward teams involved. Using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), we surveyed, measured and analysed work engagement in a representative test group of hospital-based ward teams who had recently commenced the latest phase of the national 'Productive Ward' initiative in Ireland and compared them to a control group of similar size and matched (as far as is possible) on variables such as ward size, employment grade and clinical specialty area. 338 individual datasets were recorded, n=180 (53.6%) from the Productive Ward group, and n=158 (46.4%) from the control group; the overall response rate was 67%, and did not differ significantly between the Productive Ward and control groups. The work engagement mean score (±standard deviation) in the Productive group was 4.33(±0.88), and 4.07(±1.06) in the control group, representing a modest but statistically significant between-group difference (p=0.013, independent samples t-test). Similarly modest differences were observed in all three dimensions of the work engagement construct. Employment grade and the clinical specialty area were also significantly related to the work engagement score (pengagement (the vigour, absorption and dedication) of ward-based teams. The use and suitability of the UWES as an appropriate measure of 'engagement' in QI interventions was confirmed. The engagement of nurses and front-line clinical teams is a major component of creating, developing and sustaining a culture of improvement. Copyright

  17. The identification of Aedes albopictus in the Nearctic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsie, R F

    1986-09-01

    An introduced, breeding population of Aedes albopictus has been established in Harris County, Texas, and several parishes in Louisiana. The problem of its identification and separation from the indigenous Nearctic mosquito fauna is addressed. Using the keys of Darsie and Ward (1981), the author offers suggested inserts which will accomplish the identification of adult females and larvae in the Nearctic Region. Additional pointers are given for distinguishing albopictus from the 2 common container breeders, Ae. aegypti and Ae. triseriatus.

  18. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to Shiraz Pediatric Neurology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO*

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Haghbin S, Moradi M, Dashti H, Safari N. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to Shiraz Pediatric Neurology Ward. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring; 8(2:18-23.ObjectiveIncidence of CNS acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS, especially multiple sclerosis (MS in children, appears to be on the rise worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence, clinical presentation, neuroimagingfeatures, and prognosis of different types of ADS in Iranian children.Materials & MethodsDuring the period 2002-2012, all the patients (aged 1-18 years with ADS, such as MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, optic neurotic (ON, Devic disease, and transverse myelitis (TM, referred to the pediatric neurology ward, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were includedin this study. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, past and family history, preclinical findings, clinical course, and outcome were obtained.ResultsWe identified 88 patients with ADS in our center. The most prevalent disease was MS with 36.5% (n=32, followed by AEDM 26.1% (n=31, ON 17% (n=13, TM 15.9% (n=14, and Devic disease 4.5% (n=4. MS, ON, TM were morecommon among females while ADEM was more common in males. Children with ADEM were significantly younger than those with other types of ADS.Family history was positive in 10% of patients with MS.Previous history of recent infection was considerably seen in cases with ADEM.Clinical presentation and prognosis in this study was in accordance with those in previous studies on children.ConclusionIn this study, the most common type of ADS was MS, which was more common in female and older age cases. ADEM was more common in male and younger children. ADEM and ON had the best and Devic disease had the worst prognosis.References1. Longer-Gould A, Zhaug JL, Chung J, Yeung Y, Wanbant E, Yao J. Incidence of acquired CNS demyelinating syndrome in a

  19. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

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    Zahra Pourmovahed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were selected through randomized and available sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmovahed Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients experience high levels of anxiety before angiography, which is mostly associated with irreparable effects on health status of such individuals. Use of alternative medicine to reduce stress and anxiety is of paramount importance. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of music on anxiety level of patients hospitalized in cardiac wards before angiography. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 70 patients admitted to cardiac wards before angiography in three selected hospitals of Shiraz, Iran in 2015. Samples were randomized convenience sampling and divided into two groups of control (n=35 and intervention (n=35. In this study, the intervention group received one hour of music before angiography for 20 minutes, whereas the usual care of ward was provided for the control group. Data was collected using the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI by Spielberger one hour before angiography (immediately before the intervention and 20 minutes after angiography (immediately after the intervention through interviews with all the participants. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using descriptive statistics, Chi-square, as well as paired and independent-tests. Results: In this study, mean anxiety scores of patients in the intervention and control groups before the intervention were 48.45±6.63 and 48.25±6.63, respectively. After the intervention, these scores were changed to 44.28±5.21 and 49.02±7.74 in the intervention (P=0.004 and control (P=0.90 groups, respectively. Therefore, a significant difference was observed between the groups after the intervention (P=0.008. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, music before angiography could lead to a significant decrease in anxiety level of patients. Therefore, this approach could be used as an effective method to alleviate anxiety in patients.

  1. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist's interventions in an infectious diseases ward and impact on patient's direct medication cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Mirzabeigi, Parastoo; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2013-04-01

    A clinical pharmacist is a key member of the antimicrobial multidisciplinary team involved in patients' pharmacotherapy monitoring. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of medication errors, the type of clinical pharmacy interventions, acceptance of pharmacist interventions by health-care provider team, nursing staff satisfaction with clinical pharmacy services, and the probable impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on decreasing direct medication costs at an infectious diseases ward in Iran. All clinical pharmacist interventions such as preventing medication errors were recorded in a previously designed pharmacotherapy monitoring forms. Direct medication cost of patients admitted during the study period was compared with that of subjects hospitalized at the same ward during the year before the intervention period to determine the impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on direct medication costs. The 3 most frequent medication error types were incorrect dose (35.5%), omission error (24.3%), and incorrect medication (14.3%). The mean number of clinical pharmacist intervention per patient was 3.2. Forty percent of clinical pharmacists' interventions are moderate to major clinical significant. Thirty nine percent of clinical pharmacist's interventions had moderate to major financial benefits in present study. The direct medication cost per patient was decreased about 3.8% following clinical pharmacist's interventions. Our data demonstrated that incorrect dose was the most frequent medication error in the infectious diseases ward. Major portion of clinical pharmacist interventions were accepted by physicians and nursing staff. Clinical pharmacist interventions non-significantly decreased the direct medication cost of patients. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enacting 'team' and 'teamwork': using Goffman's theory of impression management to illuminate interprofessional practice on hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Simon; Reeves, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Interprofessional teamwork is widely advocated in health and social care policies. However, the theoretical literature is rarely employed to help understand the nature of collaborative relations in action or to critique normative discourses of teamworking. This paper draws upon Goffman's (1963) theory of impression management, modified by Sinclair (1997), to explore how professionals 'present' themselves when interacting on hospital wards and also how they employ front stage and backstage settings in their collaborative work. The study was undertaken in the general medicine directorate of a large NHS teaching hospital in England. An ethnographic approach was used, including interviews with 49 different health and social care staff and participant observation of ward-based work. These observations focused on both verbal and non-verbal interprofessional interactions. Thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The study findings suggest that doctor-nurse relationships were characterised by 'parallel working', with limited information sharing or effective joint working. Interprofessional working was based less on planned, 'front stage' activities, such as wards rounds, than on ad hoc backstage opportunistic strategies. These backstage interactions, including corridor conversations, allowed the appearance of collaborative 'teamwork' to be maintained as a form of impression management. These interactions also helped to overcome the limitations of planned front stage work. Our data also highlight the shifting 'ownership' of space by different professional groups and the ways in which front and backstage activities are structured by physical space. We argue that the use of Sinclair's model helps to illuminate the nature of collaborative interprofessional relations within an acute care setting. In such settings, the notion of teamwork, as a form of regular interaction and with a shared team identity, appears to have little relevance. This suggests that interventions to

  3. User participation in a Municipal Acute Ward in Norway: dilemmas in the interface between policy ideals and work conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Anne-Kari; Tveiten, Sidsel; Werner, Anne

    2017-08-23

    User participation has become an increasingly important principle in health care over the last few decades. Healthcare professionals are expected to involve patients in treatment decisions. Clear guidance as to what this should entail for professionals in clinical work is not accounted for in legislation. In this study, we explore how healthcare professionals in a Municipal Acute Ward perceived, experienced and performed user participation. The ward represents a new short-time service model for emergency assistance in Norway. We focused on the challenges the professionals faced in clinical work and how they dealt with these. Data were drawn from qualitative interviews with 11 healthcare professionals and from 10 observations in relation to previsits and physician's rounds in the ward. Transcripts of interviews and observations were analysed using a method for systematic text condensation. In the analysis, we applied Lipsky's perspective on dilemmas of street-level bureaucrats. The results show that that the professionals perceived user participation as an important and natural part of their work. They experienced difficulties related to collaboration with patients, caregivers, and professionals in other services, and with framework conditions that caused conflicting expectations, responsibility, and priorities. The professionals seemed to take a pragmatic approach to user participation, managing it within narrow perspectives. Our study indicates that the participants dealt with the dilemmas at the cost of user participation. The results demonstrate that there is a gap between the outlined health policy and the professionals' opportunities to fulfil this policy in clinical work regarding user participation. The policy decision-makers should recognise the balancing work required of healthcare professionals to deal with difficulties in clinical work. The knowledge that professionals possess as performers of services and the need for valuing in policy processes should

  4. BED OCCUPANCY RATE AND LENGTH OF STAY OF PATIENTS IN MEDICAL AND ALLIED WARDS OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Gulzar; Memon, Khalida Naz; Shaikh, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    A good hospital management includes an effective allocative planning for beds in a hospital. Bed-occupancy rates and length of stay are the measures that reflect the functional ability of a hospital. A cross sectional study of two months' duration was carried out in eight medical and allied wards of Liaquat University Hospital (LUH) Jamshoro with objective to estimate the bed occupancy rate and the average length of stay of patients. Data was collected by filling a predesigned check list and bed occupancy rate and average length of stay were computed. Associations were analysed by using SPSS version 16. The p-value 50.05 Was taken as level of significance. One hundred & seven admissions were recorded against 235 available beds. Average bed occupancy rate was 51.33%. The 51.4% of the patients in medical wards except paediatrics ward were of the age >50 years; the mean age was 45 years and standard deviation +/-6.4 years. Mean age in paediatrics was 3.89 years and standard deviation of +/-0.8 years. 55.1% patients had infectious diseases. The 32.7% patients stayed in hospital for up to 3 days showing significant association between nature of diseases and duration of stay (p=0.03). There was male preponderance, i.e., 54.2% males against 45.8% females. Showing significant association between gender and length of stay (p=0.01). Bed occupancy rate and average stay in hospital were found within recommended range; more improvement may be brought by doing further research on this issue.

  5. Technology use, cesarean section rates, and perinatal mortality at Danish maternity wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1994-01-01

    Fifty-eight Danish maternity units, managing 99% of Danish deliveries, participated in a cross sectional study to assess the relationship between use of birth-related technologies, cesarean section rates and perinatal mortality for births after 35 completed weeks of gestation. A regional technology...... FHM had a 15% higher cesarean section rate (not planned) than units not using FHM (p ... a technology index was calculated for eight regions in Denmark, weighting the index of each unit in a region according to its number of deliveries. There was no association between the technology index in these eight regions in Denmark and their cesarean section rates. Use of FHM, technology index...

  6. The relationship between therapeutic alliance and service user satisfaction in mental health inpatient wards and crisis house alternatives: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Sweeney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. RESULTS: We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed

  7. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  8. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  9. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Harde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24, of them 7% (14 were from PACU and 5% (10 were from ward (P = 0.5285. Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150, of them 20% (80 were from PACU and 18% (70 were from ward (P = 0.3526. The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289. The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary.

  10. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...... no statistically significant effect on 30-day mortality after emergency abdominal surgery, nor any effect on secondary outcomes. The trial was stopped prematurely owing to slow recruitment and a much lower than expected mortality rate among the enrolled patients. REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01209663 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)....

  11. Poverty and Its Association with Child Labor in Njombe District in Tanzania: The Case of Igima Ward

    OpenAIRE

    Akarro, Rocky R.J.; Nathan Anthon Mtweve

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of the study is to present the state of child labour and factors behind this citing one of the most prevalent areas for child labour in Tanzania known as Njombe. Njombe district which is predominantly a rural area is one of the most prevalent areas of child labour in Tanzania. A survey of 300 household heads that were randomly selected from accessible four villages in Igima ward in Njombe district confirmed this phenomenon. Chi-square statistic analysis on the relationship betwee...

  12. Comparison of 2D fingerprint types and hierarchy level selection methods for structural grouping using Ward's clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild; Blankley

    2000-01-01

    Four different two-dimensional fingerprint types (MACCS, Unity, BCI, and Daylight) and nine methods of selecting optimal cluster levels from the output of a hierarchical clustering algorithm were evaluated for their ability to select clusters that represent chemical series present in some typical examples of chemical compound data sets. The methods were evaluated using a Ward's clustering algorithm on subsets of the publicly available National Cancer Institute HIV data set, as well as with compounds from our corporate data set. We make a number of observations and recommendations about the choice of fingerprint type and cluster level selection methods for use in this type of clustering

  13. Doctors and nurses on wards with greater access to clinical dietitians have better focus on clinical nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoresen, L.; Rothenberg, E.; Beck, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    , as well as to 678 clinical dietitians working in Scandinavian hospitals. The response rate of clinical dietitians, nurses and doctors were 53%, 46% and 29%, respectively. Nurses and doctors who saw clinical dietitians often found it less difficult to identify undernourished patients and found that insight...... into the importance of adequate nutrition was better than those who saw clinical dietitians seldom. Clinical nutrition had a higher priority in units with frequent visits by clinical dietitians. The present study shows that doctors and nurses on wards with greater access to clinical dietitians had better focus...

  14. An unusual outbreak of nontuberculous mycobacteria in hospital respiratory wards: Association with nontuberculous mycobacterial colonization of hospital water supply network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Salvatore; Rogliani, Paola; Paone, Gregorino; Altieri, Alfonso; Alma, Mario Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Puxeddu, Ermanno

    2016-06-01

    The incidence and prevalence of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is increasing worldwide arousing concerns that NTM infection may become a serious health challenge. We recently observed a significant increase of NTM-positive sputa samples from patients referred to respiratory disease wards of a large tertiary hospital in Rome. A survey to identify possible NTM contamination revealed a massive presence of NTM in the hospital water supply network. After decontamination procedures, NTM presence dropped both in water pipelines and sputa samples. We believe that this observation should encourage water network surveys for NTM contamination and prompt decontamination procedures should be considered to reduce this potential source of infection.

  15. Children's disengagement from cancer care and treatment on the ward: an undesirable social tactic in the long term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal-Nielsen, Pia; Meinert, Lotte; Clausen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This anthropological study explores children’s non-social reactions during the active treatment period, the on-treatment, in a paediatric oncology ward in a Danish university hospital. It is argued that, although some children’s non-social reactions is a tactical disengagement to manage the on...... and open-ended interviewing. Fifty children of both sexes between 4 and 15 years, their families and hospital staff participated in the study. These data formed the basis for the study. The findings show that children’s response to care challenges, including exhaustion from care management, exposure from...... and damaging tactic for survivors of cancer in childhood....

  16. Closing an open psychiatric ward: organizational change and its effect on staff uncertainty, self-efficacy, and professional functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Semyon; Shor, Razya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Gun Usishkin, Monica; Kagan, Ilya

    2013-04-01

    Converting an open psychiatric ward to a closed one can be threatening and stressful for the medical and nursing staff involved. This study describes the effects of this change, in particular the before-after correlation among self-efficacy, professional functioning, and uncertainty. Forty-four staff participated, completing pre-/poststructured questionnaires. Uncertainty was higher before the conversion than after the conversion. Professional functioning declined after the conversion. Self-efficacy was positively correlated with pre- and postconversion functioning, but negatively correlated with postconversion uncertainty. It is important to prepare staff for this significant organizational change. Suggestions for prechange interventions are offered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of the decision support system for antimicrobial treatment, TREAT, in an acute medical ward of a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Laub, Rasmus Rude; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2014-01-01

    of hospital stay, or hospital or 30-day mortality. Direct costs were significantly higher for TREAT advice than for local guidelines or the physician prescriptions (pcosts were lower for TREAT advice than for both local guidelines (p....247). The coverage of TREAT advice for the bacteraemia patients was non-inferior to the physicians (p=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: TREAT can potentially improve the ecological costs of empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients in acute medical wards, but provided lower coverage than local guidelines....... coverage rates were 65%, 51%, and 79%, respectively, and in the prospective part, 68%, 62%, and 77%, respectively. TREAT provided lower coverage than local guidelines (plength...

  18. Measuring multidisciplinary team effectiveness in a ward-based healthcare setting: development of the team functioning assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Gigi; Liao, Jenny; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D

    2011-01-01

    Nontechnical skills relating to team functioning are vital to the effective delivery of patient care and safety. In this study, we develop a reliable behavioral marker tool for assessing nontechnical skills that are critical to the success of ward-based multidisciplinary healthcare teams. The Team Functioning Assessment Tool (TFAT) was developed and refined using a literature review, focus groups, card-sorting exercise, field observations, and final questionnaire evaluation and refinement process. Results demonstrated that Clinical Planning, Executive Tasks, and Team Relations are important facets of effective multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning. The TFAT was also shown to yield acceptable inter-rater agreement.

  19. Implications of Shared Interactive Displays for Work at a Surgery Ward: Coordination, Articulation Work and Context-awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lis Witte Kjær

    2008-01-01

    We report on experiences gained from the use at a surgery ward of shared interactive displays to support coordination and communication.  The displays merge large displays, video feed, RFID tag, chat and mobile phones to facilitate better coordination and articulation of work tasks and enhance co...... appropriate meaning to new clues by clinicians and learning new ways of cooperating. Trade-offs had to be made, since work and benefits were differentially redistributed. We propose that computer support for medical work should support flexible appropriation and learning....

  20. Results of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of statistical process control charts and structured diagnostic tools to reduce ward-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the CHART Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, E; Harper, P; Loveday, H; Gilmour, H; Jones, S; Benneyan, J; Hood, J; Pratt, R

    2008-10-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts have previously been advocated for infection control quality improvement. To determine their effectiveness, a multicentre randomised controlled trial was undertaken to explore whether monthly SPC feedback from infection control nurses (ICNs) to healthcare workers of ward-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (WA-MRSA) colonisation or infection rates would produce any reductions in incidence. Seventy-five wards in 24 hospitals in the UK were randomised into three arms: (1) wards receiving SPC chart feedback; (2) wards receiving SPC chart feedback in conjunction with structured diagnostic tools; and (3) control wards receiving neither type of feedback. Twenty-five months of pre-intervention WA-MRSA data were compared with 24 months of post-intervention data. Statistically significant and sustained decreases in WA-MRSA rates were identified in all three arms (PTools wards, respectively). Participants identified SPC charts as an effective communication tool and valuable for disseminating WA-MRSA data.