WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall-bounded turbulent shear

  1. Numerical simulation of wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, P.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in three dimensional, time dependent numerical simulation of turbulent flows bounded by a wall are reviewed. Both direct and large eddy simulation techniques are considered within the same computational framework. The computational spatial grid requirements as dictated by the known structure of turbulent boundary layers are presented. The numerical methods currently in use are reviewed and some of the features of these algorithms, including spatial differencing and accuracy, time advancement, and data management are discussed. A selection of the results of the recent calculations of turbulent channel flow, including the effects of system rotation and transpiration on the flow are included.

  2. Self-sustaining processes at all scales in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Carlo; Hwang, Yongyun

    2017-03-01

    We collect and discuss the results of our recent studies which show evidence of the existence of a whole family of self-sustaining motions in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows with scales ranging from those of buffer-layer streaks to those of large-scale and very-large-scale motions in the outer layer. The statistical and dynamical features of this family of self-sustaining motions, which are associated with streaks and quasi-streamwise vortices, are consistent with those of Townsend's attached eddies. Motions at each relevant scale are able to sustain themselves in the absence of forcing from larger- or smaller-scale motions by extracting energy from the mean flow via a coherent lift-up effect. The coherent self-sustaining process is embedded in a set of invariant solutions of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations which take into full account the Reynolds stresses associated with the residual smaller-scale motions.

  3. PRESSURE-VELOCITY JOINT MEASUREMENTS OF A WALL-BOUNDED TURBULENT SHEAR FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-zheng; KE Feng; WANG Wei-zhe; CAO Zhao-min

    2006-01-01

    The unsteady behavior of the large-scale vortical structures buried in a wall-bounded turbulent shear layer flow was extensively investigated using pressure-velocity joint measurements. The wall pressure fluctuations and flow field velocity fluctuations were measured simultaneously by using a microphone and an X-type hotwire, respectively. The spatially and temporally strong coupling between the convecting flow structures and the wall pressure fluctuations were meticulously investigated in terms of the continuous wavelet transform, cross-correlation and coherence of the wall pressure and flow field. The characteristics of the large-scale vortical structures, e.g., the shedding frequency, averaged convection velocity, convective motion, and structure pattern were revealed.

  4. A Zonal Similarity Analysis of Velocity Profiles in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Shear Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Tuoc, Trinh Khanh

    2010-01-01

    It is argued that there are three distinct zones in a wall bounded turbulent flow field dominated by three completely different mechanisms: - An outer region where the velocity profile is determined by the pressure distribution - A highly active wall layer dominated by a sequence of inrush-sweep and ejections, and - An intermediate region well described by the traditional logarithmic law proposed by independently Millikan and Prandtl. The log-law and the wall layer are sometimes referred to as the inner region. Under these conditions, a unique set of normalisation parameters cannot possibly apply to all three zones. The inner region can be more successfully represented by normalising the distance and velocity with the values of these scales at the edge of the wall layer since they are shared by both the wall layer and the log-law region. The application of this similarity analysis has successfully collapsed extensive published data for the inner region covering a range of Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 1,000,0...

  5. A study of the turbulence structures of wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, M. S.; Soria, J.; Perry, A. E.; Chacin, J.; Na, Y.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    This project extends the study of the structure of wall-bounded flows using the topological properties of eddying motions as developed by Chong et al. (1990), Soria et al. (1992, 1994), and as recently extended by Blackburn et al. (1996) and Chacin et al. (1996). In these works, regions of flow which are focal in nature are identified by being enclosed by an isosurface of a positive small value of the discriminant of the velocity gradient tensor. These regions resemble the attached vortex loops suggested first by Theodorsen (1955). Such loops are incorporated in the attached eddy model versions of Perry & Chong (1982), Perry et al. (1986), and Perry & Marusic (1995), which are extensions of a model first formulated by Townsend (1976). The DNS data of wall bounded flows studied here are from the zero pressure gradient flow of Spalart (1988) and the boundary layer with separation and reattachment of Na & Moin (1996). The flow structures are examined from the viewpoint of the attached eddy hypothesis.

  6. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    CERN Document Server

    Seshasayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow - the flow between counter-translating parallel plates - displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for the spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by the approach are discussed.

  7. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshasayanan, K [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, CNRS UMR 8550, École Normale Supérieure, F-75005 Paris (France); Manneville, P, E-mail: paul.manneville@polytechnique.edu [Laboratoire d’Hydrodynamique, CNRS UMR7646, École Polytechnique, F-91128, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-06-15

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow–the flow between counter-translating parallel plates–displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier–Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond the lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at the cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by this approach are discussed. (paper)

  8. Turbulent structures in wall-bounded shear flows observed via three-dimensional numerical simulators. [using the Illiac 4 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three recent simulations of tubulent shear flow bounded by a wall using the Illiac computer are reported. These are: (1) vibrating-ribbon experiments; (2) study of the evolution of a spot-like disturbance in a laminar boundary layer; and (3) investigation of turbulent channel flow. A number of persistent flow structures were observed, including streamwise and vertical vorticity distributions near the wall, low-speed and high-speed streaks, and local regions of intense vertical velocity. The role of these structures in, for example, the growth or maintenance of turbulence is discussed. The problem of representing the large range of turbulent scales in a computer simulation is also discussed.

  9. Turbulent patterns in wall-bounded flows: a Turing instability?

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In their way to/from turbulence, plane wall-bounded flows display an interesting transitional regime where laminar and turbulent oblique bands alternate, the origin of which is still mysterious. In line with Barkley's recent work about the pipe flow transition involving reaction-diffusion concepts, we consider plane Couette flow in the same perspective and transform Waleffe's classical four-variable model of self-sustaining process into a reaction-diffusion model. We show that, upon fulfillment of a condition on the relative diffusivities of its variables, the featureless turbulent regime becomes unstable against patterning as the result of a Turing instability. A reduced two-variable model helps us to delineate the appropriate region of parameter space. An {\\it intrinsic} status is therefore given to the pattern's wavelength for the first time. Virtues and limitations of the model are discussed, calling for a microscopic support of the phenomenological approach.

  10. Secondary instability of wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, S. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    The present analysis of a secondary instability in a wide class of wall-bounded parallel shear flows indicates that two-dimensional, finite amplitude waves are exponentially unstable to infinitessimal three-dimensional disturbances. The instability appears to be the prototype of transitional instability in such flows as Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, and flat plate boundary layers, in that it has the convective time scales observed in the typical transitions. The energetics and vorticity dynamics of the instability are discussed, and it is shown that the two-dimensional perturbation without directly providing energy to the disturbance. The three-dimensional instability requires that a threshold two-dimensional amplitude be achieved. It is found possible to identify experimental features of transitional spot structure with aspects of the nonlinear two-dimensional/linear three-dimensional instability.

  11. On Turbulent Contribution to Frictional Drag in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng-Chen; KAWAGUCHI Yasuo; HISHIDA Koichi; OSHIMA Marie

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a simple model for turbulent contribution to the frictional drag in a wall-bounded turbulent flow based on the characteristic parameters of turbulent bursting events. It is verified on water and drag-reducing surfactant solution flows investigated by particle image velocimetry in experiments. It is obtained that the turbulent contribution to the skin friction factor is linearly proportional to the product of the spatial frequency and strength of turbulent bursts originated from the wall.

  12. DNS of turbulent wall bounded flows with a passive scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Juan Guillermo

    In this thesis, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the velocity and temperature fields are performed for incompressible turbulent flows in plane channels and spatially-developing boundary layers. The main goal is to numerically analyze the behavior of the momentum and thermal boundary layers subjected to different external and upstream conditions, the main focus is given to: (i) local flow perturbations, (ii) different Reynolds numbers, and, (iii) external pressure gradient. Two types of turbulent wall-bounded flows are examined in this investigation. One of them consists of the fully developed turbulent channel. Furthermore, after the developing section, the boundary layers generated by the lower and upper walls collapse. From this point to downstream, periodic boundary conditions are applicable due to the existent homogeneity. The second type of wall bounded flow explored possesses no restriction in the upper zone; consequently, the boundary layer may grow infinitely downstream. This streamwise non-homogeneous state does not allow to prescribe periodic boundary conditions along the direction of the flow. Therefore, time-dependent turbulent information must be assigned at the domain inlet, turning the numerical problem into a very challenging one. The spatially-developing turbulent boundary layer in a flat plate is a typical example of non-homogeneous flow. In the first part of this thesis, the influence of local forcing on an incompressible turbulent channel flow is numerically investigated. The extensive information provided by the DNS enable us to have a better understanding of the physical mechanism responsible for local heat transfer enhancement and drag reduction. Time-periodic blowing/suction is applied by means of thin spanwise slots located at the lower and upper walls of the channel at several forcing frequencies. It was found in Araya et al. (2008-a) the existence of a characteristic frequency, i.e. of f = 0.64 or f* = 0.044, at which maximum local

  13. Uncertainty Quantification of Turbulence Model Closure Coefficients for Transonic Wall-Bounded Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, John; West, Thomas; Hosder, Serhat; Rumsey, Christopher; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Kleb, William

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to quantify the uncertainty and sensitivity of commonly used turbulence models in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes codes due to uncertainty in the values of closure coefficients for transonic, wall-bounded flows and to rank the contribution of each coefficient to uncertainty in various output flow quantities of interest. Specifically, uncertainty quantification of turbulence model closure coefficients was performed for transonic flow over an axisymmetric bump at zero degrees angle of attack and the RAE 2822 transonic airfoil at a lift coefficient of 0.744. Three turbulence models were considered: the Spalart-Allmaras Model, Wilcox (2006) k-w Model, and the Menter Shear-Stress Trans- port Model. The FUN3D code developed by NASA Langley Research Center was used as the flow solver. The uncertainty quantification analysis employed stochastic expansions based on non-intrusive polynomial chaos as an efficient means of uncertainty propagation. Several integrated and point-quantities are considered as uncertain outputs for both CFD problems. All closure coefficients were treated as epistemic uncertain variables represented with intervals. Sobol indices were used to rank the relative contributions of each closure coefficient to the total uncertainty in the output quantities of interest. This study identified a number of closure coefficients for each turbulence model for which more information will reduce the amount of uncertainty in the output significantly for transonic, wall-bounded flows.

  14. Low-drag events in transitional wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Park, Jae Sung; Kushwaha, Anubhav; Dennis, David J. C.; Graham, Michael D.; Poole, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    Intermittency of low-drag pointwise wall shear stress measurements within Newtonian turbulent channel flow at transitional Reynolds numbers (friction Reynolds numbers 70 - 130) is characterized using experiments and simulations. Conditional mean velocity profiles during low-drag events closely approach that of a recently discovered nonlinear traveling wave solution; both profiles are near the so-called maximum drag reduction profile, a general feature of turbulent flow of liquids containing polymer additives (despite the fact that all results presented are for Newtonian fluids only). Similarities between temporal intermittency in small domains and spatiotemporal intermittency in large domains is thereby found.

  15. Modeling of Wall-Bounded Complex Flows and Free Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Various wall-bounded flows with complex geometries and free shear flows have been studied with a newly developed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The model development is based on the invariant theory in continuum mechanics. This theory enables us to formulate a general constitutive relation for the Reynolds stresses. Pope was the first to introduce this kind of constitutive relation to turbulence modeling. In our study, realizability is imposed on the truncated constitutive relation to determine the coefficients so that, unlike the standard k-E eddy viscosity model, the present model will not produce negative normal stresses in any situations of rapid distortion. The calculations based on the present model have shown an encouraging success in modeling complex turbulent flows.

  16. Near-wall behavior of turbulent wall-bounded flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschmann, Matthias H. [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik Dresden, Bertolt-Brecht-Allee 20, 01309 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: Matthias.Buschmann@ilkdresden.de; Indinger, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Aerodynamics, Boltzmannstr., 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-3015 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    A data base compiling a large number of results from direct numerical simulations and physical experiments is used to explore the properties of shear and normal Reynolds stresses very close to the wall of turbulent channel/pipe flows and boundary layers. Three types of scaling are mainly investigated, classical inner, standard mixed, and pure outer scaling. The study focuses on the wall behavior, the location and the value of the peak Reynolds shear stress and the three normal stresses. A primary observation is that all of these parameters show a significant Karman number dependence. None of the scalings investigated works in an equal manner for all parameters. It is found that the respective first-order Taylor series expansion satisfactorily represents each stress only in a surprisingly thin layer very close to the wall. In some cases, a newly introduced scaling based on u{sub {tau}}{sup 3/2}u{sub e}{sup 1/2} offers a remedy.

  17. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  18. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  19. Numerical simulation of transition in wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiser, Leonhard; Zang, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    The current status of numerical simulation techniques for the transition to turbulence in incompressible channel and boundary-layer flows is surveyed, and typical results are presented graphically. The focus is on direct numerical simulations based on the full nonlinear time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations without empirical closure assumptions for prescribed initial and boundary conditions. Topics addressed include the vibrating ribbon problem, space and time discretization, initial and boundary conditions, alternative methods based on the triple-deck approximation, two-dimensional channel and boundary-layer flows, three-dimensional boundary layers, wave packets and turbulent spots, compressible flows, transition control, and transition modeling.

  20. On turbulent energy production in wall bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, R.; Hetsroni, G.; Liberzon, A.; Nikitin, N.; Tsinober, A.

    2004-07-01

    The main point of this Brief Communication is that the turbulent energy production is due to the compressing of material elements rather than stretching. This is understood in the sense that the positiveness of the turbulent energy production is due to the contribution of the term associated with the compressive (negative) eigenvalue/eigenvector of the mean strain.

  1. Distance-from-the-wall scaling of turbulent motions in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya, R.; Philip, J.; Hutchins, N.; Monty, J. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-02-01

    An assessment of self-similarity in the inertial sublayer is presented by considering the wall-normal velocity, in addition to the streamwise velocity component. The novelty of the current work lies in the inclusion of the second velocity component, made possible by carefully conducted subminiature ×-probe experiments to minimise the errors in measuring the wall-normal velocity. We show that not all turbulent stress quantities approach the self-similar asymptotic state at an equal rate as the Reynolds number is increased, with the Reynolds shear stress approaching faster than the streamwise normal stress. These trends are explained by the contributions from attached eddies. Furthermore, the Reynolds shear stress cospectra, through its scaling with the distance from the wall, are used to assess the wall-normal limits where self-similarity applies within the wall-bounded flow. The results are found to be consistent with the recent prediction from the work of Wei et al. ["Properties of the mean momentum balance in turbulent boundary layer, pipe and channel flows," J. Fluid Mech. 522, 303-327 (2005)], Klewicki ["Reynolds number dependence, scaling, and dynamics of turbulent boundary layers," J. Fluids Eng. 132, 094001 (2010)], and others that the self-similar region starts and ends at z+˜O (√{δ+}) and O (δ+) , respectively. Below the self-similar region, empirical evidence suggests that eddies responsible for turbulent stresses begin to exhibit distance-from-the-wall scaling at a fixed z+ location; however, they are distorted by viscous forces, which remain a leading order contribution in the mean momentum balance in the region z+≲O (√{δ+}) , and thus result in a departure from self-similarity.

  2. Universality and scaling phenomenology of small-scale turbulence in wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, L.; Elsinga, G.E.; Brethouwer, G.; Schlatter, P.; Johansson, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    The Reynolds number scaling of flow topology in the eigenframe of the strain-rate tensor is investigated for wall-bounded flows, which is motivated by earlier works showing that such topologies appear to be qualitatively universal across turbulent flows. The databases used in the current study are

  3. Particles in wall-bounded turbulent flows deposition, re-suspension and agglomeration

    CERN Document Server

    Pozorski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The book presents an up-to-date review of turbulent two-phase flows with the dispersed phase, with an emphasis on the dynamics in the near-wall region. New insights to the flow physics are provided by direct numerical simuation and by fine experimental techniques. Also included are models of particle dynamics in wall-bounded turbulent flows, and a description of particle surface interactions including muti-layer deposition and re-suspension.

  4. A general Reynolds analogy theory for the compressible wall-bounded turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, You-sheng; Husain, Fazle; Li, Xin-liang; She, Zhen-su

    2012-01-01

    A general Reynolds analogy (GRA) theory is proposed for the mean and fluctuating velocity and temperature in compressible wall-bounded turbulent flows. In particular, an exact analogy solution is derived for compressible turbulent pipe and channel flows and an approximate analogy solution is derived for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), both of which are independent of fluid Prandtl number and wall temperature condition. The analogy solutions are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulation data, able to reproduce empirical relations, and can be viewed as extensions of existing theories. In contrast to Walz's equation for adiabatic CTBL, the mean temperature-velocity relation derived by GRA can be applied to different wall-bounded flows in non-adiabatic wall condition, which is achieved by extending Walz's adiabatic recovery factor to a heat flux dependent one. The fluctuation temperature-velocity relations derived by GRA are slightly different from the modified strong Reynolds analogy...

  5. New scenario of turbulence theory and wall-bounded turbulence: Theoretical significance

    CERN Document Server

    Kambe, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    New general scenario of turbulence theory is proposed and applied to wall-bounded turbulence. Significance of the theory rests on a mathematical theorem closely related to the fundamental conservation law of current flux of fluid flow, expressed in a form of 4d physical space-time representation, which predicts a system of Maxwell-type equation and supports transverse waves traveling with a phase speed c_t. In streaky wall flows it is remarkable that there exist both dynamical mechanism exciting transverse waves and an energy channel of exchange between flow field and transverse wave field. In developed state of the wave field, energy is supplied from the flow field to the transverse wave field if wavelengths are sufficiently large. The waves are accompanied with a new mechanism of energy dissipation, i.e. an internal friction analogous to the Joule effect. Energy is supplied from the main flow to the wave field, and some part of the energy is dissipated into heat. Thus, there exists a sustaining mechanism, w...

  6. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  7. Transition to turbulence in wall-bounded flows: Where do we stand?

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, we recall the specificities of the transition to turbulence in wall-bounded flows and present recent achievements in the understanding of this problem. The transition is abrupt with laminar-turbulent coexistence over a finite range of Reynolds numbers, the transitional range. The archetypical cases of Poiseuille pipe flow and plane Couette flow are first reviewed at the phenomenological level, together with a few other flow configurations. Theoretical approaches are then examined with particular emphasis on the existence of special nontrivial solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations at finite distance from laminar flow. Dynamical systems theory is most appropriate to analyze their role, in particular with respect to the transient character of turbulence in the lower transitional range. The extensions needed to deal with the prominent spatiotemporal features of the transition are then discussed. Turbulence growth/decay in terms of statistical physics of many-body systems and the relevance of dir...

  8. A relation between velocity-vorticity correlations and skin friction in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the skin friction and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient (Cf) is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The skin friction coefficient can be derived from the mean spanwise vorticity at the wall. Double integration with respect to the wall-normal direction (from 0 to y) is needed to derive Cf from the second derivative of the mean spanwise vorticity in the mean spanwise vorticity equation. One more integration is needed to find the contribution of each component to Cf from the wall to the boundary layer edge (from 0 to δ) . The present formula encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  9. Helical structure of longitudinal vortices embedded in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Okulov, Valery

    2009-01-01

    Embedded vortices in turbulent wall-bounded flow over a flat plate, generated by a passive rectangular vane-type vortex generator with variable angle \\beta to the incoming flow in a low-Reynolds number flow (Re = 2600 based on the inlet grid mesh size L = 0:039 m and free stream velocity U......_{\\infty} = 1.0 ms^{-1}) have been studied with respect to helical symmetry. The studies were carried out in a low-speed closed-circuit wind tunnel utilizing Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The vortices have been shown to possess helical symmetry, allowing the flow to be described in a simple...

  10. Improvements on digital inline holographic PTV for 3D wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) provide the most comprehensive flow information for unraveling the physical phenomena in a wide range of fluid problems, from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulent flows. Compared with other 3D PIV techniques, such as tomographic PIV and defocusing PIV, the digital inline holographic PTV (DIH-PTV) provides 3D flow measurement solution with high spatial resolution, low cost optical setup, and easy alignment and calibration. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, small sampling volume and expensive computations, limiting its broad use for 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present our latest developments on minimizing these challenges, which enables high-fidelity DIH-PTV implementation to larger sampling volumes with significantly higher particle seeding densities suitable for wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements. The improvements include: (1) adjustable window thresholding; (2) multi-pass 3D tracking; (3) automatic wall localization; and (4) continuity-based out-of-plane velocity component computation. The accuracy of the proposed DIH-PTV method is validated with conventional 2D PIV and double-view holographic PTV measurements in smooth-wall turbulent channel flow experiments. The capability of the technique in characterization of wall-bounded turbulence is further demonstrated through its application to flow measurements for smooth- and rough-wall turbulent channel flows. In these experiments, 3D velocity fields are measured within sampling volumes of 14.7  ×  50.0  ×  14.4 mm3 (covering the entire depth of the channel) with a velocity resolution of  presented DIH-PTV method and measurements highlight the

  11. Structural ensemble dynamics based closure model for wall-bounded turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Su She; Ning Hu; You Wu

    2009-01-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flow involves the development of multi-scale turbulent eddies, as well as a sharply varying boundary layer. Its theoretical descriptions are yet phenomenological. We present here a new framework called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), which aims at using systematically all relevant statistical properties of turbulent structures for a quantitative description of ensemble means. A new set of closure equations based on the SED approach for a turbulent channel flow is presented. SED order functions are defined, and numerically determined from data of direct numerical simulations (DNS). Computational results show that the new closure model reproduces accurately the solution of the original Navier-Stokes simulation, including the mean velocity profile, the kinetic energy of the stream-wise velocity component, and every term in the energy budget equation. It is suggested that the SED-based studies of turbulent structure builds a bridge between the studies of physical mechanisms of turbulence and the development of accurate model equations for engineering predictions.

  12. The dynamics of a capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The motion of an initially spherical capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow is investigated via an accelerated boundary integral implementation. The neo-Hookean model is used as the constitutive law of the capsule membrane. The maximum wall-normal migration is observed when the oscillation period of the imposed shear is of the order of the relaxation time of the elastic membrane; hence, the optimal capillary number scales with the inverse of the oscillation frequency and the ratio agrees well with the theoretical prediction in the limit of high-frequency oscillation. The migration velocity decreases monotonically with the frequency of the applied shear and the capsule-wall distance. We report a significant correlation between the capsule lateral migration and the normal stress difference induced in the flow. The periodic variation of the capsule deformation is roughly in phase with that of the migration velocity and normal stress difference, with twice the frequency of the imposed shear. The maximum...

  13. Predictions of canonical wall bounded turbulent flows via a modified $k-\\omega$ equation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in computation of engineering flows is to derive and improve turbulence models built on turbulence physics. Here, we present a physics-based modified $k-\\omega$ equation for canonical wall bounded turbulent flows (boundary layer, channel and pipe), predicting both mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise mean kinetic energy profile (SMKP) with high accuracy over a wide range of Reynolds number ($Re$). The result builds on a multi-layer quantification of wall flows, which allows a significant modification of the $k-\\omega$ equation. Three innovations are introduced: First, an adjustment of the Karman constant to 0.45 is set for the overlap region with a logarithmic MVP. Second, a wake parameter models the turbulent transport near the centerline. Third, an anomalous dissipation factor represents the effect of a meso layer in the overlap region. Then, a highly accurate (above 99\\%) prediction of MVPs is obtained in Princeton pipes, improving the original model prediction by up to 10\\%. Moreov...

  14. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined. The author is retracting this article due to a significant overlap in content from three previously published papers [Phys. Fluids 20, 040603 (2008); Phys. Fluids 24, 045103 (2012); Acta Mech. 201(1-4), 277 (2008)], which constitutes dual publication. The author would like to apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. The article is retracted from the scientific record with effect from 12 January 2017.

  15. Reynolds number effects on the fluctuating velocity distribution in wall-bounded shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Jessen, Wilhelm; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuations of zero pressure gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layers are investigated for seven Reynolds numbers based on the momentum thickness in the range of 1009  ⩽  Re θ   ⩽  4070 by particle-image velocimetry (PIV) and micro-particle tracking velocimetry (µ-PTV) at a spatial resolution up to 0.06-0.23 wall units such that the viscous sublayer is well resolved. The statistics evidence good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experimental results from the literature. The experimental results show the streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuation to grow at increasing Reynolds numbers.

  16. Assessment of tomographic PIV in wall-bounded turbulence using direct numerical simulation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C.M. de; Baidya, R.; Khashehchi, M.; Marusic, I. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2012-02-15

    Simulations of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) are performed using direct numerical simulation data of a channel flow at Reynolds number of Re{sub {tau}} = 934, to investigate the influence of experimental parameters such as camera position, seeding density, interrogation volume size and spatial resolution. The simulations employ camera modelling, a Mie scattering illumination model, lens distortion effects and calibration to realistically model a tomographic experiment. Results are presented for camera position and orientation in three-dimensional space, to obtain an optimal reconstruction quality. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis is performed on the accuracy of first and second order flow statistics, at various voxel sizes normalised using the viscous inner length scale. This enables the result to be used as a general reference for wall-bounded turbulent experiments. In addition, a ratio relating seeding density and the interrogation volume size is proposed to obtain an optimal reference value that remains constant. This can be used to determine the required seeding density concentration for a certain interrogation volume size. (orig.)

  17. Numerical issues in Lagrangian tracking and topological evolution of fluid particles in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.; Hackl, J.; Stegeman, P.; Borrell, G.; Soria, J.

    2014-04-01

    The determination of the local Lagrangian evolution of the flow topology in wall-bounded turbulence, and of the Lagrangian evolution associated with entrainment across the turbulent / non-turbulent interface into a turbulent boundary layer, require accurate tracking of a fluid particle and its local velocity gradients. This paper addresses the implementation of fluid-particle tracking in both a turbulent boundary layer direct numerical simulation and in a fully developed channel flow simulation. Determination of the sub-grid particle velocity is performed using both cubic B-spline, four-point Hermite spline and higher-order Hermite spline interpolation. Both wall-bounded flows show similar oscillations in the Lagrangian tracers of both velocity and velocity gradients, corresponding to the movement of particles across the boundaries of computational cells. While these oscillation in the particle velocity are relatively small and have negligible effect on the particle trajectories for time-steps of the order of CFL = 0.1, they appear to be the cause of significant oscillations in the evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor.

  18. The Prevalence of Similarity of the Turbulent Wall-bounded Velocity Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Weyburne, David

    2014-01-01

    In a now very influential paper, Luciano Castillo and William George used a flow governing equation approach for the outer boundary layer region to seek similarity solutions for the mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles. The development led to a less-constrained version of Clauser's pressure gradient constraint parameter. Using their new pressure gradient constraint parameter equal to a constant as a search criterion, Castillo and George claim to have found many turbulent boundary layer experimental datasets that exhibited velocity profile similarity. In fact Castillo, George, and coworkers examined an extensive set of experimental datasets and claim that most turbulent boundary layers appear to be equilibrium similarity boundary layers. This is in direct contradiction to the classical belief that equilibrium similarity flows are special flows and are difficult to achieve in experiments, a contradiction that Castillo and George themselves acknowledge. The importance of this observation cannot be ov...

  19. Identification and tracking of hairpin vortex auto-generation in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    Hairpin vortices have been widely accepted as component structures of turbulent boundary layers. Their properties (size, vorticity, energy) and dynamic phenomena (origin, growth, breakdown) have been shown to correlate to the complex, multi-scaled turbulent motions observed in both experiments and simulations. As established in the literature, the passage of a hairpin vortex creates a wall-normal ejection of fluid, which encounters the high-speed freestream resulting in near-wall shear and increased drag. A previously generated simulation of an isolated hairpin vortex is used to study the auto-generation of a secondary vortex structure. Eulerian methods such as the Q criterion and Γ2 function, as well as Lagrangian methods are used to visualize the three-dimensional hairpin vortices and the auto-generation process. The circulation development and wall-normal location of both primary and secondary hairpin heads are studied to determine if there is a correlation between the strength and height of the primary hairpin vortex with the secondary hairpin vortex auto-generation.

  20. Modelling and simulation of turbulence and heat transfer in wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovac, M.

    2006-01-01

    At present it is widely accepted that there is no universal turbulence model, i.e. no turbulence model can give acceptably good predictions for all turbulent flows that are found in nature or engineering. Every turbulence model is based on certain assumptions, and hence it is aimed at certain type o

  1. Comments on Reynolds number effects in wall-bounded shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Reynolds number on the structure of turbulent boundary layers and channel flows is discussed. Published data are reexamined in light of the following questions: (1) does the boundary layer turbulence structure change after the well known Reynolds number limit viz, when Re(theta) is greater than 6000?; (2) is it possible to disturb a high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layer near the wall such that the recovery length is O(100 delta)?; and (3) how close is the numerically simulated low Reynolds number flat plate turbulence structure to that observed experimentally? The turbulence structure appears to change continuously with Reynolds number virtually throughout the bounday layer and sometimes in unexpected manners at high Reynolds numbers.

  2. Turbulent bands in a planar shear flow without walls

    CERN Document Server

    Chantry, Matthew; Barkley, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent bands are a ubiquitous feature of transition in wall-bounded shear flows. We show that these are also a robust feature of Waleffe flow -- a shear flow driven by a sinusoidal body force between stress-free boundaries -- thus demonstrating that rigid walls are not a prerequisite for band formation. Exploiting the Fourier dependence of Waleffe forcing, we construct a model flow that uses only four wavenumbers in the shear direction and yet captures uniform turbulence, turbulent bands, and spot expansion. The model is simultaneously a reduction of the full Navier-Stokes equations and an extension of minimal models of the self-sustaining process of shear turbulence.

  3. Power-law versus log-law in wall-bounded turbulence: A large-eddy simulation perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, W.

    2014-01-29

    The debate whether the mean streamwise velocity in wall-bounded turbulent flows obeys a log-law or a power-law scaling originated over two decades ago, and continues to ferment in recent years. As experiments and direct numerical simulation can not provide sufficient clues, in this study we present an insight into this debate from a large-eddy simulation (LES) viewpoint. The LES organically combines state-of-the-art models (the stretched-vortex model and inflow rescaling method) with a virtual-wall model derived under different scaling law assumptions (the log-law or the power-law by George and Castillo [“Zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer,” Appl. Mech. Rev.50, 689 (1997)]). Comparison of LES results for Re θ ranging from 105 to 1011 for zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer flows are carried out for the mean streamwise velocity, its gradient and its scaled gradient. Our results provide strong evidence that for both sets of modeling assumption (log law or power law), the turbulence gravitates naturally towards the log-law scaling at extremely large Reynolds numbers.

  4. An analysis of curvature effects for the control of wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatski, T. B.; Savill, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The Reynolds stress transport equations are used to predict the effects of simultaneous and sequential combinations of distortions on turbulent boundary layers. The equations are written in general orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, with the curvature terms expressed in terms of the principal radii of curvature of the respective coordinate surfaces. Results are obtained for the cases of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in the limit where production and pressure-strain redistribution dominate over diffusion effects.

  5. Shear localization and effective wall friction in a wall bounded granular flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, granular flow rheology is investigated by means of discrete numerical simulations of a torsional, cylindrical shear cell. Firstly, we focus on azimuthal velocity profiles and study the effect of (i the confining pressure, (ii the particle-wall friction coefficient, (iii the rotating velocity of the bottom wall and (iv the cell diameter. For small cell diameters, azimuthal velocity profiles are nearly auto-similar, i.e. they are almost linear with the radial coordinate. Different strain localization regimes are observed : shear can be localized at the bottom, at the top of the shear cell, or it can be even quite distributed. This behavior originates from the competition between dissipation at the sidewalls and dissipation in the bulk of the system. Then we study the effective friction at the cylindrical wall, and point out the strong link between wall friction, slip and fluctuations of forces and velocities. Even if the system is globally below the sliding threshold, force fluctuations trigger slip events, leading to a nonzero wall slip velocity and an effective wall friction coefficient different from the particle-wall one. A scaling law was found linking slip velocity, granular temperature in the main flow direction and effective friction. Our results suggest that fluctuations are an important ingredient for theories aiming to capture the interface rheology of granular materials.

  6. A New Eddy-Based Model for Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. 15...results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. The...Carry out hot - wire anemometry experiments covering a large Reynolds number range. This involves the use of the High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer

  7. High fidelity digital inline holographic PTV for 3D flow measurements: from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional PIV and PTV provides the most comprehensive flow information for unraveling the physical phenomena in a wide range of fluid problems, from microfluidics to wall-bounded turbulent flows. Compared with other commercialized 3D PIV techniques, such as tomographic PIV and defocusing PIV, the digital inline holographic PTV (namely DIH-PTV) provides 3D flow measurement solution with high spatial resolution, low cost optical setup, and easy alignment and calibration. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, small sampling volume and expensive computations, limiting its broad use for 3D flow measurements. Here we will report our latest work on improving DIH-PTV method through an integration of deconvolution algorithm, iterative removal method and GPU computation to overcome some of abovementioned limitations. We will also present the application of our DIH-PTV for measurements in the following sample cases: (i) flows in bio-filmed microchannel with 50-60 μm vector spacing within sampling volumes of 1 mm (streamwise) x 1 mm (wall-normal) x 1 mm (spanwise); (ii) turbulent flows over smooth and rough surfaces (1.1 mm vector spacing within 15 mm x 50 mm x 15 mm); (iii) 3D distribution and kinematics of inertial particles in turbulent air duct flow.

  8. Universal Scaling Laws for Dense Particle Suspensions in Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Pedro; Brandt, Luca; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic behavior of dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant spheres in turbulent plane channel flow is examined. We show that particles larger than the smallest turbulence scales cause the suspension to deviate from the continuum limit in which its dynamics is well described by an effective suspension viscosity. This deviation is caused by the formation of a particle layer close to the wall with significant slip velocity. By assuming two distinct transport mechanisms in the near-wall layer and the turbulence in the bulk, we define an effective wall location such that the flow in the bulk can still be accurately described by an effective suspension viscosity. We thus propose scaling laws for the mean velocity profile of the suspension flow, together with a master equation able to predict the increase in drag as function of the particle size and volume fraction.

  9. Atomic hydrodynamics of DNA: coil-uncoil-coil transitions in a wall-bounded shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, William C; Wang, Guan M

    2008-12-01

    Extensive experimental work on the response of DNA molecules to externally applied forces and on the dynamics of DNA molecules flowing in microchannels and nanochannels has been carried out over the past two decades, however, there has not been available, until now, any atomic-scale means of analyzing nonequilibrium DNA response dynamics. There has not therefore been any way to investigate how the backbone and side-chain atoms along the length of a DNA molecule interact with the molecules and ions of the flowing solvent and with the atoms of passing boundary surfaces. We report here on the application of the nonequilibrium biomolecular dynamics simulation method that we developed [G. M. Wang and W. C. Sandberg, Nanotechnology 18, 4819 (2007)] to analyze, at the atomic interaction force level, the conformational dynamics of short-chain single-stranded DNA molecules in a shear flow near a surface. This is a direct atomic computational analysis of the hydrodynamic interaction between a biomolecule and a flowing solvent. The DNA molecules are observed to exhibit conformational behaviors including coils, hairpin loops, and figure-eight shapes that have neither been previously measured experimentally nor observed computationally, as far as we know. We relate the conformational dynamics to the atomic interaction forces experienced throughout the length of a molecule as it moves in the flowing solvent past the surface boundary. We show that the DNA conformational dynamics is related to the asymmetry in the molecular environment induced by the motion of the surrounding molecules and the atoms of the passing surface. We also show that while the asymmetry in the environment is necessary, it is not sufficient to produce the observed conformational dynamics. A time variation in the asymmetry, due in our case to a shear flow, must also exist. In order to contrast these results with the usual experimental situation of purely diffusive motion in thermal equilibrium we have also

  10. Computation and Modeling of Heat Transfer in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-31

    Dissimilarity in a Turbulent Channel Flow, Mecánica Computacional , Vol. XXVI, pp. 3644-3663, Ed. by Elaskar, S.A., E.A. Pilotta, and G.A. Torres. (http...Natural Dissimilarity in a Turbulent Plane Couette Flow, In Mecánica Computacional Vol. XXVII, Ed. by A. Cardona, M. Storti, and C. Zuppa, pp.1619-1636...Past a Circular Cylinder , In Mecánica Computacional Vol. XXVII, Ed. by A. Cardona, M. Storti, and C. Zuppa, pp.249-264, 2008. http://venus.ceride.gov.ar/twiki/bin/view/AMCA/ListadoDePublicaciones). xii

  11. Properties of the kinetic energy budgets in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ang; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Available high-quality numerical simulation data are used to investigate and characterize the kinetic energy budgets for fully developed turbulent flow in pipes and channels, and in the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. The mean kinetic energy equation in these flows is empirically and analytically shown to respectively exhibit the same four-layer leading-order balance structure as the mean momentum equation. This property of the mean kinetic energy budget provides guidance on how to group terms in the more complicated turbulence and total kinetic energy budgets. Under the suggested grouping, the turbulence budget shows either a two- or three-layer structure (depending on channel or pipe versus boundary layer flow), while the total kinetic energy budget exhibits a clear four-layer structure. These layers, however, differ in position and size and exhibit variations with friction Reynolds number (δ+) that are distinct from the layer structure associated with the mean dynamics. The present analyses indicate that each of the four layers is characterized by a predominance of a reduced set of the grouped terms in the governing equation. The width of the third layer is mathematically reasoned to scale like δ+-√{δ+} at finite Reynolds numbers. In the boundary layer the upper bounds of both the second and third layers convincingly merge under this normalization, as does the width of the third layer. This normalization also seems to be valid for the width of the third layer in pipes and channels, but only for δ+>1000 . The leading-order balances in the total kinetic energy budget are shown to arise from a nontrivial interweaving of the mean and turbulence budget contributions with distance from the wall.

  12. On the transition to turbulence of wall-bounded flows in general, and plane Couette flow in particular

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The main part of this contribution to the special issue of EJM-B/Fluids dedicated to Patrick Huerre outlines the problem of the subcritical transition to turbulence in wall-bounded flows in its historical perspective with emphasis on plane Couette flow, the flow generated between counter-translating parallel planes. Subcritical here means discontinuous and direct, with strong hysteresis. This is due to the existence of nontrivial flow regimes between the global stability threshold Re_g, the upper bound for unconditional return to the base flow, and the linear instability threshold Re_c characterized by unconditional departure from the base flow. The transitional range around Re_g is first discussed from an empirical viewpoint ({\\S}1). The recent determination of Re_g for pipe flow by Avila et al. (2011) is recalled. Plane Couette flow is next examined. In laboratory conditions, its transitional range displays an oblique pattern made of alternately laminar and turbulent bands, up to a third threshold Re_t beyo...

  13. Investigation of wall-bounded turbulent flow using Dynamic mode decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Duke, Daniel; Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio, E-mail: yoshinori.mizuno@monash.edu [Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University (Australia)

    2011-12-22

    Dynamics mode decomposition (DMD) which is a method to construct a linear mapping describing the dynamics of a given time-series of any quantities is applied to the analysis of a turbulent channel flow. The flow fields are generated by direct numerical simulations for the friction Reynolds number Re{sub {tau}} = 190. The time-series of the flow fields in a short time-interval in the order of the wall-unit time-scale and in a small spatial domain that encloses a single near-wall structure are used as the inputs to DMD. In some datasets, linearly growing modes that seem to contribute to the well-known self-sustained cycle of the flow structures near the wall are detected.

  14. Structure function tensor scaling in the logarithmic region derived from the attached eddy model of wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Baidya, R.; Johnson, P.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the scaling of the velocity structure function tensor Di j(r ,z ) in high Reynolds number wall-bounded turbulent flows, within the framework provided by the Townsend attached eddy hypothesis. Here i ,j =1 ,2 ,3 denote velocity components in the three Cartesian directions, and r is a general spatial displacement vector. We consider spatial homogeneous conditions in wall-parallel planes and dependence on wall-normal distance is denoted by z . At small scales (r =|r |≪z ) where turbulence approaches local isotropy, Di j(r ,z ) can be fully characterized as a function of r and the height-dependent dissipation rate ɛ (z ) , using the classical Kolmogorov scalings. At larger distances in the logarithmic range, existing previous studies have focused mostly on the scaling of Di j for r in the streamwise direction and for the streamwise velocity component (i =j =1 ) only. No complete description is available for Di j(r ,z ) for all i ,j , and r directions. In this paper we show that the hierarchical random additive process model for turbulent fluctuations in the logarithmic range (a model based on the Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis) may be used to make new predictions on the scaling of Di j(r ,z ) for all velocity components and in all two-point displacement directions. Some of the generalized scaling relations of Di j(r ,z ) in the logarithmic region are then compared to available data. Nevertheless, a number of predictions cannot yet be tested in detail, due to a lack of simultaneous two-point measurements with arbitrary cross-plane displacements, calling for further experiments to be conducted at high Reynolds numbers.

  15. Extended self-similarity in moment-generating-functions in wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiang I A; Marusic, Ivan; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In wall-bounded turbulence, the moment generating functions (MGFs) of the streamwise velocity fluctuations $\\left$ develop power-law scaling as a function of the wall normal distance $z/\\delta$. Here $u$ is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, $+$ indicates normalization in wall units (averaged friction velocity), $z$ is the distance from the wall, $q$ is an independent variable and $\\delta$ is the boundary layer thickness. Previous work has shown that this power-law scaling exists in the log-region {\\small $3Re_\\tau^{0.5}\\lesssim z^+$, $z\\lesssim 0.15\\delta$}, where $Re_\\tau$ is the friction velocity-based Reynolds numbers. Here we present empirical evidence that this self-similar scaling can be extended, including bulk and viscosity-affected regions $30

  16. Extended self-similarity in moment-generating-functions in wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Meneveau, C.; Marusic, I.; Biferale, L.

    2016-08-01

    In wall-bounded turbulence, the moment generating functions (MGFs) of the streamwise velocity fluctuations develop power-law scaling as a function of the wall normal distance z /δ . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units (averaged friction velocity), z is the distance from the wall, q is an independent variable, and δ is the boundary layer thickness. Previous work has shown that this power-law scaling exists in the log-region 3 Reτ0.5≲z+,z ≲0.15 δ where Reτ is the friction velocity-based Reynolds number. Here we present empirical evidence that this self-similar scaling can be extended, including bulk and viscosity-affected regions 30 reference value, qo. ESS also improves the scaling properties, leading to more precise measurements of the scaling exponents. The analysis is based on hot-wire measurements from boundary layers at Reτ ranging from 2700 to 13 000 from the Melbourne High-Reynolds-Number-Turbulent-Boundary-Layer-Wind-Tunnel. Furthermore, we investigate the scalings of the filtered, large-scale velocity fluctuations uzL and of the remaining small-scale component, uzS=uz-uzL . The scaling of uzL falls within the conventionally defined log region and depends on a scale that is proportional to l+˜Reτ1/2 ; the scaling of uzS extends over a much wider range from z+≈30 to z ≈0.5 δ . Last, we present a theoretical construction of two multiplicative processes for uzL and uzS that reproduce the empirical findings concerning the scalings properties as functions of z+ and in the ESS sense.

  17. Model the nonlinear instability of wall-bounded shear flows as a rare event: a study on two-dimensional Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoliang; Yu, Haijun; Weinan, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we study the nonlinear instability of two-dimensional (2D) wall-bounded shear flows from the large deviation point of view. The main idea is to consider the Navier-Stokes equations perturbed by small noise in force and then examine the noise-induced transitions between the two coexisting stable solutions due to the subcritical bifurcation. When the amplitude of the noise goes to zero, the Freidlin-Wentzell (F-W) theory of large deviations defines the most probable transition path in the phase space, which is the minimizer of the F-W action functional and characterizes the development of the nonlinear instability subject to small random perturbations. Based on such a transition path we can define a critical Reynolds number for the nonlinear instability in the probabilistic sense. Then the action-based stability theory is applied to study the 2D Poiseuille flow in a short channel.

  18. Simulation of a Wall-Bounded Flow using a Hybrid LES/RAS Approach with Turbulence Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Mcdaniel, James; Baurle, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of a supersonic recessed-cavity flow are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/ Reynolds-averaged simulation approach utilizing an inflow turbulence recycling procedure and hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Calorically perfect air enters the three-dimensional domain at a free stream Mach number of 2.92. Simulations are performed to assess grid sensitivity of the solution, efficacy of the turbulence recycling, and effect of the shock sensor used with the hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Analysis of the turbulent boundary layer upstream of the rearward-facing step for each case indicates excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Mean velocity and pressure results are compared to Reynolds-averaged simulations and experimental data for each case, and these comparisons indicate good agreement on the finest grid. Simulations are repeated on a coarsened grid, and results indicate strong grid density sensitivity. The effect of turbulence recycling on the solution is illustrated by performing coarse grid simulations with and without inflow turbulence recycling. Two shock sensors, one of Ducros and one of Larsson, are assessed for use with the hybridized inviscid flux reconstruction scheme.

  19. Large-eddy simulation study of the logarithmic law for second and higher-order moments in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The logarithmic law for the mean velocity in turbulent boundary layers has long provided a valuable and robust reference for comparison with theories, models, and large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulence. More recently, analysis of high-Reynolds number experimental boundary layer data has shown that also the variance and higher-order moments of the streamwise velocity fluctuations $u^\\prime$ display logarithmic laws. Such experimental observations motivate the question whether LES can accurately reproduce the variance and the higher-order moments, in particular their logarithmic dependency on distance to the wall. In this study we perform LES of very high Reynolds number wall-modeled channel flow and focus on profiles of variance and higher-order moments of streamwise velocity fluctuations. In agreement with the experimental data, we observe an approximately logarithmic law for the variance in the LES, with a `Townsend-Perry' constant of $A_1\\approx 1.25$. The LES also yields approximate logari...

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation and Large Eddy Simulation on a Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flow Using Lattice Boltzmann Method and Multiple GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation (DNS and large eddy simulation (LES were performed on the wall-bounded flow at Reτ=180 using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and multiple GPUs (Graphic Processing Units. In the DNS, 8 K20M GPUs were adopted. The maximum number of meshes is 6.7×107, which results in the nondimensional mesh size of Δ+=1.41 for the whole solution domain. It took 24 hours for GPU-LBM solver to simulate 3×106 LBM steps. The aspect ratio of resolution domain was tested to obtain accurate results for DNS. As a result, both the mean velocity and turbulent variables, such as Reynolds stress and velocity fluctuations, perfectly agree with the results of Kim et al. (1987 when the aspect ratios in streamwise and spanwise directions are 8 and 2, respectively. As for the LES, the local grid refinement technique was tested and then used. Using 1.76×106 grids and Smagorinsky constant (Cs=0.13, good results were obtained. The ability and validity of LBM on simulating turbulent flow were verified.

  1. Revisiting the quest for a universal log-law and the role of pressure gradient in "canonical" wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.

    2017-09-01

    The trinity of so-called "canonical" wall-bounded turbulent flows, comprising the zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer, abbreviated ZPG TBL, turbulent pipe flow, and channel/duct flows has continued to receive intense attention as new and more reliable experimental data have become available. Nevertheless, the debate on whether the logarithmic part of the mean velocity profile, in particular the Kármán constant κ , is identical for these three canonical flows or flow-dependent is still ongoing. In this paper, the asymptotic matching requirement of equal κ in the logarithmic overlap layer, which links the inner and outer flow regions, and in the expression for the centerline/free-stream velocity is reiterated and shown to preclude a universal logarithmic overlap layer in the three canonical flows. However, the majority of pipe and channel flow studies at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ below ≈104 extract from near-wall profiles the same κ of 0.38-0.39 as in the ZPG TBL. This apparent contradiction is resolved by a careful reanalysis of high-quality mean velocity profiles in the Princeton "Superpipe" and other pipes, channels, and ducts, which shows that the mean velocity in a near-wall region extending to around 700 "+" units in channels and ducts and 500 "+" units in pipes is the same as in the ZPG TBL. In other words, all the "canonical" flow profiles contain the lower end of the ZPG TBL log-region, which starts at a wall distance of 150 -200 "+" units with a universal κ of κZPG≈0.384 . This interior log-region is followed by a second logarithmic region with a flow specific κ >κZPG , which increases monotonically with pressure gradient. This second, exterior log-layer is the actual overlap layer matching up to the outer expansion, which implies equality of the exterior κ and κCL obtained from the evolution of the respective centerline velocity with Reynolds number. The location of the switch-over point implies furthermore that this second

  2. On the origin of streaks in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Fabian; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    The paper substantiates the notion that selective amplification and direct resonance, based on linear theory, does not provide a selection mechanism for the well-defined streak spacing of about 100 wall units observed in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows. For the direct resonance theory, it is shown that the streaks are created by the nonlinear self-interaction of the vertical velocity rather than that of the directly forced vertical vorticity. It is proposed that the selection mechanism must be inherently nonlinear and correspond to a self-sustaining process. For the case of plane Poiseuille flow the 100-wall-unit criterion corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of 1250, based on the centerline velocity and the channel half-width, which is close to the usually quoted value of about 1000. In plane Couette flow, it corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of 625, based on the half-velocity difference and the half-width.

  3. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  4. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall-bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows share the same phase-space dynamics.

  5. Prediction of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent shear layers in turbomachines are compared with the turbulent boundary layers on airfoils. Seven different aspects are examined. The limits of boundary layer theory are investigated. Boundary layer prediction methods are applied to analysis of the flow in turbomachines.

  6. Shear turbulence, Langmuir circulation and scalar transfer at an air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsi, Amine; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    DNS of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air-flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s generates gravity-capillary waves and small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir circulation (LC) beneath the interface. In addition to LC, the waterside turbulence is characterized by shear turbulence with structures similar to classical "wall streaks" in wall-bounded flow. These streaks, denoted here as "shear streaks", consist of downwind-elongated vortices alternating in sign in the crosswind direction. The presence of interfacial waves causes interaction between these vortices giving rise to bigger vortices, namely LC. LES with momentum equation augmented with the Craik-Leibovich (C-L) vortex force is used to understand the roles of the shear streaks (i.e. the shear turbulence) and the LC in determining scalar flux from the airside to the waterside and vertical scalar transport beneath. The C-L force consists of the cross product between the Stokes drift velocity (induced by the interface waves) and the flow vorticity. It is observed that Stokes drift shear intensifies the shear streaks (with respect to flow without wave effects) leading to enhanced scalar flux at the air-water interface. LC leads to increased vertical scalar transport at depths below the interface.

  7. Shear and Turbulence Effects on Lidar Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael; Sathe, Ameya; Gayle Nygaard, Nicolai

    Wind lidars are now used extensively for wind resource measurements. It is known that lidar wind speed measure-ments are affected by both turbulence and wind shear. This report explains the mechanisms behind these sensitivities. For turbulence, it is found that errors in the scalar mean speed...... are usually only small. However, particularly in re-spect of a lidar calibration procedure, turbulence induced errors in the cup anemometer speed are seen to be signifi-cantly larger. Wind shear is shown to induce measurement errors both due to possible imperfections in the lidar sensing height and due...... to the averaging of a non-linear speed profile. Both effects in combination have to be included when modelling the lidar error. Attempts to evaluate the lidar error from ex-perimental data have not been successful probably due to a lack of detailed knowledge of both the wind shear and the actual lidar sensing...

  8. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smits, Alexander J

    2006-01-01

    A good understanding of turbulent compressible flows is essential to the design and operation of high-speed vehicles. Such flows occur, for example, in the external flow over the surfaces of supersonic aircraft, and in the internal flow through the engines. Our ability to predict the aerodynamic lift, drag, propulsion and maneuverability of high-speed vehicles is crucially dependent on our knowledge of turbulent shear layers, and our understanding of their behavior in the presence of shock waves and regions of changing pressure. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, and helps provide a basis for future work in this area. Wherever possible we use the available experimental work, and the results from numerical simulations to illustrate and develop a physical understanding of turbulent compressible flows.

  9. Oblique Laminar-Turbulent Interfaces in Plane Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Yohann; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Localized structures such as turbulent stripes and turbulent spots are typical features of transitional wall-bounded flows in the subcritical regime. Based on an assumption for scale separation between large and small scales, we show analytically that the corresponding laminar-turbulent interfaces are always oblique with respect to the mean direction of the flow. In the case of plane Couette flow, the mismatch between the streamwise flow rates near the boundaries of the turbulence patch generates a large-scale flow with a nonzero spanwise component. Advection of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations (streaks) by the corresponding large-scale flow distorts the shape of the turbulence patch and is responsible for its oblique growth. This mechanism can be easily extended to other subcritical flows such as plane Poiseuille flow or Taylor-Couette flow.

  10. Equilibrium states of homogeneous sheared compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, M.; Lili, T.

    2011-06-01

    Equilibrium states of homogeneous compressible turbulence subjected to rapid shear is studied using rapid distortion theory (RDT). The purpose of this study is to determine the numerical solutions of unsteady linearized equations governing double correlations spectra evolution. In this work, RDT code developed by authors solves these equations for compressible homogeneous shear flows. Numerical integration of these equations is carried out using a second-order simple and accurate scheme. The two Mach numbers relevant to homogeneous shear flow are the turbulent Mach number Mt, given by the root mean square turbulent velocity fluctuations divided by the speed of sound, and the gradient Mach number Mg which is the mean shear rate times the transverse integral scale of the turbulence divided by the speed of sound. Validation of this code is performed by comparing RDT results with direct numerical simulation (DNS) of [A. Simone, G.N. Coleman, and C. Cambon, Fluid Mech. 330, 307 (1997)] and [S. Sarkar, J. Fluid Mech. 282, 163 (1995)] for various values of initial gradient Mach number Mg0. It was found that RDT is valid for small values of the non-dimensional times St (St 10) in particular for large values of Mg0. This essential feature justifies the resort to RDT in order to determine equilibrium states in the compressible regime.

  11. Equilibrium states of homogeneous sheared compressible turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riahi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium states of homogeneous compressible turbulence subjected to rapid shear is studied using rapid distortion theory (RDT. The purpose of this study is to determine the numerical solutions of unsteady linearized equations governing double correlations spectra evolution. In this work, RDT code developed by authors solves these equations for compressible homogeneous shear flows. Numerical integration of these equations is carried out using a second-order simple and accurate scheme. The two Mach numbers relevant to homogeneous shear flow are the turbulent Mach number Mt, given by the root mean square turbulent velocity fluctuations divided by the speed of sound, and the gradient Mach number Mg which is the mean shear rate times the transverse integral scale of the turbulence divided by the speed of sound. Validation of this code is performed by comparing RDT results with direct numerical simulation (DNS of [A. Simone, G.N. Coleman, and C. Cambon, Fluid Mech. 330, 307 (1997] and [S. Sarkar, J. Fluid Mech. 282, 163 (1995] for various values of initial gradient Mach number Mg0. It was found that RDT is valid for small values of the non-dimensional times St (St 10 in particular for large values of Mg0. This essential feature justifies the resort to RDT in order to determine equilibrium states in the compressible regime.

  12. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport.

  13. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent shear flow between parallel porous walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐政; 刘难生; 董宇红

    2014-01-01

    The effects of two parallel porous walls are investigated, consisting of the Darcy number and the porosity of a porous medium, on the behavior of turbulent shear flows as well as skin-friction drag. The turbulent channel flow with a porous surface is directly simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The Darcy-Brinkman-Forcheimer (DBF) acting force term is added in the lattice Boltzmann equation to simu-late the turbulent flow bounded by porous walls. It is found that there are two opposite trends (enhancement or reduction) for the porous medium to modify the intensities of the velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds stresses in the near wall region. The parametric study shows that flow modification depends on the Darcy number and the porosity of the porous medium. The results show that, with respect to the conventional impermeable wall, the degree of turbulence modification does not depend on any simple set of param-eters obviously. Moreover, the drag in porous wall-bounded turbulent flow decreases if the Darcy number is smaller than the order of O(10−4) and the porosity of porous walls is up to 0.4.

  15. 壁面湍流流动中高分子减阻等效粘度模型的验证%Validation of Effective Viscosity Model for Polymer Drag Reduction in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞; 李昌烽; 吴桂芬; 胡自成; 王迎慧

    2011-01-01

    In recent studies of drag reduction in wall turbulence it was proposed that the streching polymer produces a self-consistent effective viscosity that increases with the distance from the wall. This linear effective viscosity theory for drag reduction in the wall-bounded turbulent flow was examined by introducing such linear viscosity profile to Navier-Stokes equation, and computing with Reynolds stress model. It shows that the linear effective viscosity model demonstrates drag reducing properties, and the percentage of the drag reduction increases up to the drag reduction saturation with the slope of viscosity profile increasing. The level of drag reduction up to about 75% , approaching the maximum drag reduction extent was obtained. The turbulence important characteristics including mean velocity profile, root-mean-square velocity fluctuations, Reynolds stress and viscous stress profiles are in agreement with the direct numerical simulation results and experimental data. It is universal and reasonable in some content for the linear viscosity profile model to explain drag reduction mechanism.%近来在壁面湍流高分子减阻研究中,一种拉伸的高分子产生自相一致的等效粘度的理论提了出来,这个等效粘度随离开壁面的距离而增长。本文将此线性分布等效粘度置入Navier-Stokes方程,运用雷诺应力模型计算在壁面湍流中的减阻情况,检验这种等效粘度的可行性。可以发现,此模型可以得到湍流减阻的效果,所得到的减阻率随着等效粘度线性分布斜率的增加增大到一个饱和值。本文得到了接近最大减阻极限的减阻率(75%)。且由此模型计算得到的减阻湍流特征值包括平均速度分布、速度脉动均方根、雷诺应力及粘性应力分布都与实验数据和直接数值模拟结果相符。该线性分布等效粘度减阻模型大致上把握了高分子湍流减阻特性,给出了在一定程度上对湍流减阻机理普适和合理的解释。

  16. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  17. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number, similar to results on relaminarisation of localised turbulence in pipe and plane Couette flow. Results from simulations subjecting the observed large-scale flow to random perturbations of variable amplitude demonstrate that it is a linearly stable simple exact solution that can be destabilised by a finite-amplitude perturbation, like the Hagen-Poiseuille profile in pipe flow. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  18. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  19. Inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolai, Claudia; Jacob, Boris [CNR-INSEAN, via di Vallerano 139, 00128 Rome (Italy); Gualtieri, Paolo; Piva, Renzo, E-mail: claudia.nicolai@uniroma1.it [DMA, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-22

    The characteristics of inertial particles distribution in a uniformly sheared turbulent flow are investigated, with the aim of quantifying the effects associated with the large-scale anisotropy induced by the mean velocity gradient. The focus of the analysis is on clustering aspects, and in particular on the dependence of the radial distribution function on both the directionality and the magnitude of the observation scale. We discuss experimental data measured in a homogeneous shear flow seeded with particles of size comparable with the Kolmogorov length scale and Stokes number St Almost-Equal-To 0.3, and discuss their distribution properties in comparison with results provided by related one-way coupled direct numerical simulations which make use of the point-force approximation.

  20. Modification of premixed combustion in shear layers by grid turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Kejin; WANG Yue; ZHANG Zhedian; NIE Chaoqun

    2007-01-01

    The influence of grid turbulence on the shear layer of a jet and the premixed flames embedded in it was investigated in the present study. The velocity field of the jet was measured by using hot-wire anemometry. It was found that grid turbulence reduced turbulence intensities in the shear layer and suppressed low frcquency fluctuation. Moreover, the energy contained in small-scale fluctuation was increased and turbulence became homogeneous. The results indicate that grid turbulence inhibits the formation of a large-scale coherent structure in the shear layer. Flame temperature was measured by using a compensated free-wire thermocouple. It was found that grid turbulence reduced low frequency fluctuation of thc flame fronts, increased the small-scale wrinkles and elevated the mean temperature of the flame zone. The results show that grid turbulence can enhance and stabilize premixed flames in shear flow.

  1. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  2. On the origin of the streak spacing in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the ideas of selective amplification and direct resonance, based on linear theory, can not provide an explanation for the well-defined streak spacing of about 100 wall units (referred to as 100(+) hereafter) in wall-bounded turbulent shear flows. In addition, for the direct resonance theory, the streaks are created by the non-linear self-interaction of the vertical velocity rather than of the directly forced vertical vorticity. In view of the failure of these approaches, it is then proposed that the selection mechanism must be inherently non-linear and correspond to a self-sustaining mechanism. The 100(+) value should thus be considered as a critical Reynolds number for that mechanism. Indeed, in the case of Poiseuille flow, this 100(+) criterion for transition to turbulence corresponds to the usually quoted value of 1000 based on the half-width and the centerline velocity. In Couette flow, it corresponds to a critical Reynolds number of about 400 based on the half width and half velocity difference.

  3. Shear-layer structures in near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A. V.; Alfredsson, P. H.; Kim, J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of internal shear layer observed in the near-wall region of turbulent flows is investigated by analyzing flow fields obtained from numerical simulations of channel and boundary-layer flows. It is found that the shear layer is an important contributor to the turbulence production. The conditionally averaged production at the center of the structure was almost twice as large as the long-time mean value. The shear-layer structure is also found to retain its coherence over streamwise distances on the order of a thousand viscous length units, and propagates with a constant velocity of about 10.6 u sub rho throughout the near wall region.

  4. Towards a model of large scale dynamics in transitional wall-bounded flows

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A system of simplified equations is proposed to govern the feedback interactions of large-scale flows present in laminar-turbulent patterns of transitional wall-bounded flows, with small-scale Reynolds stresses generated by the self-sustainment process of turbulence itself modeled using an extension of Waleffe's approach (Phys. Fluids 9 (1997) 883-900), the detailed expression of which is displayed as an annex to the main text.

  5. Interaction of monopoles, dipoles, and turbulence with a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Rosas Fernandes, V. H.; Kamp, L. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been conducted to examine the evolution of eddies in the presence of large-scale shear flows. The numerical experiments consist of initial-value-problems in which monopolar and dipolar vortices as well as driven turbulence are superposed on a plane Couette or Poiseuille flow in a periodic two-dimensional channel. The evolution of the flow has been examined for different shear rates of the background flow and different widths of the channel. Results found for retro-grade and pro-grade monopolar vortices are consistent with those found in the literature. Boundary layer vorticity, however, can significantly modify the straining and erosion of monopolar vortices normally seen for unbounded domains. Dipolar vortices are shown to be much more robust coherent structures in a large-scale shear flow than monopolar eddies. An analytical model for their trajectories, which are determined by self-advection and advection and rotation by the shear flow, is presented. Turbulent kinetic energy is effectively suppressed by the shearing action of the background flow provided that the shear is linear (Couette flow) and of sufficient strength. Nonlinear shear as present in the Poiseuille flow seems to even increase the turbulence strength especially for high shear rates.

  6. Shear Viscosity of Turbulent Chiral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Das, Amita; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the difference between the chemical potentials of left-handed and right-handed particles in a parity violating (chiral) plasma can lead to an instability. We show that the chiral instability may drive turbulent transport. Further we estimate the anomalous viscosity of chiral plasma arising from the enhanced collisionality due to turbulence.

  7. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark A. [University of New Mexico

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  8. On the Nature of Magnetic Turbulence in Rotating, Shearing Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to $k^{-2}$, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence $k^{-3/2}$. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states -- their intensity $v_0$ and their outer scale $\\lambda_0$ satisfy the balance condition $v_0/\\lambda_0\\sim \\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\ln r$, where $\\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\l...

  9. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Larsen, Torben J.;

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case of ...... may get from a LIDAR mounted on the nacelle of the turbine (measuring upwind) and we investigated different ways of deriving an equivalent wind speed from such measurements....

  10. Particle spin in a turbulent shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.; Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    The translational and rotational motions of small spherical particles dilutely suspended in a turbulent channel flow have been investigated. Three different particle classes were studied in an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework to examine the effect of the response times on the particle statistics. The r

  11. Structure of the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumir, Alain

    2017-07-01

    The expected universality of small-scale properties of turbulent flows implies isotropic properties of the velocity gradient tensor in the very large Reynolds number limit. Using direct numerical simulations, we determine the tensors formed by n =2 and 3 velocity gradients at a single point in turbulent homogeneous shear flows and in the log-layer of a turbulent channel flow, and we characterize the departure of these tensors from the corresponding isotropic prediction. Specifically, we separate the even components of the tensors, invariant under reflexion with respect to all axes, from the odd ones, which identically vanish in the absence of shear. Our results indicate that the largest deviation from isotropy comes from the odd component of the third velocity gradient correlation function, especially from the third moment of the derivative along the normal direction of the streamwise velocity component. At the Reynolds numbers considered (Reλ≈140 ), we observe that these second- and third-order correlation functions are significantly larger in turbulent channel flows than in homogeneous shear flow. Overall, our work demonstrates that a mean shear leads to relatively simple structure of the velocity gradient tensor. How isotropy is restored in the very large Reynolds limit remains to be understood.

  12. Physics of Transitional Shear Flows Instability and Laminar–Turbulent Transition in Incompressible Near-Wall Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boiko, Andrey V; Grek, Genrih R; Kozlov, Victor V

    2012-01-01

    Starting from fundamentals of classical stability theory, an overview is given of the transition phenomena in subsonic, wall-bounded shear flows. At first, the consideration focuses on elementary small-amplitude velocity perturbations of laminar shear layers, i.e. instability waves, in the simplest canonical configurations of a plane channel flow and a flat-plate boundary layer. Then the linear stability problem is expanded to include the effects of pressure gradients, flow curvature, boundary-layer separation, wall compliance, etc. related to applications. Beyond the amplification of instability waves is the non-modal growth of local stationary and non-stationary shear flow perturbations which are discussed as well. The volume continues with the key aspect of the transition process, that is, receptivity of convectively unstable shear layers to external perturbations, summarizing main paths of the excitation of laminar flow disturbances. The remainder of the book addresses the instability phenomena found at l...

  13. On the Structure Orientation in Rotating and Sheared Homogeneous Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Joylene C.; Moreau, Adam F.; Jacobitz, Frank G.

    2016-11-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of rotation on the orientation of structures and the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy in homogeneous sheared turbulence. Shear flows without rotation, with moderate rotation, and with strong rotation are considered and the rotation axis is either parallel or anti-parallel to the mean flow vorticity. In the case of moderate rotation, an anti-parallel configuration increases the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, while a parallel configuration decreases the growth rate as compared to the flow without rotation. The orientation of turbulent structures present in the flows are characterized using the three-dimensional, two-point autocorrelation coefficient of velocity magnitude and vorticity magnitude. An ellipsoid is fitted to the surface defined by a constant autocorrelation coefficient value and the major and minor axes are used to determine the inclination angle of flow structures in the plane of shear. It was found that the inclination angle assumes a maximum value for the anti-parallel configuration with moderate rotation. Again, the inclination angle for the parallel configuration with moderate rotation is reduced as compared to the case without rotation. The smallest inclination angles are found for the strongly rotating cases. Hence, the inclination angle is directly related to the growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy. University of San Diego Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering and McNair Scholars.

  14. Feedback Control of Turbulent Shear Flows by Genetic Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Duriez, Thomas; von Krbek, Kai; Bonnet, Jean-Paul; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Gautier, Nicolas; Aider, Jean-Luc; Raibaudo, Cedric; Cuvier, Christophe; Stanislas, Michel; Debien, Antoine; Mazellier, Nicolas; Kourta, Azeddine; Brunton, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent shear flows have triggered fundamental research in nonlinear dynamics, like transition scenarios, pattern formation and dynamical modeling. In particular, the control of nonlinear dynamics is subject of research since decades. In this publication, actuated turbulent shear flows serve as test-bed for a nonlinear feedback control strategy which can optimize an arbitrary cost function in an automatic self-learning manner. This is facilitated by genetic programming providing an analytically treatable control law. Unlike control based on PID laws or neural networks, no structure of the control law needs to be specified in advance. The strategy is first applied to low-dimensional dynamical systems featuring aspects of turbulence and for which linear control methods fail. This includes stabilizing an unstable fixed point of a nonlinearly coupled oscillator model and maximizing mixing, i.e.\\ the Lyapunov exponent, for forced Lorenz equations. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of genetic p...

  15. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of α effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of α, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  16. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  17. The wall shear rate in non-Newtonian turbulent pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, K T

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating the wall shear rate in pipe turbulent flow. It collapses adequately the data measured in laminar flow and turbulent flow into a single flow curve and gives the basis for the design of turbulent flow viscometers. Key words: non-Newtonian, wall shear rate, turbulent, rheometer

  18. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  19. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  20. Studies of compressible shear flows and turbulent drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-04-01

    Compressible shear flows and drag reduction were examined and three methods are addressed: (1) the analytical and numerical aspects of conformal mapping were summarized and a new method for computation of these maps is presented; (2) the computer code SPECFD for solution of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow on the CYBER 203 computer is described; (3) results of two equation turbulence modeling of turbulent flow over wavy walls are presented. A modified Jones-Launder model is used in two dimensional spectral code for flow in general wavy geometries.

  1. Contaminant dispersal in bounded turbulent shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.M.; Bernard, P.S.; Chiang, K.F.; Ong, L. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The dispersion of smoke downstream of a line source at the wall and at y{sup +} = 30 in a turbulent boundary layer has been predicted with a non-local model of the scalar fluxes {bar u}c and {bar v}c. The predicted plume from the wall source has been compared to high Schmidt number experimental measurements using a combination of hot-wire anemometry to obtain velocity component data synchronously with concentration data obtained optically. The predicted plumes from the source at y{sup +} = 30 and at the wall also have been compared to a low Schmidt number direct numerical simulation. Near the source, the non-local flux models give considerably better predictions than models which account solely for mean gradient transport. At a sufficient distance downstream the gradient models gives reasonably good predictions.

  2. Wind shear and turbulence on Titan: Huygens analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2017-10-01

    Wind shear measured by Doppler tracking of the Huygens probe is evaluated, and found to be within the range anticipated by pre-flight assessments (namely less than two times the Brunt-Väisälä frequency). The strongest large-scale shear encountered was ∼5 m/s/km, a level associated with 'Light' turbulence in terrestrial aviation. Near-surface winds (below 4 km) have small-scale fluctuations of ∼0.1 m/s on 1 s timescales, indicated both by probe tilt and Doppler tracking, and the characteristics of the fluctuation, of interest for future missions to Titan, can be reproduced with a simple autoregressive (AR(1)) model. The turbulent dissipation rate at an altitude of ∼500 m is found to be ∼0.2 cm2/s3, which may be a useful benchmark for atmospheric circulation models.

  3. Imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence modified by velocity shear in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2016-01-01

    We study incompressible imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of background velocity shears. Using scaling arguments, we show that the turbulent cascade is significantly accelerated when the background velocity shear is stronger than the velocity shears in the subdominant Alfv% \\'{e}n waves at the injection scale. The spectral transport is then controlled by the background shear rather than the turbulent shears and the Tchen spectrum with spectral index $-1$ is formed. This spectrum extends from the injection scale to the scale of the spectral break where the subdominant wave shear becomes equal to the background shear. The estimated spectral breaks and power spectra are in good agreement with those observed in the fast solar wind. The proposed mechanism can contribute to enhanced turbulent cascades and modified $-1$ spectra observed in the fast solar wind with strong velocity shears. This mechanism can also operate in many other astrophysical environments where turbulence develops on top ...

  4. Imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence modified by velocity shear in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Voitenko, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study incompressible imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of background velocity shears. Using scaling arguments, we show that the turbulent cascade is significantly accelerated when the background velocity shear is stronger than the velocity shears in the subdominant Alfvén waves at the injection scale. The spectral transport is then controlled by the background shear rather than the turbulent shears and the Tchen spectrum with spectral index -1 is formed. This spectrum extends from the injection scale to the scale of the spectral break where the subdominant wave shear becomes equal to the background shear. The estimated spectral breaks and power spectra are in good agreement with those observed in the fast solar wind. The proposed mechanism can contribute to enhanced turbulent cascades and modified -1 spectra observed in the fast solar wind with strong velocity shears. This mechanism can also operate in many other astrophysical environments where turbulence develops on top of non-uniform plasma flows.

  5. An improved turbulence model for rotating shear flows*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yasutaka; Hattori, Hirofumi

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we construct a turbulence model based on a low-Reynolds-number non-linear k e model for turbulent flows in a rotating channel. Two-equation models, in particular the non-linear k e model, are very effective for solving various flow problems encountered in technological applications. In channel flows with rotation, however, the explicit effects of rotation only appear in the Reynolds stress components. The exact equations for k and e do not have any explicit terms concerned with the rotation effects. Moreover, the Coriolis force vanishes in the momentum equation for a fully developed channel flow with spanwise rotation. Consequently, in order to predict rotating channel flows, after proper revision the Reynolds stress equation model or the non-linear eddy viscosity model should be used. In this study, we improve the non-linear k e model so as to predict rotating channel flows. In the modelling, the wall-limiting behaviour of turbulence is also considered. First, we evaluated the non-linear k e model using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) database for a fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. Next, we assessed the non-linear k e model at various rotation numbers. Finally, on the basis of these assessments, we reconstruct the non-linear k e model to calculate rotating shear flows, and the proposed model is tested on various rotation number channel flows. The agreement with DNS and experiment data is quite satisfactory.

  6. Second Order Model for Strongly Sheared Compressible Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzougui hamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a model designed to describe a strongly sheared compressible homogeneous turbulent flows. Such flows are far from equilibrium and are well represented by the A3 and A4 cases of the DNS of Sarkar. Speziale and Xu developed a relaxation model in incompressible turbulence able to take into account significant departures from equilibrium. In a previous paper, Radhia et al. proposed a relaxation model similar to that of Speziale and Xu .This model is based on an algebraic representation of the Reynolds stress tensor, much simpler than that of Speziale and Xu and it gave a good result for rapid axisymetric contraction. In this work, we propose to extend the Radhia et al’s. model to compressible homogenous turbulence. This model is based on the pressure-strain model of Launder et al., where we incorporate turbulent Mach number in order to take into account compressibility effects. To assess this model, two numerical simulations were performed which are similar to the cases A3 and A4 of the DNS of Sarkar.

  7. Renormalization group analysis of anisotropic diffusion in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Barton, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    The renormalization group is applied to compute anisotropic corrections to the scalar eddy diffusivity representation of turbulent diffusion of a passive scalar. The corrections are linear in the mean velocity gradients. All model constants are computed theoretically. A form of the theory valid at arbitrary Reynolds number is derived. The theory applies only when convection of the velocity-scalar correlation can be neglected. A ratio of diffusivity components, found experimentally to have a nearly constant value in a variety of shear flows, is computed theoretically for flows in a certain state of equilibrium. The theoretical value is well within the fairly narrow range of experimentally observed values. Theoretical predictions of this diffusivity ratio are also compared with data from experiments and direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and scalar gradients.

  8. Fractally Fourier decimated homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathali, Mani; Khoei, Saber

    2017-02-01

    Time evolution of the fully resolved incompressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger Fourier dimensions is numerically investigated. The Fourier dimension of the flow field is extended from the integer value 3 to the noninteger values by projecting the Navier-Stokes equation on the fractal set of the active Fourier modes with dimensions 2.7 ≤d ≤3.0 . The results of this study revealed that the dynamics of both large and small scale structures are nontrivially influenced by changing the Fourier dimension d . While both turbulent production and dissipation are significantly hampered as d decreases, the evolution of their ratio is almost independent of the Fourier dimension. The mechanism of the energy distribution among different spatial directions is also impeded by decreasing d . Due to this deficient energy distribution, turbulent field shows a higher level of the large-scale anisotropy in lower Fourier dimensions. In addition, the persistence of the vortex stretching mechanism and the forward spectral energy transfer, which are three-dimensional turbulence characteristics, are examined at changing d , from the standard case d =3.0 to the strongly decimated flow field for d =2.7 . As the Fourier dimension decreases, these forward energy transfer mechanisms are strongly suppressed, which in turn reduces both the small-scale intermittency and the deviation from Gaussianity. Besides the energy exchange intensity, the variations of d considerably modify the relative weights of local to nonlocal triadic interactions. It is found that the contribution of the nonlocal triads to the total turbulent kinetic energy exchange increases as the Fourier dimension increases.

  9. Fractally Fourier decimated homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathali, Mani; Khoei, Saber

    2017-02-01

    Time evolution of the fully resolved incompressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow in noninteger Fourier dimensions is numerically investigated. The Fourier dimension of the flow field is extended from the integer value 3 to the noninteger values by projecting the Navier-Stokes equation on the fractal set of the active Fourier modes with dimensions 2.7≤d≤3.0. The results of this study revealed that the dynamics of both large and small scale structures are nontrivially influenced by changing the Fourier dimension d. While both turbulent production and dissipation are significantly hampered as d decreases, the evolution of their ratio is almost independent of the Fourier dimension. The mechanism of the energy distribution among different spatial directions is also impeded by decreasing d. Due to this deficient energy distribution, turbulent field shows a higher level of the large-scale anisotropy in lower Fourier dimensions. In addition, the persistence of the vortex stretching mechanism and the forward spectral energy transfer, which are three-dimensional turbulence characteristics, are examined at changing d, from the standard case d=3.0 to the strongly decimated flow field for d=2.7. As the Fourier dimension decreases, these forward energy transfer mechanisms are strongly suppressed, which in turn reduces both the small-scale intermittency and the deviation from Gaussianity. Besides the energy exchange intensity, the variations of d considerably modify the relative weights of local to nonlocal triadic interactions. It is found that the contribution of the nonlocal triads to the total turbulent kinetic energy exchange increases as the Fourier dimension increases.

  10. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  11. Large-scale instability in a sheared nonhelical turbulence: Formation of vortical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, Tov; Golubev, Ilia; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2007-12-01

    We study a large-scale instability in a sheared nonhelical turbulence that causes generation of large-scale vorticity. Three types of the background large-scale flows are considered, i.e., the Couette and Poiseuille flows in a small-scale homogeneous turbulence, and the "log-linear" velocity shear in an inhomogeneous turbulence. It is known that laminar plane Couette flow and antisymmetric mode of laminar plane Poiseuille flow are stable with respect to small perturbations for any Reynolds numbers. We demonstrate that in a small-scale turbulence under certain conditions the large-scale Couette and Poiseuille flows are unstable due to the large-scale instability. This instability causes formation of large-scale vortical structures stretched along the mean sheared velocity. The growth rate of the large-scale instability for the "log-linear" velocity shear is much larger than that for the Couette and Poiseuille background flows. We have found a turbulent analogue of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves in a small-scale sheared turbulence. A mechanism of excitation of turbulent Tollmien-Schlichting waves is associated with a combined effect of the turbulent Reynolds stress-induced generation of perturbations of the mean vorticity and the background sheared motions. These waves can be excited even in a plane Couette flow imposed on a small-scale turbulence when perturbations of mean velocity depend on three spatial coordinates. The energy of these waves is supplied by the small-scale sheared turbulence.

  12. Numerical studies of dynamo action in a turbulent shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K

    2013-01-01

    We perform numerical experiments to study the shear dynamo problem where we look for the growth of large-scale magnetic field due to non-helical stirring at small scales in a background linear shear flow, in previously unexplored parameter regimes. We demonstrate the large-scale dynamo action in the limit when the fluid Reynolds number (Re) is below unity whereas the magnetic Reynolds number (Rem) is above unity; the exponential growth rate scales linearly with shear, which is consistent with earlier numerical works. The limit of low Re is particularly interesting, as seeing the dynamo action in this limit would provide enough motivation for further theoretical investigations, which may focus the attention to this analytically more tractable limit of Re 1. We also perform simulations in the limits when, (i) both (Re, Rem) 1 & Rem < 1, and compute all components of the turbulent transport coefficients (\\alpha_{ij} and \\eta_{ij}) using the test-field method. A reasonably good agreement is seen between ...

  13. Dynamical-systems approach to localised turbulence in pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Paul; Avila, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent-laminar patterns are ubiquitous near transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Despite recent progress in describing their dynamics in analogy to nonequilibrium phase transitions, there is no theory explaining their emergence. Dynamical-system approaches suggest that invariant solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, such as traveling waves and relative periodic orbits in pipe flow, act as building blocks of the disordered dynamics. While recent studies have shown how transient chaos arises from such solutions, the ensuing dynamics lacks the strong fluctuations in size, shape and speed of the turbulent spots observed in experiments. We here show that chaotic spots with distinct dynamical and kinematic properties merge in phase space and give rise to the enhanced spatiotemporal patterns observed in pipe flow. This paves the way for a dynamical-system foundation to the phenomenogloy of turbulent-laminar patterns in wall-bounded extended shear flows.

  14. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2015-May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear...1 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Clearance # X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane -Oxygen Shear

  15. Aeroelastic large eddy simulations using vortex methods: unfrozen turbulent and sheared inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Papadakis, G.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    Vortex particles methods are applied to the aeroelastic simulation of a wind turbine in sheared and turbulent inflow. The possibility to perform large-eddy simulations of turbulence with the effect of the shear vorticity is demonstrated for the first time in vortex methods simulations. Most vorte...

  16. Investigation of particle-laden turbulent flow in free shear turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Ellzey, J.; Daily, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit numerical mixed phase simulations are described which couple random gasdynamic motions to inertiallly interactive gas borne particles. Theses simulations are numerical experiments intended to provide data for investigating the interaction between a developing turbulent free shear layer and gas borne solid particles it entrains. The simulations predict most probable distributions of dispersed phase trajectories, standard deviations, and gas phase mixing dynamics which include the concomitant back-influences of the particle phase on the carrier gas flow. Data for refinement of the computational scheme and physical verification are provided by experiment. The experimental evidence is developed in a splitter plate divided, two-channel free shear mixing combustion tube. A variety of particle concentrations and particle size distributions are admitted into non-combusting or combusting flows with selected heat release levels. The computations, in turn, provide guidance on design and selection of new experiments.

  17. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  18. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  19. Temporal slow-growth formulation for direct numerical simulation of compressible wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Victor; Oliver, Todd A.; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert D.

    2017-08-01

    A slow-growth formulation for DNS of wall-bounded turbulent flow is developed and demonstrated to enable extension of slow-growth modeling concepts to wall-bounded flows with complex physics. As in previous slow-growth approaches, the formulation assumes scale separation between the fast scales of turbulence and the slow evolution of statistics such as the mean flow. This separation enables the development of approaches where the fast scales of turbulence are directly simulated while the forcing provided by the slow evolution is modeled. The resulting model admits periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise direction, which avoids the need for extremely long domains and complex inflow conditions that typically accompany spatially developing simulations. Further, it enables the use of efficient Fourier numerics. Unlike previous approaches [Guarini, Moser, Shariff, and Wray, J. Fluid Mech. 414, 1 (2000), 10.1017/S0022112000008466; Maeder, Adams, and Kleiser, J. Fluid Mech. 429, 187 (2001), 10.1017/S0022112000002718; Spalart, J. Fluid Mech. 187, 61 (1988), 10.1017/S0022112088000345], the present approach is based on a temporally evolving boundary layer and is specifically tailored to give results for calibration and validation of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models. The use of a temporal homogenization simplifies the modeling, enabling straightforward extension to flows with complicating features, including cold and blowing walls. To generate data useful for calibration and validation of RANS models, special care is taken to ensure that the mean slow-growth forcing is closed in terms of the mean and other quantities that appear in standard RANS models, ensuring that there is no confounding between typical RANS closures and additional closures required for the slow-growth problem. The performance of the method is demonstrated on two problems: an essentially incompressible, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a transonic boundary layer over

  20. The fundamental difference between shear alpha viscosity and turbulent magnetorotational stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent, magnetized, differentially rotating flows driven by the magnetorotational instability are often used to calculate the effective values of alpha viscosity that is invoked in analytical models of accretion discs. In this paper we use various dynamical models...... of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic stresses, as well as numerical simulations of shearing boxes, to show that angular momentum transport in MRI-driven accretion discs cannot be described by the standard model for shear viscosity. In particular, we demonstrate that turbulent magnetorotational stresses...... are not linearly proportional to the local shear and vanish identically for angular velocity profiles that increase outwards....

  1. Turbulent mass transfer through a flat shear-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Calmet, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Mass transfer through the flat shear-free surface of a turbulent open-channel flow is investigated over a wide range of Schmidt number (1 ≤ Sc ≤ 200) by means of large-eddy simulations using a dynamic subgrid-scale model. In contrast with situations previously analysed using direct numerical simulation, the turbulent Reynolds number Re is high enough for the near-surface turbulence to be fairly close to isotropy and almost independent of the structure of the flow in the bottom region (the statistics of the velocity field are identical to those described by I. Calmet & J. Magnaudet J. Fluid Mech. vol. 474, 2003, p. 355). The main statistical features of the concentration field are analysed in connection with the structure of the turbulent motion below the free surface, characterized by a velocity macroscale u and an integral length scale L. All near-surface statistical profiles are found to be Sc-independent when plotted vs. the dimensionless coordinate Sc({1) / 2}yu/nu (y is the distance to the surface and nu is the kinematic viscosity). Mean concentration profiles are observed to be linear throughout an inner diffusive sublayer whose thickness is about one Batchelor microscale, i.e. LSc({) - 1 / 2 }Re({) - 3 / 4}. In contrast, the concentration fluctuations are found to reach their maximum near the edge of the outer diffusive layer which scales as LSc({) - 1 / 2}Re({) - 1 / 2}. Instantaneous views of the near-surface isovalues of the concentration and vertical velocity are used to reveal the influence of the Schmidt number. In particular, it is observed that at high Schmidt number, the tiny concentration fluctuations that subsist in the diffusive sublayer just mirror the divergence of the two-component surface velocity field. Co-spectra of concentration and vertical velocity fluctuations indicate that the main contribution to the turbulent mass flux is provided by eddies whose horizontal size is close to L, which strongly supports the view that the mass

  2. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ernst, D. R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  3. Nonlocal model for the turbulent fluxes due to thermal convection in rectilinear shearing flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R; Gough, D O

    2011-01-01

    We revisit a phenomenological description of turbulent thermal convection along the lines proposed by Gough (1977) in which eddies grow solely by extracting energy from the unstably stratified mean state and are subsequently destroyed by internal shear instability. This work is part of an ongoing investigation for finding a procedure to calculate the turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum in the presence of a shearing background flow in stars.

  4. Modelling turbulent fluxes due to thermal convection in rectilinear shearing flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R; Gough, D O

    2010-01-01

    We revisit a phenomenological description of turbulent thermal convection along the lines proposed originally by Gough (1965) in which eddies grow solely by extracting energy from the unstably stratified mean state and are subsequently destroyed by internal shear instability. This work is part of an ongoing investigation for finding a procedure to calculate the turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum in the presence of a shearing background flow in stars.

  5. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  6. Small-scale motions in turbulent boundary-free shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The present work is an experimental and numerical investigation of the small-scale motions in turbulent free-shear flows. In the far-field turbulence of a jet at high Reynolds number (Reλ = 350) hot-wire anemometry (HWA) is applied to measure time series of flow velocity. By filtering these time ser

  7. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization.

  8. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  9. Electromagnetic transport components and sheared flows in drift-Alfven turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2003-01-01

    Results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of drift-Alfven turbulence in a toroidal geometry with sheared magnetic field are presented. The simulations show a relation between self-generated poloidal shear flows and magnetic field perturbations. For large values of the plasma beta we...

  10. The Micro-Pillar Shear-Stress Sensor MPS3 for Turbulent Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosse, S.; Schröder, W.

    2009-01-01

    Wall-shear stress results from the relative motion of a fluid over a body surface as a consequence of the no-slip condition of the fluid in the vicinity of the wall. To determine the two-dimensional wall-shear stress distribution is of utter importance in theoretical and applied turbulence research.

  11. Synthetic atmospheric turbulence and wind shear in large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    , superimposed on top of a mean deterministic shear layer consistent with that used in the IEC standard for wind turbine load calculations. First, the method is evaluated by running a series of large-eddy simulations in an empty domain, where the imposed turbulence and wind shear is allowed to reach a fully...... as input for simulations with a wind turbine, represented by an actuator line model, to evaluate the development of turbulence in a wind turbine wake. The resulting turbulence intensity and spectral distribution, as well as the meandering of the wake, are compared to field data. Overall, the performance...

  12. Interaction of two-dimensional turbulence with a sheared channel flow: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Leon; Marques Rosas Fernandes, Vitor; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of large-scale flows with turbulence is of fundamental and widespread importance in geophysical fluid dynamics and also, more recently for the dynamics of fusion plasma. More specifically the interplay between two-dimensional turbulence and so-called zonal flows has gained considerable interest because of its relevance for transport and associated barriers. We present numerical results on the interaction of driven two-dimensional turbulence with typical sheared channel flows (Couette and Poiseuille). It turns out that a linear shear rate that is being sustained by moving channel walls (Couette flow) is far more effective in suppressing turbulence and associated transport than a Poiseuille flow. We explore the mechanisms behind this in relation to the width of the channel and the strength of the shear of the background flow. Also the prominent role played by the no-slip boundaries and the Reynolds stress is discussed.

  13. Symmetry breaking in MAST plasma turbulence due to toroidal flow shear

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, M F J; Field, A R; Ghim, Y -c; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    The flow shear associated with the differential toroidal rotation of tokamak plasmas breaks an underlying symmetry of the turbulent fluctuations imposed by the up-down symmetry of the magnetic equilibrium. Using experimental Beam-Emission-Spectroscopy (BES) measurements and gyrokinetic simulations, this symmetry breaking in ion-scale turbulence in MAST is shown to manifest itself as a tilt of the spatial correlation function and a finite skew in the distribution of the fluctuating density field. The tilt is a statistical expression of the "shearing" of the turbulent structures by the mean flow. The skewness of the distribution is related to the emergence of long-lived density structures in sheared, near-marginal plasma turbulence. The extent to which these effects are pronounced is argued (with the aid of the simulations) to depend on the distance from the nonlinear stability threshold. Away from the threshold, the symmetry is effectively restored.

  14. Enhancement of small-scale turbulent dynamo by large-scale shear

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations we show that large-scale shear in non-helically forced turbulence supports small-scale dynamo action with zero mean magnetic field, i.e., the dynamo growth rate increases with shear and shear enhances or even produces turbulence, which, in turn, further increases the dynamo growth rate. When the production rates of turbulent kinetic energy due to shear and forcing are of the same order, we find scalings for the growth rate $\\gamma$ of the small-scale dynamo and the turbulent velocity $u_{\\rm rms}$ with shear rate $S$ that are independent of the magnetic Prandtl number: $\\gamma \\propto |S|$ and $u_{\\rm rms} \\propto |S|^{2/3}$. Having compensated for shear-induced effects on turbulent velocity, we find that the normalized growth rate of the small-scale dynamo exhibits a universal scaling, $\\widetilde{\\gamma}\\propto |S|^{2/3}$, arising solely from the induction equation for a given velocity field.

  15. On the Orientation of Turbulent Structures in Stably Stratified Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Moreau, Adam; Aguirre, Joylene

    2016-11-01

    The orientation of turbulent structures in stably stratified shear flows are investigated using the results of a series of direct numerical simulations. The Richardson number is varied from Ri = 0 , corresponding to unstratified shear flow, to Ri = 1 , corresponding to strongly stratified shear flow. The evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy changes from growth for small Richardson numbers to decay for strong stratification. The orientation of turbulent structures in the flows is determined by the three-dimensional two-point autocorrelation coefficient of velocity magnitude, vorticity magnitude, and fluctuating density. An ellipsoid is fitted to the surface given by a constant autocorrelation coefficient value and the major and minor axes are used to determine the inclination angle of turbulent structures in the plane of shear. The inclination angle is observed to be fairly unaffected by the choice of the autocorrelation coefficient value. In was found that the inclination angle decreases with increasing Richardson number. The structure of the turbulent motion, as characterized by the inclination angle, is therefore directly related to the eventual evolution of the turbulence, as described by the growth or decay rate of the turbulent kinetic energy.

  16. Estimation of turbulent shear stress in free jets: application to valvular regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winoto, S H; Shah, D A; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better assess the severity of valvular regurgitation, an in-vitro experiment has been conducted to estimate turbulent shear stress levels within free jets issuing from different orifice shapes and sizes by means of hot-wire anemometry. On the basis of the measured mean velocities and the jet profiles, the distributions of the normalized kinematic turbulent shear stress (uv/Um2) were estimated for different jets by using an equation available for self-preserving circular jet. The results indicate that the equation can estimate the distributions of uv/Um2 independent of the orifice shape and Reynolds number of the jet. For the range of Reynolds numbers considered, the estimation of maximum turbulent shear stress inferred from these distributions suggests that the critical shear stress level of approximately 200 N/m2, corresponding to destruction of blood cells, is exceeded for typical blood flow velocity of 5 m/s at the valvular lesion.

  17. Mean-field dynamo in a turbulence with shear and kinetic helicity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2008-03-01

    We study the effects of kinetic helicity fluctuations in a turbulence with large-scale shear using two different approaches: the spectral tau approximation and the second-order correlation approximation (or first-order smoothing approximation). These two approaches demonstrate that homogeneous kinetic helicity fluctuations alone with zero mean value in a sheared homogeneous turbulence cannot cause a large-scale dynamo. A mean-field dynamo is possible when the kinetic helicity fluctuations are inhomogeneous, which causes a nonzero mean alpha effect in a sheared turbulence. On the other hand, the shear-current effect can generate a large-scale magnetic field even in a homogeneous nonhelical turbulence with large-scale shear. This effect was investigated previously for large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers. In this study we examine the threshold required for the shear-current dynamo versus Reynolds number. We demonstrate that there is no need for a developed inertial range in order to maintain the shear-current dynamo (e.g., the threshold in the Reynolds number is of the order of 1).

  18. Inflectional instabilities in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Jerry D.; Blackwelder, Ron F.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    The primary thrust of this research was to identify one or more mechanisms responsible for strong turbulence production events in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows. Based upon previous work in a transitional boundary layer, it seemed highly probable that the production events were preceded by an inflectional velocity profile which formed on the interface between the low-speed streak and the surrounding fluid. In bounded transitional flows, this unstable profile developed velocity fluctuations in the streamwise direction and in the direction perpendicular to the sheared surface. The rapid growth of these instabilities leads to a breakdown and production of turbulence. Since bounded turbulent flows have many of the same characteristics, they may also experience a similar type of breakdown and turbulence production mechanism.

  19. Theoretical research on rotational dispersion coefficient of fiber in turbulent shear flow of fiber suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhen-yu; LIN Jian-zhong; LI Jun

    2007-01-01

    The rotational dispersion coefficient of the fiber in the turbulent shear flow of fiber suspension was studied theoretically. The function of correlation moment between the different fluctuating velocity gradients of the flow was built firstly. Then the expression, dependent on the characteristic length, time, velocity and a dimensionless parameter related to the effect of wall, of rotational dispersion coefficient is derived. The derived expression of rotational dispersion coefficient can be employed to the inhomogeneous and non-isotropic turbulent flows. Furthermore it can be expanded to three-dimensional turbulent flows and serves the theoretical basis for solving the turbulent flow of fiber suspension.

  20. On the Space-Time Structure of Sheared Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mare, Martin Tobias; Mann, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model that predicts all two-point correlations in high Reynolds number turbulent flow, in both space and time. This is accomplished by combining the design philosophies behind two existing models, the Mann spectral velocity tensor, in which isotropic turbulence is distorted according...

  1. Space-time correlations of fluctuating velocities in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-04-01

    Space-time correlations or Eulerian two-point two-time correlations of fluctuating velocities are analytically and numerically investigated in turbulent shear flows. An elliptic model for the space-time correlations in the inertial range is developed from the similarity assumptions on the isocorrelation contours: they share a uniform preference direction and a constant aspect ratio. The similarity assumptions are justified using the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses and verified using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flows. The model relates the space-time correlations to the space correlations via the convection and sweeping characteristic velocities. The analytical expressions for the convection and sweeping velocities are derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous turbulent shear flows, where the convection velocity is represented by the mean velocity and the sweeping velocity is the sum of the random sweeping velocity and the shear-induced velocity. This suggests that unlike Taylor's model where the convection velocity is dominating and Kraichnan and Tennekes' model where the random sweeping velocity is dominating, the decorrelation time scales of the space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows are determined by the convection velocity, the random sweeping velocity, and the shear-induced velocity. This model predicts a universal form of the space-time correlations with the two characteristic velocities. The DNS of turbulent channel flows supports the prediction: the correlation functions exhibit a fair good collapse, when plotted against the normalized space and time separations defined by the elliptic model.

  2. Model of wind shear conditional on turbulence and its impact on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Natarajan, Anand; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse high-frequency wind velocity measurements from two test stations over a period of several years and at heights ranging from 60 to 200 m, with the objective to validate wind shear predictions as used in load simulations for wind turbine design. A validated wind shear model is thereby...... is most pronounced on the blade flap loads. It is further shown that under moderate wind turbulence, the wind shear exponents may be over-specified in the design standards, and a reduction of wind shear exponent based on the present measurements can contribute to reduced fatigue damage equivalent loads...

  3. The lift-up effect: the linear mechanism behind transition and turbulence in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The formation and amplification of streamwise velocity perturbations induced by cross-stream disturbances is ubiquitous in shear flows. This disturbance growth mechanism, so neatly identified by Ellingsen and Palm in 1975, is a key process in transition to turbulence and self-sustained turbulence. In this review, we first present the original derivation and early studies and then discuss the non-modal growth of streaks, the result of the lift-up process, in transitional and turbulent shear flows. In the second part, the effects on the lift-up process of additives in the fluid and of a second phase are discussed and new results presented with emphasis on particle-laden shear flows. For all cases considered, we see the lift-up process to be a very robust process, always present as a first step in subcritical transition.

  4. Local Turbulence Suppression and Flow Shear Dynamics During qmin-Triggered Internal Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Austin, M. E.; Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.

    2007-11-01

    Turbulence is observed to transiently decrease locally during the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) following the appearance of low-order rational qmin surfaces in negative central shear discharges on DIII-D. Simultaneously, increased poloidal flow shear is observed. To further study this phenomenon, localized 2D density fluctuation measurements of turbulence and turbulence flow were obtained over 0.3 < r/a < 0.7 via the high-sensitivity beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Both the reduction in fluctuations and the poloidal velocity shear are found to propagate radially outward at about 1 m/s. Initial observations suggest that these effects follow the q=2 surface. Related GYRO simulations suggest transient zonal flows form near the q=2 surface to trigger these ITBs. High-frequency poloidal velocity measurements will be used to examine this mechanism.

  5. Self-regulation of mean flows in strongly stratified sheared turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Peltier, W. Richard

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the near-equilibrium state of shear-driven stratified turbulence generated by the breaking of Holmboe wave instability (HWI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We discuss DNS analyses associated with HWI under various initial conditions. We analyze the time-dependent distribution of the gradient Richardson number, Rig (z , t) associated with the horizontally-averaged velocity and density fields. We demonstrate that unlike the KHI-induced turbulence, the fully turbulent flow that is generated by HWI is robustly characterized by its high probability of Rig 0 . 2 - 0 . 25 , independent of the strength of the initial stratification and furthermore that the turbulence evolves in a 'near-equilibrium' state. The KHI-induced turbulence may become grossly 'out of equilibrium', however, and therefore decays rapidly when the initial value at the interface, Rig (0 , 0) , is closer to the critical value of 1/4; otherwise as Rig (0 , 0) -> 0 the KHI-induced turbulence is close to a state of equilibrium and hence is much more long-lived. We conjecture that stratified shear turbulence tends to adjust to a state of 'near-equilibrium' with horizontally-averaged flows characterized by a high probability of Rig <= 1 / 4 , and hence sustained turbulence over relatively long times.

  6. Symmetry breaking in MAST plasma turbulence due to toroidal flow shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M. F. J.; van Wyk, F.; Field, A. R.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; the MAST Team

    2017-03-01

    The flow shear associated with the differential toroidal rotation of tokamak plasmas breaks an underlying symmetry of the turbulent fluctuations imposed by the up–down symmetry of the magnetic equilibrium. Using experimental beam-emission-spectroscopy measurements and gyrokinetic simulations, this symmetry breaking in ion-scale turbulence in MAST is shown to manifest itself as a tilt of the spatial correlation function and a finite skew in the distribution of the fluctuating density field. The tilt is a statistical expression of the ‘shearing’ of the turbulent structures by the mean flow. The skewness of the distribution is related to the emergence of long-lived density structures in sheared, near-marginal plasma turbulence. The extent to which these effects are pronounced is argued (with the aid of the simulations) to depend on the distance from the nonlinear stability threshold. Away from the threshold, the symmetry is effectively restored.

  7. Large-scale instability in a sheared nonhelical turbulence: formation of vortical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2007-01-01

    We study a large-scale instability in a sheared nonhelical turbulence that causes generation of large-scale vorticity. Three types of the background large-scale flows are considered, i.e., the Couette and Poiseuille flows in a small-scale homogeneous turbulence, and the "log-linear" velocity shear in an inhomogeneous turbulence. It is known that laminar plane Couette flow and antisymmetric mode of laminar plane Poiseuille flow are stable with respect to small perturbations for any Reynolds numbers. We demonstrate that in a small-scale turbulence under certain conditions the large-scale Couette and Poiseuille flows are unstable due to the large-scale instability. This instability causes formation of large-scale vortical structures stretched along the mean sheared velocity. The growth rate of the large-scale instability for the "log-linear" velocity shear is much larger than that for the Couette and Poiseuille background flows. We have found a turbulent analogue of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves in a small-scal...

  8. Role of edge turbulence and shear flows in density limit on HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rongjie; Tynan, George; Xu, Min; Nie, Lin; Guo, Dong; Ke, Rui; Long, Ting; Wu, Yifang; Yuan, Boda

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak density limit has long been suspected as a consequence of the enhanced turbulent transport in edge plasmas. In this study, evolutions of the turbulence and shear flows were investigated at different normalized density ne /nG in the plasma boundary region of HL-2A tokamak using Langmuir probes. As the density limit was approached, the equilibrium profile of density was flattened in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and steepened inside the separatrix, while the edge cooling was observed from the electron temperature profile. The turbulent cross-field transport also increased substantially with the ne /nG and the collisionality. In addition, the amplitude of the poloidal phase velocity decreased at higher densities. This destruction of the shear layer was associated with the collapse of the Reynolds stress and thus the reduction in the nonlinear energy transfer from high-frequency fluctuations to low-frequency shear flows. These observations indicate an important role of the edge turbulence and the turbulence-driven shear flow in the underlying physics of tokamak density limit. Thank the HL-2A team for machine operation. Partly supported by DOE Grant No. DE-SC0008378.

  9. Observation of the Turbulent Burst near A Sheared Air—Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuangfengWANG; ZhennanNIU; 等

    1999-01-01

    The turbulent burst under a sheared air-water interface was experimentally investigated using hydrogen bubble visualization technique.The surface shear was imposed by an airflow over the water flow which was kept free from surface waves.Results show that the wind shear has the main influence on the bursting events.At relatively high shear rates,the flow near the interface is dominated primarily by intermittent bursting events.The general features of bursting processes are described in some detail.The observed bursting events show qualitative similarities with those occurring in near-wall turbulence.However,a few distinctive phenomena were also observed,including the existence of vertical vortices and thickening process of the boundary layer,which appear to be associated with the characteristics of air-water interface.

  10. The eddy, wave, and interface structure of turbulent shear layers below/above stably stratified regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Julian C. R.; Moustaoui, Mohamed; Mahalov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    High resolution three-dimensional simulations are presented of the interactions between turbulent shear flows moving with mean relative velocity ΔU below a stably stratified region with buoyancy frequency (N+). An artificial forcing in the simulation, with a similar effect as a small negative eddy viscosity, leads to a steady state flow which models thin interfaces. Characteristic eddies of the turbulence have length scale L. If the bulk Richardson number Rib=(LN+/ΔU)2 lies between lower and upper critical values denoted as Ri∗(temperature. Comparisons are made with shear turbulent interfaces with no stratification. When Rib>R~i, vertical propagating waves are generated, with shear stresses carrying significant momentum flux and progressively less as Rib increases. Simulations for a jet and a turbulent mixing layer show similar results. A perturbation analysis, using inhomogeneous Rapid Distortion Theory, models the transition zone between shear eddies below the interface and the fluctuations in the stratified region, consistent with the simulations. It demonstrates how the wave-momentum-flux has a maximum when Rib˜2 and then decreases as Rib increases. This coupling mechanism between eddies and waves, which is neglected in eddy viscosity models for shear layers, can drive flows in the stratosphere and the deeper ocean, with significant consequences for short- and long-term flow phenomena. The "detached layer" is a mechanism that contributes to the formation of stratus clouds and polluted layers above the atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Origin of shear thickening in semidilute wormlike micellar solutions and evidence of elastic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U.P.A.L.M. C.P. 07738, Col. S. P. Zacatenco, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pérez-González, José, E-mail: jpg@esfm.ipn.mx [Laboratorio de Reología y Física de la Matería Blanda, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U.P.A.L.M. C.P. 07730, Col. S. P. Zacatenco, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, Francisco [Departamento de Biotecnología, Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, C.P. 62731, Col. San Isidro, Yautepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    The origin of shear thickening in an equimolar semidilute wormlike micellar solution of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was investigated in this work by using Couette rheometry, flow visualization, and capillary Rheo-particle image velocimetry. The use of the combined methods allowed the discovery of gradient shear banding flow occurring from a critical shear stress and consisting of two main bands, one isotropic (transparent) of high viscosity and one structured (turbid) of low viscosity. Mechanical rheometry indicated macroscopic shear thinning behavior in the shear banding regime. However, local velocimetry showed that the turbid band increased its viscosity along with the shear stress, even though barely reached the value of the viscosity of the isotropic phase. This shear band is the precursor of shear induced structures that subsequently give rise to the average increase in viscosity or apparent shear thickening of the solution. Further increase in the shear stress promoted the growing of the turbid band across the flow region and led to destabilization of the shear banding flow independently of the type of rheometer used, as well as to vorticity banding in Couette flow. At last, vorticity banding disappeared and the flow developed elastic turbulence with chaotic dynamics.

  12. Electromagnetic effects in the stabilization of turbulence by sheared flow

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, M D J; Cowley, S C; Loureiro, N F; Dickinson, D; Roach, C; Connor, J W

    2013-01-01

    We have extended our study of the competition between the drive and stabilization of plasma microinstabilities by sheared flow to include electromagnetic effects at low plasma $\\beta$ (the ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure). The extended system of characteristic equations is formulated, for a dissipative fluid model developed from the gyrokinetic equation, using a twisting mode representation in sheared slab geometry and focusing on the ion temperature gradient mode. Perpendicular flow shear convects perturbations along the field at the speed we denote as $Mc_s$ (where $c_s$ is the sound speed). $M > 1/ \\sqrt{\\beta}$ is required to make the system characteristics unidirectional and inhibit eigenmode formation, leaving only transitory perturbations in the system. This typically represents a much larger flow shear than in the electrostatic case, which only needs $M>1$. Numerical investigation of the region $M < 1/\\sqrt{\\beta}$ shows the driving terms can conflict, as in the electrostatic case, giving low ...

  13. Evolution and formation of shear layers in a developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The evolution and formation mechanism of shear layers in the outer region of a turbulent boundary layer are investigated using time-resolved PIV datasets of a developing turbulent boundary layer from inception at the trip up to Reτ = 3000 . An analysis of a sequence of instantaneous streamwise velocity fluctuation fields reveals that strong streamwise velocity gradients are prevalent along interfaces where low- and high-speed regions interact. To provide an insight on how such regions are associated with the formation of shear layers in the outer regions, we compute conditional averages of streamwise velocity fluctuations based on a strong shear layer. Our results reveal that one possible mechanism for the generation of shear layers in the outer region is due to the mismatch in the convection velocities between low- and high-speed regions. The results also indicate that the angle of the inclined shear layer is developing in time. In addition, the conditionally averaged velocity fluctuations exhibit a local instability along these shear layers, leading to a shear layer roll-up event as the layers evolve in time. Based on these findings, we propose a conceptual model which describes dynamic interactions of shear layers and their associated large-scale coherent motions. The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence and its relation to other shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence (SS-HST) is investigated by means of a new direct numerical simulation, spectral in the two horizontal directions and compact-finite-differences in the direction of the shear. No remeshing is used to impose the shear-periodic boundary condition. The influence of the geometry of the computational box is explored. Since HST has no characteristic outer length scale and tends to fill the computational domain, long-term simulations of HST are `minimal' in the sense of containing on average only a few large-scale structures. It is found that the main limit is the spanwise box width, $L_z$, which sets the length and velocity scales of the turbulence, and that the two other box dimensions should be sufficiently large $(L_x\\gtrsim 2L_z$, $L_y \\gtrsim L_z$) to prevent other directions to be constrained as well. It is also found that very long boxes, $L_x \\gtrsim 2 L_y$, couple with the passing period of the shear-periodic boundary condition, and develop strong u...

  15. Single deformable bubble interaction with turbulence in uniform and shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinyong; Bolotnov, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Combined direct numerical simulation (DNS) and interface tracking method (ITM) approach is utilized to study the effect of bubble deformability on the bubble-induced turbulence. Set of simulations is performed with 5mm diameter bubble in laminar and turbulent flows. Uniform shear and constant mean velocity profiles are used to perform evaluation of bubble-induced turbulence in various cases. The simulation capabilities allow estimating the turbulent kinetic energy before and after the bubble thus providing the information about bubble's influence on the liquid turbulence. The effect of bubble deformability is studied by separately changing the surface tension parameter. The bubble is controlled in one location of the domain using external forces. The force evolution is managed by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The steady-state values of the lateral and stream-wise forces result in the lift and drag force estimates on the bubble. DNS approach allows for comprehensive, well-defined studies of bubble-induced turbulence and interfacial forces by separately varying bubble's deformability, relative velocity, level of turbulence and local shear. This work presents new opportunities for the development of multiphase computational fluid dynamics closure laws. The presented work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1333993.

  16. Unsteady turbulent shear flow in shock tube discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Ramaiah, R.; Lin, I.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure-ruptured shock tube and an arc driven shock tube, have been used to study the evolution of turbulent fluctuations at contact surfaces with N2O4-2NO2 mixtures and at ionizing shock fronts in argon. The study has focused on point density diagnostics derived from crossed light beam correlations and electric probes. Turbulent bursts are found for which dynamical and spectral analyses suggest a particle-like evolution of fluctuation segments with a unique and characteristic frequency, independent of flow history and overall flow conditions.

  17. Shear flow generation and energetics in electromagnetic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Kendl, A.; Garcia, O.E.;

    2005-01-01

    acoustic mode (GAM) transfer in drift-Alfvén turbulence is investigated. By means of numerical computations the energy transfer into zonal flows owing to each of these effects is quantified. The importance of the three driving ingredients in electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence for conditions...... relevant to the edge of fusion devices is revealed for a broad range of parameters. The Reynolds stress is found to provide a flow drive, while the electromagnetic Maxwell stress is in the cases considered a sink for the flow energy. In the limit of high plasma β, where electromagnetic effects and Alfvén...

  18. Turbulence Characteristics in an Elevated Shear Layer over Owens Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-14

    wave breaking over the Central Alps: Role of complex terrain. J. Atmos. Sci., 61, 2249– 2266. ——, and ——, 2008: Diurnal variation of downslope winds...35, 59–77. ——, and P. F. Lester, 1974: Waves and turbulence in the strato - sphere. J. Atmos. Sci., 31, 800–812. Lindborg, E. A., 1996: A note on

  19. Power spectral density analysis of wind-shear turbulence for related flight simulations. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laituri, Tony R.

    1988-01-01

    Meteorological phenomena known as microbursts can produce abrupt changes in wind direction and/or speed over a very short distance in the atmosphere. These changes in flow characteristics have been labelled wind shear. Because of its adverse effects on aerodynamic lift, wind shear poses its most immediate threat to flight operations at low altitudes. The number of recent commercial aircraft accidents attributed to wind shear has necessitated a better understanding of how energy is transferred to an aircraft from wind-shear turbulence. Isotropic turbulence here serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in the low-altitude wind shear. The related question of how isotropic turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density (psd). The role of the psd in related Monte Carlo simulations is also considered.

  20. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  1. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  2. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kymagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  3. Self-regulation of E x B flow shear via plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N; Spada, E; Antoni, V; Spolaore, M; Serianni, G; Regnoli, G; Cavazzana, R; Bergsåker, H; Drake, J R

    2005-04-08

    The momentum balance has been applied to the ExB flow in the edge region of a reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. All terms, including those involving fluctuations, have been measured in stationary condition in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R RFP experiment. It is found that the component of the Reynolds stress driven by electrostatic fluctuations is the term playing the major role in driving the shear of the ExB flow to a value marginal for turbulent suppression, so that the results are in favor of a turbulence self-regulating mechanism underlying the momentum balance at the edge. Balancing the sheared flow driving and damping terms, the plasma viscosity is found anomalous and consistent with the diffusivity due to electrostatic turbulence.

  4. Self-Regulation of E×B Flow Shear via Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Spada, E.; Antoni, V.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Drake, J. R.

    2005-04-01

    The momentum balance has been applied to the E×B flow in the edge region of a reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. All terms, including those involving fluctuations, have been measured in stationary condition in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R RFP experiment. It is found that the component of the Reynolds stress driven by electrostatic fluctuations is the term playing the major role in driving the shear of the E×B flow to a value marginal for turbulent suppression, so that the results are in favor of a turbulence self-regulating mechanism underlying the momentum balance at the edge. Balancing the sheared flow driving and damping terms, the plasma viscosity is found anomalous and consistent with the diffusivity due to electrostatic turbulence.

  5. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine power performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Courtney, M.S.; Larsen, T.J.; Paulsen, U.S.

    2010-01-15

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly, the variations of the power output and the power curve were analysed for various turbulence intensities. Furthermore, the equivalent speed method was successfully tested on a power curve resulting from simulations cases combining shear and turbulence. Finally, we roughly simulated the wind speed measurements we may get from a LIDAR mounted on the nacelle of the turbine (measuring upwind) and we investigated different ways of deriving an equivalent wind speed from such measurements. (author)

  6. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent-driven Sheared Parallel Flows in the CSDX Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Hong, Rongjie; Li, Jiacong; Thakur, Saikat; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Parallel velocity and its radial shear is a key element for both accessing improved confinement regimes and controlling the impurity transport in tokamak devices. In this study, the development of radially sheared parallel plasma flows in plasmas without magnetic shear is investigated using laser induced fluorescence, multi-tip Langmuir and Mach probes in the CSDX helicon linear plasma device. Results show that a mean parallel velocity shear grows as the radial gradient of plasma density increased. The sheared flow onset corresponds to the onset of a finite parallel Reynolds stress that acts to reinforce the flow. As a result, the mean parallel flow gains energy from the turbulence that, in turn, is driven by the density gradient. This results in a flow away from the plasma source in the central region of the plasma and a reverse flow in far-peripheral region of the plasma column. The results motivate a model of negative viscosity induced by the turbulent stress which may help explain the origin of intrinsic parallel flow in systems without magnetic shear.

  7. On hydrodynamic shear turbulence in Keplerian disks via transient growth to bypass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Chagelishvili, G D; Tevzadze, A G; Lominadze, J G

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of hydrodynamic shear turbulence in non-magnetized Keplerian disks. We wish to draw attention to a route to hydrodynamic turbulence which seems to be little known by the astrophysical community, but which has been intensively discussed among fluid dynamicists during the past decade. In this so-called `bypass' concept for the onset of turbulence, perturbations undergo a transient growth, and they may reach an amplitude that is sufficiently large to allow positive feedback through nonlinear interactions. This transient growth is linear in nature, and thus it differs in principle from the well-known nonlinear instability. We describe the type of perturbations that according to this process are the most likely to lead to turbulence, namely non-axisymmetric vortex mode perturbations in the two dimensional limit. We show that the apparently inhibiting action of the Coriolis force on the dynamics of such vortical perturbations is substantially diminished due to the pressure perturba...

  8. Direct force wall shear measurements in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.; Pierce, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Unique, simultaneous direct measurements of the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are presented. The flow is also described with an oil streak wall flow pattern, a map of the wall shear stress-wall pressure gradient orientations, a comparison of the wall shear stress directions relative to the directions of the nearest wall velocity as measured with a typical, small boundary layer directionally sensitive claw probe, as well as limiting wall streamline directions from the oil streak patterns, and a comparison of the freestream streamlines and the wall flow streamlines. A review of corrections for direct force sensing shear meters for two-dimensional flows is presented with a brief discussion of their applicability to three-dimensional devices.

  9. Evolution and dynamics of shear-layer structures in near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. H.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Near-wall flow structures in turbulent shear flows are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the study of their space-time evolution and connection to turbulence production. The results are obtained from investigation of a database generated from direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 based on half-channel width and friction velocity. New light is shed on problems associated with conditional sampling techniques, together with methods to improve these techniques, for use both in physical and numerical experiments. The results clearly indicate that earlier conceptual models of the processes associated with near-wall turbulence production, based on flow visualization and probe measurements need to be modified. For instance, the development of asymmetry in the spanwise direction seems to be an important element in the evolution of near-wall structures in general, and for shear layers in particular. The inhibition of spanwise motion of the near-wall streaky pattern may be the primary reason for the ability of small longitudinal riblets to reduce turbulent skin friction below the value for a flat surface.

  10. Small-scale motions in turbulent boundary-free shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-01-01

    The present work is an experimental and numerical investigation of the small-scale motions in turbulent free-shear flows. In the far-field turbulence of a jet at high Reynolds number (Reλ = 350) hot-wire anemometry (HWA) is applied to measure time series of flow velocity. By filtering these time series, large- and small-scale velocity fluctuations are obtained. Both the amplitude and the frequency of the small-scale signals are locally stronger (weaker) for positive (negative) fluctuations of...

  11. Elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Jin-Bai

    2006-05-01

    An elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows is proposed based on a second order approximation to the iso-correlation contours, while Taylor's hypothesis implies a first-order approximation. It is shown that the space-time correlations are mainly determined by their space correlations and the convection and sweeping velocities. This model accommodates two extreme cases: Taylor's hypothesis at vanishing sweeping velocity and the sweeping hypothesis at vanishing convection velocity. The result is supported by the data from the direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows.

  12. Effects of a fluctuating sheared flow on cross phase in passive-scalar turbulent diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Garbet, X.

    2006-11-01

    Transport barriers are key elements concerning energy and particle confinement in fusion devices. They play a fundamental role in the L →H transition observed in most tokamaks' edges. It has been shown that a shear in the E ×B velocity could trigger and sustain such a barrier. The E ×B velocity shear model has proven to be of great interest in the study of the formation and characteristics of transport barriers. Here we address a particular case of flow shear stabilization, namely the effect of a shear flow on the diffusion of a passive scalar. A shear flow reduces the radial flux (radial transport) Γ of a passive scalar field (we consider the pressure field) via the reduction of the turbulence energy √⟨p2⟩ and/or via the reduction of the cross phase cosδ between the fluctuations of the pressure and velocity fields. We compare our results with those of different analytical models for passive-scalar advection or diffusion [Terry et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 185001 (2001); Kim and Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 075001 (2003)]. However, these studies yielded contradictory results. The purpose of this study is to shed light on this particular issue using numerical simulations to clarify the role of the reduction of the amplitude of turbulence and cross phase in regulating the radial transport.

  13. Turbulent transport in a strongly stratified forced shear layer with thermal diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Garaud, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This work presents numerical results on the transport of heat and chemical species by shear-induced turbulence in strongly stratified but thermally diffusive environments. The shear instabilities driven in this regime are sometimes called "secular" shear instabilities, and can take place even when the gradient Richardson number of the flow (the square of the ratio of the buoyancy frequency to the shearing rate) is large, provided the P\\'eclet number (the ratio of the thermal diffusion timescale to the turnover timescale of the turbulent eddies) is small. We have identified a set of simple criteria to determine whether these instabilities can take place or not. Generally speaking, we find that they may be relevant whenever the thermal diffusivity of the fluid is very large (typically larger than $10^{14}$cm$^2$/s), which is the case in the outer layers of high-mass stars ($M\\ge 10 M_\\odot$) for instance. Using a simple model setup in which the shear is forced by a spatially sinusoidal, constant-amplitude body-...

  14. The Physics of Flow Instability and Turbulent Transition in Shear Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Dou, H S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the physics of flow instability and turbulent transition in shear flows is studied by analyzing the energy variation of fluid particles under the interaction of base flow with a disturbance. It is shown that it is the transverse energy gradient that leads to the disturbance amplification while the disturbance is damped by the energy loss due to viscosity along the streamline. For the first time, a theory derived strictly from physics, is used to show that the flow instability under finite amplitude disturbance leads to turbulent transition. It is also shown that flow instability in shear flows is a nonlinear phenomenon and it has a threshold related to the disturbance amplitude. The mechanism for velocity inflection and hairpin vortex formation are explained with reference to analytical results. The inverse Reynolds number dependence of the disturbance threshold, observed in recent experiments, is well explained. Following from this analysis, it can be demonstrated that the critical value of th...

  15. The measurement of shear stress and total heat flux in a nonadiabatic turbulent hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  16. X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Turbulent Methane-Oxygen Shear Coaxial Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    applied to turbulent methane-oxygen shear coaxial flames. These flames are directly applicable to the oxygen-enriched combustion that occurs in liquid ...background argon signal subtraction and signal trapping corrections were required. To allow tracking of both the fuel and oxidizer stream, cases were...enriched combustion that occurs in liquid rocket engines where, due to the high temperature, it is difficult to obtain quantitative mixing field

  17. Flow Enhancement due to Elastic Turbulence in Channel Flows of Shear Thinning Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodiguel, Hugues; Beaumont, Julien; Machado, Anaïs; Martinie, Laetitia; Kellay, Hamid; Colin, Annie

    2015-01-01

    We explore the flow of highly shear thinning polymer solutions in straight geometry. The strong variations of the normal forces close to the wall give rise to an elastic instability. We evidence a periodic motion close the onset of the instability, which then evolves towards a turbulentlike flow at higher flow rates. Strikingly, we point out that this instability induces genuine drag reduction due to the homogenization of the viscosity profile by the turbulent flow.

  18. Homogeneous shear turbulence - bypass concept via interplay of linear transient growth and nonlinear transverse cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, George; Dong, Siwei; Khujadze, George; Chagelishvili, George; Jiménez, Javier; Foysi, Holger

    2016-04-01

    We performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence to study the mechanism of the self-sustenance of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable (constant) shear flows. For this purpose, we analyzed the turbulence dynamics in Fourier/wavenumber/spectral space based on the simulation data for the domain aspect ratio 1 : 1 : 1. Specifically, we examined the interplay of linear transient growth of Fourier harmonics and nonlinear processes. The transient growth of harmonics is strongly anisotropic in spectral space. This, in turn, leads to anisotropy of nonlinear processes in spectral space and, as a result, the main nonlinear process appears to be not a direct/inverse, but rather a transverse/angular redistribution of harmonics in Fourier space referred to as the nonlinear transverse cascade. It is demonstrated that the turbulence is sustained by the interplay of the linear transient, or nonmodal growth and the transverse cascade. This course of events reliably exemplifies the wellknown bypass scenario of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable shear flows. These processes mainly operate at large length scales, comparable to the box size. Consequently, the central, small wavenumber area of Fourier space (the size of which is determined below) is crucial in the self-sustenance and is labeled the vital area. Outside the vital area, the transient growth and the transverse cascade are of secondary importance - Fourier harmonics are transferred to dissipative scales by the nonlinear direct cascade. The number of harmonics actively participating in the self-sustaining process (i.e., the harmonics whose energies grow more than 10% of the maximum spectral energy at least once during evolution) is quite large - it is equal to 36 for the considered box aspect ratio - and obviously cannot be described by low-order models.

  19. Flux-driven gyrokinetic simulations of ion turbulent transport at low magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y; Strugarek, A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Abiteboul, J; Allfrey, S; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V; Latu, G, E-mail: yanick.sarazin@cea.fr

    2010-11-01

    Ion Temperature Gradient driven turbulence is investigated with the global full-f gyrokinetic code GYSELA for different magnetic equilibria. Reversed shear and monotonous q profile cases do not exhibit dramatic changes nor in the dynamics nor in the level of turbulence, leading to similar mean profiles. Especially, no transport barrier is observed in the vicinity of s = 0 in the general case, although the radial extent of the gap without resonant modes is larger than the typical turbulence correlation length. Conversely, a transport barrier is found to develop in the gap region if non resonant modes are artificially suppressed from the simulation. Such simulations tend to reconcile previously published contradictory results, while extending the analysis to more realistic flux-driven gyrokinetic regimes.

  20. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2016-01-01

    Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, as it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing simulations have shown that $\\alpha$-values a few times $10^{-4}$ can be generated. The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of dust particles. Here, we address in particular the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles in order to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. We perform 3D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. We confirm that under realistic conditions the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc s...

  1. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  2. Three-dimensional structures and turbulence closure of the wake developing in a wall shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, C.

    1981-01-01

    The turbulent wake interacting with the rotating wall shear layer is investigated analytically and numerically. The turbulent wakes of the rotating blades in a compressor which are interacting with the rotating hub-wall boundary layer are analyzed. A modified version of the closure model of the pressure-strain correlation term in the Reynolds stress transport equation is developed to predict the effect of rotation, which is appreciable for the present flow because the thick hub-wall boundary layer is interacting with the rotor wake. It is noted that the Poisson type equation for the pressure-strain correlation has an extra rotation term when the entire flow field is rotating. This extra rotation term is modeled to accommodate the effect of rotation. In addition, the standard correction for the wall effect is incorporated for the utilized Reynolds stress closure model. The rotation-modified Reynolds stress closure model is used to predict the present flow, and the predictions are compared with the experimental data. The experimental data reveal that the characteristics of the three-dimensional turbulent wake interacting with the wall shear layer are considerably altered by the effects of the wall and the rotation. These features are predicted with good accuracy by the turbulence closure model developed.

  3. Turbulent Heat Transfer Characteristics in the Shear Layer of a Separated Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovic, S.; Kutler, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the evolution of the heat transfer structure in a separated free shear layer region of an incompressible separated turbulent boundary layer flow behind a backward-facing step. While there is an abundance of velocity field measurements of separated flows, heat transfer measurements are rather scarce, thus limiting assessment of the heat transfer physics and its accurate modeling. The purpose of the paper is twofold: to improve an understanding of effects of flow separation on heat transfer characteristics, and to provide data for turbulence modeling and computation. The boundary layer upstream of the step was turbulent and fully developed. A constant temperature surface boundary condition was imposed upstream and downstream of the step for the heat transfer study. An internal mixing-layer like flow forms and grows from the step lip within the original boundary layer. The turbulent structure of the flow evolving downstream, however, does not switch immediately to that of a mixing layer over the entire shear layer thickness. Measurements of mean and fluctuating velocity and temperature fields indicate that the internal layer spreads gradually in the transverse direction while the outer part of the original boundary layer is effectively unperturbed. The results in this paper have not been previously reported.

  4. On the Effects of Rotation on the Passive Scalar and Kinematic Fields of Homogeneous Sheared Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chebbi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of rotation on the evolution of kinematic and passive scalar fields in two dimensional homogeneous sheared turbulence is studied using two different approaches. The first one is analytical and it consists on the resolution of differential linear equations governing the turbulence at high shear when the non linear effects are neglected. The second one is numerical and it consists on the modeling of governing equations using the most known second order models of turbulence and their numerical integration using the fourth order Runge-kutta method. In this second approach, the classic Launder Reece Rodi model, the Speziale Sarkar Gatski and the Shih Lumley models are retained for the pressure-strain correlation, pressure-scalar gradient correlation and for the time evolution equations of the kinematic and scalar dissipations. The evolution of turbulence is studied according to the dimensionless rotation number R which is varied from -0.75 to 0.5. The obtained results are compared to the recent results of the DNS of Brethouwer. Both methods have confirmed the existence of asymptotic equilibrium states for dimensionless kinematic and scalar parameters.

  5. Impact of turbulence on the prediction of linear aeroacoustic interactions: Acoustic response of a turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikadi, Jannis; Föller, Stephan; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    A powerful model to predict aeroacoustic interactions in the linear regime is the perturbed compressible linearized Navier-Stokes equations. Thus far, the frequently employed derivation suggests that the effect of turbulence and its associated Reynolds stresses is neglected and a quasi-laminar model is employed. In this paper, dynamic perturbation equations are derived incorporating the effect of turbulence and its interaction with perturbation quantities. This is done by employing a triple decomposition of the instantaneous variables. The procedure results in a closure problem for the Reynolds stresses for which a linear eddy-viscosity model is proposed. The resulting perturbation equations are applied to a grazing flow in a T-joint for which strong shear layer instabilities at certain frequencies are experimentally observed. Passive scattering properties of the grazing flow are validated against the experiments performed by Karlsson and Åbom and perturbation equations being quasi-laminar. We find that prediction models must include the effect of Reynolds stresses to capture the aeroacoustic interaction effects correctly. Neglecting its effect naturally results in the over prediction of vortex growth at the frequencies of shear layer instability and therewith in an over prediction of aeroacoustic interactions.

  6. Establishing the Transition to Turbulence in HED Shear Experiments on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kirk; Doss, F. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kot, L.; Perry, T. S.; Devolder, B.; Murphy, T. J.; Loomis, E. N.; Merritt, E. C.; Schmidt, D. W.; Capelli, D.; Cardenas, T.; Randolph, R. B.; Fierro, F.; Rivera, G.; Huntington, C. M.; Nagel, S. R.; MacLaren, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on hydrodynamic experiments performed at the NIF to investigate turbulent mixing in a High Energy Density (HED) régime using the LANL Shock/Shear platform. We investigate turbulence-driven mix from a counter-propagating shear-flow induced Kelvin- Helmholtz instability. Such flows may be present in an ICF capsule that has low-mode asymmetries and bulk mixing of the shell into the fuel. In the NIF LANL Shear experiment two shocks are generated at either end of cylinder, inside which CH foams act as a light fluid and the evolution of a tracer layer (a ``heavy fluid'') in the center plane is imaged using the Big Area Backlighter (BABL), a large area x-ray backlighter, developed for this project. Edge views of the tracer layer are studied to quantify growth of the mix layer into the foam. Additionally, plan views (90-degrees to the edge view) are imaged to look at the complex hydrodynamic behavior of the foil, revealing coherent structures like rollers and wigglers similar to those seen in dye marker pure fluid shear experiments, features that can be made to evolve quickly into a state of randomness when the foil is roughened. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the LANS, LLC for the NNSA of the U.S. DoE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  8. Characteristics of low reynolds number shear-free turbulence at an impermeable base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Mohtar, W H M; ElShafie, A

    2014-01-01

    Shear-free turbulence generated from an oscillating grid in a water tank impinging on an impermeable surface at varying Reynolds number 74 ≤ Re(l) ≤ 570 was studied experimentally, where the Reynolds number is defined based on the root-mean-square (r.m.s) horizontal velocity and the integral length scale. A particular focus was paid to the turbulence characteristics for low Re(l) < 150 to investigate the minimum limit of Re l obeying the profiles of rapid distortion theory. The measurements taken at near base included the r.m.s turbulent velocities, evolution of isotropy, integral length scales, and energy spectra. Statistical analysis of the velocity data showed that the anisotropic turbulence structure follows the theory for flows with Re(l) ≥ 117. At low Re(l) < 117, however, the turbulence profile deviated from the prediction where no amplification of horizontal velocity components was observed and the vertical velocity components were seen to be constant towards the tank base. Both velocity components sharply decreased towards zero at a distance of ≈ 1/3 of the integral length scale above the base due to viscous damping. The lower limit where Re(l) obeys the standard profile was found to be within the range 114 ≤ Re(l) ≤ 116.

  9. Drag reduction by the introduction of shear-free surfaces in a turbulent channel flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AJAY KUMAR SOOD; MURALI R CHOLEMARI; BALAJI SRINIVASAN

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel technique for drag reduction in turbulent flows is presented. The technique involves the modification of the large scales of turbulent flows and is a passive approach. The lateral transport of momentum, which is a dominant mechanism in turbulence, is attenuated by the introduction of moving shearfree surfaces (SFSes). This brings about a reduction in the drag. 2D simulations have been carried out for aturbulent channel flow using shear stress transport (SST) Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) model and validated with the available experimental results. The interaction between the plates and the fluid is two way,and is enforced either by the use of a rigid body solver with moving mesh, or by considering the SFSes to befixed at particular locations and then updating the velocities of the plates at those locations. The latter is equivalent to solving a fully developed flow in the moving mesh case. The number, shape, size and placement of the SFSes strongly influence the amount of drag reduction. The phenomenon is confirmed to be governed by a ‘slow’ turbulent time scale. Further, the efficacy of the method is seen to depend on the ratio of two time scales – an advection time scale indicating the ‘resident time’ near an SFS, and the turbulent time scale. In addition, the effectiveness of the approach is improved by judicious placement of multiple SFSes in the flow.

  10. Investigation of turbulent transport and shear flows in the Edge of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenmeier, G.; Koehn, A.; Manz, P.; Nold, B.; Stroth, U. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Happel, T. [Lab. Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Mahdizadeh, N. [ABB Switzerland Ltd. Corporate Research, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland); Wilcox, R.; Anderson, D.T. [HSX Plasma Lab., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Ramisch, M.

    2010-08-15

    Intense Langmuir-probe measurements were carried out in the toroidal low-temperature plasma of the torsatron TJ-K in order to investigate the origin and dynamics of intermittent transport events, so-called blobs, at the transition from closed to open field lines. The statistical properties of the fluctuations at the plasma boundary agree with observations made in fusion edge plasmas. Blobs were found to be generated locally through a change in turbulence drive across the separatrix. The non-linear spectral energy transfer from small-scale fluctuations into large-scale flows was measured with a 128-probe array. The results point to the transfer being a key loss channel for turbulence energy leading to a reduction in turbulent transport. Earlier observations[M.A. Pedrosa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 215003 (2008)] of enhanced long-range correlations in the plasma potential through externally induced shear flows in TJ-II stellarator were verified. The newly measured correlation of zonal vorticity and Reynolds stress at induced flow shear indicates an enhancement of zonal-flow drive (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Turbulent mixing and a generalized phase transition in shear-thickening fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory of turbulent mixing in stirred reactors. The degree of homogeneity of a mixed fluid may be characterized by the Kolmogorov micro-scale. The smaller its value, the better homogeneity. The micro-scale scales inversely with the fourth root of the energy dissipation rate in the stirring process. The higher this rate, the smaller lambda, and the better the homogeneity in the reactor. This is true for Newtonian fluids. In non-Newtonian fluids the situation is different. For instance, in shear-thickening fluids it is plausible that high shear rates thicken the fluid and might strangle the mixing. The internal interactions between different fluid-mechanical and colloidal variables are subtle, namely due to the (until recently) very limited understanding of turbulence. Starting from a qualitatively new turbulence theory for inviscid fluids [Baumert, 2013], giving e.g. the Karman constant as $(2\\pi)^{-1/2} = 0.40$ [the super-pipe in Princeton gave 0.40 p/m 0.02, Bailey et al., 2014], we...

  12. Turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Seddighi, Mehdi; Ricco, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental evidence, shear-dependent slip length superhydrophobic surfaces are studied. Lyapunov stability analysis is applied in a 3D turbulent channel flow and extended to the shear-dependent slip-length case. The feedback law extracted is recognized for the first time to coincide with the constant-slip-length model widely used in simulations of hydrophobic surfaces. The condition for the slip parameters is found to be consistent with the experimental data and with values from DNS. The theoretical approach by Fukagata (PoF 18.5: 051703) is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces. The estimated drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our DNS data. For slip parameters and flow conditions which are potentially realizable in the lab, the maximum computed drag reduction reaches 50%. The power spent by the turbulent flow on the walls is computed, thereby recognizing the hydrophobic surfaces as a passive-absorbing drag-reduction method, as opposed to geometrically-modifying techniques that do not consume energy, e.g. riblets, hence named passive-neutral. The flow is investigated by visualizations, statistical analysis of vorticity and strain rates, and quadrants of the Reynolds stresses. Part of this work was funded by Airbus Group. Simulations were performed on the ARCHER Supercomputer (UKTC Grant).

  13. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  14. Reynolds stress flow shear and turbulent energy transfer in reversed field pinch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Nicola; Spolaore, Monica; Serianni, Gianluigi; Regnoli, Giorgio; Spada, Emanuele; Antoni, Vanni; Bergsåker, Henric; Drake, James R.

    2003-10-01

    The role of Reynolds Stress tensor on flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas is still an open question and the comprehension of its behavior may assist the understanding of improved confinement scenario. It is generally believed that shear flow generation may occur by an interaction of the turbulent Reynolds stress with the shear flow. It is also generally believed that this mechanism may influence the generation of zonal flow shears. The evaluation of the complete Reynolds Stress tensor requires contemporary measurements of its electrostatic and magnetic part: this requirement is more restrictive for Reversed Field Pinch configuration where magnetic fluctuations are larger than in tokamak . A new diagnostic system which combines electrostatic and magnetic probes has been installed in the edge region of Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. With this new probe the Reynolds stress tensor has been deduced and its radial profile has been reconstructed on a shot to shot basis exploring differen plasma conditions. These profiles have been compared with the naturally occurring velocity flow profile, in particular during Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive experiment, where a strong variation of ExB flow radial profile has been registered. The study of the temporal evolution of Reynolds stress reveals the appearance of strong localized bursts: these are considered in relation with global MHD relaxation phenomena, which naturally occur in the core of an RFP plasma sustaining its configuration.

  15. Controls on Turbulent Mixing in a Strongly Stratified and Sheared Tidal River Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurisa, Joseph T.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Moum, James N.; Kilcher, Levi F.

    2016-08-01

    Considerable effort has been made to parameterize turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate ..epsilon.. and mixing in buoyant plumes and stratified shear flows. Here, a parameterization based on Kunze et al. is examined, which estimates ..epsilon.. as the amount of energy contained in an unstable shear layer (Ri < Ric) that must be dissipated to increase the Richardson number Ri = N2/S2 to a critical value Ric within a turbulent decay time scale. Observations from the tidal Columbia River plume are used to quantitatively assess the relevant parameters controlling ..epsilon.. over a range of tidal and river discharge forcings. Observed ..epsilon.. is found to be characterized by Kunze et al.'s form within a factor of 2, while exhibiting slightly decreased skill near Ri = Ric. Observed dissipation rates are compared to estimates from a constant interfacial drag formulation that neglects the direct effects of stratification. This is found to be appropriate in energetic regimes when the bulk-averaged Richardson number Rib is less than Ric/4. However, when Rib > Ric/4, the effects of stratification must be included. Similarly, ..epsilon.. scaled by the bulk velocity and density differences over the plume displays a clear dependence on Rib, decreasing as Rib approaches Ric. The Kunze et al. ..epsilon.. parameterization is modified to form an expression for the nondimensional dissipation rate that is solely a function of Rib, displaying good agreement with the observations. It is suggested that this formulation is broadly applicable for unstable to marginally unstable stratified shear flows.

  16. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  17. Particle-turbulence-acoustic interactions in high-speed free-shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Buchta, David; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the injection of micro-water droplets in turbulent flows can be used to reduce the intensity of near-field pressure fluctuations. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to evaluate the effects of particle-turbulence-acoustic coupling for the first time. Simulations of temporally developing mixing layers are conducted for a range of Mach numbers and mass loadings. Once the turbulence reaches a self-similar state, the air-density shear layer is seeded with a random distribution of mono disperse water-density droplets. For M =0.9 to M =1.75, preliminary results show reductions in the near-field pressure fluctuations for moderate mass loadings, consistent with experimental studies under similar conditions. At high speed, the principle reduction of the normal velocity fluctuations, which increases with particle mass loading, appears to correlate to the reduction of the near-field radiated pressure fluctuations. These findings demonstrate that the DNS reproduces the observed particle-turbulence-acoustic phenomenology, and its complete space-time database can be used to further understand their interactions.

  18. Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Pringle, Chris C T; Kerswell, Rich R

    2011-01-01

    We propose a general strategy for determining the minimal finite amplitude isturbance to trigger transition to turbulence in shear flows. This involves constructing a variational problem that searches over all disturbances of fixed initial amplitude, which respect the boundary conditions, incompressibility and the Navier--Stokes equations, to maximise a chosen functional over an asymptotically long time period. The functional must be selected such that it identifies turbulent velocity fields by taking significantly enhanced values compared to those for laminar fields. We illustrate this approach using the ratio of the final to initial perturbation kinetic energies (energy growth) as the functional and the energy norm to measure amplitudes in the context of pipe flow. Our results indicate that the variational problem yields a smooth converged solution providing the amplitude is below the threshold amplitude for transition. This optimal is the nonlinear analogue of the well-studied (linear) transient growth opt...

  19. Large scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi; Blackman, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal ($x$-$y$) averaging, we demonstrate the presence of large scale fields when either horizontal or vertical ($y$-$z$) averaging is employed. By computing planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase---a previously unidentified feature. Fast growing horizontal low modes and fiducial vertical modes over a narrow range of wave numbers amplify these planar averaged fields in the MRI growth phase, before turbulence sets in. The large scale field growth requires linear fluctuations but not nonlinear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling) and grows as a direct global mode of the MRI. Only by vertical averaging, can it be shown that the growth of horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes directly feed-back to the initial vertica...

  20. LES prediction of space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo; Dong Li; Xing Zhang; Guo-Wei He

    2012-01-01

    We compare the space-time correlations calculated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent channel flows.It is found from the comparisons that the LES with an eddy-viscosity subgrid scale (SGS) model over-predicts the space-time correlations than the DNS.The overpredictions are further quantified by the integral scales of directional correlations and convection velocities.A physical argument for the overprediction is provided that the eddy-viscosity SGS model alone does not includes the backscatter effects although it correctly represents the energy dissipations of SGS motions.This argument is confirmed by the recently developed elliptic model for space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows.It suggests that enstrophy is crucial to the LES prediction of spacetime correlations.The random forcing models and stochastic SGS models are proposed to overcome the overpredictions on space-time correlations.

  1. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  2. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, F. D.; Ricci, P.

    2017-03-01

    The narrow power decay-length ({λq} ), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner-wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two-fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles is found to arise due to radially sheared \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and parallel plasma currents outflowing into the sheath regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. Analytical calculations suggest that the IWL {λq} is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  3. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, Federico D

    2016-01-01

    The narrow power decay-length ($\\lambda_q$), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner-wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two-fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles measured is found to arise due to radially sheared $\\vec{E}\\times\\vec{B}$ poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and outflowing plasma currents regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. Analytical calculations suggest that the IWL $\\lambda_q$ is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  4. A method for obtaining a statistically stationary turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timson, Stephen F.; Lele, S. K.; Moser, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term goal of the current research is the study of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) as a tool for aeroacoustics. New algorithms and developments in computer hardware are making possible a new generation of tools for aeroacoustic predictions, which rely on the physics of the flow rather than empirical knowledge. LES, in conjunction with an acoustic analogy, holds the promise of predicting the statistics of noise radiated to the far-field of a turbulent flow. LES's predictive ability will be tested through extensive comparison of acoustic predictions based on a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and LES of the same flow, as well as a priori testing of DNS results. The method presented here is aimed at allowing simulation of a turbulent flow field that is both simple and amenable to acoustic predictions. A free shear flow is homogeneous in both the streamwise and spanwise directions and which is statistically stationary will be simulated using equations based on the Navier-Stokes equations with a small number of added terms. Studying a free shear flow eliminates the need to consider flow-surface interactions as an acoustic source. The homogeneous directions and the flow's statistically stationary nature greatly simplify the application of an acoustic analogy.

  5. Understanding the sub-critical transition to turbulence in wall flows

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Contrasting with free shear flows presenting velocity profiles with inflection points which cascade to turbulence in a relatively mild way, wall bounded flows are deprived of (inertial) instability modes at low Reynolds numbers and become turbulent in a much wilder way, most often marked by the coexistence of laminar and turbulent domains at intermediate Reynolds numbers, well below the range where (viscous) instabilities can show up. There can even be no unstable mode at all, as for plane Couette flow (pCf) or for Poiseuille pipe flow (Ppf) that currently are the subject of intense research. Though the mechanisms involved in the transition to turbulence in wall flows are now better understood, statistical properties of the transition itself are yet unsatisfactorily assessed. A review of the situation is given. An alternative to the temporal theory of the transition to turbulence in terms of chaotic transients in such globally subcritical flows is proposed, which invokes spatio-temporal intermittence and the ...

  6. Numerical experiments on transition control in wall-bounded shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biringen, S.; Caruso, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical simulation of transition control in plane channel and boundary layer flows. The analysis is based on a pseudo-spectral/finite difference semi-implicit solution procedure employed to numerically integrate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a doubly periodic domain. In the channel flow, it was found that the active periodic suction/blowing method was effective in controlling strongly three-dimensional disturbances. In the boundary layer, the preliminary analysis indicated that in the early stages, passive control by suction is as effective as active control to suppress instabilities. The current work is focused on a detailed comparison of active and passive control by suction/blowing in the boundary layer.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of deformable bubbles in wall-bounded shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, F.S.; Portela, L.M.; Mudde, R.F.; Mangiavacchi, N.

    2006-01-01

    We present a method for fully-resolved simulations of bubbly flows using a front-tracking/front-capturing technique. The method is a modification of a marker-and-cell method developed previously for free-surface flows. The basic approach is somehow similar to the front-tracking method of Tryggvason:

  8. Transition to turbulence in stratified shear flow: experiments in an inclined square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Colin; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We describe laboratory experiments of countercurrent stratified shear flow in an inclined square duct. To achieve this, a long water tank was partitioned into regions of higher and lower density saltwater that are connected by an inclined square duct. The flow regime was characterized to be turbulent, intermittent, Holmboe or laminar as a function of the duct inclination, θ, and the density difference, Δρ , between the two reservoirs. The density difference and duct angle were systematically varied and a phase plane of flow regime was developed. The transition between the interrmittent regime and turbulence was experimentally determined to occur at θΔρ ~= 20 [degrees kg m-3]. This critical combination of parameters fits into the buoyancy-compensated Reynolds number scaling proposed by Brethouwer et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2007). The turbulent interfacial thickness was found to be a function of the inclination angle, which can be predicted using the buoyancy lengthscale from Waite and Bartello (J. Fluid Mech., 2004) and others. Furthermore, we measured the density profiles at multiple points along the duct, and using these profiles, we modeled the entrainment at the interface. Support provided by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States.

  9. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  10. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  11. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x-y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y-z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space-time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase - a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.

  12. TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN A STRONGLY STRATIFIED FORCED SHEAR LAYER WITH THERMAL DIFFUSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaud, Pascale [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    This work presents numerical results on the transport of heat and chemical species by shear-induced turbulence in strongly stratified, thermally diffusive environments. The shear instabilities driven in this regime are sometimes called “secular” shear instabilities, and can take place when the Richardson number of the flow is large, provided the Péclet number is small. We have identified a set of simple criteria to determine whether these instabilities can take place or not. Generally speaking, we find that they may be relevant whenever the thermal diffusivity of the fluid is very large (typically larger than 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}), which is the case in the outer layers of high-mass stars (M ≥ 10 M{sub ⊙}), for instance. Using a simple model setup in which the shear is forced by a spatially sinusoidal, constant-amplitude body-force, we have identified several regimes ranging from effectively unstratified to very strongly stratified, each with its own set of dynamical properties. Unless the system is in one of the two extreme regimes (effectively unstratified or completely stable), however, we find that (1) only about 10% of the input power is used toward heat transport, while the remaining 90% is viscously dissipated; (2) that the effective compositional mixing coefficient is well-approximated by the model of Zahn, with D ≃ 0.02κ{sub T}/J where κ{sub T} is the thermal diffusivity and J is the Richardson number. These results need to be confirmed, however, with simulations in different model setups and at higher effective Reynolds number.

  13. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of a non-isothermal turbulentchannel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The particles inertia is varied by changingthe particles diameter. The density of particles is kept constant. A two-way coupled...

  14. Structure and dynamics of turbulent boundary layer flow over healthy and algae-covered corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Jonathan B.; Rippe, John P.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-scale velocity measurements over healthy and algae-covered corals were collected in situ to characterize combined wave-current boundary layer flow and the effects of algal canopies on turbulence hydrodynamics. Data were collected using acoustic Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. Flow over healthy corals is well described by traditional wall-bounded shear layers, distinguished by a logarithmic velocity profile, a local balance of turbulence production and dissipation, and high levels of bed shear stress. Healthy corals exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity in boundary layer flow structure resulting from variations in large-scale coral topography. By contrast, the turbulence structure of algae-covered corals is best represented by a plane mixing layer, with a sharp inflection point in mean velocity at the canopy top, a large imbalance of turbulence production and dissipation, and strongly damped flow and shear stresses within the canopy. The presence of an algal canopy increases turbulent kinetic energy within the roughness sublayer by ~2.5 times compared to healthy corals while simultaneously reducing bed shear stress by nearly an order of magnitude. Reduced bed shear at the coral surface and within-canopy turbulent stresses imply reduced mass transfer of necessary metabolites (e.g., oxygen, nutrients), leading to negative impacts on coral health.

  15. Turbulence-assisted shear exfoliation of graphene using household detergent and a kitchen blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrla, Eswaraiah; Paton, Keith R.; Backes, Claudia; Harvey, Andrew; Smith, Ronan J.; McCauley, Joe; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds the critical shear rate for exfoliation.To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds

  16. Two-component laser Doppler anemometer for measurement of velocity and turbulent shear stress near prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Y R; Yoganathan, A P

    1985-01-01

    The velocity and turbulent shear stress measured in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves play a vital role in the design and evaluation of these devices. In the past hot wire/film and one-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) systems were used extensively to obtain these measurements. Hot wire/film anemometers, however, have some serious disadvantages, including the inability to measure the direction of the flow, the disturbance of the flow field caused by the probe, and the need for frequent calibration. One-component LDA systems do not have these problems, but they cannot measure turbulent shear stresses directly. Since these measurements are essential and are not available in the open literature, a two-component LDA system for measuring velocity and turbulent shear stress fields under pulsatile flow conditions was assembled under an FDA contract. The experimental methods used to create an in vitro data base of velocity and turbulent shear stress fields in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves of various designs in current clinical use are also discussed.

  17. Performances of motion tracking enhanced Tomo-PIV on turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    The motion tracking enhancement technique (MTE) is a recently introduced method to improve the accuracy of tomographic PIV measurements at seeding density higher than currently practiced. The working principle is based on the fact that the particle field and its projections are correlated between the two exposures. Therefore, information from subsequent exposures can be shared within the tomographic reconstruction process of a single object, which largely reduces the energy lost into ghost particles. The study follows a previous work based on synthetic particle images, showing that the MTE technique has an effect similar to that of increasing the number of cameras. In the present analysis, MTE is applied to Tomographic PIV data from two time-resolved experiments on turbulent shear flows: a round jet at Re = 5,000 (facq = 1,000 Hz) and a turbulent boundary layer at the trailing edge of an airfoil (Rec = 370,000) measured at 12,000 Hz. The application of MTE is extended to the case of more than two recordings. The performance is assessed comparing the results from a lowered number of cameras with respect to the full tomographic imaging system. The analysis of the jet flow agrees with the findings of numerical simulations provided the results are scaled taking into account the concept of MTE efficiency based on the volume fraction where ghost-pairs (Elsinga et al. 2010a) are produced. When a large fraction of fluid has uniform motion (stagnant fluid surrounding the jet), only a moderate reduction in ghost intensity is expected by MTE. Nevertheless, a visible recovery of reconstruction quality is observed for the 3-cameras system when MTE is applied making use of 3 recordings. In the turbulent boundary layer, the objective is set to increase the seeding density beyond current practice, and the experiments are performed at approximately 200,000 particles/megapixel. The measurement robustness is monitored with the signal-to-noise ratio S/N for the cross

  18. Performances of motion tracking enhanced Tomo-PIV on turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    2012-04-01

    The motion tracking enhancement technique (MTE) is a recently introduced method to improve the accuracy of tomographic PIV measurements at seeding density higher than currently practiced. The working principle is based on the fact that the particle field and its projections are correlated between the two exposures. Therefore, information from subsequent exposures can be shared within the tomographic reconstruction process of a single object, which largely reduces the energy lost into ghost particles. The study follows a previous work based on synthetic particle images, showing that the MTE technique has an effect similar to that of increasing the number of cameras. In the present analysis, MTE is applied to Tomographic PIV data from two time-resolved experiments on turbulent shear flows: a round jet at Re = 5,000 ( f acq = 1,000 Hz) and a turbulent boundary layer at the trailing edge of an airfoil ( Re c = 370,000) measured at 12,000 Hz. The application of MTE is extended to the case of more than two recordings. The performance is assessed comparing the results from a lowered number of cameras with respect to the full tomographic imaging system. The analysis of the jet flow agrees with the findings of numerical simulations provided the results are scaled taking into account the concept of MTE efficiency based on the volume fraction where ghost- pairs (Elsinga et al. 2010a) are produced. When a large fraction of fluid has uniform motion (stagnant fluid surrounding the jet), only a moderate reduction in ghost intensity is expected by MTE. Nevertheless, a visible recovery of reconstruction quality is observed for the 3-cameras system when MTE is applied making use of 3 recordings. In the turbulent boundary layer, the objective is set to increase the seeding density beyond current practice, and the experiments are performed at approximately 200,000 particles/megapixel. The measurement robustness is monitored with the signal-to-noise ratio S/N for the cross

  19. Local wall shear stress measurements with a thin plate submerged in the sublayer in wall turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Dan; Suzuki, Hiroki; Mochizuki, Shinsuke

    2017-09-01

    A local wall shear stress measurement technique has been developed using a thin plate, referred to as a sublayer plate which is attached to the wall in the sublayer of a near-wall turbulent flow. The pressure difference between the leading and trailing edges of the plate is correlated to the known wall shear stress obtained in the fully developed turbulent channel flow. The universal calibration curve can be well represented in dimensionless form, and the sensitivity of the proposed method is as high as that of the sublayer fence, even if the sublayer fence is enveloped by the linear sublayer. The results of additional experiments prove that the sublayer plate has fairly good angular resolution in detecting the direction of the local wall shear stress vector.

  20. Quantifying turbulent wall shear stress in a stenosed pipe using large eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gårdhagen, Roland; Lantz, Jonas; Carlsson, Fredrik; Karlsson, Matts

    2010-06-01

    Large eddy simulation was applied for flow of Re=2000 in a stenosed pipe in order to undertake a thorough investigation of the wall shear stress (WSS) in turbulent flow. A decomposition of the WSS into time averaged and fluctuating components is proposed. It was concluded that a scale resolving technique is required to completely describe the WSS pattern in a subject specific vessel model, since the poststenotic region was dominated by large axial and circumferential fluctuations. Three poststenotic regions of different WSS characteristics were identified. The recirculation zone was subject to a time averaged WSS in the retrograde direction and large fluctuations. After reattachment there was an antegrade shear and smaller fluctuations than in the recirculation zone. At the reattachment the fluctuations were the largest, but no direction dominated over time. Due to symmetry the circumferential time average was always zero. Thus, in a blood vessel, the axial fluctuations would affect endothelial cells in a stretched state, whereas the circumferential fluctuations would act in a relaxed direction.

  1. Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam; Dass, N. D. Hari

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to unravel any relations that may exist between turbulent shear flows and statistical mechanics through a detailed numerical investigation in the simplest case where both can be well defined. The flow considered for the purpose is the two-dimensional (2D) temporal free shear layer with a velocity difference ΔU across it, statistically homogeneous in the streamwise direction (x) and evolving from a plane vortex sheet in the direction normal to it (y) in a periodic-in-x domain L ×±∞. Extensive computer simulations of the flow are carried out through appropriate initial-value problems for a "vortex gas" comprising N point vortices of the same strength (γ =LΔU/N) and sign. Such a vortex gas is known to provide weak solutions of the Euler equation. More than ten different initial-condition classes are investigated using simulations involving up to 32000 vortices, with ensemble averages evaluated over up to 103 realizations and integration over 104L/ΔU. The temporal evolution of such a system is found to exhibit three distinct regimes. In Regime I the evolution is strongly influenced by the initial condition, sometimes lasting a significant fraction of L /ΔU. Regime III is a long-time domain-dependent evolution towards a statistically stationary state, via "violent" and "slow" relaxations [P.-H. Chavanis, Physica A 391, 3657 (2012), 10.1016/j.physa.2012.02.014], over flow time scales of order 102 and 104L/ΔU, respectively (for N =400). The final state involves a single structure that stochastically samples the domain, possibly constituting a "relative equilibrium." The vortex distribution within the structure follows a nonisotropic truncated form of the Lundgren-Pointin (L-P) equilibrium distribution (with negatively high temperatures; L-P parameter λ close to -1). The central finding is that, in the intermediate Regime II, the spreading rate of the layer is universal over the wide range of cases considered here. The value (in terms of

  2. Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam; Hari Dass, N D

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to unravel any relations that may exist between turbulent shear flows and statistical mechanics through a detailed numerical investigation in the simplest case where both can be well defined. The flow considered for the purpose is the two-dimensional (2D) temporal free shear layer with a velocity difference ΔU across it, statistically homogeneous in the streamwise direction (x) and evolving from a plane vortex sheet in the direction normal to it (y) in a periodic-in-x domain L×±∞. Extensive computer simulations of the flow are carried out through appropriate initial-value problems for a "vortex gas" comprising N point vortices of the same strength (γ=LΔU/N) and sign. Such a vortex gas is known to provide weak solutions of the Euler equation. More than ten different initial-condition classes are investigated using simulations involving up to 32000 vortices, with ensemble averages evaluated over up to 103 realizations and integration over 104L/ΔU. The temporal evolution of such a system is found to exhibit three distinct regimes. In Regime I the evolution is strongly influenced by the initial condition, sometimes lasting a significant fraction of L/ΔU. Regime III is a long-time domain-dependent evolution towards a statistically stationary state, via "violent" and "slow" relaxations [ P.-H. Chavanis Physica A 391 3657 (2012)], over flow time scales of order 102 and 104L/ΔU, respectively (for N=400). The final state involves a single structure that stochastically samples the domain, possibly constituting a "relative equilibrium." The vortex distribution within the structure follows a nonisotropic truncated form of the Lundgren-Pointin (L-P) equilibrium distribution (with negatively high temperatures; L-P parameter λ close to -1). The central finding is that, in the intermediate Regime II, the spreading rate of the layer is universal over the wide range of cases considered here. The value (in terms of momentum thickness) is 0.0166±0

  3. Turbulence in tokamak plasmas. Effect of a radial electric field shear; Turbulence dans les plasmas de tokamaks. Effet d`un cisaillement de champ electrique radial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payan, J.

    1994-05-01

    After a review of turbulence and transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas and the radial electric field shear effect in various tokamaks, experimental measurements obtained at Tore Supra by the means of the ALTAIR plasma diagnostic technique, are presented. Electronic drift waves destabilization mechanisms, which are the main features that could describe the experimentally observed microturbulence, are then examined. The effect of a radial electric field shear on electronic drift waves is then introduced, and results with ohmic heating are studied together with relations between turbulence and transport. The possible existence of ionic waves is rejected, and a spectral frequency modelization is presented, based on the existence of an electric field sheared radial profile. The position of the inversion point of this field is calculated for different values of the mean density and the plasma current, and the modelization is applied to the TEXT tokamak. The radial electric field at Tore Supra is then estimated. The effect of the ergodic divertor on turbulence and abnormal transport is then described and the density fluctuation radial profile in presence of the ergodic divertor is modelled. 80 figs., 120 refs.

  4. Drift-Alfven turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of the finite beta plasma with warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    It was predicted [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 020701 (2016)] that two distinct drift-Alfven instabilities may be developed in the parallel shearing flow of finite beta plasmas ( 1 ≫β≫me/mi ) with comparable ion and electron temperatures. The first one is the shear-flow-modified drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping and exists in the shearless plasma as well. The second one is the shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the combined effect of the velocity shear and ion Landau damping and is absent in the shearless plasma flows. In the present paper, these drift-Alfven instabilities are examined numerically and analytically by including the electromagnetic response of the ions. The levels of the drift-Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of ion scattering by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same nonlinear effect of ion scattering, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating resulting from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence.

  5. Ocean Turbulence. Paper 2; One-Point Closure Model Momentum, Heat and Salt Vertical Diffusivities in the Presence of Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    We develop and test a 1-point closure turbulence model with the following features: 1) we include the salinity field and derive the expression for the vertical turbulent diffusivities of momentum K(sub m) , heat K(sub h) and salt K(sub s) as a function of two stability parameters: the Richardson number R(sub i) (stratification vs. shear) and the Turner number R(sub rho) (salinity gradient vs. temperature gradient). 2) to describe turbulent mixing below the mixed layer (ML), all previous models have adopted three adjustable "background diffusivities" for momentum, heat and salt. We propose a model that avoids such adjustable diffusivities. We assume that below the ML, the three diffusivities have the same functional dependence on R( sub i) and R(sub rho) as derived from the turbulence model. However, in order to compute R(sub i) below the ML, we use data of vertical shear due to wave-breaking.measured by Gargett et al. The procedure frees the model from adjustable background diffusivities and indeed we employ the same model throughout the entire vertical extent of the ocean. 3) in the local model, the turbulent diffusivities K(sub m,h,s) are given as analytical functions of R(sub i) and R(sub rho). 5) the model is used in an O-GCM and several results are presented to exhibit the effect of double diffusion processes. 6) the code is available upon request.

  6. Dynamics of homogeneous shear turbulence: A key role of the nonlinear transverse cascade in the bypass concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G.; Khujadze, G.; Chagelishvili, G.; Dong, S.; Jiménez, J.; Foysi, H.

    2016-08-01

    To understand the mechanism of the self-sustenance of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable (constant) shear flows, we performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence for different aspect ratios of the flow domain with subsequent analysis of the dynamical processes in spectral or Fourier space. There are no exponentially growing modes in such flows and the turbulence is energetically supported only by the linear growth of Fourier harmonics of perturbations due to the shear flow non-normality. This non-normality-induced growth, also known as nonmodal growth, is anisotropic in spectral space, which, in turn, leads to anisotropy of nonlinear processes in this space. As a result, a transverse (angular) redistribution of harmonics in Fourier space is the main nonlinear process in these flows, rather than direct or inverse cascades. We refer to this type of nonlinear redistribution as the nonlinear transverse cascade. It is demonstrated that the turbulence is sustained by a subtle interplay between the linear nonmodal growth and the nonlinear transverse cascade. This course of events reliably exemplifies a well-known bypass scenario of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable shear flows. These two basic processes mainly operate at large length scales, comparable to the domain size. Therefore, this central, small wave number area of Fourier space is crucial in the self-sustenance; we defined its size and labeled it as the vital area of turbulence. Outside the vital area, the nonmodal growth and the transverse cascade are of secondary importance: Fourier harmonics are transferred to dissipative scales by the nonlinear direct cascade. Although the cascades and the self-sustaining process of turbulence are qualitatively the same at different aspect ratios, the number of harmonics actively participating in this process (i.e., the harmonics whose energies grow more than 10% of the maximum spectral energy at least once during evolution) varies

  7. Large Eddy simulation of turbulence: A subgrid scale model including shear, vorticity, rotation, and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Reynolds numbers that characterize geophysical and astrophysical turbulence (Re approximately equals 10(exp 8) for the planetary boundary layer and Re approximately equals 10(exp 14) for the Sun's interior) are too large to allow a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the fundamental Navier-Stokes and temperature equations. In fact, the spatial number of grid points N approximately Re(exp 9/4) exceeds the computational capability of today's supercomputers. Alternative treatments are the ensemble-time average approach, and/or the volume average approach. Since the first method (Reynolds stress approach) is largely analytical, the resulting turbulence equations entail manageable computational requirements and can thus be linked to a stellar evolutionary code or, in the geophysical case, to general circulation models. In the volume average approach, one carries out a large eddy simulation (LES) which resolves numerically the largest scales, while the unresolved scales must be treated theoretically with a subgrid scale model (SGS). Contrary to the ensemble average approach, the LES+SGS approach has considerable computational requirements. Even if this prevents (for the time being) a LES+SGS model to be linked to stellar or geophysical codes, it is still of the greatest relevance as an 'experimental tool' to be used, inter alia, to improve the parameterizations needed in the ensemble average approach. Such a methodology has been successfully adopted in studies of the convective planetary boundary layer. Experienc e with the LES+SGS approach from different fields has shown that its reliability depends on the healthiness of the SGS model for numerical stability as well as for physical completeness. At present, the most widely used SGS model, the Smagorinsky model, accounts for the effect of the shear induced by the large resolved scales on the unresolved scales but does not account for the effects of buoyancy, anisotropy, rotation, and stable stratification. The

  8. Turbulence Modeling for the Simulation of Transition in Wall Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Our research involves study of the behavior of k-epsilon turbulence models for simulation of bypass-level transition over flat surfaces and turbine blades. One facet of the research has been to assess the performance of a multitude of k-epsilon models in what we call "natural transition", i.e. no modifications to the k-e models. The study has been to ascertain what features in the dynamics of the model affect the start and end of the transition. Some of the findings are in keeping with those reported by others (e.g. ERCOFTAC). A second facet of the research has been to develop and benchmark a new multi-time scale k-epsilon model (MTS) for use in simulating bypass-level transition. This model has certain features of the published MTS models by Hanjalic, Launder, and Schiestel, and by Kim and his coworkers. The major new feature of our MTS model is that it can be used to compute wall shear flows as a low-turbulence Reynolds number type of model, i.e. there is no required partition with patching a one-equation k model in the near-wall region to a two-equation k-epsilon model in the outer part of the flow. Our MTS model has been studied extensively to understand its dynamics in predicting the onset of transition and the end-stage of the transition. Results to date indicate that it far superior to the standard unmodified k-epsilon models. The effects of protracted pressure gradients on the model behavior are currently being investigated.

  9. A closed form solution for the rapid shear of homogeneous turbulence in a rotating frame with and without stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassinos, S. C.

    2000-11-01

    A closed-form solution for the evolution of one-point statistics is derived for the case of initially two-dimensional three-component (2D-3C) homogeneous turbulence deformed by rapid shear in a rotating frame. Cases with and without stratification are considered. Except for small total shear, the analytical result is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical solution of the governing equations, linearized for rapid distortions, and solved for the more general initial case of 3D-3C isotropic homogeneous turbulence. Based on this agreement, we show that the closed-from solution provides insight into the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of frame rotation on homogeneous stratified shear flow, and provides a useful reference point for the one-point modeling of rotated and stratified shear flows. This analysis provides insights on the stability of stratified homogeneous shear flows that are missed by the standard two-dimensional two-component (2D-2C) treatment of stability issues in these flows.

  10. Structure and kinetics of shear aggregation in turbulent flows. I. Early stage of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäbler, Matthäus U; Moussa, Amgad S; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-17

    Aggregation of rigid colloidal particles leads to fractal-like structures that are characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) which is a key parameter for describing aggregation processes. This is particularly true in shear aggregation where d(f) strongly influences aggregation kinetics. Direct measurement of d(f) in the early stages of shear aggregation is however difficult, as the aggregates are small and few in number. An alternative method for determining d(f) is to use an aggregation model that when fitted to the time evolution of the cluster mass distribution allows for estimating d(f). Here, we explore three such models, two of which are based on an effective collision sphere and one which directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates, and we apply them for interpreting the initial aggregate growth measured experimentally in a turbulent stirred tank reactor. For the latter, three polystyrene latexes were used that differed only in the size of the primary particles (d(p) = 420, 600, and 810 nm). It was found that all three models describe initial aggregation kinetics reasonably well using, however, substantially different values for d(f). To discriminate among the models, we therefore also studied the regrowth of preformed aggregates where d(f) was experimentally accessible. It was found that only the model that directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates is able to predict correctly this second type of experiments. Applying this model to the initial aggregation kinetics, we conclude that the actual initial fractal dimension is d(f) = 2.07 +/- 0.04 as found from this model.

  11. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  12. Flocculation and floc break-up related to tidally induced turbulent shear in a low-turbidity, microtidal estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2014-01-01

    Flocculation and floc break-up dynamics were studied in two field campaigns with calm winds in the northernmost part of the Danish Wadden Sea. The studies were carried out using a LISST-100C together with CTD-instruments and a current meter. A quasi-Lagrangian profiling method was used to assess...... flocculation and floc break-up dynamics in the lower part of the water column in the period around slack water. These dynamics were confirmed in the Eulerian deployments and were reoccurring in every tidal cycle. The dynamics were mostly governed by changes in turbulent shear. Strong microflocs with a lower...... mean threshold diameter of 50–60 μm present at high turbulent shear flocculated to form fragile macroflocs with sizes of several hundred microns and mean diameters above 80 μm around slack water periods. A hysteresis in floc break-up and flocculation was found at high water slack (HWS), as flocs formed...

  13. Impulse transfer in a turbulent flow with two-dimensional structure of disturbances in a homogeneous shear region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votsish, A.D.

    1977-07-01

    Results are given for experimental studies of the effect that a cross-sectional magnetic field has on longitudinal and cross-sectional velocity pulsations and the coefficient of their correlation in a homogeneous shear region of averaged flow velocity. An opposite sign change for turbulent friction was obtained as the magnetic field was increased. In this connection an identification was made of an impulse transfer from regions with lower speeds to regions with high speeds. 4 references, 1 figure.

  14. FULLY CONVECTIVE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN LARGE ASPECT-RATIO SHEARING BOXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Cattaneo, F. [The Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, 5735 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mignone, A., E-mail: bodo@oato.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univesità di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with both finite and zero net magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite thermal diffusivity. The latter is chosen to be small enough so that vigorous convective states develop. The properties of these convective solutions are analyzed as the aspect ratio of the computational domain is varied and as the value of the mean field is increased. For the cases with zero net flux, we find that a well-defined converged state is obtained for large enough aspect ratios. In the converged state, the dynamo can be extremely efficient and can generate substantial toroidal flux. We identify solutions in which the toroidal field is mostly symmetric about the mid-plane and solutions in which it is mostly anti-symmetric. The symmetric solutions are found to be more efficient at transporting angular momentum and can give rise to a luminosity that is up to an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for the anti-symmetric states. In the cases with a finite net flux, the system appears to spend most of the time in the symmetric states.

  15. Validation of the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolution in atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, M.; Guggeri, A.; Usera, G.

    2016-09-01

    Wind energy has become cost competitive in recent years for several reasons. Among them, wind turbines have become more efficient, increasing its size, both rotor diameter and tower height. This growth in size makes the prediction of the wind flow through wind turbines more challenging. To avoid the computational cost related to resolve the blade boundary layer as well as the atmospheric boundary layer, actuator models have been proposed in the past few years. Among them, the Actuator Line Model (ALM) has shown to reproduce with reasonable accuracy the wind flow in the wake of a wind turbine with moderately computational cost. However, its use to simulate the flow through wind farms requires a spatial resolution and a time step that makes it unaffordable in some cases. The present paper aims to assess the ALM with coarser resolution and larger time step than what is generally recommended, taking into account an atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow condition and comparing the results with the Actuator Disk Model with Rotation (ADM-R) and experimental data. To accomplish this, a well known wind tunnel campaign is considered as validation case.

  16. A New Boundary Model for Simulating Complex and Flexible Wall Bounded Domain in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mokhtarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive area of applications, simulation of complex wall bounded problems or any deformable boundary is still a challenge in a Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation. This limitation is rooted in the soft force nature of DPD and the fact that we need to use an antipenetration model for escaped particles. In the present paper, we propose a new model of antipenetration which preserves the conservation of linear momentum on the boundaries and enables us to simulate complex and flexible boundaries. Finally by performing numerical simulations, we demonstrate the validity of our new model.

  17. Stability and turbulent transport in rotating shear flows: prescription from analysis of cylindrical and plane Couette flows data

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Longaretti, P-Y; Richard, D; Zahn, J-P

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a prescription for the turbulent viscosity in rotating shear flows for use e.g. in geophysical and astrophysical contexts. This prescription is the result of the detailed analysis of the experimental data obtained in several studies of the transition to turbulence and turbulent transport in Taylor-Couette flow. We first introduce a new set of control parameters, based on dynamical rather than geometrical considerations, so that the analysis applies more naturally to rotating shear flows in general and not only to Taylor-Couette flow. We then investigate the transition thresholds in the supercritical and the subcritical regime in order to extract their general dependencies on the control parameters. The inspection of the mean profiles provides us with some general hints on the mean to laminar shear ratio. Then the examination of the torque data allows us to propose a decomposition of the torque dependence on the control parameters in two terms, one completely given by measurements in the ca...

  18. Spatial Resolution Correction for Electrochemical Wall-shear Stress Measurements using Rectangular Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethi Aloui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly motivated by the growing needs for highly resolved measurements for wall-bounded turbulent flows and aims to proposes a spatial correction coefficient in order to increase the wall-shear stress sensors accuracy. As it well known for the hot wire anemometry, the fluctuating streamwise velocity measurement attenuation is mainly due to the spatial resolution and the frequency response of the sensing element. The present work agrees well with this conclusion and expands it to the wall-shear stress fluctuations measurements using electrochemical sensors and suggested a correction method based on the spanwise correlation coefficient to take into account the spatial filtering effects on unresolved wall-shear stress measurements due to too large sensor spanwise size.

  19. Numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows in presence of laminar to turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, G.; Vashista, G. A.; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2017-04-01

    Most of the widely used popular mathematical models of turbulence use a judicious combination of intuition, empiricism and the governing equations of instantaneous and mean motion-valid strictly for fully developed turbulence without any laminar region. In reality however, any wall bounded or free shear flow may consist of some laminar flow patches which eventually undergo transition over a finite length to grow into fully turbulent flows. Most of the turbulence models used in commercial CFD codes, are unable to predict the dynamics of turbulent flows with laminar patches. However, accurate prediction of transitional flows is often essential to estimate the pressure losses and/or heat transfer in industrial applications. The present paper implements two different transition models in an existing finite volume URANS-based code RANS3D, developed in house and validated against reliable measurement data for flow past flat plates with different free stream turbulence levels and flow past SD7003 aerofoil at a chord-based Reynolds number of 60,000.

  20. On the heterogeneity of stratified-shear turbulence: Observations from a near-field river plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Daniel G.; Carlson, Joshua; Goodman, Louis

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneity of turbulent structure in a near-field river plume is evaluated through the application of three distinct measurement techniques: turbulent overturn analysis, direct turbulence measurement using microstructure sensors mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and a larger scale control volume approach. These techniques exploit the preturbulent potential energy available for conversion to turbulent energy, the kinetic energy associated with active turbulence, and the artifacts of turbulence demonstrated through a modified density structure, respectively. Comparisons between these methods indicate that all three techniques can provide robust estimates of mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates. Results suggest a highly heterogeneous turbulent field, with significant overturns occupying a volume fraction of less than 10%, and active turbulence occupying a volume fraction only 2-3 times larger. The combined data sets are also used to estimate expected means and confidence limits for overturn-derived dissipation rates associated with varying sample sizes.

  1. Local dependence of ion temperature gradient on magnetic configuration, rotational shear and turbulent heat flux in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Ghim, Y -c; Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Michael, C

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data from the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is used to show that the inverse gradient scale length of the ion temperature R/LTi (normalized to the major radius R) has its strongest local correlation with the rotational shear and the pitch angle of the magnetic field (or, equivalently, an inverse correlation with q/{\\epsilon}, the safety factor/the inverse aspect ratio). Furthermore, R/LTi is found to be inversely correlated with the gyro-Bohm-normalized local turbulent heat flux estimated from the density fluctuation level measured using a 2D Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic. These results can be explained in terms of the conjecture that the turbulent system adjusts to keep R/LTi close to a certain critical value (marginal for the excitation of turbulence) determined by local equilibrium parameters (although not necessarily by linear stability).

  2. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  3. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  4. Gyrokinetic Studies of Turbulence in Steep Gradient Region: Role of Turbulence Spreading and E x B Shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm; Z. Lin; P.H. Diamond; G. Rewoldt; W.X. Wang; S. Ethier; O. Gurcan; W.W. Lee; W.M. Tang

    2004-12-21

    An integrated program of gyrokinetic particle simulation and theory has been developed to investigate several outstanding issues in both turbulence and neoclassical physics. Gyrokinetic particle simulations of toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence spreading using the GTC code and its related dynamical model have been extended to the case with radially increasing ion temperature gradient, to study the inward spreading of edge turbulence toward the core. Due to turbulence spreading from the edge, the turbulence intensity in the core region is significantly enhanced over the value obtained from simulations of the core region only. Even when the core gradient is within the Dimits shift regime (i.e., self-generated zonal flows reduce the transport to a negligible value), a significant level of turbulence and transport is observed in the core due to spreading from the edge. The scaling of the turbulent front propagation speed is closer to the prediction from our nonlinear diffusion model than one based on linear toroidal coupling. A calculation of ion poloidal rotation in the presence of sharp density and toroidal angular rotation frequency gradients from the GTC-Neo particle simulation code shows that the results are significantly different from the conventional neoclassical theory predictions. An energy conserving set of a fully electromagnetic nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and Maxwell's equations, which is applicable to edge turbulence, is being derived via the phase-space action variational Lie perturbation method. Our generalized ordering takes the ion poloidal gyroradius to be on the order of the radial electric field gradient length.

  5. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  6. Particle dynamics in wall-bounded thermal counterflow of superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mantia, M.

    2017-06-01

    The motions of relatively small particles in wall-bounded thermal counterflow of superfluid helium are experimentally investigated, above 1 K, by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique. The effect of a solid boundary on this quantum flow has received little attention to date, and the focus here is on the corresponding flow-induced particle dynamics. The velocity and velocity difference statistical distributions of the particles are computed at length scales straddling two orders of magnitude across the mean distance between quantized vortices, the quantum length scale of the flow. The imposed counterflow velocity ranges between about 2 and 7 mm/s, resulting in suitably defined Reynolds numbers up to 20 000. The distributions are found to be wider in the bulk than close to the solid boundary, at small enough scales, and this suggests that the mean distance between the vortices increases with the distance from the wall. The outcome reinforces the view, supported to date solely by numerical simulations, that in thermal counterflow quantized vortices are not homogenously distributed in the channel and that they preferentially concentrate close to its walls. Boundary layers might therefore also exist in quantum flows, although some of their features appear to be significantly different from those attributed to wall-bounded flows of viscous fluids, due to the presence of quantized vortices.

  7. The role of periodic orbits and bubbles of chaos during the transition to turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeyer, S; Hof, B

    2015-01-01

    Starting with turbulence that explores a wide region in phase space, we discover several relative periodic orbits (RPOs) embedded within a subregion of the chaotic turbulent saddle. We also extract directly from simulation, several travelling waves (TWs). These TWs together with the RPOs are unstable states and are believed to provide the skeleton of the chaotic saddle. Earlier studies have shown that such invariant solutions can help to explain wall bounded shear flows, and a finite subset of them are expected to dominate the dynamics (Faisst & Eckhardt 2003; Pringle & Kerswell 2007; Hof et al. 2004). The introduction of symmetries is typically necessary to facilitate this approach. Applying only the shift-reflect symmetry, the geometry is less constrained than previous studies in pipe flow. A 'long-period' RPO is identified that is only very weakly repelling. Turbulent trajectories are found to frequently approach and frequently shadow this orbit. In addition the orbit characterises a resulting 'bub...

  8. Structures and scaling laws of turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlack, Martin; Avsarkisov, Victor; Hoyas, Sergio; Rosteck, Andreas; Garcia-Galache, Jose P.; Frank, Andy

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a set of large scale DNS of turbulent Couette flow with the two key objectives: (i) to better understand large scale coherent structures and (ii) to validate new Lie symmetry based turbulent scaling laws for the mean velocity and higher order moments. Though frequently reported in the literature large scale structures pose a serious constraint on our ability to conduct DNS of turbulent Couette flow as the largest structures grow with increasing Re#, while at the same time Kolmogorov scale decreases. Other than for the turbulent Poiseuille flow a too small box is immediately visible in low order statistics such as the mean and limited our DNS to Reτ = 550 . At the same time we observed that scaling of the mean is peculiar as it involves a certain statistical symmetry which has never been observed for any other parallel wall-bounded turbulent shear flow. Symmetries such as Galilean group lie at the heart of fluid dynamics, while for turbulence statistics due to the multi-point correlation equations (MPCE) additional statistical symmetries are admitted. Most important, symmetries are the essential to construct exact solutions to the MPCE, which with the new above-mentioned special statistical symmetry led to a new turbulent scaling law for the Couette flow. DFG Grant No; KH 257/2-1.

  9. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  10. Validation of a turbulent Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer model using a high-energy-density OMEGA laser experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O A; Smalyuk, V A; Raman, K; Schilling, O; Hansen, J F; Langstaff, G; Martinez, D; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Greenough, J A; Wallace, R; Di Stefano, C A; Drake, R P; Marion, D; Krauland, C M; Kuranz, C C

    2012-10-12

    Following the successful demonstration of an OMEGA laser-driven platform for generating and studying nearly two-dimensional unstable plasma shear layers [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056305 (2009); Harding et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045005 (2009)], this Letter reports on the first quantitative measurement of turbulent mixing in a high-energy-density plasma. As a blast wave moves parallel to an unperturbed interface between a low-density foam and a high-density plastic, baroclinic vorticity is deposited at the interface and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-driven turbulent mixing layer is created in the postshock flow due to surface roughness. The spatial scale and density profile of the turbulent layer are diagnosed using x-ray radiography with sufficiently small uncertainty so that the data can be used to ~0.17 μm) in the postshock plasma flow are consistent with an "inertial subrange," within which a Kolmogorov turbulent energy cascade can be active. An illustration of comparing the data set with the predictions of a two-equation turbulence model in the ares radiation hydrodynamics code is also presented.

  11. The turbulent structures around clusters formed under a range of armoring shear stresses and grain size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, J. C.; Tan, L.

    2011-12-01

    In gravel bed rivers, low flows generate shear stresses less than what is needed to entrain the largest particles but large enough to transport the fines. During sustained low flows, fine sediment winnows from the bed surface and an armored surface layer forms. As the surface armor forms, a surface structure develops that increases bed roughness and flow resistance and can be characterized by the presence of clusters. Individual clusters are known to exert a significant influence over the spatial and temporal flow processes acting in the vicinity of the bed. A series of flume experiments investigated the turbulent structures formed around clusters naturally developed during bed armoring. The series of experiments created armored beds using four different flow rates and four different bulk grain size distributions which progressively increased in the percent sand in the bed sediment. Following an initial run segment that established equilibrium sediment transport and full bed mobility, the flow rate in the flume was reduced and the bed surface fully armored. Once armored, clusters were identified using a combination of bed DEM, vertical profile, and visual analysis. Instantaneous three-dimensional flow velocities were measured around the clusters using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, and these values were used to calculate Reynolds shear stresses, turbulence intensities, and turbulent kinetic energy in the flow field. Results show a significant change in the flow profiles over a cluster when compared to an open area of the armored bed. Reynolds shear stresses doubled over the cluster and turbulence intensity reached a peak value right above the single cluster. The results also suggest the effects of the single cluster on the surrounding flow dynamics are quite localized and limited to 30cm in lateral orientation. Quadrant analysis showing large ejection and sweep events around clusters indicates vortex formation at the cluster crest. The magnitude of the coherent

  12. Ecological collapse and the emergence of traveling waves at the onset of shear turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The transition to turbulence exhibits remarkable spatio-temporal behavior that continues to defy detailed understanding. Near the onset to turbulence in pipes, transient turbulent regions decay either directly or, at higher Reynolds numbers through splitting, with characteristic time-scales that exhibit a super-exponential dependence on Reynolds number. Here we report numerical simulations of transitional pipe flow, showing that a zonal flow emerges at large scales, activated by anisotropic turbulent fluctuations; in turn, the zonal flow suppresses the small-scale turbulence leading to stochastic predator-prey dynamics. We show that this "ecological" model of transitional turbulence reproduces the super-exponential lifetime statistics and phenomenology of pipe flow experiments. Our work demonstrates that a fluid on the edge of turbulence is mathematically analogous to an ecosystem on the edge of extinction, and provides an unbroken link between the equations of fluid dynamics and the directed percolation univ...

  13. Solar-wind turbulence and shear: a superposed-epoch analysis of corotating interaction regions at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    A superposed-epoch analysis of ACE and OMNI2 measurements is performed on 27 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in 2003-2008, with the zero epoch taken to be the stream interface as determined by the maximum of the plasma vorticity. The structure of CIRs is investigated. When the flow measurements are rotated into the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system the shear is seen to be abrupt and intense, with vorticities on the order of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -4} sec{sup -1}. Converging flows perpendicular to the stream interface are seen in the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system and about half of the CIRs show a layer of divergent rebound flow away from the stream interface. Arguments indicate that any spreading of turbulence away from the region where it is produced is limited to about 10{sup 6} km, which is very small compared with the thickness of a CrR. Analysis of the turbulence across the CrRs is performed. When possible, the effects of discontinuities are removed from the data. Fluctuation amplitudes, the Alfvenicity, and the level of Alfvenic correlations all vary smoothly across the CrR. The Alfven ratio exhibits a decrease at the shear zone of the stream interface. Fourier analysis of 4.5-hr subintervals of ACE data is performed and the results are superposed averaged as an ensemble of realizations. The spectral slopes of the velocity, magnetic-field, and total-energy fluctuations vary smoothly across the CIR. The total-energy spectral slope is {approx} 3/2 in the slow and fast wind and in the CrRs. Analysis of the Elsasser inward-outward fluctuations shows a smooth transition across the CrR from an inward-outward balance in the slow wind to an outward dominance in the fast wind. A number of signatures of turbulence driving at the shear zone are sought (entropy change, turbulence amplitude, Alfvenicity, Alfven ratio, spectral slopes, in-out nature): none show evidence of driving of turbulence by shear.

  14. Solar-wind turbulence and shear: a superposed-epoch analysis of corotating interaction regions at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    A superposed-epoch analysis of ACE and OMNI2 measurements is performed on 27 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in 2003-2008, with the zero epoch taken to be the stream interface as determined by the maximum of the plasma vorticity. The structure of CIRs is investigated. When the flow measurements are rotated into the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system the shear is seen to be abrupt and intense, with vorticities on the order of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -4} sec{sup -1}. Converging flows perpendicular to the stream interface are seen in the local-Parker-spiral coordinate system and about half of the CIRs show a layer of divergent rebound flow away from the stream interface. Arguments indicate that any spreading of turbulence away from the region where it is produced is limited to about 10{sup 6} km, which is very small compared with the thickness of a CrR. Analysis of the turbulence across the CrRs is performed. When possible, the effects of discontinuities are removed from the data. Fluctuation amplitudes, the Alfvenicity, and the level of Alfvenic correlations all vary smoothly across the CrR. The Alfven ratio exhibits a decrease at the shear zone of the stream interface. Fourier analysis of 4.5-hr subintervals of ACE data is performed and the results are superposed averaged as an ensemble of realizations. The spectral slopes of the velocity, magnetic-field, and total-energy fluctuations vary smoothly across the CIR. The total-energy spectral slope is {approx} 3/2 in the slow and fast wind and in the CrRs. Analysis of the Elsasser inward-outward fluctuations shows a smooth transition across the CrR from an inward-outward balance in the slow wind to an outward dominance in the fast wind. A number of signatures of turbulence driving at the shear zone are sought (entropy change, turbulence amplitude, Alfvenicity, Alfven ratio, spectral slopes, in-out nature): none show evidence of driving of turbulence by shear.

  15. Structure and mechanism in a second-order statistical state dynamics model of self-sustaining turbulence in plane Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the self-sustaining process (SSP) that maintains turbulence in wall-bounded shear flow. The study uses Couette flow and is based on a statistical state dynamics (SSD) model closed at second order with state variables the streamwise mean (first cumulant) and the covariance of perturbations (second cumulant). The SSD is closed by either neglecting or stochastically parameterizing the perturbation--perturbation nonlinearity in the perturbation covariance equation. This class of quasi-linear SSD models, which are referred to as RNL models, are a second order SSD systems that includes the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T or equivalently RNL$_\\infty$) model which is used in this study. Comparisons of turbulence maintained in DNS and RNL simulations have demonstrated that RNL systems self-sustain turbulence with a mean flow and perturbation structure consistent with DNS. The current results isolate the dynamical components sustaining turbulence in the S3T system concentrati...

  16. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  17. Effects of mean shear and scalar initial length scale on three-scalar mixing in turbulent coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chenning; Li, Wei; Yuan, Mengyuan; Carter, Campbell

    2016-11-01

    We investigate three-scalar mixing in a turbulent coaxial jet, in which a center jet and an annular flow, consisting of acetone-doped air and ethylene respectively, are mixed with the co-flow air. We investigate the effects of the velocity and length scale ratios of the annular flow to the center jet. Planar laser-induced fluorescence and Rayleigh scattering are employed to image the scalars. The results show that the velocity ratio alters the relative mean shear rates in the mixing layers between the center jet and the annular flow and between the annular flow and the co-flow, modifying the scalar fields through mean-flow advection, turbulent transport, and small-scale mixing. The length scale ratio determines the degree of separation between the center jet and the co-flow. The results show that while varying the velocity ratio can alter the mixing characteristics qualitatively, varying the annulus width only has quantitative effects. The evolution of the mean scalar profiles are dominated by the mean-flow advection, while the shape of the joint probability density function is largely determined by the turbulent transport and molecular diffusion. The results in the present study have implications for understanding and modeling multiscalar mixing in turbulent reactive flows. Supported by NSF.

  18. Homage to Bob Brodkey at 85: Ejections, Sweeps and Reynolds Shear Stress Generation in Turbulent Pipe Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, James M

    2013-01-01

    Almost 50 years ago Bob Brodkey and his student, Corino, conceived of and carried out a visualization experiment for the very near wall region of a turbulent pipe flow that, together with the turbulent boundary layer visualization of Kline et al., excited the turbulence research community. Using a high-speed movie camera mounted on a lathe bed that recorded magnified images in a frame of reference moving with the flow, they observed the motions of submicron particles in the sub-layer, buffer-layer and lower part of the log-layer. Surprisingly, these motions were not nearly so locally random as was the general view of turbulence at the time. Rather, connected regions of the near wall flow decelerated and then erupted away from the wall in what they called "ejections". These decelerated motions were followed by larger scale connected motions toward the wall from above that they called "sweeps". They estimated that ejections accounted for 70% of the Reynolds shear stress at Re_d = 20,000 while only occurring abo...

  19. Instability of the roll/streak structure induced by free-stream turbulence in pre-transitional Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although the roll/streak structure is ubiquitous in pre-transitional wall-bounded shear flow, this structure is linearly stable if the idealization of laminar flow is made. Lacking an instability, the large transient growth of the roll/streak structure has been invoked to explain its appearance as resulting from chance occurrence in the free-stream turbulence (FST) of perturbations configured to optimally excite it. However, there is an alternative interpretation which is that FST interacts with the roll/streak structure to destabilize it. Statistical state dynamics (SSD) provides analysis methods for studying instabilities of this type which arise from interaction between the coherent and incoherent components of turbulence. Stochastic structural stability theory (S3T), which implements SSD in the form of a closure at second order, is used to analyze the SSD modes arising from interaction between the coherent streamwise invariant component and the incoherent FST component of turbulence. The least stable S3T ...

  20. Ecological collapse and the emergence of travelling waves at the onset of shear turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Hsieh, Tsung-Lin; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms and universality class underlying the remarkable phenomena at the transition to turbulence remain a puzzle 130 years after their discovery. Near the onset to turbulence in pipes, plane Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Couette flow, transient turbulent regions decay either directly or through splitting, with characteristic timescales that exhibit a super-exponential dependence on Reynolds number. The statistical behaviour is thought to be related to directed percolation (DP; refs ,,,). Attempts to understand transitional turbulence dynamically invoke periodic orbits and streamwise vortices, the dynamics of long-lived chaotic transients, and model equations based on analogies to excitable media. Here we report direct numerical simulations of transitional pipe flow, showing that a zonal flow emerges at large scales, activated by anisotropic turbulent fluctuations; in turn, the zonal flow suppresses the small-scale turbulence leading to stochastic predator-prey dynamics. We show that this ecological model of transitional turbulence, which is asymptotically equivalent to DP at the transition, reproduces the lifetime statistics and phenomenology of pipe flow experiments. Our work demonstrates that a fluid on the edge of turbulence exhibits the same transitional scaling behaviour as a predator-prey ecosystem on the edge of extinction, and establishes a precise connection with the DP universality class.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Statistical Turbulence Effects on Beam Propagation through 2-D Shear Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    describe turbulence effects on optical beam propagation. [6] Toselli et al summarized recent experimental results that did not agree with analytical...Tennekes, H. and J. L. Lumley. A First Course in Turbulence. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, First edition, 1972. [18] Toselli , Italo, Larry C. Andrews

  2. Turbulent Transport by Diffusive Stratified Shear Flows: From Local to Global Models. I. Numerical Simulations of a Stratified Plane Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaud, Pascale; Gagnier, Damien; Verhoeven, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Shear-induced turbulence could play a significant role in mixing momentum and chemical species in stellar radiation zones, as discussed by Zahn. In this paper we analyze the results of direct numerical simulations of stratified plane Couette flows, in the limit of rapid thermal diffusion, to measure the turbulent viscosity and the turbulent diffusivity of a passive tracer as a function of the local shear and the local stratification. We find that the stability criterion proposed by Zahn, namely that the product of the gradient Richardson number and the Prandtl number must be smaller than a critical values {(J\\Pr )}c for instability, adequately accounts for the transition to turbulence in the flow, with {(J\\Pr )}c≃ 0.007. This result recovers and confirms the prior findings of Prat et al. Zahn’s model for the turbulent diffusivity and viscosity, namely that the mixing coefficient should be proportional to the ratio of the thermal diffusivity to the gradient Richardson number, does not satisfactorily match our numerical data. It fails (as expected) in the limit of large stratification where the Richardson number exceeds the aforementioned threshold for instability, but it also fails in the limit of low stratification where the turbulent eddy scale becomes limited by the computational domain size. We propose a revised model for turbulent mixing by diffusive stratified shear instabilities that properly accounts for both limits, fits our data satisfactorily, and recovers Zahn’s model in the limit of large Reynolds numbers.

  3. Theory of turbulent shear flow I. Kinetic theory derivation of the Reynolds equation: Avoiding the closure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piest, Jürgen

    1989-06-01

    This is the first of a series of three papers which report on an theoretical turbulence investigation. In the present part, the Reynolds equation for the mean velocity field in turbulent shear flow is derived in a systematic way starting from established physical knowledge. A basic problem of contemporary turbulence theory is that, at the hydrodynamic level, there seems to be no way presently to derive systematically the initial probability distribution of the fluctuating momentum density. For this reason, N-particle statistical mechanics is employed in this investigation. The closure problem of continuum turbulence theory is avoided by this method. The technique of deriving transport equations from the Liouville equation by projection operator methods is used for the derivation. Stationary constant density/temperature processes are considered only. The dissipative term of the momemtum transport equation is analyzed in order to obtain the formulas for the laminar and turbulent friction forces. The latter is obtained as a second-order convolution in the mean velocity field. The kernel function is a time integral of an equilibrium triple correlation function; it constitutes a physical “constant” of the fluid which is needed in addition to the viscosity constant. Its calculation has been the object of a separate investigation which will be reported in the second paper. The third paper describes the numerical evaluation and comparison with experiment for the spherical case of the circular jet. In the present state, the theoretical formula does not reproduce the experimental data. This is considered a preliminary result which, in view of the systematic nature of the derivation, offers the possibility to trace it back to the spots where the theoretical structure is still not adequate.

  4. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-14

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc(-0.5), and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent shear flow using a cascade model; Numerische Simulation turbulenter Scherstroemungen mit einem Kaskadenmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, V.

    1998-01-01

    Homogeneous stratified turbulent shear flow was simulated numerically using the cascade model of Eggers and Grossmann (1991). The model is made applicable to homogeneous shear flow by transformation into a coordinate system that moves along with a basic flow with a constant vertical velocity gradient. The author simulated cases of stable thermal stratification with Richardson numbers in the range of 0{<=}Ri{<=}1. The simulation data were evaluated with particular regard to the anisotropic characteristics of the turbulence field. Further, the results are compared with some common equation systems up to second order. (orig.) [Deutsch] Thema der vorliegenden Dissertation ist die numerische Simulation homogener geschichteter turbulenter Scherstroemungen. Grundlage der Simulation ist das von Eggers and Grossmann (1991) entwickelte Kaskadenmodell. Dieses Modell wird durch Transformation in ein Koordinatensystem, das mit einem Grundstrom mit konstantem vertikalen Geschwindigkeitsgradienten mitbewegt wird, auf homogene Scherstroemungen angewendet. Simuliert werden Faelle mit stabiler thermischer Schichtung mit Richardsonzahlen im Bereich von 0{<=}Ri{<=}1. Der Schwerpunkt bei der Auswertung der Simulationsdaten liegt auf der Untersuchung der Anisotropie-Eigenschaften des Turbulenzfeldes. Darueber hinaus wird ein Vergleich mit einigen gaengigen Schliessungsansaetzen bis zur zweiten Ordnung gezogen. (orig.)

  6. Adjoint-based sensitivity of flames to ignition parameters in non-premixed shear-flow turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint of the linearized and perturbed compressible flow equations for a mixture of chemically reacting ideal gases is used to assess the sensitivity of ignition in non-premixed shear-flow turbulence. Direct numerical simulations are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint is used to provide a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). Owing to the ultimately binary outcome of ignition (i.e., it succeeds or fails after some period), a QoI is defined that both quantifies ignition success and varies smoothly near its threshold based on the heat release parameter in a short-time horizon during the ignition process. We use the resulting gradient to quantify the flow properties and model parameters that most affect the initiation of a sustained flame. A line-search algorithm is used to identify regions of high ignition probability and map the boundary between successful and failed ignition. The approach is demonstrated on a non-premixed turbulent shear layer and on a reacting jet-in-crossflow.

  7. Effect of Schmidt number on mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface in a wind-driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Naohisa; Kurose, Ryoichi; Kimura, Atsushi; Komori, Satoru

    2016-11-01

    The mass transfer across a sheared gas-liquid interface strongly depends on the Schmidt number. Here we investigate the relationship between mass transfer coefficient on the liquid side, kL, and Schmidt number, Sc, in the wide range of 0.7 ≤ Sc ≤ 1000. We apply a three-dimensional semi direct numerical simulation (SEMI-DNS), in which the mass transfer is solved based on an approximated deconvolution model (ADM) scheme, to wind-driven turbulence with mass transfer across a sheared wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface. In order to capture the deforming gas-liquid interface, an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method is employed. Our results show that similar to the case for flat gas-liquid interfaces, kL for the wind-driven wavy gas-liquid interface is generally proportional to Sc‑0.5, and can be roughly estimated by the surface divergence model. This trend is endorsed by the fact that the mass transfer across the gas-liquid interface is controlled mainly by streamwise vortices on the liquid side even for the wind-driven turbulence under the conditions of low wind velocities without wave breaking.

  8. Interaction between sheared flows and turbulent transport in magnetized fusion-grade plasmas; Interaction entre ecoulements cisailles et transport turbulent dans les plasmas de fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M.

    2008-11-15

    The H confinement regime is set when the heating power reaches a threshold value P{sub c} and is linked to the formation of a transport barrier in the edge region of the plasma. Such a barrier is characterized by a high pressure gradient and is submitted to ELM (edge localized mode) instabilities. ELM instabilities trigger violent quasi-periodical ejections of matter and heat that induce quasi-periodical relaxations of the transport barrier called relaxation oscillations. In this work we studied the interaction between sheared flows and turbulence in fusion plasmas. In particular, we studied the complex dynamics of a transport barrier and we show through a simulation that resonant magnetic perturbations could control relaxation oscillations without a significant loss of confinement

  9. One-way spatial integration of Navier-Stokes equations: stability of wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Georgios; Colonius, Tim; Towne, Aaron; Beyar, Michael

    2016-11-01

    For three-dimensional flows, questions of stability, receptivity, secondary flows, and coherent structures require the solution of large partial-derivative eigenvalue problems. Reduced-order approximations are thus required for engineering prediction since these problems are often computationally intractable or prohibitively expensive. For spatially slowly evolving flows, such as jets and boundary layers, a regularization of the equations of motion sometimes permits a fast spatial marching procedure that results in a huge reduction in computational cost. Recently, a novel one-way spatial marching algorithm has been developed by Towne & Colonius. The new method overcomes the principle flaw observed in Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE), namely the ad hoc regularization that removes upstream propagating modes. The one-way method correctly parabolizes the flow equations based on estimating, in a computationally efficient way, the local spectrum in each cross-stream plane and an efficient spectral filter eliminates modes with upstream group velocity. Results from the application of the method to wall-bounded flows will be presented and compared with predictions from the full linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations and PSE.

  10. Critical conditions for the buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate numerically the critical conditions for detachment of an isolated, wall-bound emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. To that end, we present a simple extension of a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures that was previously employed for simulating several two-phase flow phenomena far and near the critical point [A. G. Lamorgese et al. "Phase-field approach to multiphase flow modeling," Milan J. Math. 79(2), 597-642 (2011)] to allow for static contact angles other than 90°. We use the same formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin ["Contact-line dynamics of a diffuse fluid interface," J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57-88 (2000)], which accommodates a cubic (Hermite) interpolation of surface tensions between the wall and each phase at equilibrium. We show that this model can be successfully employed for simulating three-phase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components. We also show a numerical determination of critical Bond numbers as a function of static contact angle by phase-field simulation.

  11. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall-turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F; Ioannou, Petros J

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews results demonstrating the benefits of studying wall-bounded shear flows using dynamics for the evolution of the statistical state of the turbulent system. The statistical state dynamics (SSD) approach used in this work employs a second order closure which isolates the interaction between the streamwise mean and the equivalent of the perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean together with nonlinear interactions between the mean and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems in which an ensemble of a finite number of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow provide tractable approximations to the equivalently infinite ensemble RNL system. The infinite ensemble system,...

  12. Sheared stably stratified turbulence and large-scale waves in a lid driven cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, N; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated experimentally stably stratified turbulent flows in a lid driven cavity with a non-zero vertical mean temperature gradient in order to identify the parameters governing the mean and turbulent flows and to understand their effects on the momentum and heat transfer. We found that the mean velocity patterns (e.g., the form and the sizes of the large-scale circulations) depend strongly on the degree of the temperature stratification. In the case of strong stable stratification, the strong turbulence region is located in the vicinity of the main large-scale circulation. We detected the large-scale nonlinear oscillations in the case of strong stable stratification which can be interpreted as nonlinear internal gravity waves. The ratio of the main energy-containing frequencies of these waves in velocity and temperature fields in the nonlinear stage is about 2. The amplitude of the waves increases in the region of weak turbulence (near the bottom wall of the cavity), whereby the vertical mean temperat...

  13. Local Entropy Production in Turbulent Shear Flows: A Tool for Evaluating Heat Transfer Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. HERWIG; F. KOCK

    2006-01-01

    Performance evaluation of heat transfer devices can be based on the overall entropy production in these devices.In our study we therefore provide equations for the systematic and detailed determination of local entropy production due to dissipation of mechanical energy and due to heat conduction, both in turbulent flows. After turbulence modeling has been incorporated for the fluctuating parts the overall entropy production can be determined by integration with respect to the whole flow domain. Since, however, entropy production rates show very steep gradients close to the wall, numerical solutions are far more effective with wall functions for the entropy production terms. These wall functions are mandatory when high Reynolds number turbulence models are used. For turbulent flow in a pipe with an inserted twisted tape as heat transfer promoter it is shown that based on the overall entropy production rate a clear statement from a thermodynamic point of view is possible. For a certain range of twist strength there is a decrease in overall entropy production compared to the case without insert. Also, the optimum twist strength can be determined. This information is unavailable when only pressure drop and heat transfer data are given.

  14. Stochastic analysis of spectral broadening by a free turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, J. C.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the time-varying shear layer between a harmonic acoustic source and an observer on the frequency content of the observed sound is considered. Experimental data show that the spectral content of the acoustic signal is considerably broadened upon passing through such a shear layer. Theoretical analysis is presented which shows that such spectral broadening is entirely consistent with amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal by the time-varying shear layer. Thus, no actual frequency shift need be hypothesized to explain the spectral phenomenon. Experimental tests were conducted at 2, 4, and 6 kHz and at free jet flow velocities of 10, 20, and 30 m/s. Analysis of acoustic pressure time histories obtained from these tests confirms the above conclusion, at least for the low Mach numbers considered.

  15. Near-Wall Turbulence Modelling of Rotating and Curved Shear Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Bjoern Anders

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with verification and refinement of turbulence models within the framework of the Reynolds-averaged approach. It pays special attention to modelling the near-wall region, where the turbulence is strongly non-homogeneous and anisotropic. It also studies in detail the effects associated with an imposed rotation of the reference frame or streamline curvature. The objective with near-wall turbulence closure modelling is to formulate a set of equations governing single point turbulence statistics, which can be solved in the region of the flow which extends to the wall. This is in contrast to the commonly adopted wall-function approach in which the wall-boundary conditions are replaced by matching conditions in the logarithmic region. The near-wall models allow more flexibility by not requiring any such universal behaviour. Assessment of the novel elliptic relaxation approach to model the proximity of a solid boundary reveals an encouraging potential used in conjunction with second-moment and eddy-viscosity closures. The most natural level of closure modelling to predict flows affected by streamline curvatures or an imposed rotation of the reference frame is at the second-moment closure (SMC) level. Although SMCs naturally accounts for the effects of system rotation, the usual application of a scalar dissipation rate equation is shown to require ad hoc corrections in some cases in order to give good results. The elliptic relaxation approach is also used in conjunction with non-linear pressure-strain models and very encouraging results are obtained for rotating flows. Rotational induced secondary motions are vital to predicting the effects of system rotation. Some severe weaknesses of non-linear pressure-strain models are also indicated. Finally, a modelling methodology for anisotropic dissipation in nearly homogeneous turbulence are proposed. 84 refs., 56 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  17. An analytical-based method for studying the nonlinear evolution of localized vortices in planar homogenous shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.; Shukhman, I. G.; Karp, M.; Philip, J.

    2010-10-01

    Recent experimental and numerical studies have shown that the interaction between a localized vortical disturbance and the shear of an external base flow can lead to the formation of counter-rotating vortex pairs and hairpin vortices that are frequently observed in wall bounded and free turbulent shear flows as well as in subcritical shear flows. In this paper an analytical-based solution method is developed. The method is capable of following (numerically) the evolution of finite-amplitude localized vortical disturbances embedded in shear flows. Due to their localization in space, the surrounding base flow is assumed to have homogeneous shear to leading order. The method can solve in a novel way the interaction between a general family of unbounded planar homogeneous shear flows and any localized disturbance. The solution is carried out using Lagrangian variables in Fourier space which is convenient and enables fast computations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by following the evolved structures of large amplitude disturbances in three canonical base flows, including simple shear, plane stagnation (extensional) and pure rotation flows, and a general case. The results obtained by the current method for plane stagnation and simple shear flows are compared with the published results. The proposed method could be extended to other flows (e.g. geophysical and rotating flows) and to include periodic disturbances as well.

  18. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  19. Simulation of gaseous pollutant dispersion around an isolated building using the k-ω SST (shear stress transport) turbulence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hesheng; Thé, Jesse

    2017-05-01

    The dispersion of gaseous pollutant around buildings is complex due to complex turbulence features such as flow detachment and zones of high shear. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are one of the most promising tools to describe the pollutant distribution in the near field of buildings. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are the most commonly used CFD techniques to address turbulence transport of the pollutant. This research work studies the use of [Formula: see text] closure model for the gas dispersion around a building by fully resolving the viscous sublayer for the first time. The performance of standard [Formula: see text] model is also included for comparison, along with results of an extensively validated Gaussian dispersion model, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD (American Meteorological Society/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model). This study's CFD models apply the standard [Formula: see text] and the [Formula: see text] turbulence models to obtain wind flow field. A passive concentration transport equation is then calculated based on the resolved flow field to simulate the distribution of pollutant concentrations. The resultant simulation of both wind flow and concentration fields are validated rigorously by extensive data using multiple validation metrics. The wind flow field can be acceptably modeled by the [Formula: see text] model. However, the [Formula: see text] model fails to simulate the gas dispersion. The [Formula: see text] model outperforms [Formula: see text] in both flow and dispersion simulations, with higher hit rates for dimensionless velocity components and higher "factor of 2" of observations (FAC2) for normalized concentration. All these validation metrics of [Formula: see text] model pass the quality assurance criteria recommended by The Association of German Engineers (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure, VDI) guideline. Furthermore, these metrics are better than or the same as those

  20. Shear Stress, Turbulence Production and Dissipation in Small Tidal Channels Intersecting a Tidal Flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, A.; Puleo, J. A.; McKenna, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    A 16-day field experiment was conducted in March and April 2013 in a tidal wetland in Kent County, Delaware. The study area was a tidal flat fed by a second-order channel that flows into the Brockonbridge Gut, a small tributary of Delaware Bay. The goal of the field study was to investigate spatio-temporal variability in the hydrodynamics of the tidal flat and the small channels that intersect it, over the period of one spring-neap tidal cycle. The experiment combined remotely-sensed imagery with high-frequency in-situ measurements. A tower with imagers (RGB, NIR, TIR) was deployed to quantify the spatial variations of inundation of the channels, flat and marsh. In-situ sensors that measure flow velocity, sediment concentration and water depth were deployed at six locations on the tidal flat and in the channels. At three locations, a Nortek Vectrino II - profiling velocimeter was deployed that measures a 30 mm velocity profile at 1 mm vertical increments at 100 Hz. These velocity profiles are used to compute turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence dissipation and stress profiles close to the bed. Results show that peak velocities in the channels occur at the beginning and end of ebbing tide, when the water level is below the tidal flat level. At these instances, peaks in turbulence and bed stress also occur. The flow velocity and turbulence peaks are smaller when the water level does not fall below the tidal flat level. On the tidal flat, the flow velocities and turbulence are generally small compared to the intersecting tidal channel. Maximum flow velocities in the channels are around 0.4 m/s, while on the flat maximum velocities are under 0.1 m/s. A comparison is made between turbulence production and dissipation in both the channel and on the tidal flat to determine if advection and diffusion are important in this environment. In addition, the hydrodynamics at several locations in the channel are compared to investigate changes throughout the study area.

  1. Reynolds shear stress and heat flux calculations in a fully developed turbulent duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a modified form of the Van Driest mixing length for a fully developed turbulent channel flow leads to mean velocity and Reynolds stress distributions that are in close agreement with data obtained either from experiments or direct numerical simulations. The calculations are then extended to a nonisothermal flow by assuming a constant turbulent Prandtl number, the value of which depends on the molecular Prandtl number. Calculated distributions of mean temperature and lateral heat flux are in reasonable agreement with the simulations. The extension of the calculations to higher Reynolds numbers provides some idea of the Reynolds number required for scaling on wall variables to apply in the inner region of the flow.

  2. A Stochastic Wave Model Interpretation of Correlation Functions for Turbulent Shear Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    narrow band (frequency filtered) correlation function data. Next, the power spectral density function is identified as the appropriate frequency weighting... density function which agrees with the observed data is taken to be the superposition of a strong, unorganized background turbulence (Markoff noise...function with which to synthesize the broad band (unfiltered) from the narrow band correlation functions. The functional form of the power spectral

  3. Phase-detection measurements in free-surface turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity self-aerated flows are described as ‘white waters’ because of the entrained air bubbles. The air entrainment induces a drastic change in the multiphase flow structure of the water column and this leads to significant bubble-turbulence interactions, turbulence modulation and associated mixing processes impacting on the bulk flow properties. In these high-velocity free-surface turbulent flows, the phase-detection needle probe is a most reliable instrumentation. The signal processing of a phase-detection probe is re-visited herein. It is shown that the processing may be performed on the raw probe signal as well as the thresholded data. The latter yields the time-averaged void fraction, the bubble count rate, the particle chord time distributions and the particle clustering properties within the particulate flow regions. The raw probe signal analysis gives further the auto-correlation time scale and the power spectrum density function. Finally dimensional considerations are developed with a focus on the physical modelling of free-surface flows in hydraulic structures. It is argued that the notion of scale effects must be defined in terms of some specific set of air-water flow properties within well-defined testing conditions, while a number of free-surface flow characteristics are more prone to scale effects than others, even in large-size physical facilities.

  4. Estimation of Rate of Strain Magnitude and Average Viscosity in Turbulent Flow of Shear Thinning and Yield Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Robert; Thompson, Chris P.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a series of numerical simulations of non-Newtonian fluids in high Reynolds number flows in circular pipes. The fluids studied in the computations have shear-thinning and yield stress properties. Turbulence is described using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the Boussinesq eddy viscosity hypothesis. The evaluation of standard, two-equation models led to some observations regarding the order of magnitude as well as probabilistic information about the rate of strain. We argue that an accurate estimate of the rate of strain tensor is essential in capturing important flow features. It is first recognised that an apparent viscosity comprises two flow dependant components: one originating from rheology and the other from the turbulence model. To establish the relative significance of the terms involved, an order of magnitude analysis has been performed. The main observation supporting further discussion is that in high Reynolds number regimes the magnitudes of fluctuating rates of strain and fluctuating vorticity dominate the magnitudes of their respective averages. Since these quantities are included in the rheological law, the values of viscosity obtained from the fluctuating and mean velocity fields are different. Validation against Direct Numerical Simulation data shows at least an order of magnitude discrepancy in some regions of the flow. Moreover, the predictions of the probabilistic analysis show a favourable agreement with statistics computed from DNS data. A variety of experimental, as well as computational data has been collected. Data come from the latest experiments by Escudier et al. [1], DNS from Rudman et al. [2] and zeroth-order turbulence models of Pinho [3]. The fluid rheologies are described by standard power-law and Herschel-Bulkley models which make them suitable for steady state calculations of shear flows. Suitable regularisations are utilised to secure numerical stability. Two new models have been

  5. Transport and coherent structures in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tardu, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Wall bounded turbulent flows are of major importance in industrial and environmental fluid mechanics. The structure of the wall turbulence is intrinsically related to the coherent structures that play a fundamental role in the transport process. The comprehension of their regeneration mechanism is indispensable for the development of efficient strategies in terms of drag control and near wall turbulence management. This book provides an up-to-date overview on the progress made in this specific area in recent years.

  6. Coarse-grained theory to predict the concentration distribution of red blood cells in wall-bounded Couette flow at zero Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsimhan, Vivek; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2013-06-01

    We develop a coarse-grained theory to predict the concentration distribution of a suspension of vesicles or red blood cells in a wall-bound Couette flow. This model balances the wall-induced hydrodynamic lift on deformable particles with the flux due to binary collisions, which we represent via a second-order kinetic master equation. Our theory predicts a depletion of particles near the channel wall (i.e., the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect), followed by a near-wall formation of particle layers. We quantify the effect of channel height, viscosity ratio, and shear-rate on the cell-free layer thickness (i.e., the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect). The results agree with in vitro experiments as well as boundary integral simulations of suspension flows. Lastly, we examine a new type of collective particle motion for red blood cells induced by hydrodynamic interactions near the wall. These "swapping trajectories," coined by Zurita-Gotor et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 592, 447-469 (2007), 10.1017/S0022112007008701], could explain the origin of particle layering near the wall. The theory we describe represents a significant improvement in terms of time savings and predictive power over current large-scale numerical simulations of suspension flows.

  7. Height-dependence of spatio-temporal spectra of wall-bounded turbulence - LES results and model predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, Michael; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Wavenumber-frequency spectra of the streamwise velocity component obtained from large-eddy simulations are presented. Following a recent paper [Wilczek et al., J. Fluid. Mech., 769:R1, 2015] we show that the main features, a Doppler shift and a Doppler broadening of frequencies, are captured by an advection model based on the Tennekes-Kraichnan random-sweeping hypothesis with additional mean flow. In this paper, we focus on the height-dependence of the spectra within the logarithmic layer of the flow. We furthermore benchmark an analytical model spectrum that takes the predictions of the random-sweeping model as a starting point and find good agreement with the LES data. We also quantify the influence of LES grid resolution on the wavenumber-frequency spectra.

  8. Studies of Real Roughness Effects for Improved Modeling and Control of Practical Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-22

    While the aforementioned studies regarding VLSM’s employed hot - wire anemometry to study very large spatial scales from single-point velocity measurements...temporal hot - wire data. In addition, Flack et al. (2005) indicated that the rough-wall flow of Krogstad & Antonia (1994) may not satisfy the criteria...and in some cases multiple (10) points simultaneously with multiple hot - wire probes), time-resolved PIV allows one to measure velocities at many

  9. Identification and control of large-scale structures in highly turbulent shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, K. C.; Wilson, K. J.; Gutmark, E.

    Unforced and forced subsonic jets were studied using hot-wire anemometry. It is found that highly coherent flow structure can be generated in the initial region of ducted flow by applying forcing to the flow innstability frequencies. Flow visualization experiments in water showed that the coherent structures had relatively high azimuthal coherence and were periodic in time and space. The convection velocity of the structures was about 60 percent of the mean flow velocity. Mixing of the shear layer with the surrounding recirculation zone and the inside core was enhanced by the forcing and reduced their size accordingly. Photographs from the flow visualization tests are provided.

  10. Turbulent transport by diffusive stratified shear flows: from local to global models. Part I: Numerical simulations of a stratified plane Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Garaud, P; Verhoeven, J

    2016-01-01

    Shear-induced turbulence could play a significant role in mixing momentum and chemical species in stellar radiation zones, as discussed by Zahn (1974). In this paper we analyze the results of direct numerical simulations of stratified plane Couette flows, in the limit of rapid thermal diffusion, to measure the turbulent diffusivity and turbulent viscosity as a function of the local shear and the local stratification. We find that the stability criterion proposed by Zahn (1974), namely that the product of the gradient Richardson number and the Prandtl number must be smaller than a critical values $(J\\Pr)_c$ for instability, adequately accounts for the transition to turbulence in the flow, with $(J\\Pr)_c \\simeq 0.007$. This result recovers and confirms the prior findings of Prat et al. (2016). Zahn's model for the turbulent diffusivity and viscosity (Zahn 1992), namely that the mixing coefficient should be proportional to the ratio of the thermal diffusivity to the gradient Richardson number, does not satisfact...

  11. Quantifying turbulent wall shear stress in a subject specific human aorta using large eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Gårdhagen, Roland; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-10-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to calculate the disturbed flow field and the wall shear stress (WSS) in a subject specific human aorta. Velocity and geometry measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are taken as input to the model to provide accurate boundary conditions and to assure the physiological relevance. In total, 50 consecutive cardiac cycles were simulated from which a phase average was computed to get a statistically reliable result. A decomposition similar to Reynolds decomposition is introduced, where the WSS signal is divided into a pulsating part (due to the mass flow rate) and a fluctuating part (originating from the disturbed flow). Oscillatory shear index (OSI) is plotted against time-averaged WSS in a novel way, and locations on the aortic wall where elevated values existed could easily be found. In general, high and oscillating WSS values were found in the vicinity of the branches in the aortic arch, while low and oscillating WSS were present in the inner curvature of the descending aorta. The decomposition of WSS into a pulsating and a fluctuating part increases the understanding of how WSS affects the aortic wall, which enables both qualitative and quantitative comparisons.

  12. Turbulent pipe flow: Statistics, Re-dependence, structures and similarities with channel and boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, George K.; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.

    2014-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of fully developed turbulent pipe flow are extensively compared with those of turbulent channel flow and zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow for Reτ up to 1000. In the near-wall region, a high degree of similarity is observed in the three flow cases in terms of one-point statistics, probability density functions of the wall-shear stress and pressure, spectra, Reynolds stress budgets and advection velocity of the turbulent structures. This supports the notion that the near-wall region is universal for pipe and channel flow. Probability density functions of the wall shear stress, streamwise turbulence intensities, one-dimensional spanwise/azimuthal spectra of the streamwise velocity and Reynolds-stress budgets are very similar near the wall in the three flow cases, suggesting that the three canonical wall-bounded flows share many features. In the wake region, the mean streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress budgets show some expected differences.

  13. High resolution three-dimensional (256 to the 3rd) spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Werner J. A.; Buch, Kenneth A.

    Results from highly resolved three-dimensional spatio-temporal measurements of the conserved scalar field zeta(x,t) in a turbulent shear flow. Each of these experiments consists of 256 to the 3rd individual point measurements of the local instantaneous conserved scalar value in the flow. The spatial and temporal resolution of these measurements reach beyond the local Kolmogorov scale and resolve the local strain-limited molecular diffusion scale in the flow. The results clearly show molecular mixing occurring in thin strained laminar diffusion layers in a turbulent flow.

  14. Scale dependence of the alignment between strain rate and rotation in turbulent shear flow

    KAUST Repository

    Fiscaletti, D.

    2016-10-24

    The scale dependence of the statistical alignment tendencies of the eigenvectors of the strain-rate tensor e(i), with the vorticity vector omega, is examined in the self-preserving region of a planar turbulent mixing layer. Data from a direct numerical simulation are filtered at various length scales and the probability density functions of the magnitude of the alignment cosines between the two unit vectors vertical bar e(i) . (omega) over cap vertical bar are examined. It is observed that the alignment tendencies are insensitive to the concurrent large-scale velocity fluctuations, but are quantitatively affected by the nature of the concurrent large-scale velocity-gradient fluctuations. It is confirmed that the small-scale (local) vorticity vector is preferentially aligned in parallel with the large-scale (background) extensive strain-rate eigenvector e(1), in contrast to the global tendency for omega to be aligned in parallelwith the intermediate strain-rate eigenvector [Hamlington et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 111703 (2008)]. When only data from regions of the flow that exhibit strong swirling are included, the so-called high-enstrophy worms, the alignment tendencies are exaggerated with respect to the global picture. These findings support the notion that the production of enstrophy, responsible for a net cascade of turbulent kinetic energy from large scales to small scales, is driven by vorticity stretching due to the preferential parallel alignment between omega and nonlocal e(1) and that the strongly swirling worms are kinematically significant to this process.

  15. Effect of primary particle morphology on the structure of gels formed in intense turbulent shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Xie, Delong; Wu, Hua; Braun, Leonie; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-05-04

    We study the effect of primary particle morphology on intense shear-induced gelation without adding electrolytes. The primary particles are composed of a rubbery core grafted with a polystyrene shell. Depending on the shell-to-core mass ratio, the core can be partially covered by the shell, leading to strawberry-like morphology. It is found that at a fixed core mass the fractal dimension of the clusters constructing the gel decreases (i.e., more open cluster structure) as the shell mass increases, until reaching a plateau. The SEM pictures of the gels reveal that the structure variations are due to the occurrence of partial coalescence among particles, which decreases as the shell mass increases. In the region where the fractal dimension reaches a plateau, the coalescence is negligible. The conversion of the primary particles to gels is incomplete and increases as the extent of coalescence decreases. This is related to the fact that the smaller the extent of coalescence, the larger the cluster size. Thus, because of its cubic dependence on the cluster size, the aggregation rate increases as the extent of coalescence decreases, leading to increased conversion. It is therefore evident that the key parameter controlling the gel structure and the particle conversion is the core surface coverage by the shell. To further verify this conclusion, we have carried out the shear-induced gelation of another set of particles with varying core mass. It is found that the only parameter that can well correlate the values of the fractal dimension and particle conversion from the two sets of particles is the core surface coverage.

  16. A multi-layer description of Reynolds stresses in canonical wall bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2015-11-01

    A complete description of the Reynolds stress tensor is obtained for all three canonical wall turbulence (channel, pipe and turbulent boundary layer - TBL). The result builds on a multi-layer description of length (order) functions and their ratios, including viscous sublayer, buffer layer, meso-layer for the near wall (inner) region, and bulk flow or a central core (absent in TBL) for the outer region. It is shown that the streamwise mean kinetic-energy profile is quantified with high accuracy over the entire flow domain. The model contains only three Re-dependent parameters for Reynolds number (Re) covering nearly three decades. Furthermore, the inner peak location is predicted to be invariant at y+ = 15, while its magnitude shows notable Re and geometry effects, predicted to be .9.2 for high Re's pipe flows. A mechanism is proposed for the emergence of outer peak in pipes, whose magnitude is predicted to scale as .Reτ0. 05 beyond a critical Reτ about 104(). The recently reported logarithmic dependence in the bulk is recovered, but with an alternative explanation. The result is successfully extended to TBL flows by a fractional total stress and an absence of core. Equally accurate descriptions of vertical and spanwise kinetic-energy are also presented for the three flows. The result has been used to modify turbulent engineering models (i.e. k- ω model) with significant improvement.

  17. Turbulent Boundary Layer at Large Re

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia DUMITRESCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluids as deformable bodies without own shape, when starting from rest, experience interactions between the flowing fluid and the physical surfaces marking the bounds of flow. These interactions are a kind of impact process where there is a momentum exchange between two colliding bodies, i.e. the flow and its boundary surfaces. Within a short time of contact a post-impact shear flow occurs where two main effects are triggered off by the flow-induced collision: dramatic redistribution of the momentum and the boundary vorticity followed by the shear stress/viscosity change in the microstructure of the fluid which at the beginning behaves as linear reactive medium and latter as nonlinear dispersive medium. The disturbance of the starting flow induces the entanglement of the wall-bounded flow in the form of point-vortices or concentrated vorticity balls whence waves are emitted and propagated through flow field. The paper develops a wave mechanism for the transport of the concentrated boundary vorticity, directly related to the fascinating turbulence phenomenon, using the torsion concept of vorticity filaments associated with the hypothesis of thixotropic/nonlinear viscous fluid.

  18. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'.

  19. Spatially evolving vortex-gas turbulent free shear layers: Part 2. Coherent structure dynamics in vorticity and concentration fields

    CERN Document Server

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanisms of coherent structure interactions in spatially evolving turbulent free shear layers at different values of the velocity ratio parameter {\\lambda}=$(U_1-U_2)/(U_1+U_2)$, where $U_1$ and $U_2 (\\leq U_1)$ are the free stream velocities on either side of the layer. The study employs the point-vortex (or vortex-gas) model presented in part I (arXiv:1509.00603) which predicts spreading rates that are in the close neighborhood of results from most high Reynolds number experiments and 3D simulations. The present (2D) simulations show that the well-known steep-growth merger events among neighboring structures of nearly equal size (Brown & Roshko 1974) account for more than 70% of the overall growth at {\\lambda}< 0.63. However the relative contribution of such 'hard merger' events decreases gradually with increasing {\\lambda}, and accounts for only 27% of the total growth at the single-stream limit ({\\lambda} = 1). It is shown that the rest of the contribution to layer growth ...

  20. The Local Variational Multiscale Method for Turbulence Simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Ramakrishnan, Srinivas

    2005-05-01

    Accurate and efficient turbulence simulation in complex geometries is a formidable chal-lenge. Traditional methods are often limited by low accuracy and/or restrictions to simplegeometries. We explore the merger of Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) spatial discretizationswith Variational Multi-Scale (VMS) modeling, termed Local VMS (LVMS), to overcomethese limitations. DG spatial discretizations support arbitrarily high-order accuracy on un-structured grids amenable for complex geometries. Furthermore, high-order, hierarchicalrepresentation within DG provides a natural framework fora prioriscale separation crucialfor VMS implementation. We show that the combined benefits of DG and VMS within theLVMS method leads to promising new approach to LES for use in complex geometries.The efficacy of LVMS for turbulence simulation is assessed by application to fully-developed turbulent channelflow. First, a detailed spatial resolution study is undertakento record the effects of the DG discretization on turbulence statistics. Here, the localhp[?]refinement capabilites of DG are exploited to obtain reliable low-order statistics effi-ciently. Likewise, resolution guidelines for simulating wall-bounded turbulence using DGare established. We also explore the influence of enforcing Dirichlet boundary conditionsindirectly through numericalfluxes in DG which allows the solution to jump (slip) at thechannel walls. These jumps are effective in simulating the influence of the wall commen-surate with the local resolution and this feature of DG is effective in mitigating near-wallresolution requirements. In particular, we show that by locally modifying the numericalviscousflux used at the wall, we are able to regulate the near-wall slip through a penaltythat leads to improved shear-stress predictions. This work, demonstrates the potential ofthe numerical viscousflux to act as a numerically consistent wall-model and this successwarrents future research.As in any high-order numerical method some

  1. Passivity-Based Output-Feedback Control of Turbulent Channel Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Heins, Peter H; Sharma, Ati S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a robust linear time-invariant output-feedback control strategy to reduce turbulent fluctuations, and therefore skin-friction drag, in wall-bounded turbulent fluid flows, that nonetheless gives performance guarantees in the nonlinear turbulent regime. The novel strategy is effective in reducing the supply of available energy to feed the turbulent fluctuations, expressed as reducing a bound on the supply rate to a quadratic storage function. The nonlinearity present in the equations that govern the dynamics of the flow is known to be passive and can be considered as a feedback forcing to the linearised dynamics (a Lur'e decomposition). Therefore, one is only required to control the linear dynamics in order to make the system close to passive. The ten most energy-producing spatial modes of a turbulent channel flow were identified. Passivity-based controllers were then generated to control these modes. The controllers require measurements of streamwise and spanwise wall-shear stress, and the...

  2. Self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear model of plane Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States); Lieu, Binh K.; Jovanović, Mihailo R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55455 (United States); Farrell, Brian F. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Ioannou, Petros J. [Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens, 15784 (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    This paper demonstrates the maintenance of self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. The RNL system is derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations and permits higher resolution studies of the dynamical system associated with the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T) model, which is a second order approximation of the statistical state dynamics of the flow. The RNL model shares the dynamical restrictions of the S3T model but can be easily implemented by reducing a DNS code so that it retains only the RNL dynamics. Comparisons of turbulence arising from DNS and RNL simulations demonstrate that the RNL system supports self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow as well as structural and dynamical features that are consistent with DNS. These results demonstrate that the simplified RNL system captures fundamental aspects of fully developed turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows and motivate use of the RNL/S3T framework for further study of wall-turbulence.

  3. Cell wall-bound peroxidase activity and lignin formation in azuki bean epicotyls grown under hypergravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Nakano, Saho; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2009-06-01

    The effects of accelerated gravity stimuli on the cell wall-bound peroxidase activity and the lignin content were investigated along epicotyls of azuki bean (Vigna angularis) seedlings. The endogenous growth occurred primarily in the upper regions of the epicotyl, but no growth was detected in the middle or basal regions. Hypergravity treatment at 300g for 6h suppressed elongation growth and stimulated lateral expansion of the upper regions. The content of acetyl bromide-soluble lignin increased gradually from the apical to the basal regions of epicotyls. Hypergravity treatment stimulated the increase in the lignin content in epicotyls, particularly in the middle and basal regions. The peroxidase activity in the protein fraction extracted with a high ionic strength buffer from the cell wall preparation also increased gradually toward the basal region, and hypergravity treatment increased the activity in all epicotyl regions. There was a close correlation between the lignin content and the enzyme activity. These results suggest that hypergravity increases the activity of cell wall-bound peroxidase followed by increases of the lignin formation in epicotyl cell walls, which may contribute to increasing the rigidity of cell walls against the gravitational force.

  4. Investigation of wall bounded flows using SPH and the unified semi-analytical wall boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayrhofer, Arno; Violeau, Damien; Ferrand, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The semi-analytical wall boundary conditions present a mathematically rigorous framework to prescribe the influence of solid walls in SPH for fluid flows. In this paper they are investigated with respect to the skew-adjoint property which implies exact energy conservation. It will be shown that this property holds only in the limit of the continuous SPH approximation, whereas in the discrete SPH formulation it is only approximately true, leading to numerical noise. This noise, interpreted as form of "turbulence", is treated using an additional volume diffusion term in the continuity equation which we show is equivalent to an approximate Riemann solver. Subsequently two extensions to the boundary conditions are presented. The first dealing with a variable driving force when imposing a volume flux in a periodic flow and the second showing a generalization of the wall boundary condition to Robin type and arbitrary-order interpolation. Two modifications for free-surface flows are presented for the volume diffusio...

  5. The Formation of Packets of Hairpins in Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jacob; Karp, Michael; Shukhman, Ilia

    2009-11-01

    In the present work we utilize a recently developed new method in an attempt to understand the generation of packets of hairpin vortices from a pair of counter rotating streamwise vortices embedded in uniform shear flow. This analytical-based solution method is capable of following (numerically) the evolution of finite-amplitude localized vortical disturbances embedded in shear flows. Due to their localization in space, the surrounding base flow is assumed to have homogeneous shear to leading order. The method can solve in a novel way the interaction between a general family of unbounded planar homogeneous shear flows and any localized disturbance. The solution is carried out using Lagrangian variables in Fourier space which is convenient and enables fast computations. The revealed mechanism for generation of packets of hairpins seems to be universal and has been observed in the past both in fully developed wall-bounded shear flows as well as in wall-bounded transitional shear flows.

  6. Inertia-driven particle migration and mixing in a wall-bounded laminar suspension flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, V.; Abbas, M., E-mail: micheline.abbas@ensiacet.fr; Masbernat, O. [Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS: Laboratoire de Génie Chimique and CNRS, Fédération de Recherche FERMaT, Toulouse (France); Climent, E. [Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS: Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse and CNRS, Fédération de Recherche FERMaT, Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Laminar pressure-driven suspension flows are studied in the situation of neutrally buoyant particles at finite Reynolds number. The numerical method is validated for homogeneous particle distribution (no lateral migration across the channel): the increase of particle slip velocities and particle stress with inertia and concentration is in agreement with former works in the literature. In the case of a two-phase channel flow with freely moving particles, migration towards the channel walls due to the Segré-Silberberg effect is observed, leading to the development of a non-uniform concentration profile in the wall-normal direction (the concentration peaks in the wall region and tends towards zero in the channel core). The particle accumulation in the region of highest shear favors the shear-induced particle interactions and agitation, the profile of which appears to be correlated to the concentration profile. A 1D model predicting particle agitation, based on the kinetic theory of granular flows in the quenched state regime when Stokes number St = O(1) and from numerical simulations when St < 1, fails to reproduce the agitation profile in the wall normal direction. Instead, the existence of secondary flows is clearly evidenced by long time simulations. These are composed of a succession of contra-rotating structures, correlated with the development of concentration waves in the transverse direction. The mechanism proposed to explain the onset of this transverse instability is based on the development of a lift force induced by spanwise gradient of the axial velocity fluctuations. The establishment of the concentration profile in the wall-normal direction therefore results from the combination of the mean flow Segré-Silberberg induced migration, which tends to stratify the suspension and secondary flows which tend to mix the particles over the channel cross section.

  7. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B. F.; Gayme, D. F.; Ioannou, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or `band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.

  8. Contents of soluble, cell-wall-bound and exuded phlorotannins in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus, with implications on their ecological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivikko, Riitta; Loponen, Jyrki; Honkanen, Tuija; Jormalainen, Veijo

    2005-01-01

    Phlorotannins are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in brown algae that are phenotypically plastic and suggested to have multiple ecological roles. Traditionally, phlorotannins have been quantified as total soluble phlorotannins. Here, we modify a quantification procedure to measure, for the first time, the amount of cell-wall-bound phlorotannins. We also optimize the quantification of soluble phlorotannins. We use these methods to study the responses of soluble and cell-wall-bound phlorotannin to nutrient enrichment in growing and nongrowing parts of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. We also examine the effects of nutrient shortage and herbivory on the rate of phlorotannin exudation. Concentrations of cell-wall-bound phlorotannins were much lower than concentrations of soluble phlorotannins; we also found that nutrient treatment over a period of 41 days affected only soluble phlorotannins. Concentrations of each phlorotannin type correlated positively between growing and nongrowing parts of individual seaweeds. However, within nongrowing thalli, soluble and cell-wall-bound phlorotannins were negatively correlated, whereas within growing thalli there was no correlation. Phlorotannins were exuded from the thallus in all treatments. Herbivory increased exudation, while a lack of nutrients had no effect on exudation. Because the amount of cell-wall-bound phlorotannins is much smaller than the amount of soluble phlorotannins, the major function of phlorotannins appears to be a secondary one.

  9. Three measuring techniques for assessing the mean wall skin friction in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoun, E.-S.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper aims at evaluating the mean wall skin friction data in laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows obtained from two optical and one thermal measuring techniques, namely, laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA), oil-film interferometry (OFI), and surface hot-film anemometry (SHFA), respectively. A comparison among the three techniques is presented, indicating close agreement in the mean wall skin friction data obtained, directly, from both the OFI and the LDA near-wall mean velocity profiles. On the other hand, the SHFA, markedly, over estimates the mean wall skin friction by 3.5-11.7% when compared with both the LDA and the OFI data, depending on the thermal conductivity of the substrate and glue material, probe calibration, probe contamination, temperature drift and Reynolds number. Satisfactory agreement, however, is observed among all three measuring techniques at higher Reynolds numbers, Re x >106, and within ±5% with empirical relations extracted from the literature. In addition, accurate velocity data within the inertial sublayer obtained using the LDA supports the applicability of the Clauser method to evaluate the wall skin friction when appropriate values for the constants of the logarithmic line are utilized.

  10. Wall-bounded multiphase flows of N immiscible incompressible fluids: consistency and contact-angle boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective method for simulating wall-bounded multiphase flows consisting of $N$ ($N\\geqslant 2$) immiscible incompressible fluids with different densities, viscosities and pairwise surface tensions. The N-phase physical formulation is based on a modified thermodynamically consistent phase field model that is more general than in a previous work, and it is developed by considering the reduction consistency if some of the fluid components were absent from the system. We propose an N-phase contact-angle boundary condition that is reduction consistent between $N$ phases and $M$ phases ($2\\leqslant M\\leqslant N-1$). We also present a numerical algorithm for solving the N-phase governing equations together with the contact-angle boundary conditions developed herein. Extensive numerical experiments are presented for several flow problems involving multiple fluid components and solid-wall boundaries to investigate the wettability effects with multiple types of contact angles. In particular, we compare s...

  11. Turbulence in the highly restricted dynamics of a closure at second order: comparison with DNS

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas; Farrell, Brian F; Ioannou, Petros J; Jiménez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    S3T (Stochastic Structural Stability Theory) employs a closure at second order to obtain the dynamics of the statistical mean turbulent state. When S3T is implemented as a coupled set of equations for the streamwise mean and perturbation states, nonlinearity in the dynamics is restricted to interaction between the mean and perturbations. The S3T statistical mean state dynamics can be approximately implemented by similarly restricting the dynamics used in a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the full Navier-Stokes equations (referred to as the NS system). Although this restricted nonlinear system (referred to as the RNL system) is greatly simplified in its dynamics in comparison to the associated NS, it nevertheless self-sustains a turbulent state in wall-bounded shear flow with structures and dynamics comparable to that in observed turbulence. Moreover, RNL turbulence can be analyzed effectively using theoretical methods developed to study the closely related S3T system. In order to better understand RNL tu...

  12. Turbulence measurements in a transonic boundary layer and free-shear flow using laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Rose, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the turbulence fluctuations in velocity and mass flux have been obtained in Mach 0.6 and 0.8 turbulent boundary layer and free-shear layer flows by laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques. To evaluate the effects of compressibility, these transonic data are compared to available incompressible and supersonic results. Based on some simplifying assumptions, estimates of the rms density fluctuations are made for which error bounds are given. In addition to these fluctuation data, the compressible mean velocity data obtained with the laser velocimeter are presented and compared to pitot tube results. The investigation was conducted in the Ames 6- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.8 for a unit Reynolds number of about 10,000,000 per meter.

  13. Near-wall similarity in the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. III - Shear-driven flow results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ten of eleven proposed three-dimensional similarity models identified in the literature are evaluated with direct wall shear, velocity field, and pressure gradient data from a three-dimensional shear-driven boundary layer flow. Results define an upper limit on velocity vector skewing for each model's predictive ability. When combined with earlier results for pressure-driven flows, each model's predictive ability with and without pressure gradients is summarized. The utility of some two-dimensional type indirect wall shear measurement methods and wall shear inference methods from near-wall velocity measurements for three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  14. Turbulent transport modeling of shear flows around an aerodynamic wing. Development of turbulent near-wall model and its application to recirculating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in implementing and refining two near-wall turbulence models in which the near-wall region is divided into either two or three zones is outlined. These models were successfully applied to the computation of recirculating flows. The research was further extended to obtaining experimental results of two different recirculating flow conditions in order to check the validity of the present models. Two different experimental apparatuses were set up: axisymmetric turbulent impinging jets on a flat plate, and turbulent flows in a circular pipe with a abrupt pipe expansion. It is shown that generally better results are obtained by using the present near-wall models, and among the models the three-zone model is superior to the two-zone model.

  15. A study of synthetic large scales in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Luhar, Mitul; Barnard, Casey; Sheplak, Mark; McKeon, Beverley

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic spanwise-constant spatio-temporal disturbances are excited in a turbulent boundary layer through a spatially impulsive patch of dynamic wall-roughness. The downstream flow response is studied through hot wire anemometry, pressure measurements at the wall and direct measurements of wall-shear-stress made using a novel micro-machined capacitive floating element sensor. These measurements are phase-locked to the input perturbation to recover the synthetic large-scale motion and characterize its structure and wall signature. The phase relationship between the synthetic large scale and small scale activity provides further insights into the apparent amplitude modulation effect between them, and the dynamics of wall-bounded turbulent flows in general. Results from these experiments will be discussed in the context of the critical-layer behavior revealed by the resolvent analysis of McKeon & Sharma (J Fluid Mech, 2010), and compared with similar earlier work by Jacobi & McKeon (J Fluid Mech, 2011). Model predictions are shown to be in broad agreement with experiments. The support of AFOSR grant #FA 9550-12-1-0469, Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) and Sandia Graduate Fellowship (C.B.) are gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Numerical investigations on the influence of wind shear and turbulence on aircraft trailing vortices; Numerische Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von Windscherung und Turbulenz auf Flugzeugwirbelschleppen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, T.

    2003-07-01

    In several aspects, the behaviour of aircraft wake vortices under situations of vertical wind shear is significantly different from non-shear scenarios and its operational real-time forcast is challenging. By means of numerical investigations of idealized scenarios, the influence of wind shear on the lateral and vertical transport of vortices is analysed both, phenomenologically as well as in the scope of a sensitivity study. The results allow for the verification of controversial views and the benchmark of modelling approaches. Case studies of turbulent shear flows focus on the persistence of vortices. A detailed analysis of the flow fields evidence that unequal vortex decay rates can be attributed to the asymmetric distribution of secondary vorticity structures. The results moreover suggest that extended vortex lifespans can be expected under situations of wind shear. The unusual vortex behaviour observed by means of a LIDAR measurement is reproduced by realistic simulations and permits to reveal potential causes. (orig.) [German] Das Wirbelschleppenverhalten unterscheidet sich in Situationen vertikaler Windscherung in mehrfacher Hinsicht signifikant von scherungsfreien Szenarien und stellt eine besondere Herausforderung fuer eine operationelle Echtzeitvorhersage dar. Mittels numerischer Untersuchungen idealisierter Szenarien wird zunaechst der Einfluss von Windscherung auf den lateralen und vertikalen Wirbeltransport sowohl phaenomenologisch als auch quantitativ im Rahmen einer Sensitivitaetsstudie analysiert. Anhand der gewonnenen Ergebnisse werden auseinandergehende Erklaerungsansaetze geprueft und Modellierungsansaetze bewertet. Fallstudien turbulenter Scherstroemungen zur Wirbelpersistenz stellen einen weiteren Schwerpunkt dieser Arbeit dar. Durch die ausfuehrliche Analyse der Stroemungsfelder wird der Nachweis erbracht, dass sich unterschiedliche Zerfallsraten der Wirbel auf die asymmetrische Verteilung von sekundaeren Vorticity-Strukturen zurueckfuehren

  17. Buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop: Interface shape at pinchoff and nonequilibrium surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present numerical results from phase-field simulations of the buoyancy-driven detachment of an isolated, wall-bound pendant emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures which has been extended to include the influence of static contact angles other than 90∘, based on a Hermite interpolation formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin [J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57 (2000), 10.1017/S0022112099006874]. In a previous work, this model has been successfully employed for simulating triphase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components, and, in particular, applied to the determination of critical Bond numbers for buoyancy-driven detachment as a function of static contact angle. Herein, the shapes of interfaces at pinchoff are investigated as a function of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition. Furthermore, we show numerical results on the nonequilibrium surface tension that help to explain the discrepancy between our numerically determined static contact angle dependence of the critical Bond number and its sharp-interface counterpart based on a static stability analysis of equilibrium shapes after numerical integration of the Young-Laplace equation. Finally, we show the influence of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition on the temporal evolution of the minimum neck radius in the necking regime of drop detachment.

  18. Buoyancy-driven detachment of a wall-bound pendant drop: interface shape at pinchoff and nonequilibrium surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A; Mauri, R

    2015-09-01

    We present numerical results from phase-field simulations of the buoyancy-driven detachment of an isolated, wall-bound pendant emulsion droplet acted upon by surface tension and wall-normal buoyancy forces alone. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model for partially miscible binary mixtures which has been extended to include the influence of static contact angles other than 90^{∘}, based on a Hermite interpolation formulation of the Cahn boundary condition as first proposed by Jacqmin [J. Fluid Mech. 402, 57 (2000)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112099006874]. In a previous work, this model has been successfully employed for simulating triphase contact line problems in stable emulsions with nearly immiscible components, and, in particular, applied to the determination of critical Bond numbers for buoyancy-driven detachment as a function of static contact angle. Herein, the shapes of interfaces at pinchoff are investigated as a function of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition. Furthermore, we show numerical results on the nonequilibrium surface tension that help to explain the discrepancy between our numerically determined static contact angle dependence of the critical Bond number and its sharp-interface counterpart based on a static stability analysis of equilibrium shapes after numerical integration of the Young-Laplace equation. Finally, we show the influence of static contact angle and distance to the critical condition on the temporal evolution of the minimum neck radius in the necking regime of drop detachment.

  19. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  20. Experimental study of the structure of flow regions with negative turbulent kinetic energy production in confined three-dimensional shear flows with and without buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, A.; Lüthi, B.; Guala, M.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    2005-09-01

    Regions of negative turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production are observed and studied in two different flows, namely in turbulent thermal Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cubic cell, and in a mechanically agitated shear flow in absence of buoyancy, with a main focus on the small scale structure of the flow. The experimental investigation is performed using three-dimensional (3D) particle tracking velocimetry, which allows for measuring the three velocity components and the full tensor of velocity derivatives in a finite 3D volume. The capability to compute the TKE production term in its complete form P =-⟨uiuj⟩Sij is crucial due to the three dimensionality of the flows. A comparative analysis of four different flow situations is performed in regions with positive and negative TKE production with and without buoyancy effects. In both, convective shear flow and shear flow without buoyancy, negative TKE production is associated with the unusual, more pronounced alignment of the velocity vector u with the first eigenvector λ1S of the mean rate-of-strain tensor, related to the stretching eigenvalue, Λ1S, in contrast to the positive TKE production associated with the alignment with the third eigenvector (i.e., related to the negative, compressing eigenvalue). In the negative TKE production region of convective flow we find (i) increased values for mean strain, (ii) increased values of the first contribution PΛ1 in the eigenframe of the mean rate-of-strain tensor, and decreased values of the vertical contribution to the production term in a fixed frame of reference, (iii) stronger anisotropy of u, (iv) higher levels of fluctuating strain s2 and enstrophy ω2, as well as (v) higher rates of their production, -sijsjkski and ωiωjsij, compared to the respective values in positive TKE production region. In the shear flow without buoyancy, all the mentioned quantities are lower in the negative TKE production region than in the positive TKE production region. From this

  1. Estimation of turbulence intensity and shear factor for diurnal and nocturnal periods with an URANS flow solver coupled with WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga Rodrigues, C.; Palma, J. M. L. M.

    2014-06-01

    Mesoscale results using the WRF model were downscaled from 3 km to 250 m resolution in a one-way coupling with VENTOS®/M. The results were compared against field measurements at one site comprising 4 meteorological masts, each with two sets of cup anemometers and wind vanes. The results showed that the addition of VENTOS®/M to the model chain improved the wind speed RMSE. Regarding the prediction of wind direction ambivalent results were obtained. Special attention was given to the prediction of turbulence intensity, particularly in reproducing its inverse proportionality with increasing wind speed (cf. IEC 61400-1 standard). The typical use of computational models in wind resource assessment, i.e., relying on decoupled methodologies and neutrally-stratified regimes, does not allow the representation of turbulence intensity for all wind speeds. The results obtained with VENTOS®/M were in agreement with the measured turbulence characteristics at both high and low wind speeds. Such was achieved without the coupling of any turbulence related field, relying solely on the turbulence model embedded in VENTOS®/M and its respective wall boundary conditions, based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The behaviour under different stratification regimes was verified by analysing diurnal and nocturnal events separately.

  2. In-silico experiments on characteristic time scale at a shear-free gas-liquid interface in fully developed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi; Handler, Robert A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to model scalar transfer mechanisms in a fully developed turbulence for accurate predictions of the turbulent scalar flux across a shear-free gas-liquid interface. The concept of the surface-renewal approximation (Dankwerts, 1951) is introduced in this study to establish the predictive models for the interfacial scalar flux. Turbulent flow realizations obtained by a direct numerical simulation technique are employed to prepare details of three-dimensional information on turbulence in the region very close to the interface. Two characteristic time scales at the interface have been examined for exact prediction of the scalar transfer flux. One is the time scale which is reciprocal of the root-mean-square surface divergence, Tγ = langleγγrangle-1/2, where γ is the surface divergence. The other time scale to be examined is TS = Λ/V, where Λ is the zero-correlation length of the surface divergence as the interfacial length scale, and V is the root-mean-square velocity fluctuation in the streamwise direction as the interfacial velocity scale. The results of this study suggests that Tγ is slightly unsatisfactory to correlate the turbulent scalar flux at the gas-liquid interface based on the surface-renewal approximation. It is also found that the proportionality constant appear to be 0.19, which is different with that observed in the laboratory experiments, 0.34 (Komori, Murakami, & Ueda, 1989). It is concluded that the time scale, Tγ, is considered a different kind of the time scale observed in the laboratory experiments. On the other hand, the present in-silico experiments indicate that Ts predicts the turbulent scalar flux based on the surface-renewal approximation in a satisfactory manner. It is also elucidated that the proportionality constant for Ts is approximately 0.36, which is very close to that found by the laboratory experiments. This fact shows that the time scale Ts appears to be essentially the same as the time scale the

  3. A new methodology for Reynolds-averaged modeling based on the amalgamation of heuristic-modeling and turbulence-theory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Nisizima, Shoiti; Shimomura, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Hiromichi; Matsuo, Yuichi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi

    2006-03-01

    A new methodology for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modeling is presented on the basis of the amalgamation of heuristic-modeling and turbulence-theory methods. A characteristic turbulence time scale is synthesized in a heuristic manner through the combination of several characteristic time scales. An algebraic model of turbulent-viscosity type for the Reynolds stress is derived from the Reynolds-stress transport equation with the time scale embedded. It is applied to the state of weak spatial and temporal nonequilibrium, and is compared with its theoretical counterpart derived by the two-scale direct-interaction approximation. The synthesized time scale is justified through the agreement of the two expressions derived by these entirely different methods. The derived model is tested in rotating isotropic, channel, and homogeneous-shear flows. It is extended to a nonlinear algebraic model and a supersonic model. The latter is shown to succeed in reproducing the reduction in the growth rate of a free-shear layer flow, without causing wrong effects on wall-bounded flows such as channel and boundary-layer flows.

  4. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  5. Theoretical model of particle orientation distribution function in a cylindrical particle suspension subject to turbulent shear flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lingxin; LIN Jianzhong; ZHANG Weifeng

    2006-01-01

    The equation for the orientation probability function of slender cylindrical particles suspended in planar turbulent flows was investigated. After ensemble averaging, the equations for the mean and fluctuating probability function were derived. The equation for the fluctuating probability function appearing in the equation of mean probability function was solved by using the method of characteristics analysis. The orientational dispersion terms due to the random motion of cylindrical particles in the equation of mean probability function are related to the mean probability function and the Lagrangian fluid velocity correlations. The evolution of the mean probability function was described by a modified orientation-space-convection equation, where the dispersion terms account for the randomizing effect of the turbulence.

  6. Osmotic Stress Suppresses Cell Wall Stiffening and the Increase in Cell Wall-Bound Ferulic and Diferulic Acids in Wheat Coleoptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the mechanical properties of cell walls and the levels of wall-bound ferulic (FA) and diferulic (DFA) acids was investigated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) coleoptiles grown under osmotic stress (60 mM polyethylene glycol [PEG] 4000) conditions. The cell walls of stressed coleoptiles remained extensible compared with those of the unstressed ones. The contents of wall-bound FA and DFA increased under unstressed conditions, but the increase was substantially reduced by osmotic stress. In response to PEG removal, these contents increased and reached almost the same levels as those of the unstressed coleoptiles. A close correlation was observed between the contents of FA and DFA and the mechanical properties of cell walls. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase increased rapidly under unstressed conditions. Osmotic stress substantially reduced the increases in enzyme activities. When PEG was removed, however, the enzyme activities increased rapidly. There was a close correlation between the FA levels and enzyme activities. These results suggest that in osmotically stressed wheat coleoptiles, reduced rates of increase in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase activities suppress phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, resulting in the reduced level of wall-bound FA that, in turn, probably causes the reduced level of DFA and thereby maintains cell wall extensibility. PMID:12223657

  7. Turbulence and sheared flow structure behind the isotopic and q95 dependencies of the L-H power threshold on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; Gohil, P.; Petty, C.; Grierson, B.; Eldon, D.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of long wavelength density fluctuation characteristics in the edge of both Deuterium (D) and Hydrogen (H) plasmas across the L-H transition on DIII-D demonstrate the existence of dual frequency counter-propagating modes, which are strongly correlated with a reduced L-H power threshold (PLH) . E ×B shear near r/a 0.95-1.0 is larger in D than in H plasmas at low density, and the dual mode is only observed in D plasmas. Such a dual mode is also observed in a q95 scan of the L-H transition in D plasmas when the PLH is lower, where PLH is found to increase with plasma current but with complex density dependence: the largest increase of PLH is seen at ne 3.2 e 19 m-3. The complex behaviors of the turbulence characteristics (amplitude, decorrelation rate, etc.) and dual frequency modes interactions all together will impact the flow shear generation, the transition process and the power threshold scaling. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Insights into the growth rate of spatially evolving plane turbulent free-shear layers from 2D vortex-gas simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2017-02-01

    Although the free-shear or mixing layer has been a subject of extensive research over nearly a century, there are certain fundamental issues that remain controversial. These include the influence of initial and downstream conditions on the flow, the effect of velocity ratio across the layer, and the nature of any possible coupling between small scale dynamics and the large scale evolution of layer thickness. In the spirit of the temporal vortex-gas simulations of Suryanarayanan et al. ["Free turbulent shear layer in a point vortex gas as a problem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics," Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)], we revisit the simple 2D inviscid vortex-gas model with extensive computations and detailed analysis, in order to gain insights into some of the above issues. Simulations of the spatially evolving vortex-gas shear layer are carried out at different velocity ratios using a computational model based on the work of Basu et al. ["Vortex sheet simulation of a plane canonical mixing layer," Comput. Fluids 21, 1-30 (1992) and "Modelling plane mixing layers using vortex points and sheets," Appl. Math. Modell. 19, 66-75 (1995)], but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the origin of the free shear layer and at the exit to the computational domain can affect flow evolution in their respective downstream and upstream neighbourhoods, the latter being particularly strong in the single stream limit. In between these neighbourhoods at the ends is a regime of universal self-preserving growth rate given by a universal function of velocity ratio. The computed growth rates are generally located within the scatter of experimental data on plane mixing layers and closely agree with recent high Reynolds number experiments and 3D large eddy simulation studies. These findings support the view that observed free-shear layer growth can be largely explained by the 2D vortex dynamics of

  9. Regulation of cell wall-bound invertase in pepper leaves by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria type three effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Sonnewald

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv possess a type 3 secretion system (T3SS to deliver effector proteins into its Solanaceous host plants. These proteins are involved in suppression of plant defense and in reprogramming of plant metabolism to favour bacterial propagation. There is increasing evidence that hexoses contribute to defense responses. They act as substrates for metabolic processes and as metabolic semaphores to regulate gene expression. Especially an increase in the apoplastic hexose-to-sucrose ratio has been suggested to strengthen plant defense. This shift is brought about by the activity of cell wall-bound invertase (cw-Inv. We examined the possibility that Xcv may employ type 3 effector (T3E proteins to suppress cw-Inv activity during infection. Indeed, pepper leaves infected with a T3SS-deficient Xcv strain showed a higher level of cw-Inv mRNA and enzyme activity relative to Xcv wild type infected leaves. Higher cw-Inv activity was paralleled by an increase in hexoses and mRNA abundance for the pathogenesis-related gene PRQ. These results suggest that Xcv suppresses cw-Inv activity in a T3SS-dependent manner, most likely to prevent sugar-mediated defense signals. To identify Xcv T3Es that regulate cw-Inv activity, a screen was performed with eighteen Xcv strains, each deficient in an individual T3E. Seven Xcv T3E deletion strains caused a significant change in cw-Inv activity compared to Xcv wild type. Among them, Xcv lacking the xopB gene (Xcv ΔxopB caused the most prominent increase in cw-Inv activity. Deletion of xopB increased the mRNA abundance of PRQ in Xcv ΔxopB-infected pepper leaves, but not of Pti5 and Acre31, two PAMP-triggered immunity markers. Inducible expression of XopB in transgenic tobacco inhibited Xcv-mediated induction of cw-Inv activity observed in wild type plants and resulted in severe developmental phenotypes. Together, these data suggest that XopB interferes with cw-Inv activity in planta to

  10. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milici, Barbara [Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cittadella Universitaria - 94100 - Enna (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  11. Understanding the sub-critical transition to turbulence in wall flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paul Manneville

    2008-06-01

    In contrast with free shear flows presenting velocity profiles with injection points which cascade to turbulence in a relatively mild way, wall bounded flows are deprived of (inertial) instability modes at low Reynolds numbers and become turbulent in a much wilder way, most often marked by the coexistence of laminar and turbulent domains at intermediate Reynolds numbers, well below the range where (viscous) instabilities can show up. There can even be no unstable mode at all, as for plane Couette flow (pCf) or for Poiseuille pipe flow (Ppf) that are currently the subject of intense research. Though the mechanisms involved in the transition to turbulence in wall flows are now better understood, statistical properties of the transition itself are yet unsatisfactorily assessed. A widely accepted interpretation rests on non-trivial solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the form of unstable travelling waves and on transient chaotic states associated to chaotic repellors. Whether these concepts typical of the theory of temporal chaos are really appropriate is yet unclear owing to the fact that, strictly speaking, they apply when confinement in physical space is effective while the physical systems considered are rather extended in at least one space direction, so that spatiotemporal behaviour cannot be ruled out in the transitional regime. The case of pCf will be examined in this perspective through numerical simulations of a model with reduced cross-stream () dependence, focusing on the in-plane (, ) space dependence of a few velocity amplitudes. In the large aspect-ratio limit, the transition to turbulence takes place via spatiotemporal intermittency and we shall attempt to make a connection with the theory of first-order (thermodynamic) phase transitions, as suggested long ago by Pomeau.

  12. Acceleration of inertial particles in wall bounded flows: DNS and LES with stochastic modelling of the subgrid acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamansky, Remi; Vinkovic, Ivana; Gorokhovski, Mikhael, E-mail: ivana.vinkovic@univ-lyonl.fr [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique CNRS UMR 5509 Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36, av. Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2011-12-22

    Inertial particle acceleration statistics are analyzed using DNS for turbulent channel flow. Along with effects recognized in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, an additional effect is observed due to high and low speed vortical structures aligned with the channel wall. In response to those structures, particles with moderate inertia experience strong longitudinal acceleration variations. DNS is also used in order to assess LES-SSAM (Subgrid Stochastic Acceleration Model), in which an approximation to the instantaneous non-filtered velocity field is given by simulation of both, filtered and residual, accelerations. This approach allow to have access to the intermittency of the flow at subgrid scale. Advantages of LES-SSAM in predicting particle dynamics in the channel flow at a high Reynolds number are shown.

  13. Instability of the roll-streak structure induced by background turbulence in pretransitional Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Although the roll-streak structure is ubiquitous in both observations and simulations of pretransitional wall-bounded shear flow, this structure is linearly stable if the idealization of laminar flow is made. Lacking an instability, the large transient growth of the roll-streak structure has been invoked to explain its appearance as resulting from chance occurrence in the background turbulence of perturbations configured to optimally excite it. However, there is an alternative interpretation for the role of free-stream turbulence in the genesis of the roll-streak structure, which is that the background turbulence interacts with the roll-streak structure to destabilize it. Statistical state dynamics (SSD) provides analysis methods for studying instabilities of this type that arise from interaction between the coherent and incoherent components of turbulence. SSD in the form of a closure at second order is used in this work to analyze the cooperative eigenmodes arising from interaction between the coherent streamwise invariant component and the incoherent background component of turbulence. In pretransitional Couette flow a manifold of stable modes with roll-streak form is found to exist in the presence of low-intensity background turbulence. The least stable mode of this manifold is destabilized at a critical value of a parameter controlling the background turbulence intensity and a finite-amplitude roll-streak structure arises from this instability through a bifurcation in this parameter. Although this bifurcation has analytical expression only in the infinite ensemble formulation of second order SSD, referred in this work as the S3T system, it is closely reflected in numerical simulations of both the dynamically similar quasilinear system, referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) system, as well as in the full Navier-Stokes equations. This correspondence is verified using ensemble implementations of the RNL system and the Navier-Stokes equations. The S3T

  14. LES and Hybrid LES/RANS Study of Flow and Heat Transfer around a Wall-Bounded Short Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borello, D.; Delibra, G.; Hanjalić, K.; Rispoli, F.

    The flow in plate-fin-and-tube heat exchangers is featured by interesting dynamics of vortical structures, which, due to close proximity of bounding walls that suppress instabilities, differs significantly from the better-known patterns around long cylinders. Typically, several distinct vortex systems can be identified both in front and behind the pin. Their signature on the pin and end-walls reflects directly in the local heat transfer. The Reynolds numbers is usually moderate and the incoming flow is non-turbulent, transiting to turbulence on or just behind the first or few subsequent pin/tube rows. Upstream from the first pin a sequence of several horseshoe vortices attached to the boundingwall is created, while the unsteady wake contains also multiple vortical systems which control the entrainment of fresh fluid and its mixing with the hot fluid that was in contact with the heated surfaces [1]. The conventional CFD using standard turbulence models, as practiced by heat exchangers industries, falls short in capturing the subtle details of the complex vortex systems. A fine-grid LES can provide accurate solutions, but for more complex configurations and higher Re numbers a hybrid RANS/LES using a coarser grid seems a more rational option, provided it can capture all important flow and vortical features.

  15. Modulation on flow field by solid particles in gas-solid two-phase turbulent free shear flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the interaction between fluid and particles, a two-way coupled three-dimensional mixing layer laden with particles at a Stokes number of 5 with different mass loadings is numerically studied. The pseudospectral method is used for the flow fluid and the Lagrangian approach is used to trace particles. The concept of computational particles is introduced to vary the mass loading of particles. The momentum coupling effect introduced by a particle is approximated to the point force. The simulation results show that the coherent structures are still dominant in the mixing layer, but the flow field is modulated by particles. The addition of the particles enhances the energy of all the Fourier modes with non-zero spanwise wavenumber, and the enhancement increases with the augment of the mass loading. A higher mass loading results in a lower energy at fundamental wavenumber and streamwise subharmonic Fourier mode of the fluid in the phase of Kelvin-Helmholtz rolling up, but for large-scale vortex structures pairing, the energy of the fluid increases as the mass loading increases. Similar trends can also be found in the developments of the turbulent kinetic energy and the momentum thickness.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulence Properties in a Uniformly Sheared and Stably Stratified Flow%均匀剪切稳定分层流动中湍流特性的数值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾俊梅; 刘宇陆

    2012-01-01

    采用大涡模拟的方法,研究了均匀剪切稳定分层流动.主要对不同梯度Richardson数下湍流动量和标量输运特性进行分析研究.结果表明:随着梯度Richardson数的增大,湍流动能减小,湍流势能增大;垂向热通量和雷诺应力减弱,流向热通量增强;并且在强分层情况下,存在动量和热量的逆梯度输运现象.%LES method is applied to study the sheared homogeneous stratified turbulent flows. The turbulent momentum and scalar transport properties of different gradient Richardson numbers are mainly analyzed. The primary conclusions are; with the increase of gradient Richardson number, turbulent kinetic energy decreases, while the turbulent potential energy increases; vertical heat flux and the Reynolds stress decrease,but the streamwise heat flux increases;Turbulent momentum and heat CGT in strong stratification are more obvious than those of the weak stratified turbulence.

  17. A unified theory for wall turbulence via a symmetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle

    2014-11-01

    First principle based prediction of mean flow quantities of wall-bounded turbulent flows (channel, pipe, and turbulent boundary layer - TBL) remains a great challenge from both physics and engineering standpoints. Physically, a non-equilibrium physical principle governing mean properties in turbulent flows is yet unknown. Here, we outline a recently developed symmetry-based approach which derives analytic expressions governing the mean velocity profile (MVP) from an innovative Lie-group analysis. In analogy to the order parameter in Landau's (1937) mean-field theory, we develop a concept of order functions which are assumed to satisfy a dilation group invariance - representing the effects of the wall on fluctuations - allowing us to construct a set of new invariant solutions of the (unclosed) mean momentum equation (MME). The theory is validated by recent experimental and numerical data, and identifies a universal bulk flow constant 0.45 for all three canonical wall-bounded flows, which asymptotes to the true Karman constant at large Reynolds numbers. The theory equally applies to the quantification of the effects of roughness (She et al. 2012), pressure gradient, compressibility, and buoyancy, and to the study of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, such as k- ωmodel, with significant improvement of the prediction accuracy. These results affirm that a simple and unified theory of wall-bounded turbulence is viable with appropriate symmetry considerations.

  18. Comparison between Doppler echocardiography and hot-film anemometry in measuring the turbulent shear stress downstream of artificial mitral valves: a methodological study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yi; LI Rui-jie; LI Gan-niu; LI Bin; WANG Yu; MA Run-wei; YANG Bai-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Turbulent shear stress (TSS) plays an important role in the research of fluid dynamics of heart valves.This study aimed to perform a quantitative study of TSS downstream of porcine artificial mitral valves in order to verify the correlation of hot-film anemometry (HFA) and Doppler echocardiography combined with computer-aided image analysis for the detection of TSS.Methods A porcine model of mitral valve replacement was established.HFA and Doppler ultrasound techniques were used to directly and indirectly measure TSS-relevant parameters of the artificial mitral valve following different mitral valve replacements:different approaches were used to reserve the subvalvular apparatus of the mitral valve.A correlation analysis was then carried out.Results There was a significant correlation between the HFA and Doppler ultrasound combined with computer-aided image analysis of the TSS at the same time and at the same site.No significant difference was found in the TSS measured by the two methods.Conclusions Compared with HFA,Doppler echocardiography combined with computer-aided image analysis is a safe,non-invasive,and real-time method that enables accurate and quantitative detection of TSS downstream in vivo,objectively reflecting the flow field downstream of the artificial mitral valve.Doppler ultrasound combined with computeraided image analysis can be employed for quantitatively evaluating the downstream hemodynamic performance of the mitral valve.

  19. Boundary Conditions and SGS Models for LES of Wall-Bounded Separated Flows: An Application to Engine-Like Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piscaglia F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The implementation and the combination of advanced boundary conditions and subgrid scale models for Large Eddy Simulations are presented. The goal is to perform reliable cold flow LES simulations in complex geometries, such as in the cylinders of internal combustion engines. The implementation of an inlet boundary condition for synthetic turbulence generation and of two subgrid scale models, the local Dynamic Smagorinsky and the Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity SGS model ( WALE is described. The WALE model is based on the square of the velocity gradient tensor and it accounts for the effects of both the strain and the rotation rate of the smallest resolved turbulent fluctuations and it recovers the proper y3 near-wall scaling for the eddy viscosity without requiring dynamic pressure; hence, it is supposed to be a very reliable model for ICE simulation. Model validation has been performed separately on two steady state flow benches: a backward facing step geometry and a simple IC engine geometry with one axed central valve. A discussion on the completeness of the LES simulation (i.e. LES simulation quality is given.

  20. QTLs for cell wall-bound phenolics in relation to the photosynthetic apparatus activity and leaf water status under drought stress at different growth stages of triticale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hura, Tomasz; Tyrka, Mirosław; Hura, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Kinga

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the regions of triticale genome responsible for cell wall saturation with phenolic compounds under drought stress during vegetative and generative growth. Moreover, the loci determining the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus, leaf water content (LWC) and osmotic potential (Ψ o) were identified, as leaf hydration and functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus under drought are associated with the content of cell wall-bound phenolics (CWPh). Compared with LWC and Ψ o, CWPh fluctuations were more strongly associated with changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. At the vegetative stage, CWPh fluctuations were due to the activity of three loci, of which only QCWPh.4B was also related to changes in F v/F m and ABS/CSm. In the other QTLs (QCWPh.6R.2 and QCWPh.6R.3), the genes of these loci determined also the changes in majority of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. At the generative stage, the changes in CWPh in loci QCWPh.4B, QCWPh.3R and QCWPh.6R.1 corresponded to those in DIo/CSm. The locus QCWPh.6R.3, active at V stage, controlled majority of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. This is the first study on mapping quantitative traits in triticale plants exposed to drought at different stages of development, and the first to present the loci for cell wall-bound phenolics.

  1. Activity, but not Expression, of Soluble and Cell Wall-Bound Acid Invertases Is Induced by Abscisic Acid in Developing Apple Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Hong Pan; Xiang-Chun Yu; Na Zhang; Xun Zou; Chang-Cao Peng; Xiu-Ling Wang; Ke-Qin Zou; Da-Peng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment, involving both the in vivo injection of abscisic acid (ABA) into apple (Malus domestica Brohk.) fruits and the in vivo incubation of fruit tissues in ABA-containing medium, revealed that ABA activates both soluble and cell wall-bound acid invertases. Immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that this ABA-induced acid invertase activation is independent of the amount of enzyme present. The acid invertase activation induced by ABA is dependent on medium pH, time course, ABA dose, living tissue and developmental stage. Two isomers of cis-(+)-ABA, (-)-ABA and transABA, had no effect on acid invertases, showing that ABA-induced acid invertase activation is specific to physiologically active cis-(+)ABA. Protein kinase inhibitors K252a and H7 as well as acid phosphatase increased the ABA-induced effects. These data indicate that ABA specifically activates both soluble and cell wall-bound acid invertases by a posttranslational mechanism probably involving reversible protein phosphorylation, and this may be one of the mechanisms by which ABA is involved in regulating fruit development.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of K-type and H-type transitions to turbulence in a low Mach number flat plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    Transition to turbulence via spatially evolving secondary instabilities in compressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat plate boundary layers is numerically simulated for both the Klebanoff K-type and Herbert H-type disturbances. The objective of this work is to evaluate the universality of the breakdown process between different routes through transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Each localized linear disturbance is amplified through weak non-linear instability that grows into lambda-vortices and then hairpin-shaped eddies with harmonic wavelength, which become less organized in the late-transitional regime once a fully populated spanwise turbulent energy spectrum is established. For the H-type transition, the computational domain extends from Rex =105 , where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and a pair of oblique waves, to fully turbulent stage at Rex = 10 . 6 ×105 . The computational domain for the K-type transition extends to Rex = 9 . 6 ×105 . The computational algorithm employs fourth-order central differences with non-reflective numerical sponges along the external boundaries. For each case, the Mach number is 0.2. Supported by the PSAAP program of DoE, ANL and LLNL.

  3. Turbulent shear flow downstream of a sphere with and without an o-ring located over a plane boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Besir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow-structure interaction of separated shear flow from the sphere and a flat plate was investigated by using dye visualization and the particle image velocimetry technique. Later, a passive control method was applied with 2mm oring located on the sphere surface at 55° from front stagnation point. The experiments were carried out in open water channel for Reynolds number value of Re=5000. Flow characteristics have been examined in terms of the 2-D instantaneous and time-averaged velocity vectors, patterns of vorticity, streamlines, rms of velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress variations and discussed from the point of flow physics, vortex formation, lengths of large-scale Karman Vortex Streets and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices depending on the sphere locations over the flat plate. It is demonstrated that the gap flow occurring between the sphere bottom point and the flat plate surface has very high scouring effect until h/d=0.25 and then unsymmetrical flow structure of the wake region keeps up to h/D=1.0 for smooth sphere. For the sphere with o-ring, the wake flow structure becomes symmetrical at smaller gap ratios and reattachment point on the flat plate surface occurs earlier. Moreover, o-ring on the sphere diminishes peak magnitudes of the flow characteristics and thus it is expected that the flow-induced forces will be lessened both on the sphere and flat plate surface. Vortex formation lengths and maximum value occurring points become closer locations to the rear surface of the sphere with o-ring.

  4. Turbulent shear flow downstream of a sphere with and without an o-ring located over a plane boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgoren, Muammer; Okbaz, Abdulkerim; Dogan, Sercan; Sahin, Besir; Akilli, Huseyin

    2012-04-01

    Flow-structure interaction of separated shear flow from the sphere and a flat plate was investigated by using dye visualization and the particle image velocimetry technique. Later, a passive control method was applied with 2mm oring located on the sphere surface at 55° from front stagnation point. The experiments were carried out in open water channel for Reynolds number value of Re=5000. Flow characteristics have been examined in terms of the 2-D instantaneous and time-averaged velocity vectors, patterns of vorticity, streamlines, rms of velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress variations and discussed from the point of flow physics, vortex formation, lengths of large-scale Karman Vortex Streets and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices depending on the sphere locations over the flat plate. It is demonstrated that the gap flow occurring between the sphere bottom point and the flat plate surface has very high scouring effect until h/d=0.25 and then unsymmetrical flow structure of the wake region keeps up to h/D=1.0 for smooth sphere. For the sphere with o-ring, the wake flow structure becomes symmetrical at smaller gap ratios and reattachment point on the flat plate surface occurs earlier. Moreover, o-ring on the sphere diminishes peak magnitudes of the flow characteristics and thus it is expected that the flow-induced forces will be lessened both on the sphere and flat plate surface. Vortex formation lengths and maximum value occurring points become closer locations to the rear surface of the sphere with o-ring.

  5. Turbulence Structure of the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer and Transition to the Outer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, K. G.

    We present a new model of the structure of turbulence in the unstable atmospheric surface layer, and of the structural transition between this and the outer layer. The archetypal element of wall-bounded shear turbulence is the Theodorsen ejection amplifier (TEA) structure, in which an initial ejection of air from near the ground into an ideal laminar and logarithmic flow induces vortical motion about a hairpin-shaped core, which then creates a second ejection that is similar to, but larger than, the first. A series of TEA structures form a TEA cascade. In real turbulent flows TEA structures occur in distorted forms as TEA-like (TEAL) structures. Distortion terminates many TEAL cascades and only the best-formed TEAL structures initiate new cycles. In an extended log layer the resulting shear turbulence is a complex, self-organizing, dissipative system exhibiting self-similar behaviour under inner scaling. Spectral results show that this structure is insensitive to instability. This is contrary to the fundamental hypothesis of Monin--Obukhov similarity theory. All TEAL cascades terminate at the top of the surface layer where they encounter, and are severely distorted by, powerful eddies of similar size from the outer layer. These eddies are products of the breakdown of the large eddies produced by buoyancy in the outer layer. When the outer layer is much deeper than the surface layer the interacting eddies are from the inertial subrange of the outer Richardson cascade. The scale height of the surface layer, zs, is then found by matching the powers delivered to the creation of emerging TEAL structures to the power passing down the Richardson cascade in the outer layer. It is zs = u* 3ks, where u*s friction velocity, k is the von Káán constant and s is the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy in the outer layer immediately above the surface layer. This height is comparable to the Obukhov length in the fully convective boundary layer. Aircraft and tower

  6. Generation of hydroxyl radical in isolated pea root cell wall, and the role of cell wall-bound peroxidase, Mn-SOD and phenolics in their production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavica, Biljana; Mojovic, Milos; Vuccinic, Zeljko; Maksimovic, Vuk; Takahama, Umeo; Jovanovic, Sonja Veljovic

    2009-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical produced in the apoplast has been demonstrated to facilitate cell wall loosening during cell elongation. Cell wall-bound peroxidases (PODs) have been implicated in hydroxyl radical formation. For this mechanism, the apoplast or cell walls should contain the electron donors for (i) H(2)O(2) formation from dioxygen; and (ii) the POD-catalyzed reduction of H(2)O(2) to the hydroxyl radical. The aim of the work was to identify the electron donors in these reactions. In this report, hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation in the cell wall isolated from pea roots was detected in the absence of any exogenous reductants, suggesting that the plant cell wall possesses the capacity to generate .OH in situ. Distinct POD and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) isoforms different from other cellular isoforms were shown by native gel electropho-resis to be preferably bound to the cell walls. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of cell wall isolates containing the spin-trapping reagent, 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO), was used for detection of and differentiation between .OH and the superoxide radical (O(2)(-).). The data obtained using POD inhibitors confirmed that tightly bound cell wall PODs are involved in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation. A decrease in DEPMPO/OH adduct formation in the presence of H(2)O(2) scavengers demonstrated that this hydroxyl radical was derived from H(2)O(2). During the generation of .OH, the concentration of quinhydrone structures (as detected by EPR spectroscopy) increased, suggesting that the H(2)O(2) required for the formation of .OH in isolated cell walls is produced during the reduction of O(2) by hydroxycinnamic acids. Cell wall isolates in which the proteins have been denaturated (including the endogenous POD and SOD) did not produce .OH. Addition of exogenous H(2)O(2) again induced the production of .OH, and these were shown to originate from the Fenton reaction with tightly bound metal ions

  7. Dispersed phase effects on boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Helgans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    In natural and environmental settings, turbulence is often seeded with some sort of dispersed phase: dust, rain, snow, sediment, etc. Depending on the circumstances, elements of the dispersed phase can participate in both dynamic and thermodynamic coupling, thereby altering the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum through several complex avenues. In this study, evaporating droplets are two-way coupled to turbulent wall-bounded flow via direct numerical simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian point particle tracking, and we are specifically interested in the wall-normal transport of momentum, heat, and moisture. Our studies show that particles can carry significant portions of all three, and that this is a strong function of the particle Stokes number. These findings are interpreted in the context of environmental flows and the practical implications will be discussed. The authors acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding under Grant #AGS-1429921.

  8. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  9. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  10. Vorticity and turbulence effects in fluid structure interaction an application to hydraulic structure design

    CERN Document Server

    Brocchini, M

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of 11 research and review papers devoted to the topic of fluid-structure interaction.The subject matter is divided into chapters covering a wide spectrum of recognized areas of research, such as: wall bounded turbulence; quasi 2-D turbulence; canopy turbulence; large eddy simulation; lake hydrodynamics; hydraulic hysteresis; liquid impacts; flow induced vibrations; sloshing flows; transient pipe flow and air entrainment in dropshaft.The purpose of each chapter is to summarize the main results obtained by the individual research unit through a year-long activity

  11. One-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  12. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    the model to simulate the build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines in a physically consistent manner. The performance of the modified model is validated against actuator line (AL) model results and field data from the Lillgrund offshore wind farm. Qualitatively, the modified DWM model is in fair......%, respectively, by including the proposed corrections for a row of eight turbines. Furthermore, it is found that the root-mean-square difference between the AL model and the modified DWM model in terms of wind speed and turbulence intensity does not increase over a row of turbines compared with the root...

  13. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  14. 5th iTi Conference in Turbulence 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Oberlack, Martin; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01

      This volume collects the edited and reviewed contributions presented in the 5th iTi Conference in Bertinoro. covering fundamental aspects in turbulent flows. In the spirit of the iTi initiative, the volume is produced after the conference so that the authors had the possibility to incorporate comments and discussions raised during the meeting. Turbulence presents a large number of aspects and problems, which are still unsolved and which challenge research communities in engineering and physical sciences both in basic and applied research. The book presents recent advances in theory related to new statistical approaches, effect of non-linearities and presence of symmetries. This edition presents new contributions related to the physics and control of laminar-turbulent transition in wall-bounded flows, which may have a significant impact on drag reduction applications. Turbulent boundary layers, at increasing Reynolds number, are the main subject of both computational and experimental long research programs ...

  15. Microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements of transition to turbulence in microscale capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, V. K.; Christensen, K. T.

    2007-07-01

    The character of transitional capillary flow is investigated using pressure-drop measurements and instantaneous velocity fields acquired by microscopic PIV in the streamwise wall-normal plane of a 536 μm capillary over the Reynolds-number range 1,800 ≤ Re ≤ 3,400 in increments of 100. The pressure-drop measurements reveal a deviation from laminar behavior at Re = 1,900 with the differences between the measured and the predicted laminar-flow pressure drop increasing with increasing Re. These observations are consistent with the characteristics of the mean velocity profiles which begin to deviate from the parabolic laminar profile at Re = 1,900, interpreted as the onset of transition, by becoming increasingly flatter and fuller with increasing Re. A fully-turbulent state is attained at Re ≅ 3,400 where the mean velocity profile collapses onto the mean profile of fully-developed turbulent pipe flow from an existing direct numerical simulation at Re = 5,300. Examination of the instantaneous velocity fields acquired by micro-PIV in the range 1,900 ≤ Re flows at the microscale are composed of a subset of velocity fields illustrating a purely laminar behavior and a subset of fields that capture significant departure from laminar behavior. The fraction of velocity fields displaying non-laminar behavior increases with increasing Re, consistent with past observations of a growing number of intermittent turbulent spots bounded by nominally laminar flow in macroscale pipe flow with increasing Re. Instantaneous velocity fields that are non-laminar in character consistently contain multiple spanwise vortices that appear to streamwise-align to form larger-scale interfaces that incline slightly away from the wall. The characteristics of these “trains” of vortices are reminiscent of the spatial features of hairpin-like vortices and hairpin vortex packets often observed in fully-turbulent wall-bounded flow at both the macro- and micro-scales. Finally, single

  16. Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows (8th) Held in Munich, Germany on 9-11 September 1991. Volume 1. Sessions 1-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    continuity and the numerical simulation and analysis of shock Gibbs equations, one obtains the following turbulence interaction. AIAA paper 91-0523...tidiitor CONCLUSIONS I ab ihl present results provide a validation oif the initial accurate predictiotiS of the sLoripressor fase hiovt ficld, With a

  17. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  18. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  19. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  20. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  1. An Analytical Solution to the Conjugate Heat Transfer Problem of a Thermal Wall-Shear-Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C. F.; Johansson, P.; Bergh, J.; Löfdahl, L.; Sen, M.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2000-11-01

    Flush-mounted hot wires are commonly used to measure shear stress in both laminar and turbulent wall-bounded flows. At each instant of time, the sensor's internal energy changes in response to the input electrical power, the heat convected by the flow, and the heat conducted to the substrate. It is this latter quantity that cannot be measured and that causes significant uncertainty in what the probe is reading, particularly for time-dependent flows. In this talk, an asymptotic solution to the conjugate heat transfer problem of a flush-mounted heat source is presented. The bottom of the heat source's substrate is perfectly insulated so that heat can leave the solid only through the fluid-solid interface. The velocity profile in the top fluid layer is assumed linear as well as steady. The lowest-order terms of the asymptotic solution can be naturally classified into contributions from pure convection, from the interaction of convection and the conduction in the solid, and from the interaction of convection and the conduction in the fluid. It is found that downstream of the heat source the two leading-order terms of the asymptotic expansion stem from pure convection, and that the leading term decays as \\cal O [ x-2/3 ], which confirms the result from the previous analysis of Liu et al. (1994) for the case of an adiabatic wall. The third term, however, is a contribution from the interaction of convection and conduction in the solid. If the conduction in the fluid is neglected, we have been able to find an asymptotic solution upstream of the heat source as well. In this case, we find that the temperature decays exponentially with the distance from the heat source. The analytical results show good agreement with our own numerical simulations of the same problem. The present solution has important implications regarding the performance of thermal wall-shear-stress sensors.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  3. Numerical Simulation of High Drag Reduction in a Turbulent Channel Flow with Polymer Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubief, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of long chain polymer molecules to wall-bounded flows can lead to dramatic drag reduction. Although this phenomenon has been known for about fifty years, the action of the polymers and its effect on turbulent structures are still unclear. Detailed experiments have characterized two distinct regimes (Warholic et al. 1999), which are referred to as low drag reduction (LDR) and high drag reduction (HDR). The first regime exhibits similar statistical trends as Newtonian flow: the log-law region of the mean velocity profile remains parallel to that of the Newtonian ow but its lower bound moves away from the wall and the upward shift of the log-region is a function of drag reduction, DR. Although streamwise fluctuations are increased and transverse ones are reduced, the shape of the rms velocity profiles is not qualitatively modified. At higher drag reductions, of the order of 40-50%, the ow enters the HDR regime for which the slope of the log-law is dramatically augmented and the Reynolds shear stress is small (Warholic et al. 1999; Ptasinski et al. 2001). The drag reduction is eventually bounded by a maximum drag reduction (MDR) (Virk & Mickley 1970) which is a function of the Reynolds number. While several experiments report mean velocity profiles very close to the empirical profile of Virk & Mickley (1970) for MDR conditions, the observations regarding the structure of turbulence can differ significantly. For instance, Warholic et al. (1999) measured a near-zero Reynolds shear stress, whereas a recent experiment (Ptasinski et al. 2001) shows evidence of non-negligible Reynolds stress in their MDR flow. To the knowledge of the authors, only the LDR regime has been documented in numerical simulations (Sureshkumar et al. 1997; Dimitropoulos et al. 1998; Min et al. 2001; Dubief & Lele 2001; Sibilla & Baron 2002). This paper discusses the simulation of polymer drag reduced channel ow at HDR using the FENE-P (Finite Elastic non

  4. The Shear Dynamo: quasilinear kinematic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S

    2008-01-01

    Large--scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is non perturbative in the strength of the background shear. We derive expressions for the turbulent transport coefficients of the mean magnetic field, by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. We prove that, for non helical turbulence, the equation governing the time evolution of the cross shear component of the mean magnetic field is closed, in the sense that it is independent of the other two components. This result is valid for any Galilean--invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Thus we find the shear--current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large--scale non helical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  5. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  6. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  7. What is turbulence, what is fossil turbulence, and which ways do they cascade?

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales (where the vorticity is created) to larger scales (where other forces dominate and the turbulence fossilizes). Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate information about previous turbulence to larger and smaller length scales. Big bang fossil turbulence patterns are identified in anisotropies of temperature detected by space telescopes in the cosmic microwave background. Direct numerical simulations of stratified shear flows and wakes show that turbulence and fossil turbulence interactions are recognizable and persistent.

  8. 7th iTi Conference in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Talamelli, Alessandro; Oberlack, Martin; Peinke, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the edited and reviewed contribution presented in the 7th iTi Conference in Bertinoro, covering fundamental and applied aspects in turbulence. In the spirit of the iTi conference, the volume is produced after the conference so that the authors had the opportunity to incorporate comments and discussions raised during the meeting. In the present book, the contributions have been structured according to the topics: I Theory II Wall bounded flows III Pipe flow IV Modelling V Experiments VII Miscellaneous topics.

  9. Bulk flow scaling for turbulent channel and pipe flows

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    We report a theory deriving bulk flow scaling for canonical wall-bounded flows. The theory accounts for the symmetries of boundary geometry (flat plate channel versus circular pipe) by a variational calculation for a large-scale energy length, which characterizes its bulk flow scaling by a simple exponent, i.e. $m=4$ for channel and 5 for pipe. The predicted mean velocity shows excellent agreement with several dozen sets of quality empirical data for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), with a universal bulk flow constant $\\kappa\\approx0.45$. Predictions for dissipation and turbulent transport in the bulk flow are also given, awaiting data verification.

  10. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence II: turbulent energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence draws its energy from gravity and ultimately releases it via dissipation. However, the quantitative details of this energy flow have not been assessed for global disk models. In this work we examine the energetics of a well-resolved, three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulation by evaluating statistically-averaged mean-field equations for magnetic, kinetic, and internal energy using simulation data. The results reveal that turbulent magnetic (kinetic) energy is primarily injected by the correlation between Maxwell (Reynolds) stresses and shear in the (almost Keplerian) mean flow, and removed by dissipation. This finding differs from previous work using local (shearing-box) models, which indicated that turbulent kinetic energy was primarily sourced from the magnetic energy reservoir. Lorentz forces provide the bridge between the magnetic and kinetic energy reservoirs, converting ~ 1/5 of the total turbulent magnetic power input into turbulent kinetic ener...

  11. Two-Dimensional Turbulent Separated Flow. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    of detached turbulent boundary layers, even when the sign of U is changed to account for mean backflows. Thus, earlier researchers, such as Kuhn and...Turbulent Shear Layer," Third Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, pp. 16.23-16.29. Hillier, R., Latour , M.E.M.P., and Cherry, N.J. (1983), "Unsteady...344. Kuhn , G.D. and Nielsen, J.N. (1971), "An Analytical Method for Calculating Turbulent Separated Flows Due to Adverse Pressure Gradients

  12. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transpor- tation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and that the Reynolds turbulence and the Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence are united in the theorems of the turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent in- tensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the sta- bility of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  13. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  14. Relaminarization of wall turbulence by high-pressure ramps at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Kwonyul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transition from the turbulent towards the laminar flow regime was investigated experimentally by progressively increasing the pressure up to 400 MPa in a fully developed pipe flow operated with silicone oil as the working fluid. Using hot-wire anemometry, it is shown indirectly that at low Reynolds numbers a rapid increase in pressure modifies the turbulence dynamics owing to the processes which induce the effects caused by fluid compressibility in the region very close to the wall. The experimental results confirm that under such circumstances, the traditional mechanism responsible for self-maintenance of turbulence in wall-bounded flows is altered in such a way as to lead towards a state in which turbulence cannot persist any longer.

  15. Multilayer scaling of mean velocity and thermal fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weitao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yousheng; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a symmetry based structural ensemble dynamics (SED) theory was proposed by She et al. for canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, yielding prediction of the mean velocity profile at an unprecedented accuracy (99%). Here, we extend the theory to compressible turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at supersonic and hypersonic Mach numbers. The flows are acquired by spatially evolving direct numerical simulations (DNS). A momentum mixing length displays a four layer structure and quantitatively obeys the dilation group invariance as for the incompressible TBL. In addition, a temperature mixing length behaves very similarly to the momentum mixing length when the wall is adiabatic, with a small difference in the scaling exponents in the buffer layer - consistent with the strong Reynolds analogy. The Lie group based formulization of the two mixing lengths yields a multilayer model for the turbulent Prandtl number, along with predictions to the mean thermal and velocity profiles, both in good agreement with the DNS. Thus, we assert that the compressible TBLs are governed by the same symmetry principle as that in the canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, and its mean fields can be accurately described by the SED theory.

  16. Mean velocity scaling for compressible wall turbulence with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trettel, Andrew; Larsson, Johan

    2016-02-01

    The current state-of-the-art in accounting for mean property variations in compressible turbulent wall-bounded flows is the Van Driest transformation, which is inaccurate for non-adiabatic walls. An alternative transformation is derived, based on arguments about log-layer scaling and near-wall momentum conservation. The transformation is tested on supersonic turbulent channel flows and boundary layers, and it is found to produce an excellent collapse of the mean velocity profile at different Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and rates of wall heat transfer. In addition, the proposed transformation mathematically derives the semi-local scaling of the wall-normal coordinate and unifies the scaling of the velocity, the Reynolds stresses, and the wall-normal coordinate.

  17. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  18. Turbulent current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  19. Evaluation of the scale dependent dynamic SGS model in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Martin; Usera, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    The Scale Dependent Dynamic Model (SDDM) has been widely validated in large-eddy simulations using pseudo-spectral codes [1][2][3]. The scale dependency, particularly the potential law, has been proved also in a priori studies [4][5]. To the authors' knowledge there have been only few attempts to use the SDDM in finite difference (FD) and finite volume (FV) codes [6][7], finding some improvements with the dynamic procedures (scale independent or scale dependent approach), but not showing the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter when using the SDDM. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the SDDM in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi, an updated version of the code presented in [8]. caffa3d.MBRi is a FV code, second-order accurate, parallelized with MPI, in which the domain is divided in unstructured blocks of structured grids. To accomplish this, 2 cases are considered: flow between flat plates and flow over a rough surface with the presence of a model wind turbine, taking for this case the experimental data presented in [9]. In both cases the standard Smagorinsky Model (SM), the Scale Independent Dynamic Model (SIDM) and the SDDM are tested. As presented in [6][7] slight improvements are obtained with the SDDM. Nevertheless, the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter supports the generalization of the dynamic procedure proposed in the SDDM, particularly taking into account that no explicit filter is used (the implicit filter is unknown). [1] F. Porté-Agel, C. Meneveau, M.B. Parlange. "A scale-dependent dynamic model for large-eddy simulation: application to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer". Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2000, 415, 261-284. [2] E. Bou-Zeid, C. Meneveau, M. Parlante. "A scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flows". Physics of Fluids, 2005, 17, 025105 (18p). [3] R. Stoll, F. Porté-Agel. "Dynamic subgrid-scale models for momentum and scalar fluxes in large-eddy simulations of

  20. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YinQiao; CHEN JinBei; ZUO HongChao

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transportation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics,turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent intensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the stability of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  1. Power curve report - with turbulence intensity normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn; Vesth, Allan

    , additional shear and turbulence intensitity filters are applied on the measured data. Secondly, the method for normalization to a given reference turbulence intensity level (as described in Annex M of the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [3]) is applied. The measurements have been performed using DTU...

  2. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France); Smolyakov, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z{sup 2}/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  3. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z2/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  4. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  5. Simple models for shear flow transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2011-11-01

    I will discuss recent developments in modeling transitional shear flows with simple two-variable models. Both pipe flow and plane Couette flow are considered. The essential insight is that most large-scale features of these shear flows can be traced to a change from excitability to bistability in the local dynamics. Models are presented in two variables, turbulence intensity and mean shear. A PDE model of pipe flow captures the essence of the puff-slug transition as a change from excitability to bistability. Extended models with turbulence as deterministic transient chaos or multiplicative noise reproduce almost all large-scale features of transitional pipe flow. In particular they capture metastable localized puffs, puff splitting, slugs, localized edge states, a continuous transition to sustained turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency (directed percolation), and a subsequent increase in turbulence fraction towards uniform, featureless turbulence. A model that additionally takes into account the symmetries of plane Couette flow reproduces localized turbulence and periodic turbulent-laminar bands.

  6. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  7. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...... are consistent, given the inevitabel uncertainties associated with model as well as with the extreme value data analysis. Keywords: Statistical model, extreme wind conditions, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, statistical analysis, turbulence, wind loading, wind shear, wind turbines....

  8. Macroscopic effects of the spectral structure in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T.; Chakraborty, P.; Guttenberg, N.; Prescott, A.; Kellay, H.; Goldburg, W.; Goldenfeld, N.; Gioia, G.

    2010-11-01

    There is a missing link between macroscopic properties of turbulent flows, such as the frictional drag of a wall-bounded flow, and the turbulent spectrum. To seek the missing link we carry out unprecedented experimental measurements of the frictional drag in turbulent soap-film flows over smooth walls. These flows are effectively two-dimensional, and we are able to create soap-film flows with the two types of turbulent spectrum that are theoretically possible in two dimensions: the "enstrophy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 3, and the "inverse energy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 5/3. We find that the functional relation between the frictional drag f and the Reynolds number Re depends on the spectral exponent: where α= 3, f ˜Re-1/2; where α= 5/3, f ˜Re-1/4. Each of these scalings may be predicted from the attendant value of α by using a recently proposed spectral theory of the frictional drag. In this theory the frictional drag of turbulent flows on smooth walls is predicted to be f ˜Re^(1-α)/(1+α).

  9. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    was held in the summer of 2011 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes, and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author. The collection includes regular research papers, a few research briefs and review papers. The review papers are published as 'Comments' articles in Physica Scripta . Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Six papers are devoted to canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. Baumert presents a theory of shear-generated turbulence, which is based on a two-fluid concept. Gampert et al investigate the problem of adequate representation of turbulent structures by applying a decomposition of the field of the turbulent kinetic energy into regions of compressive and extensive strain. Paul and Narashima consider the dynamics of a temporal mixing layer using a vortex sheet model. Schaefer et al analyse the joint statistics and conditional mean strain rates of streamline segments in turbulent flows. Sirota and Zybin deepen their discussion of the connection between Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity structure functions in hydrodynamic turbulence. Talbot et al investigate the heterogeneous mixing by considering gases of very nearly equal densities and very different viscosities. Wall-bounded flows. Three papers are dedicated to wall-bounded flows. Mok et al use the Bayesian spectral density approach to identify the dominant free surface fluctuation frequency downstream of an oscillating hydraulic jump. Tejada-Martinez et al employ large eddy numerical simulations to study wind-driven shallow water flows with and without full-depth Langmuir circulation (parallel counter rotating vortices). Wu et al re-evaluate the Karman constant based on a multi-layer analytical theory of Prandtl's mixing length function. Non-equilibrium processes. This theme is represented by two papers. Chasheckhin and Zagumennyi consider non-equilibrium processes

  10. Formation of Large-Scale Semi-Organized Structures in Turbulent Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2002-01-01

    A new mean-field theory of turbulent convection is developed. This theory predicts the convective wind instability in a shear-free turbulent convection which causes formation of large-scale semi-organized fluid motions in the form of cells or rolls. Spatial characteristics of these motions, such as the minimum size of the growing perturbations and the size of perturbations with the maximum growth rate, are determined. This study predicts also the existence of the convective shear instability in a sheared turbulent convection which results in generation of convective shear waves with a nonzero hydrodynamic helicity. Increase of shear promotes excitation of the convective shear instability. Applications of the obtained results to the atmospheric turbulent convection and the laboratory experiments on turbulent convection are discussed. This theory can be applied also for the describing a mesogranular turbulent convection in astrophysics.

  11. Turbulent Free Shear Layer Mixing and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-29

    the stirring rate is increased. See discussion, for example, in Levenspiel (1962). 36 The effects of the asymmetric entrainment ratio can be seen in...Symposium on Numerical Methods in Engineering (edited by P. Lascaux, Pluralis, Paris), 45-63. LEVENSPIEL , 0. 1962, Chemical Reaction Engineering. An...Introduction to the Design of Chemical Reactors . (John Wiley, New York). LIEPMANN, H. W., AND ROSHKO, A. 1957, Elements of Gasdynamics (John Wiley, New

  12. Distorted Turbulent Flow in a Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The prediction of broadband noise from wind turbines , Journal of Sound and Vibration 118(2), (1987) 217-239 13. Majumder S and Peake N, 1998, Noise...introduced by Amiet[5] and used by Glegg et al [12] for wind turbines . This approach only applies when the blade passing frequency is very much less than the...K A, and Morton, M A, 2013, The Kevlar-Walled Anechoic Wind Tunnel, Journal of Sound and Vibration , http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.jsv.2013.02.043i

  13. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20 wall-bounded flows.

  14. Intrinsic rotation drive by collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Diamond, P H

    2016-01-01

    Both the parallel residual stress and parallel turbulent acceleration driven by electrostatic collisionsless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence are calculated analytically using gyrokinetic theory. Quasilinear results show that the parallel residual stress contributes an outward flux of co-current rotation for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. This may induce intrinsic counter-current rotation or flattening of the co-current rotation profile. The parallel turbulent acceleration driven by CTEM turbulence vanishes, due to the absence of a phase shift between density fluctuation and ion pressure fluctuation. This is different from the case of ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence, for which the turbulent acceleration can provide co-current drive for normal magnetic shear and turbulence intensity profile increasing outward. Its order of magnitude is predicted to be the same as that of the divergence of the residual stress [Lu Wang and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett...

  15. On the evolution of laminar to turbulent transition and breakdown to turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jovan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the basic conservation laws of fluid flow, we investigated transition and breakdown to turbulence of a laminar flat plate boundary layer exposed to small, statistically stationary, two-component, three-dimensional disturbances. The derived equations for the statistical properties of the disturbances are closed using the two-point correlation technique and invariant theory. By considering the equilibrium solutions of the modeled equations, the transition criterion is formulated in terms of a Reynolds number based on the intensity and the length scale of the disturbances. The deduced transition criterion determines conditions that guarantee maintenance of the local equilibrium between the production and the viscous dissipation of the disturbances and therefore the laminar flow regime in the flat plate boundary layer. The experimental and numerical databases for fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers were utilized to demonstrate the validity of the derived transition criterion for the estimation of the onset of turbulence in wall-bounded flows.

  16. Effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with zero pressure gradient. 4th Report. Calculation of flow field; Seiatsu ittei no heiban ranryu kyokaiso ni oyobosu shuryubu midare no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M.; Yata, J. [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Minamiyama, T. [Fukuyama University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-04-25

    The effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer were calculated using a {kappa}-{epsilon} two-equation model. The calculations were performed with respect to velocity profiles on a flat plate wall shear stress turbulence energy integral length scales of turbulence and decay of free stream turbulence and the results were compared with experimental results. The energy of free stream turbulence and the dissipation values at the leading edge of flat plate were used, as the initial conditions for calculation. These initial values of dissipation were determined from the integral length scales of free stream turbulence at the leading edge. The calculated wall shear stress increased with the free stream turbulence and integral length scales of turbulence. The velocity profiles and turbulence energy agreed well with the experimental results and the effects of free stream turbulence on the wall shear stress agreed fairly well with those observed in experiments. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Anisotropy of turbulence in wind turbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Elvira, Rafael [Comision Nacional de Energia (Spain); Crespo, Antonio; Migoya, Emilio; Manuel, Fernando [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Julio [Departamento de Mecanica, ETSII, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of non-isotropic characteristics of turbulence in wind turbine wakes, specifically the shear layer of the near wake. A calculation method based on an explicit algebraic model for the components of the turbulent stress tensor is proposed, and the results are found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. Analytical expressions for the estimation of an upper limit of the global turbulence kinetic energy, k, and the individual contributions of each diagonal term in the turbulent stress tensor are proposed. Their predictions are compared with experimental results.

  18. DNSLab: A gateway to turbulent flow simulation in Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, V.; Keskinen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research is increasingly much focused towards computationally intensive, eddy resolving simulation techniques of turbulent flows such as large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, we present a compact educational software package called DNSLab, tailored for learning partial differential equations of turbulence from the perspective of DNS in Matlab environment. Based on educational experiences and course feedback from tens of engineering post-graduate students and industrial engineers, DNSLab can offer a major gateway to turbulence simulation with minimal prerequisites. Matlab implementation of two common fractional step projection methods is considered: the 2d Fourier pseudo-spectral method, and the 3d finite difference method with 2nd order spatial accuracy. Both methods are based on vectorization in Matlab and the slow for-loops are thus avoided. DNSLab is tested on two basic problems which we have noted to be of high educational value: 2d periodic array of decaying vortices, and 3d turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is possibly the first to investigate efficiency of a 3d turbulent, wall bounded flow in Matlab. The accuracy and efficiency of DNSLab is compared with a customized OpenFOAM solver called rk4projectionFoam. Based on our experiences and course feedback, the main contribution of DNSLab consists of the following features. (i) The very compact Matlab implementation of present Navier-Stokes solvers provides a gateway to efficient learning of both, physics of turbulent flows, and simulation of turbulence. (ii) Only relatively minor prerequisites on fluid dynamics and numerical methods are required for using DNSLab. (iii) In 2d, interactive results for turbulent flow cases can be obtained. Even for a 3d channel flow, the solver is fast enough for nearly interactive educational use. (iv) DNSLab is made openly available and thus contributing to

  19. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  20. Phase relations of triadic scale interactions in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; McKeon, Beverley

    2014-11-01

    The quadratic nature of non-linearity in the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations dictates the coupling between scales in a turbulent flow to be of triadic form. An understanding of the triadic coupling affords good insights into the dynamics of turbulence, as demonstrated by Sharma & McKeon (J. Fluid Mech., 2013) through analysis of the NS resolvent operator; a set of three triadically consistent spatio-temporal modes was shown to produce complex structures such as modulating packets of hairpin vortices observed in wall-bounded turbulent flows. Here we interpret Skewness (Sk) of velocity fluctuations and the Amplitude Modulation coefficient (Ram), proposed by Mathis, Hutchins & Marusic (J. Fluid Mech., 2009), to be a measure of the large- and small-scale phase relationship. Through a simple decomposition of scales, both Sk and Ram are shown to be amplitude weighted (and normalized) measures of phase between scales that have direct triadic coupling. An analytical relationship is established between the two quantities and the result is demonstrated using experimental data from canonical and dynamically forced turbulent boundary layers presented in Duvvuri and McKeon (AIAA 2014-2883). The support of AFOSR (Grant No. FA 9550-12-1-0469) and Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  2. E x B shearing rate in quasi-symmetric plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1997-06-20

    The suppression of turbulence by the E x B shear is studied in systems with quasi-symmetry using the nonlinear analysis of eddy decorrelation previously utilized in finite aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The analytically derived E x B shearing rate which contains the relevant geometric dependence can be used for quantitative assessment of the fluctuation suppression in stellarators with quasi-symmetry.

  3. A dual-scale turbulence model for gas-liquid bubbly flows☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Guan; Zhaoqi Li; Lijun Wang⁎; Xi Li; Youwei Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A dual-scale turbulence model is applied to simulate cocurrent upward gas–liquid bubbly flows and validated with available experimental data. In the model, liquid phase turbulence is split into shear-induced and bubble-induced turbulence. Single-phase standard k-εmodel is used to compute shear-induced turbulence and another transport equation is added to model bubble-induced turbulence. In the latter transport equation, energy loss due to interface drag is the production term, and the characteristic length of bubble-induced turbulence, simply the bubble diameter in this work, is introduced to model the dissipation term. The simulated results agree well with experimental data of the test cases and it is demonstrated that the proposed dual-scale turbulence model outperforms other models. Analysis of the predicted turbulence shows that the main part of turbulent kinetic en-ergy is the bubble-induced one while the shear-induced turbulent viscosity predominates within turbulent vis-cosity, especially at the pipe center. The underlying reason is the apparently different scales for the two kinds of turbulence production mechanisms:the shear-induced turbulence is on the scale of the whole pipe while the bubble-induced turbulence is on the scale of bubble diameter. Therefore, the model reflects the multi-scale phe-nomenon involved in gas–liquid bubbly flows.

  4. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    used in related dispersion studies and coupled land atmosphere interaction models. For other more complex biosphere atmosphere interactions such as greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands, the interplay between air and water, often in presence of flexible aquatic vegetation, controls turbulence in water, which in turn affect the gas transfer processes. This process of wind shear induced wave-turbulent-vegetation interaction is studied for the first time in the laboratory and the state of turbulence as well as the bulk flow is found to be highly sensitive to environmental controls such as water height, wind speed, vegetation density and flexibility. This dissertation describes and gradually develops these concepts in an increasing order of complexity of boundary conditions. The first three chapters address the neutral and thermally stratified boundary layers and the last two chapters address the canopy edge problem and the air-water-vegetation experiments respectively.

  5. Turbulence Models of Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张直明; 王小静; 孙美丽

    2003-01-01

    The main theoretical turbulence models for application to hydrodynamic lubrication problems were briefly reviewed, and the course of their development and their fundamentals were explained. Predictions by these models on flow fields in turbulent Couette flows and shear-induced countercurrent flows were compared to existing measurements, and Zhang & Zhang' s combined k-ε model was shown to have surpassingly satisfactory results. The method of application of this combined k-ε model to high speed journal bearings and annular seals was summarized, and the predicted results were shown to be satisfactory by comparisons with existing experiments of journal bearings and annular seals.

  6. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  7. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  8. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  9. Stochastically driven instability in rotating shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-01-01

    Origin of hydrodynamic turbulence in rotating shear flows is investigated. The particular emphasis is the flows whose angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows are Rayleigh stable, but must be turbulent in order to explain observed data. Such a mismatch between the linear theory and observations/experiments is more severe when any hydromagnetic/magnetohydrodynamic instability and then the corresponding turbulence therein is ruled out. The present work explores the effect of stochastic noise on such hydrodynamic flows. We essentially concentrate on a small section of such a flow which is nothing but a plane shear flow supplemented by the Coriolis effect. This also mimics a small section of an astrophysical accretion disk. It is found that such stochastically driven flows exhibit large temporal and spatial correlations of perturbation velocities, and hence large energy dissipations of perturbation, which presumably generate instability. A ra...

  10. ALGEBRAIC TURBULENCE MODEL WITH MEMORY FOR COMPUTATION OF 3-D TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS WITH VALIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Additional equations were found based on experiments for an algebraic turbulence model to improve the prediction of the behavior of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers by taking account of the effects of pressure gradient and the historical variation of eddy viscosity, so the model is with memory. Numerical calculation by solving boundary layer equations was carried out for the five pressure driven three dimensional turbulent boundary layers developed on flat plates, swept-wing, and prolate spheroid in symmetrical plane. Comparing the computational results with the experimental data, it is obvious that the prediction will be more accurate if the proposed closure equations are used, especially for the turbulent shear stresses.

  11. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  12. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulence characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen-La Plante, Imai; Ma, Yongfeng; Nurowska, Katarzyna; Gerber, Hermann; Khelif, Djamal; Karpinska, Katarzyna; Kopec, Marta K.; Kumala, Wojciech; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence observed during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) research campaign is analyzed. Using in-flight measurements of dynamic and thermodynamic variables at the interface between the stratocumulus cloud top and free troposphere, the cloud top region is classified into sublayers, and the thicknesses of these sublayers are estimated. The data are used to calculate turbulence characteristics, including the bulk Richardson number, mean-square velocity fluctuations, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), TKE dissipation rate, and Corrsin, Ozmidov and Kolmogorov scales. A comparison of these properties among different sublayers indicates that the entrainment interfacial layer consists of two significantly different sublayers: the turbulent inversion sublayer (TISL) and the moist, yet hydrostatically stable, cloud top mixing sublayer (CTMSL). Both sublayers are marginally turbulent, i.e., the bulk Richardson number across the layers is critical. This means that turbulence is produced by shear and damped by buoyancy such that the sublayer thicknesses adapt to temperature and wind variations across them. Turbulence in both sublayers is anisotropic, with Corrsin and Ozmidov scales as small as ˜ 0.3 and ˜ 3 m in the TISL and CTMSL, respectively. These values are ˜ 60 and ˜ 15 times smaller than typical layer depths, indicating flattened large eddies and suggesting no direct mixing of cloud top and free-tropospheric air. Also, small scales of turbulence are different in sublayers as indicated by the corresponding values of Kolmogorov scales and buoyant and shear Reynolds numbers.

  13. Effects of Natural Convection on the Near-Wall Turbulence in Unstably Stratified Turbulent Channel Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, Samir; Terrapon, Vincent; Dubief, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Results of direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flows under unstable stratification are reported. Two Reynolds number are considered: Reτ = 180 , 395 and the Rayleigh number ranges between Ra = [106 -109 ] . The Prandtl number is set to 1. The channel is periodic in both streamwise and spanwise directions and non-slip/isothermal boundary conditions are imposed at the walls. The temperature difference between the walls is set so that the stratification is unstable and the coupling between temperature and momentum is achieved using the Boussinesq approximation. The dependency of the typical large scale convective structures on both Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers are investigated through cross flow sectional statistics and instantaneous flow field visualizations. Moreover, the effects of the natural convection on the coherent structures associated to the cycle of wall-bounded turbulence (Jimenez, et al. JFM 1999), namely velocity streaks and streamwise vortices, are examined. Finally, macroscopic quantities such as friction coefficient and Nusselt number are reported as a function of the Rayleigh number and are compared for both Reynolds numbers. The Belgian Team acknowledges computational resources from CÉCI (F.R.S.-FNRS grant No.2.5020.11) and the PRACE infrastructure. YD acknowledges the support of NSF and DOE under grant NSF/DOE 1258697.

  14. On turbulence in a stratified environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sutanu

    2015-11-01

    John Lumley, motivated by atmospheric observations, made seminal contributions to the statistical theory (Lumley and Panofsky 1964, Lumley 1964) and second-order modeling (Zeman and Lumley 1976) of turbulence in the environment. Turbulent processes in the ocean share many features with the atmosphere, e.g., shear, stratification, rotation and rough topography. Results from direct and large eddy simulations of two model problems will be used to illustrate some of the features of turbulence in a stratified environment. The first problem concerns a shear layer in nonuniform stratification, a situation typical of both the atmosphere and the ocean. The second problem, considered to be responsible for much of the turbulent mixing that occurs in the ocean interior, concerns topographically generated internal gravity waves. Connections will be made to data taken during observational campaigns in the ocean.

  15. Self-similarity of the large-scale motions in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Leo; Marusic, Ivan; Smits, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis assumes the existence of a set of energetic and geometrically self-similar eddies in the logarithmic layer in wall-bounded turbulent flows. These eddies can be completely scaled with the distance from their center to the wall. We performed stereo PIV measurements together with a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis, to address the self-similarity of the energetic motions, or eddies, in fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. The resulting modes/eddies, extracted at Reτ = 2460 , show a self-similar behavior for eddies with wall-normal length scales spanning a decade. This single length scale provides a complete description of the cross-sectional shape of the self-similar eddies. ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2402 and the Australian Research Council.

  16. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  17. Anisotropic character of low-order turbulent flow descriptions through the proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2017-01-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is applied to distinct data sets in order to characterize the propagation of error arising from basis truncation in the description of turbulence. Experimental data from stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in a wind turbine array and direct numerical simulation data from a fully developed channel flow are used to illustrate dependence of the anisotropy tensor invariants as a function of POD modes used in low-order descriptions. In all cases, ensembles of snapshots illuminate a variety of anisotropic states of turbulence. In the near wake of a model wind turbine, the turbulence field reflects the periodic interaction between the incoming flow and rotor blade. The far wake of the wind turbine is more homogenous, confirmed by the increased magnitude of the anisotropy factor. By contrast, the channel flow exhibits many anisotropic states of turbulence. In the inner layer of the wall-bounded region, one observes one-component turbulence at the wall; immediately above, the turbulence is dominated by two components, with the outer layer showing fully three-dimensional turbulence, conforming to theory for wall-bounded turbulence. The complexity of flow descriptions resulting from truncated POD bases can be greatly mitigated by severe basis truncations. However, the current work demonstrates that such simplification necessarily exaggerates the anisotropy of the modeled flow and, in extreme cases, can lead to the loss of three-dimensionality. Application of simple corrections to the low-order descriptions of the Reynolds stress tensor significantly reduces the residual root-mean-square error. Similar error reduction is seen in the anisotropy tensor invariants. Corrections of this form reintroduce three-dimensionality to severe truncations of POD bases. A threshold for truncating the POD basis based on the equivalent anisotropy factor for each measurement set required many more modes than a threshold based on energy. The mode

  18. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  19. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  20. Entropic-Skins Geometry to Describe Wall Turbulence Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Queiros-Conde

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to describe the phenomenon of intermittency in wall turbulence and, more particularly, the behaviour of moments  and and intermittency exponents ζP with the order p and distance to the wall, we developed a new geometrical framework called “entropic-skins geometry” based on the notion of scale-entropy which is here applied to an experimental database of boundary layer flows. Each moment has its own spatial multi-scale support Ωp (“skin”. The model assumes the existence of a hierarchy of multi-scale sets Ωp ranged from the “bulk” to the “crest”. The crest noted characterizes the geometrical support where the most intermittent (the highest fluctuations in energy dissipation occur; the bulk is the geometrical support for the whole range of fluctuations. The model assumes then the existence of a dynamical flux through the hierarchy of skins. The specific case where skins display a fractal structure is investigated. Bulk fractal dimension  and crest dimension  are linked by a scale-entropy flux defining a reversibility efficiency  (d is the embedding dimension. The model, initially developed for homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, is applied here to wall bounded turbulence where intermittency exponents are measured by extended self-similarity. We obtained for intermittency exponents the analytical expression with γ ≈ 0.36 in agreement with experimental results.

  1. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  2. Small scale aspects of flows in proximity of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, M; Nikitin, N; Kinzelbach, W; Tsinober, A

    2007-01-01

    The work reported below is a first of its kind study of the properties of turbulent flow without strong mean shear in a Newtonian fluid in proximity of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface, with emphasis on the small scale aspects. The main tools used are a three-dimensional particle tracking system (3D-PTV) allowing to measure and follow in a Lagrangian manner the field of velocity derivatives and direct numerical simulations (DNS). The comparison of flow properties in the turbulent (A), intermediate (B) and non-turbulent (C) regions in the proximity of the interface allows for direct observation of the key physical processes underlying the entrainment phenomenon. The differences between small scale strain and enstrophy are striking and point to the definite scenario of turbulent entrainment via the viscous forces originating in strain.

  3. Existence of a persistent background of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    A plausible scenario for the existence of a persistent back-ground of turbulence in the free atmosphere is described. The MST radar technique is the only existing technique that can be used to describe the morphology of occurrence of turbulence as a function of altitude, wind speed, shear, weather conditions, geographical location, etc. This technique was used also to assess the degree of universality of shape and amplitude of the buoyancy wave spectrum and the relation between the buoyancy wave spectrum and turbulence.

  4. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  5. Turbulent pipe flows subjected to temporal decelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Wongwan; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of temporally decelerating turbulent pipe flows were performed to examine effects of temporal decelerations on turbulence. The simulations were started with a fully developed turbulent pipe flow at a Reynolds number, ReD =24380, based on the pipe radius (R) and the laminar centerline velocity (Uc 0). Three different temporal decelerations were imposed to the initial flow with f= | d Ub / dt | =0.00127, 0.00625 and 0.025, where Ub is the bulk mean velocity. Comparison of Reynolds stresses and turbulent production terms with those for steady flow at a similar Reynolds number showed that turbulence is highly intensified with increasing f due to delay effects. Furthermore, inspection of the Reynolds shear stress profiles showed that strong second- and fourth-quadrant Reynolds shear stresses are greatly increased, while first- and third-quadrant components are also increased. Decomposition of streamwise Reynolds normal stress with streamwise cutoff wavelength (λx) 1 R revealed that the turbulence delay is dominantly originated from delay of strong large-scale turbulent structures in the outer layer, although small-scale motions throughout the wall layer adjusted more rapidly to the temporal decelerations. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  6. Pulsar timing noise from superfluid turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Shear-driven turbulence in the superfluid interior of a neutron star exerts a fluctuating torque on the rigid crust, causing the rotational phase to walk randomly. The phase fluctuation spectrum is calculated analytically for incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence and is found to be red; the half-power point is set by the observed spin-down rate, the crust-superfluid lag, and the dynamical response time of the superfluid. Preliminary limits are placed on the latter quantities using selected time- and frequency-domain data. It is found that measurements of the normalization and slope of the power spectrum are reproduced for reasonable choices of the turbulence parameters. The results point preferentially to the neutron star interior containing a turbulent superfluid rather than a turbulent Navier-Stokes fluid. The implications for gravitational wave detection by pulsar timing arrays are discussed briefly.

  7. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  8. Rotation shear induced fluctuation decorrelation in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    The enhanced decorrelation of fluctuations by the combined effects of the E {times} B flow (V{sub E}) shear, the parallel flow (V{sub {parallel}}) shear, and the magnetic shear is studied in toroidal geometry. A two-point nonlinear analysis previously utilized in a cylindrical model shows that the reduction of the radial correlation length below its ambient turbulence value ({Delta}r{sub 0}) is characterized by the ratio between the shearing rate {omega}{sub s} and the ambient turbulence scattering rate {Delta}{omega}{sub T}. The derived shearing rate is given by {omega}{sub s}{sup 2} = ({Delta}r{sub 0}){sup 2}[1/{Delta}{phi}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(qV{sub E}/r){r_brace}{sup 2} + 1/{Delta}{eta}{sup 2}{l_brace}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}r(V{parallel}/qR){r_brace}{sup 2}], where {Delta}{phi} and {Delta}{eta} are the correlation angles of the ambient turbulence along the toroidal and parallel directions. This result deviates significantly from the cylindrical result for high magnetic shear or for ballooning-like fluctuations. For suppression of flute-like fluctuations, only the radial shear of qV{sub E}/r contributes, and the radial shear of V{parallel}/qR is irrelevant regardless of the plasma rotation direction.

  9. Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn

    in the power curve. A power curve defined in terms of this equivalent wind speed would be less dependant on the shear than the standard power curve. The equivalent wind speed method was then experimentally validated with lidar measurements. Two equivalent wind speed definitions were considered both resulting...... ways of accounting for the turbulence were tested with the experimental data: an adaptation of the equivalent wind speed so that it also accounts for the turbulence intensity and the combination of the equivalent wind speed accounting for the wind shear only with the turbulence normalising method...... the vertical wind shear and the turbulence intensity. The work presented in this thesis consists of the description and the investigation of a simple method to account for the wind speed shear in the power performance measurement. Ignoring this effect was shown to result in a power curve dependant on the shear...

  10. Similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra in the near-wall region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra, previously confirmed using experimental data in various turbulent shear flows, is validated in the near-wall region using direct numerical simulation data in a fully developed turbulent channel flow. The dependence of this similarity on the molecular Prandtl number is also examined.

  11. High-Reynolds-number turbulence in complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmatova, D.; Bonn, D.; Kellay, H.

    2013-01-01

    We here examine the structure of turbulence in the case of a complex fluid made up of water and surfactants. This fluid has the particular property of shear thickening when driven at shear rates above a certain threshold. Through a study of the spectral properties and the structure function scalings

  12. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  13. Reynolds stress and shear flow generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    2001-01-01

    of improved confinement scenarios such as H-mode confinement regimes. However, the determination of the Reynolds stress requires measurements of the plasma potential, a task that is difficult in general and nearly impossible in hot plasmas in large devices. In this work we investigate an alternative method...... to the treatment of the pseudo-Reynolds stress, we present analytical and numerical results which demonstrate that the Reynolds stress in a plasma, indeed, generates a poloidal shear flow. The numerical simulations are performed both in a drift wave turbulence regime and a resistive interchange turbulence regime...

  14. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until str...

  15. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  16. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  17. Local Reynolds number and thresholds of transition in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, JianJun; Chen, ShiYi; Su, WeiDong

    2013-02-01

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations reveal that the onset of turbulence in plane-Poiseuille flow and plane-Couette flow has some similar stages separated with different threshold Reynolds numbers. Based on these observations and the energy equation of a disturbed fluid element, a local Reynolds number Re L is derived to represent the maximum ratio of the energy supplement to the energy dissipation in a cross section. It is shown that along the sequence of transition stages, which include transient localized turbulence, "equilibrium" localized turbulence, spatially intermittent but temporally persistent turbulence and uniform turbulence, the corresponding thresholds of Re L for plane-Couette flow, Hagen-Poiseuille flow and plane-Poiseuille flow are consistent, indicating that the critical (threshold) states during the laminar-turbulent transition are determined by the local properties of the base flow and are independent of global features, such as flow geometries (pipe or channel) and types of driving forces (shear driving or pressure driving).

  18. Large-scale dynamo action driven by velocity shear and rotating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W; Proctor, Michael R E

    2009-01-30

    By incorporating a large-scale shear flow into turbulent rotating convection, we show that a sufficiently strong shear can promote dynamo action in flows that are otherwise nondynamos. Our results are consistent with a dynamo driven either by the shear-current effect or by a fluctuating alpha effect interacting with the shear, but not with either a classical alpha(2) or alpha omega dynamo.

  19. Consistent theory of turbulent transport in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-jin

    2006-03-03

    A theory of turbulent transport is presented in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with background shear and magnetic fields. We provide theoretical predictions for the transport of magnetic flux, momentum, and particles and turbulent intensities, which show stronger reduction compared with the hydrodynamic case, with different dependences on shearing rate, magnetic field, and values of viscosity, Ohmic diffusion, and particle diffusivity. In particular, particle transport is more severely suppressed than momentum transport, effectively leading to a more efficient momentum transport. The role of magnetic fields in quenching transport without altering the amplitude of flow velocity and in inhibiting the generation of shear flows is elucidated. Implications of the results are discussed.

  20. Stability of optimal streaks in the buffer layer of a turbulent channel flow with variable viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashish; Rinaldi, Enrico; Pecnik, Rene; Schlatter, Philipp; Bagheri, Shervin

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent channel flows with variable viscosity (Patel et al., 2015, PoF) show that low speed streaks in the buffer layer strengthen and are stabilized for increasing viscosity away from the wall, as they do not lift and tilt as intensely as in a constant property flow. The opposite holds for cases where viscosity decreases away from the wall. In this work, we investigate the above observation by studying the linear stability of the mean turbulent velocity profile obtained from DNS of variable viscosity flows. Examples of such studies for constant property turbulent flows include work of del Alamo & Jiménez, 2006, JFM and Pujals et al., 2009, PoF. The calculated optimal buffer layer streaks show larger transient energy growth for a case where the viscosity increases away from the wall. We further study the stability of the saturated optimal streaks by imposing a secondary sinuous perturbation and by following the nonlinear evolution of the structures in time. The present investigation will improve the understanding of the near-wall turbulence cycle for wall-bounded turbulent flows with viscosity gradients.

  1. Fluid Dynamics of Three-Dimensional Turbulent Shear Flows and Transition: Conference Proceedings of the Symposium of the Fluid Dynamics Panel Held in Cesme (Turkey) on 3-6 October 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    laminaire-turbulent Fig. 8 -Contr~le des spots d’EMMONS d’une couche limite de plaque plane - 6volution du coefficient de frottement Evolution de la...montage exp~rimontal utilise A la soofflerie T2 f !C % ~ n-32 Fig. 27 -Variations do coefficient do *~ tratn~e do frottement . do la partie mani- - -- pul~e...rapidement. Par exomple, des mesures du coefficient de frottement en oval d’une plaque rainur~e n’ont montr& aucune variation significative par rapport au

  2. Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  3. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  4. Burgers turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bec, Jeremie [Laboratoire Cassiopee UMR6202, CNRS, OCA, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: jeremie.bec@obs-nice.fr; Khanin, Konstantin [Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: khanin@math.toronto.edu

    2007-08-15

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines.

  5. Marine particle aggregate breakup in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Matthew; Ackleson, Steven; Smith, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of marine particle aggregate formation and breakup due to turbulence is studied experimentally. Aggregates of clay particles, initially in a quiescent aggregation tank, are subjected to fully developed turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers of up to 25,000. This flow arrangement simulates the exposure of marine aggregates in coastal waters to a sudden turbulent event. Particle size distributions are measured by in-situ sampling of the small-angle forward volume scattering function and the volume concentration of the suspended particulate matter is quantified through light attenuation measurements. Results are compared to measurements conducted under laminar and turbulent flow conditions. At low shear rates, larger sized particles indicate that aggregation initially governs the particle dynamics. Breakup is observed when large aggregates are exposed to the highest levels of shear in the experiment. Models describing the aggregation and breakup rates of marine particles due to turbulence are evaluated with the population balance equation and results from the simulation and experiment are compared. Additional model development will more accurately describe aggregation dynamics for remote sensing applications in turbulent marine environments.

  6. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... with a smooth bottom. Turbulence was generated ´externally´ as the flow in the oscillator was passed through a series of grids, that extended from the cover of the water tunnel to about mid-depth. Two different types of grid porosities were used. Direct measurements of the bed shear stress and velocity...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  7. Design of a Turbulence Generator of Medium Consistency Pulp Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulence generator is a key component of medium consistency centrifugal pulp pumps, with functions to fluidize the medium consistency pulp and to separate gas from the liquid. Structure sizes of the generator affect the hydraulic performance. The radius and the blade laying angle are two important structural sizes of a turbulence generator. Starting with the research on the flow inside and shearing characteristics of the MC pulp, a simple mathematical model at the flow section of the shearing chamber is built, and the formula and procedure to calculate the radius of the turbulence generator are established. The blade laying angle is referenced from the turbine agitator which has the similar shape with the turbulence generator, and the CFD simulation is applied to study the different flow fields with different blade laying angles. Then the recommended blade laying angle of the turbulence generator is formed to be between 60° and 75°.

  8. Recent results on analytical plasma turbulence theory: Realizability, intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-18

    Recent results and future challenges in the systematic analytical description of plasma turbulence are described. First, the importance of statistical realizability is stressed, and the development and successes of the Realizable Markovian Closure are briefly reviewed. Next, submarginal turbulence (linearly stable but nonlinearly self-sustained fluctuations) is considered and the relevance of nonlinear instability in neutral-fluid shear flows to submarginal turbulence in magnetized plasmas is discussed. For the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations, a self-consistency loop that leads to steady-state vortex regeneration in the presence of dissipation is demonstrated and a partial unification of recent work of Drake (for plasmas) and of Waleffe (for neutral fluids) is given. Brief remarks are made on the difficulties facing a quantitatively accurate statistical description of submarginal turbulence. Finally, possible connections between intermittency, submarginal turbulence, and self-organized criticality (SOC) are considered and outstanding questions are identified.

  9. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  10. On the accuracy of analytical methods for turbulent flows near smooth walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absi, Rafik; Di Nucci, Carmine

    2012-09-01

    This Note presents two methods for mean streamwise velocity profiles of fully-developed turbulent pipe and channel flows near smooth walls. The first is the classical approach where the mean streamwise velocity is obtained by solving the momentum equation with an eddy viscosity formulation [R. Absi, A simple eddy viscosity formulation for turbulent boundary layers near smooth walls, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009) 158-165]. The second approach presents a formulation of the velocity profile based on an analogy with an electric field distribution [C. Di Nucci, E. Fiorucci, Mean velocity profiles of fully-developed turbulent flows near smooth walls, C. R. Mecanique 339 (2011) 388-395] and a formulation for the turbulent shear stress. However, this formulation for the turbulent shear stress shows a weakness. A corrected formulation is presented. Comparisons with DNS data show that the classical approach with the eddy viscosity formulation provides more accurate profiles for both turbulent shear stress and velocity gradient.

  11. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-06-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated.

  12. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  13. Nonlinear electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of three dimensional current shear instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Neeraj [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Das, Amita; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-09-15

    This paper deals with detailed nonlinear electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a three dimensional current shear driven instability in slab geometry. The simulations show the development of the instability in the current shear layer in the linear regime leading to the generation of electromagnetic turbulence in the nonlinear regime. The electromagnetic turbulence is first generated in the unstable shear layer and then spreads into the stable regions. The turbulence spectrum shows a new kind of anisotropy in which power transfer towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow. Results of the present three dimensional simulations of the current shear instability are compared with those of our earlier two dimensional simulations of sausage instability. It is found that the flattening of the mean velocity profile and thus reduction in the electron current due to generation of electromagnetic turbulence in the three dimensional case is more effective as compared to that in the two dimensional case.

  14. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  15. The Zero Turbulence Manifold in Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G

    2012-01-01

    The transport of heat that results from turbulence is a major factor limiting the temperature gradient, and thus the performance, of fusion devices. We use nonlinear simulations to show that a toroidal equilibrium scale sheared flow can completely suppress the turbulence across a wide range of flow gradient and temperature gradient values. We demonstrate the existence of a bifurcation across this range whereby the plasma may transition from a low flow gradient and temperature gradient state to a higher flow gradient and temperature gra- dient state. We show further that the maximum temperature gradient that can be reached by such a transition is limited by the existence, at high flow gradient, of subcritical turbulence driven by the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). We use linear simulations and analytic calculations to examine the properties of the transiently growing modes which give rise to this subcritical turbulence, and conclude that there may be a critical value of the ratio of the PVG to the suppressi...

  16. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  17. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the importance of turbulent coagulation in the Kuwaiti oil fires. Final report, April 1992-June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlberg, I.

    1993-06-01

    This study provides a mathematical determination of the spatial distribution of aerosols due to turbulent shear coagulation and turbulent inertial coagulation, as applied to the conditions of the Kuwaiti Oil Fires (KOF) of 1991. Using an approximation from a forest fire for the normalized size distribution of aerosols, the downstream particle concentration is found by the concurrent solution of the coagulations' kinetics combined with turbulent atmospheric diffusion. The result shows the explicit dependence of the concentration on the following principal parameters: turbulent energy dissipation rate, turbulent diffusion constant, average wind speed, mass ejection from a well, Kolmorogov time scale for turbulence, and Kolmorogov length scale for turbulence. For very large values of turbulent energy dissipation rate, turbulent inertial coagulation is more effective than turbulent shear coagulation in particle growth. The spatial dependence of concentration attributed to turbulent coagulation may vary considerably. Depending on the choice of parameters, the importance of turbulent coagulation in particle transport processes may extend from less than a kilometer to tens of kilometers. Kuwaiti Oil Fires (KOF), Particle transport, Turbulent inertial coagulation, Turbulent shear coagulation.

  19. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    presentations were published in the Book of Abstracts, International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', August 18-26, 2007, Copyright 2007 Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, ISBN 92-95003-36-5. This Topical Issue consists of nearly 60 articles accepted for publication in the Conference Proceedings and reflects a substantial part of the Conference contributions. The articles cover a broad variety of TMB-2007 themes and are sorted alphabetically by the last name of the first author within each of the following topics: Canonical Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing (invariant, scaling, spectral properties, scalar transports) Wall-bounded Flows (structure and fundamentals, unsteady boundary layers, super-sonic flows, shock - boundary layer interaction) Interfacial Dynamics (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) Unsteady Turbulent Processes (turbulence and turbulent mixing in unsteady, multiphase and anisotropic flows) High Energy Density Physics (laser-material interaction, Z-pinches, laser-driven, heavy-ion and magnetic fusion) Astrophysics (supernovae, interstellar medium, star formation, stellar interiors, early Universe, cosmic micro-wave background) Magneto-hydrodynamics (magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, accretion disks, dynamo) Plasmas in Ionosphere (coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere) Physics of Atmosphere (environmental fluid dynamics, forecasting, data analysis, error estimate) Geophysics (turbulent convection in stratified, rotating and active flows) Combustion (dynamics of flames, fires, blast waves and explosions) Mathematical Aspects of Multi-Scale Dynamics (vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness) Statistical Approaches, Stochastic Processes and Probabilistic Description (uncertainty quantification, anomalous diffusion, long-tail distributions, wavelets) Advanced Numerical Simulations

  20. Turbulence in the cylindrical slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentle, K. W.; Rowan, W. L.; Williams, C. B.; Brookman, M. W. [Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The cylindrical slab was the first and simplest model of intrinsically unstable microturbulence. The Helimak is an experimental realization of this model. Although finite, it is sufficiently large to escape boundary effects, with dimensionless parameters similar to those of a tokamak edge or scrape off layer. The essential drive is interchange-like, a pressure gradient with unfavorable magnetic curvature, leading to a non-linearly saturated state of large-amplitude turbulence, Δn{sub rms}/n ∼ 0.5. The nonlinear processes governing this saturation are unique, unlike any of those posited for the much weaker turbulence typical of confined plasma, e.g., in a tokamak. Neither linear stability theory, quasi-linear theory, zonal flows, nor flow shear stabilization is consistent with the observations. The mechanisms determining the non-linearly saturated state constitute an important challenge to our understanding of strongly nonlinear systems.

  1. Compressibility effects in the shear layer over a rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin; Casper, Katya Marie

    2016-10-26

    we studied the influence of compressibility on the shear layer over a rectangular cavity of variable width in a free stream Mach number range of 0.6–2.5 using particle image velocimetry data in the streamwise centre plane. As the Mach number increases, the vertical component of the turbulence intensity diminishes modestly in the widest cavity, but the two narrower cavities show a more substantial drop in all three components as well as the turbulent shear stress. Furthermore, this contrasts with canonical free shear layers, which show significant reductions in only the vertical component and the turbulent shear stress due to compressibility. The vorticity thickness of the cavity shear layer grows rapidly as it initially develops, then transitions to a slower growth rate once its instability saturates. When normalized by their estimated incompressible values, the growth rates prior to saturation display the classic compressibility effect of suppression as the convective Mach number rises, in excellent agreement with comparable free shear layer data. The specific trend of the reduction in growth rate due to compressibility is modified by the cavity width.

  2. On the self-sustained nature of large-scale motions in turbulent Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rawat, Subhandu; Hwang, Yongyun; Rincon, François

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale motions in wall-bounded turbulent flows are frequently interpreted as resulting from an aggregation process of smaller-scale structures. Here, we explore the alternative possibility that such large-scale motions are themselves self-sustained and do not draw their energy from smaller-scale turbulent motions activated in buffer layers. To this end, it is first shown that large-scale motions in turbulent Couette flow at Re=2150 self-sustain even when active processes at smaller scales are artificially quenched by increasing the Smagorinsky constant Cs in large eddy simulations. These results are in agreement with earlier results on pressure driven turbulent channels. We further investigate the nature of the large-scale coherent motions by computing upper and lower-branch nonlinear steady solutions of the filtered (LES) equations with a Newton-Krylov solver,and find that they are connected by a saddle-node bifurcation at large values of Cs. Upper branch solutions for the filtered large scale motions a...

  3. An analysis of spatially varying turbulent Prandtl number in a flow with local acceleration and deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunbum; Lee, Wook; Kang, Seongwon; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) is an important parameter in turbulent flows used in many engineering models for heat transfer. In the present study, spatial variation of Prt in a wall-bounded turbulent flow is investigated using DNS. We derived a form of Prt applicable to a general flow configuration, using the least-square method in a manner consistent with the turbulent viscosity model in LES. For a flow subject to local acceleration and deceleration induced by the wall geometry, we performed a parametric study for the Reynolds number, Prandtl number and a geometric factor using DNS. A comparison of the data from DNS and RANS with a constant Prt indicates the potential of improved RANS predictions using the present variable Prt subject to the local flow field. Also, it is observed that the local pressure gradient has an important effect on the Prt field. From the flow statistics, a few flow variables showing higher correlations with Prt are identified. An elementary model for Prt is devised, and used for RANS prediction producing a more accurate prediction of the heat transfer rate. Corresponding author

  4. Investigation of turbulent Prandtl number subject to local acceleration and deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunbeom; Lee, Wook; Kang, Seongwon; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of the present study is to analyze the turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) varying over space in a wall-bounded turbulent flow under local acceleration and deceleration. The Prt shows the opposite trends for the conditions of acceleration and deceleration. In order to explain these phenomena, the convection velocity from the space-time correlation is investigated. It is shown that small-scale motions experience larger acceleration and deceleration compared to large-scale ones. Also, a discrepancy between the momentum and heat transfer at small scales results in the spatially varying Prt. The budgets of the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance show a hint for the variation of Prt. The results from DNS and RANS with a constant Prt are compared and show that RANS prediction can be improved by using a modeled Prt. From the turbulent statistics, a few flow variables showing higher correlations with Prt are identified. Based on this, simple phenomenological models are devised and the corresponding simulations show a more accurate prediction of the heat transfer rate. Corresponding author.

  5. Interplay between Gyrokinetic Turbulence, Flows, and Collisions: Perspectives on Transport and Poloidal Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-08-01

    The impact of ion-ion collisions on confinement is investigated with the full-f and global gyrokinetic Gysela code through a series of nonlinear turbulence simulations for tokamak parameters. A twofold scan in the turbulence drive and in collisionality is performed, highlighting (i) a heat transport expressed in terms of critical quantities—threshold and exponent, (ii) a first evidence of turbulent generation of poloidal momentum, and (iii) the dominance of mean flow shear, mediated through the turbulent corrugation of the mean profiles, with regard to the oft-invoked zonal flow shear.

  6. Transport Bifurcation in Plasma Interchange Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent two-fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by the low and high mean flow shear. By increasing the input heat flux above a certain threshold, large-amplitude oscillations in the turbulent and mean flow energy are induced. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise types of oscillations are found before the transition to the second regime. The fluctuation energy is decisively transferred to the mean flows by large-amplitude Reynolds power as turbulent intensity increases. Consequently, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which strong mean shear flows are generated in the plasma edge. The peak of the spectrum shifts to higher wavenumbers as the large-scale turbulent eddies are suppressed by the mean shear flow. The transition back to the first regime is then triggered by decreasing the input heat flux to a level much lower than the threshold for the forward transition, showing strong hysteresis. During the back transition, the mean flow decreases as the energy transfer process is reversed. This transport bifurcation, based on a field-line-averaged 2D model, has also been reproduced in our recent 3D simulations of resistive interchange turbulence, in which the ion and electron temperatures are separated and the parallel current is involved. Supported by the MOST of China Grant No. 2013GB112006, US DOE Contract No. DE-FC02-08ER54966, US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734.

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  8. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  9. Edge-core interaction of ITG turbulence in Tokamaks: Is the Tail Wagging the Dog?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.

    2010-11-01

    A full-f XGC1 gyrokinetic simulation of ITG turbulence, together with the neoclassical dynamics without scale separation, has been performed for the whole-volume plasma in realistic diverted DIII-D geometry. The simulation revealed that the global structure of the turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas results from a synergy between edge-driven inward propagation of turbulence intensity and the core-driven outward heat transport. The global ion confinement and the ion temperature gradient then self-organize quickly at turbulence propagation time scale. This synergy results in inward-outward pulse scattering leading to spontaneous production of strong internal shear layers in which the turbulent transport is almost suppressed over several radial correlation lengths. Co-existence of the edge turbulence source and the strong internal shear layer leads to radially increasing turbulence intensity and ion thermal transport profiles.

  10. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  11. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  12. Transition to subcritical turbulence in a tokamak plasma

    CERN Document Server

    van Wyk, F; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Field, A R; Dorland, W

    2016-01-01

    Unstable perturbations driven by the pressure gradient and other sources of free energy in tokamak plasmas can grow exponentially and eventually saturate nonlinearly, leading to turbulence. Recent work has shown that in the presence of sheared flows, such systems can be subcritical. This means that all perturbations are linearly stable and a transition to a turbulent state only occurs if large enough initial perturbations undergo sufficient transient growth to allow nonlinear interaction. There is, however, currently very little known about a subcritical transition to turbulence in fusion-relevant plasmas. Here we use first-principles gyrokinetic simulations of a turbulent plasma in the outer core of the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) to demonstrate that the experimentally observed state is near the transition threshold, that the turbulence in this state is subcritical, and that transition to turbulence occurs via accumulation of very long-lived, intense, finite-amplitude coherent structures, which domi...

  13. Influence of turbulence on bed load sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Chua, L.; Cheng, N. S.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on the influence of an external turbulence field on the bedload sediment transport in an open channel. The external turbulence was generated by: (1) with a horizontal pipe placed halfway through the depth, h; (2) with a series of grids...... correlated with the sediment transport rate. The sediment transport increases markedly with increasing turbulence level.......-bed experiments and the ripple-covered-bed experiments. In the former case, the flow in the presence of the turbulence generator was adjusted so that the mean bed shear stress was the same as in the case without the turbulence generator in order to single out the effect of the external turbulence on the sediment...

  14. Universal Critical Behavior at a Phase Transition to Quantum Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Kazumasa A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most prototypical phenomena of systems driven out of equilibrium. While turbulence has been studied mainly with classical fluids like water, considerable attention is now drawn to quantum turbulence (QT), observed in quantum fluids such as superfluid helium and Bose-Einstein condensates. A distinct feature of QT is that it consists of quantum vortices, by which turbulent circulation is quantized. Yet, under strong forcing, characteristic properties of developed classical turbulence such as Kolmogorov's law have also been identified in QT. Here, we study the opposite limit of weak forcing, i.e., the onset of QT, numerically, and find another set of universal scaling laws known for classical non-equilibrium systems. Specifically, we show that the transition belongs to the directed percolation universality class, known to arise generically in transitions into an absorbing state, including transitions to classical shear-flow turbulence after very recent studies. We argue that quantum vort...

  15. Formation of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struminskii, V.V. (Sektor Mekhaniki Neodnorodnykh Sred, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-01-01

    Two essentially different forms of turbulence are identified in liquids and gases: (1) turbulent flow in the vicinity of solid or liquid boundaries and (2) turbulent flows evolving far from the walls. The generation mechanisms and principal characteristics of the two types of turbulent flows are discussed. It is emphasized that the two types of turbulent flows are caused by different physical mechanisms and should be considered separately in turbulence studies. 14 refs.

  16. Shear System Debugging and Shear Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Dong-xue; JIAO; Hai-yang

    2015-01-01

    Shear system is the essential equipment of head-end processing in the spent fuel reprocessing process,with the aim of cutting spent fuels into appropriate lengths for dissolve,separatingspent fuel core from jacket.Shear system of CRARL is mainly set in 01Bhot cell,element rods will be cut into short lengths of 10-30mm

  17. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  18. Instabilities of flows and transition to turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sengupta, Tapan K

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Instability and TransitionIntroductionWhat Is Instability?Temporal and Spatial InstabilitySome Instability MechanismsComputing Transitional and Turbulent FlowsFluid Dynamical EquationsSome Equilibrium Solutions of the Basic EquationBoundary Layer TheoryControl Volume Analysis of Boundary LayersNumerical Solution of the Thin Shear Layer (TSL) EquationLaminar Mixing LayerPlane Laminar JetIssues of Computing Space-Time Dependent FlowsWave Interaction: Group Velocity and Energy FluxIssues of Space-Time Scale Resolution of FlowsTemporal Scales in Turbulent FlowsComputing Time-Averag

  19. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  20. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  1. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  2. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  3. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  4. Fluxes and energy dissipation in thermal convection and shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, B.; Grossmann, S.; Lohse, D.

    2007-01-01

    We expose analogies between turbulence in a fluid heated from below (Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) flow) and shear flows: The unifying theory for RB flow (see Grossmann S. and Lohse D., J. Fluid Mech., 407 (2000) 27 and subsequent refinements) can be extended to the flow between rotating cylinders (Taylor-Co

  5. Criterion of Turbulent Transition in Pressure Driven Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2012-11-01

    It has been found from numerical simulations and experiments that velocity inflection could result in turbulent transition in viscous parallel flows. However, there are exceptions, for example, in the plane Poiseuille-Couette flow. Thus, whether velocity inflection necessarily leads to turbulent transition is still not clear. To-date, there is still no consensus on the physics of turbulence transition in the scientific community. In this study, the mechanism of turbulent transition is investigated using the energy gradient method. It is found that the transition to turbulence from a laminar flow depends on the magnitudes of the energy gradient function and the energy of the disturbance imposed (including both the amplitude and the frequency). Our study further reveals that the criterion of turbulent transition is different in pressure and shear driven flows. In pressure driven parallel flows, it is found that the necessary and sufficient condition of turbulent transition is the existence of an inflection point on the velocity profile. This criterion is found to be consistent with the available experimental data and numerical simulation results. On contrast, velocity inflection in shear driven flows does not necessarily lead to turbulent transition.

  6. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Turbulence Generated by the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Shigeo S; Suzuki, Takeru K; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate stochastic particle acceleration in accretion flows. It is believed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) generates turbulence inside accretion flows and that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated by the turbulence. We calculate equations of motion for CRs in the turbulent fields generated by MRI with the shearing box approximation without back reaction to the field. The results show that the CRs randomly gain or lose their energies through the interaction with the turbulent fields. The CRs diffuse in the configuration space anisotropically: The diffusion coefficient in direction of the unperturbed flow is about twenty times higher than the Bohm coefficient, while those in the other directions are only a few times higher than the Bohm. The momentum distribution is isotropic, and its evolution can be described by the diffusion equation in momentum space where the diffusion coefficient is a power-law function of the CR momentum. We show that the shear acceleration efficiently works for energet...

  7. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microorganisms that can vary their shape and their preferential orientation.

  8. Characterizing the mean-field dynamo in turbulent accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gressel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The formation and evolution of a wide class of astrophysical objects is governed by turbulent, magnetized accretion disks. Understanding their secular dynamics is of primary importance. Apart from enabling mass accretion via the transport of angular momentum, the turbulence affects the long-term evolution of the embedded magnetic flux, which in turn regulates the efficiency of the transport. In this paper, we take a comprehensive next step towards an effective mean-field model for turbulent astrophysical disks by systematically studying the key properties of magnetorotational turbulence in vertically-stratified, isothermal shearing boxes. This allows us to infer emergent properties of the ensuing chaotic flow as a function of the shear parameter as well as the amount of net-vertical flux. Using the test-field method, we furthermore characterize the mean-field dynamo coefficients that describe the long-term evolution of large-scale fields. We simultaneously infer the vertical shape and the spectral scale depen...

  9. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Caijuan; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microor...

  10. Elastic Turbulence in Channel Flows at Low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the existence of elastic turbulence in straight channel flow at low Reynolds numbers. Velocimetry measurements show non-periodic fluctuations in the wake of curved cylinders as well as in a parallel shear flow region. The flow in these two locations of the channel is excited over a broad range of frequencies and wavelengths, consistent with the main features of elastic turbulence. However, the decay of the initial elastic turbulence around the cylinders is followed by a growth downstream in the straight region. The emergence of distinct flow characteristics both in time and space suggests a new type of elastic turbulence, markedly different from that near the curved cylinders. We propose a self-sustaining mechanism to explain the sustained fluctuations in the parallel shear region.

  11. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  12. Turbulence energetics in stably stratified geophysical flows: strong and weak mixing regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Zilitinkevich, S S; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Esau, I; Mauritsen, T; Miles, M W

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, turbulence energetics is characterized by turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and modelled using solely the TKE budget equation. In stable stratification, TKE is generated by the velocity shear and expended through viscous dissipation and work against buoyancy forces. The effect of stratification is characterized by the ratio of the buoyancy gradient to squared shear, called Richardson number, Ri. It is widely believed that at Ri exceeding a critical value, Ric, local shear cannot maintain turbulence, and the flow becomes laminar. We revise this concept by extending the energy analysis to turbulent potential and total energies (TPE and TTE = TKE + TPE), consider their budget equations, and conclude that TTE is a conservative parameter maintained by shear in any stratification. Hence there is no "energetics Ric", in contrast to the hydrodynamic-instability threshold, Ric-instability, whose typical values vary from 0.25 to 1. We demonstrate that this interval, 0.25>1, clarify principal difference betw...

  13. Numerical study of influence of inlet turbulence parameters on turbulence intensity in the flow domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk

    2007-01-01

    The prediction of cleaning in pipe-lines is important for equipment manufacturers, who wish to optimize designs with respect to hygienic performance. Degree of cleaning correlates with the level of fluctuations in the signal recorded in discrete points during wall shear stress measurements using...... an electrochemical method. For optimization of process equipment with respect to cleaning, the levels of local fluctuations across entire surfaces are needed. Trends of fluctuations in the geometries used can be predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two sensitivity studies were carried out...... of interest (shortened geometry). Both studies having a fully developed turbulent velocity inlet profile with changing turbulence parameters: turbulence intensity 0.01-30 per cent and turbulence length scale 7.5-30 per cent of inlet pipe diameter. For the full geometry no sensitivity in the fluctuation...

  14. On flow structures and the hierarchy of shears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.; McDevitt, C. J.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Garbet, X.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the consequences of mean profile dynamics in flux-driven gyrokinetics. We report the emergence of a novel flow structure in plasma turbulence, which we call the ``ExB staircase.'' This structure connects to strong, standing corrugations in the plasma profiles, which is not related to rational q surfaces. We also show that the ExB shear associated to these mean profile corrugations is strongly dominant as compared to the usually-invoked zonal flow shear. Discussion of the dynamics of mean profiles (i) as another channel for turbulence regulation, missing in ``usual'' gyrokinetic approaches, (ii) its connection with turbulent stresses and the transport of potential vorticity, its link (iii) to the observed flow patterns and (iv) to the question of locality vs non-locality in transport is presented.

  15. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  16. Design of a Turbulence Generator of Medium Consistency Pulp Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Li; Haifei Zhuang; Weihao Geng

    2012-01-01

    The turbulence generator is a key component of medium consistency centrifugal pulp pumps, with functions to fluidize the medium consistency pulp and to separate gas from the liquid. Structure sizes of the generator affect the hydraulic performance. The radius and the blade laying angle are two important structural sizes of a turbulence generator. Starting with the research on the flow inside and shearing characteristics of the MC pulp, a simple mathematical model at the flow section of the sh...

  17. A Compilation of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer Experimental Data,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    HIRSCH KITAet ai, GOSTELOW EHERENSBERGER LU HO & CHEN KOBASHI & HAYAKAWA MAINARDI & PANDAY MARVIN* LORBER & COVERT MIZUSHINA I SAXENA RAMAPRIAN & TU...Laminar Boundary Layer by a Moving Belt. AIAA Paj_2r 69-40, New York, N.Y., 1969. (LT) Mainardi , H. and Panday, P. K.: A Study of Turbulent Pulsating...Flow in a (-cular Pipe. Eurovisc 77 - Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers and Shear Flows, Toulouse, France, Jar,. 2977. (TE-D) Mainardi , H. and Panday

  18. Turbulence statistics of Couette Poiseuille turbulent flow. 1st Report. Turbulence intensities; Couette Poiseuille gata ranryu no midare tokeiryo. 1. Midare tsuyosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, K.; Kito, O.; Kato, Y. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-10-25

    Turbulence intensities in Couette Poiseuille flow, developed between stationary and moving walls, have been measured by I- and X-type hot wires. The intensities in the wall region are affected by non-dimensional shear stress gradient parameter {mu} ({identical_to} u*{sup 3}/{alpha}{nu}), but not by Reynolds number Re* ({identical_to} hu*/{nu}). As |{mu}| decreases, distributions of streamwise and wall-normal turbulence intensities shift upward or downward from those of plane-Couette flow depending on the sign of {mu}. In the turbulent core region, turbulence intensities of Poiseuille-type flow distribute quite differently from that of Couette-type flow. The effective parameter in this region is 13, but the effect of 13 on the turbulence intensities is obscured by the low Reynolds number effect. 13 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  20. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.