WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall surface heat

  1. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  2. Instantaneous heat flux flowing into ceramic combustion chamber wall surface of low heat rejection engine; Shanetsu engine no ceramic nenshoshitsu hekimen eno shunji netsuryusoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Y.; Hagihara, Y. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, S. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, K. [Daido Hoxan Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Nagano, H. [Riso Kagaku Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, A. [Mitani Sangyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-25

    To evaluate the effectiveness of low heat rejection engine under heat loss condition, instantaneous heat fluxes flowing into ceramic piston surface and aluminum alloy (Loex) piston surface using thin film thermocouple were measured, and both were compared. As a result, in the working stroke, the instantaneous heat flux flowing into ceramic piston surface was larger than the instantaneous heat flux flowing into Loex piston surface. Accordingly, it became clear that reduction of heat loss was not effected when ceramics that thermal conductivity is small was used for combustion chamber wall. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Impact of structural design criteria on first wall surface heat flux limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Recently, Draft 7 of the ITER structural design criteria (ISDC), which provide new rules for guarding against such problems, was released for trial use by the ITER designers. The new rules, which were derived from a simple model based on the concept of elastic follow up factor, provide primary and secondary stress limits as functions of uniform elongation and ductility. The implication of these rules on the allowable surface heat flux on typical first walls made of type 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloys are discussed.

  4. A study of the flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel for a heated wall with surface texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga; Maciejewska, Beata; Grabas, Bogusław

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results concerning flow boiling heat transfer in a vertical minichannel with a depth of 1.7 mm and a width of 16 mm. The element responsible for heating FC-72, which flowed laminarly in the minichannel, was a plate with an enhanced surface. Two types of surface textures were considered. Both were produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. Infrared thermography was used to record changes in the temperature on the outer smooth side of the plate. Two-phase flow patterns were observed through a glass pane. The main aim of the study was to analyze how the two types of surface textures affect the heat transfer coefficient. A two-dimensional heat transfer approach was proposed to determine the local values of the heat transfer coefficient. The inverse problem for the heated wall was solved using a semi-analytical method based on the Trefftz functions. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the minichannel length and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported in the saturated boiling region for the plate with the type 1 texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining.

  5. Measurements of laminar mixed convection flow adjacent to an inclined surface with uniform wall heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Mulaweh, H.I. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Purdue University at Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., 46805, Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of laminar mixed convection flow adjacent to an inclined heated flat plate with uniform wall heat flux are reported. Laser-doppler velocimeter and cold wire anemometer were used to measure simultaneously the velocity and temperature distributions, respectively. Measurements of the air velocity and temperature distributions are presented for a range of buoyancy parameters 0{<=}{xi}{<=}2.91. It was found that both the mixed convection local Nusselt number and local friction coefficient increase as the buoyancy force increases (under the buoyancy assisting condition). The velocity field was found to be more sensitive to the buoyancy force than the thermal field. Predictions from both local similarity and local non-similarity models agree well with the experimental results for the thermal field, but only the predictions from the local non-similarity model agree favorably with the measured values for the flow field. (authors)

  6. Tip clearance effect on heat transfer and leakage flows on the shroud-wall surface in an axial flow turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumada, Masaya; Iwata, Satoshi; Obata, Masakazu; Watanabe, Osamu

    1992-06-01

    An axial flow turbine for a turbocharger is used as a test turbine, and the local heat transfer coefficient on the surface of the shroud is measured under uniform heat flux conditions. The nature of the tip clearance flow on the shroud surface and a flow pattern in the downstream region of the rotor blades are studied, and measurements are obtained by using a hot-wire anemometer in combination with a periodic multisampling and an ensemble averaging technique. Data are obtained under on- and off-design conditions. The effects of inlet flow angle, rotational speed and tip clearance on the local heat transfer coefficient are elucidated. The mean heat transfer coefficient is correlated with the tip clearance, and the mean velocity is calculated by the velocity triangle method for approximation. A leakage flow region exists in the downstream direction beyond the middle of the wall surface opposite the rotor blade, and a leakage vortex is recognized at the suction side near the trailing edge.

  7. Studies of Gas Turbine Heat Transfer Airfoil Surface and End-Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    station I values . N A o Profiles of crass- stram turbulent heat flux r are shown 0 06 on Fig. S. The effects of curvature and recovery on -’t’ are very...ECKCERT ET AL. APR 87 UNCLASSIFIE AFOSR-TR-70 ?1 F-5C492F/50F21/ NL mohEmhhhohhhEI mohhEEmhEmhsoE EU3OPVV NUCLUTM" VlSI Choi -W - z - _m- "W MAP ...Recovery in the weak 2 portion of the profile occurs quickly, with the profiles often overshooting the flat plate (upstream of the curve) values . 2. A

  8. Experimental Assessment of Mechanical Night Ventilation on Inner Wall Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenhui, Ji; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Wang, Houhua

    2016-01-01

    The cooling potential of night ventilation largely depends on the heat exchange at the internal room surfaces. During night time, increased heat transfer on a vertical wall is expected due to cool supply air that flows along the internal wall surface from the top of the wall. This paper presents ...

  9. Heat-pipes-based first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, PO Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Khripunov, V. [Russian Research Center `Kurchatov Institute`, Nuclear Fusion Institute, Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Antipenkov, A. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, PO Box 788, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Ulianov, A. [State Enterprise `Krasnaya Zvezda`, Electrolytny pr-d., 1a, Moscow 115230 (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Feasibilities of heat pipes application for the heat transfer out of plasma facing components in test and power fusion reactors are discussed. Based on the space technology and practice the ``hot`` ITER first wall with liquid metal and water heat pipes are proposed in two options: heat-pipes and vapor-chamber options. Other high heat loading in-vessel elements such as divertor target and limiter can be provided by effective and reliable heat pipe cooling systems. (orig.).

  10. Heat transfer characteristics of building walls using phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Pasek, A. D.; Indartono, Y. S.; Pratomo, A. W.

    2017-03-01

    Minimizing energy consumption in air conditioning system can be done with reducing the cooling load in a room. Heat from solar radiation which passes through the wall increases the cooling load. Utilization of phase change material on walls is expected to decrease the heat rate by storing energy when the phase change process takes place. The stored energy is released when the ambient temperature is low. Temperature differences at noon and evening can be utilized as discharging and charging cycles. This study examines the characteristics of heat transfer in walls using phase change material (PCM) in the form of encapsulation and using the sleeve as well. Heat transfer of bricks containing encapsulated PCM, tested the storage and released the heat on the walls of the building models were evaluated in this study. Experiments of heat transfer on brick consist of time that is needed for heat transfer and thermal conductivity test as well. Experiments were conducted on a wall coated by PCM which was exposed on a day and night cycle to analyze the heat storage and heat release. PCM used in these experiments was coconut oil. The measured parameter is the temperature at some points in the brick, walls and ambient temperature as well. The results showed that the use of encapsulation on an empty brick can increase the time for thermal heat transfer. Thermal conductivity values of a brick containing encapsulated PCM was lower than hollow bricks, where each value was 1.3 W/m.K and 1.6 W/m.K. While the process of heat absorption takes place from 7:00 am to 06:00 pm, and the release of heat runs from 10:00 pm to 7:00 am. The use of this PCM layer can reduce the surface temperature of the walls of an average of 2°C and slows the heat into the room.

  11. Identification of convective heat loss on exterior cavity wall assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1999-03-01

    Most present day low and medium rise buildings constructed in Canada use some form of cavity wall design for their exterior walls. These types of wall assemblies use a broad range of cladding materials such as brick, stone, wood, sheet metal, porcelain enamel or metal panels, cementitious materials and plastics. The interior assemblies of these walls include the air barrier, vapor barrier and insulation layers. The cladding is separated from the interior wall assembly by an air space of varying thickness. Dependent upon the temperature differential between the interior and exterior, the temperature between the outer surface of the interior wall assembly and the inner surface of the exterior cladding under conditions in which air movement is restricted will give rise to convective heat loss mechanisms. This paper will look at how these convective heat loss patterns manifest themselves as thermal patterns on exterior surfaces of cladding materials. Similar details will be illustrated under various pressure differential conditions through the entire building envelope assembly. Various types of exterior wall assemblies will be discussed.

  12. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  13. Heat transfer enhancement by dynamic corrugated heat exchanger wall: Numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Schmidmayer, K.; Topin, F.; Miscevic, M.

    2016-09-01

    A new concept of heat exchanger at sub-millimeter scale is proposed for applications in cooling on-board electronics devices, in which the quality of the exchanges between fluid and wall is very critical. In the proposed system, the upper wall of the channel is deformed dynamically to obtain a sinusoidal wave on this surface. The lower wall is exposed to constant heat flux simulating the imprint of an electronic component. A systematic 3-D numerical study in transient regime on the different deformation parameters allowed obtaining both the pumping characteristics and the heat transfer characteristics of the system. It was observed that the dynamic deformation of the wall induces a significant pumping effect. The intensification of the heat transfer is very important even for highly degraded waveforms, although the pumping efficiency is reduced in this case.

  14. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  15. Estimating local heat transfer coefficients from thin wall temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazizov, I. M.; Davletshin, I. A.; Paereliy, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    An approach to experimental estimation of local heat transfer coefficient on a plane wall has been described. The approach is based on measurements of heat-transfer fluid and wall temperatures during some certain time of wall cooling. The wall was a thin plate, a printed circuit board, made of composite epoxy material covered with a copper layer. The temperature field can be considered uniform across the plate thickness when heat transfer is moderate and thermal resistance of the plate in transversal direction is low. This significantly simplifies the heat balance written for the wall sections that is used to estimate the heat transfer coefficient. The copper layer on the plate etched to form a single strip acted as resistance thermometers that measured the local temperature of the wall.

  16. Performance of a counterflow heat exchanger with heat loss through the wall at the cold end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, S.P.; Venkatarathnam, G. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-11-01

    The performance of high effectiveness heat exchangers used in cryogenic systems is strongly controlled by irreversibilities such as longitudinal heat conduction and heat leak from ambient. In all heat exchanger analyses, it is assumed that no heat is lost through the heat exchanger walls. In the case of small J-T refrigerators such as microminiature refrigerators, the heat exchanger cold end is almost directly connected to the evaporator, which may result in a large amount of heat loss through the heat exchanger wall at the cold end. The rate of heat loss through the wall at the cold end is also strongly dependent on the longitudinal thermal resistance of the wall. In this paper, we present the relationship between the effectiveness of a heat exchanger losing heat at the cold end and other resistances such as number of transfer units (NTU), longitudinal thermal resistance etc. The performance of such heat exchangers under different operating conditions is also discussed. (author)

  17. Heat transfer with freezing in a scraped surface heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhdar, M.B. [LGL France Refrigerating Division, Genas (France); Cerecero, R.; Alvarez, G.; Guilpart, J. [Cemagref, Antony cedex (France). Food Process Engineering; Flick, D. [Institut National Agronomique, Paris (France); Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon (France). Centre de Thermique

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out on a scraped surface heat exchanger used for freezing of water-ethanol mixture and aqueous sucrose solution. The influence of various parameters on heat transfer intensity was established: product type and composition, flow rate, blade rotation speed, distance between blades and wall. During starting (transient period) the solution is first supercooled, then ice crystals appear on the scraped surface (heterogeneous nucleation) and no more supercooling is observed. It seems that, when blades are 3 mm far from the surface, a constant ice layer is formed having this thickness and acting as a thermal resistance. But when the blades rotate at 1 mm from the surface, periodically all the ice layer is removed despite the surface is not really scraped. This could simplify ice generator technology. An internal heat transfer coefficient was defined; it depends mainly on rotation speed. Correlations were proposed for its prediction, which could be applied, at least as a first approach, for the most common freezing applications of scraped surface heat exchanger i.e. ice creams (which are derived from sucrose solutions) and two-phase secondary refrigerants (which are principally ethanol solutions). (author)

  18. Influence of wall properties on peristaltic transport with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnamacharya, G.; Srinivasulu, Ch.

    2007-07-01

    The effect of elasticity of the flexible walls on peristaltic transport of an incompressible viscous fluid, with heat transfer, in a two dimensional uniform channel has been investigated under long wave length approximation. The perturbation solution has been obtained in terms of wall slope parameter and closed form expressions have been derived for velocity, temperature and heat transfer. The effects of elastic tension, damping and mass characterizing parameters on temperature and heat transfer have been studied. It is found that heat transfer increases with elastic tension and mass characterizing parameters. To cite this article: G. Radhakrishnamacharya, Ch. Srinivasulu, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  19. Conjugated Conduction-Free Convection Heat Transfer in an Annulus Heated at Either Constant Wall Temperature or Constant Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAROON IMTIAZ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate numerically the effect of thermal boundary conditions on conjugated conduction-free convection heat transfer in an annulus between two concentric cylinders using Fourier Spectral method. The inner wall of the annulus is heated and maintained at either CWT (Constant Wall Temperature or CHF (Constant Heat Flux, while the outer wall is maintained at constant temperature. CHF case is relatively more significant for high pressure industrial applications, but it has not received much attention. This study particularly focuses the latter case (CHF. The main influencing parameters on flow and thermal fields within the annulus are: Rayleigh number Ra; thickness of inner wall Rs; radius ratio Rr and inner wall-fluid thermal conductivity ratio Kr. The study has shown that the increase in Kr increases the heat transfer rate through the annulus for heating at CWT and decreases the inner wall dimensionless temperature for heating at CHF and vice versa. It has also been proved that as the Rs increases at fixed Ra and Rr, the heat transfer rate decreases for heating at CWT and the inner wall dimensionless temperature increases for heating at CHF at Kr 1 depends on Rr. It has been shown that for certain combinations of controlling parameters there will be a value of Rr at which heat transfer rate will be minimum in the annulus in case of heating at CWT, while

  20. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul, E-mail: sohel0991@gmail.com; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000. Bangladesh (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  1. Selective Internal Heat Distribution in Modified Trombe Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszka, Jerzy; Kogut, Janusz; Skrzypczak, Izabela; Kokoszka, Wanda

    2017-12-01

    At present, the requirements for thermal insulation of the external walls in buildings are being increased. There is a need to reduce energy consumption for heating rooms during the winter season. This may be achieved by increasing the thermal resistance of the outer partitions, using solutions that utilize either recuperation or solar radiation. The most popular systems include either solar collectors, or heat pump links or ground exchangers. Trombe walls (TW) are a very promising passive heating system, which requires little or no effort to operate, and may be very convenient in different climate conditions. A typical TW consists of a masonry wall painted a dark, heat absorbing paint colour and faced with a single or double layer of glass. The principle of operation is based on the photothermal conversion of solar radiation. There are various modifications of TW. They may improve the energy efficiency in relation to the climate conditions in which they operate. The hybrid solutions are also known. The efficiency of walls is related to the use of proper materials. In TW, the compromise should be sought between the thermal resistance and the ability to distribute heat from the absorbed energy of solar radiation. The paper presents an overview of the most commonly used solutions and discusses its own concept dedicated to the climate conditions of Central Europe.

  2. Options for a high heat flux enabled helium cooled first wall for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: f.arbe@kit.edu; Chen, Yuming; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klein, Christine; Neuberger, Heiko; Ruck, Sebastian; Schlindwein, Georg; Schwab, Florian; Weth, Axel von der

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design challenges for helium cooled first wall reviewed and otimization approaches explored. • Application of enhanced heat transfer surfaces to the First Wall cooling channels. • Demonstrated a design point for 1 MW/m{sup 2} with temperatures <550 °C and acceptable stresses. • Feasibility of several manufacturing processes for ribbed surfaces is shown. - Abstract: Helium is considered as coolant in the plasma facing first wall of several blanket concepts for DEMO fusion reactors, due to the favorable properties of flexible temperature range, chemical inertness, no activation, comparatively low effort to remove tritium from the gas and no chemical corrosion. Existing blanket designs have shown the ability to use helium cooled first walls with heat flux densities of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Average steady state heat loads coming from the plasma for current EU DEMO concepts are expected in the range of 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. The definition of peak values is still ongoing and depends on the chosen first wall shape, magnetic configuration and assumptions on the fraction of radiated power and power fall off lengths in the scrape off layer of the plasma. Peak steady state values could reach and excess 1 MW/m{sup 2}. Higher short-term transient loads are expected. Design optimization approaches including heat transfer enhancement, local heat transfer tuning and shape optimization of the channel cross section are discussed. Design points to enable a helium cooled first wall capable to sustain heat flux densities of 1 MW/m{sup 2} at an average shell temperature lower than 500 °C are developed based on experimentally validated heat transfer coefficients of structured channel surfaces. The required pumping power is in the range of 3–5% of the collected thermal power. The FEM stress analyses show code-acceptable stress intensities. Several manufacturing methods enabling the application of the suggested heat transfer enhanced first wall channels are explored. An

  3. Hybrid space heating/cooling system with Trombe wall, underground venting, and assisted heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, J.W.; James, L.C.; Stevens, S.; Autry, A.N.; Nussbaum, M.; MacQueen, S.V.

    1983-06-22

    Our goal was to design and monitor a hybrid solar system/ground loop which automatically assists the standard, thermostatically controlled home heating/cooling system. The input from the homeowner was limited to normal thermostat operations. During the course of the project it was determined that to effectively gather data and control the various component interactions, a micro-computer based control system would also allow the HVAC system to be optimized by simple changes to software. This flexibility in an untested concept helped us to achieve optimum system performance. Control ranged from direct solar heating and direct ground loop cooling modes, to assistance of the heat pump by both solar space and ground loop. Sensors were strategically placed to provide data on response of the Trombe wall (surface, 4 in. deep, 8 in. deep), and the ground loop (inlet, 3/4 length, outlet). Micro-computer hardware and computer programs were developed to make cost effective decisions between the various modes of operation. Although recent advances in micro-computer hardware make similar control systems more readily achievable utilizing standard components, attention to the decision making criteria will always be required.

  4. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  5. Heat transfer research on enhanced heating surfaces in pool boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawa, Wojciech; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.; Piasecka, Magdalena

    The paper focuses on the analysis of the enhanced surfaces in such applications as boiling heat transfer. The testing measurement module with enhanced heating surfaces was used for pool boiling research. Pool boiling experiments were conducted with distilled water at atmospheric pressure in the vessel using an enhanced sample as the bottom heating surface. The samples are soldered to a copper heating block of the round cross-section .They were placed: in the fluid (saturation temperature measurement), under the sample for temperature determination. A vessel made of four flat glass panes was used for visualization. The heated surfaces in contact with the fluid differed in roughness were smooth or enhanced. This paper analyzes the effects of the microstructured heated surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the heat flux and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported for the enhanced surfaces.

  6. Mixed convective heat transfer in an inclined cavity with multiple heated elements on one wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, P. H.; de Champlain, A.

    1989-06-01

    A numerical investigation has been conducted into mixed forced and free convective heat transfer through a rectangular cavity having two or three identical rectangular elements on the walls, whose faces are heated to a uniform temperature, in the case where the forced flow enters and leaves through the same wall. The study employs the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes, energy, and continuity equations, under assumptions of steady and laminar flow characteristics. Solution parameters are Reynolds number, Grashof number, fluid Prandtl number, cavity aspect ratio, cavity inclination angle, inlet and outlet duct size, and position and aspect ratio of the heated elements.

  7. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  8. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  9. Heat and mass transfer over slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, A. Sander; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2016-01-01

    The classical Graetz-Nusselt problem is extended to describe heat and mass transfer over heterogeneously slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces. The cylindrical wall consists of segments with a constant temperature/concentration and areas that are insulating/impermeable. Only in the case of mass

  10. FDNS code to predict wall heat fluxes or wall temperatures in rocket nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Gerald R.

    1993-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings on the NASA contract NAG8-212, Task No. 3. The overall project consists of three tasks, all of which have been successfully completed. In addition, some supporting supplemental work, not required by the contract, has been performed and is documented herein. Task 1 involved the modification of the wall functions in the code FDNS to use a Reynolds Analogy-based method. Task 2 involved the verification of the code against experimentally available data. The data chosen for comparison was from an experiment involving the injection of helium from a wall jet. Results obtained in completing this task also show the sensitivity of the FDNS code to unknown conditions at the injection slot. Task 3 required computation of the flow of hot exhaust gases through the P&W 40K subscale nozzle. Computations were performed both with and without film coolant injection. The FDNS program tends to overpredict heat fluxes, but, with suitable modeling of backside cooling, may give reasonable wall temperature predictions. For film cooling in the P&W 40K calorimeter subscale nozzle, the average wall temperature is reduced from 1750 R to about 1050 R by the film cooling. The average wall heat flux is reduced by a factor of three.

  11. Radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Langebach; Christoph, Haberstroh

    2017-02-01

    Radiative heat transfer is usually of substantial importance in cryogenics when systems are designed and thermal budgeting is carried out. However, the contribution of pipes is commonly assumed to be comparably low since the warm and cold ends as well as their cross section are fairly small. Nevertheless, for a first assessment of each pipe rough estimates are always appreciated. In order to estimate the radiative heat transfer with traditional “paper and pencil“ methods there is only one analytical case available in literature - the case of plane-parallel plates. This case can only be used to calculate the theoretical lower and the upper asymptotic values of the radiative heat transfer, since pipe wall radiation properties are not taken into account. For this paper we investigated the radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities with the help of numerical simulations. Out of a number of calculation series we could gain an empirical extension for the used approach of plane-parallel plates. The model equation can be used to carry out enhanced paper and pencil estimations for the radiative heat transfer through pipes without demanding numerical simulations.

  12. Analytical Solution of Flow and Heat Transfer over a Permeable Stretching Wall in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Boundary layer flow through a porous medium over a stretching porous wall has seen solved with analytical solution. It has been considered two wall boundary conditions which are power-law distribution of either wall temperature or heat flux. These are general enough to cover the isothermal and isoflux cases. In addition to momentum, both first and second laws of thermodynamics analyses of the problem are investigated. The governing equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The transformed ordinary equations are solved analytically using homotopy analysis method. A comprehensive parametric study is presented, and it is shown that the rate of heat transfer increases with Reynolds number, Prandtl number, and suction to the surface.

  13. Bed-To-Wall Heat Transfer in a Supercritical Circulating Fluidised Bed Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to find a correlation for heat transfer to walls in a 1296 t/h supercritical circulating fluidised bed (CFB boiler. The effect of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient in a long active heat transfer surface was discussed, excluding the radiation component. Experiments for four different unit loads (i.e. 100% MCR, 80% MCR, 60% MCR and 40% MCR were conducted at a constant excess air ratio and high level of bed pressure (ca. 6 kPa in each test run. The empirical correlation of the heat transfer coefficient in a large-scale CFB boiler was mainly determined by two key operating parameters, suspension density and bed temperature. Furthermore, data processing was used in order to develop empirical correlation ranges between 3.05 to 5.35 m·s-1 for gas superficial velocity, 0.25 to 0.51 for the ratio of the secondary to the primary air, 1028 to 1137K for bed temperature inside the furnace chamber of a commercial CFB boiler, and 1.20 to 553 kg·m-3 for suspension density. The suspension density was specified on the base of pressure measurements inside the boiler’s combustion chamber using pressure sensors. Pressure measurements were collected at the measuring ports situated on the front wall of the combustion chamber. The obtained correlation of the heat transfer coefficient is in agreement with the data obtained from typical industrial CFB boilers.

  14. The surface heat budget of Hudson Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danielson, E.W

    1969-01-01

    ... which information the heat budget calculations are based. These data include surface air and sea temperatures, ice concentration, cloudiness, wind, atmospheric moisture, ice and water movement, and heat storage amounts within Hudson Bay waters...

  15. Adiabatic wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient influenced by separated supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontiev Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of supersonic air flow around plane surface behind a rib perpendicular to the flow direction are performed. Research was carried out for free stream Mach number 2.25 and turbulent flow regime - Rex>2·107. Rib height was varied in range from 2 to 8 mm while boundary layer thickness at the nozzle exit section was about 6 mm. As a result adiabatic wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient are obtained for flow around plane surface behind a rib incontrast with the flow around plane surface without any disturbances.

  16. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dzinun, Hazlini; Ponraj, M.; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Noor, Zainura Zainun [Institute of Environmental Water Resources and Management (IPASA), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Remaz, Dilshah [Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iwao, Kenzo [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation) of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite), confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  17. Effects of ridged walls on the heat transfer in a heated square duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.S.; Rodriguez, W.V. [Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico DF (Mexico). Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Coordinacion de Ingenieria de Procesos Industrails y Ambientales, Circuito Interior; Issa, R. [LEGI-MOST, INPG, Grenoble (France)

    2005-05-01

    Turbulent flows in rectangular cooling ducts of rocket engine thrust chambers are characterized by secondary motions of Prandtl's first and second kinds. These secondary currents play a prominent part in heat transfer between the thrust chamber and the cooling gas conveyed in the duct. Previous numerical and experimental works reveal that attaching ridges on the walls of the duct causes the formation of new secondary flows of Prandtl's second kind. These new structures are likely to increase the heat transfer. The present study has investigated numerically, through large eddy simulations, the effects of different forms of ridges on heat transfer in straight square duct flows. (author)

  18. Enhanced boiling performance of a nanoporous copper surface by electrodeposition and heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiao; Lu, Long-Sheng; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Biao

    2017-03-01

    A nanoporous structure was fabricated on the surface of a copper block by electrodeposition and heat treatment compound technology. The influence of the heat treatment parameters on the binding force of a structure was analyzed, and a platform was set up to test the pool boiling heat transfer performance. By observing the SEM morphology, the effect of electrodeposition parameters on the formation of nanoporous structure was determined, and the heat transfer coefficient and wall superheat between different surfaces were compared. At the same time, by means of visualization, the bubble behavior of a smooth surface and a nanoporous surface under different heat fluxes was studied. The results show that the surface structure of nanoporous copper prepared by electrodeposition and heat treatment can improve the bonding strength by 77 %, decrease the wall superheat by 45 %, and increase the heat transfer coefficient by 80 %.

  19. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  20. Characterization methods of nano-patterned surfaces generated by induction heating assisted injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Ravn, Christian; Menotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    An induction heating-assisted injection molding (IHAIM) process developed by the authors is used to replicate surfaces containing random nano-patterns. The injection molding setup is developed so that an induction heating system rapidly heats the cavity wall at rates of up to 10◦C/s. In order...

  1. Heat transfer in a smooth-walled reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.W. [Thermal Fluids Laboratory, National Kaohsiung Institute of Marine Technology, Post code: 811, ROC, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, L.M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tung Fang Institute of Technology, ROC, Taiwan (China); Morris, W.D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, SA28PP, Swansea (United Kingdom); Liou, T.M. [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, ROC, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of heat transfer in a smooth-walled reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon with relevance to the 'shaker' cooling system for the pistons of marine propulsive diesel engines. A selection of experimental results illustrates the interactive effects of inertial, reciprocating and buoyancy forces on heat transfer. It is demonstrated that the gravitational and reciprocating buoyancy effects, respectively, improve heat transfer in the static and reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon. The individual pulsating force effect impairs heat transfer in the axial region with 5 hydraulic diameter length measured from the entrance of thermosyphon (region I). In the vicinity of sealed end of reciprocating thermosyphon with one hydraulic diameter from the sealed surface (region II), the individual pulsating force effect improves heat transfer at low pulsating number range, over which range a subsequent heat transfer reduction in this axial region is followed. The synergistic effects of inertial force, reciprocating force and buoyancy interaction in the reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon could, respectively, impede or improve the regional heat transfers in the axial regions I and II from the static references of zero-buoyancy. A set of empirical correlations, which is physically consistent, was developed that permits the individual and interactive effects of inertial, reciprocating and buoyancy forces on heat transfer to be evaluated. (authors)

  2. Development of a real-time system for ITER first wall heat load control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Himank; de Vries, Peter; Gribov, Yuri; Pitts, Richard; Snipes, Joseph; Zabeo, Luca

    2017-10-01

    The steady state heat flux on the ITER first wall (FW) panels are limited by the heat removal capacity of the water cooling system. In case of off-normal events (e.g. plasma displacement during H-L transitions), the heat loads are predicted to exceed the design limits (2-4.7 MW/m2). Intense heat loads are predicted on the FW, even well before the burning plasma phase. Thus, a real-time (RT) FW heat load control system is mandatory from early plasma operation of the ITER tokamak. A heat load estimator based on the RT equilibrium reconstruction has been developed for the plasma control system (PCS). A scheme, estimating the energy state for prescribed gaps defined as the distance between the last closed flux surface (LCFS)/separatrix and the FW is presented. The RT energy state is determined by the product of a weighted function of gap distance and the power crossing the plasma boundary. In addition, a heat load estimator assuming a simplified FW geometry and parallel heat transport model in the scrape-off layer (SOL), benchmarked against a full 3-D magnetic field line tracer is also presented.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF SOLAR ABSORPTANCE OF BUILDING EXTERNAL SURFACES FROM HEAT FLUX POINT OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral ÖZEL

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, solar absorptance of external surfaces of buildings has been numerically investigated from the heat gain and losses point of view. For this purpose, external surface solar absorptance was icreased from 0 to 1with an ratio of 0.1 and, for the summer and winter conditions, heat fluxs was calculated by considering orientations of the wall and its roof for brick and concrete structure materials. Besides, external surface absorptance was assumed as 0.2, 0.5 and 0.9, respectively. Than, heat gain and losses were calculated to insulation thickness increasing on the outdoor surface of wall. Results obtained were presented as graphics

  4. Evaluation of scale formation in waterwall heated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylasheva Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of forecasting assessments of the speed and the time of formation of depositions in the evaporator-tube elements of double-drum boilers. The values of thermal flow in the wall region of tank screens of boiler furnace are obtained, besides the velocity values of scaling metal corrosion products are obtained. Conclusions about the ability of forecasting unnominal situations and emergency risks dependent with damage to the screen surface heating pipes are made.

  5. Determination of surface stress anisotropy from domain wall fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Poelsema, Bene

    1999-01-01

    The thermally induced meandering of domain walls between (2×1) and c(4×2) regions on Ge(001) is analyzed with a scanning tunneling microscope in order to extract the anisotropy of the surface stress tensor. On small length scales the domain walls exhibit random walker behavior, whereas on larger

  6. A study of sensing heat flow through thermal walls by using thermoelectric module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sippawit Noppawit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Demands on heat flow detection at a plane wall via a thermoelectric module have drawn researchers’ attention to quantitative understanding in order to properly implement the thermoelectric module in thermal engineering practices. Basic mathematical models of both heat transfer through a plane wall and thermoelectric effects are numerically solved to represent genuine behaviors of heat flow detection by mounting a thermoelectric module at a plane wall. The heat transfer through the plane wall is expected to be detected. It is intriguing from simulation results that the heat rejected at the plane wall is identical to the heat absorbed by the thermoelectric module when the area of the plane wall is the same as that of the thermoelectric module. Furthermore, both the area sizes of the plane walls and the convective heat transfer coefficients at the wall influence amount of the heat absorbed by the thermoelectric module. Those observational data are modeled for development of sensing heat flow through a plane wall by a thermoelectric module in practical uses.

  7. Numerical study on condensation heat transfer of trapezoid grooved surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojin Qi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical analysis and experimental study on condensation heat transfer and fluid flow for filmwise condensation on trapezoid grooved surfaces. First, a physical model was properly simplified based on some reasonable assumptions. Then, the coupled non-linear governing equations for the mass transfer, fluid flow, and two-dimensional thermal conduction were developed. The relationship between z-coordinate and heat transfer was obtained by solving the equations numerically. The influences of groove length and basic angle were discussed. The calculation results showed that the heat flux decreased with increase in groove length, and the decline range also decreased gradually. The calculation results also suggested that the heat flux through groove with α = 60° was lower than the groove with α = 75° at the top of the groove, while the opposite conclusion was obtained at the low parts. The distributions of wall temperature and heat flux on trapezoid groove were also studied systematically. The distribution of surface temperature and heat flux presents obvious lateral inhomogeneity, and the maximum wall temperature and heat flux were both obtained in region II. The thermal resistance of groove with α = 60° was lower but the liquid-discharged ability was better than that of groove with α = 75°. In order to validate the feasibility and reliability of the present analyses and to further investigate the heat transfer performance of trapezoid grooved surfaces, experiments were carried out with three condensing plates including two trapezoid grooved surfaces in different physical dimensions and one smooth surface. The experimental data obtained under various schooling were compared with the calculations, and the experimental results for different condensing plates are all in good agreement with the numerical model, with a maximum deviation less than 15%. Moreover, the trapezoid grooves can enhance the

  8. Heat diffusion in fractal geometry cooling surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramšak Matjaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the numerical simulation of heat diffusion in the fractal geometry of Koch snowflake is presented using multidomain mixed Boundary Element Method. The idea and motivation of work is to improve the cooling of small electronic devices using fractal geometry of surface similar to cooling ribs. The heat diffusion is assumed as the only principle of heat transfer. The results are compared to the heat flux of a flat surface. The limiting case of infinite small fractal element is computed using Richardson extrapolation.

  9. Wall Area of Influence and Growing Wall Heat Transfer due to Sliding Bubbles in Subcooled Boiling Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of dynamical features of sliding bubbles and their impact on wall heat transfer were observed at subcooled flow boiling conditions in a vertical square test channel. Among the wide range of parameters observed, we particularly focus in this paper on (i) the sliding bubbles’ effect on wall heat transfer (supplemantry discussion to the authors’ previous work in Yoo et al. (2016a,b)) and (ii) the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles in subcooled boiling flow. At first, this study reveals that the degree of wall heat transfer improvement due to sliding bubbles depended less on the wall superheat condition as the mass flux increased. Also, the sliding bubble trajectory was found to be one of the critical factors in order to properly describe the wall heat transfer associated with sliding bubbles. In particular, the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles depended strongly on both sliding bubble trajectory and sliding bubble size; the sliding bubble trajectory was also observed to be closely related to the sliding bubble size. Importantly, these results indicate the limitation of current approach in CFD analyses especially for the wall area of bubble influence. In addition, the analyses on the temporal fraction of bubbles’ residence (FR) along the heated wall show that the sliding bubbles typically travel through narrow path with high frequency while the opposite was observed downstream. That is, both FR and sliding bubble trajectory depended substantially on the distance from nucleation site, which is expected to be similar for the quenching heat transfer mode induced by sliding bubbles.

  10. Microscale surface modifications for heat transfer enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Huseyin; Singh, Virendra; Kizito, John P; Rini, Daniel P; Seal, Sudipta; Chow, Louis C

    2013-10-09

    In this experimental study, two surface modification techniques were investigated for their effect on heat transfer enhancement. One of the methods employed the particle (grit) blasting to create microscale indentations, while the other used plasma spray coating to create microscale protrusions on Al 6061 (aluminum alloy 6061) samples. The test surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Because of the surface modifications, the actual surface area was increased up to 2.8× compared to the projected base area, and the arithmetic mean roughness value (Ra) was determined to vary from 0.3 μm for the reference smooth surface to 19.5 μm for the modified surfaces. Selected samples with modified surfaces along with the reference smooth surface were then evaluated for their heat transfer performance in spray cooling tests. The cooling system had vapor-atomizing nozzles and used anhydrous ammonia as the coolant in order to achieve heat fluxes up to 500 W/cm(2) representing a thermal management setting for high power systems. Experimental results showed that the microscale surface modifications enhanced heat transfer coefficients up to 76% at 500 W/cm(2) compared to the smooth surface and demonstrated the benefits of these practical surface modification techniques to enhance two-phase heat transfer process.

  11. Slug-flow dynamics with phase change heat transfer in compact heat exchangers with oblique wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Matsushita, Ryo; Suzuki, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    With abundance of low-temperature geothermal energy source, small-scale binary-cycle power generation system has gained renewed attention. Although heat exchangers play a dominant role in thermal efficiency and the system size, the optimum design strategy has not been established due to complex flow phenomena and the lack of versatile heat transfer models. In the present study, the concept of oblique wavy walls, with which high j/f factor is achieved by strong secondary flows in single-phase system, is extended to two-phase exchangers. The present analyses are based on evaporation model coupled to a VOF technique, and a train of isolated bubbles is generated under the controlled inlet quality. R245fa is adopted as a low boiling-point working media, and two types of channels are considered with a hydraulic diameter of 4 mm: (i) a straight circular pipe and (ii) a duct with oblique wavy walls. The focus is on slug-flow dynamics with evaporation under small capillary but moderate Weber numbers, where the inertial effect as well as the surface tension is of significance. A possible direction of the change in thermo-physical properties is explored by assuming varied thermal conductivity. Effects of the vortical motions on evaporative heat transfer are highlighted. This work has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan.

  12. The Heat Transfer Coefficient of Recycled Concrete Bricks Combination with EPS Insulation Board Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Four tectonic forms samples were conducted to test their heat transfer coefficients. By analyzing and comparing the test values and theoretical values of the heat transfer coefficient, a corrected-value calculation method for determining the heat transfer coefficient was proposed; the proposed method was proved to be reasonably correct. The results indicated that the recycled concrete brick wall heat transfer coefficient is higher than that of the clay brick wall, the heat transfer coefficient of recycled concrete brick wall could be effectively reduced when combined with the EPS insulation board, and the sandwich insulation type was better than that of external thermal insulation type.

  13. Erosion simulation of first wall beryllium armour under ITER transient heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, B.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Loarte, A.

    2009-04-01

    The beryllium is foreseen as plasma facing armour for the first wall in the ITER in form of Be-clad blanket modules in macrobrush design with brush size about 8-10 cm. In ITER significant heat loads during transient events (TE) are expected at the main chamber wall that may leads to the essential damage of the Be armour. The main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. Melting thresholds and melt layer depth of the Be armour under transient loads are estimated for different temperatures of the bulk Be and different shapes of transient loads. The melt motion damages of Be macrobrush armour caused by the tangential friction force and the Lorentz force are analyzed for bulk Be and different sizes of Be-brushes. The damage of FW under radiative loads arising during mitigated disruptions is numerically simulated.

  14. First wall thermal stress analysis for suddenly applied heat fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalessandro, J A

    1978-01-01

    The failure criterion for a solid first wall of an inertial confinement reactor is investigated. Analytical expressions for induced thermal stresses in a plate are given. Two materials have been chosen for this investigation: grade H-451 graphite and chemically vapor deposited (CVD) ..beta..-silicon carbide. Structural failure can be related to either the maximum compressive stress produced on the surface or the maximum tensile stress developed in the interior of the plate; however, it is shown that compressive failure would predominate. A basis for the choice of the thermal shock figure of merit, k(1 - ..nu..) sigma/E ..cap alpha.. kappa/sup 1/2/, is identified. The result is that graphite and silicon carbide rank comparably.

  15. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  16. Development of platform to compare different wall heat transfer packages for system analysis codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Gil; Lee, Won Woong; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Gil [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    System thermal hydraulic (STH) analysis code is used for analyzing and evaluating the safety of a designed nuclear system. The system thermal hydraulic analysis code typically solves mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for multiple phases with sets of selected empirical constitutive equations to close the problem. Several STH codes are utilized in academia, industry and regulators, such as MARS-KS, SPACE, RELAP5, COBRA-TF, TRACE, and so on. Each system thermal hydraulic code consists of different sets of governing equations and correlations. However, the packages and sets of correlations of each code are not compared quantitatively yet. Wall heat transfer mode transition maps of SPACE and MARS-KS have a little difference for the transition from wall nucleate heat transfer mode to wall film heat transfer mode. Both codes have the same heat transfer packages and correlations in most region except for wall film heat transfer mode. Most of heat transfer coefficients calculated for the range of selected variables of SPACE are the same with those of MARS-KS. For the intervals between 500K and 540K of wall temperature, MARS-KS selects the wall film heat transfer mode and Bromley correlation but SPACE select the wall nucleate heat transfer mode and Chen correlation. This is because the transition from nucleate boiling to film boiling of MARS-KS is earlier than SPACE. More detailed analysis of the heat transfer package and flow regime package will be followed in the near future.

  17. Effect of wall-mounted obstacles on mixed convection heat transfer in an open channel with multiple discrete heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Araf Al; Anik, Rahagir Ridwan; Sarah, Anika

    2017-12-01

    In this study a numerical investigation on two dimensional laminar steady mixed convection has been carried out in an open channel with upper wall mounted with obstacles and the lower wall is provided with different types of protruding multiple discrete heaters. The upper wall is maintained at constant low temperature. All obstacles are isotherm and have the same temperature as the walls. The heaters are also connected with adiabatic segments and the heater surfaces are assumed to release heat at constant heat flux. At inlet, a uniform velocity profile has been induced. To avoid discontinuity, the temperature of the incoming stream is supposed to change linearly. The working fluid used in this study is air and Boussinesq approximation has been applied for fluid having constant properties. Finite element method has been used to solve the non-dimensionalised governing equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy along with the boundary conditions. Effect of various parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), Grashof number(Gr) and Richardson number (Ri) on temperature distribution, flow patterns and heat transfer rate has been studied. The results show that increasing the Reynolds number while keeping Ri=1 gives better cooling performance. It has been observed that the wall-mounted obstacles over the channel wall, increases the Nusselt number when compared to the simple channel.

  18. Ultrasonic Heat Transfer Enhancement with Obstacle in Front of Heating Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Nakagawa, Masafumi; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi; Murakami, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ryousuke

    2005-06-01

    Heat transfer enhancement using a horn-type transducer was carried out in the natural convection region while a flat plate was used as a wall-like obstacle in front of the heating surface. Three types of plate were used as obstacles: acrylic, aluminum, and Styrofoam. A horn tip of 6 mm diameter and 60.7 kHz was used as the ultrasonic transducer. The acoustic cavitation jet induced by the ultrasonic vibration exhibited the same tendency as the axisymmetric free jet. The acoustic jet from the horn tip was shut out by the flat plate; however, the ultrasound passed through the flat plate and transferred the flow effect and agitation effect to the area behind the plate. By applying ultrasonic vibration, the heat transfer coefficient of the heating surface behind the flat plate was increased by up to threefold. The heat transfer coefficient decreased as the thickness of the flat plate increased. The heat transfer coefficient was the highest for the acrylic plate, then the aluminum plate, and lowest for the Styrofoam plate.

  19. Calculated heat-and-technical indicators of brick external walls of the historical residential buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhkal, Viktor; Murgul, Vera

    2017-10-01

    The analysis of the external brick walls structures of the historical residential buildings (constructions of XIX century and the beginnings of the 20th century) in St. Petersburg is carried out. The heat-and-technical indicators (coefficient of heat conductivity of brick and coefficient of the heat transfer of external brick walls) are defined. That is established that the use of modern norms of design is possible. The obtained data allow to carry out some heat-and-technical and moist calculations during designing of heating systems as well during the development of measures for energy saving.

  20. Experimental studies of surface modified oscillating heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Wu, Cheng-Han

    2017-04-01

    Oscillating heat pipe (OHP) is a two-phase heat transfer device which has the characteristics of simple construction, high heat flux capability and no need of wicking structures for liquid transport. There are many studies in finding the ways how to improve the system performance OHP. In this paper, studies of the effects of contact angle (θ c ) on the inner wall of OHP system have been conducted first. Glass OHP systems with unmodified (θ c = 26.74°), superhydrophobic (θ c = 156.2°), superhydrophilic (θ c evaporator region and superhydrophobic within condensation region) surfaces, are studied. The research results indicated that thermal resistance of these four OHP systems can be significantly affected by different surface modification approaches. Although superhydrophobic OHP system can still work, the thermal resistance (R th ) is the highest one of the four OHP systems, R th = 0.36 °C/W at 200 W. Unmodified pure glass and superhydrophilic OHP systems have similar performance. Thermal resistances are 0.28 and 0.27 °C/W at 200 W respectively. The hybrid OHP achieves the lowest thermal resistance, R th = 0.23 °C/W at 200 W in this study. The exact mechanism and effects of contact angle on OHP systems are investigated with the help of flow visualization. By comparing the flow visualization results of OHP systems before and after surface modification, one tries to find the mechanism how the surface modified inner wall surface affects the OHP system performance. In additional to the reason that the superhydrophobic dropwise condensation surface inside the hybrid OHP system, hybrid OHP system shows more stable and energetic circulation flow. It is found that instead of stratified flow, vapor slug flows are identified within the evaporator section of the hybrid OHP system that can effectively generate higher pressure force for two phase interfacial flow. This effect is attributed to be the main mechanism for better performance of the hybrid OHP system.

  1. Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Lindemuth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this Phase 2 SBIR program was to develop and demonstrate a practically insoluble coating for nickel-based superalloys for Stirling engine heat pipe applications. Specific technical objectives of the program were: (1) Determine the solubility corrosion rates for Nickel 200, Inconel 718, and Udimet 72OLI in a simulated Stirling engine heat pipe environment, (2) Develop coating processes and techniques for capillary groove and screen wick structures, (3) Evaluate the durability and solubility corrosion rates for capillary groove and screen wick structures coated with an insoluble coating in cylindrical heat pipes operating under Stirling engine conditions, and (4) Design and fabricate a coated full-scale, partial segment of the current Stirling engine heat pipe for the Stirling Space Power Convertor program. The work effort successfully demonstrated a two-step nickel aluminide coating process for groove wick structures and interior wall surfaces in contact with liquid metals; demonstrated a one-step nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures; and developed and demonstrated a two-step aluminum-to-nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures. In addition, the full-scale, partial segment was fabricated and the interior surfaces and wick structures were coated. The heat pipe was charged with sodium, processed, and scheduled to be life tested for up to ten years as a Phase 3 effort.

  2. Low temperature heating and high temperature cooling embedded water based surface heating and cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Babiak, Jan; Petras, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    This Guidebook describes the systems that use water as heat-carrier and when the heat exchange within the conditioned space is more than 50% radiant. Embedded systems insulated from the main building structure (floor, wall and ceiling) are used in all types of buildings and work with heat carriers at low temperatures for heating and relatively high temperature for cooling.

  3. Estimation of transient heat flux density during the heat supply of a catalytic wall steam methane reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settar, Abdelhakim; Abboudi, Saïd; Madani, Brahim; Nebbali, Rachid

    2017-08-01

    Due to the endothermic nature of the steam methane reforming reaction, the process is often limited by the heat transfer behavior in the reactors. Poor thermal behavior sometimes leads to slow reaction kinetics, which is characterized by the presence of cold spots in the catalytic zones. Within this framework, the present work consists on a numerical investigation, in conjunction with an experimental one, on the one-dimensional heat transfer phenomenon during the heat supply of a catalytic-wall reactor, which is designed for hydrogen production. The studied reactor is inserted in an electric furnace where the heat requirement of the endothermic reaction is supplied by electric heating system. During the heat supply, an unknown heat flux density, received by the reactive flow, is estimated using inverse methods. In the basis of the catalytic-wall reactor model, an experimental setup is engineered in situ to measure the temperature distribution. Then after, the measurements are injected in the numerical heat flux estimation procedure, which is based on the Function Specification Method (FSM). The measured and estimated temperatures are confronted and the heat flux density which crosses the reactor wall is determined.

  4. Estimation of transient heat flux density during the heat supply of a catalytic wall steam methane reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settar, Abdelhakim; Abboudi, Saïd; Madani, Brahim; Nebbali, Rachid

    2018-02-01

    Due to the endothermic nature of the steam methane reforming reaction, the process is often limited by the heat transfer behavior in the reactors. Poor thermal behavior sometimes leads to slow reaction kinetics, which is characterized by the presence of cold spots in the catalytic zones. Within this framework, the present work consists on a numerical investigation, in conjunction with an experimental one, on the one-dimensional heat transfer phenomenon during the heat supply of a catalytic-wall reactor, which is designed for hydrogen production. The studied reactor is inserted in an electric furnace where the heat requirement of the endothermic reaction is supplied by electric heating system. During the heat supply, an unknown heat flux density, received by the reactive flow, is estimated using inverse methods. In the basis of the catalytic-wall reactor model, an experimental setup is engineered in situ to measure the temperature distribution. Then after, the measurements are injected in the numerical heat flux estimation procedure, which is based on the Function Specification Method (FSM). The measured and estimated temperatures are confronted and the heat flux density which crosses the reactor wall is determined.

  5. Power Efficiency of Systems Applied for Heating Building and Structure External Walls with Ventilated Air Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    I. F. Fialko; A. S. Statsenko

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers power-efficient systems applied for heating building and structure external walls with ventilated air spaces and prescribes directions and problems pertaining to power-efficiency improvement of such systems.

  6. Analytical 1D models of the wall thermal resistance of rectangular minichannels applied in heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybiński Witold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents four 1-dimensional models of thermal resistance of walls in a heat exchanger with rectangular minichannels. The first model is the simplest one, with a single wall separating two fluids. The second model of the so called equivalent wall takes into account total volume of intermediate walls between layers of minichannels and of side walls of minichannels. The next two more complicated models take separately into account thermal resistance of these walls. In these two models side walls are treated as fins. The results of models comparison are presented. It is shown that thermal resistance may be neglected for metal walls but it should be taken into account for the walls made of plastics. For the case of non-neglected wall thermal resistance the optimum wall thickness was derived. Minichannel heat exchangers made of plastic are larger than those built of metal, but are significantly cheaper. It makes possible to use of such exchangers in inexpensive microscale ORC installations.

  7. Critical heat flux variations on CANDU calandria tube surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdadi, A.; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: behdada@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Engineering Physics Dept., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Heavy water moderator surrounding each fuel channel is one of the important safety features in CANDU reactors since it provides an in-situ passive heat sink for the fuel in situations where other engineered means of heat removal from fuel channels have failed. In a critical break LOCA scenario, fuel cooling becomes severely degraded due to rapid flow reduction in the affected flow pass of the heat transport system. This can result in pressure tubes experiencing significant heat-up during early stages of the accident when coolant pressure is still high, thereby causing uniform thermal creep strain (ballooning) of the pressure tube (PT) into contact with its calandria tube (CT). The contact of the hot PT with the CT causes rapid redistribution of stored heat from the PT to CT and a large heat flux spike from the CT to the moderator fluid. For conditions where subcooling of the moderator fluid is low, this heat flux spike can cause dryout of the CT. This can detrimentally affect channel integrity if the CT post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high to result in continued thermal creep strain deformation of both the PT and the CT. The focus of this work is to develop a mechanistic model to predict Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on the CT surface following a contact with its pressure tube. A mechanistic CHF model is applied based on a concept of wall dry patch formation, prevention of rewetting and subsequent dry patch spreading. Results have been compared to an empirical correlation and a good agreement has been obtained. The model has been used to predict the spatial variation of CHF over a cylinder with dimensions of CANDU CT. (author)

  8. Virtual walls based on oil-repellent surfaces for low-surface-tension liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Riberet; Kwon, Jae Wan

    2013-01-29

    Manipulating and controlling water-based aqueous solutions with the use of virtual walls is relatively simple compared to that of nonaqueous low-surface-tension liquids, which pose greater challenges to microfluidic devices. This letter reports a novel technique to form a virtual wall for various low-surface-tension liquids. A microfluidic channel with virtual walls has been made to guide low-surface-tension liquids by using a specially designed oil-repellent surface. Unlike generic superoleophobic surfaces, our oil-repellent surface exhibited strong repellency to the lateral flow of low-surface-tension liquids such as hexadecane and dodecane. A plasma-assisted surface micromachining process has been utilized to form the oil-repellent surface. The use of combined features of re-entrant geometries on the surface played an important role in promoting its repellence to the lateral flow of low-surface-tension liquids. We have successfully demonstrated how low-surface-tension liquids can be well confined by the virtual walls.

  9. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  10. Sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a plain heating surface during pool boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen-hua; Liao, Liang [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2008-05-15

    The pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments of water (H{sub 2}O) based and alcohol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) based nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions on the plain heated copper surface were carried out. The study was focused on the sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a heated surface. The nanofluids consisted of the base liquid, the nanoparticles and the surfactant. The nanoparticles-suspensions consisted of the base liquid and nanoparticles. The both liquids of water and alcohol and both nanoparticles of CuO and SiO{sub 2} were used. The surfactant was sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate (SDBS). The experimental results show that for nanofluids, the agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heated surface when the wall temperature was over 112{sup o}C and steady nucleated boiling experiment could not be carried out. The reason was that an unsteady porous agglutination layer was formed on the heated surface. However, for nanoparticles-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and the steady boiling could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region. For the both of alcohol based nanofluids and nano-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and steady nucleate boiling experiment could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region whose wall temperature did not exceed 112{sup o}C. The boiling heat transfer characteristics of the nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions are somewhat poor compared with that of the base fluids, since the decrease of the active nucleate cavities on the heating surface with a very thin nanoparticles sorption layer. The very thin nanoparticles sorption layer also caused a decrease in the solid-liquid contact angle on the heating surface which leaded to an increase of the critical heat flux (CHF). (author)

  11. Heat transfer modelling of first walls subject to plasma disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Makowitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    A brief description of the plasma disruption problem and potential thermal consequences to the first wall is given. Thermal models reviewed include: a) melting of a solid with melt layer in place; b) melting of a solid with complete removal of melt (ablation); c) melting/vaporization of a solid; and d) vaporization of a solid but no phase change affecting the temperature profile.

  12. Computational prediction of heat transfer to gas turbine nozzle guide vanes with roughened surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.M.; Jones, T.V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Science; Lock, G.D. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dancer, S.N. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    The local Mach number and heat transfer coefficient over the aerofoil surfaces and endwalls of a transonic gas turbine nozzle guide vane have been calculated. the computations were performed by solving the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a fully three-dimensional computational code (CFDS), which is well established at Rolls-Royce. A model to predict the effects of roughness has been incorporated into CFDS and heat transfer levels have been calculated for both hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough surfaces. The roughness influences the calculations in two ways; first the mixing length at a certain height above the surface is increased; second the wall function used to reconcile the wall condition with the first grid point above the wall is also altered. The first involves a relatively straightforward shift of the origin in the van Driest damping function description, the second requires an integration of the momentum equation across the wall layer. A similar treatment applies to the energy equation. The calculations are compared with experimental contours of heat transfer coefficient obtained using both thin-film gages and the transient liquid crystal technique. Measurements were performed using both hydraulically smooth and roughened surfaces, and at engine-representative Mach and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer results are discussed and interpreted in terms of surface-shear flow visualization using oil and dye techniques.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HEATED STREAM ABOVE THE HORIZONTAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Diachek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of thermal contaminated air stream formed above the surface of lengthy heated plate is investigated on the basis of the mathematical model of heat and mass transfer processes. The numerical simulation results performed for the purpose of finding a way to prevent the contaminants outflow from the hood in the presence of external influence are given. Three variants of the hood side panels lengthening are considered: on either side; on the side of the fresh air supply; on the side opposite to the location of air distributors. Comparison of the effects of using these variants of hood design allowed determining that the hood panel located on the side of the coming air flow gives the greatest leakage reduction. It is found out that lengthening of the hood side panels does not ensure full localization of the contaminated convective stream.Several variants of using the screen located on the side of the lateral air flow were investigated in the course of work. Best result is observed under conditions of application of the screen symmetrically located relative to spacing between the hood and the plate. The analysis of local values of temperature and velocity fields in this case shows that losses of heated contaminated air to the workshop space are practically absent. It is found out that the convective stream can be most efficiently localized under the condition of hood-symmetric distribution of supply air. Influence of the open gate on convective stream formation in the workshop space with heat emission is considered. The shift of upward flow to the opposite side relative to the gate is observed. The radiant heat release from the board is of great importance in the temperature field formation of closely located areas of floor and walls surfaces

  14. Bayesian inference of the heat transfer properties of a wall using experimental data

    KAUST Repository

    Iglesias, Marco

    2016-01-06

    A hierarchical Bayesian inference method is developed to estimate the thermal resistance and volumetric heat capacity of a wall. We apply our methodology to a real case study where measurements are recorded each minute from two temperature probes and two heat flux sensors placed on both sides of a solid brick wall along a period of almost five days. We model the heat transfer through the wall by means of the one-dimensional heat equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The initial/boundary conditions for the temperature are approximated by piecewise linear functions. We assume that temperature and heat flux measurements have independent Gaussian noise and derive the joint likelihood of the wall parameters and the initial/boundary conditions. Under the model assumptions, the boundary conditions are marginalized analytically from the joint likelihood. ApproximatedGaussian posterior distributions for the wall parameters and the initial condition parameter are obtained using the Laplace method, after incorporating the available prior information. The information gain is estimated under different experimental setups, to determine the best allocation of resources.

  15. Grasping Claws of Bionic Climbing Robot for Rough Wall Surface: Modeling and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quansheng Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the inspection of rough stone and concrete wall surfaces, a grasping module of cross-arranged claw is designed. It can attach onto rough wall surfaces by hooking or grasping walls. First, based on the interaction mechanism of hooks and rough wall surfaces, the hook structures in claw tips are developed. Then, the size of the hook tip is calculated and the failure mode is analyzed. The effectiveness and reliability of the mechanism are verified through simulation and finite element analysis. Afterwards, the prototype of the grasping module of claw is established to carry out grasping experiment on vibrating walls. Finally, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed cross-arranged claw is able to stably grasp static wall surfaces and perform well in grasping vibrating walls, with certain anti-rollover capability. This research lays a foundation for future researches on wall climbing robots with vibrating rough wall surfaces.

  16. Injection molding of nanopatterned surfaces in the sub-micrometer range with induction heating aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Replication of sub-micrometer structures by injection molding leads to special requirements for the mold in order to ensure proper replica and acceptable cycle time. This paper investigates the applicability of induction heating embedded into the mold for the improvement of nanopattern replication....... A tool insert having a surface containing functional geometries in the sub-micrometer range was produced using aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. In order to provide elevated mold temperatures necessary for the complete replica of the pattern, a new mold setup was developed, which allows...... rapid heating of the cavity wall using an induction heating system. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple placed in the mold insert. The system was used to heat up the cavity wall with heating rates of up to 10 K/s. Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC) were used...

  17. Heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B and fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel ranging 50 to 70°C: ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, R.; Shinozuka, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2016-03-01

    We studied heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B ranging 50 to 70°C ex vivo study. Porcine carotid artery was dipped in the heated Rhodamine B solution in 15 s and then cooled by 37°C saline. Rhodamine B concentration distribution in the vascular wall cross-section was measured by a fluorescence microscope using 550 nm for excitation and 620 nm emission for fluorescence detection. The total amount of measured fluorescence in the vascular wall was calculated as a indication of delivered Rhodamine B quantity. The delivered Rhodamine B quantity was increased with increasing heating temperature with 50 to 70°C. In the cases of 60 to 70°C heating, the delivered Rhodamine B quantity was 3.1 to 23.3 fold by that of 37°C. Defined penetration depth of the delivered Rhodamine B in the vascular wall was also significantly increased with 65°C and 70°C heating. We also studied heating drug delivery to the vascular wall with fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel with 70°C in 15 s and 60 s heating ex vivo. In both contact duration, the delivered Paclitaxel quantity was increased. To understand these drug delivery enhancement effects, we investigated the vascular cross-sectional structure change by the heating. Some holes over 50 nm in diameter appeared on the internal elastic lamina with 70°C heating. We prospected that vascular surface structure change by the heating might enhance drug delivery to the vascular wall.

  18. Local wall heat flux/temperature meter for convective flow and method of utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ronald D. (Inventor); Ekhlassi, Ali (Inventor); Cofie, Penrose (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a method includes providing a conduit having a fluid flowing therethrough, disposing a plurality of temperature measurement devices inside a wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices proximate an inside surface of the wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices at different radial positions at the same circumferential location within the wall, measuring a plurality of temperatures of the wall with respective ones of the temperature measurement devices to obtain a three-dimensional temperature topology of the wall, determining the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the conduit, and determining a multi-dimensional thermal characteristic of the inside surface of the wall of the conduit based on extrapolation of the three-dimensional temperature topology and the temperature dependent thermal conductivities.

  19. Role of surface thermal properties of HfB2 nanoparticles on heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hafnium diboride nanoparticles; multi-walled carbon nanotube; phenolic composites; thermal management. ... heatthroughout the sample, thereby reducing thermal gradients, reducing the intensity of heating at the surface exposed to flame,and insulating the carbonaceous char with the network of HfO 2 /MWCNT/char.

  20. Higher dimensional curved domain walls on Kähler surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Fiki T., E-mail: ftakbar@fi.itb.ac.id [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Gunara, Bobby E., E-mail: bobby@fi.itb.ac.id [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Radjabaycolle, Flinn C. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Cendrawasih University, Jl. Kampwolker Kampus Uncen Baru Waena-Jayapura 99351 (Indonesia); Wijaya, Rio N. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Theoretical High Energy Physics and Instrumentation Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha no. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2017-03-15

    In this paper we study some aspects of curved BPS-like domain walls in higher dimensional gravity theory coupled to scalars where the scalars span a complex Kähler surface with scalar potential turned on. Assuming that a fake superpotential has a special form which depends on Kähler potential and a holomorphic function, we prove that BPS-like equations have a local unique solution. Then, we analyze the vacuum structure of the theory including their stability using dynamical system and their existence in ultraviolet-infrared regions using renormalization group flow.

  1. Surface tension driven shaping of adhesive microfluidic channel walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janting, Jakob; Storm, Elisabeth K.; Geschke, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of making microfluidic channels with different wall geometries using adjacent lines of dispensed adhesive between substrates has been studied. Important parameters for the geometry have been identified to be: surface tension (adhesive / substrates), adhesive viscosity / thixotropy......, line height and distance, and temperature. Focus of the work has been on predicting the equilibrium geometries with FEM simulations using as input measured adhesive wetting angles, different adhesive line distances and height. The studied substrates are glass microscope slides, PEEK and PMMA....... The studied adhesives are DYMAX 9-20318-F, 3070, 9001 version 3.5, and Sylgard 184 PDMS....

  2. Mathematical Model of Non-stationary Heat Conduction in the Wall: Asymmetric Problem with the Boundary Conditions of Imperfect Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charvátová Hana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of a non-stationary heat conduction in the solid wall. It is focused on mathematical modelling of its asymmetric heating and cooling by imperfect heat transfer to both sides of the wall. It describes method used for deriving of the long time analytical solution describing temperature distribution in the heated (cooled wall by use Laplace transform and verification of its validity by numerical calculation with COMSOL Multiphysics software. In the tested example, the maximum difference between analytical and numerical solution was about 3.5 % considering the possible maximum and minimum temperatures in the wall under the given conditions.

  3. Inverse natural convection problem of estimating wall heat flux using a moving sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.M.; Chung, O.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Inverse heat transfer problems have many applications in various branch of science and engineering. Here, the inverse problem of determining heat flux at the bottom wall of a two-dimensional cavity from temperature measurement in the domain is considered. The Boussinesq equation is used to model the natural convection induced by the wall heat flux. The inverse natural convection problem is posed as a minimization problem of the performance function, which is the sum of square residuals between calculated and observed temperature, by means of a conjugate gradient method. Instead of employing several fixed sensors, a single sensor is used which is moving at a given frequency over the bottom wall. The present method solves the inverse natural convection problem accurately without a priori information about the unknown function to be estimated.

  4. Inverse heat conduction estimation of inner wall temperature fluctuations under turbulent penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouchao; Lu, Tao; Liu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Turbulent penetration can occur when hot and cold fluids mix in a horizontal T-junction pipe at nuclear plants. Caused by the unstable turbulent penetration, temperature fluctuations with large amplitude and high frequency can lead to time-varying wall thermal stress and even thermal fatigue on the inner wall. Numerous cases, however, exist where inner wall temperatures cannot be measured and only outer wall temperature measurements are feasible. Therefore, it is one of the popular research areas in nuclear science and engineering to estimate temperature fluctuations on the inner wall from measurements of outer wall temperatures without damaging the structure of the pipe. In this study, both the one-dimensional (1D) and the two-dimensional (2D) inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) were solved to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. First, numerical models of both the 1D and the 2D direct heat conduction problem (DHCP) were structured in MATLAB, based on the finite difference method with an implicit scheme. Second, both the 1D IHCP and the 2D IHCP were solved by the steepest descent method (SDM), and the DHCP results of temperatures on the outer wall were used to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. Third, we compared the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall estimated by the 1D IHCP with those estimated by the 2D IHCP in four cases: (1) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 3°C, (2) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 30°C, (3) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 160°C, and (4) when the fluid temperatures inside the pipe were random from 50°C to 210°C.

  5. Effects of Surface Wettability and Roughness on the Heat Transfer Performance of Fluid Flowing through Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface characteristics, such as wettability and roughness, play an important role in heat transfer performance in the field of microfluidic flow. In this paper, the process of a hot liquid flowing through a microchannel with cold walls, which possesses different surface wettabilities and microstructures, is simulated by a transient double-distribution function (DDF two-phase thermal lattice Boltzmann BGK (LBGK model. The Shan-Chen multiphase LBGK model is used to describe the flow field and the independent distribution function is introduced to solve the temperature field. The simulation results show that the roughness of the channel wall improves the heat transfer, no matter what the surface wettability is. These simulations reveal that the heat exchange characteristics are directly related to the flow behavior. For the smooth-superhydrophobic-surface flow, a gas film forms that acts as an insulating layer since the thermal conductivity of the gas is relatively small in comparison to that of a liquid. In case of the rough-superhydrophobic-surface flow, the vortex motion of the gas within the grooves significantly enhances the heat exchange between the fluid and wall.

  6. Effect of Heat Flux on Creep Stresses of Thick-Walled Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosayeb Davoudi Kashkoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the thermo-creep response of the material is governed by Norton’s law, an analytical solution is presented for the calculation of time-dependent creep stresses and displacements of homogeneous thick-walled cylindrical pressure vessels. For the stress analysis in a homogeneous pressure vessel, having material creep behavior, the solutions of the stresses at a time equal to zero (i.e. the initial stress state are needed. This corresponds to the solution of materials with linear elastic behavior. Therefore, using equations of equilibrium, stress-strain and strain-displacement, a differential equation for displacement is obtained and then the stresses at a time equal to zero are calculated. Using Norton’s law in the multi-axial form in conjunction with the above-mentioned equations in the rate form, the radial displacement rate is obtained and then the radial, circumferential and axial creep stress rates are calculated. When the stress rates are known, the stresses at any time are calculated iteratively. The analytical solution is obtained for the conditions of plane strain and plane stress. The thermal loading is as follows: inner surface is exposed to a uniform heat flux, and the outer surface is exposed to an airstream. The heat conduction equation for the one-dimensional problem in polar coordinates is used to obtain temperature distribution in the cylinder. The pressure, inner radius and outer radius are considered constant. Material properties are considered as constant. Following this, profiles are plotted for the radial displacements, radial stress, circumferential stress and axial stress as a function of radial direction and time.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Liquid Film Moving Over a Heated Horizontal Surface Under the Action of a Gas Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartashevich Maria V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer during desorption on a horizontal film of lithium bromide water solution flowing on a heated wall under the action of shear stress is numerically investigated in this paper. The shear stress on the film surface is set by the motion of surrounding saturated water vapor. It is shown that at low values of heat flux the film temperature and vapor concentration in the solution downstream decreases due to desorption. However, with an increase in heat flux, general film heating and desorption slowing down are observed.

  8. Optimal wall spacing for heat transport in thermal convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, Olga [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of RB flow for Ra up to 1 x 10{sup 10} is computationally expensive in terms of computing power and hard disk storage. Thus, we gratefully acknowledge the computational resources supported by Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Munich. Compared to Γ=1 situation, a new physical picture of heat transport is identified here at Γ{sub opt} for any explored Ra. Therefore, a detailed comparison between Γ=1 and Γ=Γ{sub opt} is valuable for our further research, for example, their vertical temperature and velocity profiles. Additionally, we plan to compare the fluid with different Pr under geometrical confinement, which are computationally expensive for the situations of Pr<<1 and Pr>>1.

  9. Standard surface grinder for precision machining of thin-wall tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.; Kotora, J., Jr.; Rein, J.; Smith, S. V.; Strack, D.; Stuckey, D.

    1967-01-01

    Standard surface grinder performs precision machining of thin-wall stainless steel tubing by electrical discharge grinding. A related adaptation, a traveling wire electrode fixture, is used for machining slots in thin-walled tubing.

  10. Numerical heat transfer in a cavity with a solar control coating deposited to a vertical semitransparent wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G.; Estrada, C. A.

    2000-12-01

    A transient two-dimensional computational model of combined natural convection, conduction, and radiation in a cavity with an aspect ratio of one, containing air as a laminar and non-participating fluid, is presented. The cavity has two opaque adiabatic horizontal walls, one opaque isothermal vertical wall, and an opposite semitransparent wall, which consists of a 6-mm glass sheet with a solar control coating of SnS-CuxS facing the cavity. The semitransparent wall also exchanges heat by convection and radiation from its external surface to the surroundings and allows solar radiation pass through into the interior of the cavity. The momentum and energy equations in the transient state were solved by finite differences using the alternating direction implicit (ADI) technique. The transient conduction equation and the radiative energy flux boundary conditions are coupled to these equations. The results in this paper are limited to the following conditions: 104Gr106, an isothermal vertical cold wall of 21°C, outside air temperatures in the range 30°CT040°C and incident solar radiation of AM2 (750 W m-2) normal to the semitransparent wall. The model allows calculation of the redistribution of the absorbed component of solar radiation to the inside and outside of the cavity. The influences of the time step and mesh size were considered. Using arguments of energy balance in the cavity, it was found that the percentage difference was less than 4 per cent, showing a possible total numerical error less than this number. For Gr=106 a wave appeared in the upper side of the cavity, suggesting the influence of the boundary walls over the air flow inside the cavity. A Nusselt number correlation as a function of the Rayleigh number is presented. Copyright

  11. Heat transport in cold-wall single-wafer low pressure chemical-vapor-deposition reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasper, A.; Schmitz, J.E.J.; Holleman, J.; Verweij, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    A model is formulated to understand and predict wafer temperatures in a tungsten low pressure chemical‐vapor‐deposition (LPCVD) single‐wafer cold‐wall reactor equipped with hot plate heating. The temperature control is usually carried out on the hot plate temperature. Large differences can occur

  12. Heat transfer in particle-laden wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaszczur, M.; Portela, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    In present work heat transfer in particle-laden wall-bounded turbulent flows has been study with the fluid-particle one way interaction approach. Direct Numerical Simulation of the flow, combined with Lagrangian particle tracking technique has been performed to study the problem. In presented

  13. Dynamics and control of a heat pump assisted extractive dividing-wall column for bioethanol dehydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patraşcu, Iulian; Bildea, Costin Sorin; Kiss, Anton A.

    Recently, a novel heat-pump-assisted extractive distillation process taking place in a dividing-wall column was proposed for bioethanol dehydration. This integrated design combines three distillation columns into a single unit that allows over 40% energy savings and low specific energy requirements

  14. CFD Study on Wall/Nanoparticle Interaction in Nanofluids Convective Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Tarybakhsh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brownian motion of the nanoparticles in nanofluid is one of the potential contributors to enhance effective thermal conductivity and the mechanisms that might contribute to this enhancement are the subject of considerable discussion and debate. In this paper, the mixing effect of the base fluid in the immediate vicinity of the nanoparticles caused by the Brownian motion was analyzed, modeled, and compared with existing experimental data available in the literature. CFD was developed to study the effect of wall/nanoparticle interaction on forced convective heat transfer in a tube under constant wall temperature condition. The results showed that the motion of the particle near the wall which can decrease boundary layer and the hydrodynamics effects associated with the Brownian motion have a significant effect on the convection heat transfer of nanofluid.

  15. Large–eddy simulations of wall heat transfer and coherent structures in mixed convection over a wavy wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, S.; Kenjeres, S.; Von Rohr, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In this numerical study the mixed convective flow of water over a heated wavy surface over a range of Reynolds and Richardson numbers, including transitional and turbulent flow regimes (20 ? Re ? 2000 and 0.5 ? Ri ? 5000) is investigated. A dynamic Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach is applied

  16. Inverse problem of estimating transient heat transfer rate on external wall of forced convection pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wen-Lih; Yang, Yu-Ching; Chang, Win-Jin; Lee, Haw-Long [Clean Energy Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Yung-Kang City, Tainan 710-03 (China)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, a conjugate gradient method based inverse algorithm is applied to estimate the unknown space and time dependent heat transfer rate on the external wall of a pipe system using temperature measurements. It is assumed that no prior information is available on the functional form of the unknown heat transfer rate; hence, the procedure is classified as function estimation in the inverse calculation. The accuracy of the inverse analysis is examined by using simulated exact and inexact temperature measurements. Results show that an excellent estimation of the space and time dependent heat transfer rate can be obtained for the test case considered in this study. (author)

  17. Study on Surface Heat Budget of Various Pavements for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Takebayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface heat budgets of various pavement surfaces are studied with the aim of mitigating the urban heat island effect. In this study, the thermal characteristics of pavements are examined using data from observations. The net radiation, surface temperature, temperature under the surface, conduction heat flux, and core weight for each experimental surface are recorded, together with the weather conditions at the time of observation. The latent heat flux is estimated from the observed weight of the cores. The surface heat budget under the same weather conditions is examined, and the sensible heat flux from each target surface is calculated. The parameters that influence the surface heat budget, for example, solar reflectance (albedo, evaporative efficiency, heat conductivity, and heat capacity, are examined. On a typical summer day, the maximum reduction in the sensible heat flux from that on a normal asphalt surface is about 150 W/m2 for an asphalt surface with water-retaining material and about 100 W/m2 for a cement concrete surface with water-retaining material, depending on the albedo of each surface.

  18. Heat transfer at boiling of R114/R21 refrigerants mixture film on microstructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, O. A.; Pecherkin, N. I.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Zubkov, N. N.; Bityutskaya, Yu L.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental study of heat transfer in the film flow of R114/R21 refrigerant mixture on the vertical thin-wall copper cylinders with microstructured outer surfaces. Microstructuring is made by the method of deforming cutting with subsequent rolling by a straight knurl roller along the fin tops. The pitch of micro-finning was 100 or 200 μm and height was 220 or 440 μm, respectively. The knurling pitch in both cases was 318 μm. The film Reynolds number was varied in the range of 300-1500. The heat flux density was step-by-step increased from zero to the values corresponding to the boiling crisis. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficients at nucleate boiling on the studied surfaces with microstructuring exceed the corresponding values for a smooth surface more than by 3 times, the critical heat flux increases more than twice.

  19. Bayesian inferences of the thermal properties of a wall using temperature and heat flux measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Iglesias, Marco

    2017-09-20

    The assessment of the thermal properties of walls is essential for accurate building energy simulations that are needed to make effective energy-saving policies. These properties are usually investigated through in situ measurements of temperature and heat flux over extended time periods. The one-dimensional heat equation with unknown Dirichlet boundary conditions is used to model the heat transfer process through the wall. In Ruggeri et al. (2017), it was assessed the uncertainty about the thermal diffusivity parameter using different synthetic data sets. In this work, we adapt this methodology to an experimental study conducted in an environmental chamber, with measurements recorded every minute from temperature probes and heat flux sensors placed on both sides of a solid brick wall over a five-day period. The observed time series are locally averaged, according to a smoothing procedure determined by the solution of a criterion function optimization problem, to fit the required set of noise model assumptions. Therefore, after preprocessing, we can reasonably assume that the temperature and the heat flux measurements have stationary Gaussian noise and we can avoid working with full covariance matrices. The results show that our technique reduces the bias error of the estimated parameters when compared to other approaches. Finally, we compute the information gain under two experimental setups to recommend how the user can efficiently determine the duration of the measurement campaign and the range of the external temperature oscillation.

  20. Wall heat transfer in gas-fired furnaces: Effect of radiation modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vondál J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study heat transfer to cooled walls in a MW-scale laboratory furnace with a dominating thermal radiation component. Experiment is performed in a specially designed combustion chamber with segmental water-cooled walls and profile of absorbed heat flux is measured along the flame. Non-premixed natural gas flame is stabilized by a guide-vane swirler. The unsteady governing equations of turbulent flow are solved by a finite-volume code with a two-equation k-ε realizable turbulence model, a combination of first-order and second-order upwind schemes and implicit time integration. The coupling of pressure with velocity is treated by SIMPLE (semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations algorithm. Radiative heat transfer as the main heat transfer method is modelled with special care by discrete ordinates method and gas absorption coefficient is calculated by two alternatives of WSGGM (weighted sum of grey gases model. The predicted total heat transfer rate is found to depend strongly on method chosen for the computation of mean beam length. The results of numerical simulations show that overall heat transfer in a process furnace can be successfully predicted, while heat flux profile along the flame is more difficult to predict accurately. Good engineering accuracy is nevertheless achievable with reasonable computational resources. The trend of deviations is reported, which is useful for the interpretation of practical predictions of process furnaces (fired heaters.

  1. Convective heat transfer between a fluid-saturated porous medium and a permeable wall with fluid injection or withdrawal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Jos

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses heat and mass transfer between a permeable wall and a fluid-saturated porous medium. To assess the effect of wall suction or injection on sensible heat transfer, a stagnant film model is developed. The model yields a thermal correction factor accounting for the effect of

  2. Near-Surface Boundary Layer Turbulence Along a Horizontally-Moving, Surface-Piercing Vertical Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Washuta, Nathan; Duncan, James H

    2016-01-01

    The complex interaction between turbulence and the free surface in boundary layer shear flow created by a vertical surface-piercing wall is considered. A laboratory-scale device was built that utilizes a surface-piercing stainless steel belt that travels in a loop around two vertical rollers, with one length of the belt between the rollers acting as a horizontally-moving flat wall. The belt is accelerated suddenly from rest until reaching constant speed in order to create a temporally-evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially-evolving boundary layer that would exist along a surface-piercing towed flat plate. Surface profiles are measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence system and sub-surface velocity fields are recorded using a high-speed planar particle image velocimetry system. It is found that the belt initially travels through the water without creating any significant waves, before the free surface bursts with activity close to the belt surface. These free surface ripples travel away...

  3. Development of a novel heat-integrated wall reactor for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioannides, Theophilos; Verykios, Xenophon E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Patras GR-265 00 (Greece)

    1998-11-16

    A novel reactor has been developed and applied in the reaction of partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. The reactor consists of a hollow ceramic tube with its inside and outside surfaces coated with a metal catalyst film. The CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} feed enters into the tube and a large fraction of the heat generated on the wall by methane combustion is transported across the tube wall towards the outer catalyst film, where the endothermic reforming reactions take place. In this way, the temperature in the combustion zone is controlled and hot spots are significantly reduced in magnitude. The performance of the novel reactor has been compared to that of a conventional wall reactor, containing the catalyst film on the inner surface of the reactor tube only. The main parameters which influence reactor operation are: the ratio of the amount of catalyst deposited on the inner and outer surface of the reactor tube, catalyst loading, temperature and feed flow rate. The position and magnitude of hot spots can be readily controlled by proper adjustment of the aforementioned parameters

  4. Laminar convective heat transfer of non-Newtonian nanofluids with constant wall temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjat, M.; Etemad, S. Gh.; Bagheri, R.; Thibault, J.

    2011-02-01

    Nanofluids are obtained by dispersing homogeneously nanoparticles into a base fluid. Nanofluids often exhibit higher heat transfer rate in comparison with the base fluid. In the present study, forced convection heat transfer under laminar flow conditions was investigated experimentally for three types of non-Newtonian nanofluids in a circular tube with constant wall temperature. CMC solution was used as the base fluid and γ-Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed to create nanodispersions of different concentrations. Nanofluids as well as the base fluid show shear thinning (pseudoplastic) rheological behavior. Results show that the presence of nanoparticles increases the convective heat transfer of the nanodispersions in comparison with the base fluid. The convective heat transfer enhancement is more significant when both the Peclet number and the nanoparticle concentration are increased. The increase in convective heat transfer is higher than the increase caused by the augmentation of the effective thermal conductivity.

  5. Sensors measure surface ablation rate of reentry vehicle heat shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, J. M., III

    1966-01-01

    Sensors measure surface erosion rate of ablating material in reentry vehicle heat shield. Each sensor, which is placed at precise depths in the heat shield is activated when the ablator surface erodes to the location of a sensing point. Sensor depth and activation time determine ablator surface erosion rate.

  6. Surface renewal method for estimating sensible heat flux | Mengistu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For short canopies, latent energy flux may be estimated using a shortened surface energy balance from measurements of sensible and soil heat flux and the net irradiance at the surface. The surface renewal (SR) method for estimating sensible heat, latent energy, and other scalar fluxes has the advantage over other ...

  7. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  8. Assessment of hypervapotron heat sink performance using CFD under DEMO relevant first wall conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domalapally, Phani, E-mail: p_kumar.domalapally@cvrez.cz

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Performance of Hypervapotron heat sink was tested for First wall limiter application. • Two different materials were tested Eurofer 97 and CuCrZr at PWR conditions. • Simulations were performed to see the effect of the different inlet conditions and materials on the maximum temperature. • It was found that CuCrZr heat sink performance is far better than Eurofer heat sink at the same operating conditions. - Abstract: Among the proposed First Wall (FW) cooling concepts for European Demonstration Fusion Power Plant (DEMO), water cooled FW is one of the options. The heat flux load distribution on the FW of the DEMO reactor is not yet precisely defined. But if the heat loads on the FW are extrapolated from ITER conditions, the numbers are quite high and have to be handled none the less. The design of the FW itself is challenging as the thermal conductivity ratio of heat sink materials in ITER (CuCrZr) and in DEMO (Eurofer 97) is ∼10–12 and the operating conditions are of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) in DEMO instead of 70 °C and 4 MPa as in ITER. This paper analyzes the performance of Hypervapotron (HV) heat sink for FW limiter application under DEMO conditions. Where different materials, temperatures, heat fluxes and velocities are considered to predict the performance of the HV, to establish its limits in handling the heat loads before reaching the upper limits from temperature point of view. In order to assess the performance, numerical simulations are performed using commercial CFD code, which was previously validated in predicting the thermal hydraulic performance of HV geometry. Based on the results the potential usage of HV heat sink for DEMO will be assessed.

  9. Heat transfer and wall temperature effects in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio; Grasso, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the wall temperature on the behavior of oblique shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions at freestream Mach number $2.28$ and shock angle of the wedge generator $\\varphi = 8^{\\circ}$. Five values of the wall-to-recovery-temperature ratio ($T_w/T_r$) are considered, corresponding to cold, adiabatic and hot wall thermal conditions. We show that the main effect of cooling is to decrease the characteristic scales of the interaction in terms of upstream influence and extent of the separation bubble. The opposite behavior is observed in the case of heating, that produces a marked dilatation of the interaction region. The distribution of the Stanton number shows that a strong amplification of the heat transfer occurs across the interaction, and the maximum values of thermal and dynamic loads are found in the case of cold wall. The analysis reveals that the fluctuating heat flux exhibits a strong intermittent behavior, characterized by ...

  10. An assessment of CFD-based wall heat transfer models in piston engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-04-26

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Only recently have experimental methods become available that enable accurate near-wall measurements to enhance simulation capability via advancing models. Initial results show crank-angle dependent discrepancies with respect to previously used boundary-layer models of up to 100%. However, available experimental data is quite sparse (only few data points on engine walls) and limited (available measurements are those of heat flux only). Predictive submodels are needed for medium-resolution ("engineering") LES and for unsteady Reynolds-averaged simulations (URANS). Recently, some research groups have performed DNS studies on engine-relevant conditions using simple geometries. These provide very useful data for benchmarking wall heat transfer models under such conditions. Further, a number of new and more sophisticated models have also become available in the literature which account for these engine-like conditions. Some of these have been incorporated while others of a more complex nature, which include solving additional partial differential equations (PDEs) within the thin boundary layer near the wall, are underway. These models will then be tested against the available DNS/experimental data in both SI (spark-ignition) and CI (compression-ignition) engines.

  11. Prototype solar heated hot water systems and double-walled heat exchangers. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    A collection of quarterly and monthly reports from Elcam, Inc., covering progress made from January 1, 1978, through September 30, 1978, is presented. Elcam, is developing two solar-heated hot water prototype systems and two heat exchangers. This effort consists of development, manufacture, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and system evaluation.

  12. The pulsations of boundary conditions – factor of the rapid wear on heat exchange surfaces in heterogeneous dispersed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodunkov, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of industrial furnace with a fluidized bed reactor. The data on the values of the coefficient of heat transfer, the quality of fluidization and mixing efficiency. In theory shows that there are significant variables of temperature gradients on the walls of the heat exchange elements are qualitative arguments about the causes of increased wear of heat exchange surfaces in a fluidized bed.

  13. Experimental and Computational Studies of Heat Transfer for Wall-type and Fin-type Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guochao; Xu, Peng; Gong, Linghui; Li, Laifeng; Zhang, Hengcheng; Li, Hongmei

    2017-12-01

    Wall-type heat exchangers (WTHX) and fin-type heat exchangers (FTHX) are attached to the first and second stage cold head of two G-M crycoolers respectively in the simulating experimental platform of the internal purifier (SEPEIP). WTHX and FTHX play a significant role in SEPEIP, WTHX is designed to remove heat from helium and freeze-out extremely few impurities, FTHX is for further cooling the helium. In this study, numerical simulation and experimental results for WTHX and FTHX are carried out. According to the comparison, the numerical results have a little discrepancy with the experimental results. However, the discrepancy is within the acceptable level. Finally, it is observed that the WTHX and FTHX are suitable to apply in the experimental system and are capable of guaranteeing a purifying function.

  14. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  15. Numerical study of heat transfer from a wall incorporating a phase change material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouttout A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of the thermal behavior of walls made up of construction materials used in Algeria and walls containing a phase change materials is presented. The model, based on the enthalpy formulation, is described by an equation of heat transfer. This equation is solved by an implicit method of finite differences and algorithm of Thomas. We analyzed the influence of the wall’s thickness and its composition on the evolution during the time of the temperature of the inside face of thewall.

  16. Influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Simone, E-mail: simone.moretti@usal.es; Raposo, Victor; Martinez, Eduardo [University of Salamanca, Plaza de los Caidos, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2016-06-07

    The domain wall depinning from a notch in a Permalloy nanostrip on top of a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate is studied theoretically under application of static magnetic fields and the injection of short current pulses. The influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning is explored self-consistently by coupling the magnetization dynamics in the ferromagnetic strip to the heat transport throughout the system. Our results indicate that Joule heating plays a remarkable role in these processes, resulting in a reduction in the critical depinning field and/or in a temporary destruction of the ferromagnetic order for typically injected current pulses. In agreement with experimental observations, similar pinning-depinning phase diagrams can be deduced for both current polarities when the Joule heating is taken into account. These observations, which are incompatible with the sole contribution of spin transfer torques, provide a deeper understanding of the physics underlying these processes and establish the real scope of the spin transfer torque. They are also relevant for technological applications based on current-induced domain-wall motion along soft strips.

  17. The causes of milk deposit formation on the walls of the heat exchangers during the heat treatment of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Matijević

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on finding the causes and preventing the formation of milk deposit are described in this paper.During the heat treatment of milk, an unwanted phenomenon occurs; the formation of milk deposit on heating surfaces of heat exchangers. This phenomenon causes the decrease of heat transfer coefficient as well as the pressure drop, it restricts the flow of milk, and causes additional production costs and increases production loss.The formation of milk deposit is a result of complex processes caused by thermal treatment of proteins and mineral substances in milk. Factors which cause milk deposit are: pH - value, the amount of proteins and mineral substances in milk, dissolved gases in milk, characteristics of heating surface, the difference in temperatures of milk and heating surfaces, and the regime of milk circulation. The chemical composition of milk can not be influenced, but the standards of heat treatment in order to minimise this phenomenon can, and that is precisely the topic of the latest researches.

  18. Liquid-Infused Smooth Surface for Improved Condensation Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hirotaka; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Moriya, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Ryohei; Sasaki, Kaichi; Togasawa, Ryo; Yamazaki, Taku; Manabe, Kengo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2017-09-12

    Control of vapor condensation properties is a promising approach to manage a crucial part of energy infrastructure conditions. Heat transfer by vapor condensation on superhydrophobic coatings has garnered attention, because dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with rough structures leads to favorable heat-transfer performance. However, pinned condensed water droplets within the rough structure and a high thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation of superhydrophobic surfaces limit their heat-transfer increase. Recently, slippery liquid-infused surfaces (SLIPS) have been investigated, because of their high water sliding ability and surface smoothness originating from the liquid layer. However, even on SLIPS, condensed water droplets are eventually pinned to degrade their heat-transfer properties after extended use, because the rough base layer is exposed as infused liquid is lost. Herein, we report a liquid-infused smooth surface named "SPLASH" (surface with π electron interaction liquid adsorption, smoothness, and hydrophobicity) to overcome the problems derived from the rough structures in previous approaches to obtain stable, high heat-transfer performance. The SPLASH displayed a maximum condensation heat-transfer coefficient that was 175% higher than that of an uncoated substrate. The SPLASH also showed higher heat-transfer performance and more stable dropwise condensation than superhydrophobic surfaces and SLIPS from the viewpoints of condensed water droplet mobility and the thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation. The effects of liquid-infused surface roughness and liquid viscosity on condensation heat transfer were investigated to compare heat-transfer performance. This research will aid industrial applications using vapor condensation.

  19. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of single walled carbon nanotubes for heating agent in photothermal therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, Syahril; Nagaoka, Ryo; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We present the theoretical investigation of the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the heating agent of photothermal therapy. In our model, the SWNT is modeled by rigid tube surrounded by cancer cells. In this model, we neglect the angle dependence of temperature and assume that the length of SWNT is much longer than the radius of tube. We calculated the temperature rise of the SWNT and its surrounding cancer cells during the laser heating by solving one-dimensional heat conduction equation in steady state condition. We found that the maximum temperature is located at the interface between SWNT and cancer cells. This maximum temperature is proportional to the square of SWNTs diameter and diameter of SWNTs depends on their chirality. These results extend our understanding of the temperature distribution in SWNT during the laser heating process and provide the suggested specification of SWNT for the improvement the photothermal therapy in the future.

  1. Automated Hybrid Microwave Heating for Lunar Surface Solidification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project addresses the need for a system that will provide automated lunar surface stabilization via hybrid microwave heating. Surface stabilization is...

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  3. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  4. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  5. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SURFACE CONSOLIDATION OF WALL PAINTINGS USING LIME NANO-SUSPENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vojtěchovský

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of the conservation of historical and cultural monuments, lime nanosuspensions are still a relatively new and unexplored material. This study examines their effect on the consolidation of architectural surfaces and, consequently, on wall paintings. Previous experiments showed that considerably deteriorated materials may not be adequately strengthened using only lime nano-suspensions. Therefore, the effects of their admixtures and gradual applications with silicic acid esters were examined. For verification, a simulation of a deteriorated lime-based paint layer was created on panels of plaster. The results of the consolidation were subsequently studied using objective (peeling test, water absorption capacity test, measuring colour changes using a mobile spectrophotometer and subjective methods (comparison of visual changes to a set standard and by testing cohesion using a cotton swab. The microstructure of a consolidated paint layer was studied with a scanning electron microscopy. Tests proved that with either individual lime-alcoholic suspensions or with successive applications and mixtures of silicic acid esters it is feasible to achieve good consolidation results, whilst the alkoxysilane content of the agent indisputably increases the consolidating effect of these materials.

  7. Heat transfer in MHD unsteady stagnation point flow with variable wall temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Soundalgekar, V.M.; Murty, T.V.R.; Takhar, H.S.

    ) (J~+ P, [ heated blunt-nosed cylinder whose wall temperature varies as Ax N is presented. Temparature profiles arc shown graphicaIIy for different values of N and the numerical values of the rate of heat transfer (- 0' (0», IJ...

  8. Simulations of Special Interior Ballistic Phenomena with and without Heat Transfer to Gun Tube Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    34Catlcurlion of Heat Trarsfer to the Gun Barrel WaLt ," J. Ballistics 6 (3), pp. 1518-1524, 1982. 7 Barlett , E.P., Anderson, L.W., Kendall, L.:!., ’Time...34Calculation of Heat Transfer to the Gun Barrel Wall," J. Ballistics 6 (3), pp. 1518-1524, 1982. 7. Barlett , E.P., Anderson, L.W., Kendall, R.M., "Time...47 HQS Santa Monica CA Only) Washington, DC 20505 90401-3297 I Foster Miller Associates General Applied Sciences Lab ATTN: A. Erickson ATTN: J. Erdos

  9. Measurement techniques for sensible and latent heat transfer coefficients during wall condensation, a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, V.; Rij, H.M. van.

    1989-11-01

    Radioactive fission product release as the consequence of a severe accident with nuclear installations needs to be studied in considerable detail in order to predict the source term hazard with acceptable accuracy. As far as the research on the fission product behaviour in containments is concerned the international effort has been concentrated around two large experimental programmes, DEMONA and LACE. Results of the bench-mark on 'Post-test calculation of thermal-hydraulic behaviour in DEMONA experiment B3 with various computer codes used in CEC member states', show still considerable differences and uncertainties due to poor knowledge of global heat transfer coefficients for the wall condensation in containments. The objective of this study is to provide an estimate of the accuracy with which the coefficient for sensible heat transfer during wall condensation can be measured. (H.W.). 15 refs.; 7 figs.; 9 tabs.

  10. Bubble detachment and lift-off diameters at a vertical heated wall for subcooled boiling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montout, Michael; Haynes, Pierre-Antoine; Peturaud, Pierre [EDF, R and D Division, Fluid Dynamics, Power Generation and Environnement Department, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Colin, Catherine [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee du Professeur Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of the NEPTUNE project jointly carried on by EDF, CEA, AREVA NP and IRSN (Guelfi et al. (2007)), the development of the NEPTUNE-CFD code aims at (among others) improving the prediction of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In this prospect, the modeling of boiling flows up to the DNB is of prime importance, and this presentation is devoted to one major related phenomenon, the wall-to-flow heat transfer in subcooled boiling flow. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of subcooled nucleate boiling has to provide the net vapor generation rate at the heated wall, as well as its related geometrical characteristic - either bubble diameter or interfacial area concentration (its velocity might also be useful). For this purpose, mechanistic models are used. Previous models (such as the widely used Kurul and Podowski model (1990)) are based on the bubble lift-off diameter, diameter from which the bubble leaves the wall to be swept along the bulk liquid flow. However, for a few years, new models (Basu et al. (2005) or Yeoh et al. (2008)) account for a finer phenomenology (bubble sliding along the heated wall) and require the knowledge of the bubble detachment diameter, diameter from which the bubble leaves its nucleation site to slide along the heated wall. Modeling these diameters is still an issue. On the one hand, several (semi-) empirical correlations are available in the open literature making it possible to provide the liftoff diameter (Uenal (1976), for instance), but they are still questionable; on the other hand, there is a great lack of information with respect to the evaluation of the detachment diameter. Therefore to progress on these concerns, an analytical work has been carried out. In a first step, a methodology providing detachment and lift-off diameters is proposed and applied. This approach is based on the resolution of a force balance model acting on a

  11. Failure analysis on unexpected wall thinning of heat-exchange tubes in ammonia evaporators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Meng Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A failure incident of heat-exchange tubes in ammonia evaporators, which suffered from unexpected wall thinning after only one-year service with respect to their original design lifetime of fifteen years, was reported and carefully analyzed. After overall inspection, many tube walls in the evaporators were found to experience severe degradations at both sides with distinct corroded defects and general cracking of corrosion layers. Thus, comprehensive investigations including external appearance, microscopic morphology and chemical composition were carried out by using a series of characterization methods. The analysis results demonstrated that the unexpected wall thinning of tubes was primarily ascribed to multiple corrosion factors including uniform corrosion, pitting and interaction behavior between them. Relative failure mechanisms were discussed in detail and prevention measures were also proposed for ammonia evaporators under similar operating condition.

  12. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  13. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  14. Investigation of the influence of a step change in surface roughness on turbulent heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Taylor, J. Keith; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    The use is studied of smooth heat flux gages on the otherwise very rough SSME fuel pump turbine blades. To gain insights into behavior of such installations, fluid mechanics and heat transfer data were collected and are reported for a turbulent boundary layer over a surface with a step change from a rough surface to a smooth surface. The first 0.9 m length of the flat plate test surface was roughened with 1.27 mm hemispheres in a staggered, uniform array spaced 2 base diameters apart. The remaining 1.5 m length was smooth. The effect of the alignment of the smooth surface with respect to the rough surface was also studied by conducting experiments with the smooth surface aligned with the bases or alternatively with the crests of the roughness elements. Stanton number distributions, skin friction distributions, and boundary layer profiles of temperature and velocity are reported and are compared to previous data for both all rough and all smooth wall cases. The experiments show that the step change from rough to smooth has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. It is concluded that use of smooth heat flux gages on otherwise rough surfaces could cause large errors.

  15. Convective heat transfer for a gaseous slip flow in micropipe and parallel-plate microchannel with uniform wall heat flux: effect of axial heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddout, Y.; Essaghir, E.; Oubarra, A.; Lahjomri, J.

    2017-12-01

    Thermally developing laminar slip flow through a micropipe and a parallel plate microchannel, with axial heat conduction and uniform wall heat flux, is studied analytically by using a powerful method of self-adjoint formalism. This method results from a decomposition of the elliptic energy equation into a system of two first-order partial differential equations. The advantage of this method over other methods, resides in the fact that the decomposition procedure leads to a selfadjoint problem although the initial problem is apparently not a self-adjoint one. The solution is an extension of prior studies and considers a first order slip model boundary conditions at the fluid-wall interface. The analytical expressions for the developing temperature and local Nusselt number in the thermal entrance region are obtained in the general case. Therefore, the solution obtained could be extended easily to any hydrodynamically developed flow and arbitrary heat flux distribution. The analytical results obtained are compared for select simplified cases with available numerical calculations and they both agree. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of flow in the thermal entrance region are strongly influenced by the axial heat conduction and rarefaction effects which are respectively characterized by Péclet and Knudsen numbers.

  16. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the local distribution of wall static pressure and the heat transfer coefficient on a rough flat plate impinged by a slot air jet. The experimental parameters include, nozzle-to-plate spacing (Z /D h = 0.5-10.0), axial distance from stagnation point ( x/D h ), size of detached rib ( b = 4-12 mm) and Reynolds number ( Re = 2500-20,000). The wall static pressure on the surface is recorded using a Pitot tube and a differential pressure transmitter. Infrared thermal imaging technique is used to capture the temperature distribution on the target surface. It is observed that, the maximum wall static pressure occurs at the stagnation point ( x/D h = 0) for all nozzle-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) and rib dimensions studied. Coefficient of wall static pressure ( C p ) decreases monotonically with x/D h . Sub atmospheric pressure is evident in the detached rib configurations for jet to plate spacing up to 6.0 for all ribs studied. Sub atmospheric region is stronger at Z/D h = 0.5 due to the fluid accelerating under the rib. As nozzle to plate spacing ( Z/D h ) increases, the sub-atmospheric region becomes weak and vanishes gradually. Reasonable enhancement in both C p as well as Nu is observed for the detached rib configuration. Enhancement is found to decrease with the increase in the rib width. The results of the study can be used in optimizing the cooling system design.

  17. Link between Surface and Subsurface Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Olesen, Folke; Goettsche, Frank; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat islands exist in all diverse layers of modern cities, such as surface and subsurface. While both layers are typically investigated separately, the coupling of surface and subsurface urban heat islands is insufficiently understood. Hence, this study focuses on the interrelation of both zones and the influence of additional underground heat sources, such as heated basements, on this interaction. Using satellite derived land surface temperatures and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements the spatial properties of both heat islands are compared. Significant correlations of 0.5 up to more than 0.8 are found between surface and subsurface urban heat islands. If groundwater flow is considered this correlation increases by approximately 10%. Next we analyzed the dissimilarities between both heat islands in order to understand the interaction between the urban surface and subsurface. We find that local groundwater hotspots under the city center and industrial areas are not revealed in satellite derived land surface temperatures. Overall groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures in 95% of the analyzed area due to the influence of below ground anthropogenic heat sources such as sewage systems, district heating systems, and especially elevated basement temperatures. Thus, an estimation method is proposed that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method regional groundwater temperatures can be accurately estimated with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. Since land surface temperatures and building densities are available from remote sensing, this method has the potential for a large scale estimations of urban groundwater temperatures. Thus, it is feasible to detect subsurface urban heat islands on a global level and to investigate sustainable geothermal potentials using satellite derived data.

  18. Analytical solution to laser short-pulse heating of microsized metal wire: volumetric and surface heat source considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yilbas, B.S; Al-Dweik, A.Y

    2012-01-01

    .... The volumetric heat source resembles absorption by irradiated field according to Lambert’s Beer law while a surface heat source represents short pulse heating through high intensity thermal contact at the surface...

  19. Measurements on the SOLARIX wall heating system; Messung SOLARIX-Wandheizsystem - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesch, P.

    2009-12-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes the SOLARIX wall-integrated heating system. The system features transparent heat insulation elements that are mounted on the east, south and west-facing sides of a building, as well as a photovoltaic installation on the balcony and terrace balustrades. The project's aims and the goals set for it are quoted. Also, problems encountered during the project are listed and changes made to the original project are discussed. Finally, 4 buildings were realised, three of which were built in a conventional manner to 'Minergie' low energy consumption standards. The construction of the transparent heat-insulating elements is described. Measurements made and results obtained are presented and discussed.

  20. Heating efficiency of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the first and second biological windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Laura Martínez; Haro-González, Patricia; Del Rosal, Blanca; Ramiro, Julio; Caamaño, A. J.; Carrasco, Elisa; Juarranz, Angeles; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Solé, José García; Jaque, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Quantum dot based-thermometry, in combination with double beam confocal microscopy and infrared thermal imaging, has been used to investigate the heating efficiency of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) under optical excitation within the first (808 nm) and second (1090 nm) biological windows as well as in the spectral region separating them (980 nm). It has been found that for the three excitation wavelengths the heating efficiency of MWCNTs (10 nm in diameter and 1.5 μm in length) is close to 50%. Despite this ``flat'' heating efficiency, we have found that the excitation wavelength is, indeed, critical during in vivo experiments due to the spectral dependence of both tissue absorption and scattering coefficients. It has been concluded that efficiency and selectivity of in vivo photothermal treatments based on MWCNTs are simultaneously optimized when laser irradiation lies within the first or second biological window.

  1. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  2. Influence of environment factors on humidity conditions of selected external wall solutions in a heated building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Contemporary single-family houses in Poland are often built during 3 quarters of a year (spring to autumn) are usually settled in a winter season. It is a special case when exploitation humidity coincides with technological one, causing unfavourable humidity conditions during the first years of exploitation. In consequence, thermal parameters of partitions differ from those assumed in the project. In construction stage the humidity state of a wall stabilizes as a result of water: associated with storage, entered technologically during wall construction and plastering, coming from rainfall. Thermo-insulation materials are built-in at dry state. During erection and exploitation of a building their thermal conductivity is changing depending on humidity conditions. According to building rules, construction humidity should be removed from a partition before the building transfer to usage, because it lowers the thermal partition insulation ability and increases air humidity of building interior. Walls are plastered and insulated in condition of simultaneous presence of atmospheric and technological humidity which cause special humidity condition during first years of exploitation. As a consequence, heating costs are substantially higher. In this article the results of simulation are shown performed with WUFI ®PRO 5 software, which was intended to define the time necessary for reaching the stabilised humidity in selected solutions of two-layer walls applied in a heated building. In the research performed, the partition orientation along geographic directions, short and long wave radiation, and environment humidity (air humidity, driving rain) coincidence with technological humidity in assumed wall solutions were taken into account.

  3. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  4. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  5. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  6. Heat and mass transfer analysis of unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with moving porous walls and medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical study of heat and mass transfer analysis in a viscous unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with porous walls and medium in the presence of metallic nanoparticles. The two cases for effective thermal conductivity are discussed in the analysis through H-C model. The impacts of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the issue are talked about. Under the patronage of small values of permeable Reynolds number and relaxation/contraction parameter, we locate that, when wall contraction is together with suction, flow turning is encouraged close to the wall where the boundary layer is shaped. On the other hand, when the wall relaxation is coupled with injection, the flow adjacent to the porous walls decreased. The outcome of the exploration may be beneficial for applications of biotechnology. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analyzed.

  7. Heat transfer nanofluid based on curly ultra-long multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncel, Sławomir; Zniszczoł, Aurelia; Pawlyta, Mirosława; Labisz, Krzysztof; Dzido, Grzegorz

    2017-08-01

    The main challenge in the use of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as key components of nanofluids is to transfer excellent thermal properties from individual nanotubes into the bulk systems. We present studies on the performance of heat transfer nanofluids based on ultra-long ( 2 mm), curly MWCNTs - in the background of various other nanoC-sp2, i.e. oxidized MWCNTs, commercially available Nanocyl™ MWCNTs and spherical carbon nanoparticles (SCNs). The nanofluids prepared via ultrasonication from water and propylene glycol were studied in terms of heat conductivity and heat transfer in a scaled up thermal circuit containing a copper helical heat exchanger. Ultra-long curly MWCNT (1 wt.%) nanofluids (stabilized with Gum Arabic in water) emerged as the most thermally conducting ones with a 23-30%- and 39%-enhancement as compared to the base-fluids for water and propylene glycol, respectively. For turbulent flows (Re = 8000-11,000), the increase of heat transfer coefficient for the over-months stable 1 wt.% ultra-long MWCNT nanofluid was found as high as >100%. The findings allow to confirm that longer MWCNTs are promising solid components in nanofluids and hence to predict their broader application in heat transfer media.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  9. Influence of surface anisotropy on domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, N. A.; Serebryakova, O. N.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that surface domain structure arises in magnetic nanotube with uniaxial anisotropy if surface anisotropy constant is negative and sufficiently high in absolute value. The surface magnetic anisotropy affects also the structure and dynamics of a head-to-head domain wall propagating along the nanotube axis in applied magnetic field. The hopping mode is observed for stationary movement of a head-to-head domain wall. The average speed of the domain wall in the hopping mode is found to be several times less than the stationary velocity of the wall in the absence of surface anisotropy. This effect is important for various applications where fast propagation of the domain wall along the sample is essential.

  10. Influence of metal frame on heat protection properties of a polystyrene concrete wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetkov Nikolay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of novel thermal-efficient building materials and technologies that allow increasing the level of thermal protection of external envelope structures and reducing the time for construction are of practical interest and represent a relevant task in the conditions of rapidly changing and increasing requirements to energy efficiency of buildings. This research aims at simulating the process of spatial heat transfer in a multilayer non-uniform structure of an external cast-in-place framed wall produced from polystyrene concrete with a stay-in-place formwork. Based on the physico-mathematical model developed with the use of ANSYS and COMSOL software complexes, parametric analysis of the impact of various factors on thermal behavior of the external wall was performed with the account of heat-stressed frame elements. The nature of temperature fields distribution in a polystyrene concrete structure was defined, and its thermal protection properties were investigated. The impact of a metal frame on thermal protection properties of a wall was found to be insignificant.

  11. Dynamics of the collision of a vortex ring with a vertical heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, G.; Palacios-Morales, C. A.; Zenit, R.; Solorio-Ordaz, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    We study the dynamics of the impact of a vortex ring with a vertical heated plate (at constant temperature). Laminar vortex rings were generated with a piston cylinder arrangement. The vertical wall is heated by a thermal bath which is held at constant temperature producing a laminar and stable thermal boundary layer. Measurements of the 2D velocity field were obtained with a PIV technique. The experimental results for the isothermal case are in agreement with previous investigations reported in the literature. To avoid azimuthal instabilities, we mainly conducted experiments for L /D0 = 1 (where L is the piston displacement and D0 is the cylinder inner diameter) with different wall temperatures and vortex translation velocities. For this case, secondary vortices were not observed. Using ink visualization we observed the evolution of the vortex shape. The initial circular shape evolves into a ``cat head'' shape after reaching the wall. The top and bottom regions of the vortex reduce and increase their vorticity, respectively. The sides are stretched and convected. An analysis of the different mechanisms leading to this shape evolution is presented and discussed.

  12. Full velocity-scalar probability density function computation of heated channel flow with wall function approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Wacławczyk, Marta; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2003-05-01

    A joint velocity-scalar probability density function (PDF) method is presented to model and simulate turbulent flows with passive inert scalars (here temperature). The full PDF approach is applied for wall-bounded flows. In the present work, the boundary conditions are imposed in the logarithmic region and the modeling is therefore performed in the wall-function spirit. The PDF equation is solved by a Monte Carlo method and the whole approach appears as a Lagrangian simulation using stochastic particles. The purpose of the work is to analyze the behavior of classical PDF models in the near-wall region and to develop new particle boundary conditions for the velocity and scalars attached to each particle. First of all, the logarithmic region is described as an equilibrium zone and resulting analytical formulas for second-order temperature-velocity statistics , , are derived. Boundary conditions for scalars are then developed and formulated in terms of instantaneous particle variables. These results are useful to discuss consistency issues between the formulation of scalar mixing models and the statement of boundary conditions. Finally, heated channel flow is simulated with a stand-alone PDF code for two different heat-flux conditions and results are compared with available direct numerical simulation and experimental data.

  13. Revised Estimate of Earth's Surface Heat Flow: 47 +- 2 TW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. H.; Davies, D. R.

    2012-04-01

    Earth's surface heat flow provides a fundamental constraint on solid Earth dynamics. However, deriving an estimate of the total surface heat flux is complex, due to the inhomogeneous distribution of heat flow measurements and difficulties in measuring heat flux in young oceanic crust, arising due to hydrothermal circulation. A database of 38347 measurements (provided by G. Laske & G. Masters), representing a 55% increase on the number of measurements used previously, and the methods of Geographical Information Science (GIS), is used to derive a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux (Davies & Davies, 2010). To account for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust, we use a model estimate of the heat flux, following the work of Jaupart et al., 2007; while for the rest of the globe, in an attempt to overcome the inhomogeneous distribution of measurements, we develop an average for different geological units. Two digital geology data sets are used to define the global geology: (i) continental geology - Hearn et al., 2003; and (ii) the global data-set of CCGM - Commission de la Carte Géologique du Monde, 2000. This leads to > 93,000 polygons defining Earth's geology. The influence of clustering is limited by intersecting the geology polygons with a 1 by 1 degree (at the equator) equal area grid. The average heat flow is evaluated for each geology class. The contribution of each geology class to the global surface heat flow is derived by multiplying this estimated average surface heat flux with the area of that geology class. The surface heat flow contributions of all the geology classes are summed. For Antarctica we use an estimate based on depth to Curie temperature and include a 1TW contribution from hot-spots in young ocean age. Geology classes with less than 50 readings are excluded. The raw data suggests that this method of correlating heat flux with geology has some power. Our revised estimate for Earth's global surface heat flux is 47 ± 2 TW

  14. Influence of Ear Surface Area on Heat Tolerance of Composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relative importance of ear surface area on heat tolerance of composite rabbit population was evaluated. The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons, climatic data were recorded to obtain categorical heat stress index. Physiological parameters, growth performance, ear length and ear width of the rabbits ...

  15. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  16. Atmostpheric simulations of extreme surface heating episodes on simple hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.E. Heilman

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonhydrostatic atmospheric model was used to simulate the circulation patterns (wind and vorticity) and turbulence energy fields associated with lines of extreme surface heating on simple two-dimensional hills. Heating-line locations and ambient crossflow conditions were varied to qualitatively determine the impact of terrain geometry on the...

  17. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  18. Bubble Formation on a Wall in Cross-Flowing Liquid and Surrounding Fluid Motion,With and Without Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Avijit; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Application of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems for space-based thermal management and for the HEDS program demands a precise control of bubble size distribution in liquid. The necessity of bulk liquid motion for controlling bubble size and frequency in the space environment has been suggested by recent studies on pool, forced convection boiling and bubble formation in flowing liquid. The present work, consisting of two parts, explores bubble generation at wall in a cross-flowing liquid, i.e., in a forced convection boiling configuration. A schematic is shown. The first part looks into the bubble formation process under isothermal conditions in a reduced gravity environment, by injecting gas through a hole in the wall of a flowing liquid channel. In the latter part with channel wall heating, flow and temperature fields near a single bubble are studied under normal (1-g) and micro-gravity (mu-g) conditions. The objective of the isothermal experiments is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter on bubble formation. Data were taken mainly under reduced gravity conditions but some data were taken in normal gravity for comparison. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted aboard the NASA DC-9 Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The results show that the process of bubble formation and detachment depends on gravity, the orifice diameter (D(sub N)), the gas flow rate (Q(sub g)), and the liquid cross-flow velocity (U(sub L)). The reduced gravity data are shown. The data are analyzed based on a force balance, and two different detachment mechanisms are identified. When the gas momentum is large, the bubble detaches from the injection orifice as the gas momentum overcomes the attaching effects of liquid drag and inertia. The surface tension force is much reduced because a large part of the bubble pinning edge at the orifice is lost as the bubble axis is tilted by the liquid flow. When the gas momentum is small

  19. Application of differential transformation method in micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer through permeable walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzaaghaian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we applied Differential Transformation Method (DTM to study micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer through a channel with permeable walls. In order to verify the accuracy and validity of the application of this method to this problem, comparison with numerical method (NUM is taken into account. Results reveal that DTM is an appropriate method for approximating solutions of the problem while it is smooth and straightforward to implement. The effect of significant parameters such as the Reynolds number, micro rotation/angular velocity and the Peclet number on the stream function, temperature distribution and concentration characteristics of the fluid, is discussed.

  20. Numerical Simulation of a Turbulent Flow Over a Backward Facing Step With Heated Wall: Effect of Pulsating Velocity and Oscillating Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate prediction of the flow and the thermal boundary layer is required to properly simulate gas to wall heat transfer in a turbulent flow. This is studied with a view to application to gas turbine combustors. A typical gas turbine combustion chamber flow presents similarities with the

  1. Purification of Single-Wall carbon nanotubes by heat treatment and supercritical extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bertoncini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arc discharge is the most practical method for the synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. However, the production of SWCNT by this technique has low selectivity and yield, requiring further purification steps. This work is a study of purification of SWCNT by heat treatment in an inert atmosphere followed by supercritical fluid extraction. The raw arc discharge material was first heat-treated at 1250 °C under argon. The nanotubes were further submitted to an extraction process using supercritical CO2 as solvent. A surfactant (tributylphosphate, TBP and a chelating agent (hexafluoroacetylacetone, HFA were used together to eliminate metallic impurities from the remaining arc discharge catalysts. Analysis of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES showed an efficient removal of iron and cobalt (>80%. The purified nanotubes were further analyzed by TGA and Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Could the heat sink effect of blood flow inside large vessels protect the vessel wall from thermal damage during RF-assisted surgical resection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Suárez, Ana; Trujillo, Macarena; Burdío, Fernando; Andaluz, Anna; Berjano, Enrique

    2014-08-01

    To assess by means of computer simulations whether the heat sink effect inside a large vessel (portal vein) could protect the vessel wall from thermal damage close to an internally cooled electrode during radiofrequency (RF)-assisted resection. First,in vivo experiments were conducted to validate the computational model by comparing the experimental and computational thermal lesion shapes created around the vessels. Computer simulations were then carried out to study the effect of different factors such as device-tissue contact, vessel position, and vessel-device distance on temperature distributions and thermal lesion shapes near a large vessel, specifically the portal vein. The geometries of thermal lesions around the vessels in the in vivo experiments were in agreement with the computer results. The thermal lesion shape created around the portal vein was significantly modified by the heat sink effect in all the cases considered. Thermal damage to the portal vein wall was inversely related to the vessel-device distance. It was also more pronounced when the device-tissue contact surface was reduced or when the vessel was parallel to the device or perpendicular to its distal end (blade zone), the vessel wall being damaged at distances less than 4.25 mm. The computational findings suggest that the heat sink effect could protect the portal vein wall for distances equal to or greater than 5 mm, regardless of its position and distance with respect to the RF-based device.

  3. Experimental Research on the Thermal Performance of Composite PCM Hollow Block Walls and Validation of Phase Transition Heat Transfer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A type of concrete hollow block with typical structure and a common phase change material (PCM were adopted. The PCM was filled into the hollow blocks by which the multiform composite PCM hollow blocks were made. The temperature-changing hot chamber method was used to test the thermal performance of block walls. The enthalpy method and the effective heat capacity method were used to calculate the heat transfer process. The results of the two methods can both reach the reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The unsteady-state thermal performance of the PCM hollow block walls is markedly higher than that of the wall without PCM. Furthermore, if the temperature of the PCM in the wall does not exceed its phase transition temperature range, the PCM wall can reach high thermal performance.

  4. Grain surface heating in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Muratov, M. M.

    2017-05-01

    The surface temperature of the dust particle in cryogenic complex plasmas at gas pressure 0.6-10 Pa is considered. It is shown that at low pressure the dust particle surface temperature is significantly higher than that of the background gas, as a result of which the atom drag force is comparable with the screened Coulomb interaction and even exceeds it for the large-size dust particles. As the gas temperature near the grain surface is a slowly decreasing function of distance with asymptotic ˜1/r behavior, for correct description of the cryogenic complex plasma at low gas pressure, it is important to include effects related to the dust particle surface temperature.

  5. Heat Rejection Concepts for Lunar Fission Surface Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for lunar surface Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for surface power applications. Surface reactors may be used for the moon to power human outposts enabling extended stays and closed loop life support. The Brayton Heat Rejection System (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Space Brayton conversion system designs tend to optimize at efficiencies of about 20 to 25 percent with radiator temperatures in the 400 K to 600 K range. A notional HRS was developed for a 100 kWe-class Brayton power system that uses a pumped water heat transport loop coupled to a water heat pipe radiator. The radiator panels employ a tube and fin construction consisting of regularly-spaced circular heat pipes contained within two composite facesheets. The water heat pipes interface to the coolant through curved sections partially contained within the cooling loop. The paper evaluates various design parameters including radiator panel orientation, coolant flow path, and facesheet thickness. Parameters were varied to compare design options on the basis of H2O pump pressure rise and required power, heat pipe unit power and radial flux, radiator area, radiator panel areal mass, and overall HRS mass.

  6. Lunar Dust on Heat Rejection System Surfaces: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Heat rejection from power systems will be necessary for human and robotic activity on the lunar surface. Functional operation of such heat rejection systems is at risk of degradation as a consequence of dust accumulation. The Apollo astronauts encountered marked degradation of performance in heat rejection systems for the lunar roving vehicle, science packages, and other components. Although ground testing of dust mitigation concepts in support of the Apollo mission identified mitigation tools, the brush concept adopted by the Apollo astronauts proved essentially ineffective. A better understanding of the issues associated with the impact of lunar dust on the functional performance of heat rejection systems and its removal is needed as planning gets underway for human and robotic missions to the Moon. Renewed emphasis must also be placed on ground testing of pristine and dust-covered heat rejection system surfaces to quantify degradation and address mitigation concepts. This paper presents a review of the degradation in performance of heat rejection systems encountered on the lunar surface to-date, and will discuss current activities underway to evaluate the durability of candidate heat rejection system surfaces and current dust mitigation concepts.

  7. Simulation of surface cracks measurement in first walls by laser spot array thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Qiu, Jinxin; Liu, Haocheng; Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    The inspection of surface cracks in first walls (FW) is very important to ensure the safe operation of the fusion reactors. In this paper, a new laser excited thermography technique with using laser spot array source is proposed for the surface cracks imaging and evaluation in the FW with an intuitive and non-contact measurement method. Instead of imaging a crack by scanning a single laser spot and superimposing the local discontinuity images with the present laser excited thermography methods, it can inspect a relatively large area at one measurement. It does not only simplify the measurement system and data processing procedure, but also provide a faster measurement for FW. In order to investigate the feasibility of this method, a numerical code based on finite element method (FEM) is developed to simulate the heat flow and the effect of the crack geometry on the thermal wave fields. An imaging method based on the gradient of the thermal images is proposed for crack measurement with the laser spot array thermography method.

  8. Heating comes from the walls in Trebsen Castle; EWS: In Schloss Trebsen heizen die Waende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Wall temperature control is an alternative to the usual methods of indoor heating and moisture proofing in historical monuments. It is largely effected by warm water pipes running in the outer walls or by skirting board pipes which are laid throughout the foundations and along the perimeters of all storeys. In particularly critical places such as thermal bridges at windows and doors skirting board pipes can be supplemented by other pipes as necessary. This paper presents the advantages of wall temperature control for the example of Trebsen Castle. [Deutsch] Die Wand-Temperierung ist eine Alternative zu den ueblichen Methoden der Gebaeudebeheizung und des Feuchteschutzes denkmalgeschuetzter Gebaeude. Sie wirkt im wesentlichen ueber Warmwasser-Heizrohre in den Aussenwaenden oder Sockelleisten-Rohre, die an allen Fundamenten und aeusseren Stockwerksgrenzen auf der ganzen Laenge verlegt werden und bei Bedarf durch weitere Heizrohre an besonders kritischen Stellen, wie Waermebruecken an Fenstern und Tueren, ergaenzt werden. Die Vorteile der Wandtemperierung, speziell fuer das Schloss Trebsen werden vorgestellt. (orig./MSK)

  9. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  10. Control of surface potential at polar domain walls in a nonpolar oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Hicher, P.; Haumont, R.; Aktas, O.; Salje, E. K. H.; Tortech, L.; Mathieu, C.; Martinotti, D.; Barrett, N.

    2017-12-01

    Ferroic domain walls could play an important role in microelectronics, given their nanometric size and often distinct functional properties. Until now, devices and device concepts were mostly based on mobile domain walls in ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials. A less explored path is to make use of polar domain walls in nonpolar ferroelastic materials. Indeed, while the polar character of ferroelastic domain walls has been demonstrated, polarization control has been elusive. Here, we report evidence for the electrostatic signature of the domain-wall polarization in nonpolar calcium titanate (CaTi O3 ). Macroscopic mechanical resonances excited by an ac electric field are observed as a signature of a piezoelectric response caused by polar walls. On the microscopic scale, the polarization in domain walls modifies the local surface potential of the sample. Through imaging of surface potential variations, we show that the potential at the domain wall can be controlled by electron injection. This could enable devices based on nondestructive information readout of surface potential.

  11. Modeling heat efficiency, flow and scale-up in the corotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter; Karlson, Torben

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of two different scale corotating disc scraped surface heat exchangers (CDHE) was performed experimentally. The findings were compared to predictions from a finite element model. We find that the model predicts well the flow pattern of the two CDHE's investigated. The heat transfer...... performance predicted by the model agrees well with experimental observations for the laboratory scale CDHE whereas the overall heat transfer in the scaled-up version was not in equally good agreement. The lack of the model to predict the heat transfer performance in scale-up leads us to identify the key...

  12. A sound idea: Manipulating domain walls in magnetic nanowires using surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J.; Bryan, M. T.; Cooper, J. D.; Virbule, A.; Cunningham, J. E.; Hayward, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method of pinning and propagating domain walls in artificial multiferroic nanowires using electrically induced surface acoustic waves. Using finite-element micromagnetic simulations and 1D semi-analytical modelling, we demonstrate how a pair of interdigitated acoustic transducers can remotely induce an array of attractive domain wall pinning sites by forming a standing stress/strain wave along a nanowire's length. Shifts in the frequencies of the surface acoustic waves allow multiple domain walls to be synchronously transported at speeds up to 50 ms-1. Our study lays the foundation for energy-efficient domain wall devices that exploit the low propagation losses of surface acoustic waves to precisely manipulate large numbers of data bits.

  13. Heat and mass transfer at a free surface with diabatic boundaries in a single-species system under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the heat and mass transfer at a free surface under microgravity conditions. The SOURCE-II (Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment) experiment was performed on a suborbital flight in February 2012 from Esrange in North Sweden. It provided representative data with respect to solid, liquid, and vapor temperatures as well as the visible surface position. The objectives were to quantify the deformation of the free liquid surface and to correlate the apparent contact angle to a characteristic temperature difference between subcooled liquid and superheated wall. Furthermore, the influence of evaporation and condensation at the liquid/vapor interface and at the superheated wall must be taken into account to analyze heat and mass fluxes due to a characteristic temperature difference. In the following, we show evidently that the magnitude of the apparent contact angle depends on the exerted specific pressurizations of the vapor phase during the experiment and hence on the change in the saturation temperature at the free surface. The characteristic temperature difference is defined with respect to the wall temperature in the vicinity of the contact line and the saturation temperature. Therefore, apparent contact angle and temperature difference can be correlated and indicate a specific characteristic. Concerning the heat and mass transfer at the free liquid surface and the contact line, two different methods are presented to evaluate the net mass due to phase change within a certain time interval. In the first approach, the mass flow rate is calculated by means of the ideal gas law and its derivatives with respect to temperature and pressure. The second approach calculates the heat flux as well as the mass flux at the wall and in the region of the free liquid surface. In these cases, a specific heat transfer coefficient and a thermal boundary layer thickness are used.

  14. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-07

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms.

  15. High performance heat sink for surface mount applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Stephen A.; Levasseur, Robert D.

    Surface-mounted electronic module configurations are sensitive to thermal cycling because the reduced compliance between the component and module increases the thermally induced strain in the solder joint. Providing a thermal match between the component and the module reduces this strain, reduces low-cycle fatigue damage, and increases solder joint life. One way of achieving this thermal match is through the use of a thermally matched heat sink. In addition to having the required coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), heat sinks for surface-mount avionic configurations require low weight and high thermal conductivity. A heat sink has been developed that has thermal conductivity close to aluminum, a CTE close to ceramic, and a weight density only 8 percent higher than aluminum. The flexural modulus of this heat sink is 40 percent higher than aluminum, which results in improved vibration performance.

  16. Research of characteristics slot-hole heat exchanger with the developed surface of heat exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkin E. C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal characteristics of multichannel slot-hole heat exchanger with the developed surface of heat exchange inside the opened-cycle water cooling system are experimentally investigated. Graphic dependences of average value of temperature of the simulator of a heat current and temperatures of the heat exchanger base are presented on tapped-off power. Dependences of tapped-off power and hydraulic losses on the of water consumption are given. It is shown, that use of developed slot-hole heat exchanger provides higher values of tapped-off power as compared to well-known two-channel slot-hole heat exchanger: at the temperature of heat-generating component simulator of +60°С the tapped-off power increases with 307 up to 750 W. Recommendations on increase of adaptability of slot-hole heat exchanger manufacturing are given. Heat exchanger is suitable for application in microprocessors and others heat-generating components and electronic equipment units cooling.

  17. Surface heat budget at the Nordic Seas in Lagrangian observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Lama, Marta S.; Isachsen, Pål E.; Koszalka, Inga; Lacasce, Joseph H.

    2014-05-01

    In the Nordic Seas, the warm, inflowing Atlantic Water is cooled until it is dense enough to sink. Thereafter it circulates at depth, eventually feeding the North Atlantic Deep Water. The air-sea interaction which facilitates this cooling is a complex process involving diverse phenomena, from surface heating to turbulent entrainment at the base of the ocean surface mixed layer. In the present study, we use 486 freely-drifting surface buoys to observe temperature changes on water parcels and the response to air-sea heat fluxes. Such Lagrangian observations advantageously 'filter out' horizontal heat fluxes, since the buoys are advected by the flow, allowing one to focus on the vertical exchanges. We examine the temporal evolution of temperature on the drifters and the correlations with surface heat fluxes, obtained from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The frequency spectra indicate a clear ω-2 dependence at frequencies higher than roughly 1/40 days-1. The temperature fluctuations on the other hand are correlated with surface fluxes only at the longer time scales. We then show how the Lagrangian temperature can be represented as a stochastic process, with a deterministic portion determined by the low frequency atmospheric forcing and a white noise perturbation. This is in line with previous studies of the ocean surface response to stochastic wind forcing. What distinguishes the present model is the deterministic part, which must account for the gradual cooling of the water parcels.

  18. On prediction of turbulent heat transfer in the framework of Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation with Wall Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritskevich, M. S.; Garbaruk, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    An investigation of Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES) with Δy +-insensitive Near Wall Treatment (NWT) for prediction of turbulent heat transfer is performed in the framework of general-purpose CFD code ANSYS-Fluent for both fully attached and separated flows. The obtained results show that the considered approach is capable to predict the mean and RMS temperature with sufficient accuracy on the grids with the wall-adjacent step of about 1% of the velocity boundary layer thickness.

  19. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-01-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g., the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate "point-particle" analysis, we show analytically that -- owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall -- such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial "swimmers" exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change ...

  1. The drop evaporation on a heated substrate with single wall nanotubes coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A. A.; Zaitsev, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    Evaporation of a sessile nanoliter water droplet was investigated experimentally at the substrate temperature of 30 °C. The studies were performed on the two substrates made of copper. One of them had no coating and was polished to the root mean square roughness of 20 nm. Another one was coated with single wall nanotubes (the root mean square roughness is 62 nm). The research has shown that specific rate of evaporation (mass loss per unit of the drop surface area) on the substrate with nanotubes coating is up to 20 percent higher in comparison with the substrate without coating.

  2. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF HEAT EXCHANGE IN DIRECT FLAT CHANNELS AND DIRECT ROUND PIPES WITH ROUGH WALLS UNDER THE SYMMETRIC HEAT SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I E. Lobanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of present work was to carry out mathematical modelling of heat transfer with symmetrical heating in flat channels and round pipes with rough walls.Methods. The calculation was carried out using the L'Hôpital-Bernoulli's method. The solution of the problem of intensified heat transfer in a round tube with rough walls was obtained using the Lyon's integral.Results. Different from existing theories, a methodology of theoretical computational heat transfer determination for flat rough channels and round pipes with rough walls is developed on the basis of the principle of full viscosity superposition in a turbulent boundary layer. The analysis of the calculated heat transfer and hydroresistivity values for flat rough channels and round rough pipes shows that the increase in heat transfer is always less than the corresponding increase in hydraulic resistance, which is a disadvantage as compared to channels with turbulators, with all else being equal. The results of calculating the heat transfer for channels with rough walls in an extended range of determinant parameters, which differ significantly from the corresponding data for the channels with turbulators, determine the level of heat exchange intensification.Conclusion. An increase in the calculated values of the relative average heat transfer Nu/NuGL for flat rough channels and rough pipes with very high values of the relative roughness is significantly contributed by both an increase in the relative roughness height and an increase in the Reynolds number Re. In comparison with empirical dependencies, the main advantage of solutions for averaged heat transfer in rough flat channels and round pipes under symmetrical thermal load obtained according to the developed theory is that they allow the calculation of heat exchange in rough pipes to be made in the case of large and very large relative heights of roughness protrusions, including large Reynolds numbers, typical for pipes

  3. The roles of thermal insulation and heat storage in the energy performance of the wall materials: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Linshuang; Ye, Hong

    2016-04-07

    A high-performance envelope is the prerequisite and foundation to a zero energy building. The thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of a wall are two thermophysical properties that strongly influence the energy performance. Although many case studies have been performed, the results failed to give a big picture of the roles of these properties in the energy performance of an active building. In this work, a traversal study on the energy performance of a standard room with all potential wall materials was performed for the first time. It was revealed that both heat storage materials and insulation materials are suitable for external walls. However, the importances of those materials are distinct in different situations: the heat storage plays a primary role when the thermal conductivity of the material is relatively high, but the effect of the thermal insulation is dominant when the conductivity is relatively low. Regarding internal walls, they are less significant to the energy performance than the external ones, and they need exclusively the heat storage materials with a high thermal conductivity. These requirements for materials are consistent under various climate conditions. This study may provide a roadmap for the material scientists interested in developing high-performance wall materials.

  4. HEAT INSULATING LIME DRY MORTARS FOR FINISHING OF WALLS MADE OF FOAM CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganina Valentina Ivanovna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different aerated mortars are used for pargeting of walls made of aerated concrete. Though the regulatory documents don’t specify the dependence of plaster density from the density grade of gas-concrete blocks. In case of facing of gas-concrete blocks with the grade D500 using plaster mortars with the density 1400…1600 km/m3 there occurs a dismatch in the values of thermal insulation and vapor permeability of the plaster and base. The authors suggest using dry mortars for finishing of gas-concrete block of the grades D500 и D600, which allow obtaining facing thermal insulating coatings. The efficiency of using four different high-porous additives in the lime dry mortar was compared. They were: hollow glass microspheres, aluminosilicate ash microspheres, expanded vermiculite sand, expanded pearlitic sand. The high efficiency of hollow glass microspheres in heat insulating finishing mortars compared to other fillers is proved.

  5. Antenna-coupled terahertz radiation from joule-heated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muthee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter an experimental method is introduced that allows detection of terahertz (THz radiation from arrays of joule-heated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs, by coupling this radiation through integrated antennas and a silicon lens. The radiation forms a diffraction-limited beam with a total maximum radiated power of 450 nW, significantly greater than the power estimated from Nyquist thermal noise (8 nW. The physical radiation process is unknown at this stage, but possible explanations for the high radiated power are discussed briefly. The emission has a typical bandwidth of 1.2 THz and can be tuned to different frequencies by changing the dimensions of the antennas. Arrays of the devices could be integrated in CMOS integrated circuits, and find application in THz systems, such as in near-range medical imaging.

  6. Scrutiny of underdeveloped nanofluid MHD flow and heat conduction in a channel with porous walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fakour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in channel with permeable walls in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is investigated. Least square method (LSM for computing approximate solutions of nonlinear differential equations governing the problem. We have tried to show reliability and performance of the present method compared with the numerical method (Runge–Kutta fourth-rate to solve this problem. The influence of the four dimensionless numbers: the Hartmann number, Reynolds number, Prandtl number and Eckert number on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are considered. The results show analytical present method is very close to numerically method. In general, increasing the Reynolds and Hartman number is reduces the nanofluid flow velocity in the channel and the maximum amount of temperature increase and increasing the Prandtl and Eckert number will increase the maximum amount of theta.

  7. Study on the L–H transition power threshold with RF heating and lithium-wall coating on EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Xu, G.S.; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency (RF) heating and lithium-wall coating is investigated experimentally on EAST for two sets of walls: an all carbon wall (C) and molybdenum chamber and a carbon divertor (Mo/C). For both sets of walls...... dependence of the L–H power threshold, namely an increase below a minimum density, was identified in the Mo/C wall for the first time. For the C wall only the single-step L–H transition with limited injection power is observed whereas also the so-called dithering L–H transition is observed in the Mo/C wall...... Ploss increases with neutral density near the lower X-point in EAST with the Mo/C wall, consistent with previous results in the C wall (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 072001). These findings suggest that the edge neutral density, the ion ∇B drift as well as the divertor pumping capability play important...

  8. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  9. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  10. Heat transfer by laminar flow of an elastico-viscous liquid along a plane wall with periodic suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, J. S.; Chaudhury, N. K.

    1980-11-01

    The problem of heat transfer by the laminar flow of an elastico-viscous liquid along a plane wall with periodic suction has been considered. A perturbation technique has been used to obtain an approximate solution of the differential equations. The flow phenomenon has been characterized by the non-dimensional parameters like the elastic number ( S), the Reynolds number ( R), the Prandtl number ( P) and the Eckert number ( E). The effects of these parameters on the temperature distributions and the rate of heat transfer at the wall have been studied.

  11. Hybrid Heat Pipes for Lunar and Martian Surface and High Heat Flux Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Mohammed T.; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel hybrid wick heat pipes are developed to operate against gravity on planetary surfaces, operate in space carrying power over long distances and act as thermosyphons on the planetary surface for Lunar and Martian landers and rovers. These hybrid heat pipes will be capable of operating at the higher heat flux requirements expected in NASA's future spacecraft and on the next generation of polar rovers and equatorial landers. In addition, the sintered evaporator wicks mitigate the start-up problems in vertical gravity aided heat pipes because of large number of nucleation sites in wicks which will allow easy boiling initiation. ACT, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center, are working together on the Advanced Passive Thermal experiment (APTx) to test and validate the operation of a hybrid wick VCHP with warm reservoir and HiK"TM" plates in microgravity environment on the ISS.

  12. Study of heat transfer conditions at the wall of an ingot heated by electron gun; Etude des conditions d'echange thermique a la paroi d'un lingot chauffe par un canon a electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saturnin, A.; Triffart, B. [CEA Vallee du Rhone, Dept. de Technologie de l' Enrichissement (DCC/DTE/STS), 26 - Pierrelatte (France)

    2000-07-01

    variation and the heat flux {phi} at the crucible wall as a function of time. This operation can be repeated for each, temperature measurement in the crucible. A heat flux mapping is therefore available whose integral is the picture of the exhausted power (Pcr1). It can be directly compared to the enthalpic balance, which is usually estimated (Pcr0). Figure 3 compares these experimental (Pcr0) and theoretical (Pcr1) values and reveals a wide discrepancy associated with the instrumentation indeterminacies (measurement error, error on thermocouple positioning, on water temperature) and with the sensitivity coefficient calculation (model error, heat transfer uncertainty). A corrective formula is proposed to correct temperature measurements as a function of experimental conditions, and particularly exhausted power (Tcorrected =Tmes + C.Pcr0). C is estimated with Pcr2(C) {identical_to} Pcr0 where Pcr2 = {phi}cor.S ({phi}cor: mean heat flux calculated by means of the inverse method and corrected temperature measurements, S crucible wall surface area). Corrective temperatures were measured in the crucible in parallel and perpendicular positions to isothermal areas. They confirm the corrective expression and show, in our study, that thermocouple location is a major source of indeterminacies. Five experiments with different operating conditions analyzed with this expression show C = 0,3 {+-} 0,02 K.kW{sup -1}. More accurate data are now available on heat flux at the ingot-crucible wall. This approach could be improved with better instrumentation that would limit measurement errors. (authors)

  13. A Novel Heat Treatment Process for Surface Hardening of Steel: Metal Melt Surface Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-sheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei; Li, Jiehua; Li, Jun; Xia, Mingxu; Li, Jianguo

    2017-09-01

    A novel heat treatment process for surface hardening of steel has been demonstrated and named as "metal melt surface hardening (MMSH)." A surface layer with a thickness of about 400 μm and a hardness of about 700 HV has been achieved by ejecting AISI 304 stainless steel melt at a temperature of about 1783 K (1510 °C) onto the 40Cr steel surface. This proposed MMSH provides a very promising application for surface hardening of steel.

  14. The surface heat island of Rotterdam and its relationship with urban surface characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, L.; Zwart, S.; Verhagen, H.; Mauri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal infrared high resolution satellite images from Landsat sensors were used to spatially quantify the surface heat island (SHI) of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Based on surface temperature maps retrieved on 15 summer days since 1984, the average surface temperature of each district and

  15. Influences of chemical reaction and wall properties on MHD Peristaltic transport of a Dusty fluid with Heat and Mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthuraj

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of elasticity of flexible walls on peristaltic transport of a dusty fluid with heat and mass transfer in a horizontal channel in the presence of chemical reaction has been investigated under long wavelength approximation. Expressions have been constructed for stream function, temperature and concentration by using perturbation technique. The effects of various parameters on heat and mass transfer characteristics of the flow are discussed through graphs.

  16. Find surface heat loss and flue gas density quickly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanapathy, V.

    1985-04-01

    Tables and charts are presented for quick estimates of heat loss from insulated surfaces and flue gas density for various fossil fuels. Two types of problems faced by thermal engineers are presented. Both types of problems can be handled. An advantage of the chart is that for a wide range of surface and ambient temperatures ..gamma.. may be determined. This situation is common in industrial practice where wind velocity and ambient temperatures vary significantly over a period of time.

  17. Heat transfer and surface flow visualization around a 180 deg turn in a rectangular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astarita, G.; Cardone, G.; Carlomagno, G.M. [Univ. of Naples (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiency of gas turbine engines strongly depends on the gas entry temperature, the higher the latter, the more efficient is the turbine thermal cycle. Present advanced gas turbines operate at gas entry temperatures much higher than metal creeping temperatures and therefore require intensive cooling of their blades especially in the early stages. The aim of the present study is to obtain detailed measurements of the convective heat transfer coefficient nearby a 180deg sharp turn in a rectangular channel, and to prove that the use of infrared thermography may be appropriate to experimentally study this type of problem. A rectangular two-pass channel, which is 40 mm high and 200 mm wide, is tested for two different geometries of the tip of the partition wall: a square tip and semicircular one. To perform surface flow visualization and heat transfer measurements, the heated-thin-foil technique is used and results in terms of temperature maps and Nusselt number Nu distributions are obtained. Nu is computed by means of the local bulk temperature which is evaluated by making a one-dimensional energy balance along the channel. Reynolds number, based on average inlet velocity and hydraulic diameter of the channel is varied between 1.6 {times} 10{sup 4} and 6.4 {times} 10{sup 4}. By moving in the streamwise direction, at the beginning of the heated zone a rapid increase of the wall temperature is found due to the development of the thermal boundary layer. Two well distinguishable separation zones are found, one at the first outer corner of the channel and the other attached to the partition wall and just downstream of its tip. The influence of the geometry of the latter seems to be limited mainly to the position of the onset of the second separation zone. A third weak recirculation zone seems to appear in the vicinity of the second outer corner at the highest tested Reynolds number.

  18. Detection of heat abduction on the walls by artificial neural network and selection of materials with decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Tekkanat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Today energy conservation is a very important issue in the world and Turkey. The aim of this study is to minimize the heat abduction, thus to save energy by utilizing the factors to prevent the heat abduction on the walls of buildings. First of all, a back-propagation network model with artificial neural network model was used for the factors that can cause heat loss on the walls. Whether the walls have insulation were considered. After that, Decision Support Systems were used for heat insulation to select the appropriate materials. A Decision Support Model with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP was recommended to meet the needs of a customer best and to make better decisions for the selection of the materials. The method was used by construction firms for their decision processes for the best materials and the results were evaluated. After the evaluations were done, the factors that cause heat loss were considered and it became clear which factors were more important for the prevention of heat loss.

  19. Linking Surface Urban Heat Islands with Groundwater Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne A; Bayer, Peter; Goettsche, Frank M; Olesen, Folke S; Blum, Philipp

    2016-01-05

    Urban temperatures are typically, but not necessarily, elevated compared to their rural surroundings. This phenomenon of urban heat islands (UHI) exists both above and below the ground. These zones are coupled through conductive heat transport. However, the precise process is not sufficiently understood. Using satellite-derived land surface temperature and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements, we compare the spatial properties of both kinds of heat islands in four German cities and find correlations of up to 80%. The best correlation is found in older, mature cities such as Cologne and Berlin. However, in 95% of the analyzed areas, groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures due to additional subsurface heat sources such as buildings and their basements. Local groundwater hot spots under city centers and under industrial areas are not revealed by satellite-derived land surface temperatures. Hence, we propose an estimation method that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land-surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method, we are able to accurately estimate regional groundwater temperatures with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K.

  20. Preparation of Nano Tourmaline Surface Treatment Agent and Its Application on Functional Wall fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Fangxing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a kind of surface treatment agent and its application on the functional wall fabrics that can produce negative ion was reported. This surface treatment agent was prepared by using nano tourmaline powder dispersion with water as solvent produced by sand milling. The parameters of sand milling process, as well as powder diameter and its distribution, and the negative ion releasing behavior of the functional wall fabrics were discussed. The results showed that nano tourmaline had good dispersity stability with the number average diameter (d50 achieved 190nm and the polydispersity index reached to 0.220. The treated wall fabrics showed good performance in high adsorption with nano powder and high negative ions releasing ability. The negative ions releasing amount changes depending on the different surface treatment process of tourmaline dispersion and three-proofing agent. This facility technics could be widely used as industrial application.

  1. Study on the L–H transition power threshold with RF heating and lithium-wall coating on EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Xu, G.S.; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency (RF) heating and lithium-wall coating is investigated experimentally on EAST for two sets of walls: an all carbon wall (C) and molybdenum chamber and a carbon divertor (Mo/C). For both sets of walls......, a minimum power threshold Pthr of ~0.6 MW was found when the EAST operates in a double null (DN) divertor configuration with intensive lithium-wall coating. When operating in upper single null (USN) or lower single null (LSN), the power threshold depends on the ion ∇B drift direction. The low density...... dependence of the L–H power threshold, namely an increase below a minimum density, was identified in the Mo/C wall for the first time. For the C wall only the single-step L–H transition with limited injection power is observed whereas also the so-called dithering L–H transition is observed in the Mo/C wall...

  2. Critical surface roughness for wall bounded flow of viscous fluids in an electric submersible pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Dhairyasheel; Siddique, Md Hamid; Kenyery, Frank; Samad, Abdus

    2017-11-01

    Surface roughness plays a vital role in the performance of an electric submersible pump (ESP). A 3-D numerical analysis has been carried out to find the roughness effect on ESP. The performance of pump for steady wall bounded turbulent flows is evaluated at different roughness values and compared with smooth surface considering a non-dimensional roughness factor K. The k- ω SST turbulence model with fine mesh at near wall region captures the rough wall effects accurately. Computational results are validated with experimental results of water (1 cP), at a design speed (3000 RPM). Maximum head is observed for a hydraulically smooth surface (K=0). When roughness factor is increased, the head decreases till critical roughness factor (K=0.1) due to frictional loss. Further increase in roughness factor (K>0.1) increases the head due to near wall turbulence. The performance of ESP is analyzed for turbulent kinetic energy and eddy viscosity at different roughness values. The wall disturbance over the rough surface affects the pressure distribution and velocity field. The roughness effect is predominant for high viscosity oil (43cP) as compared to water. Moreover, the study at off-design conditions showed that Reynolds number influences the overall roughness effect.

  3. Effect of location of a rotating circular cylinder and heat source on mixed convection heat transfer characteristics inside a square enclosure with discrete heater at the bottom wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Muntasir; Kamruzzaman, Saha, Sumon; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2017-06-01

    A numerical investigation of mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in a square enclosure containing a heat conducting rotating circular cylinder has been taken into consideration in this work. As a heat source, a discrete isoflux heater is placed at the bottom wall of the enclosure whereas the top wall is considered as adiabatic. The vertical sidewalls of the enclosure are assumed to be maintained at constant low temperature to properly describe the boundary conditions in the work. The coupled equations of the developed mathematical model are solved by using the finite element method based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals for different rotating speeds of the cylinder varying over the range of 0-500 keeping the Rayleigh number and Prandtl number fixed. The effects of position of rotating cylinder (both horizontal and vertical) and location of the heat source on the streamlines, isotherms, variation of local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number and other heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena are numerically investigated. The results reveal that the flow field, temperature field and heat transfer rate strongly depend on cylinder and heat source position.

  4. Calculation and experimental researches into the heat exchange surface formed by oppositely directed truncated cones with saddle-shaped connection straps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. Ye; Ilmov, D. N.; Mavrov, V. A.; Mamontov, Yu N.; Skorokhodov, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    The article has presented experimental data on the investigation of thermal and hydraulic characteristics of heat exchangers made of thin-walled panels with the surface formed by oppositely directed truncated cones with saddle-shaped connection straps. An approach to the mathematical description of surfaces of given class have also been proposed, and numerical modeling of stream and heat transfer have been performed. Results of numerical modeling have been compared with the experimental ones.

  5. Radiative flow of MHD Jeffrey fluid past a stretching sheet with surface slip and melting heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidas Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates numerically the influence of melting heat transfer and thermal radiation on MHD stagnation point flow of an electrically conducting non-Newtonian fluid (Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet with partial surface slip. The governing equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation and then solved numerically by using Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method. The effects of pertinent parameters on the flow and heat transfer fields are presented through tables and graphs, and are discussed from the physical point of view. Our analysis revealed that the fluid temperature is higher in case of Jeffrey fluid than that in the case of Newtonian fluid. It is also observed that the wall stress increases with increasing the values of slip parameter but the effect is opposite for the rate of heat transfer at the wall.

  6. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2017-09-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  7. Effect of carbon nanofiber surface morphology on convective heat transfer from cylindrical surface: Synthesis, characterization and heat transfer measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification is made by layers of carbon nanofiber (CNF) on a 50 μm nickel wire using Thermal chemical vapor deposition process (TCVD). Three different CNF layer morphologies are made, at 500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C, to investigate the influence of morphology on

  8. Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

    1981-12-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

  9. Solar wall heating and daylight use with transparent thermal insulation - the solar environmental wall; Solare Wandheizung und Tageslichtnutzung mit Transparenter Waermedaemmung - die Solare Umweltwand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzer, W. [Fachverband Transparente Waermedaemmung e.V., Gundelfingen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Construction with the sun means to open building walls for the sun. The building is supposed to benefit directly from daylight and solar heat. Special materials were developed for this purpose, which combine solar transmission and light transmission. They enable the transparent thermal insulation of buildings, abbreviated TWD. Their integration into the facade and the roof offer an intelligent and uncomplicated technology for the use of solar energy, the ''solar environmental wall''. TWD-materials can be used as filling material in various building components and they already constitute a weather-resistant wall. They are thermally-insulating structures or materials, which keep out the heat but allow the transmission of solar radiation and light. TWD-materials maintain their excellent insulating properties almost unchanged even in case of very cold outer temperatures or inclined construction in the roof area. In these cases the convection of components that are only filled with air or gas, can lead to considerable decreases of the U-value (according to DIN EN 673 up to 45%). Good TWD-materials are resistant against humidity, which enables to use them in non-hermetic systems, such as e.g. U-profile glas, too. (orig.)

  10. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Tayfun Kilic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys. To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage.

  11. Analysis of the Pressure Rise in a Partially Filled Liquid Tank in Microgravity with Low Wall Heat Flux and Simultaneous Boiling and Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments performed with Freon 113 in the space shuttle have shown that in a pro- cess of very slow heating, high liquid superheats can be sustained for a long period in microgravity. In a closed system explosive vaporization of superheated liquid resulted in pressure spikes of varying magnitudes. In this paper, we analyze the pressure rise in a partially lled closed tank in which a large vapor bubble (i.e., ullage) is initially present, and the liquid is subjected to a low wall heat ux. The liquid layer adjacent to the wall becomes superheated until the temperature for nucleation of the bubbles (or the incipience of boiling) is achieved. In the absence of the gravity-induced convection large quantities of superheated liquid can accumulate over time near the heated surface. Once the incipience temperature is attained, explosive boiling occurs and the vapor bubbles that are produced on the heater surface tend to quickly raise the tank pressure. The liquid-vapor saturation temperature increases as well. These two e ects tend to induce condensation of the large ullage bubble that is initially present, and tends to mitigate the tank pressure rise. As a result, the tank pressure is predicted to rise sharply, attain a maximum, and subsequently decay slowly. The predicted pressure rise is compared with experimental results obtained in the microgravity environments of the space shuttle for Freon 113. The analysis is appli- cable, in general to heating of liquid in closed containers in microgravity and to cryogenic fuel tanks, in particular where small heat leaks into the tank are unavoidable.

  12. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  13. Natural convection of nanofluid in a wavy cavity in the presence of magnetic field on variable heat surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaherdeh, Korosh; Moslemi, Mehdi; Shahbazi, Mona [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A numerical analysis has been performed to investigate the laminar natural convection heat characteristics in a wavy cavity filled with CuO/water nanofluid. One of the sinusoidal walls (BC) is at the volatile high temperature and the opposite wavy surface is at a stable low temperature and the two other walls are considered flat and insulated while the uniform magnetic field is considered. Performing the analysis, the governing equations are given in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. In order to solve the nondimensionalized equations, discretizing with second-order accurate central difference method is performed then the successive under relaxation method with appropriate boundary conditions is considered. To validate the numerical model, various comparisons with previously published studies have been conducted and the results are in a good agreement. The main objective is to survey the effects of the Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, and nanoparticles volume fraction on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are illustrated in contours of stream function, constant temperature, and Nusselt number. The results show that the presence of the magnetic field the local Nusselt number decreases at the hot wall. Moreover, the enhancement in the heat transfer performance increases with an increasing nanoparticle concentration. However, for all values of Rayleigh number, the presence of nanoparticles leads to significant enhancement in heat transfer and the increase of Rayleigh number causes the heat transfer mechanism to change from conduction to convection.

  14. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Offler, Christina E; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Insoluble coatings for Stirling engine heat pipe condenser surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-09-01

    The work done by Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the Phase 1, 1992 SBIR National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contract, 'Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces' is described. The work was performed between January 1992 and July 1992. Stirling heat engines are being developed for electrical power generation use on manned and unmanned earth orbital and planetary missions. Dish Stirling solar systems and nuclear reactor Stirling systems are two of the most promising applications of the Stirling engine electrical power generation technology. The sources of thermal energy used to drive the Stirling engine typically are non-uniform in temperature and heat flux. Liquid metal heat pipe receivers are used as thermal transformers and isothermalizers to deliver the thermal energy at a uniform high temperature to the heat input section of the Stirling engine. The use of a heat pipe receiver greatly enhances system efficiency and potential life span. One issue that is raised during the design phase of heat pipe receivers is the potential solubility corrosion of the Stirling engine heat input section by the liquid metal working fluid. This Phase 1 effort initiated a program to evaluate and demonstrate coatings, applied to nickel based Stirling engine heater head materials, that are practically 'insoluble' in sodium, potassium, and NaK. This program initiated a study of nickel aluminide as a coating and developed and demonstrated a heat pipe test vehicle that can be used to test candidate materials and coatings. Nickel 200 and nickel aluminide coated Nickel 200 were tested for 1000 hours at 800 C at a condensation heat flux of 25 W/sq cm. Subsequent analyses of the samples showed no visible sign of solubility corrosion of either coated or uncoated samples. The analysis technique, photomicrographs at 200X, has a resolution of better than 2.5 microns (.0001 in). The results indicate that the heat pipe environment is not directly

  16. Water heating solar system using collector with polycarbonate absorber surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luiz Guilherme Meira de; Sodre, Dilton; Cavalcanti, Eduardo Jose Cidade; Souza, Luiz Guilherme Vieira Meira de; Mendes, Jose Ubiragi de Lima [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)], e-mails: lguilherme@dem.ufrn.br, diltonsodre@ifba.edu.br, ubiragi@ct.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    It is presented s solar collector to be used in a heating water for bath system, whose main characteristics are low cost and easy fabrication and assembly processes. The collector absorber surface consists of a polycarbonate plate with an area of 1.5 m{sup 2}. The water inlet and outlet are made of PVC 50mm, and were coupled to a 6mm thick polycarbonate plate using fiberglass resin. A 200 liters thermal reservoir will be used. This reservoir is also alternative. The absorber heating system works under thermo-siphon regimen. Thermal parameters will be evaluated to prove the feasibility of the studied solar heating system to obtain bath water for a four people family. (author)

  17. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  18. Numerical Simulation of Free Surface in the Case of Plane Turbulent Wall Jets in Shallow Tailwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra javan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Wall-jet flow is an important flow field in hydraulic engineering, and its applications include flow from the bottom outlet of dams and sluice gates. In this paper, the plane turbulent wall jet in shallow tailwater is simulated by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations using the standard  turbulence closure model. This study aims to explore the ability of a time splitting method on a non-staggered grid in curvilinear coordinates for simulation of two-dimensional (2D plane turbulent wall jets with finite tailwater depth. In the developed model, the kinematic free-surface boundary condition is solved simultaneously with the momentum and continuity equations, so that the water surface elevation can be obtained along with the velocity and pressure fields as part of the solution. 2D simulations are carried out for plane turbulent wall jets free surface in shallow tailwater. The comparison undertaken between numerical results and experimental measurements show that the numerical model can capture the velocity field and the drop in the water surface elevation at the gate with reasonable accuracy.

  19. Cell Wall-anchored Proteins of Enterococcus faecium: Exploring a Novel Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, A.P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820741

    2009-01-01

    The past 4 years my research focussed on the identification, expression and function of surface-exposed LPXTG proteins and filamentous structures (also called pili or fimbriae) at the Enterococcus faecium cell wall. E. faecium is a commensal organism of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but the

  20. Infrared Low Temperature Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.; Camperchioli, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer distributions obtained using an infrared camera technique are described. Infrared thermography was used because noncontact surface temperature measurements were desired. Surface temperatures were 80 C or less. Tests were conducted in a three vane linear cascade, with inlet pressures between 0.14 and 1.02 atm., and exit Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, and 0.9, for turbulence intensities of approximately 1 and 10%. Measurements were taken on the vane suction side, and on the pressure side leading edge region. The designs for both the vane and test facility are discussed. The approach used to account for conduction within the vane is described. Midspan heat transfer distributions are given for the range of test conditions.

  1. Heart wall myofibers are arranged in minimal surfaces to optimize organ function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadjiev, Peter; Strijkers, Gustav J; Bakermans, Adrianus J; Piuze, Emmanuel; Zucker, Steven W; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2012-06-12

    Heart wall myofibers wind as helices around the ventricles, strengthening them in a manner analogous to the reinforcement of concrete cylindrical columns by spiral steel cables [Richart FE, et al. (1929) Univ of Illinois, Eng Exp Stn Bull 190]. A multitude of such fibers, arranged smoothly and regularly, contract and relax as an integrated functional unit as the heart beats. To orchestrate this motion, fiber tangling must be avoided and pumping should be efficient. Current models of myofiber orientation across the heart wall suggest groupings into sheets or bands, but the precise geometry of bundles of myofibers is unknown. Here we show that this arrangement takes the form of a special minimal surface, the generalized helicoid [Blair DE, Vanstone JR (1978) Minimal Submanifolds and Geodesics 13-16], closing the gap between individual myofibers and their collective wall structure. The model holds across species, with a smooth variation in its three curvature parameters within the myocardial wall providing tight fits to diffusion magnetic resonance images from the rat, the dog, and the human. Mathematically it explains how myofibers are bundled in the heart wall while economizing fiber length and optimizing ventricular ejection volume as they contract. The generalized helicoid provides a unique foundation for analyzing the fibrous composite of the heart wall and should therefore find applications in heart tissue engineering and in the study of heart muscle diseases.

  2. Heat stress causes alterations in the cell-wall polymers and anatomy of coffee leaves (Coffea arabica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Tiago Benedito; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lúcio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo; Donatti, Lucélia; Boeger, Maria Regina Torres; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira

    2013-03-01

    Coffee plants were subjected to heat stress (37 °C) and compared with control plants (24 °C). Cell wall polysaccharides were extracted using water (W), EDTA (E) and 4M NaOH (H30 and H70). In addition, monolignols were analyzed, and the leaves were observed by microscopy. Plants under heat stress accumulated higher contents of arabinose and galactose in fraction W. Xylose contents were observed to decrease in H30 fractions after the heat stress, whereas galactose and uronic acid increased. H70 fractions from plants exposed to heat stress showed increased xylose contents, whereas the contents of arabinose and glucose decreased. Differences in the molar-mass profiles of polysaccharides were also observed. The primary monolignol contents increased after the heat stress. Structural alterations in palisade cells and ultrastructural damage in chloroplasts were also observed. Our results demonstrate that the chemical profile of coffee cell-wall polymers and structural cell anatomy change under heat stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diesel particulate filter regeneration via resistive surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-10-08

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine; and a grid of electrically resistive material that is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and that selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF.

  4. Disruption heat loads and their mitigation in JET with the ITER-like wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehnen, M.; Arnoux, G.; Hartmann, N.; Brezinsek, S.; Devaux, S.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Matthews, G. F.; Reux, C.; Riccardo, V.; Sieglin, B.; Stamp, M. F.; de Vries, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The new materials of the ITER-like wall (ILW) in JET have significant impact on the disruption process. The use of beryllium for the first wall and tungsten in the divertor has shown so far a strong reduction of the radiation during disruptions compared to the previously installed CFC wall.

  5. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  6. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. DEVELOPING OF A NEW COMPREHENSIVE SPARK IGNITION ENGINES CODE FOR HEAT LOSS ANALYSIS WITHIN COMBUSTION CHAMBER WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Khalilarya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to develop the existing a zero-dimensional model named ODES to provide detailed insights into the internal process of the modern high speed spark ignition engines. Therefore, it has been concentrated on the development of new sub models for incorporation in an extended form of ODES, as follows: - the existing semi-empirical combustion model has been replaced by a new comprehensive model, which is based on the turbulent flame speed in the combustion chamber. - the existing three wall heat transfer model has been replaced by a new one in which, the combustion chamber is divided in to three zones including cylinder head, cylinder wall, and piston head. The steady-state heat transfer equation is solved through finite difference method with replaced boundary and initial conditions. The results gave the temperature distribution of combustion chamber walls. The rate of heat losses from combustion chamber to the coolant is calculated by using the mean temperature of each part. The code has been extensively validated with respect to performance and heat transfer against experimental results obtained on XU7JP spark ignition engine with two kinds of fuel, gasoline and compresed natural gas and gave good agreement with available experimental.

  8. Study of heat shielding qualities of brick wall angle with additional insulation located on the outside fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurin Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of theoretical studies of heat-shielding properties of the angle of external wall a residential building are presented. The brick wall thickness of 510 mm was considered. The studies were performed for the I-st temperature zone of Ukraine. Heat insulation was located on the external side of enclosure. Thermal protection problems of the angle are consideration of the impact of heat-conductive inclusion on adjusted heat transfer resistance of enclosure. Conductive inclusion on the external angle area is its configuration. An additional layer of insulation in the angle area is necessary to use for bringing the level of thermal protection of angle area to the standards. The results of calculations of two-dimensional temperature fields were used for the analysis of thermal protection. Two options for additional insulation were studied. The first option: continuous strip insulation covering the external wall angle. Another one provides division of additional insulation layer into two parts and displacement them from the angle within the design scheme. Studies were performed for different thickness of additional insulation. There was additionally taking into account the value of insulation displacement from the angle for the second option. The optimal location and size of additional insulation were determined. The minimum amount of additional insulation under which the thermal protection requirements are performed was accepted like optimality criterion.

  9. Thermal and Physical Properties and Deposit Structure of Power Equipment Heating Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nerezko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows influence of heating surface material, design peculiarities, operational conditions of heat exchangers and water-chemical regime on chemical and structural composition of deposits, their heat conduction and porosity.

  10. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Torres, David [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Huerta, Francisco [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1. E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Montilla, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.montilla@ua.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Morallon, Emilia [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong {pi}-{pi} interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  11. Studies on the air distribution and thermal performance of the air circulation wall. Part 4. Study on the thermal emissivity of the air circulation layer`s surfaces; Gaidannetsu tsuki koho ni okeru tsuki sonai no netsu tsuki tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu. 4. Tsuki sonai hyomen no hosha tokusei ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamimori, K.; Sakai, K.; Ishihara, O. [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The thermal and air distribution characteristics of the air circulation wall in a heat-insulated system were grasped using an experimental model. In this paper, the difference in the heat exchange between the wall and air was confirmed based on the radiation on the circulation layer`s surface. In this system, thin air circulation layers with ventilating holes at the top and bottom are attached to the south and north outer walls of a wooden building. This system is a kind of passive solar house that achieves the insolation screening effect and the temperature rising effect based on solar collection. The heat flow in a circulation layer is eliminated by the natural convection heat transfer on the outer wall. The heat flow passing through insulating materials is the heat transfer by radiation. The heat flow based on the in-layer natural convection is increasingly eliminated by the decrease in temperature on the air circulation layer`s surface. The decrease in room surface temperature using aluminum foil and the reflective heat-insulated effect showed that the heat passing through the wall surface decreases as the convection heat transfer in an air circulation layer increases. 6 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Study on critical places for maximum temperature rise on unexposed surface of curtain wall test specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulik Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the main issues related to the fire resistance of glazed curtain walls including the tests methodology and way of classification of this type of building elements. Moreover, the paper presents an attempt to determine the weak points of aluminium glazed curtain wall test specimens regarding to the maximum temperature rise measurements, based on the fire resistance tests performed in recent years by Fire Research Department of Building Research Institute. The paper analyse the results of temperature rise on unexposed surface of 17 aluminium glazed curtain wall specimens tested for internal fire exposure in accordance with EN 1364-3:2006 [3] and EN 1364-3:2014 [4], which achieved the fire resistance class of min. EI 15.

  13. Tissue responses to fractional transient heating with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Magdy A; El-Bary, Alaa A; Al-Sowayan, Noorah S

    2016-10-01

    A fractional model of Bioheat equation for describing quantitatively the thermal responses of skin tissue under sinusoidal heat flux conditions on skin surface is given. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the solution in a closed form. The resulting formulation is applied to one-dimensional application to investigate the temperature distribution in skin with instantaneous surface heating for different cases. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the fractional bioheat transfer equation has been constructed. Sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the thermal effects of various control parameters on tissue temperature. The comparisons are made with the results obtained in the case of the absence of time-fractional order. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. NON-LINEAR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION ANALYSIS OF INSULATION WALL OF TANK FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LIQUID ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M Živković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with transient nonlinear heat conduction through the insulation wall of the tank for transportation of liquid aluminum. Tanks designed for this purpose must satisfy certain requirements regarding temperature of loading and unloading, during transport. Basic theoretical equations are presented, which describe the problem of heat conduction finite element (FE analysis, starting from the differential equation of energy balance, taking into account the initial and boundary conditions of the problem. General 3D problem for heat conduction is considered, from which solutions for two- and one-dimensional heat conduction can be obtained, as special cases. Forming of the finite element matrices using Galerkin method is briefly described. The procedure for solving equations of energy balance is discussed, by methods of resolving iterative processes of nonlinear transient heat conduction. Solution of this problem illustrates possibilities of PAK-T software package, such as materials properties, given as tabular data, or analytical functions. Software also offers the possibility to solve nonlinear and transient problems with incremental methods. Obtained results for different thicknesses of the tank wall insulation materials enable its comparison in regards to given conditions

  15. Hydromagnetic mixed convective flow over a wall with variable thickness and Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model: OHAM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Awan, Saeed Ehsan; Iqbal, Khalid; Khan, Zuhaib Ashfaq; Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor

    2018-03-01

    The effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for the hydro-magnetic mixed convective flow of a non-Newtonian fluid is presented. The flow over a wall having variable thickness is anticipated under the influence of transverse magnetic field and internal heat generation/absorption effects. Mathematical formulation has been performed by making use of the suitable transformations. Convergence analysis has been performed and the optimal values are computed by employing optimal homotopy analysis method. The effects of physical parameters are elaborated in depth via graphical and numerical illustrations.

  16. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in tube under injection of gas through permeable walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, M. S.; Lushchik, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Using a differential turbulence model, a numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a tube is carried out and the dependences of the flow and heat transfer characteristics on the intensity of the coolant injection through permeable walls are obtained. It is shown that the coefficients of friction and heat transfer decrease with increasing of injection rate. The comparison of calculation results reflecting the main features of rather complicated processes of flow in tube under gas injection with well-known experimental data over a wide range of the Reynolds number and the intensity of injection show their satisfactory agreement.

  17. Bacillus anthracis Sortase A (SrtA) Anchors LPXTG Motif-Containing Surface Proteins to the Cell Wall Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Andrew H.; Marraffini, Luciano A.; Glass, Elizabeth M.; DeBord, Kristin L.; Ton-That, Hung; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Cell wall-anchored surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens play important roles during the establishment of many infectious diseases, but the contributions of surface proteins to the pathogenesis of anthrax have not yet been revealed. Cell wall anchoring in Staphylococcus aureus occurs by a transpeptidation mechanism requiring surface proteins with C-terminal sorting signals as well as sortase enzymes. The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis encodes three sortase genes and eleven surfac...

  18. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  19. Heat affected zone in surfacing chromium ledeburitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tonkovič Prijanovič

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tools get failured during work; wear is a major factor that contributes to failures. Damaged tools are replaced or filed. This paper describes typical changes that occur in the heat affected zone of tool (HAZ, which was repaired by surfacing with a TIG and with micro-plasma procedure. Microstructure of the steel on the repaired tool was analysed by an optical and scanning electron microscope. The tool was made of chromium ledeburitic steel type W.N. 1.2379 and it was repaired by surfacing steel type W.N. 1.4718. Changes in the HAZ also depend on the type of surfacing. Besides microstructural changes, dissolution of carbides, especially primary carbides. This way the concentration of the carbide-forming elements and carbon is increased in the base around the primary carbides in the HAZ so the result is so-called secondary eutectic or secondary ledeburite.

  20. Lunar Surface Stirling Power Systems Using Isotope Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, NASA has used the decay of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) (in the form of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS)) as a heat source for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), which have provided electrical power for many NASA missions. While RTGs have an impressive reliability record for the missions in which they have been used, their relatively low thermal to electric conversion efficiency and the scarcity of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) has led NASA to consider other power conversion technologies. NASA is considering returning both robotic and human missions to the lunar surface and, because of the long lunar nights (14.75 Earth days), isotope power systems are an attractive candidate to generate electrical power. NASA is currently developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate higher efficiency power system that produces greater than 160 W with two GPHS modules at the beginning of life (BOL) (32% efficiency). The ASRG uses the same Pu-238 GPHS modules, which are used in RTG, but by coupling them to a Stirling convertor provides a four-fold reduction in the number of GPHS modules. This study considers the use of americium-241 (Am-241) as a substitute for the Pu-238 in Stirling- convertor-based Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for power levels from tens of watts to 5 kWe. The Am-241 is used as a substitute for the Pu-238 in GPHS modules. Depending on power level, different Stirling heat input and removal systems are modeled. It was found that substituting Am-241 GPHS modules into the ASRG reduces power output by about one-fifth while maintaining approximately the same system mass. In order to obtain the nominal 160 W of electrical output of the Pu-238 ASRG requires 10 Am-241 GPHS modules. Higher power systems require changing from conductive coupling heat input and removal from the Stirling convertor to either pumped loops or heat pipes. Liquid metal pumped loops are considered as the primary heat transportation on the hot

  1. Automatic analysis of image of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Hu, K; Cai, N; Su, W; Xiong, H; Lou, Z; Lin, T; Hu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Some computer applications for cell characterization in medicine and biology, such as analysis of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC (El Tor Vibrio of Cholera), operate with cell samples taken from very small areas of interest. In order to perform texture characterization in such an application, only a few texture operators can be employed: the operators should be insensitive to noise and image distortion and be reliable in order to estimate texture quality from images. Therefore, we introduce wavelet theory and mathematical morphology to analyse the cellular surface micro-area image obtained by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to describe the quality of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC, we propose a fully automatic computerized method. The image analysis process is carried out in two steps. In the first, we decompose the given image by dyadic wavelet transform and form an image approximation with higher resolution, by doing so, we perform edge detection of given images efficiently. In the second, we introduce many operations of mathematical morphology to obtain morphological quantitative parameters of surface structure of cell wall-deficient EVC. The obtained results prove that the method can eliminate noise, detect the edge and extract the feature parameters validly. In this work, we have built automatic analytic software named "EVC.CELL".

  2. Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Emig, Thorsten; Aghamohamadnia, Milad

    2018-02-02

    Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

  3. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  4. The wall as witness-surface or, the Reichstag graffiti and paradoxes of writing over history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Chmielewska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Wall writing occupies a conflicted position in the urban space and in the public discourse as a political act and as an aesthetic phenomenon. Ever more present in the contemporary visual and conceptual vocabulary, it is increasingly deployed by the world of high art and politics, commerce and academia. Torn off the wall, taken as a photogenic empty sign, its potent meanings abstracted from its material surface, wall writing becomes a powerful rhetorical tool. Paris graffiti of‘68, NewYork subway art of the 70s and the pre-89 writing on the Berlin wall combine into an amalgam of aesthetic protest, graphically raw and resolutely awkward idiom that transforms an image of writing into a potent new text. The messiness of its lines, the untamed styles and the rebellious attitude towards the material surface all conspire to create the graffiti’s myth of freedom and unrestrained individual expression, further extended to associations with democratic ambitions. Supported by the popularity of hip-hop culture and the contemporary urban cool, graffiti becomes a handy implement to evoke the individual voice, endorse place identity or authenticity.

  5. MHD convective flow through porous medium in a horizontal channel with insulated and impermeable bottom wall in the presence of viscous dissipation and Joule heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V.S. Raju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a steady MHD forced convective flow of a viscous fluid of finite depth in a saturated porous medium over a fixed horizontal channel with thermally insulated and impermeable bottom wall in the presence of viscous dissipation and joule heating. The governing equations are solved in the closed form and the exact solutions are obtained for velocity and temperature distributions when the temperatures on the fixed bottom and on the free surface are prescribed. The expressions for flow rate, mean velocity, temperature, mean temperature, mean mixed temperature in the flow region and the Nusselt number on the free surface have been obtained. The cases of large and small values of porosity coefficients have been obtained as limiting cases. Further, the cases of small depth (shallow fluid and large depth (deep fluid are also discussed. The results are presented and discussed with the help of graphs.

  6. Comparison analysis of wooden house thermal comfort in tropical coast and mountainous by using wall surface temperature difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriani, Adinda Septi; Hermawan, Retyanto, Banar

    2017-09-01

    Passive thermal comfort can be analyzed through several ways including through analyzing thermal of building envelope. The wall is one of building envelope that affect the performance of the thermal buildings. Quantitative research aims to analyze the thermal comfort of the wooden house in the tropical coastal and mountains by using the surface temperature of the walls of the building. Data retrieval was done by measurement of the surface temperature of the outer and inner side of the wall using infrared thermometers at 5 am, 12 pm, 5 pm and 8 pm. The wall is measured the wall which bordering the spaces outside and exposed to the sun light. The measurement was done at 10 wooden house in a tropical coastal and 10 wooden house in tropical mountains. The surface temperature average of the outside wall of a tropical coastal house by 27.1°C, while the inner side wall has a surface temperature by 26.2°C. The difference between the average temperature of the outer surface and its inner surface by 0.9°C (lowering temperature). Tropical mountain residences have an average temperature of the outer side wall by 18.0°C and the average temperature inner side wall by 18.8°C. The difference between the average temperature of the outer surface and inner surface by 0.8 °C (raise the temperature). The nature of the wood is a storage temperature of the radiation so adjusting the temperature of the radiation that exist on a specific area. It can be concluded that the timber wall is more suitable for residential houses in the tropical coast than tropical mountains based on the difference in surface temperature.

  7. Heat loss through the glabrous skin surfaces of heavily insulated, heat-stressed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, D A; Dillon, J L; Heller, H C

    2009-07-01

    Insulation reduces heat exchange between a body and the environment. Glabrous (nonhairy) skin surfaces (palms of the hands, soles of the feet, face, and ears) constitute a small percentage of total body surface area but contain specialized vascular structures that facilitate heat loss. We have previously reported that cooling the glabrous skin surfaces is effective in alleviating heat stress and that the application of local subatmospheric pressure enhances the effect. In this paper, we compare the effects of cooling multiple glabrous skin surfaces with and without vacuum on thermal recovery in heavily insulated heat-stressed individuals. Esophageal temperatures (T(es)) and heart rates were monitored throughout the trials. Water loss was determined from pre- and post-trial nude weights. Treadmill exercise (5.6 km/h, 9-16% slope, and 25-45 min duration) in a hot environment (41.5 degrees C, 20-30% relative humidity) while wearing insulating pants and jackets was used to induce heat stress (T(es)>or=39 degrees C). For postexercise recovery, the subjects donned additional insulation (a balaclava, winter gloves, and impermeable boot covers) and rested in the hot environment for 60 min. Postexercise cooling treatments included control (no cooling) or the application of a 10 degrees C closed water circulating system to (a) the hand(s) with or without application of a local subatmospheric pressure, (b) the face, (c) the feet, or (d) multiple glabrous skin regions. Following exercise induction of heat stress in heavily insulated subjects, the rate of recovery of T(es) was 0.4+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12), but with application of cooling to one hand, the rate was 0.8+/-0.3 degrees C/h(n=12), and with one hand cooling with subatmospheric pressure, the rate was 1.0+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12). Cooling alone yielded two responses, one resembling that of cooling with subatmospheric pressure (n=8) and one resembling that of no cooling (n=4). The effect of treating multiple surfaces was

  8. Fluid mechanics of friction-reducing riblet wall surfaces; Zur Stroemungsmechanik wandreibungsvermindernder riblet-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruse, M.

    1999-10-01

    The author investigated the reduction of turbulent wall friction by riblets in flow direction. Compared with a smooth, unstructured surface, riblet surfaces can reduce the turbulent wall friction by up to 10%. Apart from a theoretical description of the mechanism of wall friction reduction, the experimental optimisation of the riblet geometry and flow rate measurements to support the theory are described as well. Technical applications of riblet surfaces are discussed. A special, oil-filled flow tunnel was constructed for the investigations. The tunnel and its high-accuracy shear strain meter are described, as is the hot film measuring system for flow rate measurement. [Deutsch] Diese Arbeit befasst sich umfassend mit der turbulenten Wandreibungsverminderung durch feine, in Stroemungsrichtung ausgerichtete Rippen. So strukturierte Oberflaechen werden als riblet-Oberflaechen oder technische Haihaut bezeichnet. Letzteres, da auf den Schuppen schneller Haie ebenfalls feine Rippen zu finden sind. Mit riblet-Oberflaechen kann die turbulente Wandreibung um bis zu 10% im Vergleich zu einer glatten unstrukturierten Oberflaeche vermindert werden. Neben einer theoretischen Beschreibung des Mechanismus der Wandreibungsverminderung werden die experimentelle Optimierung der Rippengeometrie und Geschwindigkeitsmessungen zur Untermauerung der Theorie beschrieben. Der technische Einsatz von riblet-Oberflaechen wird ebenfalls diskutiert. Fuer die Untersuchungen wurde ein spezieller Stroemungskanal aufgebaut, der mit Oel befuellt ist. Der Kanal und seine sehr genaue Schubspannungswaage, wie auch die eingesetzte Heissfilm-Messtechnik zur Geschwindigkeitsmessung, werden ausfuehrlich beschrieben. (orig.)

  9. Observational & modeling analysis of surface heat and moisture fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An observational and modeling study was conducted to help assess how well current GCMs are predicting surface fluxes under the highly variable cloudiness and flow conditions characteristic of the real atmosphere. The observational data base for the study was obtained from a network of surface flux stations operated during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The study included examination of a surface-driven secondary circulation in the boundary layer resulting from a persistent cross-site gradient in soil moisture, to demonstrate the sensitivity of boundary layer dynamics to heterogeneous surface fluxes, The performance of a biosphere model in reproducing the measured surface fluxes was evaluated with and without the use of satellite retrieval of three key canopy variables with RMS uncertainties commensurate with those of the measurements themselves. Four sensible heat flux closure schemes currently being used in GCMs were then evaluated against the FIFE observations. Results indicate that the methods by which closure models are calibrated lead to exceedingly large errors when the schemes are applied to variable boundary layer conditions. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Satellite Based Analysis of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gémes Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The most obvious characteristics of urban climate are higher air and surface temperatures compared to rural areas and large spatial variation of meteorological parameters within the city. This research examines the long term and seasonal development of urban surface temperature using satellite data during a period of 30 years and within a year. The medium resolution Landsat data were (preprocessed using open source tools. Besides the analysis of the long term and seasonal changes in land surface temperature within a city, also its relationship with changes in the vegetation cover was investigated. Different urban districts and local climate zones showed varying strength of correlation. The temperature difference between urban surfaces and surroundings is defined as surface urban heat island (SUHI. Its development shows remarkable seasonal and spatial anomalies. The satellite images can be applied to visualize and analyze the SUHI, although they were not collected at midday and early afternoon, when the phenomenon is normally at its maximum. The applied methodology is based on free data and software and requires minimal user interaction. Using the results new urban developments (new built up and green areas can be planned, that help mitigate the negative effects of urban climate.

  11. Radiative heat transfer with hydromagnetic flow and viscous dissipation over a stretching surface in the presence of variable heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer steady flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible fluid due to a stretching plate with viscous dissipation effect in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is studied. The equations of motion and heat transfer are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and the exact solutions are obtained using properties of confluent hypergeometric function. It is assumed that the prescribed heat flux at the stretching porous wall varies as the square of the distance from origin. The effects of the various parameters entering into the problem on the velocity field and temperature distribution are discussed.

  12. Investigation of the third heat transfer crisis on a vertical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avksentyuk, B. P.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    The process of development of the third heat transfer crisis for vertical orientation of the heating surface was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out with acetone under the conditions of saturation for the pressures in the working volume from 20 to 28 kPa. In all experiments, the third heat transfer crisis was preceded by propagation of evaporation front along the heating surface. The threshold values of heat flux densities, above which a stable vapor film is formed on the whole heating surface, are lower for vertical orientation of this heating surface than for the horizontal one. Data on the threshold heat flux densities and overheating before boiling-up were obtained. Above these values, formation of evaporation fronts was observed. The range of operation parameters corresponding to formation of the sites of unstable film boiling on the heating surface after boiling-up was determined.

  13. Characterization of Near Wall Surface Chemistry and Fluid Interaction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    l5Nl60 and 5N’ O titration gases to isolate surface-produced NO from all other possible sources. These experiments independently confirm the surface...For O-atom LIF, a Lambda-Physik ENG 103 XeCl Excimer laser was used to pump a Lambda-Physik FL 3002 dye laser filled with Coumarin 47 laser dye...system once isolated from the pump did slowly rise either from out-gassing of the system walls or from some undiscovered leak. In a separate experiment

  14. Estimating land surface heat flux using radiometric surface temperature without the need for an extra resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Yang, Y.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable in energy balance and is widely used for estimating regional heat flux. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero) poses a great challenge for regional heat flux estimation in one -source energy balance models. In this study, a one-source model for land (OSML) was proposed to estimate regional surface heat flux without a need for an empirical extra resistance. The proposed OSML employs both a conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analogue formula of sensible heat flux (H) to estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae) by using a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX), using a remotely-sensed data set at a regional scale. Validated against tower observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of H and latent heat flux (LE) from OSML was 47 W/m2 and 51 W/m2, which is comparable to other published studies. OSML and SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) compared under the same available energy indicated that LE estimated by OSML is comparable to that derived from the SEBS model. In conducting further inter-comparisons of rae, the aerodynamic resistance derived from SEBS (ra_SEBS), and aerodynamic resistance (ra) derived from Brutsaert et al. (2005) in corn and soybean fields, we found that rae and ra_SEBS are comparable. Most importantly, our study indicates that the OSML method is applicable without having to acquire wind speed or to specify aerodynamic surface characteristics and that it is applicable to heterogeneous areas.

  15. Energy and exergy evaluation of an integrated solar heat pipe wall ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The rate of increasing in temperature of air becomes negligible after 30 heat pipes and the trend of the thermal efficiency is descending with increasing heat pipes. The results also indicate that at a cold winter day of January, the proposed system with a 20 heat pipe collector shows maximum energy and exergy efficiency of ...

  16. RESEARCH OF EFFICIENCY OF WALL-MOUNTED BOILERS WITH SEALED CHAMBERS USED AS FLAT HEATING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khavanov Pavel Aleksandrovich

    2012-12-01

    the heating system analysis and to define the area of application of various systems of heat supply. The principal decision based on the basis of the above analysis is the decision to install an independent or a centralized system of heat supply.

  17. Conduction and convection heat transfer characteristics of water-based au nanofluids in a square cavity with differentially heated side walls subjected to constant temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternik Primož

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the natural convection in a square cavity filled with the water-based Au nanofluid. The cavity is heated on the vertical and cooled from the adjacent wall, while the other two horizontal walls are adiabatic. The governing differential equations have been solved by the standard finite volume method and the hydrodynamic and thermal fields were coupled together using the Boussinesq approximation. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the nanoparticles’ volume fraction on the heat transfer characteristics of Au nanofluids at the given base fluid’s (i.e. water Rayleigh number. Accurate results are presented over a wide range of the base fluid Rayleigh number and the volume fraction of Au nanoparticles. It is shown that adding nanoparticles in a base fluid delays the onset of convection. Contrary to what is argued by many authors, we show by numerical simulations that the use of nanofluids can reduce the heat transfer rate instead of increasing it.

  18. Radiant heat evaluation of concrete: a study of the erosion of concrete due to surface heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the erosion of concrete under high surface heat flux in connection with the core-melt/concrete interaction studies. The dominate erosion mechanism was found to be melting at the surface accompanied by chemical decomposition of the concrete beneath the melt-solid interface. The erosion process reaches a steady state after an initial transient. The steady state is characterized by an essentially constant erosion rate at the surface and a nonvarying (with respect to the moving melt interface) temperature distribution within the concrete. For the range of incident heat flux 64 W/cm/sup 2/ to 118 W/cm/sup 2/, the corresponding steady state erosion rate varies from approximately 8 cm/hr to 23 cm/hr. A simple ablation/melting model is proposed for the erosion process. The model was found to be able to correlate all temperature responses at various depths from all tests at large times and for temperatures above approximately 250/sup 0/C.

  19. Investigation into aerodynamic and heat transfer of annular channel with inner and outer surface of the shape truncated cone and swirling fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukhin, Yu L.; Pankratov, E. V.; Karpov, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    We have carried out Investigation into aerodynamic and convective heat transfer of the annular channel. Inner or outer surface of annular channel has shape of blunt-nosed cone tapering to outlet end. Truncated cone connects to a cyclone swirling flow generator. Asymmetric and unsteady flow from the swirling generator in the shape of periodic process gives rise to the formation of secondary flows of the type Taylor-Görtler vortices. These vortices occupy the whole space of the annular channel, with the axes, which coincide with the motion direction of the major stream. Contraction of cross-sectional area of channel (in both cases 52%) causes a marked increase in total velocity of flow, primarily due to its axial component and promotes a more intensive vortex generation. Vortex structures have a significant influence on both average heat transfer and surface distribution. At cross-sections of the annular channel we observe similarity of curves describing distribution of total velocity about wall and heat flux density on the surface. The coordinates of maximum and minimum values of velocity and heat flux coincide. At the average cross-section channel of maximum value of heat transfer is greater than minimum of about by a factor of 2.7 times for outer heat transfer surface and about by a factor of 1.7 times for inner heat transfer surface. Taper channel has a much higher influence on heat transfer of the inner surface than the outer surface and manifests itself at lower values of dimensionless axial coordinate. For the investigated taper cone geometry of the annular channel the heat transfer coefficient of inner surface increases at the outlet section and exceeds value in comparison with straight-line section by 91 … 98%. Heat transfer of the outer cylinder in the same section increases only by 5 … 11%. The increase in average heat transfer over the surfaces is 36% and 4% respectively.

  20. Numerical study of mixed convection and conduction in a 2-D square ventilated cavity with an inlet at the vertical glazing wall and outlet at the top surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.

    2011-02-01

    A steady state numerical study of combined laminar mixed convection and conduction heat transfer in a ventilated square cavity is presented. The air inlet gap is located at the bottom of a vertical glazing wall and air exits the cavity via a gap located at the top surface. Three locations for the opening at the top surface: left (case a), center (case b) and right side (case c) are considered. All the remaining surfaces are considered adiabatic. The mass, momentum and energy conservation equations were solved using the finite volume method for different Rayleigh numbers in the interval of 104 < Ra < 106 and Reynolds number in the interval of 100 < Re < 700. Temperature, flow field, and heat transfer rates are analyzed. The effect of the interaction between ambient conditions outside the glazing and the air inlet gap at the bottom for different air outlet gap positions at the top surface modifies the flow structure and temperature distribution of the air inside the cavity. The Nusselt number as a function of the Reynolds number was determined for the three cases. It was found that configuration for case (a) removes a higher amount of heat entering the cavity compared to cases (b) and (c). This is due to the short distance between the main stream and the glass wall surface. Thus, the forced airflow entering the cavity is assisted by the buoyancy forces, and most of the cavity remains at the inlet flow temperature, which should be appropriate for warm climates. These results may provide useful information about the heat transfer and fluid flow for future studies.

  1. Detailed Dynamic Heat Transfer in Thick Brick Walls Typical of Lille Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of thermal transfer in old houses massive walls offers a big interest permitting the understanding of their specificities and the choice of a suitable material for their eventual insulation. We propose to study the thermal transfer in massive brick walls that characterize the Northern Europe old houses. To do so, we will begin by defining the thermal transfer mode: we proved that the transfer mode can be reduced to a unidirectional transfer. Then, an experimental wall is built and submitted to two different solicitation types (constant temperature in steady state mode and sinusoidal temperature through a wooden insulated box containing a radiator. The interest of these solicitations is to determine the thermal properties of the wall: the steady-state regime permits to determine the thermal resistances of the system when the harmonic regime permits to determine the thermal capacities of the system.

  2. Vaporization heat transfer of dielectric liquids on enhanced surfaces covered with screen wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C. B.; Chow, L. C.; Pais, M. R.; Baker, K.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the vaporization heat transfer characteristics for the dielectric liquid FC-72 on several wicking surfaces which may be used in flat-plate heat pipes. The wicking materials studied included microstructure enhanced surfaces and coarse surfaces covered with screen meshes. Experimental data for q versus deltaT curves and critical heat fluxes were obtained for the two different operating conditions of a heat pipe, evaporation, and shallow pool boiling. When the liquid level was above the heated surface, the height of the liquid level above the surface was varied from 0 to 10 mm. When the liquid level was below the heated surface, the distance from the liquid level to the edge of the surface was adjusted from 0 to 15 mm. Experimental results revealed that for shallow pool boiling when the heated surface was covered with a wire screen mesh, the heat transfer coefficient increased at lower heat fluxes but the critical heat flux (CHF) decreased for all the surfaces tested. In the case of evaporation, both CHF and the heat transfer coefficient increased as the microstructure surfaces were covered with screen meshes.

  3. Optimization of mixed convection in a lid-driven porous square cavity with internal elliptic shape adiabatic block and linearly heated side walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, M. Jahirul Haque; Alim, M. A.; Bhuiyan, A. H.; Ali, M.

    2017-06-01

    The physical model considered here is a lid-driven porous square cavity with internal elliptic shape adiabatic block and linearly heated side walls. The top moving wall is well cold and set with uniform velocity. The bottom moving wall heated, linearly heated side walls and inside the elliptic shape adiabatic. The relevant parameters in the present study are Darcy number Da = 10-5-10-3, Grashof number Gr = 103-105, Reynolds number Re = 1-102 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. The isotherms are also almost symmetric at small Re with higher Gr (Gr = 105) and Da (Da = 10-3) and natural convection is found to be dominant whereas the isotherms are compressed near the left and bottom walls at higher Re for linearly heated side walls. The solution of these governing equations is obtained numerically with the finite element approach using the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. Results are presented in the form of streamlines, isotherms, Local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, velocity and temperature for the afore mentioned parameters. The numerical results indicate the strong influence of the mentioned parameters on the flow structure and heat transfer as well as average Nusselt number. An optimum combination of the governing parameters would result in higher heat transfer.

  4. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-12-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  5. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-07-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  6. Turbulent Mixed Convection of a Nanofluid in a Horizontal Circular Tube with Non-Uniform Wall Heat Flux Using a Two-Phase Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vahidinia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Turbulent mixed convective heat transfer of water and Al2O3 nanofluid has been numerically studied in a horizontal tube under non-uniform heat flux on the upper wall and insulation in the lower wall using mixture model. For the discretization of governing equations, the second-order upstream difference scheme and finite volume method were used. The coupling of pressure and velocity was established by using SIMPLEC algorithm. The calculated results demonstrated that the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid is higher than of the base fluid and by increasing the nanoparticles volume fraction, the convective heat transfer coefficient and shear stress on the wall increase. On the other hand, with increasing the Grashof number, the shear stress and convective heat transfer coefficient decrease.

  7. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  8. Mixed convection from a discrete heat source in enclosures with two adjacent moving walls and filled with micropolar nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh E. Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines numerically the thermal and flow field characteristics of the laminar steady mixed convection flow in a square lid-driven enclosure filled with water-based micropolar nanofluids by using the finite volume method. While a uniform heat source is located on a part of the bottom of the enclosure, both the right and left sidewalls are considered adiabatic together with the remaining parts of the bottom wall. The upper wall is maintained at a relatively low temperature. Both the upper and left sidewalls move at a uniform lid-driven velocity and four different cases of the moving lid ordinations are considered. The fluid inside the enclosure is a water based micropolar nanofluid containing different types of solid spherical nanoparticles: Cu, Ag, Al2O3, and TiO2. Based on the numerical results, the effects of the dominant parameters such as Richardson number, nanofluid type, length and location of the heat source, solid volume fractions, moving lid orientations and dimensionless viscosity are examined. Comparisons with previously numerical works are performed and good agreements between the results are observed. It is found that the average Nusselt number along the heat source decreases as the heat source length increases while it increases when the solid volume fraction increases. Also, the results of the present study indicate that both the local and the average Nusselt numbers along the heat source have the highest value for the fourth case (C4. Moreover, it is observed that both the Richardson number and moving lid ordinations have a significant effect on the flow and thermal fields in the enclosure.

  9. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Thakur, D.B.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon

  10. Thermal Bridge Effects in Walls Separating Rowhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures.......In this report the thermal bridge effects at internal wall/roof junctions in rowhouses are evaluated. The analysis is performed using a numerical calculation programme, and different solutions are evaluated with respect to extra heat loss and internal surface temperatures....

  11. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaporization heat transfer of dielectric liquids on a wick-covered surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C. B.; Chow, L. C.; Baker, K.

    1993-01-01

    Vaporization heat transfer characteristics were measured for the dielectric liquid FC-72 on a horizontal heated surface covered with wire screen wicks with the mesh number for the screens varying from 24 to 100. In such a situation the liquid level can be either higher or lower than the heated surface. When the liquid level was above the heated surface (shallow pool boiling), the height of the liquid level above the surface, h, was varied from 0 to 10 mm. When the liquid level was below the heated surface (evaporation through capillary pumping), the distance from the liquid level to the edge of the surface, L, was adjusted from 0 to 15 mm. Experimental data revealed that the critical heat flux (CHF) decreases as the mesh number is increased from 24 to 100 for both vaporation and shallow pool boiling, showing that the vapor-escaping limit is more important than the capillary limit in flat plate heat pipe application.

  13. Simulations of heat transfer through the cabin walls of rail vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster M.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with industrial application of numerical methods to the prediction of thermal situation in the rail vehicle interior. Basic principles of heat transfer are summarised to explain both theoretical background of simulations and engineering approach to solving temperature conditions in the vehicle interior. The main part of the contribution describes the solution of the locomotive driver’s cabin heating and controlling the temperature levels. This contribution is a brief overview of both possibilities of engineering modelling of heat transfer modes and results in the simulation of the real locomotive cabin heating/ventilation system design.

  14. Enhancement of heat transfer at pool boiling on surfaces with silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnov, E. A.; Shatskiy, E. N.; Khmel, S. Ya; Baranov, E. A.; Zamchiy, A. O.; Semionov, V. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    The boiling heat transfer on the local heaters with microstructured and nanomodified surfaces was studied. As nanomodified surfaces we used copper ones where the microropes of silicon oxide nanowires were grown. The aging of the nanomodified surface was observed after first series of experiments. It was shown that both finning and nanostructuring of the surface result in increase of heat transfer. The heat flux density of 1400 W/cm2 was reached.

  15. Impact of Fe powder sintering and soldering in production of porous heating surface on flow boiling heat transfer in minichannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depczyński Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on identification of the impact of porous heated surface on flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel. The heated element for Fluorinert FC-72 was a thin plate made of Haynes-230. Infrared thermography was used to determine changes in the temperature on its outer smooth side. The porous surface in contact with the fluid in the minichannel was produced in two processes: sintering or soldering of Fe powder to the plate. The results were presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance from the minichannel inlet and as boiling curves. Results obtained for using a smooth heated plate at the saturated boiling region were also presented to compare. In the subcooled boiling region, at a higher heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient was slightly higher for the surface prepared via soldering. In the saturated boiling region, the local heat transfer coefficients obtained for the smooth plate surface were slightly higher than those achieved from the sintered plate surface. The porous structures formed have low thermal conductivity. This may induce noticeable thermal resistance at the diffusion bridges of the sintered structures, in particular within the saturated boiling region.

  16. Impact of Fe powder sintering and soldering in production of porous heating surface on flow boiling heat transfer in minichannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depczyński, Wojciech; Piasecki, Artur; Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on identification of the impact of porous heated surface on flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel. The heated element for Fluorinert FC-72 was a thin plate made of Haynes-230. Infrared thermography was used to determine changes in the temperature on its outer smooth side. The porous surface in contact with the fluid in the minichannel was produced in two processes: sintering or soldering of Fe powder to the plate. The results were presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance from the minichannel inlet and as boiling curves. Results obtained for using a smooth heated plate at the saturated boiling region were also presented to compare. In the subcooled boiling region, at a higher heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient was slightly higher for the surface prepared via soldering. In the saturated boiling region, the local heat transfer coefficients obtained for the smooth plate surface were slightly higher than those achieved from the sintered plate surface. The porous structures formed have low thermal conductivity. This may induce noticeable thermal resistance at the diffusion bridges of the sintered structures, in particular within the saturated boiling region.

  17. Numerical Study of the Thermally Conductive Finite Thickness Walls Impact on Heat Transfer Regime in a Closed System in Conditions of Radiant Energy Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nee A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plane problem of thermogravitational convection in a closed rectangular cavity is numerically solved in conditions of radiant energy supply to the one of the boundaries. Differential heat transfer parameters (fields of temperatures and stream functions for the conjugate (only vertical walls, only horizontal, vertical and horizontal walls and the nonconjugate formulation are obtained. Temperature distributions in the Y direction in the cross section along the axis of symmetry showed that the presence of heat-conducting finite thickness walls leads to a redistribution of the energy which is accumulated by gas and enclosure structures.

  18. Experimental study of heat transfer enhancement due to the surface vibrations in a flexible double pipe heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinian, A.; Meghdadi Isfahani, A. H.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the heat transfer enhancement due to the surface vibration for a double pipe heat exchanger, made of PVDF, is investigated. In order to create forced vibrations (3-9 m/s2, 100 Hz) on the outer surface of the heat exchanger electro-dynamic vibrators are used. Experiments were performed at inner Reynolds numbers ranging from 2533 to 9960. The effects of volume flow rate and temperature on heat transfer performance are evaluated. Results demonstrated that heat transfer coefficient increases by increasing vibration level and mass flow rate. The most increase in heat transfer coefficient is 97% which is obtained for the highest vibration level (9 m/s2) in the experiment range.

  19. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  20. Multifunctional wall coating combining photocatalysis, self-cleaning and latent heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, S. S.; Barroso de Aguiar, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    Mortars, one of the most common construction materials, have not received any substantial modification for many decades. This has changed in recent years; new compositions are now being developed, with new properties, using nano-additives, fibres and capsules. In this work, surfaces with new and innovative functionalities that promote energy savings and improve air quality have been developed and studied. Incorporation of phase change materials (PCM) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in construction products is currently under study by different research groups. However, these studies only address their incorporation separately. Adding new additives into the mortar’s matrix can be complex—due to microstructural modifications that will influence both fresh and hardened state properties. Moving from a single additive to multiple additions, as in this study, increases the system’s complexity. Only with a good understanding of the microstructural properties, it is possible to add multiple additives (including nano and microparticles) to mortars, without damaging its final quality. This work demonstrates that a higher additive content is not always a guarantee of better results; lower additions can often provide a better compromise between performance and final mechanical properties. The results presented in this paper confirmed this and show that combining PCM microcapsules and TiO2 nanoparticles open a new path in the development of mortars with multiple functionalities. In this study, a new material with depolluting, self-cleaning and heat storage was created. For the development of new and innovative mortars, a proper balance of multiple additives, supported by the study of microstructural changes, can lead to an optimization of the compositions, ensuring that the mortar’s final properties are not affected.

  1. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  2. Preparation and property investigation of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/epoxy composite films as high-performance electric heating (resistive heating element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. X. Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT/epoxy composite films with a thickness of ~700 µm is prepared by a sequential process of premixing, post dispersing, film casting, and thermal curing. The effects of the physical shear dispersion on the properties of conductive polymer composites as the electric heating element are investigated. The scanning electron microscope (SEM images show that highly efficient conductive networks form with shear dispersions of MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. The electrical resistivity decreases sharply from ~1015 Ω·cm for the neat epoxy resin to ~102 Ω·cm for the composite film with 2.0 wt% MWCNTs in accordance with the percolation behaviour, and a low percolation threshold of ~0.018 wt% is fitted. The electric heating behaviour of the composite film is observed at a low MWCNT content of 0.05 wt% due to the high electrical conductivity. For the composite film with 2.0 wt% MWCNTs, an equilibrium temperature of 115 °C is reached at an applied voltage of 40 V within 30 s. The excellent electric heating behaviour, including the rapid temperature response, electric heating efficiency, and operational stability, is primarily related to the conductive two-dimensional networks consisting of MWCNTs and the thermodynamically stable polymer matrix.

  3. New Edge Localized Modes at Marginal Input Power with Dominant RF-heating and Lithium-wall Conditioning in EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.; Xu, G.; Guo, H.

    The EAST tokamak has achieved, for the rst time, the ELMy H-mode at a connement improvement factor HITER89P 1:7, with dominant RF heating and active wall conditioning by lithium evaporation and real-time injection of Li powder. During the H-mode phase, a new small-ELM regime has been observed...... of zonal flows. New observations have also been made on the type-III ELMs. Measurements from Mach probes have demonstrated a decreasing co-current rotation during type-III ELMs. These suggest that the type-III ELMs may transport substantial particles, energy and momentum out of the plasma. Each type...

  4. Wall heat transfer coefficient in a molten salt bubble column: testing the experimental setup

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available reactors that are highly exothermic or endothermic. This paper presents the design and operation of experimental setup used for measurement of the heat transfer coefficient in molten salt media. The experimental setup was operated with tap water, heat...

  5. Modulation of the wall-heat transfer in turbulent thermomagnetic convection by magnetic field gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Zinsmeester, R.; Pyrda, L.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.; Szmyd, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present combined experimental and numerical studies of the heat transfer of paramagnetic or diamagnetic fluid inside a differentially heated cubical enclosure subjected to the magnetic field gradients of different strength and orientation. In contrast to the previously reported studies in

  6. Measurement of Heat-Flux of New Type Façade Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Samardzioska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The building envelope makes the most significant contribution to the reduction of building energy consumption. The application of new, alternative and improved materials and systems has an important impact on the performance of buildings. This paper is focused on thermal transmittance as an indicator of thermal conduction of the construction element. It includes comparisons of the U-values calculated by software with those measured in-situ on three representative façade walls. The walls have been constructed with the new wall system Fragmat NZ-1, a new product in Macedonian buildings. This research provides basic information on the thermal transmittance of the system. The results of the analysis show that in-situ measuring is a useful tool in validating the precision of analytically calculated values, since it was difficult to obtain precise results from the analytical calculations only, especially when the layers have non-uniform thickness.

  7. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  8. The Use of Solar Heating and Heat Cured Polymers for Lunar Surface Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul; Curran, Jerry; Back, Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Dust ejecta can affect visibility during a lunar landing, erode nearby coated surfaces and get into mechanical assemblies of in-place infrastructure. Regolith erosion was observed at many of the Apollo landing sites. This problem needs to be addressed at the beginning of the lunar base missions, as the amount of infrastructure susceptible to problems will increase with each landing. Protecting infrastructure from dust and debris is a crucial step in its long term functionality. A proposed way to mitigate these hazards is to build a lunar launch pad. Other areas of a lunar habitat will also need surface stabilization methods to help mitigate dust hazards. Roads would prevent dust from being lifted during movement and dust free zones might be required for certain areas critical to crew safety or to critical science missions. Work at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is investigating methods of stabilizing the lunar regolith including: sintering the regolith into a solid and using heat or UV cured polymers to stabilize the surface. Sintering, a method in which powders are heated until fusing into solids, has been proposed as one way of building a Lunar launch/landing pad. A solar concentrator has been built and used in the field to sinter JSC-1 Lunar stimulant. Polymer palliatives are used by the military to build helicopter landing pads and roads in dusty and sandy areas. Those polymers are dispersed in a solvent (water), making them unsuitable for lunar use. Commercially available, solvent free, polymer powders are being investigated to determine their viability to work in the same way as the solvent borne terrestrial analog. This presentation will describe the ongoing work at KSC in this field. Results from field testing will be presented. Physical testing results, including compression and abrasion, of field and laboratory prepared samples will be presented.

  9. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel, E-mail: fabien.sauter@cea.fr, E-mail: michel.dewaard@ujf-grenoble.fr [Inserm U836, Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Site Sante la Tronche, Batiment Edmond J Safra, Chemin Fortune Ferrini, BP170, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-05-13

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  10. Effect of Surface Modification on the Hansen Solubility Parameters of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    In this work, seven types of surface-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the functional groups and extent of functionalization. Hansen solubility parameters were determined based on observations...... of the sedimentation and swollen states of the SWNTs in solvents after ultrasonication, and the results were compared with the hydrodynamic sizes of the SWNTs evaluated by the dynamic light scattering method. We found that the solubility of SWNTs is related to their functional groups and degree of functionalization...

  11. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Lee, K M; Chang, W S; Kim, D S; Rhee, G H; Choi, T Y

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature.

  12. Determination of Optimum Thermal Insulation Thicknesses for External Walls Considering the Heating, Cooling and Annual Energy Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, optimization of thermal insulation thickness applied to the external walls of buildings has been carried out comparatively based on the seasonal (space-heating and cooling and the annual energy requirements considering solar radiation effect. This study has been performed for four degree-day regions of Turkey, namely, Iskenderun (in the first region, Istanbul (in the second region, Ankara (in the third region and Ardahan (in the fourth region. By determining the sol-air temperatures for each region and maximizing the present worth value of seasonal and annual energy savings, the optimum thermal insulation thicknesses have been calculated. The effects of solar radiation on heating-cooling energy requirements, the variation of optimum insulation thicknesses and payback periods with respect to degree-day regions, the differences between the analyses based on seasonal and annual have been presented in tabular and graphical form.

  13. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  14. On the Heat Transfer through a Solid Slab Heated Uniformly and Continuously on One of Its Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Lara-Bernal, A.; Calderon, A.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Some peculiarities of the heat transfer through a sample that is heated by the superficial absorption of light energy under continuous uniform illumination are discussed. We explain, using a different approach to that presented in a recent article published in this journal (Salazar "et al" 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 1053-9), that the front surface of…

  15. Separating spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F.; Klaeui, M.; Backes, D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of domain wall motion and transformations due to injected current pulses in permalloy zigzag structures using off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating...... the SiN membranes with Al, heating effects are significantly reduced. A set of indicators is devised to separate unambiguously spin torque effects from heating and it is shown that by using the Al layer the structures are sufficiently cooled to exhibit current-induced domain wall motion due to spin...

  16. Unsteady MHD radiative flow and heat transfer of a dusty nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandeep

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic radiative flow and heat transfer characteristics of a dusty nanofluid over an exponentially permeable stretching surface in presence of volume fraction of dust and nano particles. We considered two types of nanofluids namely Cu-water and CuO-water embedded with conducting dust particles. The governing equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and solved numerically using Runge–Kutta based shooting technique. The effects of non-dimensional governing parameters namely magneticfield parameter, mass concentration of dust particles, fluid particle interaction parameter, volume fraction of dust particles, volume fraction of nano particles, unsteadiness parameter, exponential parameter, radiation parameter and suction/injection parameter on velocity profiles for fluid phase, dust phase and temperature profiles are discussed and presented through graphs. Also, friction factor and Nusselt numbers are discussed and presented for two dusty nanofluids separately. Comparisons of the present study were made with existing studies under some special assumptions. The present results have an excellent agreement with existing studies. Results indicated that the enhancement in fluid particle interaction increases the heat transfer rate and depreciates the wall friction. Also, radiation parameter has the tendency to increase the temperature profiles of the dusty nanofluid.

  17. Numerical modelling of temperature fields in the flow boiling liquid through a vertical minichannel with an enhanced heating surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hożejowska Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of heat transfer research on flow boiling in a rectangular minichannel positioned vertically, with an enhanced surface. One of the channel walls was made of thin foil powered by direct current. This foil is enhanced on the side contacting fluid in the minichannel. It is possible to observe both surfaces of the minichannel through two openings covered with glass panes. One allows detecting temperature of the plain side of the foil by liquid crystal thermography. The opposite surface of the minichannel (from the enhanced side of the foil can be observed through the other glass pane. The observations of the flow structures allowed to calculate the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected two phase flow images. In mathematical modelling of the considered process stationary heat transfer in a glass pane, heating foil and boiling liquid can be described with Laplace equation, Poisson equation and energy equation, respectively. For completeness of the model a corresponding system of boundary conditions was given. The two-dimensional temperature fields of glass pane, heating foil and fluid was computed with the Trefftz method. The equalizing calculus used to smooth the measured data has reduced errors.

  18. Film evaporation from a micro-grooved surface - An approximate heat transfer model and its comparison with experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Carey, V. P.

    1990-10-01

    An analytical model is presented that can be used to predict the heat-transfer characteristics of film evaporation on a microgroove surface. The model assumes that the liquid flow along a 'V' shaped groove channel is driven primarily by the capillary pressure difference due to the receding of the meniscus toward the apex of the groove, and the flow up the groove side wall is driven by the disjoining pressure difference. It also assumes that conduction across the thin liquid film is the dominant mechanism of heat transfer. A correlation between the Nusselt number and a nondimensional parameter Psi is developed from this model which relates the heat transfer for the microgroove surface to the fluid properties, groove geometry, and the constants for the disjoining pressure relation. The results of a limited experimental study of the heat transfer during vaporization of a liquid coolant on a microgroove surface are also reported. Film-evaporation transfer coefficients inferred from these experiments are found to correlate fairly well in terms of Nusselt number and Psi parameter format developed in the model. The results of this study suggest that disjoining pressure differences may play a central role in evaporation processes in microgroove channels.

  19. A modified force-restore approach to modeling snow-surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Luce; David G. Tarboton

    2001-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the energy balance of a snowpack requires good estimates of the snow surface temperature. The snow surface temperature allows a balance between atmospheric heat fluxes and the conductive flux into the snowpack. While the dependency of atmospheric fluxes on surface temperature is reasonably well understood and parameterized, conduction of heat from...

  20. Aram Chaos and its constraints on the surface heat flux of Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, S.; Zegers, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The surface heat flux of a planet is an important parameter to characterize its internal activity and to determine its thermal evolution. Here we report on a new method to constrain the surface heat flux of Mars during the Hesperian. For this, we explore the consequences for the martian surface

  1. Optimization of the heat output of wall convectors with using an unconventional slumped glass cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with study of a new shape of the glass cover of heat convectors. Design of the heat convectors is characterized by the low water volume, highly variable geometry, adjustable heat output and the pressure losses that arise when the fluid flow through the exchanger. Based on a new concept of a slumped glass cover of the exchanger have been created some numerical models and also carried out experiments in order to find and optimize an appropriate shape. The glass materials are very specific mainly due to their specific shaping abilities and technological capabilities of manufacturing. The aim is to determine an appropriate shape and a curvature of the glass body and also the position and size of the exchanger. It has been found a significant dependence of the heat exchanger position on to the total heat output of an entire device. Simultaneously has been proved also the dependence of a shape of the cover plate, to the total heat output, that is more considerably for natural than for the forced convection.

  2. Optimization of the heat output of wall convectors with using an unconventional slumped glass cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, Petr; Kleckova, Jitka; Petru, Michal; Havlicek, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with study of a new shape of the glass cover of heat convectors. Design of the heat convectors is characterized by the low water volume, highly variable geometry, adjustable heat output and the pressure losses that arise when the fluid flow through the exchanger. Based on a new concept of a slumped glass cover of the exchanger have been created some numerical models and also carried out experiments in order to find and optimize an appropriate shape. The glass materials are very specific mainly due to their specific shaping abilities and technological capabilities of manufacturing. The aim is to determine an appropriate shape and a curvature of the glass body and also the position and size of the exchanger. It has been found a significant dependence of the heat exchanger position on to the total heat output of an entire device. Simultaneously has been proved also the dependence of a shape of the cover plate, to the total heat output, that is more considerably for natural than for the forced convection.

  3. Analysis and optimization of the heat-insulating light concrete hollow brick walls design by the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coz Diaz, J.J. del; Betegon Biempica, C.; Prendes Gero, M.B. [Edificio Departamental Viesques, No 7, 33204 Gijon (Asturias) (Spain); Garcia Nieto, P.J. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias, C/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Asturias) (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Department of Public Works, owners and building proprietors are demanding high-capacity heat-insulating exterior masonry components specifically for further energy savings. For housing and industrial structures there is also a great interest in light building materials with good physical material behaviour, with respect to an energy conscious and ecological design, which fulfils all strength and serviceability requirements. The major variables influencing the thermal conductivity of masonry materials are illustrated in this work by taking blocks made from no-fine lightweight concrete and different mortar properties. The finite element method (FEM) is used for finding accurate solutions of the heat transfer equation for five different light concrete hollow brick walls. Mathematically, the non-linearity is due to the radiation boundary condition inside the inner recesses of the bricks. The conduction and convection phenomena are taking into account in this study for three different values of the mortar conductivity and three different values for the bricks. Optimization of the walls is carried out from the finite element analysis of five hollow brick geometries by means of the mass overall thermal efficiency and the equivalent thermal conductivity. Finally, conclusions of this work are exposed. (author)

  4. Chemically reacting micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer between expanding or contracting walls with ion slip, Soret and Dufour effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelu Ojjela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the Hall and ion slip currents on an incompressible free convective flow, heat and mass transfer of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium between expanding or contracting walls with chemical reaction, Soret and Dufour effects. Assume that the walls are moving with a time dependent rate of the distance and the fluid is injecting or sucking with an absolute velocity. The walls are maintained at constant but different temperatures and concentrations. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and then the resultant equations are solved numerically by quasilinearization technique. The results are analyzed for velocity components, microrotation, temperature and concentration with respect to different fluid and geometric parameters and presented in the form of graphs. It is noticed that with the increase in chemical reaction, Hall and ion slip parameters the temperature of the fluid is enhanced whereas the concentration is decreased. Also for the Newtonian fluid, the numerical values of axial velocity are compared with the existing literature and are found to be in good agreement.

  5. β-(1,3)-Glucan Unmasking in Some Candida albicans Mutants Correlates with Increases in Cell Wall Surface Roughness and Decreases in Cell Wall Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasim, Sahar; Allison, David P; Retterer, Scott T; Hopke, Alex; Wheeler, Robert T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Reynolds, Todd B

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common human fungal pathogens, causing a broad range of infections, including life-threatening systemic infections. The cell wall of C. albicans is the interface between the fungus and the innate immune system. The cell wall is composed of an outer layer enriched in mannosylated glycoproteins (mannan) and an inner layer enriched in β-(1,3)-glucan and chitin. Detection of C. albicans by Dectin-1, a C-type signaling lectin specific for β-(1,3)-glucan, is important for the innate immune system to recognize systemic fungal infections. Increased exposure of β-(1,3)-glucan to the immune system occurs when the mannan layer is altered or removed in a process called unmasking. Nanoscale changes to the cell wall during unmasking were explored in live cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two mutants, the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants, were selected as representatives that exhibit modest and strong unmasking, respectively. Comparisons of the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants to the wild type reveal morphological changes in their cell walls that correlate with decreases in cell wall elasticity. In addition, AFM tips functionalized with Dectin-1 revealed that the forces of binding of Dectin-1 to all of the strains were similar, but the frequency of binding was highest for the kre5Δ/Δ mutant, decreased for the cho1Δ/Δ mutant, and rare for the wild type. These data show that nanoscale changes in surface topology are correlated with increased Dectin-1 adhesion and decreased cell wall elasticity. AFM, using tips functionalized with immunologically relevant molecules, can map epitopes of the cell wall and increase our understanding of pathogen recognition by the immune system. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. β-(1,3)-Glucan Unmasking in Some Candida albicans Mutants Correlates with Increases in Cell Wall Surface Roughness and Decreases in Cell Wall Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasim, Sahar; Allison, David P.; Retterer, Scott T.; Hopke, Alex; Wheeler, Robert T.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is among the most common human fungal pathogens, causing a broad range of infections, including life-threatening systemic infections. The cell wall of C. albicans is the interface between the fungus and the innate immune system. The cell wall is composed of an outer layer enriched in mannosylated glycoproteins (mannan) and an inner layer enriched in β-(1,3)-glucan and chitin. Detection of C. albicans by Dectin-1, a C-type signaling lectin specific for β-(1,3)-glucan, is important for the innate immune system to recognize systemic fungal infections. Increased exposure of β-(1,3)-glucan to the immune system occurs when the mannan layer is altered or removed in a process called unmasking. Nanoscale changes to the cell wall during unmasking were explored in live cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two mutants, the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants, were selected as representatives that exhibit modest and strong unmasking, respectively. Comparisons of the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants to the wild type reveal morphological changes in their cell walls that correlate with decreases in cell wall elasticity. In addition, AFM tips functionalized with Dectin-1 revealed that the forces of binding of Dectin-1 to all of the strains were similar, but the frequency of binding was highest for the kre5Δ/Δ mutant, decreased for the cho1Δ/Δ mutant, and rare for the wild type. These data show that nanoscale changes in surface topology are correlated with increased Dectin-1 adhesion and decreased cell wall elasticity. AFM, using tips functionalized with immunologically relevant molecules, can map epitopes of the cell wall and increase our understanding of pathogen recognition by the immune system. PMID:27849179

  7. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  8. Performance analyses of helical coil heat exchangers. The effect of external coil surface modification on heat exchanger effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Muszyński, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    The shell and coil heat exchangers are commonly used in heating, ventilation, nuclear industry, process plant, heat recovery and air conditioning systems. This type of recuperators benefits from simple construction, the low value of pressure drops and high heat transfer. In helical coil, centrifugal force is acting on the moving fluid due to the curvature of the tube results in the development. It has been long recognized that the heat transfer in the helical tube is much better than in the straight ones because of the occurrence of secondary flow in planes normal to the main flow inside the helical structure. Helical tubes show good performance in heat transfer enhancement, while the uniform curvature of spiral structure is inconvenient in pipe installation in heat exchangers. Authors have presented their own construction of shell and tube heat exchanger with intensified heat transfer. The purpose of this article is to assess the influence of the surface modification over the performance coefficient and effectiveness. The experiments have been performed for the steady-state heat transfer. Experimental data points were gathered for both laminar and turbulent flow, both for co current- and countercurrent flow arrangement. To find optimal heat transfer intensification on the shell-side authors applied the number of transfer units analysis.

  9. Quantification of surface urban heat island intensity using impervious surface area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantification of urban heat island could contribute to efficiently evaluate potential heat risk. This paper come up with a new approach to calculate urban heat island intensity (UHII) using remote sensing data based on the linear regression slope between temperature and urban indicators. Urban fraction and sealing degree were used here as the urban indicators. Meanwhile, given the footprint of temperature measurement over each pixels, a new urban indicator, Urban Index, was calculated using sealing degree and Kernel Density Estimation. The results showed that the MODIS land surface temperature presents a strong linear correlation with the Urban Index, with R2 of 0.92 during the day and 0.94 at night compared to urban fraction and original sealing degree data. Further, the linear regression function between LST and Urban Index was used to analyze the SUHII characteristic. The daily SUHII show larger values in summer and during the day than in winter and at night with maximum values of 8.86, 9.22, 5.47 and 5.54 K at 11 am, 12:30am, 10 pm and 2 am, respectively. The new SUHII presents good correlation with the UHII calculated from the approach using in-situ measurements data, in particular at night. Given the good relationship between temperature and Urban Index, the potential heat stress risk is divided into five grades. The risk map is generated based on the spatial distribution of Urban Index.

  10. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... HAM conditions. The paper focuses on the influence of the interior surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients, and investigates its effect on the hygrothermal performance. The parameter study showed that the magnitude of the convective surface transfer coefficients have a relatively large...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  11. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... heat load is only present for a short time of the total engine cycle, it is a severe thermal load on the piston surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is generally more complicated than cooling of the other components of the combustion chamber. This can occasionally cause problems...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...

  12. Modeling, Characterization and Analysis of the dynamic behavior of heat transfers through polyethylene and glass walls of Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi-Triki, N.; Bendimerad, S.; Chermiti, A.; Mahdjoub, T.; Draoui, B.; Abène, A.

    The conventional agricultural tunnel greenhouse is highly widespread in Mediterranean countries, despite the shortcomings it presents, specifically the overheating during the day and the intense cooling at night. This can sometimes lead to an internal thermal inversion. The chapel-shaped glass greenhouse is relatively more efficient, but its evolution remains slow because of its investment cost and amortization. The objectives of the agricultural greenhouse are to create a microclimate that is favorable to the requirements and growth of plants from the surrounding climatic conditions and produce cheap off-season fruits, vegetables and flowers which must be highly available all along the year. The agricultural greenhouse is defined by its structural and functional architecture as well as by the optical, thermal and mechanical qualities of its wall and the accompanying technical support. The greenhouse is supposed to be a confined environment where there is an exchange of several components. The main intervening factors are: light, temperature and relative humidity. When protected, the culture heats up more than when in free air because of the wall that acts as a barrier to harmful influences of the wind and the surrounding climatic variations as well as to the reduction in internal air convection. This thermal evolution state depends on the air-tightness degree of the cover and its physical characteristics. It has to be transparent to solar rays, and must as well absorb and reflect infrared rays emitted by the soil. This leads to trapped solar rays, called the "greenhouse effect". In this article, we propose the dynamic modeling of the greenhouse system, the characterization and analysis of the thermal behavior of the wall for both experimental greenhouses, where the first one is made of polyethylene (tunnel greenhouse) and the second of glass (chapel-shaped greenhouse), throughout experimentation and simulation which finally lead to identifying the evolution in the

  13. Reduction of trapped ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. While the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that surface contaminants may be largely responsible. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of four in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially-available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally-activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  14. Slag and seed deposition on heat exchanger surfaces from gas-droplet mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, K. H.; Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Mechanisms of particulate deposition from turbulent streams to solid surfaces are first discussed. Two problems of current interest in MHD application are then analyzed. One is the collection of slag droplets on the interior wall of vertical tubes from the turbulent droplet-laden gas stream. Such processes take place during the cycle of the regenerative heat exchanger used to preheat combustion air. The other is the removal of sub-micron-size slag particles or collection of seed by a bank of staggered vertical tubes situated normal to the gas flow direction. Removal of both vapor and droplet phases of slag and seed is possible with such a system. While thermophoresis is found to be a strong function of the temperature difference between the gas stream and the film surface, it was found that lowering of the tube temperature may not greatly enhance the deposition rate because the lower temperature implies a thicker slag film, and the necessary temperature difference is not correspondingly increased.

  15. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m{sup -2} over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures ({approx}100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300-700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  16. Simulation of The Heat Transfer Process Inside The Thatch Walls with The Aim of Saving Energy in The Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Baseri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulation is one of the emphasized methods in recent years to reduce energy consumption in buildings. As an insulator, thatch has the advantages such as the accessibility of the site, the least energy consumption in its construction (low cost, recyclability and compatible with the nature and the environment. The aim of this study is determining of the heat transfer coefficient and thatch mechanical properties So that due to its advantages it used as insulation and thereby reducing energy consumption in buildings considered and used. In this study, the heat transfer process in a cylindrical turn of thatch was studied. In the conducted experiments the temperature changes inside a cylinder turn were determined for different values of the ratio of the Straw to the used soil and then the obtained results were simulated using the version 2.4 of the COMSOL software. The compressive strength and mechanical properties of thatch were tested. By increasing the consumed Straw weight of 50 to 90 kg per 1 cubic meter of soil, the heat conductivity coefficient from about 1.1 decreased to about 0.3 (W/m K, the contraction percentage decreased and the porous, the compressive strength and the thatch deformability increased in the failure. Thermal insulation and the mechanical properties of the thatch were improved by the mixing of appropriate ratio of straw to soil in the construction of thatch. It can be used in the plaster of the walls and the internal and external ceilings of the building.

  17. Numerical investigation of magnetic field effect on mixed convection heat transfer of nanofluid in a channel with sinusoidal walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, M.M., E-mail: mm_rashidi@sawtc.com [Shanghai Key Lab of Vehicle Aerodynamics and Vehicle Thermal Management Systems, Shanghai (China); ENN-Tongji Clean Energy Institute of Advanced Studies, Shanghai (China); Nasiri, Mohammad, E-mail: m.nasiri1989@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khezerloo, Marzieh, E-mail: m.khezerloo91@ms.tabrizu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Laraqi, Najib, E-mail: najib.laraqi@u-paris10.fr [Universite Paris 10, LTIE, EA 4415, GTE, 50 Rue de Sevres, F92410 Ville d' Avray (France)

    2016-03-01

    In this study, mixed convection heat transfer of nano-fluid flow in vertical channel with sinusoidal walls under magnetic field effect is investigated numerically. The heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics have been examined. This study has performed for 500≤Re≤1000, 5×104≤Gr≤1×106 , three amplitude sine wave (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) and three values of Hartman numbers (0, 5 and 10). Water was utilized as the base fluid and Al2O3 is the considered nano-particle. Flow is assumed two dimensional, laminar, steady and incompressible. As well the thermo-physical properties of nano-fluid are considered constant. The Boussinesq approximation used for calculated the density variations. The average Nusslet number increases by increasing the Grashof number for nano-fluids with different volume fraction. The average Nusselt and Poiseuille number increase as Reynolds number increases. Also, the average Nusselt number and Poiseuille number increases by increasing the Hartman number. - Highlights: • Mixed convection of nanofluid flow in a sinusoidal vertical channel is studied. • MHD effects on heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics are investigated. • The Nusselt number increases by adding the nanoparticles to the base fluid. • With applying a magnetic field, the velocity profile will be more uniform. • The Nusselt number increases by increasing the Hartman number.

  18. High heat flux testing of first wall mock-ups with and without neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pintsuk

    2016-12-01

    For qualification, all three flat-tile mock-ups were exposed to cyclic steady state heat loads in the electron beam facility JUDITH-1 up to a maximum of 3.0MW/m2. Thereby, each tile was loaded individually as the full loading area exceeds the limits of the facility.

  19. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter ...

  20. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, ...

  1. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results.

  2. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  3. The characteristics of turbulent surface flow in planar channel with imposed wall blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Y.; Lee, C.

    2011-10-01

    A recent study for cold flow development in an idealized hybrid rocket motor showed that energy spectra of streamwise velocity in the vicinity of the wall exhibited a peculiar local peak at a certain frequency. It is believed that the occurrence of this particular frequency, or time scale, is a direct consequence of flow modification resulting from the interaction of the main oxidizer flow with wall blowing during the process of regression. If external disturbances resulting from white noise or modified injector geometry are imposed on this hybrid system, a sudden amplification of flow instability may be realized in the form of violent oscillation. In this study, a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique was used to investigate the response of the flow in the vicinity of the propellant surface to the external forcing applied to the flow field. Results showed that both concentrated and distributed momentum forcings used in the present study did not lead to a sudden growth of instability or disastrous oscillation. However, the pressure field is thought to be more sensitive to the external forcing and exhibits relatively larger oscillations.

  4. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  5. Self-similar analysis of fluid flow, heat, and mass transfer at orthogonal nanofluid impingement onto a flat surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramenko, A. A.; Shevchuk, I. V.; Abdallah, S.; Blinov, D. G.; Tyrinov, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    Momentum, heat, and mass transfer in the vicinity of a stagnation point at uniform impingement of a nanofluid onto a flat plate were investigated. The novelty of the work consists in obtaining self-similar forms for the Hiemenz flow of a nanofluid and the self-similar representation of the velocity, thermal, and diffusion boundary layer equations derived on the basis of symmetry analysis using discrete symmetries. Momentum, energy, and concentration equations in the self-similar form were solved numerically. In frames of this analysis, functional dependence of the physical properties of nanofluids (viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient) on concentration and temperature profiles was included as a part of the mathematical model, whose form enables including different models for the thermophysical properties of the nanofluid. Also novel are numerical results that revealed the influence of the nanoparticle concentration on the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles, as well as on the normalized Nusselt numbers and surface friction coefficients illustrated in the form of analytical relations and graphically. The focus was put not only on modeling of heating of a colder wall by a hotter nanofluid but also on cooling of a hotter wall by a colder nanofluid. For the latter case, theoretical results were validated against experimental data available in the literature. Effects of various dimensionless parameters on the Nusselt number and surface friction coefficient were elucidated.

  6. Characterisation of a grooved heat pipe with an anodised surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. Brusly; Ram Kumar, A. M.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Senthil Kumar, C.; Sharifpur, Mohsen; Meyer, Josua P.

    2017-03-01

    A grooved heat pipe (GHP) is an important device for managing heat in space applications such as satellites and space stations, as it works efficiently in the absence of gravity. Apart from the above application, axial GHPs are used in many applications, such as electronic cooling units for temperature control and permafrost cooling. Improving the performance of GHPs is essential for better cooling and thermal management. In the present study, the effect of anodization on the heat transfer characteristics of a GHP is studied with R600a as a working fluid. In addition, the effects of fill ratio, inclination angle and heat inputs on the heat transfer performance of a GHP are studied. Furthermore, the effect of heat flux on dimensional numbers, such as the Webber, Bond, Kutateladze and condensation numbers, are studied. The inclination angle, heat input and fill ratio of GHPs are varied in the range of 0°-90°, 25-250 W and 10-70 % respectively. It is found that the above parameters have a significant effect on the performance of a GHP. Due to the anodisation, the maximum enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at the evaporator is 39 % for a 90° inclination at a heat flux of 11 kW/m2. The reported performance enhancement of a GHP may be due to the large numbers of nucleation sites created by the anodisation process and enhancement in the capillary force due to the coating.

  7. The laboratory investigation of surface envelope solitons: reflection from a vertical wall and collisions of solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Klein, Marco; Clauss, Günther F.

    2016-04-01

    Envelope soliton solutions are key elements governing the nonlinear wave dynamics within a simplified theory for unidirectional weakly modulated weakly nonlinear wave groups on the water surface. Within integrable models the solitons preserve their structure in collisions with other waves; they do not disperse and can carry energy infinitively long. Steep and short soliton-like wave groups have been shown to exist in laboratory tests [1] and, even earlier, in numerical simulations [2, 3]. Thus, long-living wave groups may play important role in the dynamics of intense sea waves and wave-structure interactions. The solitary wave groups may change the wave statistics and can be taken into account when developing approaches for the deterministic forecasting of dangerous waves, including so-called rogue waves. An experimental campaign has been conducted in the wave basin of the Technical University of Berlin on simulations of intense solitary wave groups. The first successful experimental observation of intense envelope solitons took place in this facility [1]. The new experiments aimed at following main goals: 1) to reproduce intense envelope solitons with different carrier wave lengths; 2) to estimate the rate of envelope soliton dissipation; 3) to consider the reflection of envelope solitons on a vertical wall; 4) to consider head-on collisions of envelope solitons, and 5) to consider overtaking interactions of envelope solitons. Up to 9 wave gauges were used in each experimental run, which enabled registration of the surface movement at different distances from the wavemaker, at different locations across the wave flume and near the wall. Besides surface displacements, the group envelope shapes were directly recorded, with use of phase shifts applied to the modulated waves generated by the wavemaker. [1] A. Slunyaev, G.F. Clauss, M. Klein, M. Onorato, Simulations and experiments of short intense envelope solitons of surface water waves. Phys. Fluids 25, 067105

  8. Experimental investigation of turbulent transport of momentum and heat in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guowen; Zheng, X. J.; Bo, Tianli

    2017-11-01

    In our study, turbulent transport of momentum and heat is investigated in the neutral and unstable atmospheric surface layer (ASL) over the edge of a desert. Our results reveal that with the increase of wind speed the transport efficiencies for momentum and heat increased, furthermore, transport efficiency of momentum increases faster than that of heat. In addition, the method of quadrant analysis and turbulent events were used to analyze the moment flux and heat flux. Experimental results show that the influence of wind speed on moment flux and heat flux can be quite different, which maybe has a great impact on the turbulent transport of momentum and heat in ASL.

  9. Analysis of Heat-and-Mass Transfer Conjugated Problem Solution while Forming Thin-Wall Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Еsman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of heat-and-mass transfer conjugated problem in case of moving of liquid melts in channels of metallic forms (moulds, dies, crystallizers etc.. Investigations of velocity profiles at various flow sections, current lines in the calculated area, pressure and viscosity fields in non-stationary state have been carried out in the paper.The paper reveals that current is of parabolic shape in the annular channel at rather large distance from a projection up and down the flow and pressure along channel section is practically unchangeable.The executed investigations of heat-and-mass transfer in the moving melt make it possible to create a data base of control parameters for development of prospective technologies  of special casting methods. 

  10. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Control of Complement Recognition and Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Robinson, Joshua T.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are receiving considerable attention in site-specific drug and nucleic acid delivery, photodynamic therapy, and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Despite these advances, nanotubes may activate the complement system (an integral part of innate immunity), which can induce...... clinically significant anaphylaxis. We demonstrate that single-walled CNTs coated with human serum albumin activate the complement system through C1q-mediated classical and the alternative pathways. Surface coating with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-based amphiphiles, which confers solubility and prolongs...... circulation profiles of CNTs, activates the complement system differently, depending on the amphiphile structure. CNTs with linear poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphiles trigger the lectin pathway of the complement through both l-ficolin and mannan-binding lectin recognition. The lectin pathway activation, however...

  11. A tri-continuous mesoporous material with a silica pore wall following a hexagonal minimal surface

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2009-04-06

    Ordered porous materials with unique pore structures and pore sizes in the mesoporous range (2-50nm) have many applications in catalysis, separation and drug delivery. Extensive research has resulted in mesoporous materials with one-dimensional, cage-like and bi-continuous pore structures. Three families of bi-continuous mesoporous materials have been made, with two interwoven but unconnected channels, corresponding to the liquid crystal phases used as templates. Here we report a three-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica, IBN-9, with a tri-continuous pore structure that is synthesized using a specially designed cationic surfactant template. IBN-9 consists of three identical continuous interpenetrating channels, which are separated by a silica wall that follows a hexagonal minimal surface. Such a tri-continuous mesostructure was predicted mathematically, but until now has not been observed in real materials. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  13. Investigation of Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger Designs for Fission Surface Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, Barry; Robbie, Malcolm; Geng, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Fission surface power is an option for future Moon and Mars surface missions. High power nuclear reactor heated Stirling convertors are an option to provide reliable power for long duration outpost operations. This report investigates various design approaches for the liquid metal to acceptor heat exchange and clarifies the details used in the analysis.

  14. Selecting the induction heating for normalization of deposited surfaces of cylindrical parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Валеріївна Бережна

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The machine parts recovered by electric contact surfacing with metal strip are characterized by high loading of the surface layer, which has a significant impact on their performance. Therefore, the improvement of the operational stability of fast-wearing machine parts through the use of combined treatment technologies is required. Not all the work-piece but just the worn zones are subjected to recovery with electric contact surfacing; the tape thickness and depth of the heat affected zone being not more than a few millimeters. Therefore, the most optimal in this case is the use of a local surface heating method of high frequency currents. This method has economical benefits because there is no need to heat the entire work-piece. The induction heating mode at a constant power density has been proposed and analytically investigated. The ratios that make it possible to determine the main heating parameters ensuring calculation of the inductor for the normalization of the reconstructed surface of cylindrical parts have been given. These parameters are: specific power, frequency and warm-up time. The proposed induction heating mode is intermediate between the quenching and cross-cutting heating and makes it possible to simultaneously obtain the required temperatures at the surface and at the predetermined depth of the heated layer of cylindrical parts with the normalization of their surfaces restored with electric contact surfacing

  15. An inverse method to estimate stem surface heat flux in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2009-01-01

    Models of wildland fire-induced stem heating and tissue necrosis require accurate estimates of inward heat flux at the bark surface. Thermocouple probes or heat flux sensors placed at a stem surface do not mimic the thermal response of tree bark to flames.We show that data from thin thermocouple probes inserted just below the bark can be used, by means of a one-...

  16. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  17. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zongshuang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiu, Li [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Chen, Yongkang, E-mail: y.k.chen@herts.ac.uk [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); University of Hertfordshire, School of Engineering and Technology, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites incorporating surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers were fabricated in a solution blending method in order to explore the dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites systematically. It is evident that surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on dispersibility of MWCNTs in PEEK, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. Typically, a clear effect of surface modifications of MWCNTs on tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites was observed. A significant reduction in frictional coefficient of MWCNT/PEEK composites with the MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine has been achieved and the self-lubricating film on their worn surfaces was also observed. - Highlights: • The dispersibility of surface modified MWCNTs in PEEK has been studied. • MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine have showed a good dispersion in PEEK. • Surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on both dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. - Abstract: The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e

  18. An Analytical Method for Determining the Convection Heat Transfer Coefficient Between Flowing Fluid and Rock Fracture Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing; He, Yuanyuan; Hu, Shaobin; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-07-01

    The convective heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is a useful indicator that characterizes the convective heat transfer properties between flowing fluid and hot dry rock. An analytical method is developed to explore a more realistic formula for the HTC. First, a heat transfer model is described that can be used to determine the general expression of the HTC. As one of the novel elements, the new model can consider an arbitrary function of temperature distribution on the fracture wall along the direction of the rock radius. The resulting Dirichlet problem of the Laplace equation on a semi-disk is successfully solved with the Green's function method. Four specific formulas for the HTC are derived and compared by assuming the temperature distributions along the radius of the fracture wall to be zeroth-, first-, second-, and third-order polynomials. Comparative verification of the four specific formulas based on the test data shows that the formula A corresponding to the zeroth-order polynomial always predicts stable HTC values. At low flow rates, the four formulas predict similar values of HTC, but at higher flow rates, formulas B and D, respectively, corresponding to the first- and third-order polynomials, predict either too large or too small values of the HTC, while formula C, corresponding to the second-order polynomial, predicts relatively acceptable HTC values. However, we cannot tell which one is the more rational formula between formulas A and C due to the limited information measured. One of the clear advantages of formula C is that it can avoid the drawbacks of the discontinuity of temperature and the singular integral of HTC at the points (± R, 0). Further experimental work to measure the actual temperature distribution of water in the fracture will be of great value. It is also found that the absorbed heat of the fluid, Q, has a significant impact on the prediction results of the HTC. The temperatures at the inlet and the outlet used for Q should be

  19. Monitoring the accumulated water soluble airborne compounds deposited on surfaces of showcases and walls in museums, archives and historical buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Lilian; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Svensmark, Bo

    2017-01-01

    to implement by curators and conservators, who can the send the flush water to specialized laboratories. Brief summary: A new methodology capable of monitoring the accumulated airborne deposits on surfaces in showcases and historic buildings is presented and tested. The method is cheap and is easy to implement...... themselves. This might make the compounds seem absent from analyses of indoor air samples. Context and purpose of the study: A new method of detecting water soluble pollutants without taking samples from the interior walls or from the CH objects themselves has been developed. The method involves sampling...... the pollutants accumulated on a surface near the CH object, e.g. a nearby wall or an interior glass surface of a showcase. The samples were obtained by gently flushing the surface with deionised water to collect the ions readily removed from the surface. The method was tested on a variety of surfaces. Results...

  20. Bernstein method for the MHD flow and heat transfer of a second grade fluid in a channel with porous wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sami Bataineh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approximate solution method for the problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow and heat transfer of a second grade fluid in a channel with a porous wall. The method is based on the Bernstein polynomials with their operational matrices and collocation method. Under some regularity conditions, upper bounds of the absolute errors are given. We apply the residual correction procedure which may estimate the absolute error to the problem. We may estimate the absolute error by using a procedure depends on the sequence of the approximate solutions. For some certain cases, we apply the method to the problem in the numerical examples. Moreover, we test the impact of changing the flow parameters numerically. The results are consistent with the results of Runge-Kutta fourth order method and homotopy analysis method.

  1. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde onto soil surfaces: a coated-wall flow tube study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Meusel, Hannah; Kuhn, Uwe; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important intermediate molecule and source of HO2 radicals. However, discrepancies exist between model simulated and observed HCHO concentrations, suggesting missing sources or sinks in the HCHO budget. Multiphase processes on the surface of soil and airborne soil-derived particles have been suggested as an important mechanism for the production/removal of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. In this work, the uptake of gaseous HCHO on soil surfaces were investigated through coated-wall flow tube experiments with HCHO concentration ranging from 10 to 40 ppbv. The results show that the adsorption of HCHO occurred on soil surfaces, and the uptake coefficient dropped gradually (i.e., by a factor of 5 after 1 hour) as the reactive surface sites were consumed. The HCHO uptake coefficient was found to be affected by the relative humidity (RH), decreasing from (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10-4 at 0% RH to (3.0 ± 0.08) × 10-5 at 70% RH, due to competition of water molecule absorption on the soil surface. A release of HCHO from reacted soil was also detected by applying zero air, suggesting the nature of reversible physical absorption and the existence of an equilibrium at the soil-gas interface. It implies that soil could be either a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on the ambient HCHO concentration. We also develop a Matlab program to calculate the uptake coefficient under laminar flow conditions based on the Cooney-Kim-Davis method.

  2. Comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of circular cooling fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityakov, V. Yu; Grekov, M. A.; Gusakov, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, S. Z.; Seroshtanov, V. V.; Bashkatov, A. V.; Dymkin, A. N.; Pavlov, A. V.; Milto, O. A.; Kalmykov, K. S.

    2017-11-01

    For the first time is proposed to combine heat flux measurements with thermal imaging and PIV (particle image velocimetry) for a comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of the circular cooling fin. The investigated hollow fin is heated from within with saturated water steam; meanwhile the isothermal external surface simulates one of the perfect fin. Flow and heat transfer at the surface of the solid fin of the same size and shape, made of titanium alloy is investigated in the same regimes. Gradient Heat Flux Sensors (GHFS) were installed at different places of the fin surface. Velocity field around a cylinder, temperature field at the surface of the fin and heat flux for each rated time were obtained. Comprehensive method including heat flux measurement, PIV and thermal imaging allow to study flow and heat transfer at the surface of the fin in real time regime. The possibility to study flow and heat transfer for non-isothermal fins is shown; it is allow to improve traditional calculation of the cooling fins.

  3. Conjugate transfer of heat and mass in unsteady flow of a micropolar fluid with wall couple stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Asma; Khan, Ilyas; Khan, Arshad; Shafie, Sharidan

    2015-12-01

    This is an attempt to investigate the unsteady flow of a micropolar fluid with free convection caused due to temperature and concentration differences. Micropolar fluid is taken over a vertical plate oscillating in its own plane. Wall couple stress is engaged at the bounding plate together with isothermal temperature and constant mass diffusion. Problem is modelled in terms of coupled partial differential equations together with some physical conditions and then written in non-dimensional form. Exact solutions are determined using the Laplace transform method. For convenience, they are expressed in simplified form using exponential functions and complementary error functions. Using computational software MATHCAD, analytical results of velocity, temperature, microrotation and concentration are plotted in graphs and discussed for various embedded parameters. Results of skin friction, wall couple stress, rate of heat transfer (Nusselt number) and rate of mass transfer (Sherwood number) are also evaluated. Present results of micropolar fluid are graphically compared with published results of Newtonian fluid. It is found that micropolar fluid velocity is smaller than Newtonian fluid.

  4. Conjugate transfer of heat and mass in unsteady flow of a micropolar fluid with wall couple stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Khalid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an attempt to investigate the unsteady flow of a micropolar fluid with free convection caused due to temperature and concentration differences. Micropolar fluid is taken over a vertical plate oscillating in its own plane. Wall couple stress is engaged at the bounding plate together with isothermal temperature and constant mass diffusion. Problem is modelled in terms of coupled partial differential equations together with some physical conditions and then written in non-dimensional form. Exact solutions are determined using the Laplace transform method. For convenience, they are expressed in simplified form using exponential functions and complementary error functions. Using computational software MATHCAD, analytical results of velocity, temperature, microrotation and concentration are plotted in graphs and discussed for various embedded parameters. Results of skin friction, wall couple stress, rate of heat transfer (Nusselt number and rate of mass transfer (Sherwood number are also evaluated. Present results of micropolar fluid are graphically compared with published results of Newtonian fluid. It is found that micropolar fluid velocity is smaller than Newtonian fluid.

  5. The TX-model - a quantitative heat loss analysis of district heating pipes by means of IR surface temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinki, Heimo [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analysing the temperature profile at the ground surface above buried district heating pipes in such a way that would enable the quantitative determination of heat loss from the pair of pipes. In practical applications, it is supposed that this temperature profile is generated by means of advanced IR-thermography. For this purpose, the principle of the TX - model has been developed, based on the fact that the heat losses from pipes buried in the ground have a temperature signature on the ground surface. Qualitative analysis of this temperature signature is very well known and in practical use for detecting leaks from pipes. These techniques primarily make use of relative changes of the temperature pattern along the pipe. In the quantitative heat loss analysis, however, it is presumed that the temperature profile across the pipes is related to the pipe heat loss per unit length. The basic idea is that the integral of the temperature profile perpendicular to the pipe, called TX, is a function of the heat loss, but is also affected by other parameters such as burial depth, heat diffusivity, wind, precipitation and so on. In order to analyse the parameters influencing the TX- factor, a simulation model for the energy balance at the ground surface has been developed. This model includes the heat flow from the pipe to the surface and the heat exchange at the surface with the environment due to convection, latent heat change, solar and long wave radiation. The simulation gives the surprising result that the TX factor is by and large unaffected during the course of a day even when the sun is shining, as long as other climate conditions are relatively stable (low wind, no rain, no shadows). The results from the simulations were verified at different sites in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and USA through a co-operative research program organised and partially financed by the IEA District Heating Programme, Task III, and

  6. Estimation of surface Latent Heat Fluxes from IRS-P4/MSMR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    latent heat flux from satellite data. Liu and Niiler. (1984) and Liu (1986) applied the bulk formula to retrieve the surface LHF using near surface para- meters derived from satellite data. This method, hereafter referred to as the LN method, uses geo- physical parameters such as winds, sea surface tem- perature and surface ...

  7. Evaluating the role of ivy (Hedera helix) in moderating wall surface microclimates and contributing to the bioprotection of historic buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Troy; Viles, Heather [Oxford University, School of Geography, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY (United Kingdom); Cathersides, Alan [English Heritage, Conservation Department, Kemble Drive, Swindon SN2 2GZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The role of ivy (Hedera helix L.) on building walls is much debated, with arguments being put forward for it playing a biodeteriorative role (for example through ivy rootlets exploiting cracks and holes) as well as suggestions that it might provide some bioprotection (for example by the ivy canopy protecting the walls from other agents of deterioration such as frost). We have carried out a year-long study of the influence that ivy canopies play on wall surface microclimates at five sites across a range of climatic settings within England, using iButtons to monitor temperature and relative humidity fluctuations at the wall surface on ivy-covered and exposed walls. Hourly data illustrates a general mediating effect of ivy canopies on both temperature and relative humidity regimes. The ivy reduces extremes of temperature and relative humidity, with the most clearcut differences for temperature. Across all five sites the average daily maximum temperature was 36% higher and the average daily minimum temperature 15% lower on exposed vs ivy-covered surfaces. Differences in the exposure level of studied walls (i.e. whether they are shaded or not by trees or other walls) influenced the degree of microclimatic alteration provided by the ivy canopy. Other important factors influencing the strength of the ivy impact on microclimate were found to be thickness of the canopy and aspect of the wall. A detailed analysis of one site, Byland in North Yorkshire, illustrates the seasonal differences in impact of ivy on microclimates, with insulation against freezing being the dominant effect in January, and the removal of high temperature 'spikes' the dominant effect in July. The observed moderating role of ivy canopies on wall surface microclimates will reduce the likelihood of frost and salt deterioration to the building materials, thus contributing to their conservation. Further research needs to be done on other potentially deteriorative roles of ivy before an overall

  8. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Convective Flow of a Colloidal Suspension in a Vertical Slot Heated from Side Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, I. N.; Smorodin, B. L.

    2017-12-01

    Convective flows and the transport of nanoparticles are numerically investigated in the vertical slot filled with a colloidal suspension and heated from the side. The thermodiffusion and gravitational sedimentation of the nanoparticles are taken into account. Two different regimes of laminar flow are found. The intensity of the first regime is much lower than in molecular liquids (the magnitudes of the convective and diffusion fluxes have the same order). The second regime is more intensive. The transitions between these two regimes are investigated. It is shown that intensive convective flow completely mixes the colloidal suspension to a homogeneous state as a result of the long transient process.

  10. Effect of size sprinkled heat exchange surface on developing boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kracík

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents research of sprinkled heat exchangers. This type of research has become rather topical in relation to sea water desalination. This process uses sprinkling of exchangers which rapidly separates vapour phase from a liquid phase. Applications help better utilize low-potential heat which is commonly wasted in utility systems. Low-potential heat may increase utilization of primary materials. Our ambition is to analyse and describe the whole sprinkled exchanger. Two heat exchangers were tested with a similar tube pitch: heat exchanger no. 1 had a four-tube bundle and heat exchanger no. 2 had eight-tube bundle. Efforts were made to maintain similar physical characteristics. They were tested at two flow rates (ca 0.07 and 0.11 kg s−1 m−1 and progress of boiling on the bundle was observed. Initial pressure was ca 10 kPa (abs at which no liquid was boiling at any part of the exchanger; the pressure was then lowered. Other input parameters were roughly similar for both flow rates. Temperature of heating water was ca 50°C at a constant flow rate of ca 7.2 L min−1. Results of our experiments provide optimum parameters for the given conditions for both tube bundles.

  11. Near-surface heat flow in Saline Valley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, C.W.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.; Munroe, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    With the exception of values from one borehole drilled at Palm Spring and three boreholes drilled around Saline Valley dry lake, eight new heatflow values in Saline Valley, California, are within or somewhat below the range one would expect for this region of the Basin and Range heat-flow province. The lack of recent volcanism in the area and the apparently normal Basin and Range heat flow suggest that geothermal systems within the valley are stable stationary phases supported by high regional heat flow and forced convection.

  12. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Narayanan, S.; Möller, S. A.; Clark, R.; Lee, T. E.; Leek, P. J.; Wallraff, A.; Schulz, St.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Häffner, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 μm. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation, the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion-loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and the possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed onto metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

  13. Immersion Condensation on Oil-Infused Heterogeneous Surfaces for Enhanced Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing condensation heat transfer is important for broad applications from power generation to water harvesting systems. Significant efforts have focused on easy removal of the condensate, yet the other desired properties of low contact angles and high nucleation densities for high heat transfer performance have been typically neglected. In this work, we demonstrate immersion condensation on oil-infused micro and nanostructured surfaces with heterogeneous coatings, where water droplets nucleate immersed within the oil. The combination of surface energy heterogeneity, reduced oil-water interfacial energy, and surface structuring enabled drastically increased nucleation densities while maintaining easy condensate removal and low contact angles. Accordingly, on oil-infused heterogeneous nanostructured copper oxide surfaces, we demonstrated approximately 100% increase in heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensation surfaces in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work offers a distinct approach utilizing surface chemistry and structuring together with liquid-infusion for enhanced condensation heat transfer. PMID:23759735

  14. High-speed PIV measurements of the near-wall flow field over hairy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, Andrea; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    The geometry of the barn owl wing, that is, the planform, the camber line, and the thickness distribution, differs significantly from the wing geometry of other bird species of comparable weight and size. Moreover, the owl wing possesses special features like a velvet-like surface, fringes on the trailing edge, and a serrated leading edge. The influence on the flow field of one of the specific adaptations of the owl wing, namely the velvet-like surface structure on the suction side, was analyzed via high-speed particle-image velocimetry. Measurements were performed in a Reynolds number range of 40,000 ≤ Re c ≤ 120,000 based on the chord length and angles of attack of 0° ≤ α ≤ 6°. As a reference, a clean wing model which possesses the geometry of a natural owl wing with its distinct nose region and large thickness in conjunction with a small chordwise position of the maximum thickness was measured. A separation bubble on the suction side of the wing was found to be the dominant flow feature. The results were compared with measurements performed with the same model geometry covered with two artificial surface structures that resemble the surface of the natural wing to investigate the influence of these surfaces on the flow field. The first artificial textile, referred to as velvet 1, was selected to imitate the filament length, density, and thus the softness of the natural surface. Velvet 2, the second artificial texture, possesses longer, softer filaments and a preferred filament direction. A strong influence of the surface structures on the flow field was found for both velvet structures. The velvet seems to force the transition process in the wall-bounded shear layer at higher Reynolds numbers by redistributing the turbulent kinetic energy and thus enables the flow to reattach earlier. This leads to a stabilization and in some cases even to a reduction of the size of the separation bubble on the suction side of the wing.

  15. Solar Energy Gain and Space-Heating Energy Supply Analyses for Solid-Wall Dwelling Retrofitted with the Experimentally Achievable U-value of Novel Triple Vacuum Glazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saim Memon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A considerable effort is devoted to devising retrofit solutions for reducing space-heating energy in the domestic sector. Existing UK solid-wall dwellings, which have both heritage values and historic fabric, are being improved but they tend to have meagre thermal performance, partly, due to the heat-loss through glazings. This paper takes comparative analyses approach to envisage space-heating supply required in order to maintain thermal comfort temperatures and attainable solar energy gains to households with the retrofit of an experimentally achievable thermal performance of the fabricated sample of triple vacuum glazing to a UK solid-wall dwelling. 3D dynamic thermal models (timely regimes of heating, occupancy, ventilation and internal heat gains of an externally-insulated solid-wall detached dwelling with a range of existing glazing types along with triple vacuum glazings are modelled. A dramatic decrease of space-heating load and moderate increase of solar gains are resulted with the dwelling of newly achievable triple vacuum glazings (having centre-of-pane U-value of 0.33 Wm-2K-1 compared to conventional glazing types. The space-heating annual cost of single glazed dwellings was minimised to 15.31% (≈USD 90.7 with the retrofit of triple-vacuum glazings. An influence of total heat-loss through the fabric of solid-wall dwelling was analysed with steady-state calculations which indicates a fall of 10.23 % with triple vacuum glazings compared to single glazings.

  16. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect.

  17. Flow of Oldroyd 8-constant fluid in a scraped surface heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, A.; Siddiqui, A. M.; Rana, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the flow of the Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model in a scraped surface heat exchanger (SSHE) is studied. We have taken the steady incompressible isothermal flow of a fluid around a periodic arrangement of pivoted scraper blades in a channel for a generalized Poiseuille flow, and the flow is modeled using the lubrication-approximation theory (LAT), where as in SSHE the gaps between the blades and the device walls are narrow. Using these approximations we got the non-linear boundary value problem which is solved using the Adomian decomposition method. Expressions for velocity profiles for different regions, flow rates, stream function are obtained. Graphical and tabular representation for the velocity profile and for the different flow parameters involved is also incorporated. Foodstuffs behave as non-Newtonian material, possess shear-thinning and shear-thickening effects, so they are considered for the understanding of non-Newtonian effects inside the SSHE Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model. In addition to food industry this work will also be helpful in pharmaceutical and chemical industries as most of the materials used in the industry are non-Newtonian in nature.

  18. Use of surface plasmon resonance to investigate lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of polydopamine films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cui, Dafu; Cai, Haoyuan; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Xing; Sun, Jianhai; Chao, Yapeng

    2013-03-15

    Dopamine (DA) is a particularly important neurotransmitter. Polydopamine (pDA) films have been demonstrated to be important materials for the immobilization of biomolecules onto almost any type of solid substrate. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensor system with the sensor chip surface parallel to the direction of gravity was used to investigate the lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of pDA films. The deposition kinetics of pDA Films are limited by the oxidation process. The pDA film could not be removed from the sensor chip completely by a strongly alkaline solution, indicating that the pDA film was heterogeneous in the direction of deposition. The pDA film formed near the interior of the solution was less stable than the film formed near the gold-solution interface. Adsorption of proteins on pDA film was studied compared with that on bare gold and dextran sensor chip. The reduction of Au(111) cations by the pDA film, forming a layer of gold particles, was monitored using SPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube surface control of complement recognition and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Alina J; Robinson, Joshua T; Dai, Hongjie; Hunter, A Christy; Andresen, Thomas L; Moghimi, S Moein

    2013-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are receiving considerable attention in site-specific drug and nucleic acid delivery, photodynamic therapy, and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Despite these advances, nanotubes may activate the complement system (an integral part of innate immunity), which can induce clinically significant anaphylaxis. We demonstrate that single-walled CNTs coated with human serum albumin activate the complement system through C1q-mediated classical and the alternative pathways. Surface coating with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-based amphiphiles, which confers solubility and prolongs circulation profiles of CNTs, activates the complement system differently, depending on the amphiphile structure. CNTs with linear poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphiles trigger the lectin pathway of the complement through both L-ficolin and mannan-binding lectin recognition. The lectin pathway activation, however, did not trigger the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. An amphiphile with branched poly(ethylene glycol) architecture also activated the lectin pathway but only through L-ficolin recognition. Importantly, this mode of activation neither generated anaphylatoxins nor induced triggering of the effector arm of the complement system. These observations provide a major step toward nanomaterial surface modification with polymers that have the properties to significantly improve innate immunocompatibility by limiting the formation of complement C3 and C5 convertases.

  20. Micro Injection Molding of Thin Walled Geometries with Induction Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate defects and improve the quality of molded parts, increasing the mold temperature is one of the applicable solutions. A high mold temperature can increase the path flow of the polymer inside the cavity allowing reduction of the number of injection points, reduction of part thickness...... and moulding of smaller and more complex geometries. The last two aspects are very important in micro injection molding. In this paper a new embedded induction heating system is proposed and validated. An experimental investigation was performed based on a test geometry integrating different aspect ratios...... of small structures. ABS was used as material and different combinations of injection velocity, pressure and mold temperature were tested. The replicated test objects were measured by means of an optical CMM machine. On the basis of the experimental investigation the efficacy of the embedded induction...

  1. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens: Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Jacqueline Wilhelmien

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  2. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens : Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  3. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Craciunescu, O. I.; Schlorff, J. L.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temperature and thermal dose distributions of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators (TBSAs) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial diseases. A steady-state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of a water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of the hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSAs in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm2) and L-shaped (875 cm2) TBSAs. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the dual-input dual-output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady-state temperature and thermal dose distributions of the rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10-15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (Tb = 38-43 °C), water flow rate (Qb = 2-4 L min-1) and tumor blood perfusion (ωb = 2-5 kg m-3 s-1) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Steady-state SAR patterns of the R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside the tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at a 2 L min-1 water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (Tb) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 °C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10-15 mm from the surface even under significant blood perfusion. Lower bolus

  4. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  5. An inverse hyperbolic heat conduction problem in estimating surface heat flux by the conjugate gradient method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.-H.; Wu, H.-H. [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronic Engineering National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2006-09-21

    In the present study an inverse hyperbolic heat conduction problem is solved by the conjugate gradient method (CGM) in estimating the unknown boundary heat flux based on the boundary temperature measurements. Results obtained in this inverse problem will be justified based on the numerical experiments where three different heat flux distributions are to be determined. Results show that the inverse solutions can always be obtained with any arbitrary initial guesses of the boundary heat flux. Moreover, the drawbacks of the previous study for this similar inverse problem, such as (1) the inverse solution has phase error and (2) the inverse solution is sensitive to measurement error, can be avoided in the present algorithm. Finally, it is concluded that accurate boundary heat flux can be estimated in this study.

  6. A new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Jianing; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling system was proposed and established using the conduction shape factor. Measured data from references were used to validate the proposed model. The results showed...... that the maximum differences between the calculated surface temperature and heat transfer using the proposed model and the measured data were 0.8 ºC and 8.1 W/m2 for radiant floor heating system when average water temperature between 40 ºC and 60 ºC. For the corresponding values were 0.3 ºC and 2.0 W/m2...... for radiant floor cooling systems when average water temperature between 10 ºC and 20 ºC. Numerically simulated data in this study were also used to validate the proposed model. The results showed that the surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor calculated by the proposed model agreed very well...

  7. The modeling of heat affected zone (HAZ in submerged arc welding (SAW surfacing steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Winczek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work the bimodal heat source model in the description of the temperature field is presented. The electric arc was treated physically as one heat source, whose heat was divided: part of the heat is transferred by the direct impact of the electric arc, but another part of the heat is transferred to the weld by the melted material of the electrode. Computations of the temperature field during SAW surfacing of S355 steel element are carried out. The macrographic and metallographic analysis of the weld confirmed the depth and shapes of the fusion line and HAZ defined by the numerical simulation.

  8. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  9. CFD simulation of simultaneous monotonic cooling and surface heat transfer coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihálka, Peter, E-mail: usarmipe@savba.sk; Matiašovský, Peter, E-mail: usarmat@savba.sk [Institute of Construction and Architecture, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 03 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-07-07

    The monotonic heating regime method for determination of thermal diffusivity is based on the analysis of an unsteady-state (stabilised) thermal process characterised by an independence of the space-time temperature distribution on initial conditions. At the first kind of the monotonic regime a sample of simple geometry is heated / cooled at constant ambient temperature. The determination of thermal diffusivity requires the determination rate of a temperature change and simultaneous determination of the first eigenvalue. According to a characteristic equation the first eigenvalue is a function of the Biot number defined by a surface heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity of an analysed material. Knowing the surface heat transfer coefficient and the first eigenvalue the thermal conductivity can be determined. The surface heat transport coefficient during the monotonic regime can be determined by the continuous measurement of long-wave radiation heat flow and the photoelectric measurement of the air refractive index gradient in a boundary layer. CFD simulation of the cooling process was carried out to analyse local convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients more in detail. Influence of ambient air flow was analysed. The obtained eigenvalues and corresponding surface heat transfer coefficient values enable to determine thermal conductivity of the analysed specimen together with its thermal diffusivity during a monotonic heating regime.

  10. Full Scale Investigation of the Dynamic Heat Storage of Concrete Decks with PCM and Enhanced Heat Transfer Surface Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the full-scale experimental investigation of the dynamic heat storage potential of the prefabricated hollow core deck elements with and without phase change material (PCM) and with and without increased bottom surface area of the decks. In the presented investigation five types...... can result in the increased heat amount that can be transferred and stored in the heavy construction element during the diurnal indoor temperature fluctuations.......The paper presents the full-scale experimental investigation of the dynamic heat storage potential of the prefabricated hollow core deck elements with and without phase change material (PCM) and with and without increased bottom surface area of the decks. In the presented investigation five types...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Frosting on Wavy Fin-and-tube Heat Exchanger Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Wu, X. M.; Chu, F.; Zhu, B.

    2017-11-01

    Frost on fin surfaces of the heat exchanger increases thermal resistance and blocks air flow passage, which reduces the system energy efficiency. In this paper, a frosting model based on Euler multi-phase flow proposed before is used to simulate the frost layer growth process on wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces. The model predicts the frost layer and temperature distributions on the heat exchanger surfaces. The air flow pressure drops before and after frosting have been obtained. The results show that the frost layer is unevenly distributed and no frost appears on the fin surfaces in the tube wake region. Frost on the wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces restricts the airflow and the pressure drop increases about 140% after 45 min frosting. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  13. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse.

  14. Penetrative Internal Oxidation from Alloy 690 Surfaces and Stress Corrosion Crack Walls during Exposure to PWR Primary Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszta, Matthew J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    Analytical electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe tomography (ATP) examinations of surface and near-surface oxidation have been performed on Ni-30%Cr alloy 690 materials after exposure to high-temperature, simulated PWR primary water. The oxidation nanostructures have been characterized at crack walls after stress-corrosion crack growth tests and at polished surfaces of unstressed specimens for the same alloys. Localized oxidation was discovered for both crack walls and surfaces as continuous filaments (typically dislocations were oxidized in non-deformed materials, while the oxidation path appeared to be along more complex dislocation substructures in heavily deformed materials. This paper will highlight the use of high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy in combination with APT to better elucidate the microstructure and microchemistry of the filamentary oxidation.

  15. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  16. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  17. Complement activation by PEG-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes is independent of PEG molecular mass and surface density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Windschiegl, Barbara; Ilbasmis-Tamer, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylated (4%) multi-walled carbon nanotubes were covalently functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol)1000 (PEG1000), PEG1500 and PEG4000 with a PEG loading of approximately 11% in all cases. PEG loading generated non-uniform and heterogeneous higher surface structures and increased nanotube w...

  18. Modelling of boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the flue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for the relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verification is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  19. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tong; Zhao, Yunliang; Xiao, Qihang; Ma, Qiulin; Kang, Shichang; Li, Hongqiang; Song, Shaoxian

    The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol) compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol). However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite.

  20. Thermal Advantages for Solar Heating Systems with a Glass Cover with Antireflection Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    Investigations elucidate how a glass cover with antireflection surfaces can improve the efficiency of a solar collector and the thermal performance of solar heating systems. The transmittances for two glass covers for a flat-plate solar collector were measured for different incidence angles...... was determined for different solar heating systems. Three systems were investigated: solar domestic hot water systems, solar heating systems for combined space heating demand and domestic hot water supply, and large solar heating plants. The yearly thermal performance of the systems was calculated by detailed...... simulation models with collectors with a normal glass cover and with a glass cover with antireflection surfaces. The calculations were carried out for different solar fractions and temperature levels of the solar heating systems. These parameters influence greatly the thermal performance associated...

  1. Measuring heat balance residual at lake surface using distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Rimmer, A.; Lechinsky, Y.; Wenker, K.J.R.; Nussboim, S.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a new method to verify the measurements of surface fluxes and the heat balance at a lake surface, by means of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) measurements from 0.5 m above to 1.5 m below the surface. Using a polyvinyl chloride hyperboloid construction, a floating

  2. Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma‐Ray spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, B. C; McLennan, S. M; Klein, E. C

    2011-01-01

    .... As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation...

  3. A Revised Estimate of Earth's Surface Heat Flux: 47TW ± 2TW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Davies, R.

    2011-12-01

    Earth's surface heat flux provides a fundamental constraint on solid Earth dynamics. However, deriving an estimate of the total surface heat flux is complex, due to the inhomogeneous distribution of heat flow measurements and difficulties in measuring heat flux in young oceanic crust, arising due to hydrothermal circulation. We derive a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux using a database of 38347 measurements (provided by G. Laske and G. Masters), representing a 55% increase on the number of measurements used previously, and the methods of Geographical Information Science (GIS) (Davies & Davies, 2010). To account for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust, we use a model estimate of the heat flux, following the work of Jaupart et al., 2007; while for the rest of the globe, in an attempt to overcome the inhomogeneous distribution of measurements, we develop an average for different geological units. Two digital geology data sets are used to define the global geology: (i) continental geology - Hearn et al., 2003; and (ii) the global data-set of CCGM - Commission de la Carte Géologique du Monde, 2000. This leads to > 93,000 polygons defining Earth's geology. To limit the influence of clustering, we intersect the geology polygons with a 1 by 1 degree (at the equator) equal area grid. For each geology class the average heat flow in the resulting polygons is evaluated. The contribution of that geology class to the global surface heat flow is derived by multiplying the estimated surface heat flux with the area of that geology class. The total surface heat flow contributions of all the geology classes are summed. For Antarctica we use an estimate based on depth to Curie temperature and include a 1TW contribution from hot-spots in young ocean age. Geology classes with less than 50 readings are excluded. The raw data suggests that this method of correlating heat flux with geology has some power. Our revised estimate for Earth's global surface heat flux

  4. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  5. Linking surface-fire behavior, stem heating, and tissue necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.S. Bova; M.B. Dickinson; M.B. Dickinson

    2005-01-01

    Data from 69 experimental, small-plot fires are used to describe relationships among fire intensity, barksurface heat flux, and depth of necrosis in stem tissue for red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.j. A tetrazolium staining technique was used to determine the depth of necrosis in tree boles subjected to fires with intensities of 20 to 2000...

  6. Thermal and Fluid Dynamic Performance of Pin Fin Heat Transfer Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sahiti, Naser

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is organized into nine Chapters. Chapter 2 gives an overview of some highly effec-tive heat transfer surfaces used basically for the enhancement of single-phase convective heat transfer in the air conditioning, refrigeration, unit air heater and automobile industries. It follows the analysis of basic parameters that influence the performance of the fins and at the end a rela-tively simple analytical method for the assessment of the order of the magnitude of heat transfer enhanceme...

  7. Characterization of bacterial community inhabiting the surfaces of weathered bricks of Nanjing Ming city walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi-Wang; Ma, Guang-You; He, Lin-Yan; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2011-01-15

    Nanjing Ming city wall, one of the important historic heritages in China, has greatly suffered weathering. Microbes play an important role in the weathering of historic buildings. However, little is known about the microbial community inhabiting naturally weathered brick minerals and their roles in the mineral weathering. To examine the associations between microorganisms and brick weathering process, we compare the phylogenetic diversity, abundance, community structure, and specific functional groups of bacteria existing in weathered bricks by using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Si-releasing bacteria. DGGE and sequence analyses show that the bacterial communities were different along a weathering gradient and the abundance of bacterial communities positively and significantly correlates with the extent of brick weathering. Laboratory brick mineral dissolution experiments indicate that bacteria isolated from the surfaces of weathered brick were very effective in enhancing brick dissolution. Phylogenetic analyses show that the weathered bricks were inhabited by specific functional groups of bacteria (Bacillus, Massillia, Brevibacillus, Glacialice, Acinetobacter, Brachysporum, and Achromobacter) that contribute to the brick weathering. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  9. Control of wave-driven turbulence and surface heating on the mixing of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Proskurowski, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    Buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) is a pollutant in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) that is submerged by turbulent transport processes. Langmuir circulation (LC) is a turbulent process driven by wind and surface waves that enhances mixing in the OSBL. Sea surface cooling also contributes to OSBL turbulence by driving convection. On the other hand, sea surface heating stratifies and stabilizes the water column to reduce turbulent motion. We analyze observed MPMD surface concentrations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to reveal a significant increase in MPMD concentrations during surface heating and a decrease during surface cooling. Turbulence resolving large eddy simulations of the OSBL for an idealized diurnal heating cycle suggest that turbulent downward fluxes of buoyant tracers are enhanced at night, facilitating deep submergence of plastics, and suppressed in heating conditions, resulting in surface trapped MPMD. Simulations agree with observations if enhanced mixing due to LC is included. Our results demonstrate the controlling influence of surface heat fluxes and LC on turbulent transport in the OSBL and on vertical distributions of buoyant marine particles.

  10. Heat Transfer Mechanism of a Vertical Wall Inside a Two-Phase Closed Thermosiphon Evaporator and Its Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O-Uchi, Masaki; Hirose, Koichi; Saito, Futami

    The inside heat transfer coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, and heat flow rate at the heating section of the thermosiphon were determined for each heating method. In order to observe the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator, a thermosiphon unit made of glass was assembled and conducted separately. The results of these experiments with these two units are summarized as follows. (1) Nucleate boiling due to the internal heat transfer mechanism improves the heat transfer characteristics of the thermosiphon unit. Under the specific heating conditions with dropwise condensation, there are two types of heat transfer mechanism occur in the evaporator accompanying nucleate boiling, i. e. latent heat transfer and sensible heat transfer. (2) In the case of latent heat transfer, the inside heat transfer coefficient has an upper limit which can be used as a criterion to determine the type of internal heat transfer mechanism.

  11. Heat Transfer Enhancement During Water and Hydrocarbon Condensation on Lubricant Infused Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J; Lu, Zhengmao; Song, Youngsup; Zhao, Yajing; Wilke, Kyle L; Antao, Dion S; Louis, Marcel; Wang, Evelyn N

    2018-01-11

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat or separating fluids. Dropwise condensation, where discrete droplets form on the condenser surface, offers a potential improvement in heat transfer of up to an order of magnitude compared to filmwise condensation, where a liquid film covers the surface. Low surface tension fluid condensates such as hydrocarbons pose a unique challenge since typical hydrophobic condenser coatings used to promote dropwise condensation of water often do not repel fluids with lower surface tensions. Recent work has shown that lubricant infused surfaces (LIS) can promote droplet formation of hydrocarbons. In this work, we confirm the effectiveness of LIS in promoting dropwise condensation by providing experimental measurements of heat transfer performance during hydrocarbon condensation on a LIS, which enhances heat transfer by ≈450% compared to an uncoated surface. We also explored improvement through removal of noncondensable gases and highlighted a failure mechanism whereby shedding droplets depleted the lubricant over time. Enhanced condensation heat transfer for low surface tension fluids on LIS presents the opportunity for significant energy savings in natural gas processing as well as improvements in thermal management, heating and cooling, and power generation.

  12. Heat transfer in a stagnation point flow of a second grade fluid over a stretching surface with heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Ali Attia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer in a steady planar stagnation point flow of an incompressible non-Newtonian second grade fluid impinging on a permeable stretching surface with heat generation or absorption is examined. The governing nonlinear momentum and energy equations are solved numerically using finite differences. The influence of the characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid, the surface stretching velocity, the heat generation/ absorption coefficient, and Prandtl number on both the flow and heat transfer is reported.

  13. Attenuation of Temperature Fluctuations on an External Surface of the Wall by a Phase Change Material-Activated Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Heim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodical changes of temperature on an external surface of building envelope, e.g., thermal stress or excessive heat gains, is often an undesirable phenomenon. The idea proposed and described in the following paper is to stabilize the external surface temperature in a period of significant heat gains by the originally developed, novel composite modified by phase change material (PCM and applied as an external, thin finishing plaster layer. The PCM composite is made from porous, granulated perlite soaked with paraffin wax (Tm = 25 °C and macro-encapsulated by synthetic resin. The effect of temperature attenuation was estimated for two designated periods of time—the heat gains season (HGS and the heat losses season (HLS. The attenuation coefficient (AC was proposed as evaluation parameter of isothermal storage of heat gains determining the reduction of temperature fluctuations. The maximum registered temperature of an external surface for a standard insulation layer was around 20 K higher than for the case modified by PCM. The calculated values of AC were relatively constant during HGS and around two times lower for PCM case. The obtained results confirmed that the proposed modification of an external partition by equipped with additional PCM layer can be effectively used to minimize temperature variations and heat flux in the heat gains season.

  14. Heat transfer and vascular cambium necrosis in the boles of trees during surface fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. B. Dickinson

    2002-01-01

    Heat-transfer and cell-survival models are used to link surface fire behavior with vascular cambium necrosis from heating by flames. Vascular cambium cell survival was predicted with a numerical model based on the kinetics of protein denaturation and parameterized with data from the literature. Cell survival was predicted for vascular cambium temperature regimes...

  15. Color and surface chemistry changes of extracted wood flour after heating at 120 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Nicole M. Stark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of heat on color and surface chemistry of wood flour (WF), unextracted, extracted and delignified samples of commercial WF were heated at 120 °C for 24 h and analyzed by colorimetry, diffuse reflectance visible (DRV), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopies....

  16. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  17. Experimental study of curvature effects on jet impingement heat transfer on concave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the local and average heat transfer characteristics of a single round jet impinging on the concave surfaces was conducted in this work to gain in-depth knowledge of the curvature effects. The experiments were conducted by employing a piccolo tube with one single jet hole over a wide range of parameters: jet Reynolds number from 27000 to 130000, relative nozzle to surface distance from 3.3 to 30, and relative surface curvature from 0.005 to 0.030. Experimental results indicate that the surface curvature has opposite effects on heat transfer characteristics. On one hand, an increase of relative nozzle to surface distance (increasing jet diameter in fact enhances the average heat transfer around the surface for the same curved surface. On the other hand, the average Nusselt number decreases as relative nozzle to surface distance increases for a fixed jet diameter. Finally, experimental data-based correlations of the average Nusselt number over the curved surface were obtained with consideration of surface curvature effect. This work contributes to a better understanding of the curvature effects on heat transfer of a round jet impingement on concave surfaces, which is of high importance to the design of the aircraft anti-icing system.

  18. Heat pipe and surface mass transfer cooling of hypersonic vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Gene T.; Modlin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heating using heat pipe and mass transfer cooling techniques is addressed. A description is presented of a numerical finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model incorporating poststartup liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling to predict the transient structural temperature distributions and maximum surface temperatures of hypersonic vehicle leading edge. An application of this model to the transient cooling of a typical aerospace plane wing leading-edge section. The results of this application indicated that liquid metal heat pipe cooling alone is insufficient to maintain surface temperatures below an assumed maximum level of 1800 K for about one-third of a typical aerospace plane ascent trajectory through the earth's atmosphere.

  19. Heat transfer to a full-coverage film-cooled surface with 30 degree slant-hole injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M. E.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer behavior was studied in a turbulent boundary layer with full coverage film cooling through an array of discrete holes and with injection 30 deg to the wall surface in the downstream direction. Stanton numbers were measured for a staggered hole pattern with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 5 and 10, an injection mass flux ratio range of 0.1 to 1.3, and a range of Reynolds number Re sub x of 150,000 to 5 million. Air was used as the working fluid, and the mainstream velocity varied from 9.8 to 34.2 m/sec (32 to 112 ft/sec). The data were taken for secondary injection temperature equal to the wall temperature and also equal to the mainstream temperature. The data may be used to obtain Stanton number as a continuous function of the injectant temperature by use of linear superposition theory. The heat transfer coefficient is defined on the basis of a mainstream-to-wall temperature difference. This definition permits direct comparison of performance between film cooling and transpiration cooling. A differential prediction method was developed to predict the film cooling data base. The method utilizes a two-dimensional boundary layer program with routines to model the injection process and turbulence augmentation. The program marches in the streamwise direction, and when a row of holes is encountered, it stops and injects fluid into the boundary layer. The turbulence level is modeled by algebraically augmenting the mixing length, with the augmentation keyed to a penetration distance for the injected fluid.

  20. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  1. Linking potential heat source and sink to urban heat island: Heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Cao, Qiwen; Lang, Kun; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-05-15

    Rapid urbanization has significantly contributed to the development of urban heat island (UHI). Regulating landscape composition and configuration would help mitigate the UHI in megacities. Taking Shenzhen, China, as a case study area, we defined heat source and heat sink and identified strong and weak sources as well as strong and weak sinks according to the natural and socioeconomic factors influencing land surface temperature (LST). Thus, the potential thermal contributions of heat source and heat sink patches were differentiated. Then, the heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on LST were examined by using semiparametric geographically weighted regression (SGWR) models. The results showed that landscape composition has more significant effects on thermal environment than configuration. For a strong source, the percentage of patches has a positive impact on LST. Additionally, when mosaicked with some heat sink, even a small improvement in the degree of dispersion of a strong source helps to alleviate UHI. For a weak source, the percentage and density of patches have positive impacts on LST. For a strong sink, the percentage, density, and degree of aggregation of patches have negative impacts on LST. The effects of edge density and patch shape complexity vary spatially with the fragmentation of a strong sink. Similarly, the impacts of a weak sink are mainly exerted via the characteristics of percent, density, and shape complexity of patches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Formation of transition metal cluster adducts on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes: HRTEM studies

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    We report the formation of chromium clusters on the outer walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The clusters were obtained by reacting purified SWNTs with chromium hexacarbonyl in dibutyl ether at 100°C. The functionalized SWNTs were characterized by thermogravimetic analysis, XPS, and high-resolution TEM. The curvature of the SWNTs and the high mobility of the chromium moieties on graphitic surfaces allow the growth of the metal clusters and we propose a mechanism for their formation. © 2014 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  3. Enhanced biocompatibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by surface modification: Future perspectives for drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhi, C. M. S.; Asath, R. Mohamed; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2017-05-01

    Surface modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was carried out by introducing mixture of concentrated sulphuric acid and nitric acid by ultrasonication process. The pristine and surface modified MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. FT-IR spectra revealed that the presence of carboxylic acid functional groups on the surface of MWCNTs. The integrated intensity ratio of pristine and surface modified MWCNTs was calculated by Raman spectroscopic analysis. XRD patterns examines the crystallinity of the surface modified MWCNTs. SEM analysis investigates the change in morphology of the surface modified MWCNTs compared with that of pristine, which is due to the attachment of the carboxylic acid functional groups. Surface modified MWCNTs acts as precursors for further functionalization with various biomolecules, which improves the biocompatibility and initiates the implementation of MWCNTs in the field of nanomedicine and targeted drug delivery.

  4. Analysing the potential of retrofitting ultra-low heat loss triple vacuum glazed windows to an existing UK solid wall dwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saim Memon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat loss through the windows of solid wall dwellings is one of the factors contributing to high energy consumption for space heating ensuing in preventable carbon emissions. This research forms a part of novel contribution in vacuum glazing science presenting the refurbishment technology of an experimentally achievable thermal performance of triple vacuum glazing to existing UK solid wall dwelling by investigating the space-heating load, solar energy gain and window to wall area ratios. Three-dimensional dynamic thermal models, considering realistic heating and occupancy regimes, of an externally insulated solid wall dwelling with single glazed, double glazed air filled, double glazed argon gas filled, triple glazed air filled and triple vacuum glazed windows were developed. Predictions for the simulated dwelling when replacing single glazed windows with triple vacuum glazed windows indicate space-heating energy saving of 14.58% (871.1 kWh for the winter months (Dec, Jan and Feb; predicted annual energy savings are 15.31% (1863.5 kWh. The predicted reduction in the solar energy gains for the triple vacuum glazing was 75.3 kWh in the winter months. The effects on solar energy gain are analysed and the potential to increase window-to-wall area ratios (WWR’s examined. For a simulated room with triple vacuum glazed windows increasing the WWR’s from 5% to 59% led to a reduction in the predicted required space-heating; whilst for a room with single glazed, double air filled, double argon gas filled and triple air filled windows the predicted required space-heating increased with increasing WWR. It was shown that retrofitting existing solid wall dwelling with triple vacuum glazed windows could be a robust retrofit solution in improving building energy efficiency. This research also implicates a need of the cost-effective development of triple vacuum glazing at the manufacturing level, which would then be more beneficial to consumers in terms of

  5. Modelling of Boiler Heating Surfaces and Evaporator Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the ue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equation systems (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for these relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verication is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  6. Heat transfer at evaporation of falling films of Freon mixture on the smooth and structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecherkin, N. I.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Volodin, O. A.

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigation of heat transfer and hydrodynamics of falling films of binary mixtures of R21 and R114 freons on the surfaces with complex configuration. The vertical tubes of 50-mm diameter with the smooth and structured surfaces, made of D16T alloy, were used as the working sections. The range of film Reynolds number at the inlet to the working section was Re =10÷155. The image of wave surface of the falling liquid film was visualized and recorded by a high-speed digital video camera. At evaporation the heat transfer coefficients on the smooth and structured surfaces are determined by the liquid flow rate and weakly depend on the heat flux. At low liquid flows, the heat transfer coefficients on the structured surface decrease in comparison with the smooth surface because of liquid accumulation and enlargement of efficient thickness in microtexture channels. At high liquid flows, a change in the structure of the wave film surface leads to an increase in heat transfer coefficients in comparison with the smooth surface.

  7. Effect of Plane Couette Flow on Natural Convection in a Vertical Slot with Side-Wall Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Shuhei; Fujimura, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    In a vertical slot with side-wall heating, and depending on the Prandtl number Pr, both steady and oscillatory modes are known to yield a critical condition. Linear stability analysis reveals that a superimposed plane Couette flow yields an instability of the third kind that arises with a Reynolds number in the range - 0.3 ≲ Re ≲ - 0.1 for Pr ≳ 2.15. We focus on this third instability mode. Weakly nonlinear analysis indicates a nonlinear degeneracy occurring on the linear critical curve in the (Re,Gr)-plane where Gr is the Grashof number. Near the upper bound of the Reynolds number range for the existence of the mode, bifurcation on a segment of the critical curve is subcritical. Fully-numerical analysis shows the solution branch extending far from the linearly unstable wavenumber band and exhibiting a complicated bifurcation structure. Near the lower bound, in contrast, bifurcation is supercritical and its characteristics are well explained using weakly nonlinear analyses.

  8. The Surface Reactivities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Related Toxicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei

    After 20 years of extensive exploration, people are more and more convinced on the great potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the applications of many different areas. On the other hand, the properties and toxicities have also been closely watched for the safe utilization. In this dissertation I focus on the surface properties of SWCNTs and their related toxicities. In chapter 2, we revealed the generation of peroxyl radical by the unmodified SWCNT and the poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized SWCNT in aqueous solution with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF). According to the results, we identified peroxyl radical, ROO• as the major ROS in our system. Peroxyl radical could be produced from the adsorption of oxygen on the SWCNT surface. In chapter 3, we studied oxidation of several biologically relevant reducing agents in the presence of SWCNTs in aqueous solutions. H2DCF and several small antioxidants (vitamin C, Trolox, and cysteine), and a high-molecular-weight ROS scavenger (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were selected as reductants. We revealed that the unmodified or carboxylated SWCNT played duplex roles by acting as both oxidants and catalysts in the reaction. In chapter 4, we confirmed that SWCNTs bind to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at a site proximate to the enzyme's activity center and participating in the ET process, enhancing the activity of (HRP) in the solution-based redox reaction. The capability of SWCNT in receiving electrons and the direct attachment of HRP to the surface of SWCNT strongly affected the enzyme activity due to the direct involvement of SWCNT in ET. In chapter 5, the toxicity of SWCNTs coated with different concentrations of BSA to a human fibroblast cell line was explored. The result indicates that the toxicity of SWCNTs decrease with the higher coating degree as assumed. Then we choose mitochondrion to study the interactions between

  9. Evaporation Heat Transfer of HCFC 22 on the Grooved Surfaces Inside a Horizontal Rectangular Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Osao; Uehara, Haruo

    The evaporation heat transfer performance on six kinds of grooved surface with 0.15 mm to 0.34 mm of the groove pitch was obtained using a rectangular channel. The upper and lower surfaces inside a horizontal rectangular channel, 10 mm in width, 5 mm in height, and 500 mm in length, were heated electrically by Nichrome heaters. HCFC 22 was used as a working fluid. Evaporating pressure was 0.49 MPa, heat flux was 4.65 kW/m2, vapor quality was varied from 0.1 to 0.9, and mass velocity was varied from 86 to 345 kg/(m2s). The empirical correlations to predict the heat transfer coefficients on upper and lower surfaces were proposed. The maximum heat transfer coefficient on upper surface is obtained on the grooved surface with 2 × 10-8 of the modified bond number. Heat transfer coefficient on lower surface isn't influenced by the groove geometries except for lead angle.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms are more resistant to heat treatment than traditional hydrated biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, A; Tahir, S; Hu, H; Chowdhury, D; Gosbell, I B; Jensen, S O; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Glasbey, T; Vickery, K

    2018-02-01

    The importance of biofilms to clinical practice is being increasingly realized. Biofilm tolerance to antibiotics is well described but limited work has been conducted on the efficacy of heat disinfection and sterilization against biofilms. To test the susceptibility of planktonic, hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm forms of Staphylococcus aureus, to dry-heat and wet-heat treatments. S. aureus was grown as both hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm in the CDC biofilm generator. Biofilm was subjected to a range of temperatures in a hot-air oven (dry heat), water bath or autoclave (wet heat). Dry-surface biofilms remained culture positive even when treated with the harshest dry-heat condition of 100°C for 60min. Following autoclaving samples were culture negative but 62-74% of bacteria in dry-surface biofilms remained alive as demonstrated by live/dead staining and confocal microscopy. Dry-surface biofilms subjected to autoclaving at 121°C for up to 30min recovered and released planktonic cells. Recovery did not occur following autoclaving for longer or at 134°C, at least during the time-period tested. Hydrated biofilm recovered following dry-heat treatment up to 100°C for 10min but failed to recover following autoclaving despite the presence of 43-60% live cells as demonstrated by live/dead staining. S. aureus dry-surface biofilms are less susceptible to killing by dry heat and steam autoclaving than hydrated biofilms, which are less susceptible to heat treatment than planktonic suspensions. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progress in remote sensing of global land surface heat fluxes and evaporations with a turbulent heat exchange parameterization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Bob

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing has provided us an opportunity to observe Earth land surface with a much higher resolution than any of GCM simulation. Due to scarcity of information for land surface physical parameters, up-to-date GCMs still have large uncertainties in the coupled land surface process modeling. One critical issue is a large amount of parameters used in their land surface models. Thus remote sensing of land surface spectral information can be used to provide information on these parameters or assimilated to decrease the model uncertainties. Satellite imager could observe the Earth land surface with optical, thermal and microwave bands. Some basic Earth land surface status (land surface temperature, canopy height, canopy leaf area index, soil moisture etc.) has been produced with remote sensing technique, which already help scientists understanding Earth land and atmosphere interaction more precisely. However, there are some challenges when applying remote sensing variables to calculate global land-air heat and water exchange fluxes. Firstly, a global turbulent exchange parameterization scheme needs to be developed and verified, especially for global momentum and heat roughness length calculation with remote sensing information. Secondly, a compromise needs to be innovated to overcome the spatial-temporal gaps in remote sensing variables to make the remote sensing based land surface fluxes applicable for GCM model verification or comparison. A flux network data library (more 200 flux towers) was collected to verify the designed method. Important progress in remote sensing of global land flux and evaporation will be presented and its benefits for GCM models will also be discussed. Some in-situ studies on the Tibetan Plateau and problems of land surface process simulation will also be discussed.

  12. FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF PEARLITIC S.G. CAST IRONS AFTER LASER SURFACE HEAT TREATMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Pantelis, D.; Chambolle, D.; Parent-Simonin, S.; Poupeau, Ph.

    1991-01-01

    The laser transformation hardening does not improve the fatigue resistance of two pearlitic S.G. cast irons, using as surface preparation BN coating, sandblasting or phosphatation. On the treated surface, the initial pearlite is transformed into martensite. In the treated layer, further under the treated surface, a martensitic microstructure with traces of incompletely dissolved cementite can be observed. A bidimensional numerical heat transfer model has been developed for surface transformat...

  13. Surface-Enhanced and Normal Stokes and Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, K.; Kneipp, H.; Corio, P.; Brown, S. D. M.; Shafer, K.; Motz, J.; Perelman, L. T.; Hanlon, E. B.; Marucci, A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2000-04-01

    Surface enhancement factors of at least 1012 for the Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotubes in contact with fractal silver colloidal clusters result in measuring very narrow Raman bands corresponding to the homogeneous linewidth of the tangential C-C stretching mode in semiconducting nanotubes. Normal and surface-enhanced Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra are discussed in the framework of selective resonant Raman contributions of semiconducting or metallic nanotubes to the Stokes or anti-Stokes spectra, respectively, of the population of vibrational levels due to the extremely strong surface-enhanced Raman process, and of phonon-phonon interactions.

  14. Sensible and Latent Heat Exchange at the Soil Surface Beneath a Maize Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Thomas John

    Soil heat and vapor exchange at the soil surface beneath a plant canopy was measured using heat and vapor source plates. Data from field and laboratory experiments were used to derive equations predicting interfacial heat and vapor transfer coefficients for inclusion in an existing, comprehensive soil-plant-atmosphere model, Cupid. Heat and vapor source plates constructed of anodized aluminum (305 by 864 mm by 13 mm thick) were installed level with the soil surface within a maize (Zea mays, L.) field to provide an area of known and controllable temperature and/or vapor pressure and sensible and/or latent heat flux. Sensible heat flux density was determined from an energy budget analysis while evaporation from wetted felt fabric on one plate's surface was used to determine the latent heat flux density. Flux measurements were combined with measured temperature and vapor pressure differences to determine the interfacial transfer coefficients. Field measurements were made during all stages of canopy development and were supplemented by extensive measurements of the local microclimate. Controlled forced convection experiments were also conducted in a wind tunnel using three levels of turbulence intensity and two arrays of aluminum roughness elements to assess the effects of turbulence and surface roughness on heat and mass transfer. Measured interfacial transfer coefficients during the field experiments ranged from 2 to 30 mm s ^{-1} over wind speeds of 5 to 280 cm s^{-1} measured 3 cm above the plate surface. Equations based on dimensionless parameters were developed and fit to the wind tunnel data, compared with the field data, and incorporated into the computer model. The new transfer coefficient relationships had less scatter and were more closely correlated to within -canopy wind speed than the previous formulations. Predictions of canopy microclimate characteristics were significantly improved as compared to those predictions obtained using transfer coefficients

  15. Effect of surface catalytic activity on stagnation heat-transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was made to determine the effect heterogeneous catalytic surface reactions have on heat-transfer rates in highly frozen low-density stagnation-point boundary layers. Data were obtained in arc-heated facilities that were capable of producing large percentages of chemical energy frozen in a supersonic freestream. The heat-transfer rate to a silicon-dioxide surface was reduced to a minimum value of only one-third of the value obtained on relatively active nickel and platinum surfaces. This is the result of its low catalytic efficiency. Ionization energy was recovered on both the active and the inactive surfaces, indicating that this energy either was released many times faster than the recombination energy or was not controlled by the surface composition.

  16. Experimental measurements of heat transfer from an iced surface during artificial and natural cloud icing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M. S.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The heat transfer behavior of accreting ice surfaces in natural (flight test) and simulated (wind tunnel) cloud icing conditions have been studied. Observations of wet and dry ice growth regimes as measured by ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were made. Observed wet and dry ice growth regimes at the stagnation point of a cylinder were compared with those predicted using a quasi steady-state heat balance model. A series of heat transfer coefficients were employed by the model to infer the local heat transfer behavior of the actual ice surfaces. The heat transfer in the stagnation region was generally inferred to be higher in wind tunnel icing tests than in natural, flight, icing conditions.

  17. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  18. Embedded water-based surface heating part 2: experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    : hybrid 3D numerical model. Journal of Building Physics 33: 357-391). The thermal response of the system is tested in both long (16 h) and short (30 min) cycle experiments where the water flow alters between on and off. Temperature distribution, within the floor construction, and the heat exchange process...... at the core of the concrete slab are underestimated by up to 1.5 degrees C. Amplitudes, phase shifts, rise, and delay times at different measurement points are simulated with good precision. A sensitivity analysis is performed where material parameters and boundary conditions are analyzed. None of the tested...

  19. Turbulence Control Through Selective Surface Heating Using Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    air channel of wind tunnel ,(facility) , ,S S sc S tsP P P . Calibration has been performed for five positions of reference pressure probe across... big project. Here it is simply supposed that the bottom part of model (it is not shown in Fig.4.5b) is made of a radiotransparent dielectric...before the model burnout that enable only a limited number of test runs. The main drawback of the MW heating resultd from the non-uniformity of energy

  20. Viscous flow and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ene Remus-Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have studied the flow and heat transfer of a horizontal sheet in a viscous fluid. The stretching rate and temperature of the sheet vary with time. The governing equations for momentum and thermal energy are reduced to ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. These equations are solved approximately by means of the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM which provides us with a convenient way to control the convergence of approximation solutions and adjust convergence rigorously when necessary. Some examples are given and the results obtained reveal that the proposed method is effective and easy to use.

  1. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  2. Influence of snow cover changes on surface radiation and heat balance based on the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingxue; Liu, Tingxiang; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping; Zhang, Shuwen

    2017-10-01

    The snow cover extent in mid-high latitude areas of the Northern Hemisphere has significantly declined corresponding to the global warming, especially since the 1970s. Snow-climate feedbacks play a critical role in regulating the global radiation balance and influencing surface heat flux exchange. However, the degree to which snow cover changes affect the radiation budget and energy balance on a regional scale and the difference between snow-climate and land use/cover change (LUCC)-climate feedbacks have been rarely studied. In this paper, we selected Heilongjiang Basin, where the snow cover has changed obviously, as our study area and used the WRF model to simulate the influences of snow cover changes on the surface radiation budget and heat balance. In the scenario simulation, the localized surface parameter data improved the accuracy by 10 % compared with the control group. The spatial and temporal analysis of the surface variables showed that the net surface radiation, sensible heat flux, Bowen ratio, temperature and percentage of snow cover were negatively correlated and that the ground heat flux and latent heat flux were positively correlated with the percentage of snow cover. The spatial analysis also showed that a significant relationship existed between the surface variables and land cover types, which was not obviously as that for snow cover changes. Finally, six typical study areas were selected to quantitatively analyse the influence of land cover types beneath the snow cover on heat absorption and transfer, which showed that when the land was snow covered, the conversion of forest to farmland can dramatically influence the net radiation and other surface variables, whereas the snow-free land showed significantly reduced influence. Furthermore, compared with typical land cover changes, e.g., the conversion of forest into farmland, the influence of snow cover changes on net radiation and sensible heat flux were 60 % higher than that of land cover changes

  3. Thermal Characteristics of a Primary Surface Heat Exchanger with Corrugated Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Won Seo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE with corrugated surfaces. The PSHE was experimentally investigated for a Reynolds number range of 156–921 under various flow conditions on the hot and cold sides. The inlet temperature of the hot side was maintained at 40 °C, while that of the cold side was maintained at 20 °C. A counterflow was used as it has a higher temperature proximity in comparison with a parallel flow. The heat transfer rate and pressure drop were measured for various Reynolds numbers on both the hot and cold sides of the PSHE, with the heat transfer coefficients for both sides computed using a modified Wilson plot method. Based on the results of the experiment, both Nusselt number and friction factor correlations were suggested for a PSHE with corrugated surfaces.

  4. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Surface-Mounted One-Dimensional Flat Gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using flat gages mounted onto the surface. Conduction heat flux is not the focus of this standard. Conduction applications related to insulation materials are covered by Test Method C 518 and Practices C 1041 and C 1046. The sensors covered by this test method all use a measurement of the temperature difference between two parallel planes normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface in keeping with Fourier’s Law. The gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Different sensor types are described in detail in later sections as examples of the general method for measuring heat flux from the temperature gradient normal to a surface (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages have broad application from aerospace to biomedical en...

  5. Lutein, a Natural Carotenoid, Induces α-1,3-Glucan Accumulation on the Cell Wall Surface of Fungal Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junnosuke Otaka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available α-1,3-Glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, is a refractory polysaccharide for most plants. Previously, we showed that various fungal plant pathogens masked their cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan to evade plant immunity. This surface accumulation of α-1,3-glucan was infection specific, suggesting that plant factors might induce its production in fungi. Through immunofluorescence observations of fungal cell walls, we found that carrot (Daucus carota extract induced the accumulation of α-1,3-glucan on germlings in Colletotrichum fioriniae, a polyphagous fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in various dicot plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of carrot leaf extract successfully identified two active substances that caused α-1,3-glucan accumulation in this fungus: lutein, a carotenoid widely distributed in plants, and stigmasterol, a plant-specific membrane component. Lutein, which had a greater effect on C. fioriniae, also induced α-1,3-glucan accumulation in other Colletotrichum species and in the phylogenetically distant rice pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus, but not in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae belonging to the same phylogenetic subclass as Colletotrichum. Our results suggested that fungal plant pathogens reorganize their cell wall components in response to specific plant-derived compounds, which these pathogens may encounter during infection.

  6. Lutein, a Natural Carotenoid, Induces α-1,3-Glucan Accumulation on the Cell Wall Surface of Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaka, Junnosuke; Seo, Shigemi; Nishimura, Marie

    2016-07-28

    α-1,3-Glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, is a refractory polysaccharide for most plants. Previously, we showed that various fungal plant pathogens masked their cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan to evade plant immunity. This surface accumulation of α-1,3-glucan was infection specific, suggesting that plant factors might induce its production in fungi. Through immunofluorescence observations of fungal cell walls, we found that carrot (Daucus carota) extract induced the accumulation of α-1,3-glucan on germlings in Colletotrichum fioriniae, a polyphagous fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in various dicot plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of carrot leaf extract successfully identified two active substances that caused α-1,3-glucan accumulation in this fungus: lutein, a carotenoid widely distributed in plants, and stigmasterol, a plant-specific membrane component. Lutein, which had a greater effect on C. fioriniae, also induced α-1,3-glucan accumulation in other Colletotrichum species and in the phylogenetically distant rice pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus, but not in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae belonging to the same phylogenetic subclass as Colletotrichum. Our results suggested that fungal plant pathogens reorganize their cell wall components in response to specific plant-derived compounds, which these pathogens may encounter during infection.

  7. Exchange of Surfactant by Natural Organic Matter on the Surfaces of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing production and applications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have elicited concerns regarding their release and potential adverse effects in the environment. To form stable aqueous MWCNTs suspensions, surfactants are often employed to facilitate dispersion...

  8. Heat Transfer in Bubble Columns with High Viscous and Low Surface Tension Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Tae; Lim, Dae Ho; Kang, Yong [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Axial and overall heat transfer coefficients were investigated in a bubble column with relatively high viscous and low surface tension media. Effects of superficial gas velocity (0.02-0.1 m/s), liquid viscosity (0.1-3 Pa·s) and surface tension (66.1-72.9x10{sup -3} N/m) on the local and overall heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer field was composed of the immersed heater and the bubble column; a vertical heater was installed at the center of the column coaxially. The heat transfer coefficient was determined by measuring the temperature differences continuously between the heater surface and the column which was bubbling in a given operating condition, with the knowledge of heat supply to the heater. The local heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing axial distance from the gas distributor and liquid surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing liquid viscosity or surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient was well correlated in terms of operating variables such as superficial gas velocity, liquid surface tension and liquid viscosity with a correlation coefficient of 0.91, and in terms of dimensionless groups such as Nusselt, Reynolds, Prandtl and Weber numbers with a correlation of 0.92; h=2502U{sub G}{sup 0.236}{sub L}{sup -0.250}{sub L}{sup -}0{sup .028} Nu=3.25Re{sup 0.180}Pr{sup -0.067}We{sup 0.028}.

  9. Mapping soil moisture and surface heat fluxes by assimilating GOES land surface temperature and SMAP soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating soil moisture and sensible/latent heat fluxes by assimilating remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) and soil moisture data. Surface heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere, and play a crucial role in the water and energy cycles. However, they cannot be directly measured using remote sensing. It has been demonstrated that LST time series contain information about the surface energy balance, and that assimilating soil moisture further improves the estimation by putting more constraints on the energy partitioning. In previous studies, two controlling factors were estimated: (1) a monthly constant bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) that scales the sum of surface heat fluxes, and (2) an evaporative fraction (EF) which governs the energy partitioning and stays quasi-constant during the near-peak hours. Considering the fact that CHN is not constant especially in the growing season, here CHN is assumed a function of leaf area index (LAI). LST data from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites) and soil moisture data from SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) are both assimilated into a simply heat and water transfer model to update LST, soil moisture, CHN and EF , and to map surface heat fluxes over a study area in central US. A hybrid data assimilation strategy is necessary because SMAP data are available every 2-3 days, while GOES LST data are provided every hour. In this study, LST data are assimilated using an adaptive particle batch smoother (APBS) and soil moisture is periodically updated using a particle filter (PF). Results show that soil moisture is greatly improved, and that EF estimates are restored very well after assimilation. As forcing data are provided by remote sensing or reanalysis products to minimize the dependence on ground measurements, this methodology can be easily applied in other regions with limited data.

  10. Sensible and latent heat loss from the body surface of Holstein cows in a tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, A. S. C.; Dasilva, R. G.; Battiston Loureiro, C. M.

    2005-09-01

    The general principles of the mechanisms of heat transfer are well known, but knowledge of the transition between evaporative and non-evaporative heat loss by Holstein cows in field conditions must be improved, especially for low-latitude environments. With this aim 15 Holstein cows managed in open pasture were observed in a tropical region. The latent heat loss from the body surface of the animals was measured by means of a ventilated capsule, while convective heat transfer was estimated by the theory of convection from a horizontal cylinder and by the long-wave radiation exchange based on the Stefan-Boltzmann law. When the air temperature was between 10 and 36°C the sensible heat transfer varied from 160 to -30 W m-2, while the latent heat loss by cutaneous evaporation increased from 30 to 350 W m-2. Heat loss by cutaneous evaporation accounted for 20-30% of the total heat loss when air temperatures ranged from 10 to 20°C. At air temperatures >30°C cutaneous evaporation becomes the main avenue of heat loss, accounting for approximately 85% of the total heat loss, while the rest is lost by respiratory evaporation.

  11. Surface energy balance closure in an arid region: role of soil and heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Berkowicz, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The large soil heat fluxes in hot desert regions are very important in energy balance studies. Surface energy balance (SEB) observations, however, reveal that there is an imbalance in Surface flux measurements and that it is difficult to isolate those flux measurements causing the imbalance errors.

  12. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the ue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level uctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level uctuations in the drum....

  13. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the flue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level fluctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level fluctuations in the drum....

  14. Relationship between Secondary Structure and Surface Hydrophobicity of Soybean Protein Isolate Subjected to Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated relationship between secondary structure and surface hydrophobicity of soy protein isolate (SPI subjected to a thermal treatment at 70~90°C. Heat denaturation increased the surface hydrophobicity and surface hydrophobicity decreased as aggregate formed. Heat caused an increase in the relative amount of α-helix structures and an overall decrease in the amount of β-sheet structures when compared with nontreated SPI. The relative amounts of secondary structures varied with time, temperature, and intensity of heat treatment applied. The β-sheet structure was most important for its significant role in denaturation of 7S globulin and following formed aggregates and even in denaturation of 11S globulin. The amount of β-sheet structure in SPI had an inverse correlation with the surface hydrophobicity when the temperature was kept below 90°C. Besides, β-turn structure increased as β-7S/B-11S aggregate formated.

  15. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment–a comparison between UHV and APXPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L.; Johansson, N.; Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Stenqvist, T.; Lundgren, E.

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  16. Experimental Study on Boiling Heat Transfer of Liquid Film Flow on a Structural Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Koichi; Mizuno, Itsuo; Nakata, Daisuke; Ouchi, Masaki

    An experimental study on the boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid films flowing downward along vertically positioned plane and constant curvature surface (CCS) with isolated fine cavities was conducted. The effects of structural surfaces were examined, comparing with the case of smooth plane. The main results of these experiments are summarized as follows; (1) In the case of structual plane surface, there are remarkable enhancements of heat transfer rate in the nucleate boiling region. (2) In the case of CCS, it takes large values of heatflux in the region which strongly governed by the surface evaporation. (3)CCS avoids effectively the occurrence of splitting of the liquid film into rivulets. This study aims to put practical use of the heat transfer enhancement for the evaporator of a two-phase closed thermosiphon.

  17. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment-a comparison between UHV and APXPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L; Johansson, N; Bertram, F; Evertsson, J; Stenqvist, T; Lundgren, E

    2018-01-17

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  18. Effects of Thermal Radiation on Mixed Convection Flow of a Micropolar Fluid from an Unsteady Stretching Surface with Viscous Dissipation and Heat Generation/Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khilap Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model is developed to examine the effects of thermal radiation on unsteady mixed convection flow of a viscous dissipating incompressible micropolar fluid adjacent to a heated vertical stretching surface in the presence of the buoyancy force and heat generation/absorption. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The model contains nonlinear coupled partial differential equations which have been converted into ordinary differential equation by using the similarity transformations. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are solved by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth-order method with shooting technique. Numerical solutions are then obtained and investigated in detail for different interesting parameters such as the local skin-friction coefficient, wall couple stress, and Nusselt number as well as other parametric values such as the velocity, angular velocity, and temperature.

  19. Transition process leading to microbubble emission boiling on horizontal circular heated surface in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ando, Jun; Horiuchi, Kazuna; Saiki, Takahito; Kaneko, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) produces a higher heat flux than critical heat flux (CHF) and therefore has been investigated in terms of its heat transfer characteristics as well as the conditions under which MEB occurs. Its physical mechanism, however, is not yet clearly understood. We carried out a series of experiments to examine boiling on horizontal circular heated surfaces of 5 mm and of 10 mm in diameter, in a subcooled pool, paying close attention to the transition process to MEB. High-speed observation results show that, in the MEB regime, the growth, condensation, and collapse of the vapor bubbles occur within a very short time. In addition, a number of fine bubbles are emitted from the collapse of the vapor bubbles. By tracking these tiny bubbles, we clearly visualize that the collapse of the vapor bubbles drives the liquid near the bubbles towards the heated surface, such that the convection field around the vapor bubbles under MEB significantly differs from that under nucleate boiling. Moreover, the axial temperature gradient in a heated block (quasi-heat flux) indicates a clear difference between nucleate boiling and MEB. A combination of quasi-heat flux and the measurement of the behavior of the vapor bubbles allows us to discuss the transition to MEB. This work was financially supported by the 45th Research Grant in Natural Sciences from The Mitsubishi Foundation (2014 - 2015), and by Research Grant for Boiler and Pressurized Vessels from The Japan Boiler Association (2016).

  20. The simultaneous retrieval of surface evaporative fraction and heat transfer coefficients using variational data assimilation and surface radiometric temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, W. T.; Kustas, W. P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent advances in land data assimilation have yielded data assimilation techniques designed to solve the surface energy balance based on remote observations of surface radiometric temperature and a simple prognostic equation for surface temperature. These approaches have a number of potential advantages over existing diagnostic models, including the ability to make energy flux predictions between satellite overpass times, more physically realistic representations of ground heat flux, and reduced requirements for ancillary parameter estimation. Of particular interest is the variational approach presented by Caparrini et al. (Journal of Hydrometeorology, 2003) which uses a force-restore equation for surface temperature as a constraint for the simultaneous estimation of both evaporative fraction and bulk heat transfer coefficients from sequences of surface radiometric temperature observations. Using eddy correlation flux tower data and analogous energy balance results obtained from the diagnostic Two-Source Model (TSM), this presentation will examine the performance of the Caparrini et al. algorithm over a range of vegetative and hydrologic conditions in the southern United States. Results identify circumstances under which the simultaneous - and unambiguous - retrieval of both surface evaporation fraction and heat transfer coefficients is possible and clarify parameter interpretation issues associated with the single-source geometry of the variational approach. Inter-comparison with the TSM model illustrates circumstances under which the increased parameter complexity of the TSM model is justified by its more accurate two-source representation of thermal emission from partial vegetation canopies. Potential improvements to current variational data assimilation techniques will also be discussed.

  1. Investigation of the ellipsoidal-statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic model applied to gas-phase transport of heat and tangential momentum between parallel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    The ellipsoidal-statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (ES-BGK) kinetic model is investigated for steady gas-phase transport of heat, tangential momentum, and mass between parallel walls (i.e., Fourier, Couette, and Fickian flows). This investigation extends the original study of Cercignani and Tironi, who first applied the ES-BGK model to heat transport (i.e., Fourier flow) shortly after this model was proposed by Holway. The ES-BGK model is implemented in a molecular-gas-dynamics code so that results from this model can be compared directly to results from the full Boltzmann collision term, as computed by the same code with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) algorithm of Bird. A gas of monatomic molecules is considered. These molecules collide in a pairwise fashion according to either the Maxwell or the hard-sphere interaction and reflect from the walls according to the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord model with unity accommodation coefficients. Simulations are performed at pressures from near-free-molecular to near-continuum. Unlike the BGK model, the ES-BGK model produces heat-flux and shear-stress values that both agree closely with the DSMC values at all pressures. However, for both interactions, the ES-BGK model produces molecular-velocity-distribution functions that are qualitatively similar to those determined for the Maxwell interaction from Chapman-Enskog theory for small wall temperature differences and moment-hierarchy theory for large wall temperature differences. Moreover, the ES-BGK model does not produce accurate values of the mass self-diffusion coefficient for either interaction. Nevertheless, given its reasonable accuracy for heat and tangential-momentum transport, its sound theoretical foundation (it obeys the H-theorem), and its available extension to polyatomic molecules, the ES-BGK model may be a useful method for simulating certain classes of single-species noncontinuum gas flows, as Cercignani suggested.

  2. Cdc48 and cofactors Npl4-Ufd1 are important for G1 progression during heat stress by maintaining cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ti Hsieh

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-selective chaperone Cdc48, a member of the AAA (ATPase Associated with various cellular Activities ATPase superfamily, is involved in many processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD, ubiquitin- and proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and mitosis. Although Cdc48 was originally isolated as a cell cycle mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its cell cycle functions have not been well appreciated. We found that temperature-sensitive cdc48-3 mutant is largely arrested at mitosis at 37°C, whereas the mutant is also delayed in G1 progression at 38.5°C. Reporter assays show that the promoter activity of G1 cyclin CLN1, but not CLN2, is reduced in cdc48-3 at 38.5°C. The cofactor npl4-1 and ufd1-2 mutants also exhibit G1 delay and reduced CLN1 promoter activity at 38.5°C, suggesting that Npl4-Ufd1 complex mediates the function of Cdc48 at G1. The G1 delay of cdc48-3 at 38.5°C is a consequence of cell wall defect that over-activates Mpk1, a MAPK family member important for cell wall integrity in response to stress conditions including heat shock. cdc48-3 is hypersensitive to cell wall perturbing agents and is synthetic-sick with mutations in the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Our results suggest that the cell wall defect in cdc48-3 is exacerbated by heat shock, which sustains Mpk1 activity to block G1 progression. Thus, Cdc48-Npl4-Ufd1 is important for the maintenance of cell wall integrity in order for normal cell growth and division.

  3. High Heat Flux Surface Coke Deposition and Removal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    obtained under these conditions. Another study was directed at hypersonic vehicles and was done with Inconel tubes, which eliminated complications...Release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Technical paper presented at the AIAA Propulsion and Energy Forum and Exposition (Joint... Propulsion Conference)in Orlando, FL; 27-29 July, 2015 14. ABSTRACT The internal surfaces of liquid hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine thrust chambers

  4. The Influence of Rain Sensible Heat and Subsurface Energy Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollet, S.J.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R.M.; Moene, A.F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-01-01

    In land surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible, and latent heat fluxes and net radiation. In most models, subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly

  5. Impact of Cubic Pin Finned Surface Structure Geometry upon Spray Cooling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of enhanced surface structures on heat flux using spray cooling. The surface enhancements consisted of cubic pin fins machined on the top surface of copper heater blocks. The structure height, pitch, and width were parametrically vaned. Each copper block had a projected cross-sectional area of 2.0 sq cm. Measurements were also obtained on a heater block with a flat surface for baseline comparison purposes. A 2 x 2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data were obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa) and gassy conditions (chamber with N2 gas at 100.7 kPa) with a bulk fluid temperature of 20.5 C. Results for both the degassed and gassy cases show that structure width and separation distance have a dominant effect upon the heat transfer for the size ranges used. Cubic pin fin height had little impact upon heat flux. The maximum critical heat flux (CHF) attained for any of the surfaces was 121 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 51% relative to the flat surface case under nominally degassed conditions. The gassy case had a maximum CHF of 149 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 38% relative to the flat surface case.

  6. Mean surface temperature prediction models for broiler chickens—a study of sensible heat flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; da Silva, Iran José Oliveira; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Castro, Ariane Cristina; Vieira, Frederico Marcio Corrêa

    2014-03-01

    Body surface temperature can be used to evaluate thermal equilibrium in animals. The bodies of broiler chickens, like those of all birds, are partially covered by feathers. Thus, the heat flow at the boundary layer between broilers' bodies and the environment differs between feathered and featherless areas. The aim of this investigation was to use linear regression models incorporating environmental parameters and age to predict the surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas of broiler chickens. The trial was conducted in a climate chamber, and 576 broilers were distributed in two groups. In the first trial, 288 broilers were monitored after exposure to comfortable or stressful conditions during a 6-week rearing period. Another 288 broilers were measured under the same conditions to test the predictive power of the models. Sensible heat flow was calculated, and for the regions covered by feathers, sensible heat flow was predicted based on the estimated surface temperatures. The surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas can be predicted based on air, black globe or operative temperatures. According to the sensible heat flow model, the broilers' ability to maintain thermal equilibrium by convection and radiation decreased during the rearing period. Sensible heat flow estimated based on estimated surface temperatures can be used to predict animal responses to comfortable and stressful conditions.

  7. Effects of heat stress on the level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of hepatocellular carcinoma Hep G2 cells: implications for the treatment of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Naizhong; Xu, Yongping; Cao, Zhenhui; Xu, Fanxing; Zhang, Peng; Jin, Liji

    2013-04-01

    The ability to distinguish tumor cells from normal cells is vital to allow the immune system to selectively destroy tumor cells. In order to find an effective marker, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry to investigate the effects of heat stress on the amount of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of tumor cells (Hep G2 cells). Heat shock protein 70 is the major stress-induced heat shock protein found on the surface of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the percentage of Hep G2 cells with a detectable level of heat shock protein 70 on their cell surface increased significantly (P heat stress at 42 °C for 2 h (up to 1.92 times the level before heat treatment). The detectable level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of Hep G2 cells reached its peak 12 h after treatment. However, the fluorescent intensity of stressed and unstressed Hep G2 cells was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The increase in the level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of tumor cells following heat stress could provide a basis for finding novel immunotoxins as targets for drug action and may have application to be used in conjunction with hyperthermia in the treatment of tumors.

  8. Development of energy efficient smart module with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, W.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Lee, H.J. [Jeju University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    This work has been carried out to develop thermal diode modules with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity. The module can be used for space heating in winter and reduce the cooling load of buildings in summer. this concept could be also utilized for domestic hot water heating. The modules are categorized as follows; (1) Loop Type Smart Module, (2) Bayonet Type Smart Module, (3) Roller Type Smart Module, (4) Plane Tubeless Solar Collector and Storage System Utilizing the Bayonet Concept. Each system generally features either or both of the passive or active schemes. The Loop Type, in particular, is designed with the photo diode and microprocessor to harness the solar energy more aggressively. It is essential to contrive a totally new design concept apart from conventional ones to fully appreciate the availability of the sun`s energy. In this regard, the solar modules under investigation in the present study is of great significance. (author) 29 refs., 65 figs., 5 photos.

  9. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  10. A comparative study of the local heat transfer distributions around various surface mounted obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyssmann, Robert; Ullmer, Dirk; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter

    2014-04-01

    In many engineering applications, heat transfer enhancement techniques are of vital importance in order to ensure reliable thermal designs of convective heat transfer applications. This study examines experimentally the heat transfer characteristics on the base plate around various surface mounted obstacles. Local convection coefficients are evaluated in the vicinity of each individual protruding body with great spatial resolution using the transient liquid crystal technique. Five different obstacles of constant height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (˜1.3) are considered. These include: a cylinder, a square, a triangle, a diamond and a vortex generator of delta wing shape design. The experiments were carried out over a range of freestream Reynolds numbers, based on the hydraulic diameter of each obstacle, varying from 4,000 to 13,000. The results indicate a negligible effect of the flow speed on the heat transfer topological structure and a considerable effect of the obstacle geometry on the level and distribution of heat transfer enhancement.

  11. Behavior of divertor and first wall armour materials at plasma heat fluxes relevant to ITER ELMs and disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Kovalenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main results of numerous experiments carried out over the past 10 years at QSPA-T and QSPA-Be plasma guns in support of ITER. Special targets made of pure W, W-1%La2O3 and two types of Be (TGP-56FW and S65-C were tested under the series of repeated plasma stream and photonic flux impact. Maximum heat load on the target surface was up to 2.5MJ/m2 in the case of plasma testing and was equal to 0.5MJ/m2 in the case of photonic flux testing. Pulse waveform was rectangular with tpulse= 0.5ms. It was found that the main erosion mechanisms of W and Be under plasma stream impact are the melt layer movement, the ejection of droplets and the cracks formation. As a result of repeated photonic fluxes a regular, “corrugated” structure are eventually formed on the Be target surface. Study of erosion products of W formed under plasma stream impact on the W target has shown that the D/W atomic ratio in the deposited W films during pulsed events may be the same or even higher than that for stationary processes.

  12. Comments on the dissipation of hydromagnetic surface waves. [applicable to solar coronal plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A recent paper by Wentzel, which claims to calculate a plasma heating rate due to dissipation of surface waves in an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid, is found to be in error in interpretation. A well-established general theorem pertaining to the conservative ideal MHD fluid requires that the normal mode calculated by Wentzel be oscillatory in time. Within ideal MHD, dissipation and plasma heating are therefore impossible.

  13. Similarity Solutions for Flow and Heat Transfer of Non-Newtonian Fluid over a Stretching Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Atta Sojoudi; Ali Mazloomi; Saha, Suvash C.; Gu, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    Similarity solutions are carried out for flow of power law non-Newtonian fluid film on unsteady stretching surface subjected to constant heat flux. Free convection heat transfer induces thermal boundary layer within a semi-infinite layer of Boussinesq fluid. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations (PDE) governing the flow and the boundary conditions are converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) using two-parameter groups. This technique reduces the number of ...

  14. Vibration-Assisted Laser Surface Texturing and Electromachining for the Intensification of Boiling Heat Transfer in a Minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes applications of the vibration-assisted laser surface texturing and spark erosion process as methods of modifying properties and structures of metal surfaces. Practical aspects of the use of produced surfaces in the heat exchanger with a minichannel have been described. Compared with smooth surfaces, developed metal surfaces obtained by vibration-assisted laser surface texturing and electromachining show more effective heat transfer. The local heat transfer coefficient for the saturated boiling region obtained for developed surfaces had the values significantly higher than those obtained for the smooth plate at the same heat flux. The experimental results are presented as the heated plate temperature (obtained from infrared thermography and relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the length of the minichannel for the saturated boiling region.

  15. Effect of airway surface liquid on the forces on the pharyngeal wall: Experimental fluid-structure interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnar, Jernej; Širok, Brane; Bombač, Andrej

    2017-10-03

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a breathing disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The respiratory epithelium is lined with a thin layer of airway surface liquid preventing interactions between the airflow and epithelium. The effect of the liquid lining in OSAS pathogenesis remains poorly understood despite clinical research. Previous studies have shown that the physical properties of the airway surface liquid or altered stimulation of the airway mechanoreceptors could alleviate or intensify OSAS; however, these studies do not provide a clear physical interpretation. To study the forces transmitted from the airflow to the liquid-lined compliant wall and to discuss the effects of the airway surface liquid properties on the stimulation of the mechanoreceptors, a novel and simplified experimental system mimicking the upper airway fundamental characteristics (i.e., liquid-lined compliant wall and complex unsteady airflow features) was constructed. The fluctuating force on the compliant wall was reduced through a damping mechanism when the liquid film thickness and/or the viscosity were increased. Conversely, the liquid film damping was reduced when the surface tension decreased. Based on the experimental data, empirical correlations were developed to predict the damping potential of the liquid film. In the future, this will enable us to extend the existing computational fluid-structure interaction simulations of airflow in the human upper airway by incorporating the airway surface liquid effect without adopting two-phase flow interface tracking methods. Furthermore, the experimental system developed in this study could be used to investigate the fundamental principles of the complex once/twice-coupled physical phenomena. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of Ficam VC (Bendiocarb) Residual Activity on Different Wall Surfaces for Control of Anopheles gambiae s.s. (Diptera: Culicidae) in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirunda, James; Okello-Onen, Joseph; Opiyo, Elizabeth A; Rwakimari, J B; de Alwis, Ranjith; Okia, Michael; Ambayo, Denis; Abola, Benard; Hoel, David F

    2017-07-01

    Insecticide decay rate on different wall surfaces is of importance to indoor residual spray (IRS) programs used as a malaria control intervention. Past IRS operations showed increasing populations of endophilic malaria vectors resting on indoor surfaces from various sites in Uganda following use of Ficam VC (bendiocarb) insecticide; variability of insecticide life was believed to be primarily due to wall surface type. Bendiocarb longevity was tested in the northern Uganda districts of Amuru, Apac, and Pader to assess its residual efficacy on three commonly encountered wall surfaces. Wall types included mud and wattle, plain brick, and painted plaster. A susceptible mosquito strain (Anopheles gambiae Kisumu) was used in all trials. Nine houses in each of the three districts were set with three test cones and one control cone per house, divided evenly among the three wall surfaces. Bioassays were run monthly through 6 mo. Painted plastered surfaces produced 100% mortality (at 24 h) through 6 mo. Plain brick surfaces killed 100% of test mosquitoes through 4 mo, while mud and wattle wall surfaces produced a 98% mortality rate at 3 mo post spray. The KD60 (knockdown at 60 min) for painted plastered surfaces was 100% for 6 mo, plain brick surface KD60 was 80% at 6 mo, and the mud and wattle surface KD60 was >80% at 3 mo. There was a significant effect on Ficam VC longevity by wall type and evidence of a relationship between test period and wall type on the KD60. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves in the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Richter, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (> 2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (> 1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  18. The effects of heat treatment on the physical properties and surface roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L.) wood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korkut, Derya Sevim; Korkut, Süleyman; Bekar, Ilter; Budakçi, Mehmet; Dilik, Tuncer; Cakicier, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    Heat treatment is often used to improve the dimensional stability of wood. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the physical properties and surface roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L.) wood were examined...

  19. Condensation on Highly Superheated Surfaces: Unstable Thin Films in a Wickless Heat Pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Akshay; Nguyen, Thao T T; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C; Chao, David F; Sicker, Ronald J

    2017-03-03

    A wickless heat pipe was operated on the International Space Station to provide a better understanding of how the microgravity environment might alter the physical and interfacial forces driving evaporation and condensation. Traditional heat pipes are divided into three zones: evaporation at the heated end, condensation at the cooled end, and intermediate or adiabatic in between. The microgravity experiments reported herein show that the situation may be dramatically more complicated. Beyond a threshold heat input, there was a transition from evaporation at the heated end to large-scale condensation, even as surface temperatures exceeded the boiling point by 160 K. The hotter the surface, the more vapor was condensed onto it. The condensation process at the heated end is initiated by thickness and temperature disturbances in the thin liquid film that wet the solid surface. Those disturbances effectively leave the vapor "superheated" in that region. Condensation is amplified and sustained by the high Marangoni stresses that exist near the heater and that drive liquid to cooler regions of the device.

  20. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The evaluation of energy efficiency of convective heat transfer surfaces in tube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, B. A.; Pronin, V. A.; Salohin, V. I.; Sidenkov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    When evaluating the effectiveness of the heat exchange surfaces in the main considered characteristics such as heat flow (Q, Watt), the power required for pumps (N, Watt), and surface area of heat transfer (F, m2). The most correct comparison provides a comparison “ceteris paribus”. Carried out performance comparison “ceteris paribus” in-line and staggered configurations of bundles with a circular pipes can serve as a basis for the development of physical models of flow and heat transfer in tube bundles with tubes of other geometric shapes, considering intertubular stream with attached eddies. The effect of longitudinal and transverse steps of the pipes on the energy efficiency of different configurations would take into account by mean of physical relations between the structure of shell side flow with attached eddies and intensity of transfer processes of heat and momentum. With the aim of energy-efficient placement of tubes, such an approach opens up great opportunities for the synthesis of a plurality of tubular heat exchange surfaces, in particular, the layout of the twisted and in-line-diffuser type with a drop-shaped pipes.

  2. Change in cell surface properties of Lactobacillus casei under heat shock treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaji, Najla; Mahdhi, Abdel Karim; Krifi, Boubaker; Ismail, Manel Ben; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2015-05-01

    We undertake this study in the aim to give new insight about the change in cellular physiological state under heat shock treatment and probiotic strain screening procedure. Different cell properties have been studied like adhesive ability to biotic and abiotic surfaces, the cell surface hydrophobicity and the fatty acids profiles. Compared to the normal cells, the heated cells increased their adhesive ability to biotic surface. However, the adhesion to abiotic surface was decreased. The cell surface hydrophobicity of the heated strains showed a significant decrease (P Lactobacillus casei cells was significantly higher than that of the control cells (P < 0.05). The present finding could firstly add new insight about the response of probiotic to stressful conditions, such us the important role of cell membrane, considered as the first main structure to be damaged by physicochemical stress, in stress resistance because of their composition that can change in adaptation to harsh conditions. Secondly, there is no relationship between changes in membrane composition and fluidity induced by heat shock treatment and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surface. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Nanofluids for power engineering: Emergency cooling of overheated heat transfer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, B. I.; Moraru, V. N.; Sidorenko, S. V.; Komysh, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of emergency cooling of an overheated heat transfer surface using nanofluids in the case of a boiling crisis is explored by means of synchronous recording of changes of main heat transfer parameters of boiling water over time. Two nanofluids are tested, which are derived from a mixture of natural aluminosilicates (AlSi-7) and titanium dioxide (NF-8). It is found that the introduction of a small portions of nanofluid into a boiling coolant (distilled water) in a state of film boiling ( t heater > 500°C) can dramatically decrease the heat transfer surface temperature to 130-150°C, which corresponds to a transition to a safe nucleate boiling regime without affecting the specific heat flux. The fact that this regime is kept for a long time at a specific heat load exceeding the critical heat flux for water and t heater = 125-130°C is particularly important. This makes it possible to prevent a potential accident emergency (heater burnout and failure of the heat exchanger) and to ensure the smooth operation of the equipment.

  4. A review of surface heat-flow data of the northern Middle Atlas (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiozzi, Paolo; Barkaoui, Alae-Eddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Verdoya, Massimo; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2017-12-01

    We revised thermal data available from water and oil wells in the northern sector of the Middle Atlas region. To avoid biased estimation of surface heat flow caused by advection likely occurring in shallow aquifers, temperature measurements in water boreholes were carefully inspected and selected. The heat flow in the oil wells was inferred by taking into account the porosity variation with depth, the temperature effect on thermal conductivity of the matrix and the pore fluid, together with the contribution of the radiogenic heat production. Moreover, the possible bias in heat flow caused by convection occurring in confined carbonate aquifers was evaluated. The results of heat flow slightly modify the picture reported in previous investigations. The heat flow value over the investigated region is rather uniform (about 80 mW m-2) and is similar in oil wells and in water boreholes. Geothermal calculations indicate that such a surface heat flow is compatible with a ∼70 km thick thermal lithosphere and normal thermal conditions in the asthenospheric mantle.

  5. Heat Transfer through a Condensate Droplet on Hydrophobic and Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Shreyas; Cha, Hyeongyun; Orejon, Daniel; Nawaz, Kashif; Singla, Nitish; Yeung, Yip Fun; Park, Deokgeun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Chang, Yujin; Takata, Yasuyuki; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-08-09

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing vapor condensation on nonwetting surfaces is crucial to a wide range of energy and water applications. In this paper, we reconcile classical droplet growth modeling barriers by utilizing two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations to study individual droplet heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces (90° condensation. To verify our simulation results, we study condensed water droplet growth using optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy on biphilic samples consisting of hydrophobic and nanostructured superhydrophobic regions, showing excellent agreement with the simulations for both constant base area and constant contact angle growth regimes. Our results demonstrate the importance of resolving local heat transfer effects for the fundamental understanding and high fidelity modeling of phase change heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces.

  6. Stagnation point flow over a stretching/shrinking cylinder with prescribed surface heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.

    2014-06-01

    The steady stagnation-point flow towards a horizontal linearly stretching/shrinking cylinder immersed in an incompressible viscous fluid with prescribed surface heat flux is investigated. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations. The transformed equations are solved numerically by using the shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity profiles and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Prandtl number on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The study indicate that the solutions for a shrinking cylinder are non-unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases.

  7. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  8. Correlation between platinum nanoparticle surface rearrangement induced by heat treatment and activity for an oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Chung, Young-Hoon; Jung, Namgee; Choi, Kwang-Hyun; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-08-28

    Heat treatment of nanoparticles could induce the surface rearrangement for more stable facet exposure induced by thermodynamics. By changing the heat treatment environment, we confirmed the correlation between the oxygen reduction activity and the effect of surface oxide and the degree of surface rearrangement of Pt nanoparticles. Native surface oxide was not a critical factor for oxygen reduction activity. However, the degree of surface rearrangement could affect the activity, which was confirmed by the surface sensitive techniques such as CO(ad) oxidation and potential of zero total charge. Analysis indicated that the driving force for nanoparticle surface rearrangement was affected by the heat treatment environment such as gas, in our case.

  9. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  10. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Numerical investigation of heat transfer performance of synthetic jet impingement onto dimpled/protrusioned surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Di

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mesh methods and user defined functions are adopted and the shear stress transport k-ω turbulent model has been used in the numerical investigation of heat transfer performance of synthetic jet impingement onto dimple/protrusioned surface. The results show that the local time-averaged Nusselt number of the dimpled/protrusioned target surface tends to be much closer with that of flat cases with increasing of frequency. The heat transfer performance gets better when frequency increases. The area-averaged time-averaged Nusselt number of protrusioned target surface is the most close to that of flat cases when f = 320 Hz while it is the smallest among the synthetic jet cases in dimpled target surface. The heat transfer enhancement performance of synthetic jet is 30 times better than that of natural convection. The time-averaged Nusselt number of stagnation point in the protrusioned target surface is higher than that of flat target surface while it is lower in the dimpled surface than that of flat surface no matter in the synthetic jet, steady jet or natural convection cases. Meanwhile, the timeaveraged Nusselt number of stagnation point in the synthetic jet cases increases with the increasing of frequency. It is worth pointing out that the time-averaged Nusselt number of stagnation point is lower than that of steady cases when the frequency is low. However, it shows a bit higher than that of steady cases when f = 320 Hz.

  12. Spray Cooling Trajectory Angle Impact Upon Heat Flux Using a Straight Finned Enhanced Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of spray trajectory angles upon heat flux for flat and enhanced surface spray cooling. The surface enhancement consisted of straight fins machined on the top surface of a copper heater block. Spray cooling curves were obtained with the straight fin surface aligned both parallel (axial) and perpendicular (transverse) to the spray axis. Measurements were also obtained on a flat surface heater block for comparison purposes. Each copper block had a cross-sectional area of 2.0 sq cm. A 2x2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data was obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa) conditions. Results show that the maximum CHF in all cases was attained for a trajectory angle of 30' from the surface normal. Furthermore, trajectory angles applied to straight finned surfaces can have a critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement as much as 75% (heat flux value of 140 W/sq cm) relative to the vertical spray orientation for the analogous flat surface case under nominally degassed conditions.

  13. Microstructural evolution and mechanical property of Ti-6Al-4V wall deposited by continuous plasma arc additive manufacturing without post heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianjun; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Kaibo; Li, Zhuguo; Wu, Yixiong; Xu, Binshi

    2017-05-01

    Plasma arc additive manufacturing (PAM) is a novel additive manufacturing (AM) technology due to its big potential in improving efficiency, convenience and being cost-savings compared to other AM processes of high energy bea\\m. In this research, several Ti-6Al-4V thin walls were deposited by optimized weld wire-feed continuous PAM process (CPAM), in which the heat input was gradually decreased layer by layer. The deposited thin wall consisted of various morphologies, which includes epitaxial growth of prior β grains, horizontal layer bands, martensite and basket weave microstructure, that depends on the heat input, multiple thermal cycles and gradual cooling rate in the deposition process. By gradually reducing heat input of each bead and using continuous current in the PAM process, the average yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation reach about 877MPa, 968MPa and 1.5%, respectively, which exceed the standard level of forging. The mechanical property was strengthened and toughened due to weakening the aspect ratio of prior β grains and separating nano-dispersoids among α lamellar. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that the CPAM process has a potential to manufacture or remanufacture in AM components of metallic biomaterials without post-processing heat treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ENSO related SST anomalies and relation with surface heat fluxes over south Pacific and Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Nuncio, M.; Satheesan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes in Southern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean SST anomalies associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is studied using observation and ocean reanalysis products. A prominent dipole structure in SST anomaly is found with a positive (negative) anomaly center over south Pacific (65S-45S, 120W-70W) and negative (positive) one over south Atlantic (50S-30S, 30W-0E) during austral summer (DJF) of El Nino (LaNina). During late austral spring-early summer (OND) of El Nino (LaNina), anomalous northerly (southerly) meridional moisture transport and a positive (negative) sea level pressure anomaly induces a suppressed (enhanced) latent heat flux from the ocean surface over south Pacific. This in turn results in a shallower than normal mixed layer depth which further helps in development of the SST anomaly. Mixed layer thins further due to anomalous shortwave radiation during summer and a well developed SST anomaly evolves. The south Atlantic pole exhibits exactly opposite characteristics at the same time. The contribution from the surface heat fluxes to mixed layer temperature change is found to be dominant over the advective processes over both the basins. Net surface heat fluxes anomaly is also found to be maximum during late austral spring-early summer period, with latent heat flux having a major contribution to it. The anomalous latent heat fluxes between atmosphere and ocean surface play important role in the growth of observed summertime SST anomaly. Sea-surface height also shows similar out-of-phase signatures over the two basins and are well correlated with the ENSO related SST anomalies. It is also observed that the magnitude of ENSO related anomalies over the southern ocean are weaker in LaNina years than in El Nino years, suggesting an intensified tropics-high latitude tele-connection during warm phases of ENSO.

  15. Estimating regional distribution of surface heat fluxes by combining satellite data and a heat budget model over the Kherlen River Basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Dai

    2007-01-01

    SummaryThe regional distribution of surface heat fluxes and related parameters over a semi-arid region was estimated using a technique that incorporates the thermal-infrared brightness temperature from a satellite into a heat budget model of land surface including vegetation canopy. We studied the western part of the Kherlen River Basin in Mongolia, where typical steppe dominates, including forest-steppe in the northern part and dry-steppe in the southern part of the basin. Our goal was to estimate the temporal change of surface heat fluxes at a location in the typical steppe over a growing season, and to estimate the spatial distribution of surface heat fluxes over the study area. Seven parameters, including the bulk transfer coefficients, the evaporation efficiency, and the subsurface thermal inertia, which are relevant to the surface heat fluxes, were optimized employing the simplex method. To compensate for insufficient satellite data samples to reproduce the diurnal change of surface heat fluxes, the spatial distribution of the surface brightness temperature was used in the optimization rather than using diurnal change, which is referred to as spatial optimization. Diurnal changes in the surface heat fluxes estimated by spatial optimization were validated by observation. The surface heat fluxes were reasonably accurately reproduced on a daily basis, with the root-mean-squares error of the sensible and the latent heat within 15 W m -2 over the growing season. The evaporation efficiency of canopy and the subsurface thermal inertia optimized in this study correlated well with the volumetric soil water content in a shallow layer on a daily basis, which suggests that thermal inertia can be an indicator of water conditions in a shallow subsurface layer. Spatial distribution of estimated sensible and latent heat after rainfall on successive summer days is discussed.

  16. Optimal homotopy asymptotic method for flow and heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid in an axisymmetric channel with a porous wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabood, Fazle; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an approximate analytical solution of flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid in an axisymmetric channel with porous wall is presented. The solution is obtained through the use of a powerful method known as Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM). We obtained the approximate analytical solution for dimensionless velocity and temperature for various parameters. The influence and effect of different parameters on dimensionless velocity, temperature, friction factor, and rate of heat transfer are presented graphically. We also compared our solution with those obtained by other methods and it is found that OHAM solution is better than the other methods considered. This shows that OHAM is reliable for use to solve strongly nonlinear problems in heat transfer phenomena.

  17. Fem Simulation of Triple Diffusive Natural Convection Along Inclined Plate in Porous Medium: Prescribed Surface Heat, Solute and Nanoparticles Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, triple diffusive natural convection under Darcy flow over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium saturated with a binary base fluid containing nanoparticles and two salts is studied. The model used for the nanofluid is the one which incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition, the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. The vertical surface has the heat, mass and nanoparticle fluxes each prescribed as a power law function of the distance along the wall. The boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. A wide range of parameter values are chosen to bring out the effect of buoyancy ratio, regular Lewis number and modified Dufour parameters of both salts and nanofluid parameters with varying angle of inclinations. The effects of parameters on the velocity, temperature, solutal and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as on the important parameters of heat and mass transfer, i.e., the reduced Nusselt, regular and nanofluid Sherwood numbers, are discussed. Such problems find application in extrusion of metals, polymers and ceramics, production of plastic films, insulation of wires and liquid packaging.

  18. Fem Simulation of Triple Diffusive Natural Convection Along Inclined Plate in Porous Medium: Prescribed Surface Heat, Solute and Nanoparticles Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, M.; Goyal, R.; Bhargava, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, triple diffusive natural convection under Darcy flow over an inclined plate embedded in a porous medium saturated with a binary base fluid containing nanoparticles and two salts is studied. The model used for the nanofluid is the one which incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition, the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. The vertical surface has the heat, mass and nanoparticle fluxes each prescribed as a power law function of the distance along the wall. The boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. A wide range of parameter values are chosen to bring out the effect of buoyancy ratio, regular Lewis number and modified Dufour parameters of both salts and nanofluid parameters with varying angle of inclinations. The effects of parameters on the velocity, temperature, solutal and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as on the important parameters of heat and mass transfer, i.e., the reduced Nusselt, regular and nanofluid Sherwood numbers, are discussed. Such problems find application in extrusion of metals, polymers and ceramics, production of plastic films, insulation of wires and liquid packaging.

  19. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  20. Influence of the wall on the droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative influence of the wall material and its thickness has been investigated in the present study. The wall influence for heat exchangers is particularly important in the boiling transition regime and in the event of the Leidenfrost temperature. The experimental points significantly diverge in the transition area of the boiling crisis. This fact can be explained by a different residence time of droplet on the wall surface. The discrepancy between the experimental data also takes place at the Leidenfrost temperature. The lower the thermal diffusivity of the wall material (high thermal inertia, the more the wall is cooled under a droplet.

  1. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  3. Urban heat mitigation by roof surface materials during the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoon; Ryu, Youngryel; Jiang, Chongya

    2017-04-01

    Roof surface materials, such as green and white roofs, have attracted attention in their role in urban heat mitigation, and various studies have assessed the cooling performance of roof surface materials during hot and sunny summer seasons. However, summers in the East Asian monsoon climate region are characterized by significant fluctuations in weather events, such as dry periods, heatwaves, and rainy and cloudy days. This study investigated the efficacy of different roof surface materials for heat mitigation, considering the temperatures both at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials during a summer monsoon in Seoul, Korea. We performed continuous observations of temperature at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials, and manual observation of albedo and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for a white roof, two green roofs (grass [Poa pratensis] and sedum [Sedum sarmentosum]), and a reference surface. Overall, the surface temperature of the white roof was significantly lower than that of the grass and sedum roofs (1.1 and 1.3°C), whereas the temperature beneath the surface of the white roof did not differ significantly from that of the grass and sedum roofs during the summer. The degree of cloudiness significantly modified the surface temperature of the white roof compared with that of the grass and sedum roofs, which depended on plant metabolisms. It was difficult for the grass to maintain its cooling ability without adequate watering management. After considering the cooling performance and maintenance efforts for different environmental conditions, we concluded that white roof performed better in urban heat mitigation than grass and sedum during the East Asian summer monsoon. Our findings will be useful in urban heat mitigation in the region.

  4. Effect of variable surface catalysis on heating near the stagnation point of a blunt body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.; Kolodziej, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes arc-jet data obtained on the performance of glass coated thermal protection systems in a convectively heated environment. These data confirm earlier flight and arc-jet data that show an increased surface catalysis with salt contamination and a decreased surface catalysis near the softening point temperature of the glass. In addition, surface temperature distributions along sphere-cones with abruptly changing surface catalysis were measured near the stagnation point and compared well with computations using a reacting boundary layer code.

  5. Highly sensitive detection of silybin based on adsorptive stripping analysis at single-sided heated screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes with direct current heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Nie, Fa-Hui; Chen, Qi-Zhen; Sun, Jian-Jun

    2011-02-14

    A new disposable multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified single-sided heated screen-printed carbon electrode (MWNT/ss-HSPCE) was fabricated. The electrochemical behavior of silybin was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and the probable electrode reaction mechanism was proposed. A simple and cheap direct current heating supplier was used to heating the electrode for adsorptive accumulation of silybin. The square wave voltammetric stripping peak current of silybin at MWNT/ss-HSPCE with an elevated electrode temperature of 50°C only during accumulation step was dramatically improved compared with that at bare single-sided heated screen-printed carbon electrode (ss-HSPCE) without heating. This enhancement was mainly contributed to the combination of the advantages of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and electrically heated electrodes. Under optimum conditions, two detection linear ranges of silybin were from 1.0×10(-9) to 1.0×10(-7) M and 3.0×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-6) M. A detection limit of 5.0×10(-10) M could be obtained (S/N=3), which was more than two magnitudes lower than that at bare ss-HSPCE without heating. To the best of our knowledge, this was also at least two magnitudes lower than any others for electrochemical detection of silybin in the literature. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the determination of silybin in pharmaceutical tablets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Advantages of analytically computing the ground heat flux in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the ground heat flux accounts for a significant fraction of the surface energy balance. In land surface models, the ground heat flux is typically estimated through a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation. Recent research has shown that this approach introduces errors in the estimation of the energy balance. In this paper, we calibrate a land surface model using a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation with four different vertical spatial resolutions. It is found that the thermal conductivity is the most sensitive parameter to the spatial resolution. More importantly, the thermal conductivity values are directly related to the spatial resolution, thus rendering any physical interpretation of this value irrelevant. The numerical solution is then replaced by an analytical solution. The results of the numerical and analytical solutions are identical when fine spatial and temporal resolutions are used. However, when using resolutions that are typical of land surface models, significant differences are found. When using the analytical solution, the ground heat flux is directly calculated without calculating the soil temperature profile. The calculation of the temperature at each node in the soil profile is thus no longer required, unless the model contains parameters that depend on the soil temperature, which in this study is not the case. The calibration is repeated, and thermal conductivity values independent of the vertical spatial resolution are obtained. The main conclusion of this study is that care must be taken when interpreting land surface model results that have been obtained using numerical ground heat flux estimates. The use of exact analytical solutions, when available, is recommended.

  7. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  8. Air-side performance of a micro-channel heat exchanger in wet surface conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisomba Raviwat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of operating conditions on the air-side heat transfer, and pressure drop of a micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions were studied experimentally. The test section was an aluminum micro-channel heat exchanger, consisting of a multi-louvered fin and multi-port mini-channels. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of inlet relative humidity, air frontal velocity, air inlet temperature, and refrigerant temperature on air-side performance. The experimental data were analyzed using the mean enthalpy difference method. The test run was performed at relative air humidities ranging between 45% and 80%; air inlet temperature ranges of 27, 30, and 33°C; refrigerant-saturated temperatures ranging from 18 to 22°C; and Reynolds numbers between 128 and 166. The results show that the inlet relative humidity, air inlet temperature, and the refrigerant temperature had significant effects on heat transfer performance and air-side pressure drop. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for the micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions are proposed in terms of the Colburn j factor and Fanning f factor.

  9. On ultrahigh-vacuum preparation of monocrystalline transition metal surfaces by heat treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Krakhmalev, V A; Nimatov, S J; Garafutdinova, I A; Boltaev, N N

    2002-01-01

    The composition and substructure changes in monocrystalline singular W, Mo, Nb surfaces under heat treatment have been studied in the range 30-1900 sup d egC and vacuum approx 5 centre dot 10 sup - sup 8 Pa by electronic Auger spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and X-ray methods. Under multiple thermal-cycled treatment the large carbide inclusions have been found to become the places of local surface polygonization with block disordering >=3 sup d eg. In the case of Nb annealing the carbide in the O sub 2 atmosphere has led to solving O sub 2 in sample volume. In what follows, the solute O sub 2 is found to diffuse to on the surface under heating up to maximal temperatures of the above range. Under 30 min annealing of Nb(110) at approx 550 sup d egC, sulphur (S sub 1 sub 5 sub 2) segregation on surface appears that increases with temperature. (author)

  10. An Efficient Surface Algorithm for Random-Particle Simulation of Vorticity and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. A.; Stansby, P. K.

    1989-04-01

    A new surface algorithm has been incorporated into the random-vortex method for the simulation of 2-dimensional laminar flow, in which vortex particles are deleted rather than reflected as they cross a solid surface. This involves a modification to the strength and random walk of newly created vortex particles. Computations of the early stages of symmetric, impulsively started flow around a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers demonstrate that the number of vortices required for convergence is substantially reduced. The method has been further extended to accommodate forced convective heat transfer where temperature particles are created at a surface to satisfy the condition of constant surface temperature. Vortex and temperature particles are handled together throughout each time step. For long runs, in which a steady state is reached, comparison is made with some time-averaged experimental heat transfer data for Reynolds numbers up to a few hundred. A Karman vortex street occurs at the higher Reynolds numbers.

  11. The Impact of Trends in the Large Scale Atmospheric Circulation on Mediterranean Surface Turbulent Heat Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Hameed, Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Interannual variations of latent heat fluxes (LHF) and sensible heat fluxes (SHF) over the Mediterranean for the boreal winter season (DJF) show positive trends during 1958-2011. Comparison of correlations between the heat fluxes and the intensity and location of the Azores High (AH), and the NAO and East Atlantic-West Russia (EAWR) teleconnections, along with analysis of composites of surface temperature, humidity and wind fields for different teleconnection states, demonstrates that variations of the AH are found to explain the heat flux changes more successfully than the NAO and the EAWR. Trends in sea level pressure and longitude of the Azores High during DJF show a strengthening, and an eastward shift. DJF Azores High pressure and longitude are shown to co-vary such that variability of the Azores High occurs along an axis defined by lower pressure and westward location at one extreme, and higher pressure and eastward location at the other extreme. The shift of the Azores High from predominance of the low/west state to the high/east state induces trends in Mediterranean Sea surface winds, temperature and moisture. These, combined with sea surface warming trends, produce trends in wintertime Mediterranean Sea sensible and latent heat fluxes.

  12. Effect of Favorable Pressure Gradients on Turbine Blade Pressure Surface Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Giel, P. W.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements on a turbine rotor showed significant relaminarization effects. These effects were evident on the pressure surface heat transfer measurements. The character of the heat transfer varied with Reynolds number. Data were obtained for exit Reynolds numbers between 500,000 and 880,000. Tests were done with a high level of inlet turbulence, 7.5%. At lower Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to that for laminar flow, but at a level higher than for laminar flow. At higher Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to turbulent flow, when the acceleration parameter, K, was sufficiently small. The proposed paper discusses the experimental results, and also discusses approaches to calculating the surface heat transfer for the blade surface. Calculations were done using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD analysis. The results of these tests, when compared with previous blade tests in the same facility, illustrate modeling difficulties that were encountered in CFD predictions. The two blades were in many ways similar. However, the degree of agreement between the same analysis and the experimental data was significantly different. These differences are highlighted to illustrate where improvements in modeling approaches are needed for transitional flows.

  13. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  14. CONVECTIVE HEAT EXCHANGE ON THE LATERAL SURFACE OF A RELATIVELY LONG CYCLONE CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Saburov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-turbulent swirling flows of heat carrier that are created by a cyclone chamber are used in industry. They make it possible to intensify processes of heat and mass exchange. The results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer on the lateral surface of the active volume of a relatively long cyclone chamber considerably exceeding the length of the chambers that were used in previously performed studies are presented and analyzed in the article. Air supply in the swirler of the chamber was performed tangentially from diametrically opposite sides of the two input channels. The gas outlet was implemented from the opposite end. The heat transfer by convection to the swirling air flow was studied by the method of changing the state of aggregation of a heating agent – condensation of slightly superheated steam. Collecting condensate from the working section was made through a water seal for maintaining a constant pressure calorimeter. The amount of heat transferred during experiment was determined by weight of the collected condensate. The specific features of influence of geometrical characteristics of cyclone chamber on intensity of heat exchange are considered. In the experiments we varied the relative diameter of the outlet port of the chamber dвых and the relative area of the input channels fвх. Segmental construction of the chamber made it possible to move a calorimeter on its length. The local heat transfer coefficient was determined for various values of the dimensionless longitudinal coordinate z coinciding with the axis of the chamber, and counted from the back end of the swirler. The estimated equations of heat transfer obtained during the research are presented and recommended for use in practice of engineering. The considered problem is of an interest from the point of view of further research of aerodynamics and of convective heat transfer in a highly swirling flow cyclone devices, in order to improve the

  15. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  16. Mass and heat transfers in the parietal boundary layer and inside a flat porous wall submitted to effusion or transpiration; Transferts de masse et de chaleur dans la couche limite parietale et a l'interieur d'une paroi poreuse plane soumise a de l'effusion ou de la transpiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellettre, J.

    1998-12-01

    The flows and the heat transfer near and inside a porous wall subjected to an internal flow are numerically and experimentally studied. Numerical simulations of the main flow are performed using a classical model of turbulence (RNG k-{xi} model). A discrete modeling of blowing through a porous plate is developed in order to predict interactions between the main flow and the injected fluid. Numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data obtained with a subsonic wind tunnel. The coupling between the heat transfer near and inside porous plates is studied for different injection rates, main flow temperatures and internal exchange surfaces of porous media. Surfaces temperatures are calculated using a nodal model of internal heat transfer, linked to the model of boundary layer submitted to injection. By comparing numerical and experimental temperatures of walls, the heat transfer coefficients inside porous media are calculated. In order to improve the thermal protection of walls, the transpiration with a liquid is studied. Experimental results, obtained with ethanol injection whereas the main flow is gaseous, show an important enhancement of the protection process. The coolant evaporation rate is calculated using measurement of mass fraction in the boundary layer and is used for the numerical study of mass transfer in the boundary layer. (author)

  17. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  18. A Quantitative Assessment of Surface Urban Heat Islands Using Satellite Multitemporal Data over Abeokuta, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ishola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast urban expansion has led to the transformation of the natural landscape into anthropogenic surfaces. The city of Abeokuta, for instance, is located in a region experiencing rapid urbanization, which has produced a remarkable effect on the surface thermal response. This effect significantly influences urban internal microclimatology on a regional scale. In this study, the surface temperatures and land cover types retrieved from Landsat TM and ETM+ images of Abeokuta city for 1984, 2003, and 2014 were analyzed. A quantitative approach was used to assess surface urban heat islands through the relationships among surface temperature and land cover types. Results showed that impervious surface areas were found to be correlated positively with high temperatures. Conversely, vegetated areas and bare surfaces correlated positively with mid temperature zones. This study found that areas with increasing impervious surfaces will accelerate LST rise and consequently lead to increasing effect of surface urban heat islan